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Sample records for prehospital hypertonic resuscitation-head

  1. ROC trials update on prehospital hypertonic saline resuscitation in the aftermath of the US-Canadian trials

    PubMed Central

    Dubick, Michael A; Shek, Pang; Wade, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to assess the current state of hypertonic saline as a prehospital resuscitation fluid in hypotensive trauma patients, particularly after the 3 major Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trauma trials in the US and Canada were halted due to futility. Hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury are the leading causes of death in both military and civilian populations. Prehospital fluid resuscitation remains controversial in civilian trauma, but small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic fluids is of utility in military scenarios with prolonged or delayed evacuation times. A large body of pre-clinical and clinical literature has accumulated over the past 30 years on the hemodynamic and, most recently, the anti-inflammatory properties of hypertonic saline, alone or with dextran-70. This review assesses the current state of hypertonic fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of the failed Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trials. PMID:23778489

  2. Prehospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsens Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Rizoli, Sandro B; Rhind, Shawn G; Cuschieri, Joseph; Junger, Wolfgang; Baker, Andrew J; Dubick, Michael A; Hoyt, David B; Bulger, Eileen M

    2015-07-01

    Impaired hemostasis frequently occurs after traumatic shock and resuscitation. The prehospital fluid administered can exacerbate subsequent bleeding and coagulopathy. Hypertonic solutions are recommended as first-line treatment of traumatic shock; however, their effects on coagulation are unclear. This study explores the impact of resuscitation with various hypertonic solutions on early coagulopathy after trauma. We conducted a prospective observational subgroup analysis of large clinical trial on out-of-hospital single-bolus (250 mL) hypertonic fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock trauma patients (systolic blood pressure, ≤70 mmHg). Patients received 7.5% NaCl (HS), 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 (HSD), or 0.9% NaCl (normal saline [NS]) in the prehospital setting. Thirty-four patients were included: 9 HS, 8 HSD, 17 NS. Treatment with HS/HSD led to higher admission systolic blood pressure, sodium, chloride, and osmolarity, whereas lactate, base deficit, fluid requirement, and hemoglobin levels were similar in all groups. The HSD-resuscitated patients had higher admission international normalized ratio values and more hypocoagulable patients, 62% (vs. 55% HS, 47% NS; P < 0.05). Prothrombotic tissue factor was elevated in shock treated with NS but depressed in both HS and HSD groups. Fibrinolytic tissue plasminogen activator and anti-fibrinolytic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 were increased by shock but not thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. The HSD patients had the worst imbalance between procoagulation/anticoagulation and profibrinolysis/antifibrinolysis, resulting in more hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis. We concluded that resuscitation with hypertonic solutions, particularly HSD, worsens hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis after hemorrhagic shock in trauma through imbalances in both procoagulants and anticoagulants and both profibrinolytic and antifibrinolytic activities. PMID:25784523

  3. Hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Constable, P D

    1999-11-01

    A key feature in the successful resuscitation of dehydrated or endotoxemic ruminants is the total amount of sodium administered. Administration of small volumes of HS and HSD offer major advantages over large volumes of isotonic saline because HS and HSD do not require intravenous catheterization or periodic monitoring, and are therefore suitable for use in the field. Hypertonic saline and HSD exert their beneficial effect by rapidly increasing preload and transiently decreasing afterload. Contrary to early reports, HS and HSD decrease cardiac contractility and do not activate a pulmonary reflex. The osmolality of HS and HSD should be 2400 mOsm/L (7.2% NaCl solution, 8 times normal plasma osmolality). Use of HS and HSD solutions of different osmolality to 2400 mOsm/L should be avoided at all costs, as too low a tonicity removes the main advantages of HS (low cost, decreased infusion time), whereas too high a tonicity may cause rapid vasodilation and decreased cardiac contractility, resulting in death. Rapid administration (> 1 mL/kg-1/min-1) of HS (2400 mOsm/L) should be avoided, as the induced hypotension may be fatal when coupled with a transient decrease in cardiac contractility. For treating dehydrated adult ruminants, HS (2400 mOsm/L, 4-5 mL/kg i.v. over 4-5 minutes) should be administered through the jugular vein and the cow allowed to drink water. This means that 2 L of HS should be administered to adult cattle. HSD should be administered in conjunction with isotonic oral electrolyte solutions to all calves 8% or more dehydrated (eyes recessed > or = 4 mm into the orbit, cervical skin tent duration > 6 seconds) or calves with reduced cardiac output (fetlock temperature < 29 degrees C when housed at 10-24 degrees C). For treating dehydrated calves, HSD (2400 mOsm/L NaCl in 6% dextran-70, 4-5 mL/kg i.v. over 4-5 minutes) should be administered through the jugular vein and the calf allowed to suckle an isotonic oral electrolyte solution. This means that 120

  4. Tolerability of hypertonic injectables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-07-25

    Injectable drug products are ideally developed as isotonic solutions. Often, hypertonic injectables may have to be marketed for a variety of reasons such as product solubilization and stabilization. A key concern during product formulation development is the local and systemic tolerability of hypertonic products upon injection. This report reviews and discusses the tolerability in terms of local discomfort, irritation, sensation of heat and pain, along with other observed side effects of hypertonicity in both in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal and human models. These side effects clearly depend on the degree of hypertonicity. The sensation of pain among different injection routes seems to follow this order: intramuscular>subcutaneous>intravenous or intravascular. It is recommended that the upper osmolality limit should be generally controlled under 600 mOsm/kg for drug products intended for intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. For drug products intended for intravenous or intravascular injection, the recommended upper limit should be generally controlled under 1,000 mOsm/kg for small-volume injections (≤ 100 mL) and 500 mOsm/kg for large-volume injections (>100mL). Several options are available for minimization of hypertonicity-induced pain upon product administration. PMID:26027488

  5. Out-of-Hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P.; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J. Steven; Hoyt, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Design, Setting, and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. Intervention A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Main Outcome Measure Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). Results The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, −4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, −4.0% to 9.7%]; P=.67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline

  6. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  7. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  8. [Obesity in prehospital emergency care].

    PubMed

    Kruska, Patricia; Kappus, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased steadily in recent years. Obese people often suffer from diseases which acute decompensation requires a prompt prehospital therapy. The Emergency Medical Service will be confronted with difficulties in clinical diagnostic, therapy and especially with a delayed management of rescue and transport. It is most important to avoid prehospital depreciation in quality and time management. This article reviews the specific requirements of prehospital care of obese persons and discusses possible solutions to optimize the prehospital therapy. PMID:22968983

  9. Pre-hospital oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Johannigman, Jay A

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen use in prehospital care is aimed at treating or preventing hypoxemia. However, excess oxygen delivery has important consequences in select patients, and hyperoxia can adversely impact outcome. The unique environment of prehospital care poses logistical and educational challenges. Oxygen therapy in prehospital care should be provided to patients with hypoxemia and titrated to achieve normoxemia. Changes to the current practice of oxygen delivery in prehospital care are needed. PMID:23271821

  10. Prehospital care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, E; Pusponegoro, A

    2005-01-01

    Current system: Hospitals of varying standards are widespread but have no system of emergency ambulance or patient retrieval. Indonesia's only public emergency ambulance service, 118, is based in five of the biggest cities and is leading the way in paramedic training and prehospital care. Challenges and developments: There are many challenges faced including the culture of acceptance, vast geographical areas, traffic, inadequate numbers of ambulances, and access to quality training resources. Recently there have been a number of encouraging developments including setting up of a disaster response brigade, better provision of ambulances, and development of paramedic training. Conclusions: An integrated national regionalised hospital and prehospital system may seem fantastic but with the enthusiasm of those involved and perhaps some help from countries with access to training resources it may not be an unrealistic goal. PMID:15662073

  11. A comparison of invasive airway management and rates of pneumonia in prehospital and hospital

    PubMed Central

    Andrusiek, Douglas L; Szydlo, Danny; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J; Minei, Joseph; van Heest, Rardi; MacDonald, Russell; Schreiber, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma. Infection in trauma is poorly understood. The impact of prehospital invasive airway management (IAM) on the incidence of pneumonia and health services utilization is unknown. We hypothesized that trauma patients exposed to prehospital IAM will suffer higher rates of pneumonia compared to no IAM or exposure to IAM performed in the hospital. We hypothesized that patients who develop pneumonia subsequent to prehospital IAM will have longer ICU and hospital LOS compared to patients who acquired pneumonia after IAM performed in the hospital. Methods This is an observational cohort study of data previously collected for the ROC hypertonic resuscitation randomized trial. Patients were included if traumatic injury resulted in shock, traumatic brain injury or both. Patients were excluded if they died 24 hours after injury, or pneumonia data were missing. Adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio of pneumonia if exposed in the prehospital setting compared to no exposure or exposure in the hospital. Results Of 2222 patients enrolled in HS, 1676 patients met enrolment criteria for this study. Four and a half percent of patients suffered pneumonia. IAM in the prehospital setting resulted in 6.8 fold increase (C.I. 2.0, 23.0, p=0.003) in the adjusted odds of developing pneumonia compared to not being intubated, while in hospital intubation resulted in 4.8 fold increase (C.I. 1.4, 16.6, p=0.01), which was not statistically significantly different to the odds ratio of prehospital IAM. There were no statistically significant increases in health services utilization resulting from pneumonia incurred after IAM. Conclusion Exposure to IAM in prehospital and in hospital setting results in an increase in pneumonia, however, there does not appear to be a link between the source of pneumonia and an increase in ICU or hospital LOS. Levels of Evidence Level III, therapeutic

  12. Immunomodulatory effect of hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Motaharinia, Javad; Etezadi, Farhad; Moghaddas, Azadeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and nosocomial infection following trauma-hemorrhage are among the most important causes of mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients. Dysregulation of the immune system plays a central role in MODS and a fluid having an immunomodulatory effect could be advantageous in hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. Hypertonic saline (HS) is widely used as a resuscitation fluid in trauma-hemorrhagic patients. Besides having beneficial effects on the hemodynamic parameters, HS has modulatory effects on various functions of immune cells such as degranulation, adhesion molecules and cytokines expression, as well as reactive oxygen species production. This article reviews clinical evidence for decreased organ failure and mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients resuscitated with HS. Despite promising results in animal models, results from pre-hospital and emergency department administration in human studies did not show improvement in survival, organ failure, or a reduction in nosocomial infection by HS resuscitation. Further post hoc analysis showed some benefit from HS resuscitation for severely-injured patients, those who received more than ten units of blood by transfusion, patients who underwent surgery, and victims of traumatic brain injury. Several reasons are suggested to explain the differences between clinical and animal models. PMID:26437974

  13. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  14. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services. PMID:25494913

  15. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  16. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care. PMID:26738719

  17. Hypertonic Saline Dextran Ameliorates Organ Damage in Beagle Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    You, Guo-xing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Gan; Wang, Quan; Zhang, Xi-gang; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong; He, Yue-zhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of hypertonic saline with 6% Dextran-70 (HSD) resuscitation on organ damage and the resuscitation efficiency of the combination of HSD and lactated ringers (LR) in a model of hemorrhage shock in dogs. Methods Beagles were bled to hold their mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 50±5 mmHg for 1 h. After hemorrhage, beagles were divided into three groups (n = 7) to receive pre-hospital resuscitation for 1 h (R1): HSD (4 ml/kg), LR (40 ml/kg), and HSD+LR (a combination of 4 ml/kg HSD and 40 ml/kg LR). Next, LR was transfused into all groups as in-hospital resuscitation (R2). After two hours of observation (R3), autologous blood was transfused. Hemodynamic responses and systemic oxygenation were measured at predetermined phases. Three days after resuscitation, the animals were sacrificed and tissues including kidney, lung, liver and intestinal were obtained for pathological analysis. Results Although the initial resuscitation with HSD was shown to be faster than LR with regard to an ascending MAP, the HSD group showed a similar hemodynamic performance compared to the LR group throughout the experiment. Compared with the LR group, the systemic oxygenation performance in the HSD group was similar but showed a lower venous-to-arterial CO2 gradient (Pv-aCO2) at R3 (p < 0.05). Additionally, the histology score of the kidneys, lungs and liver were significantly lower in the HSD group than in the LR group (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a superior hemodynamic response but higher extravascular lung water (EVLW) and lower arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) than the other groups (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a marginally improved systemic oxygenation performance and lower histology score than other groups. Conclusions Resuscitation after hemorrhagic shock with a bolus of HSD showed a similar hemodynamic response compared with LR at ten times the volume of HSD, but HSD showed superior efficacy in organ protection

  18. Pelvic floor hypertonic disorders: identification and management.

    PubMed

    Butrick, Charles W

    2009-09-01

    Patients with hypertonic pelvic floor disorders can present with pelvic pain or dysfunction. Each of the various syndromes will be discussed including elimination disorders, bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), vulvodynia, vaginismus, and chronic pelvic pain. The symptoms and objective findings on physical examination and various diagnostic studies will be reviewed. Therapeutic options including physical therapy, pharmacologic management, and trigger point injections, as well as botulinum toxin injections will be reviewed in detail. PMID:19932423

  19. [A procedure for infusion-transfusion therapy and autohemodilution in severe trauma and shock (apropos the article by B. N. Salamatin et al., The use of the "internal autotransfusion" method in complex shock-control measures at the prehospital stage)].

    PubMed

    Tsybuliak, G N; Nasonkin, O S; Chechëtkin, A V

    1992-05-01

    The infusion of hypertonic solution is thought by the authors to be effective due to its reflectory action for treatment of patients who are in the state of anaphylactic and cardiogenic shock. This method seems to be expedient for massive blood loss under conditions of prehospital medical aid to victims with very low level of arterial pressure, with craniocerebral trauma and critical trauma of the chest. PMID:1302953

  20. Prehospital emergency trauma care and management.

    PubMed

    Kerby, Jeffrey D; Cusick, Marianne V

    2012-08-01

    Prehospital care of the trauma patient is continuing to evolve; however, the principles of airway maintenance, hemorrhage control, and appropriate resuscitative maneuvers remain central to the role of the emergency medical care provider. Recent changes in the regulations for research in emergency settings will allow randomized trials to proceed to test new devices, drugs, and resuscitative strategies in the prehospital environment. The creation of prehospital research networks will provide the appropriate infrastructure to greatly facilitate the development of new protocols and the execution of large-scale randomized trials with the potential to change current prehospital practice. PMID:22850149

  1. Innovation possibilities for prehospital providers.

    PubMed

    Galli, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The national interest in disaster management and a burgeoning technology field are leading to the development of new approaches to emergency evaluation, triage, and treatment in prehospital and all hospital arenas. The ability to bring "hands-on" expertise, both physically and technologically, as quickly as possible to the trauma patient brings the potential for real advancement in the field. This descriptive report presents several such concepts that are moving into reality. PMID:16801269

  2. [Nurses and prehospital CBRN risk].

    PubMed

    Béguec, Francis; Pallier, Jérôme; Travers, Stéphane; Calamal, Franck; Lefort, Hugues; Bignand, Milichel

    2014-09-01

    With events presenting a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear risk, treating victims in the field can decrease lethality. in this context, the mismatch between the availability of care and the number of victims adds to the constraints of working in protective clothing. In the prehospital setting, nurses from the Paris fire brigade have a distinct role to play and Use specific equipment and antidotes, Theoretical and practical training is essential to be prepared for these situations. PMID:25508268

  3. [Nurses and prehospital CBRN risk].

    PubMed

    Béguec, Francis; Pallier, Jérôme; Travers, Stéphane; Calamal, Franck; Lefort, Hugues; Bignand, Milichel

    2014-09-01

    With events presenting a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear risk, treating victims in the field can decrease lethality. in this context, the mismatch between the availability of care and the number of victims adds to the constraints of working in protective clothing. In the prehospital setting, nurses from the Paris fire brigade have a distinct role to play and Use specific equipment and antidotes, Theoretical and practical training is essential to be prepared for these situations. PMID:25464637

  4. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. The active ingredient and its concentration in the product is as...

  5. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OPHTHALMIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients § 349.16 Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. The...

  6. Advances in prehospital airway management

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, PE; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts. PMID:24741499

  7. [Prehospital thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Carlsson, J; Schuster, H P; Tebbe, U

    1997-10-01

    The extent of myocardial damage occurring during acute myocardial infarction is time dependent, and there is abundant evidence from most clinical trials that mortality reduction is greatest in patients treated early with thrombolytic agents, although beneficial effects have been shown with treatment initiated up to 12 h after onset of symptoms. All studies on prehospital thrombolysis have conclusively shown the practicability and safety of patient selection and administration of the thrombolytic agent. The accuracy of diagnosis in the prehospital setting was comparable to trials of in-hospital thrombolysis, e.g., in the Myocardial Infarction Triage and Intervention Project (MITI) 98% of the patients enrolled had subsequent evidence of acute myocardial infarction. With regard to time savings, all randomized studies showed positive results. The smallest time gain was observed in the MITI trial: prehospital-treated patients received thrombolytic therapy an average of 33 min earlier than those treated in hospital. In the European Myocardial Infarction Project (EMIP) the difference in time between prehospital and hospital treatment was a median of 55 min. However, none of these trials was able to show a significant short-term mortality difference between the two groups. Only a meta analysis of five randomized studies with a combined median time gain of about 60 min showed a significant 17% reduction in short-term mortality for patients who received thrombolytic therapy in the prehospital phase. In the Grampian Region Early Anistreplase Trial (GREAT), a study performed in a more rural area than other studies, the time gain by prehospital initiation of thrombolysis was a median of 130 min. GREAT was the only study to date reporting a significant mortality benefit for prehospital-treated patients after 3 months and 1 year. In conclusion, prehospital thrombolysis is feasible and safe. Patients with acute myocardial infarction can be correctly identified and treated with

  8. Therapeutic effects of compound hypertonic saline on rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Chen, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Huabing; Lu, Huizhi

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the major causes of death and is the biggest obstacle preventing improvement of the success rate in curing critical illnesses. Currently, isotonic solutions are used in fluid resuscitation technique. Several studies have shown that hypertonic saline applied in hemorrhagic shock can rapidly increase the plasma osmotic pressure, facilitate the rapid return of interstitial fluid into the blood vessels, and restore the effective circulating blood volume. Here, we established a rat model of sepsis by using the cecal ligation and puncture approach. We found that intravenous injection of hypertonic saline dextran (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran) after cecal ligation and puncture can improve circulatory failure at the onset of sepsis. We found that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 levels in the lung tissue of cecal ligation and puncture rats treated with hypertonic saline dextran were significantly lower than the corresponding levels in the control group. We inferred that hypertonic saline dextran has a positive immunoregulatory effect and inhibits the overexpression of the inflammatory response in the treatment of sepsis. The percentage of neutrophils, lung myeloperoxidase activity, wet to dry weight ratio of lung tissues, histopathological changes in lung tissues, and indicators of arterial blood gas analysis was significantly better in the hypertonic saline dextran-treated group than in the other groups in this study. Hypertonic saline dextran-treated rats had significantly improved survival rates at 9 and 18 h compared to the control group. Our results suggest that hypertonic saline dextran plays a protective role in acute lung injury caused after cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, hypertonic/hyperoncotic solutions have beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of an animal model of sepsis. PMID:24983672

  9. Hypertonicity augments bullfrog taste nerve responses to inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Namie; Higure, Yoko; Mashiyama, Kazunori; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2012-06-01

    The tonicity of taste stimulating solutions has been usually ignored, though taste substances themselves yielded the tonicity. We investigated the effect of hypertonicity on bullfrog taste nerve responses to inorganic salts by adding nonelectrolytes such as urea and sucrose that elicited no taste nerve responses. Here, we show that hypertonicity alters bullfrog taste nerve-response magnitude and firing pattern. The addition of urea or sucrose enhances the taste nerve-response magnitude to NaCl and shifts the concentration-response curve to the left. The effect of hypertonicity on responses to CaCl(2) is bimodal; hypertonicity suppresses CaCl(2) responses at concentrations less than ~30 mM and enhances them at concentrations greater than ~30 mM. The hypertonicity also enhances response magnitude to other monovalent salts. The extent of the enhancing effects depends on the difference between the mobility of the cation and anion in the salt. We quantitatively suggest that both the enhancing and suppressing effects result from the magnitude and direction of local circuit currents generated by diffusion potentials across tight junctions surrounding taste receptor cells. PMID:22422087

  10. Rat supraoptic neurones: the effects of locally applied hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Leng, G

    1980-07-01

    1. Extracellular action potentials were recorded from supraoptic neurones in lactating, urethane-anaesthetized rats. A microtap was used to apply a very small volume (about 10(-7) ml.) of hypertonic saline (1-4 M-NaCl) to the immediate neighbourhood of these units over about 1 min.2. Twenty-five of twenty-seven supraoptic neurones were excited by this local osmotic stimulus. The response of individual units was reversible and repeatable. Microtap applications of isotonic saline to supraoptic neurones were without observed effect.3. Continuously firing supraoptic neurones responded to hypertonic saline with a smooth acceleration in firing rate. Phasic neurones showed an increase in the over-all level of activity, and in particular, a prolongation of the active phases. Slow, irregularly firing cells responded either with a smooth acceleration in firing rate, or with phasic behaviour.4. The response to local hypertonic saline appears to be reasonably specific to the supraoptic nucleus. Of thirty-five neurones recorded close to the supraoptic nucleus but which were not antidromically activated from stimulation of the neural stalk, only nine responded to the local application of hypertonic saline.5. Similarities between the manner of response of supraoptic neurones to local application of hypertonic saline and the manner of their response to systemic increases in the osmotic pressure of blood plasma support the hypothesis that supraoptic neurones are osmosensitive. PMID:7441542

  11. Prehospital activated charcoal: the way forward

    PubMed Central

    Greene, S; Kerins, M; O'Connor, N

    2005-01-01

    Methods: A postal questionnaire was used to determine the current level of use of prehospital activated charcoal by ambulance NHS trusts, the incidence of associated complications, and barriers preventing the routine use of prehospital SDAC. Results: A completed questionnaire was returned by 36 of the 39 ambulance NHS trusts in the UK (response rate 92%). Currently none of the trusts that responded to the questionnaire provides prehospital SDAC as an intervention. The most common barriers to the provision of prehospital SDAC are the current lack of evidence in the medical literature proving it is effective in improving patient outcome and the lack of a recognised protocol for its administration. Other issues included concerns regarding potential complications, ambulance turnaround times, lack of availability of SDAC, and lack of funding. Conclusions: A lack of published evidence proving efficacy remains the most important factor in preventing the routine administration of SDAC to appropriate patients in the prehospital environment. Further research in this setting is required to determine the usefulness of this therapy. PMID:16189043

  12. Prehospital care in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lo, C B; Lai, K K; Mak, K P

    2000-09-01

    A quick and efficient prehospital emergency response depends on immediate ambulance dispatch, patient assessment, triage, and transport to hospital. During 1999, the Ambulance Command of the Hong Kong Fire Services Department responded to 484,923 calls, which corresponds to 1329 calls each day. Cooperation between the Fire Services Department and the Hospital Authority exists at the levels of professional training of emergency medical personnel, quality assurance, and a coordinated disaster response. In response to the incident at the Hong Kong International Airport in the summer of 1999, when an aircraft overturned during landing, the pre-set quota system was implemented to send patients to designated accident and emergency departments. Furthermore, the 'first crew at the scene' model has been adopted, whereby the command is established and triage process started by the first ambulance crew members to reach the scene. The development of emergency protocols should be accompanied by good field-to-hospital and interhospital communication, the upgrading of decision-making skills, a good monitoring and auditing structure, and commitment to training and skills maintenance. PMID:11025847

  13. Hypertonic saline dextran resuscitation of thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J W; White, D J; Baxter, C R

    1990-01-01

    Burn treatment requires large volumes of crystalloid, which may exacerbate burn-induced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Small-volume hypertonic saline dextran (HSD) resuscitation has been used for effective treatment of several types of shock. In this study isolated coronary perfused guinea pig hearts were used to determine if HSD improved left ventricular contractile response to burn injuries. Parameters measured included left ventricular pressure (LVP) and maximal rate of LVP rise (+dP/dt max) and fall (-dP/dt max) at a constant preload. Third-degree scald burns comprising 45% of total body surface area (burn groups, N = 75), or 0% for controls (group 1, N = 25) were produced using a template device. In group 2, 25 burned guinea pigs were not fluid resuscitated and served as untreated burns; 20 burns were resuscitated with 4 mL lactated Ringer's (LR) solution/kg/% burn for 24 hours (group 3); additional burn groups were treated with an initial bolus of HSD (4 mL/kg, 2400 mOsm, sodium chloride, 6% dextran 70) followed by either 1, 2, or 4 mL LR/kg/% burn over 24 hours (groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively). Untreated burn injury significantly impaired cardiac function, as indicated by a fall in LVP (from 88 +/- 3 to 68 +/- 4 mmHg; p = 0.01) and +/- dP/dt max (from 1352 +/- 50 to 1261 +/- 90 and from 1150 +/- 35 to 993 +/- 59; p = 0.01, respectively) and a downward shift of LV function curves from those obtained from control hearts. Compared to untreated burns, hearts from burned animals treated with LR alone showed no significant improvement in cardiac function. However hearts from burned animals treated with HSD + 1 mL LR/kg/% burn had significantly higher LVP (79 +/- 4 vs. 68 +/- 4 mmHg, p = 0.01) and +/- dP/dt max (+dP/dt: 1387 +/- 60 vs. 1261 +/- 90 mmHg/sc, p = 0.01; -dP/dt: 1079 +/- 50 vs. 993 +/- 59 mmHg/sc, p = 0.01) than hearts from untreated burned animals and generated left ventricular function curves comparable to those calculated for hearts from control

  14. Phosphoinositolphosphate (PIP) cascade induction by hypertonic stress of plant tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.; Jacoby, B. )

    1989-04-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) was determined by competition with ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 3} for binding to an IP{sub 3} specific protein. A hypertonic mannitol, sorbitol or lactose shock induced an increase in the rate of K{sup +} uptake and raised the IP{sub 3} content of Beta vulgaris slices, excised Vigna mungo and Sorghum bicolor roots, as well as attached V. mungo roots. Increased K{sup +} uptake could also be induced by compounds that artificially induce the PIP cascade, or mimic it's products. A hypertonic shock, administered to intact B. vulgaris slices, further enhanced the phosphorylation of a 20 kD protein in the plasmalemma. Maximal IP{sub 3} content was found 10 min after hypertonic induction and maximal K{sup +} uptake was obtained 10 min later. The effect of a continuous hypertonic treatment on IP{sub 3} content, but not on K{sup +} uptake, was transient. Li{sup +} decreased the rate of IP{sub 3} metabolism.

  15. Controlled aquaporin-2 expression in the hypertonic environment.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Udo

    2009-04-01

    The corticomedullary osmolality gradient is the driving force for water reabsorption occurring in the kidney. In the collecting duct, this gradient allows luminal water to move across aquaporin (AQP) water channels, thereby increasing urine concentration. However, this same gradient exposes renal cells to great osmotic challenges. These cells must constantly adapt to fluctuations of environmental osmolality that challenge cell volume and incite functional change. This implies profound alterations of cell phenotype regarding water permeability. AQP2 is an essential component of the urine concentration mechanism whose controlled expression dictates apical water permeability of collecting duct principal cells. This review focuses on changes of AQP2 abundance and trafficking in hypertonicity-challenged cells. Intracellular mechanisms governing these events are discussed and the biological relevance of altered AQP2 expression by hypertonicity is outlined. PMID:19211910

  16. Oral hypertonic saline causes transient fall of vasopressin in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Seckl, J.R.; Williams, D.M.; Lightman, S.L.

    1986-08-01

    After dehydration, oral rehydration causes a fall in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) that precedes changes in plasma osmolality. To investigate further the stimulus for this effect, its specificity, and association with thirst, six volunteers were deprived of water for 24 h and given a salt load on two separate occasions. On each study day they then drank rapidly 10 ml/kg of either tap water or hypertonic saline (360 mosmol/kg). There was a significant fall in plasma AVP from 2.0 +/- 0.3 to 1.2 +/- 0.4 pmol/l 5 min after drinking water and from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 pmol/l after hypertonic saline. Plasma osmolality fell 30-60 min after water and was unchanged after saline. Plasma renin activity, oxytocin, and total protein all remained unchanged. All subjects reported diminished thirst after hypertonic saline. Gargling with water reduced thirst but did not affect plasma AVP. There appears to be a drinking-mediated neuroendocrine reflex that decreases plasma AVP irrespective of the osmolality of the liquid consumed. The sensation of thirst did not correlate with plasma osmolality and was not always related to plasma AVP concentration. AVP was measured by radioimmunoassay.

  17. [Prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries].

    PubMed

    Samokhvallov, I M; Reva, V A; Pronchenko, A A; Seleznev, A B

    2011-09-01

    The problem of temporary hemorrhage control is one of the most important issues of modern war surgery and surgery of trauma. It is a review of literature devoted to prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries, embraced up-to-date domestic materials as well as the modern foreign papers in this area. The most important historical landmarks of temporary hemorrhage control system are considered. We paid special attention to the most usable methods and means of hemorrhage control which are utilized at the modern time: pressure bandages, tourniquets, local haemostatic agents. The comprehensive analysis of the contamporary haemostatic means concerning U.S. Army has done. The experience of foreign colleagues in development of prehospital care for the injured, creation and progress of new haemostatic methods, application of temporary hemorrhage control system is analyzed. PMID:22165585

  18. A case of unrecognized prehospital anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Ryan C; Gratton, Matthew C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A case of prehospital anaphylactic shock that presented atypically, without a known exposure, is discussed. Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction that requires prompt recognition and aggressive treatment. While there is little diagnostic dilemma (specifically used in the conclusion section of this paper) in the recognition and management of "classic" presentations of anaphylaxis there is likely a need for further education of prehospital providers, as well as emergency physicians, on how to recognize atypical cases of anaphylaxis. These cases can be equally severe, with potentially fatal consequences if missed. The diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis are reviewed, as well as barriers that providers encounter in diagnosing uncommon presentations. PMID:20954971

  19. Emergency center thoracotomy: impact of prehospital resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Durham, L A; Richardson, R J; Wall, M J; Pepe, P E; Mattox, K L

    1992-06-01

    Emergency center thoracotomy was performed at our facility on 389 patients from 1984 through 1989. There were no patients excluded from the study, and survival for all patients was 8.3% with survival rates of 15.2% and 7.3% for stab and gunshot wounds, respectively. Emergency center thoracotomy was performed on 42 patients suffering from isolated extrathoracic injuries with 7% survival. There were no survivors of blunt trauma in this study. Fifty-three percent of the patients arrived with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in progress. The average time of prehospital CPR for survivors was 5.1 minutes compared with 9.1 minutes for nonsurvivors. Of the survivors, prehospital endotracheal intubation prolonged successful toleration of CPR to 9.4 minutes compared with 4.2 minutes for nonintubated surviving patients (p less than 0.001). Emergency center thoracotomy is useful in the resuscitation of victims dying of penetrating truncal trauma. Prehospital endotracheal intubation significantly lengthened the time of successful CPR. PMID:1613838

  20. Out-of-hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Kerby, Jeffery D.; Emerson, Scott; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Brasel, Karen J.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Coimbra, Raul; Rizoli, Sandro; Minei, Joseph P.; Hata, J. Steven; Sopko, George; Evans, David C.; Hoyt, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids would improve survival after severe injury with hemorrhagic shock. Background Hypertonic fluids have potential benefit in the resuscitation of severely injured patients because of rapid restoration of tissue perfusion, with a smaller volume, and modulation of the inflammatory response, to reduce subsequent organ injury. Methods Multicenter, randomized, blinded clinical trial, May 2006 to August 2008, 114 emergency medical services agencies in North America within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Inclusion criteria: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure ≤ 70 mm Hg or systolic blood pressure 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108 beats per minute). Initial resuscitation fluid, 250 mL of either 7.5% saline per 6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran, HSD), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline, HS), or 0.9% saline (normal saline, NS) administered by out-of-hospital providers. Primary outcome was 28-day survival. On the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, the study was stopped early (23% of proposed sample size) for futility and potential safety concern. Results A total of 853 treated patients were enrolled, among whom 62% were with blunt trauma, 38% with penetrating. There was no difference in 28-day survival—HSD: 74.5% (0.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], −7.5 to 7.8); HS: 73.0% (−1.4; 95% CI, −8.7–6.0); and NS: 74.4%, P = 0.91. There was a higher mortality for the postrandomization subgroup of patients who did not receive blood transfusions in the first 24 hours, who received hypertonic fluids compared to NS [28-day mortality—HSD: 10% (5.2; 95% CI, 0.4–10.1); HS: 12.2% (7.4; 95% CI, 2.5–12.2); and NS: 4.8%, P < 0.01]. Conclusion Among injured patients with hypovolemic shock, initial resuscitation fluid treatment with either HS or HSD compared with NS, did not result in superior 28-day survival. However

  1. Prehospital Emergency Nursing students' experiences of learning during prehospital clinical placements.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Kim; Fridlund, Bengt; Thorén, Ann-Britt

    2013-07-01

    Clinical placements play an important role in learning a new profession, but students report about poor placement experiences. Standards have been laid down for improvements within clinical training in Prehospital Emergency Nursing programmes in Sweden, but no studies have been carried out in this field in a Swedish context. The purpose of this study was thus to describe the experiences of Prehospital Emergency Nursing (PEN) students of their clinical placement and the effect on their learning process. Data were collected in 28 individual interviews and analyzed in accordance with Flanagan's Critical Incident Technique. Three main areas emerged: the professional clinical supervisor, the clinical placement setting and the learning strategy. All these areas played a significant role in the PEN students' learning progress and development into a new professional role. The choice of clinical supervisor (CS) and clinical placement is important if PEN students' learning is to be an effective and positive experience. The prehospital environment is unique and can have positive and negative effects on student learning depending on the support and structure given during their clinical placement. A learning strategy based on reflective dialogue, CS continuity and a learning structure based on the prehospital environment is presented. PMID:23140791

  2. Epinephrine Improves the Efficacy of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline in Moderate Bronchiolitis: A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Comino-Vazquez, Paloma; Palma-Zambrano, Encarnación; Bulo-Concellón, Rocio; Santos-Sánchez, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims There is no evidence that the epinephrine-3% hypertonic saline combination is more effective than 3% hypertonic saline alone for treating infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. We evaluated the efficacy of nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline. Patients and Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 208 infants hospitalized with acute moderate bronchiolitis. Infants were randomly assigned to receive nebulized 3% hypertonic saline with either 3 mL of epinephrine or 3 mL of placebo, administered every four hours. The primary outcome measure was the length of hospital stay. Results A total of 185 infants were analyzed: 94 in the epinephrine plus 3% hypertonic saline group and 91 in the placebo plus 3% hypertonic saline group. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in the epinephrine group as compared with the placebo group (3.94 ±1.88 days vs. 4.82 ±2.30 days, P = 0.011). Disease severity also decreased significantly earlier in the epinephrine group (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036 on days 3 and 5, respectively). Conclusions In our setting, nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline significantly shortens hospital stay in hospitalized infants with acute moderate bronchiolitis compared to 3% hypertonic saline alone, and improves the clinical scores of severity from the third day of treatment, but not before. Trial Registration EudraCT 2009-016042-57 PMID:26575036

  3. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Anas M.; Turner, Michael R.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after sc administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyper-osmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as our animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and, O-Phospho-L-Serine (OPLS) on plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after sc administration. We observed an increase in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, as compared to isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph node in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatic, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05 % in isotonic buffer to 13% in hyper-tonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. Our data suggests that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option to improve sc bioavailability. PMID:25377184

  4. Prehospital care and the community hospital as a base station.

    PubMed

    Morhaim, D K

    1989-03-01

    In Maryland's coordinated, regionalized emergency medical system, prehospital care is given to an injured or ill person at home, on the street, or in a doctor's office before the patient is transported to a hospital. Prehospital care of patients has advanced significantly since the federal government passed emergency medical service (EMS) legislation in 1966. In Maryland there are several functioning levels of prehospital care providers who perform skills unique to their particular environment and training. It is reasonable for all hospitals operating a full-service Emergency Department to consider becoming base stations for consultation to prehospital care providers bringing patients to that hospital. This is well within the province of the Emergency Medicine specialist and will provide improved service to patients. PMID:2927265

  5. Hypertonic stress induces rapid and widespread protein damage in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Burkewitz, Kris; Choe, Keith; Strange, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    Proteostasis is defined as the homeostatic mechanisms that maintain the function of all cytoplasmic proteins. We recently demonstrated that the capacity of the proteostasis network is a critical factor that defines the limits of cellular and organismal survival in hypertonic environments. The current studies were performed to determine the extent of protein damage induced by cellular water loss. Using worm strains expressing fluorescently tagged foreign and endogenous proteins and proteins with temperature-sensitive point mutations, we demonstrate that hypertonic stress causes aggregation and misfolding of diverse proteins in multiple cell types. Protein damage is rapid. Aggregation of a polyglutamine yellow fluorescent protein reporter is observable with <1 h of hypertonic stress, and aggregate volume doubles approximately every 10 min. Aggregate formation is irreversible and occurs after as little as 10 min of exposure to hypertonic conditions. To determine whether endogenous proteins are aggregated by hypertonic stress, we quantified the relative amount of total cellular protein present in detergent-insoluble extracts. Exposure for 4 h to 400 mM or 500 mM NaCl induced a 55-120% increase in endogenous protein aggregation. Inhibition of insulin signaling or acclimation to mild hypertonic stress increased survival under extreme hypertonic conditions and prevented aggregation of endogenous proteins. Our results demonstrate that hypertonic stress causes widespread and dramatic protein damage and that cells have a significant capacity to remodel the network of proteins that function to maintain proteostasis. These findings have important implications for understanding how cells cope with hypertonic stress and other protein-damaging stressors. PMID:21613604

  6. Pre-Hospital Emergency in Iran: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ghardashi, Fatemeh; Izadi, Ahmad Reza; Ravangard, Ramin; Mirhashemi, Sedigheh; Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-hospital care plays a vital role in saving trauma patients. Objectives This study aims to review studies conducted on the pre-hospital emergency status in Iran. Data Sources Data were sourced from Iranian electronic databases, including SID, IranMedex, IranDoc, Magiran, and non-Iranian electronic databases, such as Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar. In addition, available data and statistics for the country were used. Data Selection All Persian-language articles published in Iranian scientific journals and related English-language articles published in Iranian and non-Iranian journals indexed on valid sites for September 2005 - 2014 were systematically reviewed. Data Extraction To review the selected articles, a data extraction form developed by the researchers as per the study’s objective was adopted. The articles were examined under two categories: structure and function of pre-hospital emergency. Results A total of 19 articles were selected, including six descriptive studies (42%), four descriptive-analytical studies (21%), five review articles (16%), two qualitative studies (10.5%), and two interventional (experimental) studies (10.5%). In addition, of these, 14 articles (73.5%) had been published in the English language. The focus of these selected articles were experts (31.5%), bases of emergency medical services (26%), injured (16%), data reviews (16%), and employees (10.5%). A majority of the studies (68%) investigated pre-hospital emergency functions and 32% reviewed the pre-hospital emergency structure. Conclusions The number of studies conducted on pre-hospital emergency services in Iran is limited. To promote public health, consideration of prevention areas, processes to provide pre-hospital emergency services, policymaking, foresight, systemic view, comprehensive research programs and roadmaps, and assessments of research needs in pre-hospital emergency seem necessary. PMID:27626016

  7. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  8. Pleuropulmonary hydatid disease treated with thoracoscopic instillation of hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan P, Hari; Musthafa A, Monhammed; Suraj, Kp; Ravidran, C

    2008-01-01

    Hydatid disease is caused by the larval stage of the cestode, Echinococcus granulosus. Man is the intermediate host in its life cycle. The most common organ involved is liver followed by lung. Although surgery remains the definitive treatment for symptomatic lesions, it is associated with considerable morbidity. Other less invasive treatment strategies as an adjunct to medical treatment that have been tried in various case series include percutaneous aspiration, instillation and reaspiration of scolicidal agents (PAIR), and thoracoscopic removal of cysts located subpleurally. Here we report the case of a 58 year old gentleman with hepatic and pleuropulmonary hydatid disease who was subjected to medical thoracoscopy and instillation of hypertonic saline (3%), followed by medical management with albendazole with which complete resolution of the pulmonary cysts was achieved. PMID:20390071

  9. Spine immobilization: prehospitalization to final destination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Care of the combat casualty with spinal column or spinal cord injury has not been previously described, particularly in regards to spinal immobilization. The ultimate goal of spinal immobilization in the combat casualty is to first ``do no further harm'' and then provide a stable, painless spine and an optimal neurologic recovery. The protocol for treatment of the combat casualty with suspected spinal column or spinal cord injury from the battlefield to final arrival at a definitive treatment center is discussed, and the special considerations for medical evacuation off the battlefield and for aeromedical transport are delineated. Selective prehospital spine immobilization, which involves spinal immobilization with backboard, semi-rigid cervical collar, lateral supports, and straps or tape, is recommended if there is suspicion of spinal column or spinal cord injury in the combat casualty and when conditions and resources permit. The authors do not recommend spinal immobilization for the combat casualty with isolated penetrating trauma. PMID:21477526

  10. Principles of prehospital care of musculoskeletal injuries.

    PubMed

    Worsing, R A

    1984-05-01

    Prehospital management of musculoskeletal injuries in the traumatized patient is based on the application of a few basic principles in an orderly but expeditious manner. The patient must be assessed for immediate life-threatening conditions involving airway, respiratory, and circulatory functions while the cervical spine is protected. Resuscitative efforts to reestablish and preserve an adequate circulating volume of oxygenated blood must follow, using airways, oxygen therapy, and fluid replacement through MAST trousers and intravenous fluids. Cardiac function must be maintained as well. Respiratory function must be monitored and assisted as required. Finally, neurologic status must be assessed and monitored. Secondary assessment of all pertinent history and physical findings is made to delineate all other injuries that do not pose an immediate threat to the life or limb of the patient. Definitive care follows but is limited to basic resuscitation, stabilization, and immobilization techniques under medical control through telemetry and radio communication. Immediate definitive care of the traumatized patient requires the expeditious intervention of the trauma team in a hospital setting with surgical, blood banking, radiographic, laboratory, and other hospital-based capabilities available. Field management of the traumatized patient is directed at the expeditious delivery of the viable patient to the trauma team. In the multiply traumatized patient with severe injuries to several organ systems, prehospital care may need to be expedited to provide this patient the in-hospital care required to save his or her life. Appropriate treatment in such life-threatening trauma situations will consist of a rapid primary assessment, airway and cervical spine control, appropriate respiratory and cardiovascular assistance, gross whole body fracture immobilization using a backboard, and immediate transport. For less severely injured patients, primary assessment, resuscitation

  11. Prehospital care at a major international airport.

    PubMed

    Cwinn, A A; Dinerman, N; Pons, P T; Marlin, R

    1988-10-01

    Medical emergencies at a major metropolitan airport have a significant impact on prehospital care capabilities for the rest of the community in which the airport is located. Stapleton International Airport in Denver, Colorado, is a facility that in 1985 had 14.4 million passengers and a static employee population of 12,000 to 15,000. In 1981, there were 1,182 ambulance trips to the airport, 40.4% of which did not result in the transport of a patient. The expense of sending an ambulance and fire engine out on such calls was great, and paramedics were out of service for approximately 300 hours on these nontransport cases. In order to improve prehospital services to the airport and the city, a paramedic has been stationed in the concourse at the airport 16 hours a day since 1982. The records for airport paramedic services for the 12 months ending September 1985 were reviewed. Paramedic services were requested for 1,952 patients. Of these, 696 (35.7%) were transported to hospital by ambulance; 115 (5.9%) went by private car; 284 (14.6%) refused any paramedic care or transport; and 857 (43.9%) were released, after base station contact, with instructions to seek definitive care at the final destination. Presenting complaints were classified into 55 categories and the frequencies and dispositions are described. The most common presentations resulting in transport were chest pain, 110 (5.6%); syncope, 60 (3.1%); psychiatric, 57 (2.9%); abdominal pain, 49 (2.5%); seizure, 36 (1.8%); fracture, 31 (1.6%); and cardiac arrest, 29 (1.5%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3177992

  12. Hypertonic Dextrose Injection for The Treatment of a Baker’s Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kibar, Sibel; Balaban, Birol

    2016-01-01

    We present extremely rare and interesting case of a Baker’s cyst treated with hypertonic dextrose injection. A 54-year-old female patient had a Baker’s cyst which was diagnosed by an ultrasonography. After the failure of the two-weekly conservative treatment, we injected hypertonic dextrose (25%) into her right knee joint for the treatment of a Baker’s cyst. Two weeks after the injection, the patient reported improvement in posterior knee pain, and an US showed a resolution of the posterior knee cyst. Certainly hypertonic dextrose injection for the treatment of a Baker’s cyst appears to be a reasonable treatment option. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the efficacy of hypertonic dextrose injection in the treatment of Baker’s cysts. PMID:27042572

  13. Comparison of Normal Saline, Hypertonic Saline Albumin and Terlipressin plus Hypertonic Saline Albumin in an Infant Animal Model of Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In series of cases and animal models suffering hemorrhagic shock, the use of vasopressors has shown potential benefits regarding hemodynamics and tissue perfusion. Terlipressin is an analogue of vasopressin with a longer half-life that can be administered by bolus injection. We have previously observed that hypertonic albumin improves resuscitation following controlled hemorrhage in piglets. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether the treatment with the combination of terlipressin and hypertonic albumin can produce better hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters than normal saline or hypertonic albumin alone at early stages of hemorrhagic shock in an infant animal model. Methods Experimental, randomized animal study including 39 2-to-3-month-old piglets. Thirty minutes after controlled 30 ml/kg bleed, pigs were randomized to receive either normal saline (NS) 30 ml/kg (n = 13), 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline (AHS) 15 ml/kg (n = 13) or single bolus of terlipressin 15 μg/kg i.v. plus 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline 15 ml/kg (TAHS) (n = 13) over 30 minutes. Global hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters were compared. Results After controlled bleed a significant decrease of blood pressure, cardiac index, central venous saturation, carotid and peripheral blood flow, brain saturation and an increase of heart rate, gastric PCO2 and lactate was observed. After treatment no significant differences in most hemodynamic (cardiac index, mean arterial pressure) and perfusion parameters (lactate, gastric PCO2, brain saturation, cutaneous blood flow) were observed between the three therapeutic groups. AHS and TAHS produced higher increase in stroke volume index and carotid blood flow than NS. Conclusions In this pediatric animal model of hypovolemic shock, albumin plus hypertonic saline with or without terlipressin achieved similar hemodynamics and perfusion parameters than twice the volume of NS. Addition of terlipressin did not

  14. Pre-hospital anaesthesia: the same but different.

    PubMed

    Lockey, D J; Crewdson, K; Lossius, H M

    2014-08-01

    Advanced airway management is one of the most controversial areas of pre-hospital trauma care and is carried out by different providers using different techniques in different Emergency Medical Services systems. Pre-hospital anaesthesia is the standard of care for trauma patients arriving in the emergency department with airway compromise. A small proportion of severely injured patients who cannot be managed with basic airway management require pre-hospital anaesthesia to avoid death or hypoxic brain injury. The evidence base for advanced airway management is inconsistent, contradictory and rarely reports all key data. There is evidence that poorly performed advanced airway management is harmful and that less-experienced providers have higher intubation failure rates and complication rates. International guidelines carry many common messages about the system requirements for the practice of advanced airway management. Pre-hospital rapid sequence induction (RSI) should be practiced to the same standard as emergency department RSI. Many in-hospital standards such as monitoring, equipment, and provider competence can be achieved. Pre-hospital and emergency in-hospital RSI has been modified from standard RSI techniques to improve patient safety, physiological disturbance, and practicality. Examples include the use of opioids and long-acting neuromuscular blocking agents, ventilation before intubation, and the early release of cricoid pressure to improve laryngoscopic view. Pre-hospital RSI is indicated in a small proportion of trauma patients. Where pre-hospital anaesthesia cannot be carried out to a high standard by competent providers, excellent quality basic airway management should be the mainstay of management. PMID:25038153

  15. Midtrimester abortion by hypertonic saline instillation experience in Ramathibodi Hospital.

    PubMed

    Suthutvoravut, S; Supacharapongkul, V; Bhiromswasdi, S

    1983-03-01

    A retrospective study of midtrimester abortions using the intraamniotic instillation of hypertonic saline solution was conducted. All 62 cases admitted to the Ramathibodi Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand for midtrimester abortion in 1980 were terminated by intraamniotic hypertonic saline instillation. The pregnancies were unwanted in 32 (51.6%) of the cases because of family problems, poor socioeconomic status, and deteriorated psychological health. 15 cases (24.2%) were preganancy from rape; 9 (14.5%) had rubella infection during the 1st trimester; and 3 cases (4.8%) were mentally retarded. There was 1 case of renal staghorn calculi post nephrostomy, 1 of multiparity with history of hemophilia in the family, and 1 of failed IUD contraception. The women were between 16-25 years of age in 39 cases, aged 15 or under in 4 cases (6.5%), and over age 35 in 4 cases. In 49 cases (79%) abortion was performed during 16-20 weeks gestation, in 12 cases (19.1%) at 21-24 weeks, and in 1 case at 25 weeks of gestation. The time interval from hypertonic saline instillation to abortion was analyzed in order to evaluate the effect of parity, amount of amniotic fluid withdrawn, and oxytocin augmentation. The mean instillation to abortion time (I-A) was 30.19 +or- 11.25 hours. There were 3 cases which did not receive oxytocin and who spontaneously aborted within 24 hours. Among cases which received oxytocin augmentation, there were 9 who received oxytocin immediately after instillation and 50 who received it 18-24 hours later. The I-A time was 31.22 +or- 11.63 hours in the group that received oxytocin immediately and 31.09 +or- 10.68 in the group receiving it later. There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups. Among the 50 cases which received oxytocin augmentation 18-24 hours later, there was no statistical difference between groups of nulliparity and multiparity. There were 46 cases in which the amount of amniotic fluid withdrawn was noted. In the group in which more than

  16. Architecture of a prehospital emergency patient care report system (PEPRS).

    PubMed

    Majeed, Raphael W; Stöhr, Mark R; Röhrig, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, prehospital emergency care adapted to the technology shift towards tablet computers and mobile computing. In particular, electronic patient care report (e-PCR) systems gained considerable attention and adoption in prehospital emergency medicine [1]. On the other hand, hospital information systems are already widely adopted. Yet, there is no universal solution for integrating prehospital emergency reports into electronic medical records of hospital information systems. Previous projects either relied on proprietary viewing workstations or examined and transferred only data for specific diseases (e.g. stroke patients[2]). Using requirements engineering and a three step software engineering approach, this project presents a generic architecture for integrating prehospital emergency care reports into hospital information systems. Aim of this project is to describe a generic architecture which can be used to implement data transfer and integration of pre hospital emergency care reports to hospital information systems. In summary, the prototype was able to integrate data in a standardized manner. The devised methods can be used design generic software for prehospital to hospital data integration. PMID:23920925

  17. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-01-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening. PMID:27004604

  18. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli in hypertonic sucrose media.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Taketo; Furukawa, Soichi; Narisawa, Naoki; Hagiwara, Chisato; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2009-06-01

    High osmotic environments produced by NaCl or sucrose have been used as reliable and traditional methods of food preservation. We tested, Escherichia coli as an indicator of food-contaminating bacterium, to determine if it can form biofilm in a hyperosmotic environment. E. coli K-12 IAM1264 did not form biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M NaCl. However, the bacterium formed biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M sucrose, although the planktonic growth was greatly suppressed. The biofilm, formed on solid surfaces, such as titer-plate well walls and glass slides, solely around the air-liquid interface. Both biofilm forming cells and planktonic cells in the hypertonic medium adopted a characteristic, fat and filamentous morphology with no FtsZ rings, which are a prerequisite for septum formation. Biofilm forming cells were found to be alive based on propidium iodide staining. The presence of 1 M sucrose in the food environment is not sufficient to prevent biofilm formation by E. coli. PMID:19447340

  19. Theater Blood Support in the Prehospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Audra L; Corley, Jason B

    2016-01-01

    The Army Blood Program (ABP) is charged with the responsibility of supporting the Warfighter on the battlefield, in addition to meeting garrison hospital blood requirements on a daily basis. Blood support concepts developed in response to Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom combat operations are the cornerstone to maintaining current capabilities and shaping future endeavors.. The ABP is actively engaged with research, advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy for both our conventional and operational forces. The feasibility of frozen/deglycerolized red blood cell use in theater has been demonstrated. The use of Blood Group A plasma in the place of Blood Group AB plasma has been successful. Placement of cryoprecipitate at Role 2 medical facilities and the placement of blood products on MEDEVAC (Vampire Program missions) have proven invaluable in moving transfusion therapy closer to the point of Injury. The improved patient outcomes from earlier transfusion of blood products has driven the requirement for far-forward blood support. Now (more than ever), there are products and processes in place to meet the requirements for blood use in the prehospital setting. PMID:27215865

  20. Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Quell, Robin; Sørlie, Venke

    2008-10-01

    The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation. PMID:18929341

  1. Effect of extreme temperatures on drugs for prehospital ACLS.

    PubMed

    Johansen, R B; Schafer, N C; Brown, P I

    1993-09-01

    Advanced cardiac life support drugs undergo a wide range of temperature exposures in the prehospital setting. Although manufacturers place temperature restrictions for drug stability on their products, it has been shown that these limits are often exceeded in the prehospital environment. We exposed four different drugs to temperatures of -20 degrees C (-6 degrees F) and 70 degrees C (150 degrees F) and subsequently performed assays to determine their respective chemical stability compared with that of control samples. We determined that no significant difference in chemical structure occurred between the standard sample and the four drugs exposed to extreme temperatures (P > .05). This information has obvious implications in making further recommendations for drug storage. More work to determine bioactivity of temperature-exposed drugs may show results with implications for success in prehospital cardiac resuscitation. PMID:8363680

  2. Management of pain in pre-hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Rodgers, Antony

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and management of pain in pre-hospital care settings are important aspects of paramedic and clinical team roles. As emergency department waiting times and delays in paramedic-to-nurse handover increase, it becomes more and more vital that patients receive adequate pre-hospital pain relief. However, administration of analgesia can be inadequate and can result in patients experiencing oligoanalgesia, or under-treated pain. This article examines these issues along with the aetiology of trauma and the related socioeconomic background of traumatic injury. It reviews validated pain-assessment tools, outlines physiological responses to traumatic pain and discusses some of the misconceptions about the provision of effective analgesia in pre-hospital settings. PMID:26050779

  3. Environmental Hypertonicity Causes Induction of Gluconeogenesis in the Air-Breathing Singhi Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Manas; Banerjee, Bodhisattwa; Choudhury, Mahua G.; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2013-01-01

    The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) is frequently being challenged by different environmental insults such as hyper-ammonia, dehydration and osmotic stresses in their natural habitats throughout the year. The present study investigated the effect of hyperosmotic stress, due to exposure to hypertonic environment (300 mM mannitol) for 14 days, on gluconeogenesis in this catfish. In situ exposure to hypertonic environment led to significant stimulation of gluconeogenic fluxes from the perfused liver after 7 days of exposure, followed by further increase after 14 days in presence of three different potential gluconeogenic substrates (lactate, pyruvate and glutamate). Environmental hypertonicity also caused a significant increase of activities of key gluconeogenic enzymes, namely phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase and glucose 6-phosphatase by about 2-6 fold in liver, and 3-6 fold in kidney tissues. This was accompanied by more abundance of enzyme proteins by about 1.8–3.7 fold and mRNAs by about 2.2–5.2 fold in both the tissues with a maximum increase after 14 days of exposure. Hence, the increase in activities of key gluconeogenic enzymes under hypertonic stress appeared to be as a result of transcriptional regulation of genes. Immunocytochemical analysis further confirmed the tissue specific localized expression of these enzymes in both the tissues with the possibility of expressing more in the same localized places. The induction of gluconeogenesis during exposure to environmental hypertonicity possibly occurs as a consequence of changes in hydration status/cell volume of different cell types. Thus, these adaptational strategies related to gluconeogenesis that are observed in this catfish under hypertonic stress probably help in maintaining glucose homeostasis and also for a proper energy supply to support metabolic demands mainly for ion transport and other altered metabolic processes under various

  4. Biphasic modulation of synaptic transmission by hypertonicity at the embryonic Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Tomonori; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    Puff-application of hypertonic saline (sucrose added to external saline) causes a transient increase in the frequency of spontaneous miniature synaptic currents (mSCs) at the neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos. The frequency gradually returns to pre-application levels. External Ca2+ is not needed for this response, but it may modify it. At 50 mm added sucrose, for example, enhanced spontaneous release was observed only in the presence of external Ca2+, suggesting that Ca2+ augments the response. In a high-K+ solution, in which the basal mSC frequency was elevated, higher sucrose concentrations produced an increase in mSC frequency that was followed (during and after the hypertonic exposure) by depression, with the magnitude of both effects increasing with hypertonicity between 100 and 500 mm. Evoked release by nerve stimulation showed only depression in response to hypertonicity. We do not believe that the depression of spontaneous or evoked release can be explained by the depletion of releasable quanta, however, since the frequency of quantal release did not reach levels compatible with this explanation and the enhancement and depression could be obtained independent of one another. In a mutant lacking neuronal synaptobrevin, only the depression of mSC frequency was induced by hypertonicity. Conversely, only the enhancing effect was observed in wild-type embryos when the mSC frequency was elevated with forskolin in Ca2+-free saline. In cultured embryonic Drosophila neurons, Ca2+ signals that were induced by high K+ and detected by Fura-2, were reduced by hypertonicity, suggesting that the depressing response is due to a direct effect of hypertonicity on Ca2+ influx. PMID:12433954

  5. Outcome following physician supervised prehospital resuscitation: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Krüger, Andreas J; Zwisler, Stine T; Brøchner, Anne C

    2015-01-01

    Background Prehospital care provided by specially trained, physician-based emergency services (P-EMS) is an integrated part of the emergency medical systems in many developed countries. To what extent P-EMS increases survival and favourable outcomes is still unclear. The aim of the study was thus to investigate ambulance runs initially assigned ‘life-saving missions’ with emphasis on long-term outcome in patients treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark Methods All MECU runs are registered in a database by the attending physician, stating, among other parameters, the treatment given, outcome of the treatment and the patient's diagnosis. Over a period of 80 months from May 1 2006 to December 31 2012, all missions in which the outcome of the treatment was registered as ‘life saving’ were scrutinised. Initial outcome, level of competence of the caretaker and diagnosis of each patient were manually established in each case in a combined audit of the prehospital database, the discharge summary of the MECU and the medical records from the hospital. Outcome parameters were final outcome, the aetiology of the life-threatening condition and the level of competences necessary to treat the patient. Results Of 25 647 patients treated by the MECU, 701 (2.7%) received prehospital ‘life saving treatment’. In 596 (2.3%) patients this treatment exceeded the competences of the attending emergency medical technician or paramedic. Of these patients, 225 (0.9%) were ultimately discharged to their own home. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that anaesthesiologist administrated prehospital therapy increases the level of treatment modalities leading to an increased survival in relation to a prehospital system consisting of emergency medical technicians and paramedics alone and thus supports the concept of applying specialists in anaesthesiology in the prehospital setting especially when treating patients with cardiac arrest, patients in

  6. Mannitol versus hypertonic saline: Safety and efficacy of mannitol and hypertonic saline in sputum induction and bronchial hyperreactivity assessment.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Puebla, M J; Olaguibel, J M; Almudevar, E; Echegoyen, A A; Vela, C; de Esteban, B

    2015-08-01

    Eosinophilic asthma phenotype predicts good response to corticosteroids and associates to asthmatic exacerbations. Sputum induction by hypertonic saline (HS) inhalation is technically demanding. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to osmotic agents indirectly mirrors active airway inflammation. We compared the safety and ability of HS and mannitol to induce sputum and measure BHR. We evaluated the stability of inflammatory phenotypes. We studied 35 non-smoking asthmatics randomized to undergo HS and mannitol challenges on 2 days 1 week apart. Sputum was sampled for cell analysis and phenotyped as eosinophilic (≥3% eosinophils) and non-eosinophilic (<3%) asthma. Nineteen subjects had BHR to mannitol and nine of them also had BHR to HS. Drops in forced expiratory volume in 1 s were higher from HS challenge than from mannitol challenge. Adequate sputum samples were obtained from 80% subjects (68% mannitol and 71% HS). Eosinophils and macrophages from both challenges correlated. Neutrophils were higher in sputum from HS. Ninety percent samples were equally phenotyped with HS and mannitol. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide, sputum eosinophils and BHR correlated in both challenges. HS and mannitol showed similar capacity to produce valuable sputum samples. BHR to both osmotic stimuli partially resembled airway eosinophilic inflammation but mannitol was more sensitive than HS to assess BHR. Eosinophilic phenotype remained stable in most patients with both stimuli. PMID:25761367

  7. Skills required for maritime pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care (PHEC) in the military has undergone major changes during the last 10 years of warfighting in the land environment. Providing this care in the maritime environment presents several unique challenges. This paper examines the clinical capabilities required of a PHEC team in the maritime environment and how this role can be fulfilled as part of Role 2 Afloat. It applies to Pre-hospital emergency care projected from a hospital not to General Duties Medical Officers at Role 1. PMID:22558737

  8. [Case Report: prehospital treatment on a major injured motorcycle driver].

    PubMed

    Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Knacke, Peer G; Heller, Gilbert; Naguschewski, Jörg; Scholz, Jens

    2008-09-01

    This case report describes the prehospital care of a 42-year-old person damaged by a severe motorcycle accident in a rural scene. The injured person was unconscious, one pupil was dilated and rib fractures were palpable. Purposeful therapy without delay was necessary. The prehospital therapy took 35 minutes in total. The time benefit by using a rescue helicopter is illustrated: time to initial treatment is minimized and duration of transport as well - direct transport to a trauma center is possible. PMID:18792860

  9. Correlation of growth of aerobic blood cultures in hypertonic broth with antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Maeland, A

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which sucrose improves growth in a hypertonic medium for isolating aerobes from blood. Clinical blood cultures were made routinely in duplicate in plain broth consisting of brain heart infusion broth with sodium polyanetholesulfonate, gelatin, and penicillinase and the same broth with 20% sucrose added. The growth patterns of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacteriaceae from plain and from hypertonic broth were correlated with the presence or absence of antimicrobial therapy in patients when the blood cultures were collected. In S. aureus bacteremias, 58.7% of the positive cultures collected during treatment of patients with beta-lactam antibiotics showed earlier growth or growth only in hypertonic broth, compared with 16.7% of the cultures taken during treatment with other antimicrobial agents (P less than 0.05) and 17.6% of the cultures made in antibiotic-free intervals (P less than 0.01). In the group of cultures yielding growth of Enterobacteriaceae, growth occurred earlier or solely in hypertonic broth in 28.9% of the cultures taken during treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics, compared with 15.7% of the cultures taken during treatment with other antimicrobial agents and 21.6% of the cultures collected in antibiotic-free intervals (differences not statistically significant). It is concluded that treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics is an important reason for the improved growth of S. aureus from hypertonic broth, but other factors are also involved. PMID:7153339

  10. Modulation of TonEBP activity by SUMO modification in response to hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kwon, Mi Jin; Lee-Kwon, Whaseon; Choi, Soo Youn; Sanada, Satoru; Kwon, Hyug Moo

    2014-01-01

    TonEBP is a DNA binding transcriptional enhancer that enables cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress by promoting expression of specific genes. TonEBP expression is very high in the renal medulla because local hypertonicity stimulates its expression. Given the high level of expression, it is not well understood how TonEBP activity is modulated. Here we report that TonEBP is post-translationally modified by SUMO, i.e., sumoylated, in the renal medulla but not in other isotonic organs. The sumoylation is reproduced in cultured cells when switched to hypertonicity. Analyses of site-directed TonEBP mutants reveal that K556 and K603 are independently sumoylated in response to hypertonicity. DNA binding is required for the sumoylation. Functional analyses of non-sumoylated mutants and SUMO-conjugated constructs show that sumoylation inhibits TonEBP in a dose-dependent manner but independent of the site of SUMO conjugation. Sumoylation inhibits transactivation without affecting nuclear translocation or DNA binding. These data suggest that sumoylation modulates the activity of TonEBP in the hypertonic renal medulla to prevent excessive action of TonEBP. PMID:24994984

  11. Hypertonic upregulation of amino acid transport system A in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, J G; Klus, L R; Steenbergen, D K; Kempson, S A

    1994-08-01

    The A10 line of vascular smooth muscle cells has Na+ dependent transport systems for alanine, proline, and Pi, whereas uptake of leucine, myo-inositol and D-glucose is Na+ independent. When A10 cells were incubated for 4 h in medium made hypertonic by addition of sucrose, there was a marked increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of alanine and proline but no change in Na(+)-dependent Pi uptake or Na(+)-independent uptake of leucine and inositol. Intracellular alanine content was increased 61% by the hypertonic treatment. Other nonpenetrating solutes, such as cellobiose and mannitol, reproduced the effect of sucrose, but urea, a penetrating solute, did not. Studies with 2-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid revealed that the upregulation by hypertonicity involved only system A. Increases in alanine and proline uptake also occurred after incubating the cells in isotonic medium containing 0.1 mM ouabain, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Na+ may be part of the intracellular signal for upregulation of system A. Hypertonic upregulation of Na(+)-dependent alanine transport occurred also in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. The response was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that gene transcription and protein synthesis play important roles in the mechanism leading to increased alanine uptake. We conclude that vascular smooth muscle cells, during prolonged hypertonic stress, activate system A and accumulate specific neutral amino acids which may act as organic osmolytes to help maintain normal cell volume. PMID:8074188

  12. 5'-Untranslated region of heat shock protein 70 mRNA drives translation under hypertonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Laura; Alfieri, Roberta R; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    In mammalian cells, adaptation to hypertonic conditions leads to the activation of an array of early (cell shrinkage, regulatory volume increase) and late (accumulation of compatible osmolytes) responses and increased level of HSPs (heat shock proteins). Protein synthesis is strongly inhibited few minutes after the hypertonic challenge as demonstrated in whole cells and as reproduced under controlled conditions in cell-free systems. Different mechanisms known to mediate the accumulation of HSP70, such as mRNA transcription and stabilization, require fully active protein synthesis. We show that the 5'-untranslated region of HSP70 messenger drives a hypertonicity-resistant translation (up to 0.425 osmol/kg of water), whereas cap-dependent protein synthesis is almost totally blocked under the same conditions. The results, obtained in cell-free systems and in whole cells, might help to explain why HSP70 is accumulated in cells when total protein synthesis is impaired. We also observed that translation initiated by viral IRES (from Cricket paralysis virus) is highly efficient in cells exposed to hyperosmolarity, suggesting that the resistance to hypertonic conditions is a more general feature of cap-independent translation. The described mechanism may also play a role in the control of translation of other messengers encoding for proteins involved in the adaptation to hypertonicity. PMID:23291172

  13. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  14. An open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology network architecture.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam B; Rokos, Ivan C; Burns, Kevin; Van Gelder, Carin M; Fisher, Roger M; Dunford, James V; Cone, David C; Bogucki, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most intractable challenges in prehospital medicine include response time optimization, inefficiencies at the emergency medical services (EMS)-emergency department (ED) interface, and the ability to correlate field interventions with patient outcomes. Information technology (IT) can address these and other concerns by ensuring that system and patient information is received when and where it is needed, is fully integrated with prior and subsequent patient information, and is securely archived. Some EMS agencies have begun adopting information technologies, such as wireless transmission of 12-lead electrocardiograms, but few agencies have developed a comprehensive plan for management of their prehospital information and integration with other electronic medical records. This perspective article highlights the challenges and limitations of integrating IT elements without a strategic plan, and proposes an open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology (PHIT) architecture. The two core components of this PHIT architecture are 1) routers with broadband network connectivity to share data between ambulance devices and EMS system information services and 2) an electronic patient care report to organize and archive all electronic prehospital data. To successfully implement this comprehensive PHIT architecture, data and technology requirements must be based on best available evidence, and the system must adhere to health data standards as well as privacy and security regulations. Recent federal legislation prioritizing health information technology may position federal agencies to help design and fund PHIT architectures. PMID:21294627

  15. Prehospital use of adenosine by ambulance services in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R.; Bon, V.

    2003-01-01

    Background The prehospital use of adenosine in the treatment of supraventricular arrhythmias has recently been implemented in standard ambulance care. However, establishing the origin and nature of the arrhythmia with certainty is an absolute requirement for using adenosine. Methods The ability of the ambulance nurse to predict supraventricular arrhythmias and the necessity of prehospital treatment of arrhythmias in general was evaluated. To do this, cardiologists at the Academic Medical Centre of Amsterdam were consulted and a literature search by means of an electronic search in Pubmed was performed. The search was complemented by a second survey concerning antagonists of adenosine using the keywords: adenosine and theophylline. Moreover, the Ambulance Nurse textbook, the National Protocol for Ambulance Care as well as the explanatory memorandum to the protocol were consulted. Results No strong indication for the prehospital use of adenosine was found, while detrimental effects of the drug can occur. There is no literature showing the ability of ambulance staff to correctly interpret complex cardiac arrhythmias in the Netherlands; the current ambulance protocol does not prevent an incorrect choice of therapy and medication. Conclusion It is strongly advised against using antiarrhythmic medication for the treatment of tachycardias in a prehospital setting if this treatment can be postponed to the hospital environment. PMID:25696211

  16. Common toads (Bufo arenarum) learn to anticipate and avoid hypertonic saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Daneri, M Florencia; Papini, Mauricio R; Muzio, Rubén N

    2007-11-01

    Toads (Bufo arenarum) were exposed to pairings between immersion in a neutral saline solution (i.e., one that caused no significant variation in fluid balance), followed by immersion in a highly hypertonic saline solution (i.e., one that caused water loss). In Experiment 1, solutions were presented in a Pavlovian conditioning arrangement. A group receiving a single neutral-highly hypertonic pairing per day exhibited a greater conditioned increase in heart rate than groups receiving either the same solutions in an explicitly unpaired fashion, or just the neutral solution. Paired toads also showed a greater ability to compensate for water loss across trials than that of the explicitly unpaired group. Using the same reinforcers and a similar apparatus, Experiment 2 demonstrated that toads learn a one-way avoidance response motivated by immersion in the highly hypertonic solution. Cardiac and avoidance conditioning are elements of an adaptive system for confronting aversive situations involving loss of water balance. PMID:18085926

  17. Foregoing prehospital care: should ambulance staff always resuscitate?

    PubMed Central

    Iserson, K V

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 400,000 people die outside US hospitals or chronic care facilities each year. While there has been some recent movement towards initiating procedures for prehospital Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders, the most common situation in the US is that emergency medical systems (EMS) personnel are not authorized to pronounce patients dead, but are required to attempt resuscitation with all of the modalities at their disposal in virtually all patients. It is unfair and probably unrealistic for EMS personnel to have to make a determination of the validity of a non-standard prehospital DNR order (for example, a living will or a durable power of attorney for health care). Existing prehospital DNR protocols range from being very restrictive in the scope of patients allowed to participate and in their implementation, to those that are more liberal. Potential benefits of prehospital DNR orders include freeing up vital personnel and material for use by those who would more fully benefit, and alleviating the enormous emotional strain on patients, families, EMS personnel, and hospital medical staffs involved in unwanted resuscitations that only prolong the dying process. Given this, prehospital DNR orders present several legal and moral problems. These include proper patient identification, the nature of the document itself, precautions incorporated into a DNR system to prevent misuse, potential liability for EMS and hospital personnel, and potential errors in implementation. Functioning prehospital DNR systems need to include: 1) specific legislation detailing the circumstances in which such a document could be used, the wording of such a document, and protection from liability for those implementing the document's directives; 2) having the currently valid document immediately available to the EMS personnel or base station doctors; and 3) acceptable means of identifying the patient. Relatively few US jurisdictions as yet have a prehospital DNR order system, although it

  18. Are pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, L. M.; Redmond, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine what proportion of pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury--deaths at the scene of the accident and those that occur before the person has reached hospital--are preventable. DESIGN--Retrospective study of all deaths from accidental injury that occurred between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1990 and were reported to the coroner. SETTING--North Staffordshire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Injury severity score, probability of survival (probit analysis), and airway obstruction. RESULTS--There were 152 pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury (110 males and 42 females). In the same period there were 257 deaths in hospital from accidental injury (136 males and 121 females). The average age at death was 41.9 years for those who died before reaching hospital, and their average injury severity score was 29.3. In contrast, those who died in hospital were older and equally likely to be males or females. Important neurological injury occurred in 113 pre-hospital deaths, and evidence of airway obstruction in 59. Eighty six pre-hospital deaths were due to road traffic accidents, and 37 of these were occupants in cars. On the basis of the injury severity score and age, death was found to have been inevitable or highly likely in 92 cases. In the remaining 60 cases death had not been inevitable and airway obstruction was present in up to 51 patients with injuries that they might have survived. CONCLUSION--Death was potentially preventable in at least 39% of those who died from accidental injury before they reached hospital. Training in first aid should be available more widely, and particularly to motorists as many pre-hospital deaths that could be prevented are due to road accidents. PMID:8173428

  19. Pediatric Anaphylaxis Management in the Prehospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Linda; Cone, David C.; Langhan, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening systemic allergic reaction that occurs after contact with an allergy-causing substance. Timely administration of intramuscular epinephrine is the treatment of choice for controlling symptoms and decreasing fatalities. Our purpose was to investigate the prehospital management of anaphylaxis among patients receiving care in an urban tertiary care pediatric emergency department (PED). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review from May, 2008 to January, 2010 of patients 18 years or younger who received care in the PED for anaphylaxis. Data were extracted by one investigator and included demographic information, patient symptoms, past medical history, medications administered (including route and provider), and final disposition. Results We reviewed 218 cases of anaphylaxis in 202 children. Mean age of patients was 7.4 years; 56% of patients were male. Two hundred and fourteen (98%) manifested symptoms in the skin/mucosal system, 68% had respiratory symptoms, 44% had gastrointestinal symptoms, and 2% had hypotension. Sixty-seven percent had a previous history of allergic reaction and 38% had a history of asthma. Seventy-six percent of the patients presented with anaphylaxis to food products, 8% to medications, 1% to stings, and 16% to unknown allergens. Reactions occurred at home or with family members 87% of the time, and at school 12% of the time. Only 36% of the patients who met criteria for anaphylaxis had epinephrine administered by emergency medical services (EMS). Among 26 patients with anaphylactic reactions at school, 69% received epinephrine by the school nurse. Of the 117 patients with known allergies who were with their parents at the time of anaphylactic reaction, 41% received epinephrine. Thirteen patients were seen by a physician prior to coming to the PED; all received epinephrine at the physician’s office. In total, epinephrine was given to 41% (89) of the 218 cases prior to coming to the PED

  20. Selecting cases for feedback to pre-hospital clinicians - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brichko, Lisa; Jennings, Paul; Bain, Christopher; Smith, Karen; Mitra, Biswadev

    2016-06-01

    Background There are currently limited avenues for routine feedback from hospitals to pre-hospital clinicians aimed at improvements in clinical practice. Objective The aim of this study was to pilot a method for selectively identifying cases where there was a clinically significant difference between the pre-hospital and in-hospital diagnoses that could have led to a difference in pre-hospital patient care. Methods This was a single-centre retrospective study involving cases randomly selected through informatics extraction of final diagnoses at hospital discharge. Additional data on demographics, triage and diagnoses were extracted by explicit chart review. Blinded groups of pre-hospital and in-hospital clinicians assessed data to detect clinically significant differences between pre-hospital and in-hospital diagnoses. Results Most (96.9%) patients were of Australasian Triage Scale category 1-3 and in-hospital mortality rate was 32.9%. Of 353 cases, 32 (9.1%; 95% CI: 6.1-12.1) were determined by both groups of clinical assessors to have a clinically significant difference between the pre-hospital and final in-hospital diagnoses, with moderate inter-rater reliability (kappa score 0.6, 95% CI: 0.5-0.7). Conclusion A modest proportion of cases demonstrated discordance between the pre-hospital and in-hospital diagnoses. Selective case identification and feedback to pre-hospital services using a combination of informatics extraction and clinician consensus approach can be used to promote ongoing improvements to pre-hospital patient care. What is known about the topic? Highly trained pre-hospital clinicians perform patient assessments and early interventions while transporting patients to healthcare facilities for ongoing management. Feedback is necessary to allow for continual improvements; however, the provision of formal selective feedback regarding diagnostic accuracy from hospitals to pre-hospital clinicians is currently not routine. What does this paper add? For a

  1. Effect of hypertonicity on augmentation and potentiation and on corresponding quantal parameters of transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Miyamoto, M D

    1999-03-01

    Augmentation and (posttetanic) potentiation are two of the four components comprising the enhanced release of transmitter following repetitive nerve stimulation. To examine the quantal basis of these components under isotonic and hypertonic conditions, we recorded miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs) from isolated frog (Rana pipiens) cutaneous pectoris muscles, before and after repetitive nerve stimulation (40 s at 80 Hz). Continuous recordings were made in low Ca2+ high Mg2+ isotonic Ringer solution, in Ringer that was made hypertonic with 100 mM sucrose, and in wash solution. Estimates were obtained of m (no. of quanta released), n (no. of functional release sites), p (mean probability of release), and vars p (spatial variance in p), using a method that employed MEPP counts. Hypertonicity abolished augmentation without affecting potentiation. There were prolonged poststimulation increases in m, n, and p and a marked but transient increase in vars p in the hypertonic solution. All effects were completely reversed with wash. The time constants of decay for potentiation and for vars p were virtually identical. The results are consistent with the notion that augmentation is caused by Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated calcium channels and that potentiation is due to Na+-induced Ca2+ release from mitochondria. The results also demonstrate the utility of this approach for analyzing the dynamics of quantal transmitter release. PMID:10085369

  2. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. III. Hypertonic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H. L.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that treatment in anisotonic medium modifies rejoining of radiation-induced breaks in interphase chromosomes. In previous work, we have demonstrated that formation of exchanges in human lymphocytes has a slow component (half-time of 1-2 h), but a fraction of exchanges are also observed in samples assayed soon after exposure. In this paper we studied the effect of hypertonic treatment on rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced breaks using fluorescence in situ hybridization of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 7 Gy gamma rays, fused to mitotic hamster cells and incubated in hypertonic solution (0.5 M NaCl) for the period normally allowed for interphase chromosome condensation to occur. The data from hypertonic treatment experiments indicate the presence of a class of interphase chromosome breaks that rejoin and misrejoin very quickly (half-time of 5-6 min). The fast misrejoining of these lesions is considered to be responsible for the initial level of exchanges which we reported previously. No significant effect of hypertonic treatment on the yield of chromosome aberrations scored at the first postirradiation mitosis was detected.

  3. In vitro increase of mean corpuscular volume difference (dMCV) as a marker for serum hypertonicity in dogs.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Jennifer M; Yancey, Misty R; Pohlman, Lisa M; Schermerhorn, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Spurious increase in erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume (MCV) on automated cell analyzers is a well-characterized lab error in hypertonic patients. A difference between automated and manual MCV (dMCV) greater than 2 fl has been shown to predict hypertonicity in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate dMCV as a marker for serum hypertonicity in dogs and to examine the relationship between dMCV and three methods of estimating serum tonicity: measured (OsMM), calculated (OsMC), and calculated effective (OsMCE) osmolalities. OsMC, OsMCE, and dMCV were calculated from routine blood values and OsMM was directly measured in 121 dogs. The dMCV of hypertonic dogs was significantly larger than that of normotonic dogs for all three osmolality methods. dMCV predicted hypertonicity as estimated by OsMM better than it predicted hypertonicity as estimated by OsMC and OsMCE. A cutoff of 2.96 fl yielded the best sensitivity (76%) and specificity (71%) for hypertonicity estimated by OsMM. PMID:24656345

  4. Abnormal Osmotic Avoidance Behavior in C. elegans Is Associated with Increased Hypertonic Stress Resistance and Improved Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine C.; Kim, Heejung; Ditano, Jennifer; Manion, Dacie; King, Benjamin L.; Strange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Protein function is controlled by the cellular proteostasis network. Proteostasis is energetically costly and those costs must be balanced with the energy needs of other physiological functions. Hypertonic stress causes widespread protein damage in C. elegans. Suppression and management of protein damage is essential for optimal survival under hypertonic conditions. ASH chemosensory neurons allow C. elegans to detect and avoid strongly hypertonic environments. We demonstrate that mutations in osm-9 and osm-12 that disrupt ASH mediated hypertonic avoidance behavior or genetic ablation of ASH neurons are associated with enhanced survival during hypertonic stress. Improved survival is not due to altered systemic volume homeostasis or organic osmolyte accumulation. Instead, we find that osm-9(ok1677) mutant and osm-9(RNAi) worms exhibit reductions in hypertonicity induced protein damage in non-neuronal cells suggesting that enhanced proteostasis capacity may account for improved hypertonic stress resistance in worms with defects in osmotic avoidance behavior. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes that play roles in managing protein damage are upregulated in osm-9(ok1677) worms. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work demonstrating that intercellular communication between neuronal and non-neuronal cells plays a critical role in integrating cellular stress resistance with other organismal physiological demands and associated energy costs. PMID:27111894

  5. Inhibition of Neutrophils by Hypertonic Saline Involves Pannexin-1, CD39, CD73, and Other Ectonucleotidases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Woehrle, Tobias; Sumi, Yuka; Ledderose, Stephan; Li, Xiaoou; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2015-09-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation has been studied as a possible strategy to reduce polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) activation and tissue damage in trauma patients. Hypertonic saline blocks PMNs by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors. Here, we studied the underlying mechanisms in search of possible reasons for the inconsistent results of recent clinical trials with HS resuscitation. Purified human PMNs or PMNs in whole blood were treated with HS to simulate hypertonicity levels found after HS resuscitation (40 mmol/L beyond isotonic levels). Adenosine triphosphate release was measured with a luciferase assay. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation was assessed by measuring oxidative burst. The pannexin-1 (panx1) inhibitor panx1 and the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) blocked ATP release from PMNs in purified and whole blood preparations, indicating that HS releases ATP via panx1 and gap junction channels. Hypertonic saline blocked N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-induced PMN activation by 40% in purified PMN preparations and by 60% in whole blood. These inhibitory effects were abolished by panx1 but only partially reduced by CBX, which indicates that panx1 has a central role in the immunomodulatory effects of HS. Inhibition of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 abolished the suppressive effect of HS on purified PMN cultures but only partially reduced the effect of HS in whole blood. These findings suggest redundant mechanisms in whole blood that may strengthen the immunomodulatory effect of HS in vivo. We conclude that HS resuscitation exerts anti-inflammatory effects that involve panx1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases, which produce the adenosine that blocks PMNs by stimulating their A2a receptors. Our findings shed new light on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of HS and suggest possible new strategies to improve the clinical efficacy of hypertonic resuscitation. PMID:26009814

  6. Hypertonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock: a prospective randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    van Haren, Frank M P; Sleigh, James; Boerma, E Christiaan; La Pine, Mary; Bahr, Mohamed; Pickkers, Peter; van der Hoeven, Johannes G

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the short-term effects of hypertonic fluid versus isotonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock. This was a double-blind, prospective randomized controlled trial in a 15-bed intensive care unit. Twenty-four patients with septic shock were randomized to receive 250 mL 7.2% NaCl/6% hydroxyethyl starch (HT group) or 500 mL 6% hydroxyethyl starch (IT group). Hemodynamic measurements included mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), central venous pressure, stroke volume index, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index, gastric tonometry, and sublingual microcirculatory flow as assessed by sidestream dark field imaging. Systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities of the medial mitral annulus were measured using echocardiography to assess left ventricular contractility. Log transformation of the ratio MAP divided by the norepinephrine infusion rate (log MAP/NE) quantified the combined effect on both parameters. Compared with the IT group, hypertonic solution treatment resulted in an improvement in log MAP/NE (P = 0.008), as well as an increase in systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities (P = 0.03) and stroke volume index (P = 0.017). No differences between the groups were found for preload parameters (central venous pressure, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index) or for afterload parameters (systemic vascular resistance index, MAP). Hypertonic solution treatment decreased the need for ongoing fluid resuscitation (P = 0.046). No differences between groups were observed regarding tonometry or the sublingual microvascular variables. In patients with septic shock, hypertonic fluid administration did not promote gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion or sublingual microcirculatory blood flow in comparison to isotonic fluid. Independent of changes in preload or afterload, hypertonic fluid administration improved the cardiac contractility and vascular tone compared with isotonic fluid. The need for ongoing fluid

  7. Emergency prehospital on-scene thoracotomy: a novel method.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Hutan; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2010-12-01

    The necessity for prehospital thoracotomy is rare, but can be lifesaving. Occasionally an emergency practitioner or surgeon coincidentally arrives at a trauma scene before the arrival of emergency medical teams. In such a circumstance, even when thoracotomy may be indicated, it is not usually performed in view of the lack of equipment (e.g., dissecting tools or rib retractor). We present a novel technique of "L" shape thoracotomy, or Thoraco-sterno-costochondrotomy, whereby in a prehospital setting, and with minimal equipment (such as a penknife) a thoracotomy can be performed with adequate exposure of the heart and great vessels. The similarities of this pragmatic procedure are considered within the context of ancient Aztec and Mesoamerican thoracotomies. PMID:21874737

  8. [Nursing care in pre-hospital services and airmedical removal].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Patricia Kuerten; do Prado, Marta Lenise; Radünz, Vera; Wosny, Antônio de Miranda

    2003-01-01

    The present article is a description of an experience developed during the Conclusive Monography of the Nursing Course from Santa Catarina's Federal University, in the second semester year 2000. It discusses the importance of the Pre-hospital Attendiment Service and Airmedical Removal, and the need of nurses preparation to attend the increasing requests of those services. It presents a historical review on these kind of attention method in health, in Brazil and in the world. It discusses some aspects related to management of human and material resources, concerning its specificity in those kind of services. It also points out the importance of the Nurse roll, and the necessity of widening their skills to act in the field of pre-hospital attendiment and airmedical removal. PMID:15320626

  9. Base station prehospital care: judgement errors and deviations from protocol.

    PubMed

    Wasserberger, J; Ordog, G J; Donoghue, G; Balasubramaniam, S

    1987-08-01

    During a three-year period 5,944 paramedic runs were reviewed at the King/Drew Medical Center for deviations from prehospital management protocols established by the Los Angeles Paramedic Training Institute, and from standard medical practice. An overall compliance to the prehospital management protocols of 94% was found. Compliance to standard medical care was 97%. The most common deviations were failure to administer prophylactic lidocaine to patients having chest pain suggestive of myocardial ischemia and failure to apply cervical spine precautions in patients with suspected head trauma. Fifty percent of the radio operators who deviated from algorithms also were found to be making errors in judgment in standard medical care. PMID:3619166

  10. [Pre-hospital medicine and medical control system in Japan].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Seizan

    2016-02-01

    It is necessary to treat the patient from the site of the emergency to raise a lifesaving rate of the patient. As a prime example would be out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Once you start the treatment after hospital arrival, cardiac arrest patient can't be life-saving. It is necessary to start the chest compression, etc. from the site of the emergency. Medical care to be carried out on the scene of emergency is the pre-hospital care. In recent years, improvement of the pre-hospital care is remarkable in Japan. It is because of that the quantity and quality of the emergency life-saving technician are being enhanced. And also doctor-helicopter system have been enhanced. Medical control is a critical component of the improvement. PMID:26915258

  11. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  12. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maegele, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries, Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid. The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care. The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system. The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept. The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first"). If no immediate treatment is necessary, a "Secondary Sur- vey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism. Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme. Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go")toTR-DGU® certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks. Due to the difficult pre- hospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and, as consequence, the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low. Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited. The present article provides a synopsis of rec- ommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multi- disciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung", the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible. PMID:26643236

  13. Endotracheal Intubation in Patients Treated for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph B.; Nicholas, Katherine S.; Varelas, Panayiotis N.; Harsh, Donna M.; Durkalski, Valerie; Silbergleit, Robert; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data describe the frequency, timing, or indications for endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients with status epilepticus. A better understanding of the characteristics of patients with status epilepticus requiring airway interventions could inform clinical care. We sought to characterize ETI use in patients with prehospital status epilepticus. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing intravenous lorazepam to intramuscular midazolam for prehospital status epilepticus treatment. Subjects received ETI in the prehospital, Emergency Department (ED), or inpatient setting at the discretion of caregivers. Results Of 1023 enrollments, 218 (21 %) received ETI. 204 (93.6 %) of the ETIs were performed in the hospital and 14 (6.4 %) in the prehospital setting. Intubated patients were older (52 vs 41 years, p < 0.001), and men underwent ETI more than women (26 vs 21 %, p = 0.047). Patients with ongoing seizures on ED arrival had a higher rate of ETI (32 vs 16 %, p < 0.001), as did those who received rescue anti-seizure medication (29 vs 20 %, p = 0.004). Mortality was higher for intubated patients (7 vs 0.4 %, p < 0.001). Most ETI (n = 133, 62 %) occurred early (prior to or within 30 min after ED arrival), and late ETI was associated with higher mortality (14 vs 3 %, p = 0.002) than early ETI. Conclusions ETI is common in patients with status epilepticus, particularly among the elderly or those with refractory seizures. Any ETI and late ETI are both associated with higher mortality. PMID:25623785

  14. Man or machine? An experimental study of prehospital emergency amputation

    PubMed Central

    Leech, Caroline; Porter, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prehospital emergency amputation is a rare procedure, which may be necessary to free a time-critical patient from entrapment. This study aimed to evaluate four techniques of cadaveric lower limb prehospital emergency amputation. Method A guillotine amputation of the distal femur was undertaken in fresh frozen self-donated cadavers. A prehospital doctor conducted a surgical amputation with Gigli saw or hacksaw for bone cuts and firefighters carried out the procedure using the reciprocating saw and Holmatro device. The primary outcome measures were time to full amputation and the number of attempts required. The secondary outcomes were observed quality of skin cut, soft tissue cut and CT assessment of the proximal bone. Observers also noted the potential risks to the rescuer or patient during the procedure. Results All techniques completed amputation within 91 s. The reciprocating saw was the quickest technique (22 s) but there was significant blood spattering and continuation of the cut to the surface under the leg. The Holmatro device took less than a minute. The quality of the proximal femur was acceptable with all methods, but 5 cm more proximal soft tissue damage was made by the Holmatro device. Conclusions Emergency prehospital guillotine amputation of the distal femur can effectively be performed using scalpel and paramedic shears with bone cuts by the Gigli saw or fire service hacksaw. The reciprocating saw could be used to cut bone if no other equipment was available but carried some risks. The Holmatro cutting device is a viable option for a life-threatening entrapment where only firefighters can safely access the patient, but would not be a recommended primary technique for medical staff. PMID:27280425

  15. [Analysis of the prehospitalization period in myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Benzer, W; Mähr, G

    1983-01-01

    56 patients with acute myocardial infarction during the period 1973/74, and 58 during the period 1979/80, were questioned immediately after arrival in the coronary care unit about their pre-hospitalization phase. We were able to determine, that the patients' decision time followed by the transportation time accounted for the greater part of the pre-hospitalization period. The contact time between general practitioner and patient played only an insignificant role in the total time-lag. In a comparison of the years 1973/74 and 1979/80 an increase in the patients' decision time and a decrease in the transportation time became evident. Noteworthy was, that in approximately one-fifth of the cases the telephone call to the doctor was not answered. Since an improvement in informing the general public about prodromal symptoms of heart attacks does not seem to bring about a decrease in the decision time, a shortening of the pre-hospitalization period could succeed through a reduction in transportation time and an improvement in doctor accessibility. The use of mobile coronary care units, in particular in rural areas, and improvement in doctors' radio communication services would in that case be matters for discussion. PMID:6868942

  16. Understanding prehospital delay behavior in acute myocardial infarction in women.

    PubMed

    Waller, Cynthia G

    2006-12-01

    Studies demonstrate that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality can be reduced if reperfusion therapy is initiated within 1 hour of AMI symptom onset. However, a considerable number of men and women arrive at the emergency department outside of the time frame for thrombolytic and angioplasty effectiveness. This is especially true for women who have been shown to delay longer than men due to their prehospital decision-making process utilized. With a mean total delay time greater than 4 hours, the time interval from symptom onset to transport activation to the hospital consumes the majority of the prehospital phase of emergency cardiac care. The health belief model, self-regulation model, theory of reasoned action, and theory of planned behavior have all been used to describe the prehospital decision-making process of both men and women with an AMI and the variables that impact that process. These models have identified the importance of symptom attribution to cardiac-related causes as a target variable for research and interventions related to care-seeking behavior. PMID:18340239

  17. [A historical retrospect of Pre-hospital emergency treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Peng; Cui, Yong-Ying; Wang, Zhen-E

    2013-07-01

    In 1240, the first organization of first aid medical service for rescuing and transferring the wounded in the world was established at Florence, Italy. The stations of Air Ambulances were set up in most of the developed countries at the end of the 1960s. In the middle of the 1970s, the International Red Cross put forward the principles of internationalization, international cooperation and its standardization, thus, promoting the development of pre-hospital emergency treatment. In 1972, the first Emergency Medical Service Center was established and in 1973, Congress of the United States passed the Emergency Medical Services Act (EMSS). In 1976, the legislative procedure was finished and the National Emergency Network was formed, afterwards, pre-hospital emergency treatment, on-site rescue and transfer care, patient monitoring system of ICU-CCU were set up successively. Since the first rescue group of "three failure" (heart failure, lung failure and renal failure) was first formed at Tianjin First Center Hospital in August 1974, the pre-hospital emergency of China had been developing gradually. PMID:24345547

  18. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome. PMID:25635190

  19. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Amadi-Obi, Ahjoku; Gilligan, Peadar; Owens, Niall; O'Donnell, Cathal

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome. PMID:25635190

  20. Understanding Safety in Prehospital Emergency Medical Services for Children

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Erika K.; O’Brien, Kerth; Curry, Merlin; Meckler, Garth D.; Engle, Philip P.; Jui, Jonathan; Summers, Caitlin; Lambert, William; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Objective For over a decade, the field of medicine has recognized the importance of studying and designing strategies to prevent safety issues in hospitals and clinics. However, there has been less focus on understanding safety in prehospital emergency medical services, particularly in regard to children. Roughly 27.7 million (or 27%) of the annual ED visits are by children under the age of 19, and about 2 million of these children reach the hospital via EMS. This paper adds to our qualitative understanding of the nature and contributors to safety events in the prehospital emergency care of children. Methods We conducted four 8–12 person focus groups among paid and volunteer Emergency Medical Services providers to understand: 1) patient safety issues that occur in the prehospital care of children, and 2) factors that contribute to these safety issues (e.g. patient, family, systems, environmental, or individual provider factors). Focus groups were conducted in rural and urban settings. Interview transcripts were coded for overarching themes. Results Key factors and themes identified in the analysis were grouped into categories using an ecological approach that distinguishes between systems, team, child and family, and individual provider level contributors. At the systems level, focus group participants cited challenges such as lack of appropriately sized equipment or standardized pediatric medication dosages, insufficient human resources, limited pediatric training and experience, and aspects of emergency medical services culture. EMS team level factors centered on communication with other EMS providers (both prehospital and hospital). Family and child factors included communication barriers and challenging clinical situations or scene characteristics. Finally, focus group participants highlighted a range of provider level factors including heightened levels of anxiety, insufficient experience and training with children and errors in assessment and decision

  1. Risk assessment of pre-hospital trauma airway management by anaesthesiologists using the predictive Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Endotracheal intubation (ETI) has been considered an essential part of pre-hospital advanced life support. Pre-hospital ETI, however, is a complex intervention also for airway specialist like anaesthesiologists working as pre-hospital emergency physicians. We therefore wanted to investigate the quality of pre-hospital airway management by anaesthesiologists in severely traumatised patients and identify possible areas for improvement. Method We performed a risk assessment according to the predictive Bayesian approach, in a typical anaesthesiologist-manned Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS). The main focus of the risk assessment was the event where a patient arrives in the emergency department without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication for it. Results In the risk assessment, we assigned a high probability (29%) for the event assessed, that a patient arrives without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication. However, several uncertainty factors in the risk assessment were identified related to data quality, indications for use of ETI, patient outcome and need for special training of ETI providers. Conclusion Our risk assessment indicated a high probability for trauma patients with an indication for pre-hospital ETI not receiving it in the studied HEMS. The uncertainty factors identified in the assessment should be further investigated to better understand the problem assessed and consequences for the patients. Better quality of pre-hospital airway management data could contribute to a reduction of these uncertainties. PMID:20409306

  2. Prehospital diagnosis of massive ethylene glycol poisoning and use of an early antidote.

    PubMed

    Amathieu, Roland; Merouani, Medhi; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Smail, Nadia; Adnet, Frédéric

    2006-08-01

    We report the case of a patient suspected of voluntary massive poisoning by ethylene glycol. Prehospital diagnosis was established by portable blood analyser and an early antidote with 4 MP treatment initiated in out-of-hospital setting. Use of portable blood analyser in prehospital care should be considered in case of suspected massive poisoning by ethylene glycol. PMID:16808995

  3. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Holms, Carla Augusto; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Kahvegian, Marcia; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Junior, Jose Otavio Costa Auler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid. METHODS: Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg); acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis. RESULTS: Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertonic saline

  4. [Time costs cardiac muscle tissue--prehospital therapy of acute myocardial infarct--a case report].

    PubMed

    Eschenburg, G; Pappert, D; Ohlmeier, H

    2003-01-01

    Symptoms of an acute myocardial infarction are a common reason for calling the emergency physician. Pre-hospital mortality caused by cardiac infarction is constantly high. The main potential for decreasing infarction mortality lies in the pre-hospital period. The problems and prospects of treatment in the early period are described in the case of a 73-year-old patient with an acute anterior infarction. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach is shown and discussed in this concrete case, taking into consideration the guidelines for diagnostics and therapy of acute myocardial infarction in the pre-hospital period of the German Society for Cardiology. A particular focus is the management of pre-hospital thrombolysis, the preconditions, realization and risks of which are described. In this context, the experience and competence of the emergency physician is prerequisite for the exact diagnosis and therapy. Furthermore, the importance of a smooth transition from pre-hospital therapy to intensive care is emphasized. PMID:12666508

  5. Case studies in prehospital care from London HEMS: pre-hospital administration of prothrombin complex concentrate to the head-injured patient.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, Robbie A; Kotze, Jean-Pierre; Lockey, David J; Weaver, Anne E

    2013-03-01

    A case of pre-hospital administration of prothrombin complex concentrate to a patient anticoagulated with warfarin and with suspected intracranial haemorrhage is described. Effective, early reversal of anticoagulation by the time of arrival at hospital was achieved. PMID:23349352

  6. Supporting Information Use and Retention of Pre-Hospital Information during Trauma Resuscitation: A Qualitative Study of Pre-Hospital Communications and Information Needs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Burd, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-hospital communication is a critical first step towards ensuring efficient management of critically injured patients during trauma resuscitation. Information about incoming patients received from the field and en route serves a critical role in helping emergency medical teams prepare for patient care. Despite many efforts, inefficiencies persist. In this paper, we examine the pre-hospital communications between pre-hospital and hospital providers, including the types of information transferred during en-route calls, as well as the information needs of trauma teams. Our findings show that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) teams report a great deal of information from the field, most of which match the needs of trauma teams. We discuss design implications for a computerized system to support the use and retention of pre-hospital information during trauma resuscitation. PMID:24551428

  7. Time-dependent expression of hypertonic effects on bullfrog taste nerve responses to salts and bitter substances.

    PubMed

    Mashiyama, Kazunori; Nozawa, Yuhei; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2014-03-27

    We previously showed that the hypertonicity of taste stimulating solutions modified tonic responses, the quasi-steady state component following the transient (phasic) component of each integrated taste nerve response. Here we show that the hypertonicity opens tight junctions surrounding taste receptor cells in a time-dependent manner and modifies whole taste nerve responses in bullfrogs. We increased the tonicity of stimulating solutions with non-taste substances such as urea or ethylene glycol. The hypertonicity enhanced phasic responses to NaCl>0.2M, and suppressed those to NaCl<0.1M, 1mM CaCl2, and 1mM bitter substances (quinine, denatonium and strychnine). The hypertonicity also enhanced the phasic responses to a variety of 0.5M salts such as LiCl and KCl. The enhancing effect was increased by increasing the difference between the ionic mobilities of the cations and anions in the salt. A preincubation time >20s in the presence of 1M non-taste substances was needed to elicit both the enhancing and suppressing effects. Lucifer Yellow CH, a paracellular marker dye, diffused into bullfrog taste receptor organs in 30s in the presence of hypertonicity. These results agreed with our proposed mechanism of hypertonic effects that considered the diffusion potential across open tight junctions. PMID:24513402

  8. Roles of TauT and system A in cytoprotection of rat syncytiotrophoblast cell line exposed to hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Sai, Y; Fujii, J; Muta, M; Iizasa, H; Tomi, M; Deureh, M; Kose, N; Nakashima, E

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the cytoprotective mechanism(s) induced in a conditionally immortalized syncytiotrophoblast cell line (TR-TBT 18d-1) exposed to hypertonic conditions. Hypertonicity-induced apoptosis of TR-TBT 18d-1 cells, but this was blocked by addition of 1 mM taurine to the culture medium. TauT-knockdown using siRNA revealed that TauT is a major contributor to taurine uptake by TR-TBT 18d-1 cells, at least under normal conditions. Cellular uptake of [(3)H]taurine and [(14)C]betaine by TR-TBT 18d-1 cells cultured under hypertonic conditions was increased compared to that under normal conditions. TauT, BGT-1, ATA2 and HSP70 mRNAs were upregulated by hypertonicity, while OCTN2, ENT1 and CNT1 mRNAs were downregulated. [(3)H]Taurine uptake was strongly inhibited by TauT inhibitors such as hypotaurine and β-alanine. MeAIB, a system A specific substrate, inhibited hypertonic stress-induced [(14)C]betaine uptake. These results suggest that TauT and system A play cytoprotective roles in syncytiotrophoblasts exposed to hypertonic stress. PMID:20801504

  9. Hypertonic Saline for the Treatment of Bronchiolitis in Infants and Young Children: A Critical Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiolitis, an infection of the lower respiratory tract, is the leading cause of infant and child hospitalization in the United States. Therapeutic options for management of bronchiolitis are limited. Hypertonic saline inhalation therapy has been studied in numerous clinical trials with mixed results. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published updated guidelines on the diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis, which include new recommendations on the use of hypertonic saline. We reviewed all published clinical trials mentioned in the 2014 AAP guidelines, as well as additional trials published since the guidelines, and critically evaluated each trial to determine efficacy, safety, and expectations of hypertonic saline inhalation therapy. A total of 2682 infants were studied over the course of 22 clinical trials. Nine trials were carried out in the outpatient/clinic/emergency department and 13 in the inpatient setting. We agree with the AAP guidelines regarding the recommendation to use nebulized hypertonic saline for infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis, with the expectation of reducing bronchiolitis scores and length of stay when it is expected to last more than 72 hours. However, we also believe there might be an advantage for hypertonic saline in reducing admission rates from the emergency department, based on close examination of the results of recent trials. This review also highlights important gaps in the available literature that need to be addressed in order to define the role of inhaled hypertonic saline therapy. PMID:26997926

  10. Ionic imbalance, in addition to molecular crowding, abates cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicle motility during hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula; Roth, Isabelle; Meda, Paolo; Féraille, Eric; Brown, Dennis; Hasler, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Cell volume homeostasis is vital for the maintenance of optimal protein density and cellular function. Numerous mammalian cell types are routinely exposed to acute hypertonic challenge and shrink. Molecular crowding modifies biochemical reaction rates and decreases macromolecule diffusion. Cell volume is restored rapidly by ion influx but at the expense of elevated intracellular sodium and chloride levels that persist long after challenge. Although recent studies have highlighted the role of molecular crowding on the effects of hypertonicity, the effects of ionic imbalance on cellular trafficking dynamics in living cells are largely unexplored. By tracking distinct fluorescently labeled endosome/vesicle populations by live-cell imaging, we show that vesicle motility is reduced dramatically in a variety of cell types at the onset of hypertonic challenge. Live-cell imaging of actin and tubulin revealed similar arrested microfilament motility upon challenge. Vesicle motility recovered long after cell volume, a process that required functional regulatory volume increase and was accelerated by a return of extracellular osmolality to isosmotic levels. This delay suggests that, although volume-induced molecular crowding contributes to trafficking defects, it alone cannot explain the observed effects. Using fluorescent indicators and FRET-based probes, we found that intracellular ATP abundance and mitochondrial potential were reduced by hypertonicity and recovered after longer periods of time. Similar to the effects of osmotic challenge, isovolumetric elevation of intracellular chloride concentration by ionophores transiently decreased ATP production by mitochondria and abated microfilament and vesicle motility. These data illustrate how perturbed ionic balance, in addition to molecular crowding, affects membrane trafficking. PMID:26045497

  11. Hypertonic saline monotherapy in children with perennial allergic rhinitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Barberi, S; D'Auria, E; Bernardo, L; Ferrara, F; Pietra, B; Pinto, F; Ferrero, F; Ciprandi, G

    2016-01-01

    Perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) is very common in children and has a relevant impact on their families. House dust mites (HDM) are the most relevant cause of PAR. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate whether hypertonic saline (3%) nasal spray as monotherapy is able to improve: nasal symptom severity and parental perception of rhinitis control, sleep, and school performance in HDM-mono-sensitized children with PAR. Globally, 25 children (13 males and 12 females; mean age 9.5±3.1 years) were treated for 3 weeks. They were visited at baseline, at the end of treatment, and after a 2-week follow-up. Hypertonic saline significantly reduced total symptom score, and improved the perception, according to their parents, of rhinitis control, sleep, and school performance. In conclusion, the present pilot study provided the first evidence that 3% hypertonic saline monotherapy was able to relieve nasal symptoms and parental perception of PAR impact as well as being safe and well tolerated. PMID:27049102

  12. Sphingomyelin metabolism is involved in the differentiation of MDCK cells induced by environmental hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Favale, Nicolás Octavio; Santacreu, Bruno Jaime; Pescio, Lucila Gisele; Marquez, Maria Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are relevant lipid components of eukaryotic cells. Besides regulating various cellular processes, SLs provide the structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Particularly, SM is associated with detergent-resistant microdomains. We have previously shown that the adherens junction (AJ) complex, the relevant cell-cell adhesion structure involved in cell differentiation and tissue organization, is located in an SM-rich membrane lipid domain. We have also demonstrated that under hypertonic conditions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells acquire a differentiated phenotype with changes in SL metabolism. For these reasons, we decided to evaluate whether SM metabolism is involved in the acquisition of the differentiated phenotype of MDCK cells. We found that SM synthesis mediated by SM synthase 1 is involved in hypertonicity-induced formation of mature AJs, necessary for correct epithelial cell differentiation. Inhibition of SM synthesis impaired the acquisition of mature AJs, evoking a disintegration-like process reflected by the dissipation of E-cadherin and β- and α-catenins from the AJ complex. As a consequence, MDCK cells did not develop the hypertonicity-induced differentiated epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:25670801

  13. Biochemical and histochemical features of human cultured cells (EUE) adapted to hypertonic medium.

    PubMed

    Bolognani, L; Fantin, A M; Conti, A M; Gervaso, M V; Salè, M F

    1978-01-01

    EUE cells from a human heteroploid line cultured in hypertonic medium (0.274 M NaCl) modify their lipid pattern: sulfolipid concentration reaches 86 to 90 microgram/mg protein whilst it ranges between 19 to 32 microgram/mg in cells cultured in isotonic medium. Ganglioside concentration reaches 2.6 nmoles of sialic acid/mg protein (after 75 days) and 13 (after 85 days) in hypertonic saline medium. Whilst it is 0.5 in isotonic medium. Phospholipid concentration does not show any similar change. Cytoenzymatic analysis reveals that dehydrogenases (lactate, G-6-P dehydrogenases, tetrahydrofolate reductase and NADH diaphorase) appear strongly enhanced in cells grown on hypertonic medium. On the contrary higher acid phosphatase and ATPase activity was demonstrable in cells grown on isotonic medium. These results are similar (except for ATPase activity) to those observed in salt secreting glands involved in strong osmotic work. The results are discussed in relation to the problem of energy supply in cells performing osmotic work. PMID:151474

  14. Prehospital stroke diagnostics based on neurological examination and transcranial ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCS) has proved to be a fast and reliable tool for the detection of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusions in a hospital setting. In this feasibility study on prehospital sonography, our aim was to investigate the accuracy of TCCS for neurovascular emergency diagnostics when performed in a prehospital setting using mobile ultrasound equipment as part of a neurological examination. Methods Following a ‘911 stroke code’ call, stroke neurologists experienced in TCCS rendezvoused with the paramedic team. In patients with suspected stroke, TCCS examination including ultrasound contrast agents was performed. Results were compared with neurovascular imaging (CTA, MRA) and the final discharge diagnosis from standard patient-centered stroke care. Results We enrolled ‘232 stroke code’ patients with follow-up data available in 102 patients with complete TCCS examination. A diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made in 73 cases; 29 patients were identified as ‘stroke mimics’. MCA occlusion was diagnosed in ten patients, while internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion/high-grade stenosis leading to reversal of anterior cerebral artery flow was diagnosed in four patients. The initial working diagnosis ‘any stroke’ showed a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 48%. ‘Major MCA or ICA stroke’ diagnosed by mobile ultrasound showed an overall sensitivity of 78% and specificity of 98%. Conclusions The study demonstrates the feasibility and high diagnostic accuracy of emergency transcranial ultrasound assessment combined with neurological examinations for major ischemic stroke. Future combination with telemedical support, point-of-care analysis of blood serum markers, and probability algorithms of prehospital stroke diagnosis including ultrasound may help to speed up stroke treatment. PMID:24572006

  15. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; M. Rubiano, Andres; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Calderon-Miranda, Willem; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Blancas Rivera, Marco Antonio; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.  PMID:27162922

  16. [Pre-hospital management of acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lefort, Hugues; Fradin, Jordan; Blgnand, Michel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The medical management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) follows the recommendations of international medical societies. The call to the emergency services by the patient triggers a race against the clock in pre-hospital care. It is essential to reduce the duration of the inadequate perfusion of the heart in order to limit its consequences. An effective reperfusion strategy must be planned in advance taking into account the logistical constraints. It is crucial that the general public is educated to recognise the signs of ACS and to call the emergency services immediately (such as 15, 112 or 991). PMID:26040140

  17. Acute Hypertonicity Alters Aquaporin-2 Trafficking and Induces a MAPK-dependent Accumulation at the Plasma Membrane of Renal Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Udo; Nunes, Paula; Bouley, Richard; Lu, Hua A. J.; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Brown, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    The unique phenotype of renal medullary cells allows them to survive and functionally adapt to changes of interstitial osmolality/tonicity. We investigated the effects of acute hypertonic challenge on AQP2 (aquaporin-2) water channel trafficking. In the absence of vasopressin, hypertonicity alone induced rapid (<10 min) plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2 in rat kidney collecting duct principal cells in situ, and in several kidney epithelial lines. Confocal microscopy revealed that AQP2 also accumulated in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) following hypertonic challenge. AQP2 mutants that mimic the Ser256-phosphorylated and -nonphosphorylated state accumulated at the cell surface and TGN, respectively. Hypertonicity did not induce a change in cytosolic cAMP concentration, but inhibition of either calmodulin or cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activity blunted the hypertonicity-induced increase of AQP2 cell surface expression. Hypertonicity increased p38, ERK1/2, and JNK MAPK activity. Inhibiting MAPK activity abolished hypertonicity-induced accumulation of AQP2 at the cell surface but did not affect either vasopressin-dependent AQP2 trafficking or hypertonicity-induced AQP2 accumulation in the TGN. Finally, increased AQP2 cell surface expression induced by hypertonicity largely resulted from a reduction in endocytosis but not from an increase in exocytosis. These data indicate that acute hypertonicity profoundly alters AQP2 trafficking and that hypertonicity-induced AQP2 accumulation at the cell surface depends on MAP kinase activity. This may have important implications on adaptational processes governing transcellular water flux and/or cell survival under extreme conditions of hypertonicity. PMID:18664568

  18. Pre-Exercise Ingestion of Pickle Juice, Hypertonic Saline, or Water and Aerobic Performance and Thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Peikert, Jarett; Miller, Kevin C.; Albrecht, Jay; Tucker, Jared; Deal, James

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ingesting high-sodium drinks pre-exercise can improve thermoregulation and performance. Athletic trainers (19%) give athletes pickle juice (PJ) prophylactically for cramping. No data exist on whether this practice affects aerobic performance or thermoregulation. Objective: To determine if drinking 2 mL/kg body mass of PJ, hypertonic saline, or deionized water (DIW) pre-exercise affects aerobic performance or thermoregulation. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Controlled laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: Nine euhydrated men (age = 22 ± 3 years, height = 184.0 ± 8.2 cm, mass = 82.6 ± 16.0 kg) completed testing. Intervention(s): Participants rested for 65 minutes. During this period, they ingested 2 mL/kg of PJ, hypertonic saline, or DIW. Next, they drank 5 mL/kg of DIW. Blood was collected before and after ingestion of all fluids. Participants were weighed and ran in the heat (temperature = 38.3°C ± 1°C, relative humidity = 21.1% ± 4.7%) at increasing increments of maximal heart rate (50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 95%) until exhaustion or until rectal temperature exceeded 39.5°C. Participants were weighed postexercise so we could calculate sweat volume. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time to exhaustion, rectal temperature, changes in plasma volume, and sweat volume. Results: Time to exhaustion did not differ among drinks (PJ = 77.4 ± 5.9 minutes, hypertonic saline = 77.4 ± 4.0 minutes, DIW = 75.7 ± 3.2 minutes; F2,16 = 1.1, P = .40). Core temperature of participants was similar among drinks (PJ = 38.7°C ± 0.3°C, hypertonic saline = 38.7°C ± 0.4°C, DIW = 38.8°C ± 0.4°C; P = .74) but increased from pre-exercise (36.7°C ± 0.2°C) to postexercise (38.7°C ± 0.4°C) (P < .05). No differences were observed for changes in plasma volume or sweat volume among drinks (P > .05). Conclusions: Ingesting small amounts of PJ or hypertonic saline with water did not affect performance or select thermoregulatory measures. Drinking larger volumes of

  19. Hypertonicity increases NO production to modulate the firing rate of magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M P; Ventura, R R; Varanda, W A

    2013-10-10

    Increases in plasma osmolality enhance nitric oxide (NO) levels in magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and modulate the secretion of both vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT). In this paper, we describe the effects of hypertonicity on the electrical properties of MNCs by focusing on the nitrergic modulation of their activity in this condition. Membrane potentials were measured using the patch clamp technique, in the presence of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission blockers, in coronal brain slices of male Wistar rats. The recordings were first made under a control condition (295 mosm/kg H2O), then in the presence of a hypertonic stimulus (330 mosm/kg H2O) and, finally, with a hypertonic stimulus plus 500 μM L-Arginine or 100 μM N-nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME). Hypertonicity per se increased the firing frequency of the neurons. L-Arginine prevented the increase in fire frequency induced by hypertonic stimulus, and L-NAME (inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) induced an additional increase in frequency when applied together with the hypertonic solution. Moreover, L-Arginine hyperpolarizes the resting potential and decreases the peak value of the after-hyperpolarization; both effects were blocked by L-NAME and hypertonicity and/or L-NAME reduced the time constant of the rising phase of the after-depolarization. These results demonstrate that an intrinsic nitrergic system is part of the mechanisms controlling the excitability of MNCs of the SON when the internal fluid homeostasis is disturbed. PMID:23850590

  20. Streamlining of prehospital stroke management: the golden hour.

    PubMed

    Fassbender, Klaus; Balucani, Clotilde; Walter, Silke; Levine, Steven R; Haass, Anton; Grotta, James

    2013-06-01

    Thrombolysis with alteplase administered within a narrow therapeutic window provides an effective therapy for acute ischaemic stroke. However, mainly because of prehospital delay, patients often arrive too late for treatment, and no more than 1-8% of patients with stroke obtain this treatment. We recommend that all links in the prehospital stroke rescue chain must be optimised so that in the future more than a small minority of patients can profit from time-sensitive acute stroke therapy. Measures for improvement include continuous public awareness campaigns, education of emergency medical service personnel, the use of standardised, validated scales for recognition of stroke symptoms and for triaging to the appropriate institution, and advance notification to the receiving hospital. In the future, use of telemedicine technologies for interaction between the emergency site and hospital, and the strategy of treatment directly at the emergency site (mobile stroke unit concept), could contribute to more efficient use of resources and reduce the time taken to instigate treatment to within 60 min--the golden hour--of the onset of the symptoms of stroke. PMID:23684084

  1. A preliminary comparison of levalbuterol and albuterol in prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Monica; Wise, Suzanne; Rodenberg, Howard

    2004-04-01

    Nebulized levalbuterol has been documented as more efficacious than albuterol in enhancing airflow in Emergency Department (ED) patients with bronchospasm. This work attempts to determine if nebulized levalbuterol yields similar improvements in peak flow measurements as those produced by albuterol in the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arena. All adult EMS patients given a nebulized beta-agonist from January to June 2000 were included in this prospective, before-and-after, open-label study. Data collected included demographics, initial peak expiratory flow (PF), and use of home inhaled or nebulized bronchodilators before EMS arrival (PRE-TX). Outcome variable was the change in PF after a single EMS treatment with one of the study agents. Statistical analysis was performed using t-test and chi-square techniques; p was defined as 0.05. There were 298 patients enrolled; complete data for analysis were available for 196. Mean age was 68.0 years; 44.4% were male. Overall, albuterol produced a PF change of 19.7%; levalbuterol yielded a change of 20.4% (p = 0.9). In contrast to ED data, levalbuterol and albuterol produces similar changes in PF in the prehospital setting. Explanations for this finding may be linked to the pharmacokinetics of single vs. dual isomer preparations, and to the time frames of EMS care. Further efforts correlating EMS and ED data may better define the use of levalbuterol in prehospital care. PMID:15028323

  2. Prehospital tidal volume influences hospital tidal volume: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stoltze, Andrew J.; Wong, Terrence S.; Harland, Karisa K.; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Fuller, Brian M.; Mohr, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe current practice of ventilation in a modern air medical system, and to measure the association of ventilation strategy with subsequent ventilator care and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Materials and Methods Retrospective observational cohort study of intubated adult patients (n=235) transported by a university-affiliated air medical transport service to a 711-bed tertiary academic center between July 2011 and May 2013. Low tidal volume ventilation was defined as tidal volumes ≤ 8 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW). Multivariable regression was used to measure the association between prehospital tidal volume, hospital ventilation strategy, and ARDS. Results Most patients (57%) were ventilated solely with bag-valve ventilation during transport. Mean tidal volume of mechanically ventilated patients was 8.6 mL/kg PBW (SD 0.2 mL/kg). Low tidal volume ventilation was used in 13% of patients. Patients receiving low tidal volume ventilation during air medical transport were more likely to receive low tidal volume ventilation in the emergency department (p < 0.001) and intensive care unit (p = 0.015). ARDS was not associated with pre-hospital tidal volume (p = 0.840). Conclusions Low tidal volume ventilation was rare during air medical transport. Air transport ventilation strategy influenced subsequent ventilation, but was not associated with ARDS. PMID:25813548

  3. Prehospital thrombolysis perfomed by a ship's nurse with on-line physician consultation.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Olli; Mäkijärvi, Markku; Silfvast, Tom

    2005-02-01

    Prehospital thrombolysis for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been shown to improve recovery from myocardial function. We describe prehospital thrombolytic treatment in two patients suffering from STEMI complicated by ventricular fibrillation (VF) on a passenger ship. The importance of a functioning Emergency Medical Service (EMS) system providing guidance for paramedical personnel is discussed briefly. Both our patients survived and returned back to normal life. It is concluded that EMS physician guided prehospital thrombolytic treatment may offer an important therapeutic option for nurses or paramedics in locations out of reach of ordinary EMS services. PMID:15680535

  4. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest--from current concepts to a future standard.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  5. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    PubMed Central

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  6. Inhibition of neutrophils by hypertonic saline involves pannexin-1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Woehrle, Tobias; Sumi, Yuka; Ledderose, Stephan; Li, Xiaoou; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation has been studied as a possible strategy to reduce PMN activation and tissue damage in trauma patients. HS blocks PMNs by ATP release and stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors. Here we studied the underlying mechanisms in search of possible reasons for the inconsistent results of recent clinical trials with HS resuscitation. Purified human PMNs or PMNs in whole blood were treated with HS to simulate hypertonicity levels found after HS resuscitation (40 mM beyond isotonic levels). ATP release was measured with a luciferase assay. PMN activation was assessed by measuring oxidative burst. The pannexin-1 (panx1) inhibitor 10panx1 and the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) blocked ATP release from PMNs in purified and whole blood preparations, indicating that HS releases ATP via panx1 and gap junction channels. HS blocked fMLP-induced PMN activation by 40% in purified PMN preparations and by 60% in whole blood. These inhibitory effects were abolished by 10panx1 but only partially reduced by CBX, which indicates that panx1 has a central role in the immunomodulatory effects of HS. Inhibition of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 abolished the suppressive effect of HS on purified PMN cultures but only partially reduced the effect of HS in whole blood. These findings suggest redundant mechanisms in whole blood that may strengthen the immunomodulatory effect of HS in vivo. We conclude that HS resuscitation exerts anti-inflammatory effects that involve panx1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases, which produce the adenosine that blocks PMNs by stimulating their A2a receptors. Our findings shed new light on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of HS and suggest possible new strategies to improve the clinical efficacy of hypertonic resuscitation. PMID:26009814

  7. Hypertonicity compromises renal mineralocorticoid receptor signaling through Tis11b-mediated post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Viengchareun, Say; Lema, Ingrid; Lamribet, Khadija; Keo, Vixra; Blanchard, Anne; Cherradi, Nadia; Lombès, Marc

    2014-10-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates the Na(+)-retaining action of aldosterone. MR is highly expressed in the distal nephron, which is submitted to intense variations in extracellular fluid tonicity generated by the corticopapillary gradient. We previously showed that post-transcriptional events control renal MR abundance. Here, we report that hypertonicity increases expression of the mRNA-destabilizing protein Tis11b, a member of the tristetraprolin/ZFP36 family, and thereby, decreases MR expression in renal KC3AC1 cells. The 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) of human and mouse MR mRNA, containing several highly conserved adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs), were cloned downstream of a reporter gene. Luciferase activities of full-length or truncated MR Luc-3'-UTR mutants decreased drastically when cotransfected with Tis11b plasmid, correlating with an approximately 50% shorter half-life of ARE-containing transcripts. Using site-directed mutagenesis and RNA immunoprecipitation, we identified a crucial ARE motif within the MR 3'-UTR, to which Tis11b must bind for destabilizing activity. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that endogenous Tis11b physically interacts with MR mRNA in KC3AC1 cells, and Tis11b knockdown prevented hypertonicity-elicited repression of MR. Moreover, hypertonicity blunted aldosterone-stimulated expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine-zipper protein and the α-subunit of the epithelial Na(+) channel, supporting impaired MR signaling. Challenging the renal osmotic gradient by submitting mice to water deprivation, diuretic administration, or high-Na(+) diet increased renal Tis11b and decreased MR expression, particularly in the cortex, thus establishing a mechanistic pathway for osmotic regulation of MR expression in vivo. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which renal MR expression is regulated through mRNA turnover, a post-transcriptional control that seems physiologically relevant. PMID:24700863

  8. Hypertonicity Compromises Renal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Signaling through Tis11b-Mediated Post-Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Viengchareun, Say; Lema, Ingrid; Lamribet, Khadija; Keo, Vixra; Blanchard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates the Na+-retaining action of aldosterone. MR is highly expressed in the distal nephron, which is submitted to intense variations in extracellular fluid tonicity generated by the corticopapillary gradient. We previously showed that post-transcriptional events control renal MR abundance. Here, we report that hypertonicity increases expression of the mRNA-destabilizing protein Tis11b, a member of the tristetraprolin/ZFP36 family, and thereby, decreases MR expression in renal KC3AC1 cells. The 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs) of human and mouse MR mRNA, containing several highly conserved adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs), were cloned downstream of a reporter gene. Luciferase activities of full-length or truncated MR Luc-3′-UTR mutants decreased drastically when cotransfected with Tis11b plasmid, correlating with an approximately 50% shorter half-life of ARE-containing transcripts. Using site-directed mutagenesis and RNA immunoprecipitation, we identified a crucial ARE motif within the MR 3′-UTR, to which Tis11b must bind for destabilizing activity. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that endogenous Tis11b physically interacts with MR mRNA in KC3AC1 cells, and Tis11b knockdown prevented hypertonicity-elicited repression of MR. Moreover, hypertonicity blunted aldosterone-stimulated expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine-zipper protein and the α-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel, supporting impaired MR signaling. Challenging the renal osmotic gradient by submitting mice to water deprivation, diuretic administration, or high-Na+ diet increased renal Tis11b and decreased MR expression, particularly in the cortex, thus establishing a mechanistic pathway for osmotic regulation of MR expression in vivo. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which renal MR expression is regulated through mRNA turnover, a post-transcriptional control that seems physiologically relevant. PMID:24700863

  9. From agonal to output: An ECG history of a successful pre-hospital thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Deakin, Charles D

    2007-12-01

    This case report describes the first reported successful UK pre-hospital thoracotomy performed outside the London HEMS system. Continuous ECG monitoring during the procedure has allowed presentation of sequential ECGs recorded during the procedure. PMID:17697740

  10. A Computerized Evaluation Methodology for Pre-Hospital EMS Cardiac Care

    PubMed Central

    Nagurney, Frank K.

    1980-01-01

    The computerized application of cardiac care protocols for pre-hospital EMS care is presented. The program logic is reviewed and an example of its application is provided. Uses of the results of the program in EMS management are suggested.

  11. Prehospitalization Preparation for Institutionalized People with Mental Retardation: A Nursing Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Diane M.

    1986-01-01

    A program developed by the nursing department at Fernald State School (Massachusetts) prepares nurses to develop prehospital admission teaching programs for mentally retarded persons. Two case studies indicate that the program's emphasis on an interdisciplinary team approach is successful. (CB)

  12. Standard operating procedure changed pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour: a quality control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The ability of standard operating procedures to improve pre-hospital critical care by changing pre-hospital physician behaviour is uncertain. We report data from a prospective quality control study of the effect on pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour of implementing a standard operating procedure for pre-hospital controlled ventilation. Materials and methods Anaesthesiologists from eight pre-hospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region prospectively registered pre-hospital advanced airway-management data according to the Utstein-style template. We collected pre-intervention data from February 1st 2011 to January 31st 2012, implemented the standard operating procedure on February 1st 2012 and collected post intervention data from February 1st 2012 until October 31st 2012. We included transported patients of all ages in need of controlled ventilation treated with pre-hospital endotracheal intubation or the insertion of a supraglottic airways device. The objective was to evaluate whether the development and implementation of a standard operating procedure for controlled ventilation during transport could change pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour and thereby increase the use of automated ventilators in these patients. Results The implementation of a standard operating procedure increased the overall prevalence of automated ventilator use in transported patients in need of controlled ventilation from 0.40 (0.34-0.47) to 0.74 (0.69-0.80) with a prevalence ratio of 1.85 (1.57-2.19) (p = 0.00). The prevalence of automated ventilator use in transported traumatic brain injury patients in need of controlled ventilation increased from 0.44 (0.26-0.62) to 0.85 (0.62-0.97) with a prevalence ratio of 1.94 (1.26-3.0) (p = 0.0039). The prevalence of automated ventilator use in patients transported after return of spontaneous circulation following pre-hospital cardiac arrest increased from 0.39 (0

  13. The prehospital phase of acute myocardial infarction in the era of thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S B; Borsch, M A

    1990-06-15

    To evaluate the factors affecting the time between symptom onset and hospital arrival in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), we gave a detailed questionnaire to all who were admitted or transferred with AMI from January 1988 to February 1989. In these 126 patients (94 men, 32 women) the mean prehospital time was 5.9 +/- 11.0 hours (median 2.0, range 0.4 to 69.0). The time between symptom onset and reaching a decision that medical care should be sought was 62% of the mean prehospital time. In 100 (79%) patients, the prehospital time was less than or equal to 6 hours; of these, 61 (61%) were retrospectively judged to have been optimal candidates for lytic therapy. Stepwise multiple regression selected the following 4 variables as independent predictors of prehospital time: slow symptom progression; low income; female gender; and advanced age. All of these variables are predictive (p less than 0.03) of increased prehospital time; absence of prior AMI was of borderline additional significance (p = 0.053). Similarly, logistic regression analysis selected slow symptom progression, female gender and low income as significant (p less than or equal to 0.02) independent predictors of prehospital time greater than 6 hours. The logistic regression model incorporating these 3 variables had a sensitivity of 54%, a specificity of 95% and a positive predictive value of 72% in identifying patients with prehospital time greater than 6 hours. Thus, these data indicate it is possible to characterize patients likely to experience undue prehospital delay during AMI, which may be of importance to future public education efforts. PMID:2353644

  14. The Swiss bus accident on 13 March 2012: lessons for pre-hospital care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The recent bus crash in Switzerland involving many children provides several lessons for the pre-hospital care community. The use of multiple helicopters that are capable of flying at night and that carry advanced medical pre-hospital teams undoubtedly saved lives following the tragedy. We describe the medical response to the incident and the lessons that can be learned for emergency medical services. PMID:22784360

  15. Serotonin, glutamate and glycerol are released after the injection of hypertonic saline into human masseter muscles – a microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic myalgia is associated with higher muscle levels of certain algesic biomarkers. The aim of this study was to investigate if hypertonic saline-induced jaw myalgia also leads to release of such biomarkers and if there were any sex differences in this respect. Methods Healthy participants, 15 men and 15 aged-matched women (25.7 ± 4.3 years) participated. Intramuscular microdialysis into masseter muscles was performed to sample serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, glucose and glycerol. After 2 hours 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (58.5 mg/mL) was injected into the masseter on one side and 0.2 mL isotonic saline (9 mg/mL) into the contralateral masseter close to the microdialysis catheter. Microdialysis continued for 1 hour after the injections. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pain were assessed before and after injections. Results The median (IQR) peak pain intensity (0–100 visual analogue scale) after hypertonic saline was 52.5 (38.0) and after isotonic saline 7.5 (24.0) (p < 0.05). 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after hypertonic saline injection (p < 0.05). Lactate, pyruvate and glucose showed no change. PPT after microdialysis was reduced on both sides (p < 0.05) but without side differences. Pain after hypertonic saline injection correlated positively to 5-HT (p < 0.05) and negatively to glycerol (p < 0.05). Conclusions 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after a painful hypertonic saline injection into the masseter muscle, but without sex differences. Since increased levels of 5-HT and glutamate have been reported in chronic myalgia, this strengthens the validity of the pain model. Glycerol warrants further investigations. PMID:25519464

  16. Can empirical hypertonic saline or sodium bicarbonate treatment prevent the development of cardiotoxicity during serious amitriptyline poisoning? Experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Sukru Paksu, Muhammet; Zengin, Halit; Uzun, Adem; Ilkaya, Fatih; Guzel, Hasan; Paksu, Sule; Ucar, Durmus; Alacam, Hasan; Duran, Latif; Murat, Naci; Guzel, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The aim of this experimental study was to investigate whether hypertonic saline or sodium bicarbonate administration prevented the development of cardiotoxicity in rats that received toxic doses of amitriptyline. Method Thirty-six Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The animals were divided into six groups. Group 1 received toxic doses of i.p. amitriptyline. Groups 2 and 3 toxic doses of i.p. amitriptyline, plus i.v. sodium bicarbonate and i.v. hypertonic saline, respectively. Group 4 received only i.v. sodium bicarbonate, group 5 received only i.v. hypertonic saline, and group 6 was the control. Electrocardiography was recorded in all rats for a maximum of 60 minutes. Blood samples were obtained to measure the serum levels of sodium and ionised calcium. Results The survival time was shorter in group 1. In this group, the animals’ heart rates also decreased over time, and their QRS and QTc intervals were significantly prolonged. Groups 2 and 3 showed less severe changes in their ECGs and the rats survived for a longer period. The effects of sodium bicarbonate or hypertonic saline treatments on reducing the development of cardiotoxicity were similar. The serum sodium levels decreased in all the amitriptyline-applied groups. Reduction of serum sodium level was most pronounced in group 1. Conclusion Empirical treatment with sodium bicarbonate or hypertonic saline can reduce the development of cardiotoxicity during amitriptyline intoxication. As hypertonic saline has no adverse effects on drug elimination, it should be considered as an alternative to sodium bicarbonate therapy. PMID:25939777

  17. Hypertonic conditions trigger transient plasmolysis, growth arrest and blockage of transporter endocytosis in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bitsikas, Vassilis; Karachaliou, Mayia; Gournas, Christos; Diallinas, George

    2011-01-01

    By using Aspergillus nidulans strains expressing functional GFP-tagged transporters under hypertonic conditions, we noticed the rapid appearance of cortical, relatively static, fluorescent patches (0.5-2.3 μm). These patches do not correspond to transporter microdomains as they co-localize with other plasma membrane-associated molecules, such as the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and the SsoA t-Snare, or the lipophilic markers FM4-64 and filipin. In addition, they do not show characteristics of lipid rafts, MCCs or other membrane microdomains. Deconvoluted microscopic images showed that fluorescent patches correspond to plasma membrane invaginations. Transporters remain fully active during this phenomenon of localized plasmolysis. Plasmolysis was however associated with reduced growth rate and a dramatic blockage in transporter and FM4-64 endocytosis. These phenomena are transient and rapidly reversible upon wash-out of hypertonic media. Based on the observation that block in endocytosis by hypertonic treatment altered dramatically the cellular localization of tropomyosin (GFP-TpmA), although it did not affect the cortical appearance of upstream (SlaB-GFP) or downstream (AbpA-mRFP) endocytic components, we conclude that hypertonicity modifies actin dynamics and thus acts indirectly on endocytosis. This was further supported by the effect of latrunculin B, an actin depolymerization agent, on endocytosis. We show that the phenomena observed in A. nidulans also occur in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that they constitute basic homeostatic responses of ascomycetes to hypertonic shock. Finally, our work shows that hypertonic treatments can be used as physiological tools to study the endocytic down-regulation of transporters in A. nidulans, as non-conditional genetic blocks affecting endocytic internalization are lethal or severely debilitating. PMID:20919858

  18. Identification of adults with sepsis in the prehospital environment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Early identification of sepsis could enable prompt delivery of key interventions such as fluid resuscitation and antibiotic administration which, in turn, may lead to improved patient outcomes. Limited data indicate that recognition of sepsis by paramedics is often poor. We systematically reviewed the literature on prehospital sepsis screening tools to determine whether they improved sepsis recognition. Design Systematic review. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed were systematically searched up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. Setting Prehospital/emergency medical services (EMS). Study selection All studies addressing identification of sepsis (including severe sepsis and septic shock) among adult patients managed by EMS. Outcome measures Recognition of sepsis by EMS clinicians. Results Owing to considerable variation in the methodological approach adopted and outcome measures reported, a narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Three studies addressed development of prehospital sepsis screening tools. Six studies addressed paramedic diagnosis of sepsis with or without use of a prehospital sepsis screening tool. Conclusions Recognition of sepsis by ambulance clinicians is poor. The use of screening tools, based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign diagnostic criteria, improves prehospital sepsis recognition. Screening tools derived from EMS data have been developed, but they have not yet been validated in clinical practice. There is a need to undertake validation studies to determine whether prehospital sepsis screening tools confer any clinical benefit. PMID:27496231

  19. Migrants' and professionals' views on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, Diana; Hannig, Christian; Schmidt, Silke

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to explore the views of migrants and professionals on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care in order to adapt such care to migrants' needs. Interviews were conducted with 41 migrants who had received direct (as a patient) or indirect (as a significant other) pre-hospital emergency care. Furthermore, 20 professionals in the field of pre-hospital emergency care were interviewed. The content analysis showed five distinguishable categories based on the statements by the migrants and six categories based on the statements by the professionals. While migrants gave priority to basic proficiencies of first responders such as 'social/emotional competencies' and 'communication skills', the professionals considered '(basic) cultural knowledge', 'awareness' and 'attitude' the most important. Furthermore, migrants provided practical indications, e.g. regarding areas of cultural knowledge, whereas professionals seemed to view the issue of culturally pre-hospital emergency care from a more theoretical perspective. The issues of the culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care itself, as well as the varying points of view of the two groups interviewed, resulted in eight recommendations for culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care. PMID:26123882

  20. INHALED HYPERTONIC SALINE IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN LESS THAN SIX YEARS OF AGE WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS: THE ISIS RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ratjen, Felix; Brumback, Lyndia; Daniel, Stephen; Rowbotham, Ron; McNamara, Sharon; Johnson, Robin; Kronmal, Richard; Davis, Stephanie D

    2013-01-01

    Context Inhaled hypertonic saline is recommended as therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients 6 years of age and older, but its efficacy has never been evaluated in CF patients <6 years of age. Objective To determine if hypertonic saline reduces the rate of protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients <6 years of age. Design and Setting A multicenter, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted from April 2009 to October 2011 at 30 CF care centers in the United States and Canada. Participants Participants had an established diagnosis of CF and were 4 to 60 months of age. A total of 344 patients were assessed for eligibility; 321 participants were randomized; 29 (9%) withdrew prematurely. Intervention The active group (n=158) received 7% hypertonic saline and the control group (n=163) received 0.9% isotonic saline nebulized twice daily for 48 weeks. Both groups received albuterol or levalbuterol prior to each study drug dose. Main Outcome Measures the rate of protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbations during the 48 week treatment period treated with oral, inhaled or intravenous antibiotics. Results The mean pulmonary exacerbation rate (events/person-year) was 2.3 (95% CI, 2.0, 2.5) in the hypertonic saline group and 2.3 (95% CI, 2.1, 2.6) in the isotonic saline group; the rate ratio was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.84, 1.14)). Among participants with pulmonary exacerbations, the mean number of total antibiotic treatment days for a pulmonary exacerbation was 60 (95% CI 49, 70) in the hypertonic saline group and 52 (95% CI 43, 61) in the isotonic saline group. There was no significant difference in secondary endpoints including height, weight, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, cough or respiratory symptom scores. Infant pulmonary function testing performed as an exploratory outcome in a subgroup (N=73, with acceptable measurements at 2 visits in 45) did not demonstrate significant differences between groups except for the mean change in forced

  1. Use of the Airtraq® device for airway management in the prehospital setting – a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Difficulties with prehospital intubations have encouraged the development of indirect laryngoscopy techniques, facilitating laryngeal visualization. Airtraq® is a relatively new single-use indirect laryngoscope. The Airtraq® has been evaluated in several prehospital mannequin intubation trials. However, prehospital clinical experience with the device is limited. Methods A retrospective medical chart review was performed for patients who underwent prehospital endotracheal intubation in the Stockholm County between January 2008 and December 2012. Both anaesthesiologists and nurse anaesthetists performed prehospital intubations during the study period. All Airtraq® intubations during this period were included in the analysis. The objective was to estimate the success rate of Airtraq® used in a prehospital setting. Results During the 5-year period (January 2008- December 2012), 2453 tracheal intubations were performed. Airtraq® was used in 28 cases (1%). The overall Airtraq® intubation success rate was 68%. Among patients with anticipated or unexpected difficult airway (23/28) the Airtraq® success rate was 61% (14/23). Among patients who underwent drug facilitated or rapid-sequence intubation protocols 4/5 (80%) were successfully intubated with Airtraq®. Conclusion In conclusion, this retrospective study showed a higher Airtraq® success rate than previous prospective prehospital trials. However, compared to other prehospital direct and indirect intubation methods the Airtraq success rate is low. Further clinical trials are necessary to evaluate the role of Airtraq® in the prehospital airway management. PMID:24484856

  2. Endocytic response of type I alveolar epithelial cells to hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohua; Singh, Raman Deep; Godin, Lindsay; Pagano, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    We present plasma membrane (PM) internalization responses of type I alveolar epithelial cells to a 50 mosmol/l increase in tonicity. Our research is motivated by interest in ATI repair, for which endocytic retrieval of PM appears to be critical. We validated pharmacological and molecular tools to dissect the endocytic machinery of these cells and used these tools to test the hypothesis that osmotic stress triggers a pathway-specific internalization of PM domains. Validation experiments confirmed the fluorescent analogs of lactosyl-ceramide, transferrin, and dextran as pathway-specific cargo of caveolar, clathrin, and fluid-phase uptake, respectively. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that hypertonic exposure causes a downregulation of clathrin and fluid-phase endocytosis while stimulating caveolar endocytosis. The tonicity-mediated increase in caveolar endocytosis was associated with the translocation of caveolin-1 from the PM and was absent in cells that had been transfected with dominant-negative dynamin constructs. In separate experiments we show that hypertonic exposure increases the probability of PM wound repair following micropuncture from 82 ± 4 to 94 ± 2% (P < 0.01) and that this effect depends on Src pathway activation-mediated caveolar endocytosis. The therapeutic and biological implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:21257731

  3. [Bioregulating therapy and life quality in aged patients with hypertonic angioretinopathy].

    PubMed

    Trofimova, S V; Atakhanova, L E; Akhmedova, E P

    2008-01-01

    The researches data of influence of vascular impair of a retina in aged patients with arterial hypertension (AH) on their life quality (LQ) are given in the article. The questionnaires "The Scale of an estimation of life quality", SF-36 and VF-16 in authors updating were used. Ultrasonic dopplerography of retina vessels in patients with hypertonic angioretinopathy showed the authentic decrease of maximal systolic speeds of a blood-groove of an orbital artery, increase in its index of resistance and decrease of ophthalmic-retinal factor in comparison with normal parameters in the given age group. The studying of the comparative analysis of change of LQ and visual functions of aged patients with hypertonic angioretinopathy under adding to complex hypotensive therapies the Cortexin (the basic group, 28 people) and Actovegin (control group, 30 people) was held. As a result of treatment disappearance or reduction of visual discomfort and improvement of the emotional condition of 61% of patients of the basic group and 36% of patients of control group were marked. Improvement of LQ and subjective quality of eyesight correlated with improvement of visual functions. Thus, the researches enable to include people of elderly and senile age with AH into group of risk with probable decrease in visual functions; inclusion the neuro-protector cortexin in complex treatment of elderly and senile patients with AH and changes in eye-bottom considerably raises and stabilizes LQ and quality of eyesight of these patients. PMID:19432215

  4. Symptomatic Abdominal Simple Cysts: Is Percutaneous Sclerotherapy with Hypertonic Saline and Bleomycin a Treatment Option?

    PubMed Central

    Souftas, V. D.; Kosmidou, M.; Karanikas, M.; Souftas, D.; Menexes, G.; Prassopoulos, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous sclerotherapy of symptomatic simple abdominal cysts, using hypertonic saline and bleomycin, as an alternative to surgery. Materials and Methods. This study involved fourteen consecutive patients (ten women, four men, mean age: 59.2 y) with nineteen symptomatic simple cysts (liver n = 14, kidney n = 3, and adrenal n = 2) treated percutaneously using a modified method. Initially CT-guided drainage was performed; the next day the integrity of the cyst/exclusion of extravasation or communications was evaluated under fluoroscopy, followed by two injections/reabsorptions of the same quantity of hypertonic NaCl 15% solution and three-time repetition of the same procedure with the addition of bleomycin. The catheter was then removed; the patients were hospitalized for 12 hours and underwent follow-ups on 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th months. Cyst's volumes and the reduction rate (%) were calculated in each evaluation. Results. No pain or complications were noted. A significant cyst's volume reduction was documented over time (P < 0.001). On the 12th month 17 cysts disappeared and two displayed a 98.7% and 68.9% reduction, respectively. Conclusion. This percutaneous approach constitutes a very promising nonsurgical alternative for patients with symptomatic simple cyst, without complications under proper precautions, leading to eliminating the majority of cysts. PMID:25878660

  5. Neurohypophyseal response to fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline during septic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Michael Brian; Vieira, Alexandre Antonio; Elias, Lucila L K; Rodrigues, José Antunes; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2013-02-01

    Septic shock is a serious condition with a consequent drop in blood pressure and inadequate tissue perfusion. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline (HS) has been proposed to restore physiological haemodynamics during haemorrhagic and endotoxic shock. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects produced by an HS infusion in rats subjected to caecal ligation and perforation (CLP). Male Wistar rats were randomly grouped and submitted to either CLP or sham surgery. Either HS (7.5% NaCl, 4 ml kg(-1) i.v.) or isotonic saline (IS; 0.9% NaCl, 4 ml kg(-1) i.v.) was administered 6 h after CLP. Recordings of mean arterial pressure and heart rate were made during this protocol. Moreover, measurements of electrolyte, vasopressin and oxytocin secretion were analysed after either the HS or the IS treatment. Six hours after CLP, we observed a characteristic decrease in mean arterial pressure that occurs after CLP. The HS infusion in these rats produced a transient elevation of the plasma sodium concentration and osmolality and increased plasma vasopressin and oxytocin levels. Moreover, the HS infusion could restore the mean arterial pressure after CLP, which was completely blunted by the previous injection of the vasopressin but not the oxytocin antagonist. The present study demonstrated that rats subjected to CLP and an infusion of hypertonic saline respond with secretion of neurohypophyseal hormones and a transient increase in blood pressure mediated by the V(1) receptor. PMID:22903979

  6. National Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines Strategy: A Summary for EMS Stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Gaither, Joshua B; Bigham, Blair L; Myers, J Brent; Kupas, Douglas F; Spaite, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Multiple national organizations have recommended and supported a national investment to increase the scientific evidence available to guide patient care delivered by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and incorporate that evidence directly into EMS systems. Ongoing efforts seek to develop, implement, and evaluate prehospital evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) using the National Model Process created by a multidisciplinary panel of experts convened by the Federal Interagency Committee on EMS (FICEMS) and the National EMS Advisory Council (NEMSAC). Yet, these and other EBG efforts have occurred in relative isolation, with limited direct collaboration between national projects, and have experienced challenges in implementation of individual guidelines. There is a need to develop sustainable relationships among stakeholders that facilitate a common vision that facilitates EBG efforts. Herein, we summarize a National Strategy on EBGs developed by the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) with involvement of 57 stakeholder organizations, and with the financial support of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the EMS for Children program. The Strategy proposes seven action items that support collaborative efforts in advancing prehospital EBGs. The first proposed action is creation of a Prehospital Guidelines Consortium (PGC) representing national medical and EMS organizations that have an interest in prehospital EBGs and their benefits to patient outcomes. Other action items include promoting research that supports creation and evaluates the impact of EBGs, promoting the development of new EBGs through improved stakeholder collaboration, and improving education on evidence-based medicine for all prehospital providers. The Strategy intends to facilitate implementation of EBGs by improving guideline dissemination and incorporation into protocols, and seeks to establish standardized evaluation methods for prehospital EBGs. Finally, the Strategy

  7. Prehospital risk factors of mortality and impaired consciousness after severe traumatic brain injury: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health concern and a major burden for society. The period between trauma event and hospital admission in an emergency department (ED) could be a determinant for secondary brain injury and early survival. The aim was to investigate the relationship between prehospital factors associated with secondary brain injury (arterial hypotension, hypoxemia, hypothermia) and the outcomes of mortality and impaired consciousness of survivors at 14 days. Methods A multicenter, prospective cohort study was performed in dedicated trauma centres of Switzerland. Adults with severe TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale score of head region (HAIS) >3) were included. Main outcome measures were death and impaired consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤13) at 14 days. The associations between risk factors and outcome were assessed with univariate and multivariate regression models. Results 589 patients were included, median age was 55 years (IQR 33, 70). The median GCS in ED was 4 (IQR 3-14), with abnormal pupil reaction in 167 patients (29.2%). Median ISS was 25 (IQR 21, 34). Three hundred seven patients sustained their TBI from falls (52.1%) and 190 from a road traffic accidents (32.3%). Median time from Out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service (OHEMS) departure on scene to arrival in ED was 50 minutes (IQR 37-72); 451 patients had a direct admission (76.6%). Prehospital hypotension was observed in 24 (4.1%) patients, hypoxemia in 73 (12.6%) patients and hypothermia in 146 (24.8%). Prehospital hypotension and hypothermia (apart of age and trauma severity) was associated with mortality. Prehospital hypoxemia (apart of trauma severity) was associated with impaired consciousness; indirect admission was a protective factor. Conclusion Mortality and impaired consciousness at 14 days do not have the same prehospital risk factors; prehospital hypotension and hypothermia is associated with mortality, and prehospital hypoxemia with

  8. Hypertonicity sensing in organum vasculosum lamina terminalis neurons: a mechanical process involving TRPV1 but not TRPV4.

    PubMed

    Ciura, Sorana; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Bourque, Charles W

    2011-10-12

    Primary osmosensory neurons in the mouse organum vasculosum lamina terminalis (OVLT) transduce hypertonicity via the activation of nonselective cation channels that cause membrane depolarization and increased action potential discharge, and this effect is absent in mice lacking expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (Trpv1) gene (Ciura and Bourque, 2006). However other experiments have indicated that channels encoded by Trpv4 also contribute to central osmosensation in mice (Liedtke and Friedman, 2003; Mizuno et al., 2003). At present, the mechanism by which hypertonicity modulates cation channels in OVLT neurons is unknown, and it remains unclear whether Trpv1 and Trpv4 both contribute to this process. Here, we show that physical shrinking is necessary and sufficient to mediate hypertonicity sensing in OVLT neurons isolated from adult mice. Steps coupling progressive decreases in cell volume to increased neuronal activity were quantitatively equivalent whether shrinking was evoked by osmotic pressure or mechanical aspiration. Finally, modulation of OVLT neurons by tonicity or mechanical stimulation was unaffected by deletion of trpv4 but was abolished in cells lacking Trpv1 or wild-type neurons treated with the TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. Thus, hypertonicity sensing is a mechanical process requiring Trpv1, but not Trpv4. PMID:21994383

  9. AMPK potentiates hypertonicity-induced apoptosis by suppressing NFκB/COX-2 in medullary interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Qifei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xue, Rui; Yang, Hang; Zhou, Yunfeng; Kong, Xiaomu; Zhao, Pan; Li, Jing; Yang, Jichun; Zhu, Yi; Guan, Youfei

    2011-10-01

    Cells residing in the hypertonic, hypoxic renal medulla depend on dynamic adaptation mechanisms to respond to changes in energy supply and demand. The serine/threonine kinase 5'-AMP protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status, but whether it contributes to the survival of cells in the renal medulla is unknown. Here, hypertonic conditions induced a decrease in AMPK phosphorylation within 12 hours in renal medullary interstitial cells (RMIC), followed by a gradual return to baseline levels. Activation of AMPK markedly increased hypertonicity-induced apoptosis of RMICs and suppressed both hypertonicity-induced NFκB nuclear translocation and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activation; overexpression of COX-2 significantly attenuated these effects. AMPK activation also markedly reduced generation of reactive oxygen species and nuclear expression of tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein, which prevented upregulation of osmoprotective genes. In vivo, pharmacologic activation of AMPK led to massive apoptosis of RMICs and renal dysfunction in the setting of water deprivation in mice. Taken together, these results identify a critical role for AMPK in the maintenance of RMIC viability and suggest that AMPK modulates the NFκB-COX-2 survival pathway in the renal medulla. Furthermore, this study raises safety concerns for the development of AMPK activators as anti-diabetic drugs, especially for patients prone to dehydration. PMID:21903993

  10. Hypertonic enhancement of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals: Ca2+ independence and role of integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A. H.; Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperosmotic solutions cause markedly enhanced spontaneous quantal release of neurotransmitter from many nerve terminals. The mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. We have investigated this phenomenon at the frog neuromuscular junction with the aim of determining the degree to which it resembles the modulation of release by stretch, which has been shown to be mediated by mechanical tension on integrins.The hypertonicity enhancement, like the stretch effect, does not require Ca2+ influx or release from internal stores, although internal release may contribute to the effect. The hypertonicity effect is sharply reduced (but not eliminated) by peptides containing the RGD sequence, which compete with native ligands for integrin bonds.There is co-variance in the magnitude of the stretch and osmotic effects; that is, individual terminals exhibiting a large stretch effect also show strong enhancement by hypertonicity, and vice versa. The stretch and osmotic enhancements also can partially occlude each other.There remain some clear-cut differences between osmotic and stretch forms of modulation: the larger range of enhancement by hypertonic solutions, the relative lack of effect of osmolarity on evoked release, and the reported higher temperature sensitivity of osmotic enhancement. Nevertheless, our data strongly implicate integrins in a significant fraction of the osmotic enhancement, possibly acting via the same mechanism as stretch modulation.

  11. The membrane properties of the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig portal vein in isotonic and hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, H; Oshima, K; Sakamoto, Y

    1971-08-01

    The membrane properties of the longitudinal smooth muscle of the guinea-pig portal vein were investigated under various experimental conditions.1. In isotonic Krebs solution, the membrane potential (-48.7 mV), the maximum rates of rise and fall of the spike (4.6 and 2.3 V/sec respectively), the space constant (0.61 mm), the conduction velocity of excitation (0.97 cm/sec) and the time constant of the foot of the propagated spike (18.4 msec) were measured.2. The various parameters of the muscle membrane in the isotonic solution were compared with those in the hypertonic solution prepared by the addition of solid sucrose (twice the normal tonicity).3. When the muscles were perfused with hypertonic solution, marked depolarization of the membrane and increased membrane resistance occurred. These were probably due to reduction of the K permeability, increased internal resistance of the muscle and shrinkage of the muscle fibre.4. The membrane potential in isotonic and hypertonic solutions was analysed into two components, i.e. the metabolic (electrogenic Na-pump) and the ionic (electrical diffusion potential) component in the various environmental conditions.(a) In isotonic and hypertonic solutions, the membrane was depolarized by lowering the temperature or by removal of K ion from the solutions. When the tissues were rewarmed or on readdition of K ion, the membrane was markedly hyperpolarized. These hyperpolarizations of the membrane were suppressed by treatment with ouabain (10(-5) g/ml.), by warming to only 20 degrees C and by K-free solution.(b) The relationships between the membrane potential and the [K](o) in isotonic Krebs, in the hypertonic (sucrose) Krebs, in the Na-free (Tris) Krebs and in the Cl-deficient (C(6)H(5)SO(3)) Krebs were observed. The maximum slopes of the membrane depolarization against tenfold changes of [K](o) were much lower than that expected if it behaved like a K electrode.(c) In Na-free (Tris) solution, the membrane was not depolarized in

  12. Intracellular hypertonicity is responsible for water flux associated with Na+/glucose cotransport.

    PubMed

    Charron, François M; Blanchard, Maxime G; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2006-05-15

    Detection of a significant transmembrane water flux immediately after cotransporter stimulation is the experimental basis for the controversial hypothesis of secondary active water transport involving a proposed stoichiometry for the human Na(+)/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) of two Na(+), one glucose, and 264 water molecules. Volumetric measurements of Xenopus laevis oocytes coexpressing human SGLT1 and aquaporin can be used to detect osmotic gradients with high sensitivity. Adding 2 mM of the substrate alpha-methyl-glucose (alphaMG) created mild extracellular hypertonicity and generated a large cotransport current with minimal cell volume changes. After 20, 40, and 60 s of cotransport, the return to sugar-free, isotonic conditions was accompanied by measurable cell swelling averaging 0.051, 0.061, and 0.077 nl/s, respectively. These water fluxes are consistent with internal hypertonicities of 1.5, 1.7, and 2.2 mOsm for these cotransport periods. In the absence of aquaporin, the measured hypertonicites were 4.6, 5.0, and 5.3 mOsm for the same cotransport periods Cotransport-dependent water fluxes, previously assumed to be water cotransport, could be largely explained by hypertonicities of such amplitudes. Using intracellular Na(+) injection and Na(+)-selective electrode, the intracellular diffusion coefficient for Na(+) was estimated at 0.29 +/- 0.03 x 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1). Using the effect of intracellular alphaMG injection on the SGLT1-mediated outward current, the intracellular diffusion coefficient of alphaMG was estimated at 0.15 +/- 0.01 x 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1). Although these intracellular diffusion coefficients are much lower than in free aqueous solution, a diffusion model for a single solute in an oocyte would require a diffusion coefficient three times lower than estimated to explain the local osmolyte accumulation that was experimentally detected. This suggests that either the diffusion coefficients were overestimated, possibly due to the presence of

  13. Prehospital Nitroglycerin Safety in Inferior ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Laurie; Ross, Dave; Proulx, Marie-Hélène; Légaré, Sébastien; Vacon, Charlene; Xue, Xiaoqing; Segal, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), associated with right ventricular infarction, are thought to be at higher risk of developing hypotension when administered nitroglycerin (NTG). However, current basic life support (BLS) protocols do not differentiate location of STEMI prior to NTG administration. We sought to determine if NTG administration is more likely to be associated with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg) in inferior STEMI compared to non-inferior STEMI. We conducted a retrospective chart review of prehospital patients with chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and computer-interpreted prehospital ECGs indicating "ACUTE MI." We included all local STEMI cases identified as part of our STEMI registry. Univariate analysis was used to compare differences in proportions of hypotension and drop in systolic blood pressure ≥ 30 mmHg after nitroglycerin administration between patients with inferior wall STEMI and those with STEMI in another region (non-inferior). Multiple variable logistic regression analysis was also used to assess the study outcomes while controlling for various factors. Over a 29-month period, we identified 1,466 STEMI cases. Of those, 821 (56.0%) received NTG. We excluded 16 cases because of missing data. Hypotension occurred post NTG in 38/466 inferior STEMIs and 30/339 non-inferior STEMIs, 8.2% vs. 8.9%, p = 0.73. A drop in systolic blood pressure ≥ 30 mmHg post NTG occurred in 23.4% of inferior STEMIs and 23.9% of non-inferior STEMIs, p = 0.87. Interrater agreement for chart review of the primary outcome was excellent (κ = 0.94). NTG administration to patients with chest pain and inferior STEMI on their computer-interpreted electrocardiogram is not associated with a higher rate of hypotension compared to patients with STEMI in other territories. Computer interpretation of inferior STEMI cannot be used as the sole predictor for patients who may be at higher risk for hypotension following NTG

  14. Mapping the use of simulation in prehospital care – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High energy trauma is rare and, as a result, training of prehospital care providers often takes place during the real situation, with the patient as the object for the learning process. Such training could instead be carried out in the context of simulation, out of danger for both patients and personnel. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the development and foci of research on simulation in prehospital care practice. Methods An integrative literature review were used. Articles based on quantitative as well as qualitative research methods were included, resulting in a comprehensive overview of existing published research. For published articles to be included in the review, the focus of the article had to be prehospital care providers, in prehospital settings. Furthermore, included articles must target interventions that were carried out in a simulation context. Results The volume of published research is distributed between 1984- 2012 and across the regions North America, Europe, Oceania, Asia and Middle East. The simulation methods used were manikins, films, images or paper, live actors, animals and virtual reality. The staff categories focused upon were paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), medical doctors (MDs), nurse and fire fighters. The main topics of published research on simulation with prehospital care providers included: Intubation, Trauma care, Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), Ventilation and Triage. Conclusion Simulation were described as a positive training and education method for prehospital medical staff. It provides opportunities to train assessment, treatment and implementation of procedures and devices under realistic conditions. It is crucial that the staff are familiar with and trained on the identified topics, i.e., intubation, trauma care, CPR, ventilation and triage, which all, to a very large degree, constitute prehospital care. Simulation plays an integral role in this. The current state of

  15. Assessment of the Status of Prehospital Care in 13 Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Katie; Mock, Charles; Joshipura, Manjul; Rubiano, Andres M.; Zakariah, Ahmed; Rivara, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Injury and other medical emergencies are becoming increasingly common in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Many to most of the deaths from these conditions occur outside of hospitals, necessitating the development of prehospital care. Prehospital capabilities are inadequately developed to meet the growing needs for emergency care in most LMICs. In order to better plan for development of prehospital care globally, this study sought to better understand the current status of prehospital care in a wide range of LMICs. Methods A survey was conducted of emergency medical services (EMS) leaders and other key informants in 13 LMICs in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Questions addressed methods of transport to hospital, training and certification of EMS providers, organization and funding of EMS systems, public access to prehospital care, and barriers to EMS development. Results Prehospital care capabilities varied significantly, but in general, were less developed in low-income countries and in rural areas, where utilization of formal emergency medical services was often very low. Commercial drivers, volunteers, and other bystanders provided a large proportion of prehospital transport and occasionally also provide first aid in many locations. Although taxes and mandatory motor vehicle insurance provided supplemental funds to EMS in 85% of the countries, the most frequently cited barriers to further development of prehospital care was inadequate funding (36% of barriers cited). The next most commonly sited barriers were lack of leadership within the system (18%) and lack of legislation setting standards (18%). Conclusions Expansion of prehospital care to currently under- or un-served areas, especially in low-income countries and in rural areas, could make use of the already existing networks of first responders, such as commercial drivers and lay persons. Efforts to increase their effectiveness, such as more widespread first aid training, and better

  16. Prehospital triage and communication performance in small mass casualty incidents: a gauge for disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G A; Calkins, A

    1999-03-01

    Because of their infrequency, disasters are difficult to train for. Emergency prehospital personnel frequently participate in small mass casualty incidents (MCIs) (3 to 50 victims). This study sought to examine prehospital performance in small MCIs in areas that are frequently mismanaged in disasters. Prospective data from the resource physician and retrospective data from tape recorded prehospital conversations were collected for a 9-month period. Clinical patient data, patient demographics, emergency medical services squad characteristics, and triage information were recorded. Forty-five consecutive MCIs were studied. Most of these were motor vehicle accidents. Prehospital providers included paid providers, nonpaid providers, and air and ground transport. The mean number of victims first identified (4.6%) was greatly different than the mean number of victims eventually transported from a scene (7.1%). Most patients were treated at a level 1 trauma center. Frequent errors included having multiple communicators on site (38%), misidentifying the number of victims (56%), and having unclear information for the resource physician (43%). Only 38% of events had prehospital triage information that was deemed appropriate in total. These results show that scene and triage errors are frequent in MCIs of small scale. This information can be used to assay a system's readiness for disasters. PMID:10102314

  17. Hypertonic glucose pleurodesis and surgical diaphragmatic repair for tension hydrothorax complicating continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gui-Na; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-05-01

    We herein describe a case of tension hydrothorax that occurred on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), highlighting the problems of diagnosis and a novel management. A 38-year-old male with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to diabetes mellitus developed dyspnea and poor drainage after 13 months of CAPD. Chest X-ray revealed massive right-sided hydrothorax and mediastinal shift. He underwent emergency thoracentesis and pleural fluid showed a high level of glucose. Pleuroperitoneal communication was strongly suspected, although the methylene blue test was negative. We temporarily performed hemodialysis. Two weeks later, PD was resumed but failed with recurrent right-side hydrothorax in 4 months. The pleuroperitoneal leakage was definitively confirmed by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Diaphragmatic repair and pleurodesis with hypertonic glucose were performed. There was no recurrence of hydrothorax after treatment. PMID:26784913

  18. Ultramicroscopic and biochemical changes in ram spermatozoa cryopreserved with trehalose-based hypertonic extenders.

    PubMed

    Aisen, E; Quintana, M; Medina, V; Morello, H; Venturino, A

    2005-06-01

    The ability of a range of extenders to cryopreserve ram spermatozoa was tested. The extenders were modified by the inclusion of citrate, Tris buffer, trehalose, and EDTA. Ejaculates from three Pampinta rams were evaluated and pooled at 30 degrees C. The semen was diluted to contain 1 x 10(9) cells/mL, cooled to 5 degrees C, loaded into 0.25-mL straws, frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen. Evaluation was based on the hypoosmotic swelling test (HOS test), electron microscopy, and biochemical parameters such as lipid peroxidation and reduced and total glutathione levels, all measured after thawing. The HOS test indicated that the percentage of intact plasma membranes after freezing and thawing was significantly higher for the hypertonic extender containing trehalose (T), compared with an extender containing trehalose+EDTA (TE) or an isotonic Tris extender (B) (p < 0.05). Membrane evaluation by ultramicroscopy also indicated better sperm cryopreservation in extender T compared with the others, and there was a significant reduction in the number of damaged membranes (27%, p < 0.0002). The level of reduced glutathione was significantly higher after sperm cryopreservation in either hypertonic diluent (T and TE) with respect to the isotonic extender B, immediately after thawing (12%) and after a 3-h post-thawing thermotolerance test at 37 degrees C (17%, p = 0.007). Total glutathione levels did not show statistical differences among the extenders. After 3h post-thawing incubation at 37 degrees C, lipid peroxide levels in spermatozoa were statistically lower for T than TE (35%) or isotonic extender B (44%) (p = 0.002). Taken together these results indicate a reduction in the oxidative stress provoked by freezing and thawing when semen is cryopreserved in extender T. The antioxidant properties of extender T may be related to its effectiveness in membrane cryopreservation. PMID:15925576

  19. Hypertonic conditions enhance cartilage formation in scaffold-free primary chondrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Ylärinne, Janne H; Qu, Chengjuan; Lammi, Mikko J

    2014-11-01

    The potential of hypertonic conditions at in vivo levels to promote cartilage extracellular matrix accumulation in scaffold-free primary chondrocyte cultures was investigated. Six million bovine primary chondrocytes were cultured in transwell inserts in low glucose (LG), high glucose (HG), or hypertonic high glucose (HHG) DMEM supplemented with fetal bovine serum, antibiotics, and ascorbate under 5 % or 20 % O2 tension with and without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 for 6 weeks. Samples were collected for histological staining of proteoglycans (PGs) and type II collagen, analysis by quantitative reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of mRNA expression of aggrecan and procollagen α1 (II) and of Sox9 and procollagen α2 (I), and quantitation of PGs and PG separation in agarose gels. Cartilage tissues produced at 20 % O2 tension were larger than those formed at 5 % O2 tension. Compared with LG, the tissues grew to larger sizes in HG or HHG medium. Histological staining showed the strongest PG and type II collagen staining in cartilage generated in HG or HHG medium at 20 % O2 tension. Quantitative RT-PCR results indicated significantly higher expression of procollagen α1 (II) mRNA in cartilage generated in HHG medium at 20 % O2 tension compared with that in the other samples. TGF-β3 supplements in the culture medium provided no advantage for cartilage formation. Thus, HHG medium used at 20 % O2 tension is the most beneficial combination of the tested culture conditions for scaffold-free cartilage production in vitro and should improve cell culture for research into cartilage repair or tissue engineering. PMID:25107609

  20. The transport systems of Ventricaria ventricosa: hypotonic and hypertonic turgor regulation.

    PubMed

    Bisson, M A; Beilby, M J

    2002-11-01

    The time course of hypertonic and hypotonic turgor regulation was studied in Ventricaria (Valonia) using pressure probe and I/V(current-voltage) analysis. Of 11 cells, 9 exhibited hypertonic turgor regulation, ranging from 100% regulation in 150 min to 14% regulation (14% recovery of the decrease in turgor) in 314 min. Some cells began regulating immediately, others took up to 90 min to begin. The resting PD (potential difference) became more positive in most cells. The I/V characteristics became more nonlinear with high resistance between -150 and -20 mV and negative conductance region near -70 mV. Prolonged (16 sec) voltage clamps to negative levels (-100 to -150 mV) showed progressively more rapid current turn-off, but subsequent I/V characteristics were not affected. Clamping to +150 mV, however, abolished the high conductance between -50 and +100 mV to yield a uniform high resistance I/V characteristic, similar to that in high [K+]o. Decreasing illumination from 2.02 micromol sec(-1) m(-2) to 0.5 micromol sec(-1)1 m(-2) had a similar effect. Two out of a total of three cells exhibited hypotonic turgor regulation. Both cells started regulating within minutes and achieved near 50% regulation within 50 min. The PD became more negative. The I/V curves exhibited high resistance between +50 and +150 mV. The characteristics were similar to those in cells exposed to low [K+]o. Prolonged voltage clamps to both negative and positive levels showed slow current increase. Decreased illumination increased the membrane resistance. PMID:12422271

  1. The sensitivity of apical Na+ permeability in frog skin to hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Zeiske, W; Van Driessche, W

    1984-02-01

    Na+ transport across abdominal skins of the frog species Rana esculenta and Rana pipiens was analyzed by recording short-circuit current (Isc), transepithelial conductance (Gt), and the current noise generated by the random blockage of apical Na+ channels by the diuretic, amiloride. Specific Na+ current (INa) and conductance (GNa), as reflected by the amiloride-sensitive part of Isc and Gt, respectively, were markedly depressed after addition of some osmotically active substances, like sugars or alcohols to the mucosal Na+-Ringer solution. These hypertonicity-induced reactions were fast and fully reversible, even at mucosal osmolarities of 1 Osmol. With mucosal solutions of moderate hyperosmolarity a recovery of INa and GNa was observed in presence of the osmotic gradient. This "regulatory" current showed to be carried by Na+ through the Na+-specific apical channels. Contrary to the fast current drop during the initial phase of hyperosmotic shocks, the "osmoregulation" was considerably slower. The recovery of INa was only complete at smaller osmotic gradients but became more and more suppressed at higher osmolarities. Steady-state analysis of the kinetics of the Na+-specific current revealed that the current depression by osmotic shocks obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics. This current depression at high osmolarities, as well as during the initial phase before "osmoregulation" with small osmotic gradients, can be described in terms of a non-competitive inhibition. This was also suggested by Na+-concentration jump experiments indicating a reduction of the maximal, apical Na+ permeability as mechanism of the hypertonicity-induced drop in INa. The INa kinetics after complete "osmoregulation" were, however, indistinguishable from the isotonic control condition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6326045

  2. Remote videolaryngoscopy skills training for pre-hospital personnel.

    PubMed

    Berg, Benjamin W; Beamis, Eileen K; Murray, W Bosseau; Boedeker, Ben H

    2009-01-01

    Videolaryngoscopy (VL) is a novel technology that can facilitate rapid acquisition of intubation skills with simultaneous teacher and learner visualization of laryngeal structures. Videolaryngoscopy improves laryngeal visualization, and improves intubation success in difficult airway management compared to standard direct laryngoscopy. First responders need enhanced airway management tools to improve intubation success rates in civilian pre-hospital and military battlefield settings. We evaluated feasibility and efficacy of a remote first responder videolaryngoscopy skills training paradigm using distance learning by VTC (256kb ISDN) with synchronous transmission of laryngoscopy images to a remotely located trainer. Airway visualization, intubation success rates, and intubation times documented feasibility and comparability of remote and face-to-face introductory familiarization and intubation training with the Storz-Berci videolaryngoscopy system. User acceptance was good. Remote training paradigms for advanced technology solutions such as videolaryngoscopy can accelerate the diffusion of life-saving new technologies, especially when there is limited access to specialized training. Videolaryngoscopy visualization and difficult airway intubation success rates were better than direct laryngoscopy. PMID:19377107

  3. Risks associated with obese patient handling in emergency prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Réminiac, François; Jouan, Youenn; Cazals, Xavier; Bodin, Jean-François; Dequin, Pierre-François; Guillon, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The number of ambulance crewmembers may affect the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in particular situations. However, few studies have investigated how the number of emergency care providers affects the quality of CPR. Nonetheless, problems in the initial handling of patients due to small ambulance crew sizes may have significant consequences. These difficulties may be more frequent in an obese population than in a non-obese population. Hence such problems may be frequently encountered because obesity is epidemic in developed countries. In this report, we illustrate the fatal consequences of initial problems in patient handling due to a small ambulance crew size in an obese patient who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Following successful resuscitation, this patient presented humeral fractures that may have promoted a disorder of hemostasis. The patient eventually died. This case highlights the requirement for specific instructions for paramedics to manage obese patients in these emergency conditions. This case also highlights the need to take into account body mass index when deciding on appropriate pre-hospital care, especially regarding the number of ambulance crewmembers. PMID:24830962

  4. Tyranny of distance and rural prehospital care: Is there potential for a national rural responder network?

    PubMed

    Leeuwenburg, Tim; Hall, John

    2015-10-01

    Critical illness intersects with the workload of rural doctors in Australia, mostly via their on-call responsibilities to rural hospitals. A significant proportion of these are prehospital incidents - vehicle crashes, farming injuries, bushfire etc. Effective care for such patients requires an integration of prehospital ambulance services, retrieval services and tertiary level trauma services all the way through to rehabilitation. Ambulance services in rural areas are often volunteer based, and with increasing remoteness via the 'tyranny of distance' comes the likelihood of increased delay in arrival of specialist retrieval services. Potential exists to utilise rural clinicians to respond to prehospital incidents in certain defined circumstances, as suggested by a recent survey of rural doctors. PMID:26105215

  5. Triage in the Tower of Babel: interpreter services for children in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Tate, Ramsey C; Kelley, Maureen C

    2013-12-01

    Minority pediatric populations have higher rates of emergency medical services use than the general pediatric population, and prior studies have documented that limited-English proficiency patients are more likely to undergo invasive procedures, require more resources, and be admitted once they arrive in the emergency department. Furthermore, limited-English proficiency patients may be particularly vulnerable because of immigration or political concerns. In this case report, we describe an infant with breath-holding spells for whom a language barrier in the prehospital setting resulted in an escalation of care to the highest level of trauma team activation. This infant underwent unnecessary, costly, and harmful interventions because of a lack of interpreter services. In a discussion of the legal, ethical, and medical implications of this case, we conclude that further investigation into prehospital strategies for overcoming language barriers is required to provide optimal prehospital care for pediatric patients. PMID:24300472

  6. Quality improvement in pre-hospital critical care: increased value through research and publication.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Marius; Krüger, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Pre-hospital critical care is considered to be a complex intervention with a weak evidence base. In quality improvement literature, the value equation has been used to depict the inevitable relationship between resources expenditure and quality. Increased value of pre-hospital critical care involves moving a system from quality assurance to quality improvement. Agreed quality indicators can be integrated in existing quality improvement and complex intervention methodology. A QI system for pre-hospital critical care includes leadership involvement, multi-disciplinary buy-in, data collection infrastructure and long-term commitment. Further, integrating process control with governance systems allows evidence-based change of practice and publishing of results. PMID:24887186

  7. Prehospital intranasal evaporative cooling for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a pilot, feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard M; Van Antwerp, Jerry; Henderson, Charles; Weaver, Anne; Davies, Gareth; Lockey, David

    2014-10-01

    Intranasal evaporative cooling presents a novel means of initiating therapeutic hypothermia after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Few studies have evaluated the use of intranasal therapeutic hypothermia using the Rhinochill device in the prehospital setting. We sought to evaluate the use of Rhinochill in the Physician Response Unit of London's Air Ambulance, aiming to describe the feasibility of employing it during prehospital resuscitation for OHCA. We prospectively evaluated the Rhinochill device over a 7-month period. Inclusion criteria for deployment included: age above 18 years, Physician Response Unit on-scene within maximum of 10 min after return-of-spontaneous circulation (ROSC), witnessed OHCA or unwitnessed downtime of less than 10 min, pregnancy not suspected, normal nasal anatomy, and likely ICU candidate if ROSC were to be achieved. Thirteen patients were included in the evaluation. The average time from the 999 call to initiation of cooling was 39.5 min (range 22-61 min). The average prehospital temperature change in patients who achieved ROSC was -1.9°C. Patients were cooled for an average of 38 min prehospital. In all cases, the doctor and paramedic involved with the resuscitation reported that the Rhinochill was easy to set up and use during resuscitation and that it did not interfere with standard resuscitation practice. Intranasal evaporative cooling using the Rhinochill system is feasible in an urban, prehospital, doctor/paramedic response unit. Cooling with Rhinochill was not found to interfere with prehospital resuscitation and resulted in significant core body temperature reduction. Further research on the potential benefit of intra-arrest and early initiation of intranasal evaporative cooling is warranted. PMID:24300245

  8. Anaesthesiologist-provided prehospital airway management in patients with traumatic brain injury: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Troels M.; Kirkegaard, Hans; Tønnesen, Else

    2014-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend that patients with brain trauma with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of less than 9 should have an airway established. Hypoxia, hypotension and hypertension as well as hypoventilation and hyperventilation may worsen outcome in these patients. Objectives The objectives were to investigate guideline adherence, reasons for nonadherence and the incidences of complications related to prehospital advanced airway management in patients with traumatic brain injury. Materials and methods We prospectively collected data from eight anaesthesiologist-staffed prehospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region according to the Utstein-style template. Results Among 1081 consecutive prehospital advanced airway management patients, we identified 54 with a traumatic brain injury and an initial GCS score of less than 9. Guideline adherence in terms of airway management was 92.6%. The reasons for nonadherence were the patient’s condition, anticipated difficult airway management and short distance to the emergency department. Following rapid sequence intubation (RSI), 11.4% developed oxygen saturation below 90%, 9.1% had a first post-RSI systolic blood pressure below 90 mmHg and 48.9% had a first post-RSI systolic blood pressure below 120 mmHg. The incidence of hypertension following prehospital RSI was 4.5%. The incidence of postendotracheal intubation hyperventilation was as high as 71.1%. Conclusion The guideline adherence was high. The incidences of post-RSI hypoxia and systolic blood pressure below 90 compare with the results reported from other physician-staffed prehospital services. The incidence of systolic blood pressure below 120 as well as that of hyperventilation following prehospital endotracheal intubation in patients with traumatic brain injury call for a change in our current practice. PMID:24368407

  9. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Savino, P. Brian; Sporer, Karl A.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either), as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine). Prehospital 12-Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26759642

  10. Feasibility and safety of prehospital administration of bivalirudin in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sejersten, Maria; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Engstrøm, Thomas; Jørgensen, Erik; Clemmensen, Peter

    2009-06-15

    The selective thrombin inhibitor bivalirudin with a provisional glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (GPI) has been shown to be comparable to heparin plus GPI in the rates of ischemic events but to significantly reduce the risk of bleeding complications in patients with acute coronary syndromes. The aim of this preliminary study was to describe the feasibility and safety of a switch from prehospital administration of unfractionated heparin to bivalirudin in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients referred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients with STEMI treated with a 1-mg/kg bivalirudin bolus in the ambulance followed by infusion during angiography/primary percutaneous coronary intervention were compared with a STEMI control group (from the preceding year) treated with 10,000 U unfractionated heparin in the ambulance followed by in-hospital treatment with a GPI. A total of 102 patients (59%) receiving bivalirudin and 72 receiving heparin were followed during hospitalization. The baseline characteristics and prehospital treatment times were comparable between the 2 groups. The thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow before and after primary percutaneous coronary intervention was similar. Stents were used significantly more often in the heparin-treated patients (90% versus 76%; p = 0.04), with bailout GPI for those receiving bivalirudin occurring in 30% compared with 83% of those receiving heparin (p <0.001). Significant bleeding complications were seen in <10% of all patients undergoing angiography with no difference between groups. Bivalirudin was easy to administer in the prehospital setting and did not affect the prehospital run times. In conclusion, the results suggest that prehospital bivalirudin administration is as safe and effective as heparin in the treatment of patients with STEMI. Prehospital administration seemed to reduce the need for GPI. PMID:19539068

  11. Adult Status Epilepticus: A Review of the Prehospital and Emergency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Billington, Michael; Kandalaft, Osama R; Aisiku, Imoigele P

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation in the prehospital and emergency department setting and status epilepticus represents an emergency neurologic condition. The classification and various types of seizures are numerous. The objectives of this narrative literature review focuses on adult patients with a presentation of status epilepticus in the prehospital and emergency department setting. In summary, benzodiazepines remain the primary first line therapeutic agent in the management of status epilepticus, however, there are new agents that may be appropriate for the management of status epilepticus as second- and third-line pharmacological agents. PMID:27563928

  12. Prehospital Emergency Ultrasound: A Review of Current Clinical Applications, Challenges, and Future Implications

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, Mazen J.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging modalities in the prehospital setting are helpful in the evaluation and management of time-sensitive emergency conditions. Ultrasound is the main modality that has been applied by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in the field. This paper examines the clinical applications of ultrasound in the prehospital setting. Specific focus is on applications that provide essential information to guide triage and management of critical patients. Challenges of this modality are also described in terms of cost impact on EMS agencies, provider training, and skill maintenance in addition to challenges related to the technical aspect of ultrasound. PMID:24171113

  13. [The influence of an isotonic solution containing benzalkonium chloride and a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium from the nasal cavity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Bogomil'sky, M R; Soldatsky, Yu L; Pogosova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of an isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride and of a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium in the nasal cavity in vitro. To this effect, we investigated the cytological material obtained from 35 children presenting with adenoid tissue hypertrophy. The tissue samples were taken from the nasal cavity by the standard method. A cellular biopsy obtained from each patient was distributed between three tubes that contained isotonic saline solution supplemented by benzalconium chloride (0.1 mg/ml), a hypertonic seawater solution, and a standard physiological saline solution. It was shown that the number of the viable cells in both isotonic solutions was statistically comparable and significantly higher than in the hypertonic solution (p<0.05). The ciliary beat frequency of the cells embedded in the two isotonic solutions was not significantly different but considerably exceeded that in the hypertonic seawater solution (p<0.05). Thus, the present study has demonstrated the absence of the ciliotoxic influence of isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml and the strong ciliotoxic effect of the hypertonic seawater solution. This finding gives reason to recommend isotonic solutions for the regular application whereas hypertonic solutions can be prescribed only during infectious and/or inflammatory ENT diseases. PMID:27213656

  14. Hypertonic-induced lamin A/C synthesis and distribution to nucleoplasmic speckles is mediated by TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Favale, Nicolas O.; Sterin Speziale, Norma B.; Fernandez Tome, Maria C.

    2007-12-21

    Lamin A/C is the most studied nucleoskeletal constituent. Lamin A/C expression indicates cell differentiation and is also a structural component of nuclear speckles, which are involved in gene expression regulation. Hypertonicity has been reported to induce renal epithelial cell differentiation and expression of TonEBP (NFAT5), a transcriptional activator of hypertonicity-induced gene transcription. In this paper, we investigate the effect of hypertonicity on lamin A/C expression in MDCK cells and the involvement of TonEBP. Hypertonicity increased lamin A/C expression and its distribution to nucleoplasm with speckled pattern. Microscopy showed codistribution of TonEBP and lamin A/C in nucleoplasmic speckles, and immunoprecipitation demonstrated their interaction. TonEBP silencing caused lamin A/C redistribution from nucleoplasmic speckles to the nuclear rim, followed by lamin decrease, thus showing that hypertonicity induces lamin A/C speckles through a TonEBP-dependent mechanism. We suggest that lamin A/C speckles could serve TonEBP as scaffold thus favoring its role in hypertonicity.

  15. Prehospital advanced trauma life support for critical blunt trauma victims.

    PubMed

    Cwinn, A A; Pons, P T; Moore, E E; Marx, J A; Honigman, B; Dinerman, N

    1987-04-01

    The ability of paramedics to deliver advanced trauma life support (ATLS) in an expedient fashion for victims of trauma has been strongly challenged. In this study, the records of 114 consecutive victims of blunt trauma who underwent laparotomy or thoracotomy were reviewed. Prehospital care was rendered by paramedics operating under strict protocols. The mean response time (minutes +/- SEM) to the scene was 5.6 +/- 0.27. On-scene time was 13.9 +/- 0.62. The time to return to the hospital was 8.0 +/- 0.4. On-scene time included assessing hazards at the scene, patient extrication, spine immobilization (n = 98), application of oxygen (n = 94), measurement of vital signs (n = 114), splinting of 59 limbs, and the following ATLS procedures: endotracheal intubation (n = 31), IV access (n = 106), ECG monitoring (n = 69), procurement of blood for tests including type and cross (n = 58), and application of a pneumatic antishock garment (PASG) (n = 31). On-scene times were analyzed according to the number of ATLS procedures performed: insertion of one IV line (n = 46), 14.8 +/- 1.03 minutes; two IV lines (n = 28), 13.4 +/- 0.92; one IV line plus intubation (n = 7), 14.0 +/- 2.94; two IV lines plus intubation (n = 9), 17.0 +/- 2.38; and two IV lines plus intubation plus PASG (n = 13), 12.4 +/- 1.36. Of the 161 IV attempts, 94% were completed successfully. Of 36 attempts at endotracheal intubation, 89% were successful.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3826807

  16. Determinants of Success and Failure in Prehospital Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Lucas A.; Gallet, Charles G.; Kolb, Logan J.; Lohse, Christine M.; Russi, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to identify factors associated with successful endotracheal intubation (ETI) by a multisite emergency medical services (EMS) agency. Methods We collected data from the electronic prehospital record for all ETI attempts made from January through May 2010 by paramedics and other EMS crew members at a single multistate agency. If documentation was incomplete, the study team contacted the paramedic. Paramedics use the current National Association of EMS Physicians definition of an ETI attempt (laryngoscope blade entering the mouth). We analyzed patient and EMS factors affecting ETI. Results During 12,527 emergent ambulance responses, 200 intubation attempts were made in 150 patients. Intubation was successful in 113 (75%). A crew with paramedics was more than three times as likely to achieve successful intubation as a paramedic/emergency medical technician-Basic crew (odds ratio [OR], 3.30; p=0.03). A small tube (≤7.0 inches) was associated with a more than 4-fold increased likelihood of successful ETI compared with a large tube (≥7.5 inches) (OR, 4.25; p=0.01). After adjustment for these features, compared with little or no view of the glottis, a partial or entire view of the glottis was associated with a nearly 13-fold (OR, 12.98; p=0.001) and a nearly 40-fold (OR, 39.78; p<0.001) increased likelihood of successful intubation, respectively. Conclusion Successful ETI was more likely to be accomplished when a paramedic was partnered with another paramedic, when some or all of the glottis was visible and when a smaller endotracheal tube was used. PMID:27625734

  17. Prehospital Identification of Stroke Subtypes in Chinese Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hai-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Chao; Sun, Yong-An; Lyu, Pu; Cui, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhen, Zhi-Gang; Huang, Yi-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Differentiating intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from cerebral infarction as early as possible is vital for the timely initiation of different treatments. This study developed an applicable model for the ambulance system to differentiate stroke subtypes. Methods: From 26,163 patients initially screened over 4 years, this study comprised 1989 consecutive patients with potential first-ever acute stroke with sudden onset of the focal neurological deficit, conscious or not, and given ambulance transport for admission to two county hospitals in Yutian County of Hebei Province. All the patients underwent cranial computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the final diagnosis based on stroke criteria. Correlation with stroke subtype clinical features was calculated and Bayes’ discriminant model was applied to discriminate stroke subtypes. Results: Among the 1989 patients, 797, 689, 109, and 394 received diagnoses of cerebral infarction, ICH, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and other forms of nonstroke, respectively. A history of atrial fibrillation, vomiting, and diabetes mellitus were associated with cerebral infarction, while vomiting, systolic blood pressure ≥180 mmHg, and age <65 years were more typical of ICH. For noncomatose stroke patients, Bayes’ discriminant model for stroke subtype yielded a combination of multiple items that provided 72.3% agreement in the test model and 79.3% in the validation model; for comatose patients, corresponding agreement rates were 75.4% and 73.5%. Conclusions: The model herein presented, with multiple parameters, can predict stroke subtypes with acceptable sensitivity and specificity before CT scanning, either in alert or comatose patients. This may facilitate prehospital management for patients with stroke. PMID:27098788

  18. Prehospital Blood Product Resuscitation for Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Iain M.; James, Robert H.; Dretzke, Janine; Midwinter, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Administration of high ratios of plasma to packed red blood cells is a routine practice for in-hospital trauma resuscitation. Military and civilian emergency teams are increasingly carrying prehospital blood products (PHBP) for trauma resuscitation. This study systematically reviewed the clinical literature to determine the extent to which the available evidence supports this practice. Methods: Bibliographic databases and other sources were searched to July 2015 using keywords and index terms related to the intervention, setting, and condition. Standard systematic review methodology aimed at minimizing bias was used for study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment (protocol registration PROSPERO: CRD42014013794). Synthesis was mainly narrative with random effects model meta-analysis limited to mortality outcomes. Results: No prospective comparative or randomized studies were identified. Sixteen case series and 11 comparative studies were included in the review. Seven studies included mixed populations of trauma and non-trauma patients. Twenty-five of 27 studies provided only very low quality evidence. No association between PHBP and survival was found (OR for mortality: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.84–1.96, P = 0.24). A single study showed improved survival in the first 24 h. No consistent physiological or biochemical benefit was identified, nor was there evidence of reduced in-hospital transfusion requirements. Transfusion reactions were rare, suggesting the short-term safety of PHBP administration. Conclusions: While PHBP resuscitation appears logical, the clinical literature is limited, provides only poor quality evidence, and does not demonstrate improved outcomes. No conclusions as to efficacy can be drawn. The results of randomized controlled trials are awaited. PMID:26825635

  19. Hypertonic saline solutions do not influence the solubility of sputum from secretor and non-secretor cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Marcelo A.I.; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara C.; Ferreira, Ana Iara C.; Barja, Paulo R.; Santos de Faria Junior, Newton; de Oliveira, Luís Vicente F.; de Mattos, Luiz C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Functional alterations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) increase the viscoelasticity of pulmonary secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and require the use of therapeutic aerosols. The biochemical properties of exocrine secretions are influenced by the expression of the FUT2 gene which determine the secretor and non-secretor phenotypes of the ABH glycoconjugates. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of secretor and non-secretor phenotypes by means of photoacoustic analysis, both the typical interaction time (t 0) and the solubilization interval (Δt) of the sputum of secretor and non-secretor CF patients nebulized by hypertonic saline solutions at different concentrations. Material and methods Sputum samples were obtained by spontaneous expectoration from 6 secretor and 4 non-secretor patients with CF. Each sample was nebulized with 3%, 6%, and 7% hypertonic saline solutions in a photoacoustic cell. The values of t 0 and Δt were determined using the Origin 7.5® computer program (Microcal Software Inc.). The t-test was employed using the GraphPad Instat 3.0® computer program to calculate the mean and standard deviation for each parameter. Results For all hypertonic saline solutions tested, the mean values of t 0 and Δt do not show statistically significant differences between secretor and non-secretor patients. Conclusions The secretor and non-secretor phenotypes do not influence the in vitro solubilization of the sputum nebulized by hypertonic saline solutions at different concentrations when analysed by photoacoustic technique. PMID:22291775

  20. Osmotic injury of PC-3 cells by hypertonic NaCl solutions at temperatures above 0 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Zawlodzka, Sylwia; Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    Cell injury due to osmotic dehydration, which is regarded as a major cause of injury during freeze-thaw processes, was examined closely using a perfusion microscope. Human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells (PC-3), which were put in a chamber, were subjected to hyperosmotic stresses by perfusing NaCl solutions of varying concentrations into the chamber. Cells were exposed to 2.5 and 4.5M NaCl solutions for 1-60 min by changing the concentrations at 0.2, 1, and 10 M/min. Decrease in cell viability was biphasic: the viability decreased first after the increase in NaCl concentration due to dehydration and then after return to isotonic conditions due to rehydration. Rehydration was substantially more responsible for cell injury than dehydration, which was marked at lower NaCl concentrations and lower temperatures. Injury resulting from contraction was negligible at the 2.5 M NaCl solution. While the hypertonic cell survival, which was determined without a return to isotonic conditions, was almost independent of time of exposure to hyperosmotic concentrations, the post-hypertonic survival after returning to isotonic conditions decreased with increasing exposure time, suggesting that the rehydration-induced injury was a consequence of time-dependent alteration of the plasma membrane. The post-hypertonic survival was lower for higher NaCl concentrations and higher temperatures, which was qualitatively consistent with previous studies. Effects of the rate of concentration change on the post-hypertonic cell survival were observed at 4.5 M; the highest rate of survival was obtained by slower increase and faster decrease in the NaCl concentration. However, the effect was negligible at 2.5 M. PMID:15710370

  1. Acute inhalation of hypertonic saline does not improve mucociliary clearance in all children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known of how mucociliary clearance (MCC) in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and normal pulmonary function compares with healthy adults, or how an acute inhalation of 7% hypertonic saline (HS) aerosol affects MCC in these same children. Methods We compared MCC in 12 children with CF and normal pulmonary function after an acute inhalation of 0.12% saline (placebo), or HS, admixed with the radioisotope 99 mtechnetium sulfur colloid in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over study. Mucociliary clearance on the placebo day in the children was also compared to MCC in 10 healthy, non-CF adults. Mucociliary clearance was quantified over a 90 min period, using gamma scintigraphy, and is reported as MCC at 60 min (MCC60) and 90 min (MCC90). Results Median [interquartile range] MCC60 and MCC90 in the children on the placebo visit were 15.4 [12.4-24.5]% and 19.3 [17.3-27.8%]%, respectively, which were similar to the adults with 17.8 [6.4-28.7]% and 29.6 [16.1-43.5]%, respectively. There was no significant improvement in MCC60 (2.2 [-6.2-11.8]%) or MCC90 (2.3 [-1.2-10.5]%) with HS, compared to placebo. In addition, 5/12 and 4/12 of the children showed a decrease in MCC60 and MCC90, respectively, after inhalation of HS. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the change in MCC90 after HS showed a significantly greater improvement in MCC in children with lower placebo MCC90 compared to those with higher placebo MCC90 (p = 0.045). Conclusions These data suggest that percent MCC varies significantly between children with CF lung disease and normal pulmonary functions, with some children demonstrating MCC values within the normal range and others showing MCC values that are below normal values. In addition, although MCC did not improve in all children after inhalation of HS, improvement did occur in children with relatively low MCC values after placebo. This finding suggests that acute inhalation of hypertonic saline may benefit a subset of children with low MCC

  2. Opposite effects of oxytocin on water intake induced by hypertonic NaCl or polyethylene glycol administration.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Antonio; Mahía, Javier; Mediavilla, Cristina; Puerto, Amadeo

    2015-03-15

    Oxytocin (OT), a neurohormone, has been related to natriuretic and diuretic effects and also to water intake and sodium appetite. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of subcutaneous OT administration on water intake and urine-related measures induced by the administration of hypertonic NaCl (experiment 1) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) (experiment 2). Experiment 1 showed that OT administration increases the urine volume, urinary sodium concentration, and natriuresis and reduces the water intake, water and sodium balances, and estimated plasma sodium concentration induced by hypertonic NaCl administration. Conversely, experiment 2 showed that OT administration increases the water intake and the antidiuretic response induced by PEG administration. These results show that the opposite effects of OT on the water intake induced by hypertonic NaCl or PEG administration are accompanied by differential regulatory effects, enhancing a natriuretic response in the first experiment and generating an antidiuretic reaction in the second experiment. This study suggests a differential regulatory effect of OT during states of intra- and extracellular thirst. PMID:25617595

  3. Hypertonic NaCl enhances adenosine release and hormonal cAMP production in mouse thick ascending limb.

    PubMed

    Baudouin-Legros, M; Badou, A; Paulais, M; Hammet, M; Teulon, J

    1995-07-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), accumulated in the presence of adenosine, was measured in medullary portions of mouse thick ascending limbs of Henle's loop, suspended either in classic extracellular buffer or in the presence of added NaCl. Under control conditions (140 mmol/l NaCl), adenosine (< 10(-5) mol/l) and N6-cyclohexyladenosine, an A1 adenosine receptor agonist, inhibit the cAMP accumulation induced by arginine vasopressin (AVP). On the other hand, high concentrations of adenosine and CGS-21680, an A2 adenosine receptor agonist, stimulate cAMP formation. Addition of NaCl (+300 mmol/l) to extracellular buffer stimulates the release of endogenous adenosine. It also enhances A2 receptor-induced cAMP accumulation but suppresses A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. This hypertonic NaCl medium also potentiates the stimulatory action of AVP on adenylyl cyclase. The modifications of tubular responses to both AVP and A1 and A2 agonists, brought about by hypertonic NaCl, were all inhibited by adenosine deaminase, thereby demonstrating the involvement of endogenous adenosine. Adenosine, the release and the effects of which are modulated by hypertonic NaCl, thus appears to act as an endogenous physiological modulator of kidney medulla function. PMID:7631823

  4. Simplifying prehospital analgesia. Why certain medications should or should not be used for pain management in the field.

    PubMed

    Bledsoe, Bryan; Braude, Darren; Dailey, Michael W; Myers, Jeff; Richards, Mike; Wesley, Keith

    2005-07-01

    Prehospital analgesia can be safely provided with only three agents: fentanyl, morphine and the mixed-gas nitrous oxide/oxygen. Of these three, fentanyl is by far the best agent for general EMS analgesic therapy by paramedics. However, to initiate prehospital analgesia earlier in the EMS response time frame, EMT's should administer nitrous oxide/oxygen. This protocol can easily be added to the EMT education program or through a continuing education session. All of the other agents discussed have absolutely no role in modern prehospital care. PMID:16027666

  5. Should prehospital resuscitative thoracotomy be incorporated in advanced life support after traumatic cardiac arrest?

    PubMed

    Chalkias, A; Xanthos, T

    2014-06-01

    The survival of traumatic cardiac arrest patients poses a challenge for Emergency Medical Services initiating advanced life support on-scene, especially with regard to having to decide immediately whether to initiate prehospital emergency thoracotomy. Although the necessity for carrying out the procedure remains a cause for debate, it can be life-saving when performed with the correct indications and approaches. PMID:26816077

  6. Effects of Crew Resource Management Training on Medical Errors in a Simulated Prehospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carhart, Elliot D.

    2012-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated the effect of crew resource management (CRM) training on medical errors in a simulated prehospital setting. Specific areas addressed by this program included situational awareness, decision making, task management, teamwork, and communication. This study is believed to be the first investigation of CRM…

  7. Trauma in elderly people: access to the health system through pre-hospital care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Hilderjane Carla; Pessoa, Renata de Lima; de Menezes, Rejane Maria Paiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to identify the prevalence of trauma in elderly people and how they accessed the health system through pre-hospital care. Method: documentary and retrospective study at a mobile emergency care service, using a sample of 400 elderly trauma victims selected through systematic random sampling. A form validated by experts was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between the variables. Results: Trauma was predominant among women (52.25%) and in the age range between 60 and 69 years (38.25%), average age 74.19 years (standard deviation±10.25). Among the mechanisms, falls (56.75%) and traffic accidents (31.25%) stood out, showing a significant relation with the pre-hospital care services (p<0.001). Circulation, airway opening, cervical control and immobilization actions were the most frequent and Basic Life Support Services (87.8%) were the most used, with trauma referral hospitals as the main destination (56.7%). Conclusion: trauma prevailed among women, victims of falls, who received pre-hospital care through basic life support services and actions and were transported to the trauma referral hospital. It is important to reorganize pre-hospital care, avoiding overcrowded hospitals and delivering better care to elderly trauma victims. PMID:27143543

  8. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces.

    PubMed

    Acker, Peter; Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard Bud F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia's most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam. PMID:27489749

  9. The development and features of the Spanish prehospital advanced triage method (META) for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Garijo Gonzalo, Gracia; Martinez Monzon, Carlos; Pelaez Corres, Nieves; Rodriguez Soler, Alberto; Turegano Fuentes, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This text describes the process of development of the new Spanish Prehospital Advanced Triage Method (META) and explain its main features and contribution to prehospital triage systems in mass casualty incidents. The triage META is based in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols, patient's anatomical injuries and mechanism of injury. It is a triage method with four stages including early identification of patients with severe trauma that would benefit from a rapid evacuation to a surgical facility and introduces a new patient flow by-passing the advanced medical post to improve evacuation. The stages of triage META are: I) Stabilization triage that classifies patients according to severity to set priorities for initial emergency treatment; II) Identifying patients requiring urgent surgical treatment, this is done at the same time than stage I and creates a new flow of patients with high priority for evacuation; III) Implementation of Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols to patients previously classified according to stablished priority; and IV) Evacuation triage, stablishing evacuation priorities in case of lacks of appropriate transport resources. The triage META is to be applied only by prehospital providers with advanced knowledge and training in advanced trauma life support care and has been designed to be implemented as prehospital procedure in mass casualty incidents (MCI). PMID:27130042

  10. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard (Bud) F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia’s most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.  PMID:27489749

  11. The impact of shorter prehospital transport times on outcomes in patients with abdominal vascular injuries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most deaths in patients with abdominal vascular injuries (ABVI) are caused by exsanguination and irreversible shock. Therefore, time to definitive hemorrhage control is an important factor affecting survival. The study goals were: (1) document current outcomes in patients with ABVI, and (2) compare outcomes to those from the era preceding improvements in an urban prehospital system. Methods A retrospective review of all patients with ABVI at an urban level 1 trauma center was completed. Patients injured prior to prehospital transport improvements (1991–1994) were compared to those following a reduction in transport times (1995–2004). Results Of 388 patients, 70 (18%) arrived prior to prehospital improvements (1991–1994). Patient/injury demographics were similar in both groups (age, sex, penetrating mechanism; p > 0.05). The number of patients presenting with ABVI increased (23 vs. 35 per year; p < 0.05) concurrent to a reduction in transport times (27 vs. 20 minutes; p < 0.05). Patients were more frequently unstable (63% vs. 91%; p < 0.05). Regardless of the specific vessel, mortality increased (37% vs. 67%; p < 0.05) following prehospital improvements. Conclusions A reduction in urban transport times resulted in an increase in (1) the number of patients arriving with abdominal vascular injuries, (2) the proportion presenting in physiologic extremis, and (3) overall mortality. PMID:24360286

  12. Prehospital system delay in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Pek, Pin Pin; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Timely reperfusion in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) improves outcomes. System delay is that between first medical contact and reperfusion therapy, comprising prehospital and hospital components. This study aimed to characterize prehospital system delay in Singapore. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed for 462 consecutive STEMI patients presenting to a tertiary hospital from December 2006 to April 2008. Patients with cardiac arrest secondarily presented were excluded. For those who received emergency medical services (EMS), ambulance records were reviewed. Time intervals in the hospital were collected prospectively. The patients were divided into two equal groups of high/low prehospital system delay using visual binning technique. RESULTS: Of 462 patients, 76 received EMS and 52 of the 76 patients were analyzed. The median system delay was 125.5 minutes and the median prehospital system delay was 33.5 minutes (interquartile range [IQR]=27.0, 42.0). Delay between call-received-by-ambulance and ambulance-dispatched was 2.48 minutes (IQR=1.47, 16.55); between ambulance-dispatch and arrival-at-patient-location was 8.07 minutes (IQR=1.30, 22.13); between arrival-at- and departure-from-patient-location was 13.12 minutes (IQR=3.12, 32.2); and between leaving-patient-location to ED-registration was 9.90 minutes (IQR=1.62, 32.92). Comparing patients with prehospital system delay of less than 35.5 minutes versus more showed that the median delay between ambulance-dispatch and arrival-at-patient-location was shorter (5.75 vs. 9.37 minutes, P<0.01). The median delay between arrival-at-patient-location and leaving-patient-location was also shorter (10.78 vs. 14.37 minutes, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Prehospital system delay in our patients was suboptimal. This is the first attempt at characterizing prehospital system delay in Singapore and forms the basis for improving efficiency of STEMI care. PMID:26693262

  13. Use of prehospital ultrasound in North America: a survey of emergency medical services medical directors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in ultrasound imaging technology have made it more accessible to prehospital providers. Little is known about how ultrasound is being used in the prehospital environment and we suspect that it is not widely used in North America at this time. We believe that EMS system characteristics such as provider training, system size, population served, and type of transport will be associated with use or non-use of ultrasound. Our study objective was to describe the current use of prehospital ultrasound in North America. Methods This study was a cross-sectional survey distributed to EMS directors on the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) mailing list. Respondents had the option to complete a paper or electronic survey. Results Of the 755 deliverable surveys we received 255 responses from across Canada and the United states for an overall response rate of 30%. Of respondents, 4.1% of EMS systems (95% CI 1.9, 6.3) reported currently using ultrasound and an additional 21.7% (95% CI 17, 26.4) are considering implementing ultrasound. EMS services using ultrasound have a higher proportion of physicians (p < 0.001) as their highest trained prehospital providers when compared to the survey group as a whole. The most commonly cited current and projected applications are Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma (FAST) and assessment of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) arrest. The cost of equipment and training are the most significant barriers to implementation of ultrasound. Most medical directors want evidence that prehospital ultrasound improves patient outcomes prior to implementation. Conclusions Prehospital ultrasound is infrequently used in North America and there are a number of barriers to its implementation, including costs of equipment and training and limited evidence demonstrating improved outcomes. A research agenda for prehospital ultrasound should focus on patient-important outcomes such as morbidity and mortality. Two commonly

  14. Prehospital Lactate Measurement by Emergency Medical Services in Patients Meeting Sepsis Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Lori L.; Hokanson, Jonathan S.; Fernstrom, Karl M.; Kinzy, Tyler G.; Lick, Charles J.; Satterlee, Paul A.; LaCroix, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to pilot test the delivery of sepsis education to emergency medical services (EMS) providers and the feasibility of equipping them with temporal artery thermometers (TATs) and handheld lactate meters to aid in the prehospital recognition of sepsis. Methods This study used a convenience sample of prehospital patients meeting established criteria for sepsis. Paramedics received education on systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, were trained in the use of TATs and hand-held lactate meters, and enrolled patients who had a recent history of infection, met ≥ 2 SIRS criteria, and were being transported to a participating hospital. Blood lactate was measured by paramedics in the prehospital setting and again in the emergency department (ED) via usual care. Paramedics entered data using an online database accessible at the point of care. Results Prehospital lactate values obtained by paramedics ranged from 0.8 to 9.8 mmol/L, and an elevated lactate (i.e. ≥ 4.0) was documented in 13 of 112 enrolled patients (12%). The unadjusted correlation of prehospital and ED lactate values was 0.57 (p< 0.001). The median interval between paramedic assessment of blood lactate and the electronic posting of the ED-measured lactate value in the hospital record was 111 minutes. Overall, 91 patients (81%) were hospitalized after ED evaluation, 27 (24%) were ultimately diagnosed with sepsis, and 3 (3%) died during hospitalization. Subjects with elevated prehospital lactate were somewhat more likely to have been admitted to the intensive care unit (23% vs 15%) and to have been diagnosed with sepsis (38% vs 22%) than those with normal lactate levels, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion In this pilot, EMS use of a combination of objective SIRS criteria, subjective assessment of infection, and blood lactate measurements did not achieve a level of diagnostic accuracy for sepsis that would warrant hospital prenotification

  15. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. PMID:21996444

  16. NFAT5 in cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress - regulations and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chris Yk; Ko, Ben Cb

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-5 (NFAT5), also known as OREBP or TonEBP, is a member of the nuclear factors of the activated T cells family of transcription factors. It is also the only known tonicity-regulated transcription factor in mammals. NFAT5 was initially known for its role in the hypertonic kidney inner medulla for orchestrating a genetic program to restore the cellular homeostasis. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that NFAT5 might play a more diverse functional role, including a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation and the development of autoimmune diseases. Despite the growing significance of NFAT5 in physiology and diseases, our understanding of how its activity is regulated remains very limited. Furthermore, how changes in tonicities are converted into functional outputs via NFAT5 remains elusive. Therefore, this review aims to summarize our current knowledge on the functional roles of NFAT5 in osmotic stress adaptation and the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. PMID:23618372

  17. Mannitol or hypertonic saline in the setting of traumatic brain injury: What have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Myles Dustin; Oren-Grinberg, Achikam; Robinson, Timothy Matthew; Chen, Clark C.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intracranial hypertension, defined as an intracranial pressure (ICP) >20 mmHg for a period of more than 5 min, worsens neurologic outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI). While several mechanisms contribute to poor outcome, impaired cerebral perfusion appears to be a highly significant common denominator. Management guidelines from the Brain Trauma Foundation recommend measuring ICP to guide therapy. In particular, hyperosmolar therapy, which includes mannitol or hypertonic saline (HTS), is frequently administered to reduce ICP. Currently, mannitol (20%) is considered the gold standard hyperosmolar agent. However, HTS is increasingly used in this setting. This review sought to compare the efficacy of mannitol to HTS in severe TBI. Methods: The PubMed database was used to systematically search for articles comparing mannitol to HTS in severe TBI. The following medical subject headings were used: HTS, sodium lactate, mannitol, ICP, intracranial hypertension, and TBI. We included both prospective and retrospective randomized controlled studies of adult patients with intracranial hypertension as a result of severe TBI who received hyperosmolar therapy. Results: Out of 45 articles, seven articles were included in our review: 5 were prospective, randomized trials; one was a prospective, nonrandomized trial; and one was a retrospective, cohort study. Conclusions: While all seven studies found that both mannitol and HTS were effective in reducing ICP, there was heterogeneity with regard to which agent was most efficacious. PMID:26673517

  18. Airway responsiveness to hypertonic saline: dose-response slope or PD15?

    PubMed

    de Meer, G; Marks, G B; de Jongste, J C; Brunekreef, B

    2005-01-01

    The result of airway challenge test with hypertonic saline (HS) is expressed as the dose causing a 15% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; PD15). A noncensored measure, such as the dose-response slope (DRS), allows the evaluation of the risk of asthma for subjects with a fall in FEV1 <15%. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between airway responsiveness to HS by PD15 or DRS, asthma symptoms and markers of eosinophilic inflammation. Data on current wheeze and airway responsiveness were obtained for 1,107 children (aged 8-13 yrs). Blood eosinophils and serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) were assessed in subsets (n = 683 and 485). PD15 was assessed if FEV1 fell > or =15%, and the DRS was calculated for all tests. Graphs were constructed to visualise relationships with current wheeze, blood eosinophils and serum ECP. Odds ratios and Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify these relationships. Children with features of asthma had lower PD15 and higher DRS, and separation was most pronounced for DRS. Prevalence of current wheeze increased continuously over the entire range of DRS values. Blood eosinophils were significantly higher only for the highest values of DRS. In conclusion, the continuous relationship between airway responsiveness and asthma symptoms is in favour of a noncensored measure of airway responsiveness, such as the dose-response slope. PMID:15640337

  19. Hypertonic saline infusion in traumatic brain injury increases the incidence of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Coritsidis, George; Diamond, Nechama; Rahman, Aleef; Solodnik, Paul; Lawrence, Kayode; Rhazouani, Salwa; Phalakornkul, Suganda

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the incidence of electrolyte abnormalities, acute kidney injury (AKI), deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and infections in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) treated with hypertonic saline (HTS) as osmolar therapy. We retrospectively studied 205 TBI patients, 96 with HTS and 109 without, admitted to the surgical/trauma intensive care unit between 2006 and 2012. Hemodynamics, electrolytes, length of stay (LOS), acute physiological assessment and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), injury severity scores (ISS) and mortality were tabulated. Infection, mechanical ventilation, DVT and AKI incidence were reviewed. HTS was associated with increased LOS and all infections (p=0.0001). After correction for the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and ventilator need, pulmonary infections (p=0.001) and LOS remained higher with HTS (p=0.0048). HTS did not result in increased blood pressure, DVT, AKI or neurological benefits. HTS significantly increased the odds for all infections, most specifically pulmonary infections, in patients with GCS<8. Due to these findings, HTS in TBI should be administered with caution regardless of acuity. PMID:26055957

  20. Hypertonic saline activation of p38 MAPK primes the PMN respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, D J; Moore, E E; Biffl, W L; Gonzalez, R J; Moore, H B; Silliman, C C

    2001-10-01

    Investigation of hypertonic saline (HTS) modulation of neutrophils (PMN) cytotoxic responses has generated seemingly contradictory results. Clinically relevant levels of HTS attenuate receptor-mediated p38 MAPK signaling, whereas higher levels activate p38 MAPK. Concurrently, HTS exerts a dose-dependent attenuation of the PMN respiratory burst, most notably at concentrations where p38 MAPK is activated. We hypothesized that HTS-mediated p38 MAPK activation augments the PMN respiratory burst on return to normotonicity. We found that although clinically relevant levels of HTS (Na+ > or = 200 mM) did not activate p38 MAPK, higher concentrations (Na+ > or = 300 mM) resulted in activation comparable with that after PAF stimulation. Transient stimulation with high levels of HTS primed the PMN respiratory burst in response to fMLP and PMA. This effect was attenuated by pretreatment with SB 203580, a p38 MAPK specific inhibitor. We conclude that severe osmotic shock primes the respiratory burst via p38 MAPK signaling, further supporting the role of this signaling cascade in PMN priming. PMID:11580111

  1. Two isoforms of aquaporin 2 responsive to hypertonic stress in the bottlenose dolphin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miwa; Wakui, Hitomi; Itou, Takuya; Segawa, Takao; Inoshima, Yasuo; Maeda, Ken; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the expression of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) and its newly found alternatively spliced isoform (alternative AQP2) and the functions of these AQP2 isoforms in the cellular hyperosmotic tolerance in the bottlenose dolphin, ITALIC! Tursiops truncatus mRNA sequencing revealed that alternative AQP2 lacks the fourth exon and instead has a longer third exon that includes a part of the original third intron. The portion of the third intron, now part of the coding region of alternative AQP2, is highly conserved among many species of the order Cetacea but not among terrestrial mammals. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that AQP2 was expressed only in the kidney, similar to terrestrial mammals. In contrast, alternative AQP2 was expressed in all organs examined, with strong expression in the kidney. In cultured renal cells, expression of both AQP2 isoforms was upregulated by the addition to the medium of NaCl but not by the addition of mannitol, indicating that the expression of both isoforms is induced by hypersalinity. Treatment with small interfering RNA for both isoforms resulted in a decrease in cell viability in hypertonic medium (500 mOsm kg(-1)) when compared with controls. These findings indicate that the expression of alternatively spliced AQP2 is ubiquitous in cetacean species, and it may be one of the molecules important for cellular osmotic tolerance throughout the body. PMID:26944501

  2. Micropuncture study of hypertonic mannitol diuresis in the proximal and distal tubule of the dog kidney

    PubMed Central

    Seely, John F.; Dirks, John H.

    1969-01-01

    Fractional reabsorption of water, sodium, and potassium at proximal and distal tubular sites within the nephron was studied by recollection-micropuncture experiments on dogs undergoing hypertonic mannitol diuresis. After an initial control hydropenic phase, 16% mannitol in modified Ringer's solution was administered intravenously, resulting in marked increases in fractional excretion of water (28.7%), sodium (12.6%), and potassium (63.9%). Inulin clearance decreased significantly from 35.1 to 25.2 ml/min. Analysis of paired micropuncture data revealed a significant decrease in tubule fluid to plasma (TF:P) inulin ratios in both the proximal tubule (1.63-1.45) and distal tubule (5.38-1.94). There was also a significant decrease in proximal TF:P sodium ratios (0.99-0.93) and potassium ratios (1.05-0.98). Distal TF:P sodium ratios, in contrast, rose significantly (0.38-0.59), while TF:P potassium ratios tended towards unity whether initially greater or less than one. Fractional reabsorption of sodium and water decreased by 5% and 10% respectively in the proximal tubule, but to a lesser extent than the resulting increases in fractional urinary excretion. The nonreabsorbed fraction, however, had increased sharply at the point of distal puncture for water (32%), sodium (26%), and potassium (26%), indicating a large inhibitory effect within the loop of Henle in addition to the smaller proximal effects. PMID:5355344

  3. A Comprehensive Review of Prehospital and In-hospital Delay Times in Acute Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Foraker, Randi; Morris, Dexter L.; Rosamond, Wayne D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize prehospital and in-hospital stroke evaluation and treatment delay times. We identified 123 unique peer-reviewed studies published from 1981 to 2007 of prehospital and in-hospital delay time for evaluation and treatment of patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms. Based on studies of 65 different population groups, the weighted Poisson regression indicated a 6.0% annual decline (p<0.001) in hours/year for prehospital delay, defined from symptom onset to emergency department (ED) arrival. For in-hospital delay, the weighted Poisson regression models indicated no meaningful changes in delay time from ED arrival to ED evaluation (3.1%, p=0.49 based on 12 population groups). There was a 10.2% annual decline in hours/year from ED arrival to neurology evaluation or notification (p=0.23 based on 16 population groups) and a 10.7% annual decline in hours/year for delay time from ED arrival to initiation of computed tomography (p=0.11 based on 23 population groups). Only one study reported on times from arrival to computed tomography scan interpretation, two studies on arrival to drug administration, and no studies on arrival to transfer to an in-patient setting, precluding generalizations. Prehospital delay continues to contribute the largest proportion of delay time. The next decade provides opportunities to establish more effective community based interventions worldwide. It will be crucial to have effective stroke surveillance systems in place to better understand and improve both prehospital and in-hospital delays for acute stroke care. PMID:19659821

  4. Immediate prehospital hypothermia protocol in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Laure; Vitrat, François; Savary, Dominique; Debaty, Guillaume; Santre, Charles; Durand, Michel; Dessertaine, Geraldine; Timsit, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves the outcomes of cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of an immediate prehospital cooling procedure implemented just after the return of spontaneous circulation with a prehospital setting. During 30 months, the case records of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital CA presumably due to a cardiac disease were studied. A routine protocol of immediate postresuscitation cooling had been tested by an emergency team, which consisted of an infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline. We decided to assess the efficacy and tolerance of this procedure. A total of 99 patients were studied; 22 were treated with prehospital TH, and 77 consecutive patients treated with prehospital standard resuscitation served as controls. For all patients, TH was maintained for 12 to 24 hours. The demographic, clinical, and biological characteristics of the patients were similar in the 2 groups. The rate of patients with a body temperature of less than 35 degrees C upon admission was 41% in the cooling group and 18% in the control group. Rapid infusion of fluid was not associated with pulmonary edema. After 1 year of follow-up, 6 (27%) of 22 patients in the cooling group and 30 (39%) of 77 patients in the control group had a good outcome. Our preliminary observation suggests that in comatose survivors of CA, prehospital TH with infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline is feasible and can be used safely by mobile emergency and intensive care units. PMID:19497463

  5. Intramuscular versus Intravenous Therapy for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Silbergleit, Robert; Durkalski, Valerie; Lowenstein, Daniel; Conwit, Robin; Pancioli, Arthur; Palesch, Yuko; Barsan, William

    2012-01-01

    . Adverse-event rates were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS For subjects in status epilepticus, intramuscular midazolam is at least as safe and effective as intravenous lorazepam for prehospital seizure cessation. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00809146.) PMID:22335736

  6. Prehospital Use of Magnesium Sulfate as Neuroprotection in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Eckstein, Marc; Stratton, Samuel J.; Pratt, Franklin D.; Hamilton, Scott; Conwit, Robin; Liebeskind, David S.; Sung, Gene; Kramer, Ian; Moreau, Gary; Goldweber, Robert; Sanossian, Nerses

    2016-01-01

    -group differences were noted with respect to mortality (15.4% in the magnesium group and 15.5% in the placebo group, P = 0.95) or all serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Prehospital initiation of magnesium sulfate therapy was safe and allowed the start of therapy within 2 hours after the onset of stroke symptoms, but it did not improve disability outcomes at 90 days. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; FAST-MAG ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00059332.) PMID:25651247

  7. Motor Vehicle Crash Severity Estimations by Physicians and Prehospital Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Nathan; Colwell, Christopher; Douglass, Erica; Hopkins, Emily; Haukoos, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether emergency physicians (EPs) and prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) personnel differ in their assessment of motor vehicle crash (MVC) severity and the potential for serious injury when viewing crash scene photographs. Methods Attending and resident EPs, paramedics, and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) from a single emergency medicine system used a web-based survey platform to rate the severity of 100 crash photographs on a 10-point Likert scale (Crash Score) and the potential for serious injury on a 0–100% scale (Injury Score). Serious injury was defined as skull fracture or intracranial bleeding, spine fracture or spinal cord injury, intrathoracic or intraabdominal injury, or long bone fracture. Crash and Injury Scores were stratified into EP and paramedic/EMT (EMS) groups and the mean score was calculated for each photo. Spearman rank correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) and Bland-Altman plots were constructed to assess agreement. Secondary analyses were performed after categorizing data into quartiles based on participants’ estimations of MVC severity. Results A total of 54 attending and 53 resident EPs, 156 paramedics, and 34 EMTs were invited to participate in the survey. Of these, 39 (72%) attending and 46 (87%) resident EPs, 107 (69%) paramedics, and 17 (50%) EMTs completed the survey. A total of 183 (88%) surveys were completed in full. The overall Crash Score correlation coefficient between EPs and EMS was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.97–0.99). The Crash Score correlation coefficients for each quartile were 0.86 (0.57–0.97), 0.93 (0.85–0.96), 0.58 (0.16–0.85), and 0.88 (0.66–0.97), respectively. The overall Injury Score correlation coefficient between EPs and EMS was 0.98 (0.88–0.97). The Injury Score correlation coefficients for each quartile were 0.94 (0.48–0.91), 0.76 (0.50–0.92), 0.80 (0.69–1.00), and 0.94 (0.57–0.97), respectively. Conclusion Although overall agreement

  8. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  9. Influence of environmental hypertonicity on the induction of ureogenesis and amino acid metabolism in air-breathing walking catfish (Clarias batrachus, Bloch).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Bodhisattwa; Bhuyan, Gitalee; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2014-07-01

    Effect of environmental hypertonicity, due to exposure to 300 mM mannitol solution for 7 days, on the induction of ureogenesis and also on amino acid metabolism was studied in the air-breathing walking catfish, C. batrachus, which is already known to have the capacity to face the problem of osmolarity stress in addition to other environmental stresses in its natural habitats. Exposure to hypertonic mannitol solution led to reduction of ammonia excretion rate by about 2-fold with a concomitant increase of urea-N excretion rate by about 2-fold. This was accompanied by significant increase in the levels of both ammonia and urea in different tissues and also in plasma. Further, the environmental hypertonicity also led to significant accumulation of different non-essential free amino acids (FAAs) and to some extent the essential FAAs, thereby causing a total increase of non-essential FAA pool by 2-3-fold and essential FAA pool by 1.5-2.0-fold in most of the tissues studied including the plasma. The activities of three ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) enzymes such as carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase in liver and kidney tissues, and four key amino acid metabolism-related enzymes such as glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase (reductive amination), alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransaminase were also significantly up-regulated in different tissues of the fish while exposing to hypertonic environment. Thus, more accumulation and excretion of urea-N observed during hypertonic exposure were probably associated with the induction of ureogenesis through the induced OUC, and the increase of amino acid pool was probably mainly associated with the up-regulation of amino acid synthesizing machineries in this catfish in hypertonic environment. These might have helped the walking catfish in defending the osmotic stress and to acclimatize better under hypertonic environment, which is very much uncommon among

  10. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg−1 min−1), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (Ptime < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited. PMID:27073699

  11. Systematic training in focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound affects decision-making in the prehospital setting – two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstact We present two cases from the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) in Denmark, in which prehospital physicians trained in cardiac ultrasound (FATE) disclosed significant pathology that induced a radical change for the critical patient’s course. PMID:24886932

  12. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  13. Paramedics' and pre-hospital physicians' assessments of anatomic injury in trauma patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pre-hospital assessment of a blunt trauma is difficult. Common triage tools are the mechanism of injury (MOI), vital signs, and anatomic injury (AI). Compared to the other tools, the clinical assessment of anatomic injury is more subjective than the others, and, hence, more dependent on the skills of the personnel. The aim of the study was to estimate whether the training and qualifications of the personnel are associated with the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury and the completion of pre-hospital procedures indicated by local guidelines. Methods Adult trauma patients met by a trauma team at Helsinki University Trauma Centre during a 12-month period (n = 422) were retrospectively analysed. To evaluate the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury, clinically assessed pre-hospital injuries in six body regions were compared to injuries assessed at hospital in two patient groups, the patients treated by pre-hospital physicians (group 1, n = 230) and those treated by paramedics (group 2, n = 190). Results The groups were comparable in respect to age, sex, and MOI, but the patients treated by physicians were more severely injured than those treated by paramedics [ISS median (interquartile range) 16 (6-26) vs. 6 (2-10)], thus rendering direct comparison of the groups ineligible. The positive predictive values (95% confidence interval) of assessed injury were highest in head injury [0,91 (0,84-0,95) in group 1 and 0,86 (0,77-0,92) in group 2]. The negative predictive values were highest in abdominal injury [0,85 (0,79-0,89) in group 1 and 0,90 (0,84-0,93) in group 2]. The measurements of agreement between injuries assessed pre- and in-hospitally were moderate in thoracic and extremity injuries. Substantial kappa values (95% confidence interval) were achieved in head injury, 0,67 (0,57-0,77) in group 1 and 0,63 (0,52-0,74) in group 2. The rate of performing the pre-hospital procedures as indicated by the local instructions was 95-99%, except for

  14. Salt appetite is reduced by a single experience of drinking hypertonic saline in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Michael P; Greenwood, Mingkwan; Paton, Julian F R; Murphy, David

    2014-01-01

    Salt appetite, the primordial instinct to favorably ingest salty substances, represents a vital evolutionary important drive to successfully maintain body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. This innate instinct was shown here in Sprague-Dawley rats by increased ingestion of isotonic saline (IS) over water in fluid intake tests. However, this appetitive stimulus was fundamentally transformed into a powerfully aversive one by increasing the salt content of drinking fluid from IS to hypertonic saline (2% w/v NaCl, HS) in intake tests. Rats ingested HS similar to IS when given no choice in one-bottle tests and previous studies have indicated that this may modify salt appetite. We thus investigated if a single 24 h experience of ingesting IS or HS, dehydration (DH) or 4% high salt food (HSD) altered salt preference. Here we show that 24 h of ingesting IS and HS solutions, but not DH or HSD, robustly transformed salt appetite in rats when tested 7 days and 35 days later. Using two-bottle tests rats previously exposed to IS preferred neither IS or water, whereas rats exposed to HS showed aversion to IS. Responses to sweet solutions (1% sucrose) were not different in two-bottle tests with water, suggesting that salt was the primary aversive taste pathway recruited in this model. Inducing thirst by subcutaneous administration of angiotensin II did not overcome this salt aversion. We hypothesised that this behavior results from altered gene expression in brain structures important in thirst and salt appetite. Thus we also report here lasting changes in mRNAs for markers of neuronal activity, peptide hormones and neuronal plasticity in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus following rehydration after both DH and HS. These results indicate that a single experience of drinking HS is a memorable one, with long-term changes in gene expression accompanying this aversion to salty solutions. PMID:25111786

  15. Osmotic hypertonicity of the renal medulla during changes in renal perfusion pressure in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Leszek; Ba̧dzyńska, Bożena; Walkowska, Agnieszka; Sadowski, Janusz

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between renal perfusion pressure (RPP) and ion concentration in renal medulla was studied in anaesthetized rats. RPP was changed in steps within the pressure range 130–80 mmHg, while tissue electrical admittance (Y, index of interstitial ion concentration) and medullary and cortical blood flow (MBF and CBF; laser Doppler flowmetry) were measured, along with glomerular filtration rate (Cin) and renal excretion. With a RPP reduction from 130 to 120 mmHg, tissue Y remained stable; at 100 and 80 mmHg, Y was 5 and 17 % lower, respectively, than at 120 mmHg. CBF fell less than RPP (partial autoregulation) in the range 130–100 mmHg only. MBF was autoregulated within 120–100 mmHg, but not above or below this range. Each step of RPP reduction was followed by a decrease in sodium and water excretion (UNaV and V). The osmolality of excised inner medulla fragments was similar at 120 and 105 mmHg (586 ± 45 and 618 ± 35 mosmol (kg H2O)−1, respectively) but lower at 80 mmHg (434 ± 31 mosmol (kg H2O)−1, P < 0.01); the ion concentration changed in parallel. The data show that medullary hypertonicity was well preserved during RPP fluctuations within 130–100 mmHg, but not below this range. RPP-dependent changes of UNaV and V were not clearly associated with changes in solute concentration in medullary tissue. PMID:9518743

  16. K(+) channels of squid giant axons open by an osmotic stress in hypertonic solutions containing nonelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kukita, Fumio

    2011-08-01

    In hypertonic solutions made by adding nonelectrolytes, K(+) channels of squid giant axons opened at usual asymmetrical K(+) concentrations in two different time courses; an initial instantaneous activation (I (IN)) and a sigmoidal activation typical of a delayed rectifier K(+) channel (I (D)). The current-voltage relation curve for I (IN) was fitted well with Goldman equation described with a periaxonal K(+) concentration at the membrane potential above -10 mV. Using the activation-voltage curve obtained from tail currents, K(+) channels for I (IN) are confirmed to activate at the membrane potential that is lower by 50 mV than those for I (D). Both I (IN) and I (D) closed similarly at the holding potential below -100 mV. The logarithm of I (IN)/I (D) was linearly related with the osmolarity for various nonelectrolytes. Solute inaccessible volumes obtained from the slope increased with the nonelectrolyte size from 15 to 85 water molecules. K(+) channels representing I (D) were blocked by open channel blocker tetra-butyl ammonium (TBA) more efficiently than in the absence of I (IN), which was explained by the mechanism that K(+) channels for I (D) were first converted to those for I (IN) by the osmotic pressure and then blocked. So K(+) channels for I (IN) were suggested to be derived from the delayed rectifier K(+) channels. Therefore, the osmotic pressure is suggested to exert delayed-rectifier K(+) channels to open in shrinking rather hydrophilic flexible parts outside the pore than the pore itself, which is compatible with the recent structure of open K(+) channel pore. PMID:21773888

  17. Median Preoptic Nucleus Mediates the Cardiovascular Recovery Induced by Hypertonic Saline in Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Naves, Lara Marques; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos Luiz; Freiria-Oliveira, André Henrique; Colombari, Eduardo; Reis, Angela Adamski da Silva; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Changes in plasma osmolarity, through central and peripheral osmoreceptors, activate the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) that modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine adjustments. The present study sought to determine the participation of MnPO in the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline infusion (HSI) in rats submitted to hemorrhagic shock. The recordings of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) were carried out on male Wistar rats (250–300 g). Hemorrhagic shock was induced by blood withdrawal over 20 min until the MAP values of approximately 60 mmHg were attained. The nanoinjection (100 nL) of GABAA agonist (Muscimol 4 mM; experimental group (EXP)) or isotonic saline (NaCl 150 mM; control (CONT)) into MnPO was performed 2 min prior to intravenous overload of sodium through HSI (3 M NaCl, 1.8 mL/kg, b.wt.). Hemorrhagic shock reduced the MAP in control (62 ± 1.1 mmHg) and EXP (61 ± 0.4 mmHg) equipotently. The inhibition of MnPO impaired MAP (CONT: 104 ± 4.2 versus EXP: 60 ± 6.2 mmHg) and RVC (CONT: 6.4 ± 11.4 versus EXP: -53.5 ± 10.0) recovery 10 min after HSI. The overall results in this study demonstrated, for the first time, that the MnPO plays an essential role in the HSI induced resuscitation during hypovolemic hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25485300

  18. Release of uremic retention solutes from protein binding by hypertonic predilution hemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Böhringer, Falko; Jankowski, Vera; Gajjala, Prathibha R; Zidek, Walter; Jankowski, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Protein-bound uremic retention solutes accumulate in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease, and the removal of these solutes by hemodialysis is hampered. Therefore, we developed a dialysis technique where the protein-bound uremic retention solutes are removed more efficiently under high ionic strength. Protein-bound uremic solutes such as phenylacetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresyl sulfate were combined with plasma in the presence of increased ionic strength. The protein integrity of proteins and enzymatic activities were analyzed. In vitro dialysis of albumin solution was performed to investigate the clearance of the bound uremic retention solutes. In vitro hemodiafiltrations of human blood were performed to investigate the influence of increased ionic strength on blood cell survival. The protein-bound fraction of phenylacetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresyl sulfate was significantly decreased from 59.4% ± 3.4%, 95.7% ± 0.6%, 96.9% ± 1.5% to 36.4% ± 3.7%, 87.8% ± 0.6%, and 90.8% ± 1.3%, respectively. The percentage of phenylacetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresyl sulfate released from protein was 23.0% ± 5.7%, 7.9% ± 1.1%, and 6.1% ± 0.2%, respectively. The clearance during in vitro dialysis was increased by 13.1% ± 3.6%, 68.8% ± 15.1%, and 53.6% ± 10.2%, respectively. There was no difference in NaCl concentrations at the outlet of the dialyzer using isotonic and hypertonic solutions. In conclusion, this study forms the basis for establishing a novel therapeutic approach to remove protein-bound retention solutes. PMID:25419832

  19. Inhaled hypertonic saline in adults hospitalised for exacerbation of cystic fibrosis lung disease: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, David A; Hornick, Douglas B; Durairaj, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhaled hypertonic saline (HTS) improves quality of life and reduces pulmonary exacerbations when given long term in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While increasingly being offered for acute pulmonary exacerbations, little is known about the efficacy in this setting. Objectives The authors examined the tolerability and efficacy of HTS use among adult subjects hospitalised with a CF pulmonary exacerbation and hypothesised that use of HTS would improve pulmonary function during the admission. Design Pilot retrospective non-randomised study. Setting Single tertiary care centre. Participants 45 subjects admitted to the inpatient service for acute CF pulmonary exacerbation in 2006–2007. A subset of 18 subjects who were also admitted in 2005 when HTS was not available was included in the comparative study. Primary outcome Change in forced expiratory volume in one second from admission to discharge. Secondary outcomes Change in weight from admission to discharge and time to next exacerbation. Results Mean age was 32.5 years, and mean length of stay was 11.5 days. HTS was offered to 33 subjects and was well tolerated for a total use of 336 days out of 364 days of hospital stay. Baseline demographics, lung function and sputum culture results were comparable in first and second visits. Use of HTS was not associated with an improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second (p=0.1), weight gain (p=0.24) or in the time to next admission (p=0.08). Conclusions These pilot data suggest that HTS is well tolerated during CF pulmonary exacerbation but offers no clear outcome benefits. It is possible that HTS may not have much advantage above and beyond intensive rehabilitation and intravenous antibiotics and may add to hospital costs and treatment burden. PMID:22517980

  20. Predetermining value analysis of the prehospital phase procedures in trauma victims survival.

    PubMed

    Malvestio, Marisa Aparecida Amaro; Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso de

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the determining value of the procedures carried out during prehospital care in the survival time of traffic accident victims. Data of 175 victims with Revised Trauma Score pound 11, cared for and transported by advanced life support to tertiary referral hospitals, were submitted to Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis and to Cox proportional hazards model. Four procedure groups associated with survival were identified: basic circulatory; advanced respiratory; volume replaced and medication. Until hospital discharge, the victims who underwent orotracheal intubation and chest compressions showed 3.6 and 6.4 times higher death hazards, respectively. The need for definitive airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the prehospital phase was predetermining with higher death hazard. The less than 1000 ml intravenous fluid replacement was the only predetermining factor with protective power against death hazard. PMID:18695818

  1. Maritime pre-hospital emergency care primary retrieval team--operational considerations.

    PubMed

    Newman, Darryl A

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the non clinical skills and training required for effective maritime pre-hospital emergency care provision within a Role Two Afloat facility, allowing for a Primary Retrieval Team to be deployed in support of boarding operations. The provision of pre-hospital emergency care and sending a retrieval team forward has been trialled in various forms. In 2010 and 2011 a R2A team was deployed aboard RFA FORT VICTORIA. This included a Primary Retrieval Team consisting of an Emergency Nurse Specialist, a Medical Assistant which can be enhanced when required by an Emergency Care or Anaesthetic Consultant. This differs from the land operations support provided by the airborne Medical Emergency Response Team (MERT) as the maritime environment requires a bespoke solution for casualty retrieval as the method of deployment and the type of casualties and their locations may be more varied, requiring greater flexibility of approach. PMID:22558736

  2. [Pre-hospital care for wounded in military conflicts: state and prospects].

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, I M; Reva, V A

    2015-10-01

    Pre-hospital care is one of the most important links in a chain of the military medical tenet. A survival of the most of severe casualties at the scene depends on a good quality and well-timed first aid and paramedic care. Based on the current state of medical equipment and training of the soldiers of the Russian and foreign armies, we summarized the data about the main medical products designed for pre-hospital care, briefly analyzed and compared their effectiveness to the foreign analogues. It is currently obvious, that fundamental changes in First aid kit modification and Medical Bags are warranted according to the reality and soldier's demands in combat operations. Proposals for modernization of military medical equipment were put forward. PMID:26827503

  3. Prehospital Use of Cervical Collars in Trauma Patients: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Asbjørnsen, Helge; Habiba, Samer; Sunde, Geir Arne; Wester, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The cervical collar has been routinely used for trauma patients for more than 30 years and is a hallmark of state-of-the-art prehospital trauma care. However, the existing evidence for this practice is limited: Randomized, controlled trials are largely missing, and there are uncertain effects on mortality, neurological injury, and spinal stability. Even more concerning, there is a growing body of evidence and opinion against the use of collars. It has been argued that collars cause more harm than good, and that we should simply stop using them. In this critical review, we discuss the pros and cons of collar use in trauma patients and reflect on how we can move our clinical practice forward. Conclusively, we propose a safe, effective strategy for prehospital spinal immobilization that does not include routine use of collars. PMID:23962031

  4. Instrument for assessing the quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care: content validation.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Rodrigo Assis Neves; Torres, Gilson de Vasconcelos; Salvetti, Marina de Góes; Dantas, Daniele Vieira; Mendonça, Ana Elza Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To validate an instrument to assess quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care. METHOD A methodological study where 20 professionals gave their opinions on the items of the proposed instrument. The analysis was performed using Kappa test (K) and Content Validity Index (CVI), considering K> 0.80 and CVI ≥ 0.80. RESULTS Three items were excluded from the instrument: Professional Compensation; Job Satisfaction and Services Performed. Items that obtained adequate K and CVI indexes and remained in the instrument were: ambulance conservation status; physical structure; comfort in the ambulance; availability of material resources; user/staff safety; continuous learning; safety demonstrated by the team; access; welcoming; humanization; response time; costumer privacy; guidelines on care; relationship between professionals and costumers; opportunity for costumers to make complaints and multiprofessional conjunction/actuation. CONCLUSION The instrument to assess quality of care has been validated and may contribute to the evaluation of pre-hospital care in mobile emergency services. PMID:26107697

  5. Prehospital Use of IM Ketamine for Sedation of Violent and Agitated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scheppke, Kenneth A.; Braghiroli, Joao; Shalaby, Mostafa; Chait, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Violent and agitated patients pose a serious challenge for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. Rapid control of these patients is paramount to successful prehospital evaluation and also for the safety of both the patient and crew. Sedation is often required for these patients, but the ideal choice of medication is not clear. The objective is to demonstrate that ketamine, given as a single intramuscular injection for violent and agitated patients, including those with suspected excited delirium syndrome (ExDS), is both safe and effective during the prehospital phase of care, and allows for the rapid sedation and control of this difficult patient population. Methods We reviewed paramedic run sheets from five different catchment areas in suburban Florida communities. We identified 52 patients as having been given intramuscular ketamine 4mg/kg IM, following a specific protocol devised by the EMS medical director of these jurisdictions, to treat agitated and violent patients, including a subset of which would be expected to suffer from ExDS. Twenty-six of 52 patients were also given parenteral midazolam after medical control was obtained to prevent emergence reactions associated with ketamine. Results Review of records demonstrated that almost all patients (50/52) were rapidly sedated and in all but three patients no negative side effects were noted during the prehospital care. All patients were subsequently transported to the hospital before ketamine effects wore off. Conclusion Ketamine may be safely and effectively used by trained paramedics following a specific protocol. The drug provides excellent efficacy and few clinically significant side effects in the prehospital phase of care, making it an attractive choice in those situations requiring rapid and safe sedation especially without intravenous access. PMID:25493111

  6. Prehospital transport practices prevalent among patients presenting to the pediatric emergency of a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Jhuma; Singh, Archana; Narsaria, Praveen; Dev, Nishanth; Singh, Pradeep; Dubey, Nandkishore

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Prehospital transport practices prevalent among children presenting to the emergency are under-reported. Our objectives were to evaluate the prehospital transport practices prevalent among children presenting to the pediatric emergency and their subsequent clinical course and outcome. Methods: In this prospective observational study we enrolled all children ≤17 years of age presenting to the pediatric emergency (from January to June 2013) and recorded their demographic data and variables pertaining to prehospital transport practices. Data was entered into Microsoft Excel and analyzed using Stata 11 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA). Results: A total of 319 patients presented to the emergency during the study period. Acute gastroenteritis, respiratory tract infection and fever were the most common reasons for presentation to the emergency. Seventy-three (23%) children required admission. Most commonly used public transport was auto-rickshaw (138, 43.5%) and median time taken to reach hospital was 22 min (interquartile range: 5, 720). Twenty-six patients were referred from another health facility. Of these, 25 were transported in ambulance unaccompanied. About 8% (25) of parents reported having difficulties in transporting their child to the hospital and 57% (181) of parents felt fellow passengers and drivers were unhelpful. On post-hoc analysis, only time taken to reach the hospital (30 vs. 20 min; relative risk [95% confidence interval]: 1.02 [1.007, 1.03], P = 0.003) and the illness nature were significant (45% vs. 2.6%; 0.58 [0.50, 0.67], P ≤ 0.0001) on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: In relation to prehospital transport among pediatric patients we observed that one-quarter of children presenting to the emergency required admission, the auto-rickshaw was the commonest mode of transport and that there is a lack of prior communication before referring patients for further management. PMID:26321808

  7. Emergency ultrasound in the prehospital setting: the impact of environment on examination outcomes.

    PubMed

    Snaith, B; Hardy, M; Walker, A

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to compare ultrasound examinations performed within a land ambulance (stationary and moving) with those completed in a simulated emergency department (ED) to determine the feasibility of undertaking ultrasound examinations within the UK prehospital care environment. The findings suggest that abdominal aortic aneurysm and extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma emergency ultrasound examinations can be performed in the stationary or moving land ambulance environment to a standard consistent with those performed in the hospital ED. PMID:21450758

  8. [Prehospital thrombolysis. Evaluation of preliminary experiences at Val-de-Marne].

    PubMed

    Dubois-Randé, J L; Herve, C; Duval-Moulin, A M; Gaillard, M; Boesch, C; Louvard, Y; Wolf, M; Jan, F; Castaigne, A

    1989-12-01

    Benefits of thrombolysis have been shown to be greater when therapy is administered early, and this led us to consider the value of starting thrombolytic treatment in the patient's home. However, this implies the transfer of responsibility of patient management from the cardiologist to the physician in charge of the mobile emergency care team. A study was undertaken in the Val-de-Marne department to assess the benefits and risks of this therapeutic approach. The first phase was designed to evaluate the reliability of the emergency care team's diagnosis and the second phase of the study was a randomised double blind prehospital therapeutic trial of a thrombolytic agent, acylated streptokinase (intravenous bolus of 30 units in 4 minutes) against placebo. The nature of prehospital treatment was revealed on hospital admission and thrombolytic therapy was immediately given to those patients allocated to placebo at home providing the admitting cardiologist confirmed the indication. A total of 100 patients were included; 57 were allocated to thrombolytic therapy and 43 to placebo in the prehospital phase. The diagnosis of acute coronary insufficiency was confirmed in all cases and 97 p. 100 of patients had signs of acute myocardial infarction. No complications were attributable to prehospital administration of the thrombolytic. The average time gain in instituting treatment was 60 minutes. At control coronary angiography, 72 p. 100 of the coronary arteries thought to the responsible for the infarct were shown to be patent. The global left ventricular ejection fraction of patients treated with thrombolysis at home was 56.7 p. 100 compared with 53.4 p. 100 in the placebo group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2515822

  9. Pre-hospital care seeking behaviour for childhood acute respiratory infections in south-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ukwaja, Kingsley N; Talabi, Ademola A; Aina, Olufemi B

    2012-12-01

    WHO/UNICEF currently recommend that childhood malaria and pneumonia be managed together in the community; most African countries are in the process of developing this policy. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine maternal awareness of general danger signs of childhood illnesses and the prevalence, determinants and sources of pre-hospital treatment by mothers during their child's acute respiratory illness in a poor urban community in south-western Nigeria. A total of 226 mothers were interviewed. Only 4.9% of the mothers were aware of the two pneumonia symptoms: difficult breathing and fast breathing. About 75% of the children were given pre-hospital medication at home and only 16.5% of them received the drugs within 24 hour of symptom recognition. Drug shops/patent medicine vendors (PMVs; 70.6%) were the most common source of care. Wishing to try home management first (46.6%); waiting for the child to improve (14.4%) and lack of money (31.6%) delayed care-seeking. Older maternal age (aOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.2-4.4) and having a child with cough and difficult and/or fast breathing (aOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.1-5.2) were positive predictors of pre-hospital treatment. Maternal education and adequately equipping PMVs could improve prompt access to integrated community-based child health services in Nigeria. PMID:24029675

  10. Impact of Prehospital Care on Outcomes in Sepsis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is a common and potentially life-threatening response to an infection. International treatment guidelines for sepsis advocate that treatment be initiated at the earliest possible opportunity. It is not yet clear if very early intervention by ambulance clinicians prior to arrival at hospital leads to improved clinical outcomes among sepsis patients. Methoda We systematically searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. We adopted the GRADE (grading recommendations assessment, development and evaluation) methodology to conduct the review and follow PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations to report findings. Results Nine studies met the eligibility criteria – one study was a randomized controlled trial while the remaining studies were observational in nature. There was considerable variation in the methodological approaches adopted and outcome measures reported across the studies. Because of these differences, the studies did not answer a unique research question and meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Conclusion There is little robust evidence addressing the impact of prehospital interventions on outcomes in sepsis. That which is available is of low quality and indicates that prehospital interventions have limited impact on outcomes in sepsis beyond improving process outcomes and expediting the patient’s passage through the emergency care pathway. Evidence indicating that prehospital antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation improve patient outcomes is currently lacking. PMID:27429693

  11. Pre-hospital advanced airway management by anaesthesiologists: Is there still room for improvement?

    PubMed Central

    Sollid, Stephen JM; Heltne, Jon Kenneth; Søreide, Eldar; Lossius, Hans Morten

    2008-01-01

    Background Endotracheal intubation is an important part of pre-hospital advanced life support that requires training and experience, and should only be performed by specially trained personnel. In Norway, anaesthesiologists serve as Helicopter Emergency Medical Service HEMS physicians. However, little is known about how they themselves evaluate the quality and safety of pre-hospital advanced airway management. Method Using a semi-structured questionnaire, we interviewed anaesthesiologists working in the three HEMS programs covering Western Norway. We compared answers from specialists and non-specialists as well as full- and part-time HEMS physicians. Results Of the 17 available respondents, most (88%) felt that their continuous exposure to intubations was not sufficient. Additional training was mainly acquired through other clinical practice and mannequin- or cadaver-based skills training. Of the respondents, 77% and 35% reported having experienced difficult and failed intubations, respectively. Further, 59% reported knowledge of airway management-related deaths in their HEMS program. Significantly more full- than part-time HEMS physicians had experienced these problems. All respondents had airway back-up equipment in their service, but 29% were not familiar with all the equipment. Conclusion The majority of anaesthesiologists working as HEMS physicians view pre-hospital advanced airway management as a high-risk procedure. Relevant airway management competencies for HEMS physicians in Norway seem to be insufficiently trained and maintained. A better-defined level of competence with better training methods and systems seems warranted. PMID:18957064

  12. A consensus-based template for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physician-staffed pre-hospital units are employed in many Western emergency medical services (EMS) systems. Although these services usually integrate well within their EMS, little is known about the quality of care delivered, the precision of dispatch, and whether the services deliver a higher quality of care to pre-hospital patients. There is no common data set collected to document the activity of physician pre-hospital activity which makes shared research efforts difficult. The aim of this study was to develop a core data set for routine documentation and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services in Europe. Methods Using predefined criteria, we recruited sixteen European experts in the field of pre-hospital care. These experts were guided through a four-step modified nominal group technique. The process was carried out using both e-mail-based communication and a plenary meeting in Stavanger, Norway. Results The core data set was divided into 5 sections: "fixed system variables", "event operational descriptors", " patient descriptors", "process mapping", and "outcome measures and quality indicators". After the initial round, a total of 361 variables were proposed by the experts. Subsequent rounds reduced the number of core variables to 45. These constituted the final core data set. Emphasis was placed on the standardisation of reporting time variables, chief complaints and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions Using a modified nominal group technique, we have established a core data set for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services. We believe that this template could facilitate future studies within the field and facilitate standardised reporting and future shared research efforts in advanced pre-hospital care. PMID:22107787

  13. Baclofen into the lateral parabrachial nucleus induces hypertonic sodium chloride intake during cell dehydration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Activation of GABAB receptors with baclofen into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) induces ingestion of water and 0.3 M NaCl in fluid replete rats. However, up to now, no study has investigated the effects of baclofen injected alone or combined with GABAB receptor antagonist into the LPBN on water and 0.3 M NaCl intake in rats with increased plasma osmolarity (rats treated with an intragastric load of 2 M NaCl). Male Wistar rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted bilaterally into the LPBN were used. Results In fluid replete rats, baclofen (0.5 nmol/0.2 μl), bilaterally injected into the LPBN, induced ingestion of 0.3 M NaCl (14.3 ± 4.1 vs. saline: 0.2 ± 0.2 ml/210 min) and water (7.1 ± 2.9 vs. saline: 0.6 ± 0.5 ml/210 min). In cell-dehydrated rats, bilateral injections of baclofen (0.5 and 1.0 nmol/0.2 μl) into the LPBN induced an increase of 0.3 M NaCl intake (15.6 ± 5.7 and 21.5 ± 3.5 ml/210 min, respectively, vs. saline: 1.7 ± 0.8 ml/210 min) and an early inhibition of water intake (3.5 ± 1.4 and 6.7 ± 2.1 ml/150 min, respectively, vs. saline: 9.2 ± 1.4 ml/150 min). The pretreatment of the LPBN with 2-hydroxysaclofen (GABAB antagonist, 5 nmol/0.2 μl) potentiated the effect of baclofen on 0.3 M NaCl intake in the first 90 min of test and did not modify the inhibition of water intake induced by baclofen in cell-dehydrated rats. Baclofen injected into the LPBN did not affect blood pressure and heart rate. Conclusions Thus, injection of baclofen into the LPBN in cell-dehydrated rats induced ingestion of 0.3 M NaCl and inhibition of water intake, suggesting that even in a hyperosmotic situation, the blockade of LPBN inhibitory mechanisms with baclofen is enough to drive rats to drink hypertonic NaCl, an effect independent of changes in blood pressure. PMID:23642235

  14. Ad Libitum Fluid Intake and Plasma Responses After Pickle Juice, Hypertonic Saline, or Deionized Water Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Scott; Miller, Kevin C.; Albrecht, Jay; Garden-Robinson, Julie; Blodgett-Salafia, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Context: Adding sodium (Na+) to drinks improves rehydration and ad libitum fluid consumption. Clinicians (∼25%) use pickle juice (PJ) to treat cramping. Scientists warn against PJ ingestion, fearing it will cause rapid plasma volume restoration and thereby decrease thirst and delay rehydration. Advice about drinking PJ has been developed but never tested. Objective: To determine if drinking small volumes of PJ, hypertonic saline (HS), or deionized water (DIW) affects ad libitum DIW ingestion, plasma variables, or perceptual indicators. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen, euhydrated (urine specific gravity ≤ 1.01) men (age = 22 ± 2 years, height = 178 ± 6 cm, mass = 82.9 ± 8.4 kg). Intervention(s): Participants completed 3 testing days (≥72 hours between days). After a 30-minute rest, a blood sample was collected. Participants completed 60 minutes of hard exercise (temperature = 36 ± 2°C, relative humidity = 16 ± 1%). Postexercise, they rested for 30 minutes; had a blood sample collected; rated thirst, fullness, and nausea; and ingested 83 ± 8 mL of PJ, HS, or DIW. They rated drink palatability (100-mm visual analog scale) and were allowed to drink DIW ad libitum for 60 minutes. Blood samples and thirst, fullness, and nausea ratings (100-mm visual analog scales) were collected at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes posttreatment drink ingestion. Main Outcome Measure(s): Ad libitum DIW volume, percentage change in plasma volume, plasma osmolality (OSMp,) plasma sodium concentration ([Na+]p), and thirst, fullness, nausea, and palatability ratings. Results: Participants consumed more DIW ad libitum after HS (708.03 ± 371.03 mL) than after DIW (532.99 ± 337.14 mL, P < .05). Ad libitum DIW ingested after PJ (700.35 ± 366.15 mL) was similar to that after HS and DIW (P > .05). Plasma sodium concentration, OSMp, percentage change in plasma volume, thirst, fullness, and nausea did not differ among treatment drinks

  15. Effect of Atractylodes macrocephala on Hypertonic Stress-Induced Water Channel Protein Expression in Renal Collecting Duct Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Pyo; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Yoon, Jung Joo; Kim, Hye Yoom; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Edema is a symptom that results from the abnormal accumulation of fluid in the body. The cause of edema is related to the level of aquaporin (AQP)2 protein expression, which regulates the reabsorption of water in the kidney. Edema is caused by overexpression of the AQP2 protein when the concentration of Na(+) in the blood increases. The rhizome of Atractylodes macrocephala has been used in traditional oriental medicine as a diuretic drug; however, the mechanism responsible for the diuretic effect of the aqueous extract from A. macrocephala rhizomes (AAMs) has not yet been identified. We examined the effect of the AAM on the regulation of water channels in the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-3 cells under hypertonic stress. Pretreatment of AAM attenuates a hypertonicity-induced increase in AQP2 expression as well as the trafficking of AQP2 to the apical plasma membrane. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is a transcription factor known to play a central role in cellular homeostasis by regulating the expression of some proteins, including AQP2. Western immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expression levels of TonEBP also decrease after AAM treatment. These results suggest that the AAM has a diuretic effect by suppressing water reabsorption via the downregulation of the TonEBP-AQP2 signaling pathway. PMID:23258995

  16. Comparative study of midtrimester termination of pregnancy using hypertonic saline, ethacridine lactate, prostaglandin analogue and iodine-saline.

    PubMed

    Allahbadia, G

    1992-09-01

    The study consisted of terminations of 200 cases of second trimester pregnancies ranging from 14 weeks to 20 weeks. Out of these 200 cases, in 50 cases intra-amniotic instillation of 20% hypertonic saline (200 ml) was done after withdrawing 35-200 ml of amniotic fluid. Ethacridine lactate was instilled in 50 cases extra-amniotically. Prostaglandin F2 alpha was injected intramuscularly at regular intervals in 50 cases. Fifty cases of pregnancies were terminated with extra-amniotic instillation of 5% povidone-iodine solution mixed with normal saline. Comparison was made among all the methods regarding instillation-abortion interval, completeness of abortion, failure of the procedure and postoperative complications. Solution of 5% povidone-iodine in normal saline was found to be comparable in all aspects to other methods and above all a much cheaper alternative for poor patients. Success rate was highest with iodine-saline solution (100%) followed by ethacridine lactate (98%), hypertonic saline (96%) and lowest with prostaglandin F2 alpha (90%). PMID:1460314

  17. The Need for More Prehospital Research on Language Barriers: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Ramsey C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite evidence from other healthcare settings that language barriers negatively impact patient outcomes, the literature on language barriers in emergency medical services (EMS) has not been previously summarized. The objective of this study is to systematically review existing studies of the impact of language barriers on prehospital emergency care and identify opportunities for future research. Methods A systematic review with narrative synthesis of publications with populations specific to the prehospital setting and outcome measures specific to language barriers was conducted. A four-prong search strategy of academic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, and Clinical Key) through March 2015, web-based search for gray literature, search of citation lists, and review of key conference proceedings using pre-defined eligibility criteria was used. Language-related outcomes were categorized and reported as community-specific outcomes, EMS provider-specific outcomes, patient-specific outcomes, or health system-specific outcomes. Results Twenty-two studies met eligibility criteria for review. Ten publications (45%) focused on community-specific outcomes. Language barriers are perceived as a barrier by minority language speaking communities to activating EMS. Eleven publications (50%) reported outcomes specific to EMS providers, with six of these studies focused on EMS dispatch. EMS dispatchers describe less accurate and delayed dispatch of resources when confronted with language discordant callers, as well as limitations in the ability to provide medical direction to callers. There is a paucity of research on EMS treatment and transport decisions, and no studies provided patient-specific or health system-specific outcomes. Key research gaps include identifying the mechanisms by which language barriers impact care, the effect of language barriers on EMS utilization and clinically significant outcomes, and the cost implications of addressing language

  18. Trauma Simulation Training Increases Confidence Levels in Prehospital Personnel Performing Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Archita D.; Meurer, David A.; Shuster, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Limited evidence is available on simulation training of prehospital care providers, specifically the use of tourniquets and needle decompression. This study focused on whether the confidence level of prehospital personnel performing these skills improved through simulation training. Methods. Prehospital personnel from Alachua County Fire Rescue were enrolled in the study over a 2- to 3-week period based on their availability. Two scenarios were presented to them: a motorcycle crash resulting in a leg amputation requiring a tourniquet and an intoxicated patient with a stab wound, who experienced tension pneumothorax requiring needle decompression. Crews were asked to rate their confidence levels before and after exposure to the scenarios. Timing of the simulation interventions was compared with actual scene times to determine applicability of simulation in measuring the efficiency of prehospital personnel. Results. Results were collected from 129 participants. Pre- and postexposure scores increased by a mean of 1.15 (SD 1.32; 95% CI, 0.88–1.42; P < 0.001). Comparison of actual scene times with simulated scene times yielded a 1.39-fold difference (95% CI, 1.25–1.55) for Scenario 1 and 1.59 times longer for Scenario 2 (95% CI, 1.43–1.77). Conclusion. Simulation training improved prehospital care providers' confidence level in performing two life-saving procedures. PMID:27563467

  19. Randomised clinical study comparing the effectiveness and physiological effects of hypertonic and isotonic polyethylene glycol solutions for bowel cleansing

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Hiro-o; Matsushita, Hiro-o; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Takagi, Ryo; Harada, Eiji; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakaoka, Michiko; Himori, Ryogo; Yoshida, Yuko; Satou, Kentarou; Imai, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Bowel cleansing is necessary before colonoscopy, but is a burden to patients because of the long cleansing time and large dose volume. A low-volume (2 L) hypertonic polyethylene glycol-ascorbic acid solution (PEG-Asc) has been introduced, but its possible dehydration effects have not been quantitatively studied. We compared the efficacy and safety including the dehydration risk between hypertonic PEG-Asc and isotonic PEG regimens. Design This was an observer-blinded randomised study. Participants (n=310) were allocated to receive 1 of 3 regimens on the day of colonoscopy: PEG-Asc (1.5 L) and water (0.75 L) dosed with 1 split (PEG-Asc-S) or 4 splits (PEG-Asc-M), or PEG-electrolyte solution (PEG-ES; 2.25 L) dosed with no split. Dehydration was analysed by measuring haematocrit (Ht). Results The cleansing time using the hypertonic PEG-Asc-S (3.33±0.48 hours) was significantly longer than that with isotonic PEG-ES (3.05±0.56 hours; p<0.001). PEG-Asc-M (3.00±0.53 hours) did not have this same disadvantage. Successful cleansing was achieved in more than 94% of participants using each of the 3 regimens. The percentage changes in Ht from baseline (before dosing) to the end of dosing with PEG-Asc-S (3.53±3.32%) and PEG-Asc-M (4.11±3.07%) were significantly greater than that with PEG-ES (1.31±3.01%). Conclusions These 3 lower volume regimens were efficacious and had no serious adverse effects. Even patients cleansed with isotonic PEG-ES showed significant physiological dehydration at the end of dosing. The four-split PEG-Asc-M regimen is recommended because of its shorter cleansing time without causing serious nausea. Trial registration number UMIN000013103; Results. PMID:27547443

  20. Intravenous access during pre-hospital emergency care of non-injured patients: a population-based outcome study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Cooke, Colin R.; Hebert, Paul L.; Rea, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Advanced, pre-hospital procedures such as intravenous access are commonly performed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, yet little evidence supports their use among non-injured patients. We evaluated the association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients. Methods We analyzed a population-based cohort of adult (aged ≥18 years) non-injured, non-arrest patients transported by four advanced life support agencies to one of 16 hospitals from January 1, 2002 until December 31, 2006. We linked eligible EMS records to hospital administrative data, and used multivariable logistic regression to determine the risk-adjusted association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and hospital mortality. We also tested whether this association differed by patient acuity using a previously published, out-of-hospital triage score. Results Among 56,332 eligible patients, one half (N=28,978, 50%) received pre-hospital intravenous access from EMS personnel. Overall hospital mortality in patients who did and did not receive intravenous access was 3%. However, in multivariable analyses, the placement of pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with an overall reduction in odds of hospital mortality (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.56, 0.81). The beneficial association of intravenous access appeared to depend on patient acuity (p=0.13 for interaction). For example, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 1.38 (95%CI: 0.28, 7.0) among those with lowest acuity (score = 0). In contrast, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 0.38 (95%CI: 0.17, 0.9) among patients with highest acuity (score ≥ 6). Conclusions In this population-based cohort, pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with a reduction in hospital mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients with the highest acuity. PMID:21872970

  1. Intramuscular midazolam versus intravenous lorazepam for the prehospital treatment of status epilepticus in the pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Robert D.; Nicholas, Katherine; Durkalski-Mauldin, Valerie L.; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Conwit, Robin; Mahajan, Prashant V.; Lewandowski, Christopher; Silbergleit, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine the effectiveness of intramuscular (IM) midazolam versus intravenous (IV) lorazepam for the treatment of pediatric patients with status epilepticus (SE) in the prehospital care setting. Methods This multicenter clinical trial randomized patients diagnosed with SE to receive either IM midazolam or IV lorazepam administered by paramedics in the prehospital care setting. Included in this secondary analysis were only patients younger than 18 years of age. Evaluated were the associations of the treatment group (IM vs. IV) with the primary outcome, defined as seizure cessation prior to emergency department (ED) arrival, and with patient characteristics, time to important events, and adverse events. Descriptive statistics and 99% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for the analysis. Results Of 893 primary study subjects, 120 met criteria for this study (60 in each treatment group). There were no differences in important baseline characteristics or seizure etiologies between groups. The primary outcome was met in 41 (68.3%) and 43 (71.7%) of subjects in the IM and IV groups, respectively (risk difference [RD] −3.3%, 99% CI −24.9% to 18.2%). Similar results were noted for those younger than 11 years (RD −1.3%, 99% CI −25.7% to 23.1%). Time from initiating the treatment protocol was shorter for children who received IM midazolam, mainly due to the shorter time to administer the active treatment. Safety profiles were similar. Significance IM midazolam can be rapidly administered and appears to be safe and effective for the management of children with SE treated in the prehospital setting. The results must be interpreted in the context of the secondary analysis design and sample size of the study. PMID:25597369

  2. Effects of prehospital hypothermia on transfusion requirements and outcomes: a retrospective observatory trial

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Nora; Gräff, Ingo; Fleischer, Andreas; Boehm, Olaf; Guttenthaler, Vera; Baumgarten, Georg; Meybohm, Patrick; Wittmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Prehospital hypothermia is defined as a core temperature <36.0°C and has been shown to be an independent risk factor for early death in patients with trauma. In a retrospective study, a possible correlation between the body temperature at the time of admission to the emergency room and subsequent in-hospital transfusion requirements and the in-hospital mortality rate was explored. Setting This is a retrospective single-centre study at a primary care hospital in Germany. Participants 15 895 patients were included in this study. Patients were classified by admission temperature and transfusion rate. Excluded were ambulant patients and patients with missing data. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome values were length of stay (LOS) in days, in-hospital mortality, the transferred amount of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), and admission to an intensive care unit. Secondary influencing variables were the patient's age and the Glasgow Coma Scale. Results In 22.85% of the patients, hypothermia was documented. Hypothermic patients died earlier in the course of their hospital stay than non-hypothermic patients (p<0.001). The administration of 1–3 PRBC increased the LOS significantly (p<0.001) and transfused patients had an increased risk of death (p<0.001). Prehospital hypothermia could be an independent risk factor for mortality (adjusted OR 8.521; p=0.001) and increases the relative risk for transfusion by factor 2.0 (OR 2.007; p=0.002). Conclusions Low body temperature at hospital admission is associated with a higher risk of transfusion and death. Hence, a greater awareness of prehospital temperature management should be established. PMID:27029772

  3. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. Objectives To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. Patients and Methods This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. Results There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed. PMID:24350154

  4. Lightweight physiologic sensor performance during pre-hospital care delivered by ambulance clinicians.

    PubMed

    Mort, Alasdair J; Fitzpatrick, David; Wilson, Philip M J; Mellish, Chris; Schneider, Anne

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of motion generated by ambulance patient management on the performance of two lightweight physiologic sensors. Two physiologic sensors were applied to pre-hospital patients. The first was the Contec Medical Systems CMS50FW finger pulse oximeter, monitoring heart rate (HR) and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The second was the RESpeck respiratory rate (RR) sensor, which was wireless-enabled with a Bluetooth(®) Low Energy protocol. Sensor data were recorded from 16 pre-hospital patients, who were monitored for 21.2 ± 9.8 min, on average. Some form of error was identified on almost every HR and SpO2 trace. However, the mean proportion of each trace exhibiting error was <10 % (range <1-50 % for individual patients). There appeared to be no overt impact of the gross motion associated with road ambulance transit on the incidence of HR or SpO2 error. The RESpeck RR sensor delivered an average of 4.2 (±2.2) validated breaths per minute, but did not produce any validated breaths during the gross motion of ambulance transit as its pre-defined motion threshold was exceeded. However, this was many more data points than could be achieved using traditional manual assessment of RR. Error was identified on a majority of pre-hospital physiologic signals, which emphasised the need to ensure consistent sensor attachment in this unstable and unpredictable environment, and in developing intelligent methods of screening out such error. PMID:25804608

  5. Development and Validation of a Portable Platform for Deploying Decision-Support Algorithms in Prehospital Settings

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, A. T.; Khitrov, M. Y.; Chen, L.; Blood, A.; Wilkins, K.; Doyle, W.; Wilcox, S.; Denison, T.; Reifman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Advanced decision-support capabilities for prehospital trauma care may prove effective at improving patient care. Such functionality would be possible if an analysis platform were connected to a transport vital-signs monitor. In practice, there are technical challenges to implementing such a system. Not only must each individual component be reliable, but, in addition, the connectivity between components must be reliable. Objective We describe the development, validation, and deployment of the Automated Processing of Physiologic Registry for Assessment of Injury Severity (APPRAISE) platform, intended to serve as a test bed to help evaluate the performance of decision-support algorithms in a prehospital environment. Methods We describe the hardware selected and the software implemented, and the procedures used for laboratory and field testing. Results The APPRAISE platform met performance goals in both laboratory testing (using a vital-sign data simulator) and initial field testing. After its field testing, the platform has been in use on Boston MedFlight air ambulances since February of 2010. Conclusion These experiences may prove informative to other technology developers and to healthcare stakeholders seeking to invest in connected electronic systems for prehospital as well as in-hospital use. Our experiences illustrate two sets of important questions: are the individual components reliable (e.g., physical integrity, power, core functionality, and end-user interaction) and is the connectivity between components reliable (e.g., communication protocols and the metadata necessary for data interpretation)? While all potential operational issues cannot be fully anticipated and eliminated during development, thoughtful design and phased testing steps can reduce, if not eliminate, technical surprises. PMID:24155791

  6. A consensus based template for reporting of pre-hospital major incident medical management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Structured reporting of major incidents has been advocated to improve the care provided at future incidents. A systematic review identified ten existing templates for reporting major incident medical management, but these templates are not in widespread use. We aimed to address this challenge by designing an open access template for uniform reporting of data from pre-hospital major incident medical management that will be tested for feasibility. Methods An expert group of thirteen European major incident practitioners, planners or academics participated in a four stage modified nominal group technique consensus process to design a novel reporting template. Initially, each expert proposed 30 variables. Secondly, these proposals were combined and each expert prioritized 45 variables from the total of 270. Thirdly, the expert group met in Norway to develop the template. Lastly, revisions to the final template were agreed via e-mail. Results The consensus process resulted in a template consisting of 48 variables divided into six categories; pre-incident data, Emergency Medical Service (EMS) background, incident characteristics, EMS response, patient characteristics and key lessons. Conclusions The expert group reached consensus on a set of key variables to report the medical management of pre-hospital major incidents and developed a novel reporting template. The template will be freely available for downloading and reporting on http://www.majorincidentreporting.org. This is the first global open access database for pre-hospital major incident reporting. The use of a uniform dataset will allow comparative analysis and has potential to identify areas of improvement for future responses. PMID:24517242

  7. Potential cardiac arrest – an observational study of pre-hospital medical response

    PubMed Central

    Zakariassen, Erik; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A previous study showed that Norwegian GPs on call attended around 40% of out-of-hospital medical emergencies. We wanted to investigate the alarms of prehospital medical resources and the doctors' responses in situations of potential cardiac arrests. Design and setting A three-month prospective data collection was undertaken from three emergency medical communication centres, covering a population of 816,000 residents. From all emergency medical events, a sub-group of patients who received resuscitation, or who were later pronounced dead at site, was selected for further analysis. Results 5,105 medical emergencies involving 5,180 patients were included, of which 193 met the inclusion criteria. The GP on call was alarmed in 59 %, and an anaesthesiologist in 43 % of the cases. When alarmed, a GP attended in 84 % and an anaesthesiologist in 87 % of the cases. Among the patients who died, the GP on call was alarmed most frequently. Conclusion Events involving patients in need of resuscitation are rare, but medical response in the form of the attendance of prehospital personnel is significant. Norwegian GPs have a higher call-out rate for patients in severe situations where resuscitation was an option of treatment, compared with other “red-response” situations. Key pointsThis study investigates alarms of and call-outs among GPs and anaesthesiologists on call, in the most acute clinical situations:Medical emergencies involving patients in need of resuscitation were rare.The health care contribution by pre-hospital personnel being called out was significant.Compared with other acute situations, the GP had a higher attendance rate to patients in life-threatening situations. PMID:27092724

  8. Hypertonicity-induced p38MAPK activation elicits recovery of corneal epithelial cell volume and layer integrity.

    PubMed

    Bildin, V N; Wang, Z; Iserovich, P; Reinach, P S

    2003-05-01

    In hypertonicity-stressed (i.e., 600 mOsm) SV40-immortalized rabbit and human corneal epithelial cell layers (RCEC and HCEC, respectively), we characterized the relationship between time-dependent changes in translayer resistance, relative cell volume and modulation of MAPK superfamily activities. Sulforhodamine B permeability initially increased by 1.4- and 2-fold in RCEC and HCEC, respectively. Subsequently, recovery to its isotonic level only occurred in RCEC. Light scattering revealed that in RCEC 1) regulatory volume increase (RVI) extent was 20% greater; 2) RVI half-time was 2.5-fold shorter. However, inhibition of Na-K-2Cl cotransporter and Na/K-ATPase activity suppressed the RVI response more in HCEC. MAPK activity changes were as follows: 1) p38 was wave-like and faster as well as larger in RCEC than in HCEC (90- and 18-fold, respectively); 2) increases in SAPK/JNK activity were negligible in comparison to those of p38; 3) Erk1/2 activity declined to 30-40% of their basal values. SB203580, a specific p38 inhibitor, dose dependently suppressed the RVI responses in both cell lines. However, neither U0126, which inhibits MEK, the kinase upstream of Erk, nor SP600125, inhibitor of SAPK/JNK, had any effect on this response. Taken together, sufficient activation of the p38 limb of the MAPK superfamily during a hypertonic challenge is essential for maintaining epithelial cell volume and translayer resistance. On the other hand, Erk1/2 activity restoration seems to be dependent on cell volume recovery. PMID:12879161

  9. Pre-hospital, Maritime In-Transit care from a Role 2 Afloat platform.

    PubMed

    Whalley, L; Smith, S

    2013-01-01

    Maritime In-Transit Care (MITC) is a new concept to allow the provision of pre-hospital care in the maritime environment within Role 2 Afloat (R2A) teams. This article describes the experiences of an Emergency Medicine nurse and a Medical Assistant who made up the MITC team on the recent R2A exercise on RFA CARDIGAN BAY. As well as describing their personal experiences, the concept of the MITC team is introduced and their role within R2A outlined. PMID:24511798

  10. [The use of pre-hospital tourniquets in life-threatening extremity traumas].

    PubMed

    Lyngsaa Lang, Christian; Lauridsen, Trine; Boel, Thomas

    2015-08-17

    Tourniquets have been used for centuries. They have been called lifesavers and "an invention of the evil one". 90.9% of deaths on the battlefields result from haemorrhage. Lessons learned du­ring the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have developed the treat­ment given to hypovolaemic patients on the battlefield. Treating bleeding and hypovolaemia is now considered as the primary intervention. The tourniquet has proven to be an indis­pensable tool treating wounded soldiers, with little risk of complications. The tourniquet might also show to be a valuable asset in a pre-hospital urban setting. PMID:26561659

  11. Improving adjustments for older age in pre-hospital assessment and care.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Marius

    2013-01-01

    Population estimates projects a significant increase in the geriatric population making elderly trauma patients more common. The geriatric trauma patients experience higher incidence of pre-existing medical conditions, impaired age-dependent physiologic reserve, use potent drugs and suffer from trauma system related shortcomings that influence outcomes. To improve adjustments for older age in pre-hospital assessment and care, several initiatives should be implemented. Decision-makers should make system revisions and introduce advanced point-of-care initiatives to improve outcome after trauma for the elderly. PMID:23343340

  12. High Yield Research Opportunities in Geriatric Emergency Medicine: Prehospital Care, Delirium, Adverse Drug Events, and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Shah, Manish N.; Hustey, Fredric M.; Heard, Kennon; Gerson, Lowell W.

    2011-01-01

    Emergency services constitute crucial and frequently used safety nets for older persons, an emergency visit by a senior very often indicates high vulnerability for functional decline and death, and interventions via the emergency system have significant opportunities to change the clinical course of older patients who require its services. However, the evidence base for widespread employment of emergency system-based interventions is lacking. In this article, we review the evidence and offer crucial research questions to capitalize on the opportunity to optimize health trajectories of older persons seeking emergency care in four areas: prehospital care, delirium, adverse drug events, and falls. PMID:21498881

  13. Communicative Management in Ambulatory Services: Prehospital Management Communication--Limits and Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Poor management communication in healthcare services affects employees' motivation, commitment, and, in the final instance, organizational performance and the quality of patient care. In any area of health management, good communication is, therefore, key to successful management. This article discusses how managers of ambulance stations should secure communication with their paramedic crews. The first part uses ethical concepts to analyze communicative disagreement in interactive dialogue between managers and paramedics. The second part outlines basic communication principles that can serve as conceptual tools for avoiding misinterpretation in prehospital manager-employee interaction. PMID:26182699

  14. Association of Prehospital Shock Index and Trauma Bay Uncrossmatched Red Blood Cell Transfusion With Multiple Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Day, Darcy L; Anzelon, Kathleen M; Conde, Franscisco A

    2016-01-01

    Early resuscitation of bleeding trauma patients with multiple blood products improves outcome, yet transfusion initiation is not standardized. Shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure) and trauma bay uncrossmatched red blood cell (RBC) transfusion were evaluated for association with multiple transfusions, defined as 6 or more RBCs during the first 6 hrs of hospital presentation. A prehospital shock index of 1 was significantly associated with multiple transfusions (p = .02). Subjects receiving uncrossmatched RBCs required more RBCs during the first 6 hrs (10.3 units, p < .01). Consideration of these simple variables may help trauma nurses anticipate the potentially bleeding patient. PMID:26953537

  15. Barriers and facilitators to provide effective pre-hospital trauma care for road traffic injury victims in Iran: a grounded theory approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries are a major global public health problem. Improvements in pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize mortality and morbidity from road traffic injuries (RTIs) worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with a high rate of RTIs such as Iran. The current study aimed to explore pre-hospital trauma care process for RTI victims in Iran and to identify potential areas for improvements based on the experience and perception of pre-hospital trauma care professionals. Methods A qualitative study design using a grounded theory approach was selected. The data, collected via in-depth interviews with 15 pre-hospital trauma care professionals, were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results Seven categories emerged to describe the factors that hinder or facilitate an effective pre-hospital trauma care process: (1) administration and organization, (2) staff qualifications and competences, (3) availability and distribution of resources, (4) communication and transportation, (5) involved organizations, (6) laypeople and (7) infrastructure. The core category that emerged from the other categories was defined as "interaction and common understanding". Moreover, a conceptual model was developed based on the categories. Conclusions Improving the interaction within the current pre-hospital trauma care system and building a common understanding of the role of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) emerged as key issues in the development of an effective pre-hospital trauma care process. PMID:21059243

  16. Strategically Leapfrogging Education in Prehospital Trauma Management: Four-Tiered Training Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Rohit; Vyas, Dinesh; Narayan, Mayur; Vyas, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Trauma-related injury in fast developing countries are linked to 90% of international mortality rates, which can be greatly reduced by improvements in often non-existent or non-centralized emergency medical systems (EMS)—particularly in the pre-hospital care phase. Traditional trauma training protocols—such as Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS), International Trauma Life Support (ITLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS)—have failed to produce an effective pre-hospital ground force of medical first responders. To overcome these barriers, we propose a new four-tiered set of trauma training protocols: Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Trauma Training, Acute Trauma Training (ATT), Broad Trauma Training (BTT), and Cardiac and Trauma Training (CTT). These standards are specifically differentiated to accommodate the educational and socioeconomic diversity found in fast developing settings, where each free course is taught in native, lay language while ensuring the education standards are maintained by fully incorporating high-fidelity simulation, video-recorded debriefing, and retraining. The innovative pedagogy of this trauma education program utilizes MOOC for global scalability and a “train-the-trainer” approach for exponential growth—both components help fast developing countries reach a critical mass of first responders needed for the base of an evolving EMS. PMID:27419222

  17. A method to reduce response times in prehospital care: the motorcycle experience.

    PubMed

    Lin, C S; Chang, H; Shyu, K G; Liu, C Y; Lin, C C; Hung, C R; Chen, P H

    1998-11-01

    This study compared the response times of a motorcycle and a standard ambulance in a congested urban emergency medical services (EMS) setting. The study was performed in Taipei, Taiwan, a densely populated urban area. A basic life support (BLS) motorcycle (without defibrillation capability) and an advanced life support (ALS) ambulance were based at three study hospitals and simultaneously dispatched when there was a perceived need for ALS ambulance transport. Over a 3-month period, prehospital personnel evaluated 307 medical and trauma emergencies. Time data were insufficient for analysis in 33 cases, leaving a study population of 274. Response times of the motorcycle and the ambulance were prospectively assessed and compared. During rush hours, the response times of the motorcycle and ambulance were 4.9+/-3.0 minutes and 6.3+/-3.4 minutes (P < .05), respectively, and in non-rush hours, 4.2+/-2.1 minutes and 5.1+/-2.5 minutes (P < .05), respectively. Using motorcycles to transport EMTs to the emergency scene significantly reduced response time compared with a standard ambulance in a congested urban setting. Large prospective studies are required to determine the impact on patient outcome of shorter EMS response times using motorcycles. EMS motorcycles appear feasible and deserve consideration to help expedite prehospital care in other systems in densely populated cities. PMID:9827757

  18. Medium-fidelity medical simulators: use in a pre-hospital, operational, military environment.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J J; Forbes, K; Woolrich-Burt, L; Russell, R; Mahoney, P F

    2006-09-01

    On Operation Telic 6, the UK Med Group consisting of 3 Close Support Medical Regiment and 205 Field Hospital (Volunteers) deployed to provide medical support to coalition forces in Iraq. Personnel were drawn from Regular and Territorial Units, plus additional medical support from Armies of the Czech Republic and Denmark. The efficient delivery of operational emergency medical care hinged upon the successful integration of personnel from these units. We report on the use of a medium-fidelity simulator, in a pre-hospital and hospital environment over a three month period on an operational tour. In conducting 42 exercises (12 of which commenced in a pre-hospital environment), we have demonstrated the feasibility of the system in rehearsing the management of the major trauma patient. This training was used to enhance teamwork, identify system deficiencies and practise solutions in a safe environment. This paper discusses our experiences in relation to the current literature on this expanding area of trauma training. PMID:17295008

  19. Prehospital stroke diagnosis and treatment in ambulances and helicopters-a concept paper.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Thilo; Dunford, James V; Schlachetzki, Felix; Boy, Sandra; Hemmen, Thomas; Meyer, Brett C; Serra, John; Powers, Jeff; Voie, Arne

    2013-04-01

    Stroke is the second common cause of death and the primary cause of early invalidity worldwide. Different from other diseases is the time sensitivity related to stroke. In case of an ischemic event occluding a brain artery, 2000000 neurons die every minute. Stroke diagnosis and treatment should be initiated at the earliest time point possible, preferably at the site or during patient transport. Portable ultrasound has been used for prehospital diagnosis for applications other than stroke, and its acceptance as a valuable diagnostic tool "in the field" is growing. The intrahospital use of transcranial ultrasound for stroke diagnosis has been described extensively in the literature. Beyond its diagnostic use, first clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical work demonstrate that ultrasound can be used to accelerate clot lysis (sonothrombolysis) in presence as well as in absence of tissue plasminogen activator. Hence, the use of transcranial ultrasound for diagnosis and possibly treatment of stroke bares the potential to add to current stroke care paradigms significantly. The purpose of this concept article is to describe the opportunities presented by recent advances in transcranial ultrasound to diagnose and potentially treat large vessel embolic stroke in the prehospital environment. PMID:23415600

  20. Paramedic Recognition of Sepsis in the Prehospital Setting: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Andrew H.; Cain, Edward; Campbell, Samuel G.; Jensen, Jan L.; Petrie, David A.; Erdogan, Mete; Patrick, Gredi; Patrick, Ward

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with sepsis benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Accurate paramedic recognition of sepsis is important to initiate care promptly for patients who arrive by Emergency Medical Services. Methods. Prospective observational study of adult patients (age ≥ 16 years) transported by paramedics to the emergency department (ED) of a Canadian tertiary hospital. Paramedic identification of sepsis was assessed using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool developed by the study team and compared to blind, independent documentation of ED diagnoses by attending emergency physicians (EPs). Specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value, and likelihood ratios were calculated with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Overall, 629 patients were included in the analysis. Sepsis was identified by paramedics in 170 (27.0%) patients and by EPs in 71 (11.3%) patients. Sensitivity of paramedic sepsis identification compared to EP diagnosis was 73.2% (95% CI 61.4–83.0), while specificity was 78.8% (95% CI 75.2–82.2). The accuracy of paramedic identification of sepsis was 78.2% (492/629, 52 true positive, 440 true negative). Positive and negative predictive values were 30.6% (95% CI 23.8–38.1) and 95.9% (95% CI 93.6–97.5), respectively. Conclusion. Using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool, paramedic recognition of sepsis had greater specificity than sensitivity with reasonable accuracy. PMID:27051533

  1. Pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of severe injuries: changes and trends.

    PubMed

    Hussmann, Bjoern; Lendemans, Sven

    2014-10-01

    The pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of most severely injured patients has dramatically changed over the last 20 years. In this context, the factor time has gained more and more attention, particularly in German-speaking countries. While the management in the early 1990s aimed at comprehensive and complete therapy at the accident site, the premise today is to stabilise trauma patients at the accident site and transfer them into the hospital rapidly. In addition, the introduction of training and education programmes such as Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS(®)), Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS(®)) concept or the TEAM(®) concept has increased the quality of treatment of most severely injured trauma patients both in the preclinical field and in the emergency trauma room. Today, all emergency surgical procedures in severely injured patients are generally performed in accordance with the Damage Control Orthopaedics (DCO) principle. The advancements described in this article provide examples for the improved quality of the management of severely injured patients in the preclinical field and during the initial in-hospital treatment phase. The implementation of trauma networks, the release of the S3 polytrauma guidelines, and the DGU "Weißbuch" have contributed to a more structured management of most severely injured patients. PMID:25284232

  2. Prehospital delay in patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Choon Chiet; Sultana, Papia; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Chan, Kim Poh; Pek, Pin Pin; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2011-10-01

    To characterize prehospital delays in patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital in Asia. A retrospective review of 273 patients with diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction; symptom to door (S2D) time was described in two ways, time from first onset of symptoms; and time from the onset of the worst episode to presentation at emergency department. The median first onset S2D time was 173 min (interquartile range 80-350 min); and median worst episode S2D time was 131 min (interquartile range 70-261 min). Patients with prehospital delay tended to use their own transport compared with the no delay group (P=0.026, 95% confidence interval=0.02-0.24). There was no difference in S2D times for typical compared with atypical symptoms. A large proportion of patients experienced delay in seeking medical care after the onset of acute coronary symptoms. Self-transport was associated with delay. PMID:21317785

  3. The Development of Sustainable Emergency Care in Ghana: Physician, Nursing and Prehospital Care Training Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Martel, John; Oteng, Rockefeller; Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Bell, Sue Anne; Zakariah, Ahmed; Oduro, George; Kowalenko, Terry; Donkor, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Ghana’s first Emergency Medicine residency and nursing training programs were initiated in 2009 and 2010, respectively, at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in the city of Kumasi in association with Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and the Universities of Michigan and Utah. In addition, the National Ambulance Service was commissioned initially in 2004 and has developed to include both prehospital transport services in all regions of the country and Emergency Medical Technician training. Over a decade of domestic and international partnership has focused on making improvements in emergency care at a variety of institutional levels, culminating in the establishment of comprehensive emergency care training programs. Objective We describe the history and status of novel post-graduate emergency physician, nurse and prehospital provider training programs as well as the prospect of creating a board certification process and formal continuing education program for practicing emergency physicians. Discussion Significant strides have been made in the development of emergency care and training in Ghana over the last decade, resulting in the first group of Specialist level EM physicians as of late 2012, as well as development of accredited emergency nursing curricula and continued expansion of a national EMS. Conclusion This work represents a significant move toward in-country development of sustainable, interdisciplinary, team-based emergency provider training programs designed to retain skilled healthcare workers in Ghana and may serve as a model for similar developing nations. PMID:25066956

  4. Barriers of Pre-Hospital Services in Road Traffic Injuries in Tehran: The Viewpoint of Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    Alinia, Shahrokh; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Maddah, Sadat Seyed Bagher; Negarandeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran is one of the countries with considerable road traffic injuries. Pre-hospital interventions have an important role in preventing mortalities and disabilities caused by traffic accidents. The present study aimed to explore the barriers of pre-hospital care in traffic injuries in Tehran, Iran. Methods: A qualitative content analysis approach was conducted based on 21 semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and then data condensing, labeling, coding and defining categories were performed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Four main barriers including 4 main categories and 13 subcategories emerged; they included Barriers related to people, Barriers related to metropolitan infrastructure, Barriers related to the profession and Barriers related to managerial issues. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, pre-hospital service barriers in traffic accidents have many dimensions including cultural, structural and managerial domains. Policy makers in health system can use these findings to promote the quality of pre-hospital services, especially in the field of traffic injuries. PMID:26448954

  5. An Introduction to Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Pre-Hospital Phase. Emergency Medical Services Orientation, Lesson Plan No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Derrick P.

    Designed for use with interested students at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges, this lesson plan was developed to provide an introduction to the pre-hospital phase of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and to serve as a recruitment tool for the EMS Program at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) in Hawaii. The objectives of the…

  6. Review on pharmacological pain management in trauma patients in (pre-hospital) emergency medicine in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, B M; Berben, S A A; van Dongen, R T M; Schoonhoven, L

    2014-01-01

    Pain is one of the main complaints of trauma patients in (pre-hospital) emergency medicine. Significant deficiencies in pain management in emergency medicine have been identified. No evidence-based protocols or guidelines have been developed so far, addressing effectiveness and safety issues, taking the specific circumstances of pain management of trauma patients in the chain of emergency care into account. The aim of this systematic review was to identify effective and safe initial pharmacological pain interventions, available in the Netherlands, for trauma patients with acute pain in the chain of emergency care. Up to December 2011, a systematic search strategy was performed with MeSH terms and free text words, using the bibliographic databases CINAHL, PubMed and Embase. Methodological quality of the articles was assessed using standardized evaluation forms. Of a total of 2328 studies, 25 relevant studies were identified. Paracetamol (both orally and intravenously) and intravenous opioids (morphine and fentanyl) proved to be effective. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) showed mixed results and are not recommended for use in pre-hospital ambulance or (helicopter) emergency medical services [(H)EMS]. These results could be used for the development of recommendations on evidence-based pharmacological pain management and an algorithm to support the provision of adequate (pre-hospital) pain management. Future studies should address analgesic effectiveness and safety of various drugs in (pre-hospital) emergency care. Furthermore, potential innovative routes of administration (e.g., intranasal opioids in adults) need further exploration. PMID:23737462

  7. Prehospital Lactated Ringer's Solution Treatment and Survival in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Prospective Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hagihara, Akihito; Hasegawa, Manabu; Abe, Takeru; Wakata, Yoshifumi; Nagata, Takashi; Nabeshima, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Background No studies have evaluated whether administering intravenous lactated Ringer's (LR) solution to patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) improves their outcomes, to our knowledge. Therefore, we examined the association between prehospital use of LR solution and patients' return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), 1-month survival, and neurological or physical outcomes at 1 month after the event. Methods and Findings We conducted a prospective, non-randomized, observational study using national data of all patients with OHCA from 2005 through 2009 in Japan. We performed a propensity analysis and examined the association between prehospital use of LR solution and short- and long-term survival. The study patients were ≥18 years of age, had an OHCA before arrival of EMS personnel, were treated by EMS personnel, and were then transported to hospitals. A total of 531,854 patients with OHCA met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, compared with those who did not receive pre-hospital intravenous fluids, prehospital use of LR solution was associated with an increased likelihood of ROSC before hospital arrival (odds ratio [OR] adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 1.239 [1.146–1.339] [p<0.001], but with a reduced likelihood of 1-month survival with minimal neurological or physical impairment (cerebral performance category 1 or 2, OR adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 0.764 [0.589–0.992] [p = 0.04]; and overall performance category 1 or 2, OR adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 0.746 [0.573–0.971] [p = 0.03]). There was no association between prehospital use of LR solution and 1-month survival (OR adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 0.960 [0.854–1.078]). Conclusion In Japanese patients experiencing OHCA, the prehospital use of LR solution was independently associated with a decreased likelihood of a good functional outcome 1 month after the event, but with an increased likelihood of ROSC

  8. Pre-hospital cooling of patients following cardiac arrest is effective using even low volumes of cold saline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pre-hospital induction of therapeutic mild hypothermia (TH) may reduce post-cardiac arrest brain injury in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Most often, it is induced by a rapid intravenous administration of as much as 30 ml/kg of cold crystalloids. We decided to assess the pre-hospital cooling effectivity of this approach by using a target dose of 15-20 ml/kg of 4°C cold normal saline in the setting of the physician-staffed Emergency Medical Service. The safety and impact on the clinical outcome have also been analyzed. Methods We performed a prospective observational study with a retrospective control group. A total of 40 patients were cooled by an intravenous administration of 15-20 ml/kg of 4°C cold normal saline during transport to the hospital (TH group). The pre-hospital decrease of tympanic temperature (TT) was analyzed as the primary endpoint. Patients in the control group did not undergo any pre-hospital cooling. Results In the TH group, administration of 12.6 ± 6.4 ml/kg of 4°C cold normal saline was followed by a pre-hospital decrease of TT of 1.4 ± 0.8°C in 42.8 ± 19.6 min (p < 0.001). The most effective cooling was associated with a transport time duration of 38-60 min and with an infusion of 17 ml/kg of cold saline. In the TH group, a trend toward a reduced need for catecholamines during transport was detected (35.0 vs. 52.5%, p = 0.115). There were no differences in demographic variables, comorbidities, parameters of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation and in other post-resuscitation characteristics. The coupling of pre-hospital cooling with subsequent in-hospital TH predicted a favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (OR 4.1, CI95% 1.1-18.2, p = 0.046). Conclusions Pre-hospital induction of TH by the rapid intravenous administration of cold normal saline has been shown to be efficient even with a lower dose of coolant than reported in previous studies. This dose can be associated with a

  9. The Quality of Pre-Hospital Oxygen Therapy in Patients With Multiple Trauma: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Paravar, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a major healthcare challenge worldwide. In developing countries, most road deaths happen during the pre-hospital phase; consequently, pre-hospital trauma care has received considerable attention during the past decades. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital oxygen therapy in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services to the central trauma department in Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, Kashan, Iran. The data collection instrument had three parts including demographic, a trauma assessment, and an oxygen therapy quality assessment questionnaires that were designed by the researchers. In total, 350 patients with multiple trauma were recruited from March through July 2013. Data were described by using frequency tables, central tendency measures, and variability indices. Moreover, we analyzed data by using the Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, and the logistic regression analysis. Results: The study sample consisted of 263 (75.1%) male and 87 (24.9%) female patients. Overall, 211 patients needed oxygen therapy during the pre-hospital phase; however, only 35 (16.60%) patients had received oxygen. The quality of oxygen therapy was undesirable in 92.42% of cases. In addition, 83.4% of patients, whose pre-hospital records indicated the administration of oxygen, reported that they had not received oxygen therapy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the place of accident and the level of patients' education were significant predictors for administration of oxygen during the pre-hospital phase (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The quality of pre-hospital oxygen therapy had been provided for the patients with multiple trauma was poor while these patients, particularly patients with chest traumas and head injuries, were in

  10. Nontraumatic Hypotension and Shock in the Emergency Department and the Prehospital setting, Prevalence, Etiology, and Mortality: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Bech, Camilla Nørgaard; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Mikkelsen, Søren; Pedersen, Court; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute patients presenting with hypotension in the prehospital or emergency department (ED) setting are in need of focused management and knowledge of the epidemiology characteristics might help the clinician. The aim of this review was to address prevalence, etiology and mortality of nontraumatic hypotension (SBP ≤ 90 mmHg) with or without the presence of shock in the prehospital and ED setting. Methods We performed a systematic literature search up to August 2013, using Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Dare and The Cochrane Library. The analysis and eligibility criteria were documented according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA-guidelines) and The Cochrane Collaboration. No restrictions on language, publication date, or status were imposed. We used the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale (NOS-scale) and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE-statement) to assess the quality. Results Six observational studies were considered eligible for analysis based on the evaluation of 11,880 identified papers. Prehospital prevalence of hypotension was 19.5/1000 emergency medicine service (EMS) contacts, and the prevalence of hypotensive shock was 9.5-19/1000 EMS contacts with an inhospital mortality of shock between 33 to 52%. ED prevalence of hypotension was 4-13/1000 contacts with a mortality of 12%. Information on mortality, prevalence and etiology of shock in the ED was limited. A meta-analysis was not feasible due to substantial heterogeneity between studies. Conclusion There is inadequate evidence to establish concise estimates of the characteristics of nontraumatic hypotension and shock in the ED or in the prehospital setting. The available studies suggest that 2% of EMS contacts present with nontraumatic hypotension while 1-2% present with shock. The inhospital mortality of prehospital shock is 33-52%. Prevalence of hypotension in the ED is 1% with an inhospital

  11. Long-term improvement of lung clearance index in patients with mild cystic fibrosis lung disease: Does hypertonic saline play a role?

    PubMed

    Ellemunter, Helmut; Eder, Johannes; Fuchs, Susanne; Gappa, Monika; Steinkamp, Gratiana

    2016-01-01

    To assess whether long-term inhalation with hypertonic saline is able to halt the progression of mild CF lung disease, we analysed longitudinal data of lung clearance index (LCI) and spirometry. A total of 34 patients with mild lung disease (FEV1 ≥ 70% of predicted) had at least one LCI result before and ≥2 LCI measurements after start of hypertonic saline (HS) therapy. After a mean follow-up of 39.7 (SD 7.4) months after starting HS, LCI improved significantly from 7.89 (SD 1.35) at baseline to 6.96 (SD 1.03), and 19/34 patients had a normal LCI value at the last measurement. No decrease in mean FEV1 was observed. Thus, ventilation inhomogeneity can improve in patients with mild lung disease. PMID:26190829

  12. Substance P-like peptides and vasopressin release from posterior pituitary lobe incubated in situ after intracarotid injections of hypertonic solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Traczyk, W Z; Strumillo-Dyba, E

    1977-01-01

    The experiments were performed on male rats, drinking 2% NaCl solution ad libitum for 12 days instead of tap water. The pituitary gland was exposed by the transpharyngeal approach under urethane-chloralose anaesthesia. The posterior lobe remained in neural and partial vascular connection with the hypothalamus, whereas the anterior lobe was entirely removed. Samples of the outflow medium from the incubated in situ rat posterior pituitary lobe were collected during 30 min intervals. Substance P-like peptides and vasopressin activities were assayed by the biological tests. Injections of hypertonic solution into the internal carotid artery did not change vasopressin release, but induced an increase in Substance P release from the posterior pituitary lobe into the incubation medium. Under conditions of unexcitability of the osmosensitive cells, triggering vasopressin release, the injection of hypertonic solution into the internal carotid artery stimulated the Substance P-like peptides release from the posterior pituitary lobe. PMID:22985

  13. Body water handling in response to hypertonic-saline induced diuresis in fasting northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2003-01-01

    During natural fasting conditions in postweaned northern elephant seal (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) pups, urinary water loss is minimized and percent total body water (TBW) is maintained constant. However, following infusion of hypertonic saline, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine output increased in fasting pups. Therefore, we quantified the magnitude of the hypernatremia-induced diuresis relative to the animal's total body water (TBW) pool and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed. Following a 24 h control period, naturally fasting NES pups (n=7) were infused (4 ml min(-1)) with hypertonic saline (16.7%) at a dose of 3 mmol NaCl kg(-1) body mass. Total body water was estimated prior to infusion by tritium dilution, GFR was estimated by standard creatinine clearance, and urine output (V) was measured for 24 h during the control and post infusion periods. Percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was calculated as (1-(V/GFR))x100. Twenty-four hours following the infusion, GFR (control: 69+/-12 ml min(-1) and post-infusion: 118+/-19 ml min(-1); mean+/-S.E.) increased 77+/-28% above control and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was decreased 0.4+/-0.1%. The increase in urine output (control: 218+/-47 ml d(-1) and post-infusion: 883+/-92 ml d(-1)) accounted for 1.7+/-0.2% of the pups' TBW. The hypernatremia-induced diuresis was accompanied by the loss of body water indicating the lack of water retention. Although the 77% increase in GFR was only associated with a 0.4% decrease in the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed, this decrease was significant enough to result in a 4-fold increase in urine output. Despite the observed diuresis, fasting NES pups appear to possess an efficient water recycling mechanism requiring only a small percentage of body water to excrete an excess salt load. This water recycling mechanism may allow pups to avoid negative perturbations in body water as they initiate feeding in a marine environment following the

  14. Selective response of human airway epithelia to luminal but not serosal solution hypertonicity. Possible role for proximal airway epithelia as an osmolality transducer.

    PubMed Central

    Willumsen, N J; Davis, C W; Boucher, R C

    1994-01-01

    The response of cultured human nasal epithelia to hypertonic bathing solutions was tested using ion-selective microelectrode and quantitative microscopy. Raised luminal, but not serosal, osmolality (+/- 150 mM mannitol) decreased Na+ absorption but did not induce Cl- secretion. Raised luminal osmolality increased cell Cl- activity, Na+ activity, and transepithelial resistance and decreased both apical and basolateral membrane potentials and the fractional resistance of the apical membrane; equivalent circuit analysis revealed increases in apical, basolateral, and shunt resistances. Prolonged exposure (10 min) to 430 mosM luminal solution elicited no regulation of any parameter. Optical measurements revealed a reduction in the thickness of preparations only in response to luminal hypertonic solutions. We conclude that (a) airway epithelial cells exhibit asymmetric water transport properties, with the apical membrane water permeability exceeding that of the basolateral membrane; (b) the cellular response to volume loss is a deactivation of the basolateral membrane K+ conductance and the apical membrane Cl- conductance; (c) luminal hypertonicity slows the rate of Na+ absorption but does not induce Cl- secretion; and (d) cell volume loss increases the resistance of the paracellular path. We speculate that these properties configure human nasal epithelium to behave as an osmotic sensor, transducing information about luminal solutions to the airway wall. Images PMID:8040333

  15. German critical incident reporting system database of prehospital emergency medicine: Analysis of reported communication and medication errors between 2005–2015

    PubMed Central

    Hohenstein, Christian; Fleischmann, Thomas; Rupp, Peter; Hempel, Dorothea; Wilk, Sophia; Winning, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Communication failure in prehospital emergency medicine can affect patient safety as it does in other areas of medicine as well. We analyzed the database of the critical incident reporting system for prehospital emergency medicine in Germany retrospectively regarding communication errors. METHODS: Experts of prehospital emergency medicine and risk management screened the database for verbal communication failure, non-verbal communication failure and missing communication at all. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2015, 845 reports were analyzed, of which 247 reports were considered to be related to communication failure. An arbitrary classification resulted in six different kinds: 1) no acknowledgement of a suggestion; 2) medication error; 3) miscommunication with dispatcher; 4) utterance heard/understood improperly; 5) missing information transfer between two persons; and 6) other communication failure. CONCLUSION: Communication deficits can lead to critical incidents in prehospital emergency medicine and are a very important aspect in patient safety. PMID:27313802

  16. Probabilistic Linkage of Prehospital and Outcomes Data in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Mumma, Bryn E.; Diercks, Deborah B.; Danielsen, Beate; Holmes, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lack of longitudinal patient outcome data is an important barrier in emergency medical services (EMS) research. We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of linking prehospital data from the California EMS Information Systems (CEMSIS) database to outcomes data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) database for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods We included patients age 18 years or older who sustained non-traumatic OHCA and were included in the 2010–2011 CEMSIS databases. The CEMSIS database is a unified EMS data collection system for California. The OSHPD database is a comprehensive data collection system for patient-level inpatient and emergency department encounters in California. OHCA patients were identified in the CEMSIS database using cardiac rhythm, procedures, medications, and provider impression. Probabilistic linkage blocks were created using in hospital death or one of the following primary or secondary diagnoses (I CD-9-CM) in the OSHPD databases: cardiac arrest (427.5), sudden death (798), ventricular tachycardia (427.1), ventricular fibrillation (427.4), and acute myocardial infarction (410.xx). Blocking variables included incident date, gender, date of birth, age, and/or destination facility. Due to the volume of cases, match thresholds were established based on clerical record review for each block individually. Match variables included incident date, destination facility, date of birth, sex, race, and ethnicity. Results Of the 14,603 cases of OHCA we identified in the prehospital databases, 91 (0.6%) duplicate records were excluded. Overall, 46% of the data used in the linkage algorithm were missing in CEMSIS. We linked 4,961/14,512 (34.2%) records. Linkage rates varied significantly by local EMS agency, ranging from 1.4% to 61.1% (OR for linkage 0.009–0.76; p<0.0001). After excluding the local EMS agency with the outlying low linkage rate, we linked 4,934/12,596 (39

  17. Prehospital and hospital delays after stroke onset--United States, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    2007-05-18

    Each year approximately 700,000 persons in the United States have a new or recurrent stroke; of these persons, 15%-30% become permanently disabled, and 20% require institutionalization during the first 3 months after the stroke. The severity of stroke-related disability can be reduced if timely and appropriate treatment is received. Patients with ischemic stroke may be eligible for treatment with intravenous thrombolytic (i.e., tissue plasminogen activator [t-PA]) therapy within 3 hours of symptom onset. Receipt of this treatment usually requires patients to recognize stroke symptoms and receive prompt transport to a hospital emergency department (ED), where timely evaluation and brain imaging (i.e., computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) can take place. For patients eligible for t-PA, evidence suggests that the earlier patients are treated after the onset of symptoms the greater the likelihood of a more favorable outcome. In 2001, Congress established the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry to measure and track the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients. To assess prehospital delays from onset of stroke symptoms to ED arrival and hospital delays from ED arrival to receipt of brain imaging, CDC analyzed data from the four states participating in the national stroke registry. The results of that analysis indicated that fewer than half (48.0%) of stroke patients for whom onset data were available arrived at the ED within 2 hours of symptom onset, and prehospital delays were shorter for persons transported to the ED by ambulance (i.e., emergency medical services) than for persons who did not receive ambulance transport. The interval between ED arrival and brain imaging also was significantly reduced for those arriving by ambulance. More extensive public education is needed regarding early recognition of stroke and the urgency of telephoning 9-1-1 to receive ambulance transport. Shortening prehospital and hospital delays will increase

  18. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  19. Neurological outcomes in patients transported to hospital without a prehospital return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction As emergency medical services (EMS) personnel in Japan are not allowed to perform termination of resuscitation in the field, most patients experiencing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) are transported to hospitals without a prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). As the crucial prehospital factors for outcomes are not clear in patients who had an OHCA without a prehospital ROSC, we aimed to determine the prehospital factors associated with 1-month favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (CPC 1–2)). Methods We analyzed the data of 398,121 adult OHCA patients without a prehospital ROSC from a prospectively recorded nationwide Utstein-style Japanese database from 2007 to 2010. The primary endpoint was 1-month CPC 1–2. Results The rate of 1-month CPC 1–2 was 0.49%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the independent variables associated with CPC 1–2 were the following nine prehospital factors: (1) initial non-asystole rhythm (ventricular fibrillation (VF): adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 9.37; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.71 to 11.4; pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT): aOR, 8.50; 95% CI, 5.36 to 12.9; pulseless electrical activity (PEA): aOR, 2.75; 95% CI, 2.40 to 3.15), (2) age <65 years (aOR, 3.90; 95% CI, 3.28 to 4.67), (3) arrest witnessed by EMS personnel (aOR, 2.82; 95% CI, 2.48 to 3.19), (4) call-to-hospital arrival time <24 minutes (aOR, 2.58; 95% CI, 2.22 to 3.01), (5) arrest witnessed by any layperson, (6) physician-staffed ambulance, (7) call-to-response time <5 minutes, (8) prehospital shock delivery, and (9) presumed cardiac cause. When four crucial key factors (with an aOR >2.0 in the regression model: initial non-asystole rhythm, age <65 years, EMS-witnessed arrest, and call-to-hospital arrival time <24 minutes) were present, the rates of 1-month CPC 1–2 and 1-month survival were 16.1% and 23.2% in initial VF, 8.3% and 16.7% in pulseless VT, and 3

  20. Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sit, Regina Ws; Chung, Vincent Ch; Reeves, Kenneth D; Rabago, David; Chan, Keith Kw; Chan, Dicken Cc; Wu, Xinyin; Ho, Robin St; Wong, Samuel Ys

    2016-01-01

    Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) is an emerging treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) but its efficacy is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to synthesize clinical evidence on the effect of prolotherapy for knee OA. Fifteen electronic databases were searched from their inception to September 2015. The primary outcome of interest was score change on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moderate risk of bias and one quasi-randomized trial were included, with data from a total of 258 patients. In the meta-analysis of two eligible studies, prolotherapy is superior to exercise alone by a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.18 to 1.45, p = 0.012), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.25 to 1.30, p = 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.04 to 1.20, p = 0.035) on the WOMAC composite scale; and WOMAC function and pain subscale scores respectively. Moderate heterogeneity exists in all cases. Overall, prolotherapy conferred a positive and significant beneficial effect in the treatment of knee OA. Adequately powered, longer-term trials with uniform end points are needed to better elucidate the efficacy of prolotherapy. PMID:27146849

  1. G-CSF Administration after the Intraosseous Infusion of Hypertonic Hydroxyethyl Starches Accelerating Wound Healing Combined with Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Tong, Chuan; Ti, Dongdong; Liu, Huiling; Song, Haijing; Jiang, Chaoguang; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of G-CSF administration after intraosseous (IO) resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury rats. Methods. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) HS with resuscitation (blank), (2) HS with resuscitation + G-CSF (G-CSF, 200 μg/kg body weight, subcutaneous injection), (3) HS with resuscitation + normal saline solution injection (normal saline), and (4) HS + G-CSF injection without resuscitation (Unres/G-CSF). To estimate the treatment effects, the vital signs of alteration were first evaluated, and then wound closure rates and homing of MSCs and EPCs to the wound skins and vasculogenesis were measured. Besides, inflammation and vasculogenesis related mRNA expressions were also examined. Results. IO infusion hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch (HHES) exhibited beneficial volume expansion roles and G-CSF administration accelerated wound healing 3 days ahead of other groups under hemorrhagic shock. Circulating and the homing of MSCs and EPCs at wound skins were significantly elevated at 6 h after G-CSF treatment. Inflammation was declined since 3 d while angiogenesis was more obvious in G-CSF treated group on day 9. Conclusions. These results suggested that the synergistical application of HHES and G-CSF has life-saving effects and is beneficial for improving wound healing in HS combined with cutaneous injury rats. PMID:26989687

  2. Ejaculatio praecox, erectio praecox, and detumescentia praecox as symptoms of a hypertonic state in lifelong premature ejaculation: a new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2014-06-01

    In the last two decades, in vivo animal research and human neurobiological, genetic and pharmacological research of lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) have much contributed to a better understanding of the role of the central and peripheral nervous systems in mediating ejaculation. Research of genetic polymorphisms in men with lifelong PE and clinical research of the validity of the classification into four PE subtypes have provided a better insight into lifelong PE and its distinction from the three other PE subtypes. Nevertheless, a number of symptoms of lifelong PE and its treatment by SSRIs are still not well understood. In the current article, it will be argued that lifelong PE is characterized not only by early ejaculations (ejaculatio praecox), a diminished control over ejaculation, and negative personal consequences, but also by early erections (erectio praecox) and an immediately occurring detumescence of the penis after ejaculation (detumescentia praecox) as symptoms of an (sub)acute hypertonic or hypererotic physical state when making love. Based on animal research it is postulated that the facilitated erection, facilitated ejaculation and facilitated penile detumescence are associated with centrally and peripherally increased oxytocin release. In addition, it is postulated that mechano- and thermosensory activity of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, located in skin receptors of the glans penis, are associated with lifelong PE. Research into the three characteristics of the (sub)acute hypererotic state will presumably contribute to a better phenomenological description of and better neurobiological understanding of lifelong PE and its delineation to the three other PE subtypes. PMID:24333546

  3. Effects of hypertonic stimuli and arginine vasotocin (AVT) on water absorption response in Japanese treefrog, Hyla japonica.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Sho; Yamada, Toshiki; Hamada, Takayuki; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2008-06-01

    Anuran amphibians do not drink orally but absorb water osmotically through the highly permeable ventral skin. In this cutaneous water absorption, roles of the putative cerebral osmoreceptors and functions of arginine vasotocin (AVT) were examined in the central nervous system of the Japanese treefrog, Hyla japonica. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intralymphatic sac (ILS) administration of various hypertonic solutions (NaCl, mannitol and urea) significantly extended the residence time in water in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting facilitation of water absorption in frogs. ICV injection of AVT also increased significantly the residence time in a dose-dependent manner. The water absorption effect of AVT was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of ICV OPC-21268, a vasopressin V(1) receptor antagonist. But pre-ICV injection of OPC-31260, a vasopressin V(2) receptor antagonist, did not block the water absorption effect of AVT. Extension of the residence time induced by hyperosmotic NaCl (1000 mOsm) ICV injection was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of ICV OPC-21268. The present results showed that increases of osmotic pressure in plasma and/or cerebrospinal fluid stimulate water absorption response, suggesting that osmoreceptors are certainly present in the central nervous system and AVT may directly stimulate water absorption in the treefrog. It is also suggested that AVT activates cellular mechanisms via V(1)-like but not V(2)-like receptors in the central nervous system and facilitates water absorption response in the treefrog. PMID:18555070

  4. Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Regina WS; Chung, Vincent CH; Reeves, Kenneth D.; Rabago, David; Chan, Keith KW; Chan, Dicken CC; Wu, Xinyin; Ho, Robin ST; Wong, Samuel YS

    2016-01-01

    Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) is an emerging treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) but its efficacy is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to synthesize clinical evidence on the effect of prolotherapy for knee OA. Fifteen electronic databases were searched from their inception to September 2015. The primary outcome of interest was score change on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moderate risk of bias and one quasi–randomized trial were included, with data from a total of 258 patients. In the meta-analysis of two eligible studies, prolotherapy is superior to exercise alone by a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.18 to 1.45, p = 0.012), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.25 to 1.30, p = 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.04 to 1.20, p = 0.035) on the WOMAC composite scale; and WOMAC function and pain subscale scores respectively. Moderate heterogeneity exists in all cases. Overall, prolotherapy conferred a positive and significant beneficial effect in the treatment of knee OA. Adequately powered, longer-term trials with uniform end points are needed to better elucidate the efficacy of prolotherapy. PMID:27146849

  5. Inhaled hypertonic saline for cystic fibrosis: Reviewing the potential evidence for modulation of neutrophil signalling and function

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Emer P; McCarthy, Cormac; McElvaney, Oliver J; Vijayan, Maya Sakthi N; White, Michelle M; Dunlea, Danielle M; Pohl, Kerstin; Lacey, Noreen; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disorder with significantly shortened life expectancy. The major cause of mortality and morbidity is lung disease with increasing pulmonary exacerbations and decline in lung function predicting significantly poorer outcomes. The pathogenesis of lung disease in CF is characterised in part by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. This leads to accumulation of viscous mucus in the CF airway, providing an ideal environment for bacterial pathogens to grow and colonise, propagating airway inflammation in CF. The use of nebulised hypertonic saline (HTS) treatments has been shown to improve mucus clearance in CF and impact positively upon exacerbations, quality of life, and lung function. Several mechanisms of HTS likely improve outcome, resulting in clinically relevant enhancement in disease parameters related to increase in mucociliary clearance. There is increasing evidence to suggest that HTS is also beneficial through its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to reduce bacterial activity and biofilm formation. This review will first describe the use of HTS in treatment of CF focusing on its efficacy and tolerability. The emphasis will then change to the potential benefits of aerosolized HTS for the attenuation of receptor mediated neutrophil functions, including down-regulation of oxidative burst activity, adhesion molecule expression, and the suppression of neutrophil degranulation of proteolytic enzymes. PMID:26261770

  6. Inhaled hypertonic saline for cystic fibrosis: Reviewing the potential evidence for modulation of neutrophil signalling and function.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Emer P; McCarthy, Cormac; McElvaney, Oliver J; Vijayan, Maya Sakthi N; White, Michelle M; Dunlea, Danielle M; Pohl, Kerstin; Lacey, Noreen; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disorder with significantly shortened life expectancy. The major cause of mortality and morbidity is lung disease with increasing pulmonary exacerbations and decline in lung function predicting significantly poorer outcomes. The pathogenesis of lung disease in CF is characterised in part by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. This leads to accumulation of viscous mucus in the CF airway, providing an ideal environment for bacterial pathogens to grow and colonise, propagating airway inflammation in CF. The use of nebulised hypertonic saline (HTS) treatments has been shown to improve mucus clearance in CF and impact positively upon exacerbations, quality of life, and lung function. Several mechanisms of HTS likely improve outcome, resulting in clinically relevant enhancement in disease parameters related to increase in mucociliary clearance. There is increasing evidence to suggest that HTS is also beneficial through its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to reduce bacterial activity and biofilm formation. This review will first describe the use of HTS in treatment of CF focusing on its efficacy and tolerability. The emphasis will then change to the potential benefits of aerosolized HTS for the attenuation of receptor mediated neutrophil functions, including down-regulation of oxidative burst activity, adhesion molecule expression, and the suppression of neutrophil degranulation of proteolytic enzymes. PMID:26261770

  7. Recognizing/accepting futility: prehospital, emergency center, operating room, and intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, Raul; Lee, Jeanne; Bansal, Vishal; Hollingsworth-Fridlund, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Trauma has been perceived by the public as occurring as an isolated event, always resulting in favorable outcomes. There has therefore been a lack of discussion of futility of care and termination of care when dealing with the sick trauma patient. Several stages exist where issues of futility and early termination of care must be considered. These include the prehospital setting and involve the emergency medical service system in recognizing those patients who are nonsurvivors. Next is in the emergency room, where heroic measures may not benefit the very sick patient. In the operating room, the surgeon must always reassess and recognize when massive resuscitation will not benefit a particular trauma patient. Lastly, the intensivist must recognize those patients who may or may not benefit from continued efforts to sustain life. PMID:17579324

  8. Blunt cardiac rupture with prehospital pulseless electrical activity: a rare successful experience.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Hua; Choi, Wai-Mau; Wu, Hsueh-Ru; Liu, Hung-Chang; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Tsai, Shin-Han

    2005-12-01

    Blunt cardiac rupture is highly associated with mortality. In the recent literature, the reported mortality rates of cardiac rupture ranged from 59.7% to 100%. The probability of survival for those with prehospital pulseless electrical activity was extremely low. This case report describes a rare example of survival of a female patient with life-threatening cardiac rupture and cardiac tamponade after a major car accident. The victim developed pulseless electrical activity at admission. She recovered from the accident, however, without developing any signs of neurologic deficits. This case study emphasizes the value of the primary survey of patients and prompt and accurate interventions, including focused abdominal sonography for trauma, pericardiocentesis, and an urgent thoracotomy in the operating room for primary repair of cardiac rupture without applying a cardiopulmonary bypass system. The study showed that early diagnosis and aggressive interventions are crucial factors to the successful outcome of patient's survival. PMID:16394928

  9. Significant excess of early deaths after prehospital ticagrelor: The ATLANTIC trial challenge.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor; Cherepanov, Vasily; Dukhanin, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    The recently published Administration of Ticagrelor in the Cath Lab or in the Ambulance for New ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction to Open the Coronary Artery (ATLANTIC) trial concluded that prehospital administration of ticagrelor in patients with acute STEMI appeared to be safe but did not improve pre-PCI coronary reperfusion. The ATLANTIC data fully support the PLATO Angiographic Substudy denying early benefit of ticagrelor, and correspond well with lack of immediate clinical benefit including the early PCI "death paradox" in PLATO-USA patients. Finally, there were significantly (p=0.043) more deaths in early ticagrelor ATLANTIC arm (odds ratio 3.18 (1.02-9.90) challenging stent thrombosis reduction. Indeed, ATLANTIC represents an important step for our better understanding of ticagrelor, although the confirmation of the PLATO mortality wonder in an adequately powered PEGASUS (TIMI-54) to be reported in 2015 will be vital for ticagrelor future. PMID:25947272

  10. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador. PMID:26262065

  11. Hemostatic dressings in civil prehospital practice: 30 uses of QuikClot Combat Gauze.

    PubMed

    Travers, Stéphane; Lefort, Hugues; Ramdani, Eric; Lemoine, Sabine; Jost, Daniel; Bignand, Michel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    To report the use and describe the interest of hemostatic dressings in a civilian setting, we provided medical prehospital teams with QuikClot Combat Gauze (QCG) and asked physicians to complete a specific questionnaire after each use. Thirty uses were prospectively reported. The wounds were mostly caused by cold steel (n=15) and were primarily cervicocephalic (n=16), with 19/30 active arterial bleedings. For 26/30 uses, hemostatic dressing was justified by the inefficiency of other hemostasis techniques. Those 30 applications were associated with 22 complete cessations of bleeding, six decreases of bleeding, and ineffectiveness in two cases. The application of QCG permitted the removal of an effective tourniquet that was applied initially for three patients. No side-effects were reported. The provision of hemostatic dressings in civilian resuscitation ambulances was useful by providing an additional tool to limit bleeding while rapidly transporting the injured patient to a surgical facility. PMID:26351975

  12. NATO Blood Panel perspectives on changes to military prehospital resuscitation policies: current and future practice.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Tom; Badloe, John; Bohonek, Milos; Taylor, Audra L; Erik Heier, Hans; Doughty, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Blood Panel exists to promote interoperability of transfusion practice between NATO partners. However, it has served as an important forum for the development of prehospital transfusion and transfusion in the austere environment. There are synergies with the trauma hemostasis and oxygen research community especially in the areas of innovation and research. Four presentations are summarized together with a review of some scientific principles. The past decade has already seen significant changes in early transfusion support. Sometimes practice has preceded the evidence and has stretched regulatory and logistic constraints. Ethical and philosophical issues are also important and require us to question "should we" and not just "could we." The challenge for the combined communities is to continue to optimize transfusion support underpinned by evidence-based excellence. PMID:27100759

  13. Does paramedic-base hospital contact result in beneficial deviations from standard prehospital protocols?

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, J. R.; Luo, J.; Schriger, D. L.; Silver, L.

    1990-01-01

    We reviewed written and audio records of paramedic-base hospital radio contact to determine whether care differed from that suggested in standard prehospital care protocols. Records of all 659 contacts for seizure, syncope, abdominal pain, or altered mental state during 1987 (28.4% of all contacts) were scored for the use of standard therapies (such as intravenous access, oxygen, naloxone hydrochloride) and unanticipated therapies (intubation, nitroglycerin). Cases that involved unanticipated treatments were reviewed to determine whether they could have been prospectively identified by simple clinical findings. Standard therapies were used in the majority of patients. Unanticipated therapies were administered to 13 patients, all of whom had abnormal vital signs, diaphoresis, respiratory distress, or a second prominent symptom. Data suggest that protocols could replace radio contact for most patients and that the few who might benefit from radio contact can be easily identified. A 90% reduction in radio contacts in Los Angeles county could save $3 million each year. PMID:2219893

  14. Microwave-based stroke diagnosis making global prehospital thrombolytic treatment possible.

    PubMed

    Persson, Mikael; Fhager, Andreas; Trefná, Hana Dobsicek; Yu, Yinan; McKelvey, Tomas; Pegenius, Göran; Karlsson, Jan-Erik; Elam, Mikael

    2014-11-01

    Here, we present two different brain diagnostic devices based on microwave technology and the associated two first proof-of-principle measurements that show that the systems can differentiate hemorrhagic from ischemic stroke in acute stroke patients, as well as differentiate hemorrhagic patients from healthy volunteers. The system was based on microwave scattering measurements with an antenna system worn on the head. Measurement data were analyzed with a machine-learning algorithm that is based on training using data from patients with a known condition. Computer tomography images were used as reference. The detection methodology was evaluated with the leave-one-out validation method combined with a Monte Carlo-based bootstrap step. The clinical motivation for this project is that ischemic stroke patients may receive acute thrombolytic treatment at hospitals, dramatically reducing or abolishing symptoms. A microwave system is suitable for prehospital use, and therefore has the potential to allow significantly earlier diagnosis and treatment than today. PMID:24951677

  15. Predictors of Prehospital Delay in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction in Kashan City

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Farzaneh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Zohrehea, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prehospital delay might result in death in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the prehospital delay and its related factors in patients with AMI admitted to Kashan’s Shahid Beheshti Hospital. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 117 patients with AMI in the second half of 2013. The interval between the onset of symptoms and arrival at the hospital was noted and in cases of delay, the factors leading to the delay were investigated using a questionnaire. The content validity of the questionnaire was confirmed through content validity method and its internal consistency was confirmed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Chi-square test, odds ratio, and logistic regression analysis were used in data analysis. Results: The median delay was 129 minutes (mean ± SD, 240.44 ± 295.30). Overall, 32.5% of patients were admitted within 90 minutes of symptom onset. The long distance between living locations to the hospital was the most common cause of delay to hospital admission (31.7%). Significant associations were observed between the delay time and location of residency (P = 0.00) and type of transportation vehicle (P = 0.003). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the location of residency and type of transportation vehicle could significantly predict the delay time in patients with AMI (P = 0.039 and 0.036, respectively). Conclusions: The delay time from symptom onset to hospital admission was high in patients with AMI. It is necessary to create emergency medical system (EMS) stations in suburbs and train the public on the importance of quick contact with the EMS when the symptoms of an AMI are observed. PMID:25741517

  16. Pre-hospital assessment with ultrasound in emergencies: implementation in the field

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Kevin P.; Lahham, Sari; Lahham, Shadi; Anderson, Craig L.; Bledsoe, Bryan; Sloane, Bryan; Joseph, Linda; Osborn, Megan B.; Fox, John C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasound (US) is a proven diagnostic imaging tool in the emergency department (ED). Modern US devices are now more compact, affordable and portable, which has led to increased usage in austere environments. However, studies supporting the use of US in the prehospital setting are limited. The primary outcome of this pilot study was to determine if paramedics could perform cardiac ultrasound in the field and obtain images that were adequate for interpretation. A secondary outcome was whether paramedics could correctly identify cardiac activity or the lack thereof in cardiac arrest patients. METHODS: We performed a prospective educational study using a convenience sample of professional paramedics without ultrasound experience. Eligible paramedics participated in a 3-hour session on point-of-care US. The paramedics then used US during emergency calls and saved the scans for possible cardiac complaints including: chest pain, dyspnea, loss of consciousness, trauma, or cardiac arrest. RESULTS: Four paramedics from two distinct fire stations enrolled a total of 19 unique patients, of whom 17 were deemed adequate for clinical decision making (89%, 95%CI 67%–99%). Paramedics accurately recorded 17 cases of cardiac activity (100%, 95%CI 84%–100%) and 2 cases of cardiac standstill (100%, 95%CI 22%–100%). CONCLUSION: Our pilot study suggests that with minimal training, paramedics can use US to obtain cardiac images that are adequate for interpretation and diagnose cardiac standstill. Further large-scale clinical trials are needed to determine if prehospital US can be used to guide care for patients with cardiac complaints. PMID:27313806

  17. Terrorism involving cyanide: the prospect of improving preparedness in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Keim, Mark E

    2006-01-01

    The potential for domestic or international terrorism involving cyanide has not diminished and in fact may have increased in recent years. This paper discusses cyanide as a terrorist weapon and the current state of readiness for a cyanide attack in the United States. Many of the factors that render cyanide appealing to terrorists are difficult to modify sufficiently to decrease the probability of a cyanide attack. For example, the relative ease with which cyanide can be used as a weapon without special training, its versatile means of delivery to intended victims, and to a large degree, its ready availability cannot be significantly modified through preparedness efforts. On the other hand, the impact of an attack can be mitigated through preparedness measures designed to minimize the physical, psychological, and social consequences of cyanide exposure. Although the nation remains ill-equipped to manage a cyanide disaster, significant progress is being realized in some aspects of preparedness. Hydroxocobalamin-a cyanide antidote that may be appropriate for use in the prehospital setting for presumptive cases of cyanide poisoning-currently is under development for potential introduction in the US. If it becomes available in the US, hydroxocobalamin could enhance the role of the prehospital emergency responder in providing care to victims of a cyanide disaster. Additional progress is required in the areas of ensuring local and regional availability of antidotal treatment and supportive interventions, educating emergency healthcare providers about cyanide poisoning and its management, and raising public awareness of the potential for a cyanide attack and how to respond. PMID:16771013

  18. The Future of Ischemic Stroke: Flow from Prehospital Neuroprotection to Definitive Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Hing Lung; Liebeskind, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in ischemic stroke enable a seamless transition of the patient flow from the prehospital setting to definitive reperfusion, without the arbitrary separation of therapeutic phases of ischemia based on time alone. In 2013, the framework to understand and directly address the pathophysiology of cerebral blood flow that determines the timeline or evolution of ischemia in an individual case is given. This continuum of flow and the homeostasis of brain perfusion balanced by collaterals may be captured with serial imaging. Ongoing imaging core laboratory activities permit large-scale measurement of angiographic and tissue biomarkers of ischemia. Prehospital neuroprotection has become a reality and may be combined with revascularization therapies. Recent studies confirm that image-guided thrombolysis may be achieved without restrictive time windows. Baseline imaging patterns may be used to predict response to therapy and serial imaging may discern recanalization and reperfusion. Advanced techniques, such as arterial spin-labeled MRI, may also report hyperperfusion associated with hemorrhagic transformation. Endovascular therapies, including novel stent retriever devices, may augment revascularization and angiographic core laboratories may define optimal reperfusion. Serial evaluation of collaterals and reperfusion may identify definitive reperfusion linked with good clinical outcome rather than imposing arbitrary definitions of effective recanalization. Reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic transformation of various types may be detailed to explain clinical outcomes. Similar approaches may be used in intracranial atherosclerosis where flow, and not the degree of luminal stenosis, is paramount. Fractional flow may now be measured with computational fluid dynamics to identify high-risk lesions that require revascularization to restore the equilibrium of antegrade and collateral perfusion. Serial perfusion imaging of such cases may also illustrate inadequate

  19. Faculty of Prehospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh guidance for medical provision for wilderness medicine.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian; Dodds, Naomi; Joshi, Raj; Hall, John; Dhillon, Sundeep; Hollis, Sarah; Davis, Pete; Hillebrandt, David; Howard, Eva; Wilkes, Matthew; Langdana, Burjor; Lee, David; Hinson, Nigel; Williams, Thomas Harcourt; Rowles, Joe; Pynn, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    To support leaders and those involved in providing medical care on expeditions in wilderness environments, the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care (FPHC) of The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh convened an expert panel of leading healthcare professionals and expedition providers. The aims of this panel were to: (1) provide guidance to ensure the best possible medical care for patients within the geographical, logistical and human factor constraints of an expedition environment. (2) Give aspiring and established expedition medics a 'benchmark' of skills they should meet. (3) Facilitate expedition organisers in selecting the most appropriate medical cover and provider for their planned activity. A system of medical planning is suggested to enable expedition leaders to identify the potential medical risks and their mitigation. It was recognised that the scope of practice for wilderness medicine covers elements of primary healthcare, pre-hospital emergency medicine and preventative medicine. Some unique competencies were also identified. Further to this, the panel recommends the use of a matrix and advisory expedition medic competencies relating to the remoteness and medical threat of the expedition. This advice is aimed at all levels of expedition medic, leader and organiser who may be responsible for delivering or managing the delivery of remote medical care for participants. The expedition medic should be someone equipped with the appropriate medical competencies, scope of practice and capabilities in the expedition environment and need not necessarily be a qualified doctor. In addition to providing guidance regarding the clinical competencies required of the expedition medic, the document provides generic guidance and signposting to the more pertinent aspects of the role of expedition medic. PMID:26629337

  20. The Tanzanian trauma patients' prehospital experience: a qualitative interview-based study

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Kristin; Lim, Andrew George; Kepha, Bernard; Nalitolela, Neema Evelyne; Reynolds, Teri A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to characterise the prehospital experience of Tanzanian trauma patients, and identify barriers and facilitators to implement community-based emergency medical systems (EMS). Settings Our study was conducted in the emergency department of an urban national referral hospital in Tanzania. Participants A convenience sample of 34 adult trauma patients, or surrogate family members, presenting or referred to an urban referral emergency department in Tanzania for treatment of injury, participated in the study. Interventions Participation in semistructured, iteratively developed interviews until saturation of responses was reached. Outcomes A grounded theory-based approach to qualitative analysis was used to identify recurrent themes. Results We characterised numerous deficiencies within the existing clinic-to-hospital referral network, including missed/delayed diagnoses, limited management capabilities at pre-referral facilities and interfacility transfer delays. Potential barriers to EMS implementation include patient financial limitations and lack of insurance, limited public infrastructure and resources, and the credibility of potential first aid responders. Potential facilitators of EMS include communities’ tendency to pool resources, individuals’ trust of other community members to be first aid responders, and faith in community leaders to organise EMS response. Participants expressed a strong desire to learn first aid. Conclusions The composite themes generated by the data suggest that there are myriad structural, financial, institutional and cultural barriers to the implementation of a formal prehospital system. However, our analysis also revealed potential facilitators to a first-responder system that takes advantage of close-knit local communities and the trust of recognised leaders in society. The results suggest favourable acceptability for community-based response by trained lay people. There is significant opportunity for care

  1. Novel wireless electroencephalography system with a minimal preparation time for use in emergencies and prehospital care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although clinical applications such as emergency medicine and prehospital care could benefit from a fast-mounting electroencephalography (EEG) recording system, the lack of specifically designed equipment restricts the use of EEG in these environments. Methods This paper describes the design and testing of a six-channel emergency EEG (emEEG) system with a rapid preparation time intended for use in emergency medicine and prehospital care. The novel system comprises a quick-application cap, a device for recording and transmitting the EEG wirelessly to a computer, and custom software for displaying and streaming the data in real-time to a hospital. Bench testing was conducted, as well as healthy volunteer and patient measurements in three different environments: a hospital EEG laboratory, an intensive care unit, and an ambulance. The EEG data was evaluated by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists and compared with recordings from a commercial system. Results The bench tests demonstrated that the emEEG system's performance is comparable to that of a commercial system while the healthy volunteer and patient measurements confirmed that the system can be applied quickly and that it records quality EEG data in a variety of environments. Furthermore, the recorded data was judged to be of diagnostic quality by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists. Conclusions In the future, the emEEG system may be used to record high-quality EEG data in emergency medicine and during ambulance transportation. Its use could lead to a faster diagnostic, a more accurate treatment, and a shorter recovery time for patients with neurological brain disorders. PMID:24886096

  2. Induction of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest in prehospital patients using ice-cold Ringer's solution: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Silfvast, Tom

    2004-09-01

    The cooling and haemodynamic effects of prehospital infusion of ice-cold Ringer's solution were studied in 13 adult patients after successful resuscitation from non-traumatic cardiac arrest. After haemodynamics stabilisation, 30 ml/kg of Ringer's solution was infused at a rate of 100ml/min into the antecubital vein. Arterial blood pressure and blood gases, pulse rate, end-tidal CO(2) and oesophageal temperature were monitored closely. The mean core temperature decreased from 35.8 +/- 0.9 degrees C at the start of infusion to 34.0 +/- 1.2 degrees C on arrival at hospital (P < 0.0001). No serious adverse haemodynamic effects occurred. It is concluded that the induction of therapeutic hypothermia using this technique in the prehospital setting is feasible. PMID:15325449

  3. Prehospital Evaluation of Effusion, Pneumothorax, and Standstill (PEEPS): Point-of-care Ultrasound in Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sundeep R.; Johnson, David A.; Pierog, Jessica E.; Zaia, Brita E.; Williams, Sarah R.; Gharahbaghian, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, there are limited studies regarding use of prehospital ultrasound (US) by emergency medical service (EMS) providers. Field diagnosis of life-threatening conditions using US could be of great utility. This study assesses the ability of EMS providers and students to accurately interpret heart and lung US images. Methods We tested certified emergency medical technicians (EMT-B) and paramedics (EMT-P) as well as EMT-B and EMT-P students enrolled in prehospital training programs within two California counties. Participants completed a pre-test of sonographic imaging of normal findings and three pathologic findings: pericardial effusion, pneumothorax, and cardiac standstill. A focused one-hour lecture on emergency US imaging followed. Post-tests were given to all EMS providers immediately following the lecture and to a subgroup one week later. Results We enrolled 57 prehospital providers (19 EMT-B students, 16 EMT-P students, 18 certified EMT-B, and 4 certified EMT-P). The mean pre-test score was 65.2%±12.7% with mean immediate post-test score of 91.1%±7.9% (95% CI [22%–30%], p<0.001). Scores significantly improved for all three pathologic findings. Nineteen subjects took the one-week post-test. Their mean score remained significantly higher: pre-test 65.8%±10.7%; immediate post-test 90.5%±7.0% (95% CI [19%–31%], p<0.001), one-week post-test 93.1%±8.3% (95% CI [21%–34%], p<0.001). Conclusion Using a small sample of EMS providers and students, this study shows the potential feasibility for educating prehospital providers to accurately identify images of pericardial effusion, pneumothorax, and cardiac standstill after a focused lecture. PMID:26265961

  4. The Impact of Pre-Hospital Administration of Lactated Ringer's Solution versus Normal Saline in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rowell, Susan E; Fair, Kelly A; Barbosa, Ronald R; Watters, Jennifer M; Bulger, Eileen M; Holcomb, John B; Cohen, Mitchell J; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Fox, Erin E; Schreiber, Martin A

    2016-06-01

    Lactated Ringer's (LR) and normal saline (NS) are both used for resuscitation of injured patients. NS has been associated with increased resuscitation volume, blood loss, acidosis, and coagulopathy compared with LR. We sought to determine if pre-hospital LR is associated with improved outcome compared with NS in patients with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI). We included patients receiving pre-hospital LR or NS from the PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study. Patients with TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] head ≥3) and without TBI (AIS head ≤2) were compared. Cox proportional hazards models including Injury Severity Score (ISS), AIS head, AIS extremity, age, fluids, intubation status, and hospital site were generated for prediction of mortality. Linear regression models were generated for prediction of red blood cell (RBC) and crystalloid requirement, and admission biochemical/physiological parameters. Seven hundred ninety-one patients received either LR (n = 117) or NS (n = 674). Median ISS, AIS head, AIS extremity, and pre-hospital fluid volume were higher in TBI and non-TBI patients receiving LR compared with NS (p < 0.01). In patients with TBI (n = 308), LR was associated with higher adjusted mortality compared with NS (hazard rate [HR] = 1.78, confidence interval [CI] 1.04-3.04, p = 0.035). In patients without TBI (n = 483), no difference in mortality was demonstrated (HR = 1.49, CI 0.757-2.95, p = 0.247). Fluid type had no effect on admission biochemical or physiological parameters, 6-hour RBC, or crystalloid requirement in either group. LR was associated with increased mortality compared with NS in patients with TBI. These results underscore the need for a prospective randomized trial comparing pre-hospital LR with NS in patients with TBI. PMID:26914721

  5. Epidemiology of Patients With Multiple Trauma and the Quality of Their Prehospital Respiration Management in Kashan, Iran: Six Months Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Maghaminejad, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Respiration management is an important and critical issue in prehospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care has not been assessed in Iran Emergency Medical Services’ (EMS). Objectives: This study was conducted to investigate the quality of prehospital respiration management in patients with multiple trauma, referred to the Shahid Beheshti Trauma Center, Kashan, Iran. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the first six months of 2013. All the 400 patients with multiple trauma, transferred by EMS to the Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, were recruited. The study instrument was a checklist, which was completed through observation. Descriptive statistics were presented. Results: Out of all included individuals, 301 were males (75.2%) and 99 were females (24.8%). The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (87.25%). Furthermore, 71.7% of the patients were injured in head and neck and chest areas. The quality of consciousness monitoring and airway management was desirable in 95% of the cases. However, the quality of monitoring patients’ respiration was only desirable in 42% of the cases. Only 18.6% of the patients received oxygen therapy during prehospital transportation. Conclusions: The quality of monitoring patients’ respiration and oxygen therapy was undesirable in most patients with multiple trauma. Therefore, the EMS workers should be retrained to apply proper respiration management in patients with multiple trauma. PMID:25147774

  6. Between professional values and the social valuation of patients: the fluctuating economy of pre-hospital emergency work.

    PubMed

    Nurok, Michael; Henckes, Nicolas

    2009-02-01

    A number of authors have shown how medical decisions are influenced by social values; others have minimized the putative influence of values and have argued that medical decisions are predominantly constrained by the organization of medical work. Based on fieldwork in France and the USA observing pre-hospital resuscitations, we seek to resolve these views by showing that while judgments about the social value of a patient do influence professional decisions, so do judgments about the work that must be accomplished to manage a case. Pre-hospital emergency work has many facets that are variably valued by different professionals at different moments of an emergency's trajectory. These values compete with each other in what we call a "fluctuating economy". This article analyses the role of social, technical, medical or surgical, heroic, and competence values in the course of pre-hospital emergency work. We show how these values may conflict or align with each other, forcing professionals to constantly establish priorities during an emergency trajectory. PMID:19062149

  7. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mingtao; Tang, Hao; Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  8. Focal adhesion kinase regulates the activity of the osmosensitive transcription factor TonEBP/NFAT5 under hypertonic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Küper, Christoph; Lichtnekert, Julia; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Rupanagudi, Khader V.; Fraek, Maria-Luisa; Bartels, Helmut; Beck, Franz-Xaver

    2014-01-01

    TonEBP/NFAT5 is a major regulator of the urinary concentrating process and is essential for the osmoadaptation of renal medullary cells. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a mechanosensitive non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase expressed abundantly in the renal medulla. Since osmotic stress causes cell shrinkage, the present study investigated the contribution of FAK on TonEBP/NFAT5 activation. Osmotic stress induced time-dependent activation of FAK as evidenced by phosphorylation at Tyr-397, and furosemide reduces FAK Tyr-397 phosphorylation in the rat renal medulla. Both pharmacological inhibition of FAK and siRNA-mediated knockdown of FAK drastically reduced TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activity and target gene expression in HEK293 cells. This effect was not mediated by impaired nuclear translocation or by reduced transactivating activity of TonEBP/NFAT5. However, TonEBP/NFAT5 abundance under hypertonic conditions was diminished by 50% by FAK inhibition or siRNA knockdown of FAK. FAK inhibition only marginally reduced transcription of the TonEBP/NFAT5 gene. Rather, TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA stability was diminished significantly by FAK inhibition, which correlated with reduced reporter activity of the TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). In conclusion, FAK is a major regulator of TonEBP/NFAT5 activity by increasing its abundance via stabilization of the mRNA. This in turn, depends on the presence of the TonEBP/NFAT5 3′-UTR. PMID:24772088

  9. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  10. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the long-latency stretch reflex leading to hypertonia. Approach We modelled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable Very-Large-Scale-Integrated-circuit (VLSI) hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the long-latency stretch reflex is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia. PMID:25946372

  11. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and hypertonic glucose with 72% chromated glycerin in gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Elwakil, Reda; Montasser, Mohamed Fawzy; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and a mixture of 72% chromated glycerin with hypertonic glucose solution in management of gastric varices. METHODS: Ninety patients with gastric varices presented to Endoscopy Unit of Ain Shams University Hospital were included. They were randomly allocated into three groups; each group included 30 patients treated with intravariceal sclerosant injections in biweekly sessions till complete obturation of gastric varices; Group I (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Histoacryl®), Group II (iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Amcrylate®) and Group III (mixture of 72% chromated glycerin; Scleremo® with glucose solution 25%). All the procedures were performed electively without active bleeding. Recruited patients were followed up for 3 mo. RESULTS: 26% of Scleremo group had bleeding during puncture vs 3.3% in each of the other two groups with significant difference, (P < 0.05). None of Scleremo group had needle obstruction vs 13.3% in each of the other two groups with no significant difference, (P > 0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 13.3% of Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups vs 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. The in hospital mortality was 6.6% in both Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups, while it was 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. In the first and second sessions, the amount of Scleremo needed for obturation was significantly high, while the amount of Histoacryl was significantly low. Scleremo was the less costly of the two treatments. CONCLUSION: All used sclerosant substances showed efficacy and success in management of gastric varices with no significant differences except in total amount, cost and bleeding during puncture. PMID:25901221

  12. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the LLSR leading to hypertonia. Approach. We modeled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable very-large-scale-integrated-circuit hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32 ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64 ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results. When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance. Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the LLSR is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia.

  13. Methodology of the Field Administration of Stroke Therapy – Magnesium (FAST-MAG) phase 3 trial: Part 2 – prehospital study methods

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Eckstein, Marc; Stratton, Samuel; Pratt, Frank; Hamilton, Scott; Conwit, Robin; Liebeskind, David S.; Sung, Gene; Sanossian, Nerses

    2016-01-01

    Rationale In acute stroke, the volume of salvageable brain tissue is maximal at onset and declines rapidly with time. Prehospital start of clinical trial interventions would enable delivery of neuroprotective agents, such as magnesium sulfate, to stroke patients in the hyperacute period when they are potentially most effective. Aims A broad aim of the FAST-MAG study is to develop and validate techniques to perform pivotal trials of neuroprotective therapies for acute stroke in the prehospital setting. In tandem with an accompanying general trial design article, this manuscript provides a detailed overview of several novel prehospital study methods employed in the NIH FAST-MAG Trial. Design Multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, pivotal clinical trial. Special Prehospital Procedures Distinctive prehospital methods deployed in FAST-MAG include: identifying likely stroke patients using the Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen; eliciting explicit informed consent from patients or on scene legally authorized representatives via cellphone discussion with off-scene physicians; paramedic rating of pretreatment stroke severity using the Los Angeles Motor Scale; assigning patients to a study arm using blinded, pre-encounter randomization; facilitating continuity of study infusion from the field to the ED by stocking ambulances with study kits including both field and hospital doses; and electronic fax consent signature documentation by geographically separated subjects and enrolling physicians. Discussion The suite of prehospital trial methods developed for the FAST-MAG Trial enable enrollment of patients in very early time windows, including the hyperacute, ‘golden hour’ period immediately after stroke onset. PMID:24444117

  14. Pre-Hospital Care Management of a Potential Spinal Cord Injured Patient: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Henry; Singh, Jeffrey; Nathens, Avery; MacDonald, Russell D.; Travers, Andrew; Tallon, John; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An interdisciplinary expert panel of medical and surgical specialists involved in the management of patients with potential spinal cord injuries (SCI) was assembled. Four key questions were created that were of significant interest. These were: (1) what is the optimal type and duration of pre-hospital spinal immobilization in patients with acute SCI?; (2) during airway manipulation in the pre-hospital setting, what is the ideal method of spinal immobilization?; (3) what is the impact of pre-hospital transport time to definitive care on the outcomes of patients with acute spinal cord injury?; and (4) what is the role of pre-hospital care providers in cervical spine clearance and immobilization? A systematic review utilizing multiple databases was performed to determine the current evidence about the specific questions, and each article was independently reviewed and assessed by two reviewers based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Guidelines were then created related to the questions by a national Canadian expert panel using the Delphi method for reviewing the evidence-based guidelines about each question. Recommendations about the key questions included: the pre-hospital immobilization of patients using a cervical collar, head immobilization, and a spinal board; utilization of padded boards or inflatable bean bag boards to reduce pressure; transfer of patients off of spine boards as soon as feasible, including transfer of patients off spinal boards while awaiting transfer from one hospital institution to another hospital center for definitive care; inclusion of manual in-line cervical spine traction for airway management in patients requiring intubation in the pre-hospital setting; transport of patients with acute traumatic SCI to the definitive hospital center for care within 24 h of injury; and training of emergency medical personnel in the pre-hospital setting to apply criteria to clear patients of cervical spinal injuries, and immobilize patients

  15. Role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 in regulating hypertonic-mediated secretin receptor expression in kidney collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Chua, Oscar W H; Wong, Kenneth K L; Ko, Ben C; Chung, Sookja K; Chow, Billy K C; Lee, Leo T O

    2016-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that secretin (SCT) is an important element in the osmoregulatory pathway. It is interesting to note that both SCT and its receptor (SCTR) gene are activated upon hyperosmolality in the kidney. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of the SCTR gene expression in response to changes in osmolality have yet to be clarified. Detailed DNA sequence analysis of the promoter regions of the SCTR gene reveals the presence of multiple osmotic response elements (ORE). The ORE is the binding site of a key osmosensitive transactivator, namely, the nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5). SCTR and NFAT5 are co-expressed in the kidney cortex and medulla collecting duct cells. We therefore hypothesize that NFAT5 is responsible for modulating SCTR expression in hypertonic environments. In this study, we found hypertonicity stimulates the promoter activities and endogenous gene expression of SCTR in mouse kidney cortex collecting duct cells (M1) and inner medulla collecting duct cells (mIMCD3). The overexpression and silencing of NFAT5 further confirmed it to be responsible for the up-regulation of the SCTR gene under hypertonic conditions. A significant increase in the interaction between NFAT5 and the SCTR promoter was also observed following chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In vivo, osmotic stress up-regulates the SCTR gene in the kidney cortex and medulla of wild-type mice, but does not do so in NFAT5(+/-) animals. Hence, this study provides comprehensive information on how NFAT5 regulates SCTR expression in different osmotic environments. PMID:27080132

  16. Mutation of a single threonine in the cytoplasmic NH2 terminus disrupts trafficking of renal betaine-GABA transporter 1 during hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Schweikhard, Eva S; Kempson, Stephen A; Ziegler, Christine; Burckhardt, Birgitta C

    2014-07-01

    Betaine is an important osmolyte and is, compared with other organs, much more abundant in the kidneys, where it enters cells in the medulla by betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) to balance osmoregulation in the countercurrent system. In wild-type (wt-)BGT1-expressing oocytes, GABA-mediated currents were diminished by preincubation of oocytes with 100 nM PMA or 5 μM dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol, activators of PKC, whereas the application of staurosporine before the application of dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol restored the response to GABA. Four potential phosphorylation sites on BGT1 were mutated to alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants (T235A, S428A, and S564A) evoked GABA currents comparable in magnitude to currents observed in wt-BGT1-expressing oocytes, whereas GABA currents in T40A were barely detectable. Uptake of [(3)H]GABA was also determined in human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged BGT1 with the same mutations. T235A, S428A, and S564A showed upregulation of GABA uptake after hypertonic stress and downregulation by PMA similar to EGFP-wt-BGT1. In contrast, T40A did not respond to either hypertonicity or PMA. Confocal microscopy of the EGFP-BGT1 mutants expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells revealed that T40A was present in the cytoplasm after 24 h of hypertonic stress. whereas the other mutants and EGFP-wt-BGT1 were in the plasma membrane. All mutants, including T40A, comigrated with wt-BGT1 on Western blots, suggesting that they are full-length proteins. T40A, however, cannot be phosphorylated, as revealed using a specific anti-phosphoantibody, and, therefore, T40 may be important for the trafficking and insertion of BGT1 in the plasma membrane. PMID:24829506

  17. Prehospital administered fascia iliaca compartment block by emergency medical service nurses, a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with a proximal femur fracture are often difficult to evacuate from the accident scene. Prehospital pain management for this vulnerable group of patients may be challenging. Multiple co-morbidities, polypharmacy and increased age may limit the choice of suitable analgesics. The fascia iliaca compartment (FIC) block may be an alternative to intravenous analgesics. However this peripheral nerve block is mainly applied by physicians. In the Netherlands, prehospital emergency care is mostly provided by EMS-nurses. Therefore we examined whether well-trained EMS-nurses are able to successfully perform a FIC block in order to ensure timely and appropriate effective analgesia. The study was study was registered in the Netherlands Trial Register (NTR-nr 3824). Methods Ten EMS nurses were educated in the performance of a FIC-block. Indications, technique, side-effects and complications were discussed. Hereafter the trained EMS-nurses staffed ambulance teams were dispatched to patients with a suspicion for a proximal femur fracture. After confirmation of the diagnosis, the block was performed and 0.3 ml/kg lidocaine (10 mg/ml) with adrenaline 5 μg/ml was injected. The quality of pain relief, occurrence of complications and patient satisfaction were evaluated. Results In 108 patients a block was performed. One hundred patients could be included. Every EMS nurse performed at least 10 FIC blocks. The block was effective in 96 patients. The initial median (NRS)-pain score decreased after block performance to a score of 6 (after 10 minutes), 4 (after 20 minutes) and 3 (after 30 minutes). At arrival at the Emergency Department the median pain score was 3. Dynamic NRS-pain scores when transferring the patient from the accident scene to the ambulance stretcher, during transportation to the hospital and when transferring the patient to a hospital bed were, 4, 3 and 3.5 respectively. Patient satisfaction was very high. No complications were noted

  18. Experience in Prehospital Endotracheal Intubation Significantly Influences Mortality of Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bossers, Sebastiaan M.; Schwarte, Lothar A.; Loer, Stephan A.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Boer, Christa; Schober, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at high risk for airway obstruction and hypoxia at the accident scene, and routine prehospital endotracheal intubation has been widely advocated. However, the effects on outcome are unclear. We therefore aim to determine effects of prehospital intubation on mortality and hypothesize that such effects may depend on the emergency medical service providers’ skill and experience in performing this intervention. Methods and Findings PubMed, Embase and Web of Science were searched without restrictions up to July 2015. Studies comparing effects of prehospital intubation versus non-invasive airway management on mortality in non-paediatric patients with severe TBI were selected for the systematic review. Results were pooled across a subset of studies that met predefined quality criteria. Random effects meta-analysis, stratified by experience, was used to obtain pooled estimates of the effect of prehospital intubation on mortality. Meta-regression was used to formally assess differences between experience groups. Mortality was the main outcome measure, and odds ratios refer to the odds of mortality in patients undergoing prehospital intubation versus odds of mortality in patients who are not intubated in the field. The study was registered at the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) with number CRD42014015506. The search provided 733 studies, of which 6 studies including data from 4772 patients met inclusion and quality criteria for the meta-analysis. Prehospital intubation by providers with limited experience was associated with an approximately twofold increase in the odds of mortality (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.61 to 3.38, p<0.001). In contrast, there was no evidence for higher mortality in patients who were intubated by providers with extended level of training (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.52 to 1.08, p = 0.126). Meta-regression confirmed that experience is a significant predictor of

  19. The efficacy of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Nicholas S; Spinks, Anneliese; Wasiak, Jason

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the supporting evidence for the clinical use of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting. Two authors searched three databases (Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and The Cochrane Library) for relevant English language articles published through September 2014. Reference lists, conference proceedings and non-indexed academic journals were manually searched. A separate search was conducted using the Internet search engine Google to source additional studies from burns advisory agencies, first aid bodies, military institutions, manufacturer and paramedic websites. Two authors independently assessed study eligibility and relevance of non-traditional data forms for inclusion. Studies were independently assessed and included if Hydrogel-based burn dressings (HBD) were examined in first aid practices in the pre-hospital setting. A total of 129 studies were considered for inclusion, of which no pre-hospital studies were identified. The review highlights that current use of HBD in the pre-hospital setting appears to be driven by sources of information that do not reflect the paramedic environment. We recommend researchers in the pre-hospital settings undertake clinical trials in this field. More so, the review supports the need for expert consensus to identify key demographic, clinical and injury outcomes for clinicians and researchers undertaking further research into the use of dressings as a first aid measure. PMID:26177570

  20. Diastolic Timed Vibrator: Noninvasive Pre-Hospitalization Treatment of Acute Coronary Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Marzencki, Marcin; Kajbafzadeh, Behrad; Khosrow-Khavar, Farzad; Tavakolian, Kouhyar; Kaminska, Bozena; Menon, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    The speed of intervention is one of the major factors in increasing the survival rate of patients suffering from acute coronary ischemia. The two principal techniques currently in use: pharmacological and interventional, can be employed to re-canalize coronary arteries, but the former is slow acting and often leads to incomplete reperfusion, while the latter requires specialized personnel in a hospital with a cardiac catheterization laboratory. In this paper, we introduce a novel method intended for pre-hospitalization treatment of patients with acute coronary ischemia that can be safely applied by a minimally trained individual prior to or during patient transportation to hospital. It consists in applying low frequency mechanical vibrations to the left intercostal space of patient's chest during diastole of the heart cycle, to induce vibrations of the heart and thus of the coronary arteries. Mechanical vibrations stimulate mixing of blood which improves drug delivery to the occlusion site, applies mechanical force on the clot leading to its faster dissolution and finally acts as a strong vasodilator in case of spasms. We introduce the principle of operation and the architecture of the Diastolic Timed Vibrator (DTV), including a custom ECG processing algorithm, vibration pattern generator and active braking methods. Experimental results demonstrate the functionality of the DTV device and pave way for in-vivo tests necessary for clinical confirmation of the proposed method. PMID:23934670

  1. Use of a lighted stylet for guided orotracheal intubation in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T P; Stewart, R D; Paris, P M; Ellis, D; Berkebile, P E

    1985-04-01

    Management of the airway in acutely injured patients demands special skills of the emergency physician. A technique of light-guided orotracheal intubation has been described in the literature and was performed under protocol by resident physicians in an urban mobile intensive care system. The method utilizes a flexible lighted stylet to provide a guide to correct placement through transillumination of the soft tissues of the neck. During the 12-month period of the study, 24 intubations were attempted in 21 patients using this technique. Twenty-one attempts (88%) were successful. The average time for intubation was 20 seconds, with none requiring more than 45 seconds. Fourteen intubations (67%) were successful on the first attempt. Of the three unsuccessful procedures, two were attempted in bright sunlight, and all three patients had vomited prior to the attempts. Trauma to the soft tissues in one successfully intubated patient was the only complication reported with the technique. The advantages of this method, including rapidity of intubation, ability to intubate without manipulation of the head or neck, and the apparently few complications, make it particularly attractive to emergency personnel. We conclude that guided orotracheal intubation using a lighted stylet is an effective and safe method of emergency intubation, even in the adverse prehospital environment. PMID:3985444

  2. Orofacial injuries associated with prehospital management of febrile convulsion in Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Ndukwe, Kizito C; Folayan, Morenike O; Ugboko, Vincent I; Elusiyan, Jerome B E; Laja, Olajumoke O

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine in a population of pediatric patients with febrile convulsions the prevalence and pattern of orofacial and dental injuries caused by traditional remedies used in a suburban Nigerian community. Over the study period of 28 months, 75 cases of febrile convulsion presented to the Children's Emergency unit of our hospital. Of these, 27 children (36%) sustained orofacial injuries caused by forceful insertion of a spoon into the mouth (96.3%) or a bite (3.7%) during convulsive episodes. The ages of the patients ranged from 12 to 84 months with a mean 39.8 +/- 18.3 months. There were 15 males and 11 females with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. The orofacial and dental injuries sustained from prehospital treatment at home were lacerations and bruising of soft tissues including lips, tongue, mucosa and commissures and tooth subluxation, displacement or avulsion. Other injuries sustained outside the mouth include second-degree burns to the feet, a chin laceration and facial bruises resulting from a fall. Many oral injuries were overlooked by pediatricians. Prompt recognition and appropriate management of febrile convulsion would be of great benefit to the pediatric patients. PMID:17367452

  3. Prehospital versus Emergency Room Intubation of Trauma Patients in Qatar: A-2-year Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-01-01

    Background: The impact of prehospital intubation (PHI) in improving outcome of trauma patients has not been adequately evaluated in the developing countries. Aims: The present study analyzed the outcome of PHI versus emergency room intubation (ERI) among trauma patients in Qatar. Materials and Methods: Data were retrospectively reviewed for all intubated trauma patients between 2010 and 2011. Patients were classified according to location of intubation (PHI: Group-1 versus ERI: Group-2). Data were analyzed and compared. Results: Out of 570 intubated patients; 482 patients (239 in group-1 and 243 in group-2) met the inclusion criteria with a mean age of 32 ΁ 14.6 years Head injury (P = 0.003) and multiple trauma (P = 0.004) were more prevalent in group-1, whereas solid organ injury predominated in group-2 (P = 0.02). Group-1 had significantly higher mean injury severity scoring (ISS), lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS), greater head abbreviated injury score and longer activation, response, scene and total emergency medical services times. The mortality was higher in group-1 (53% vs. 18.5%; P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that GCS [odds ratio (OR) 0.78, P = 0.005) and ISS (OR 1.12, P = 0.001) were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: PHI is associated with high mortality when compared with ERI. However, selection bias cannot be ruled out and therefore, PHI needs further critical assessment in Qatar. PMID:24678471

  4. Prehospital electrocardiogram and early helicopter dispatch to expedite interfacility transfer for percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen H; Kociszewski, Christine; Hyde, Robert J; Brennan, Paul J; Wedel, Suzanne K

    2006-09-01

    Care provision and benchmarking for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have focused on streamlining time between initial hospital presentation and opening of theinfarct-related artery. In a Boston-area regional system already characterized by expedited advanced life support (ALS) dispatch and paramedic performance of prehospital electrocardiogram (EKG), a critical pathway was designed that allows for helicopter dispatch based on ground ALS providers' STEMI diagnosis. The pathway dictates that as soon as ALS crews make the diagnosis of STEMI from their 12-lead EKG, they will contact Boston MedFlight (BMF) and a helicopter will be immediately dispatched to the participating community hospital (Lawrence General Hospital [LGH]). Based on historical and predicted time patterns, it is expected that BMF will arrive at LGH soon after the ALS ambulance delivers the patient to the LGH emergency department (ED). The patient will then undergo BMF transport from the ED into central Boston with direct transfer into an awaiting cardiac catheterization suite (ie, bypassing the receiving hospital ED). The pathway minimizes the delay between patient arrival at LGH and BMF arrival for transport to the catheterization laboratory. It is hoped that implementation of the critical pathway will allow the region's patients with STEMI to achieve coronary arterial patency within 90 minutes of LGH presentation. If the pathway proves effective, it can serve as a model for other regions and programs with similar clinical and logistic situations and advance the concept of "diagnosis-to-balloon" time. PMID:18340231

  5. Systematic literature review of templates for reporting prehospital major incident medical management

    PubMed Central

    Fattah, Sabina; Rehn, Marius; Reierth, Eirik; Wisborg, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify and describe the content of templates for reporting prehospital major incident medical management. Design Systematic literature review according to PRISMA guidelines. Data sources PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus and Web of Knowledge. Grey literature was also searched. Eligibility criteria for selected studies Templates published after 1 January 1990 and up to 19 March 2012. Non-English language literature, except Scandinavian; literature without an available abstract; and literature reporting only psychological aspects were excluded. Results The main database search identified 8497 articles, among which 8389 were excluded based on title and abstract. An additional 96 were excluded based on the full-text. The remaining 12 articles were included in the analysis. A total of 107 articles were identified in the grey literature and excluded. The reference lists for the included articles identified five additional articles. A relevant article published after completing the search was also included. In the 18 articles included in the study, 10 different templates or sets of data are described: 2 methodologies for assessing major incident responses, 3 templates intended for reporting from exercises, 2 guidelines for reporting in medical journals, 2 analyses of previous disasters and 1 Utstein-style template. Conclusions More than one template exists for generating reports. The limitations of the existing templates involve internal and external validity, and none of them have been tested for feasibility in real-life incidents. Trial registration The review is registered in PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42012002051). PMID:23906946

  6. AToMS: A Ubiquitous Teleconsultation System for Supporting AMI Patients with Prehospital Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruno S. P. M.; Gonçalves, Bernardo; Teixeira, Iuri M.; Gomes, Antônio T. A.; Ziviani, Artur

    2011-01-01

    The latest population-based studies in the medical literature worldwide indicate that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients still experience prolonged delay to be rescued, which often results in morbidity and mortality. This paper reports from a technological standpoint a teleconsultation and monitoring system named AToMS. This system addresses the problem of prehospital delivery of thrombolysis to AMI patients by enabling the remote interaction of the paramedics and a cardiologist available at a Coronary Care Unit (CCU). Such interaction allows the diagnosis of the patient eligibility to the immediate application of thrombolysis, which is meant to reduce the delay between the onset of symptoms and the eventual application of proper treatment. Such delay reduction is meant to increase the AMI patient's chances of survival and decrease the risks of postinfarction sequels. The teleconsultation is held with the support of wireless and mobile technologies, which also allows the cardiologist to monitor the patient while he/she is being taken to the nearest CCU. All exchanged messages among paramedics and cardiologists are recorded to render an auditable system. AToMS has been deployed in a first stage in the city of Rio de Janeiro, where the medical team involved in the project has conducted commissioned tests. PMID:21772839

  7. Hypertonic saline resuscitation enhances blood pressure recovery and decreases organ injury following hemorrhage in acute alcohol intoxicated rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, Jesse K.; Whitaker, Annie M.; Molina, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) impairs the hemodynamic and arginine vasopressin (AVP) counter-regulation to hemorrhagic shock (HS) and lactated Ringer’s (LR) fluid resuscitation (FR). The mechanism of AAI-induced suppression of AVP release in response to HS involves accentuated nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory tone. In contrast, AAI does not prevent AVP response to increased osmolarity produced by hypertonic saline (HTS) infusion. We hypothesized that FR with HTS during AAI would enhance AVP release by decreasing PVN NO inhibitory tone subsequently improving mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and organ perfusion. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats received a 15h alcohol infusion (2.5g/kg + 0.3 g/kg/h) or dextrose (DEX) prior to HS (40mmHg × 60 min) and FR with HTS (7.5%; 4ml/kg) or LR (2.4 × blood volume removed). Organ blood flow was determined and brains collected for NO content at 2h post-FR. Results HTS improved MABP recovery in AAI (109 vs 80mmHg) and DEX (114 vs 83mmHg) animals compared to LR. This was associated with higher (>60%) circulating AVP levels at 2h post-FR than those detected in LR animals in both groups. Neither AAI alone nor HS in DEX animals resuscitated with LR altered organ blood flow. In AAI animals, HS and FR with LR reduced blood flow to liver (72%), small intestine (65%), and large intestine (67%) compared to shams. FR with HTS improved liver (3-fold) and small intestine (2-fold) blood flow compared to LR in AAI-HS animals. The enhanced MABP response to HTS was prevented by pretreatment with a systemic AVP V1a receptor antagonist. HTS decreased PVN NO content in both groups 2h post-FR. Conclusions These results suggest that FR with HTS in AAI results in removal of central NO inhibition of AVP, restoring AVP levels and improving MABP and organ perfusion in AAI-HS. PMID:23147176

  8. A Physiologically-Motivated Compartment-Based Model of the Effect of Inhaled Hypertonic Saline on Mucociliary Clearance and Liquid Transport in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Markovetz, Matthew R.; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Locke, Landon W.; Myerburg, Michael M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Parker, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by liquid hyperabsorption, airway surface dehydration, and impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC). Herein, we present a compartment-based mathematical model of the airway that extends the resolution of functional imaging data. Methods Using functional imaging data to inform our model, we developed a system of mechanism-motivated ordinary differential equations to describe the mucociliary clearance and absorption of aerosolized radiolabeled particle and small molecules probes from human subjects with and without CF. We also utilized a novel imaging metric in vitro to gauge the fraction of airway epithelial cells that have functional ciliary activity. Results This model, and its incorporated kinetic rate parameters, captures the MCC and liquid dynamics of the hyperabsorptive state in CF airways and the mitigation of that state by hypertonic saline treatment. Conclusions We postulate, based on the model structure and its ability to capture clinical patient data, that patients with CF have regions of airway with diminished MCC function that can be recruited with hypertonic saline treatment. In so doing, this model structure not only makes a case for durable osmotic agents used in lung-region specific treatments, but also may provide a possible clinical endpoint, the fraction of functional ciliated airway. PMID:25383714

  9. Thermal skin injury: I. Acute hemodynamic effects of fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's, plasma, and hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H; Lund, T; Reed, R

    1989-01-01

    Heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac index (CI) were measured in anesthetized rats subjected to a 40% body surface area full-thickness scald burn. Postburn intravenous fluid therapy with lactated Ringer's (5 ml/hr), plasma (2.5 ml/hr), or very hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) (0.75 ml/hr) was compared to unburned or burned, untreated controls. HR and CVP were not influenced significantly by thermal injury. MAP decreased steadily in the untreated group from 110 mmHg to 80 mmHg at 3 hr postburn. In the fluid-treated groups MAP did not change significantly. During the first 15 min postburn, CI was reduced to 58-71% of control values (P less than 0.01). CI increased during Ringer's and plasma infusion to 74-80% of control values (P less than 0.02 vs. unburned). Despite infusion therapy, hematocrit increased from 48 to 52%, clearly less than in the unresuscitated group (increase from 48 to 58%). Theoretically, the 2,400 mosmol/l saline would expand extracellular volume by five to six times the infused volume. Still, CI was reduced by 55% at 3 hr postburn in the hypertonic saline as well as in the burned, untreated group (P less than 0.001 vs. unburned). The low CI was mainly due to a reduced stroke volume. PMID:2917370

  10. Adapting prehospital care to a large rural geographic area: a review of the Emergency Health Services Nova Scotia implementation.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Michael K

    2003-01-01

    Nova Scotia is building a system of prehospital care based on four principles: "Fail Safe" government ownership; "Full Service" advanced life support capable; "High Performance" resource efficiency; and "Fiscally Responsible" performance goals, incentives and penalties. Emergency Health Services Nova Scotia exercises funding and regulatory control through service provided by a private contractor. Benefits include improved fleet and equipment management, information systems, 911 dispatch and performance tracking, medical control and paramedic care, and public accountability. Problems include rural dispatch, budget costs, labour issues and stakeholder communication. PMID:14981841

  11. Evaluation of a thoracic ultrasound training module for the detection of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema by prehospital physician care providers

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Vicki E; Lamhaut, Lionel; Capp, Roberta; Bosson, Nichole; Liteplo, Andrew; Marx, Jean-Sebastian; Carli, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background While ultrasound (US) has continued to expedite diagnosis and therapy for critical care physicians inside the hospital system, the technology has been slow to diffuse into the pre-hospital system. Given the diagnostic benefits of thoracic ultrasound (TUS), we sought to evaluate image recognition skills for two important TUS applications; the identification of B-lines (used in the US diagnosis of pulmonary edema) and the identification of lung sliding and comet tails (used in the US diagnosis of pneumothorax). In particular we evaluated the impact of a focused training module in a pre-hospital system that utilizes physicians as pre-hospital providers. Methods 27 Paris Service D'Aide Médicale Urgente (SAMU) physicians at the Hôpital Necker with varying levels of US experience were given two twenty-five image recognition pre-tests; the first test had examples of both normal and pneumothorax lung US and the second had examples of both normal and pulmonary edema lung US. All 27 physicians then underwent the same didactic training modules. A post-test was administered upon completing the training module and results were recorded. Results Pre and post-test scores were compared for both the pneumothorax and the pulmonary edema modules. For the pneumothorax module, mean test scores increased from 10.3 +/- 4.1 before the training to 20.1 +/- 3.5 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased as well, indicating a collective improvement. For the pulmonary edema module, mean test scores increased from 14.1 +/- 5.2 before the training to 20.9 +/- 2.4 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased again by more than half, indicating a collective improvement. Conclusion This brief training module resulted in significant improvement of image recognition skills for physicians both with and without previous ultrasound experience. Given that rapid diagnosis of these conditions in the pre-hospital system

  12. An evidence-based prehospital guideline for external hemorrhage control: American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma.

    PubMed

    Bulger, Eileen M; Snyder, David; Schoelles, Karen; Gotschall, Cathy; Dawson, Drew; Lang, Eddy; Sanddal, Nels D; Butler, Frank K; Fallat, Mary; Taillac, Peter; White, Lynn; Salomone, Jeffrey P; Seifarth, William; Betzner, Michael J; Johannigman, Jay; McSwain, Norman

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the development of an evidence-based guideline for external hemorrhage control in the prehospital setting. This project included a systematic review of the literature regarding the use of tourniquets and hemostatic agents for management of life-threatening extremity and junctional hemorrhage. Using the GRADE methodology to define the key clinical questions, an expert panel then reviewed the results of the literature review, established the quality of the evidence and made recommendations for EMS care. A clinical care guideline is proposed for adoption by EMS systems. Key words: tourniquet; hemostatic agents; external hemorrhage. PMID:24641269

  13. Prehospital advanced trauma life support for critical penetrating wounds to the thorax and abdomen.

    PubMed

    Pons, P T; Honigman, B; Moore, E E; Rosen, P; Antuna, B; Dernocoeur, J

    1985-09-01

    The role of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) in the prehospital care of the critically injured is highly controversial. This study analyzes the efficacy of ATLS in the management of critical penetrating wounds of the thorax and abdomen. In the 2 1/2-year period ending July 1984, 203 consecutive patients underwent emergency laparotomy or thoracotomy for gunshot and stab wounds. All patients were treated in the field by advanced paramedics (EMT-P). For gunshot wounds the mean time (+/- S.E.M.) responding to the scene was 4.5 (+/- 0.29) minutes, on the scene 10.1 (+/- 0.41) minutes, and returning to the hospital 6.4 (+/- 0.32) minutes. For stab wounds the mean time responding to the scene was 4.8 (+/- 0.21) minutes, on the scene 9.5 (+/- 0.37) minutes, and returning to the hospital 5.7 (+ 0.30) minutes. The number of intravenous lines started averaged 1.8 per patient. Eighty-one patients had PASG applied and 28 patients underwent endotracheal intubation (21 orally, seven nasally). Thirty-three patients had no obtainable blood pressure, of whom six survived (18%). One hundred sixty (94%) of the remaining 170 patients who had any initial blood pressure survived. One hundred nine (55%) patients had an increase in BP greater than or equal to 10 mm Hg (average, 35.6 mm Hg), 64 (32%) had no significant change, and 25 (13%) had a fall greater than or equal to 10 mm Hg (average, 24.2 mm Hg) from the field to the emergency department. Twenty (80%) of the 25 patients with a fall in blood pressure survived.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4032506

  14. Comparison of three different prehospital wrapping methods for preventing hypothermia - a crossover study in humans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accidental hypothermia increases mortality and morbidity in trauma patients. Various methods for insulating and wrapping hypothermic patients are used worldwide. The aim of this study was to compare the thermal insulating effects and comfort of bubble wrap, ambulance blankets / quilts, and Hibler's method, a low-cost method combining a plastic outer layer with an insulating layer. Methods Eight volunteers were dressed in moistened clothing, exposed to a cold and windy environment then wrapped using one of the three different insulation methods in random order on three different days. They were rested quietly on their back for 60 minutes in a cold climatic chamber. Skin temperature, rectal temperature, oxygen consumption were measured, and metabolic heat production was calculated. A questionnaire was used for a subjective evaluation of comfort, thermal sensation, and shivering. Results Skin temperature was significantly higher 15 minutes after wrapping using Hibler's method compared with wrapping with ambulance blankets / quilts or bubble wrap. There were no differences in core temperature between the three insulating methods. The subjects reported more shivering, they felt colder, were more uncomfortable, and had an increased heat production when using bubble wrap compared with the other two methods. Hibler's method was the volunteers preferred method for preventing hypothermia. Bubble wrap was the least effective insulating method, and seemed to require significantly higher heat production to compensate for increased heat loss. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a combination of vapour tight layer and an additional dry insulating layer (Hibler's method) is the most efficient wrapping method to prevent heat loss, as shown by increased skin temperatures, lower metabolic rate and better thermal comfort. This should then be the method of choice when wrapping a wet patient at risk of developing hypothermia in prehospital environments. PMID:21699720

  15. The 60-Day Temperature-Dependent Degradation of Midazolam and Lorazepam in the Prehospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, Jason T.; Pinnawin, Ashley; Jones, Elizabeth; Denninghoff, Kurt; Siewart, Nicholas; Spaite, Daniel W.; Zaleski, Erin; Silbergleit, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background The choice of the optimal benzodiazepine to treat prehospital status epilepticus is unclear. Lorazepam is preferred in the emergency department, but concerns about nonrefrigerated storage limits emergency medical services (EMS) use. Midazolam is increasingly popular, but its heat stability is undocumented. Objective This study evaluated temperature-dependent degradation of lorazepam and midazolam after 60 days in the EMS environment. Methods Lorazepam or midazolam samples were collected prior to (n = 139) or after (n = 229) 60 days of EMS deployment during spring–summer months in 14 metropolitan areas across the United States. Medications were stored in study boxes that logged temperature every minute and were stored in EMS units per local agency policy. Mean kinetic temperature (MKT) exposure was derived for each sample. Drug concentrations were determined in a central laboratory by high-performance liquid chromatography. Concentration as a function of MKT was analyzed by linear regression. Results Prior to deployment, measured concentrations of both benzodiazepines were 1.0 relative to labeled concentration. After 60 days, midazolam showed no degradation (mean relative concentration 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.00) and was stable across temperature exposures (adjusted R2 –0.008). Lorazepam experienced little degradation (mean relative concentration 0.99, 95% CI 0.98–0.99), but degradation was correlated to increasing MKT (adjusted R2 0.278). The difference between the temperature dependence of degradation of midazolam and lorazepam was statistically significant (T = −5.172, p < 0.001). Conclusions Lorazepam experiences small but statistically significant temperature-dependent degradation after 60 days in the EMS environment. Additional study is needed to evaluate whether clinically significant deterioration occurs after 60 days. Midazolam shows no degradation over this duration, even in high-heat conditions. PMID:23148574

  16. Prehospital Electronic Patient Care Report Systems: Early Experiences from Emergency Medical Services Agency Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Lee, Christopher H.; Sasson, Comilla; Van Gelder, Carin M.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2012-01-01

    Background As the United States embraces electronic health records (EHRs), improved emergency medical services (EMS) information systems are also a priority; however, little is known about the experiences of EMS agencies as they adopt and implement electronic patient care report (e-PCR) systems. We sought to characterize motivations for adoption of e-PCR systems, challenges associated with adoption and implementation, and emerging implementation strategies. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews with EMS agency leaders. Participants were recruited through a web-based survey of National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) members, a didactic session at the 2010 NAEMSP Annual Meeting, and snowball sampling. Interviews lasted approximately 30 minutes, were recorded and professionally transcribed. Analysis was conducted by a five-person team, employing the constant comparative method to identify recurrent themes. Results Twenty-three interviewees represented 20 EMS agencies from the United States and Canada; 14 EMS agencies were currently using e-PCR systems. The primary reason for adoption was the potential for e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts. Challenges to e-PCR system adoption included those common to any health information technology project, as well as challenges unique to the prehospital setting, including: fear of increased ambulance run times leading to decreased ambulance availability, difficulty integrating with existing hospital information systems, and unfunded mandates requiring adoption of e-PCR systems. Three recurring strategies emerged to improve e-PCR system adoption and implementation: 1) identify creative funding sources; 2) leverage regional health information organizations; and 3) build internal information technology capacity. Conclusion EMS agencies are highly motivated to adopt e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts; however, adoption and implementation of e

  17. The effect of pre-hospital care for venomous snake bite on outcome in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Michael, Godpower C; Thacher, Tom D; Shehu, Mohammed I L

    2011-02-01

    We studied pre-hospital practices of 72 consecutive snake bite victims at a hospital in north-central Nigeria. The primary outcome assessed was death or disability at hospital discharge. Victims were predominantly male farmers, and in 54 cases (75%) the snake was identified as a carpet viper (Echis ocellatus), with the remainder unidentified. Most subjects (58, 81%) attempted at least one first aid measure after the bite, including tourniquet application (53, 74%), application (15, 21%) or ingestion (10, 14%) of traditional concoctions, bite site incision (8, 11%), black stone application (4, 5.6%), and suction (3, 4.2%). The majority (44, 61%) presented late (after 4 hours). Most (53, 74%) had full recovery at hospital discharge. Three deaths (4.2%) and thirteen (18%) disabilities (mainly tissue necrosis) occurred. The use of any first aid was associated with a longer hospital stay than no use (4.6 ± 2.0 days versus 3.6 ± 2.7 days, respectively, P = 0.02). The antivenom requirement was greater in subjects who had used a tourniquet (P = 0.03) and in those who presented late (P = 0.02). Topical application (Odds Ratio 15, 95% CI 1.4-708) or ingestion of traditional concoctions (OR 20, 95% CI 1.4-963) were associated with increased risk of death or disability. Ingestion and application of concoctions were associated with a longer time interval before presentation, a higher cost of hospitalization, and an increased risk of wound infection. PMID:21035155

  18. Job Involvement and Organizational Commitment of Employees of Prehospital Emergency Medical System

    PubMed Central

    Rahati, Alireza; Sotudeh-Arani, Hossein; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Rostami, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies are available on organizational commitment of employees in different organizations. However, the organizational commitment and job involvement of the employees in the prehospital emergency medical system (PEMS) of Iran have largely been ignored. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the organizational commitment and job involvement of the employees of PEMS and the relationship between these two issues. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 160 employees of Kashan PEMS who were selected through a census method in 2014. A 3-part instrument was used in this study, including a demographic questionnaire, the Allen and Miller’s organizational commitment inventory, and the Lodahl and Kejner’s job involvement inventory. We used descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman, analysis of variance, and Tukey post hoc tests to analyze the data. Results: The mean job involvement and organizational commitment scores were 61.78 ± 10.69 and 73.89 ± 13.58, respectively. The mean scores of job involvement and organizational commitment were significantly different in subjects with different work experiences (P = 0.043 and P = 0.012, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between the mean scores of organizational commitment and job involvement in subjects with different fields of study, different levels of interest in the profession, and various educational levels. A direct significant correlation was found between the total scores of organizational commitment and job involvement of workers in Kashan PEMS (r = 0.910, P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study showed that the employees in the Kashan PEMS obtained half of the score of organizational commitment and about two-thirds of the job involvement score. Therefore, the higher level managers of the emergency medical system are advised to implement some strategies to increase the employees’ job involvement

  19. PRE-HOSPITAL EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES FOR ELDERLY POPULATION IN TBILISI.

    PubMed

    Dalakishvili, S; Bakuradze, N; Gugunishvili, M; Jojua, R; Eremashvili, M

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the issue is determined by the current demographic situation in Georgia and the world in general. The trend of growing the number of older people and the increase of the life span is obvious. At the same time in the number of countries, particularly in the developed western countries and Japan, the decrease of birth rate is noticed. Similar processes are taking place in Georgia; this logically increases the number of sick and weakened people, which means that taking care of them becomes more acute problem. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was the study of the situation of the pre-hospital emergency medical services in the Georgian capital Tbilisi during the period of 2012-2014. For this reason, the data provided by the Tbilisi Emergency Medical Service were used. Besides, we have also looked for the statistics of the different countries, including the US, Japan and South-East Asian countries. Attention was paid to the recommendations proposed because of the Monitoring of the European Union Mission in Georgia, which focuses on the social and economic protection of elderly. The tables and diagrams, describing the current conditions are provided. Since 2012, there has been launched the state health care program for the elderly in Georgia, but based on research conducted, it does not cover home care services while, the majority of the elderly are chronically sick people and suffer from the number of diseases. Results of the study can be used for improving quality of the Emergency Medical Service model in Georgia and finding the possible ways for its reforms. PMID:27249441

  20. Effects of a standard operating procedure on prehospital emergency care of patients presenting with symptoms of the acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Francis, Roland C; Bubser, Florian; Schmidbauer, Willi; Spies, Claudia D; Sörensen, Marc; Bosse, Götz; Kerner, Thoralf

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether a standard operating procedure (SOP) for prehospital management of patients with the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) improves the quality of patient care in terms of adherence to treatment guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology. Among a total of 1025 patient medical records collected from a period before and after the introduction of the SOP, 269 records included the working diagnosis of ACS and were then reviewed for guideline adherence. Most aspects of patient evaluation, monitoring, treatment, and hospital allocation were fairly guideline adherent (>70%) before the SOP was introduced and were not affected by the SOP. The percentage of cases in whom sublingual nitrate (55.2 vs. 66.7%) or intravenous morphine (26.9 vs. 43.0%) was administered without contraindications was higher after the SOP had been introduced. Therefore, the use of an SOP in prehospital emergency medicine can partly improve the adherence to guideline recommendations for the treatment of patients with ACS. PMID:23411814

  1. Alexithymia Affects Pre-Hospital Delay of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Meta-Analysis of Existing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Preti, Antonio; Sancassiani, Federica; Cadoni, Federica; Carta, Mauro Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background: The time between the onset of symptoms and reperfusion is a critical determinant of the clinical course of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Any delay in seeking help will affect patient’s outcome. Alexithymia can influence the information processing but also the skills to detect the signal of an ongoing AMI. Method: Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies investigating the role of alexithymia in pre-hospital delay after AMI. Pubmed/Medline and PsychINFO/Ovid search from 1990 until 2012. Results: Out of 29 studies investigating the role of psychological factors in pre-hospital delay after AMI, 3 studies specifically assessed alexithymia, involving 258 patients. All studies used the Toronto Alexithymia Scale to group patients into clusters by time to presentation after AMI. Meta-analysis of data showed that the patients with higher emotional awareness (i.e., low alexithymia) had shorter time to presentation after AMI. Conclusions: Preliminary evidence indicates that alexithymia may have a role in seeking help delay after AMI. Further studies are necessary to better appreciate how alexithymia influence help-seeking in patients with an evolving AMI and in what extent their ineffective behavior can be changed. PMID:23878612

  2. [Adherence to standard precautions by the public pre-hospital health team in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Lopes, Aline Cristine Souza; Oliveira, Adriana Cristina; Silva, Jussara Teixeira; Paiva, Maria Henriqueta Rocha Siqueira

    2008-06-01

    This was a cross-sectional study of workers in the pre-hospital care team in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, aimed at evaluating adherence to precautions. The study instrument included questions on knowledge, attitudes, and facilitating factors for adherence to standard precautions. Adherence was verified by percentage of adequacy: > 75% correct answers. Drivers showed the lowest degree of knowledge and physicians the highest. In self-reported answers, none of the workers demonstrated adequate use of face masks, goggles, or personal protective equipment (PPE), and drivers reported inadequate attitudes on all the items. In the univariate analysis, job position, gender, and specific rescue unit were associated with adoption of precautions. Meanwhile, in the multivariate analysis, only job position was related (drivers and nurse technicians/aides). The most frequently cited facilitating factors for improvement of adherence were: training focusing on infections, occupational risks, and use of PPE; periodic team meetings; and creation of a central unit for cleaning, disinfecting, and sterilizing equipment and materials. Workers in the pre-hospital care service demonstrated attitudes that were compatible with knowledge, but professional class affected knowledge on standard precautions and self-reported adequate attitudes. PMID:18545764

  3. Knowledge of Community General Practitioners and Nurses on Pre-Hospital Stroke Prevention and Treatment in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jie; Ou, Shu; Wang, Ni; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study aimed to investigate the knowledge of community general practitioners (GPs) and nurses about pre-hospital stroke recognition, treatment and management and secondary stroke prevention; to identify the sociodemographic and educational factors influencing knowledge. Methods A self-designed test questionnaire was applied in a self-administered close-exam setting among 480 GPs and nurses working in community health centers (stations) in eight urban districts of Chongqing. Results A total of 331 (69%) valid test questionnaires were returned. Of the 331 participants, 39% were aware of the clinical guidelines for cerebrovascular diseases, whereas 48% considered themselves to have stroke management capabilities. The correct rate of answering questions of pre-hospital recognition and management knowledge was as low as 24%, the correct rate of secondary stroke prevention knowledge was only 38%. In terms of the total score for stroke prevention and treatment knowledge, there were significant differences between the medical staff with different specialties before engaging in community health services and whether they have received GP training (P <0.05). Conclusion The community GPs and nurses in the urban districts of Chongqing clearly lack knowledge of stroke, and the levels of stroke prevention and treatment urgently need to be improved. PMID:26384330

  4. Use of Advanced Bleeding Control Mechanisms in Athletic Training: A Shift in the Thought Process of Prehospital Care. Part 1: Tourniquets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert; Payne, Ellen K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this column is to provide athletic training educators (ATE) with evidence regarding the use of tourniquets in the prehospital setting as well as to be a resource on how to teach the management of external hemorrhage using tourniquets.

  5. Pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; Ru, Xiaojuan; Sun, Haixin; Liu, Hongmei; Sun, Dongling; Liu, Yunhai; Huang, Jiuyi; He, Li; Wang, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China. The rates of delay greater than or equal to 2 hours were calculated and factors associated with delays were determined by non-conditional binary logistic regression, after adjusting for different explanatory factors. Among the 403 cases of stroke with an accurate documented time of prehospital delay, the median time (interquartile range) was 4.00 (1.50–14.00) hours. Among the 544 cases of stroke with an estimated time range of prehospital delay, 24.8% of patients were transferred to the emergency department or hospital within 2 hours, only 16.9% of patients with stroke were aware that the initial symptom represented a stroke, only 18.8% used the emergency medical service and one-third of the stroke cases were not identified by ambulance doctors. In the multivariate analyses, 8 variables or sub-variables were identified. In conclusion, prehospital delay of stroke was common in communities. Thus, intervention measures in communities should focus on education about the early identification of stroke and appropriate emergency medical service (EMS) use, as well as the development of organized stroke care. PMID:27411494

  6. Educating the Educator: Use of Advanced Bleeding Control Mechanisms in Athletic Training: A Shift in the Thought Process of Prehospital Care. Part 2: Hemostatic Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ellen K.; Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of this series [see: EJ1044392], the concepts of hemorrhaging, shock, and controlling bleeding as they relate to athletic training and prehospital emergency care along with the use of tourniquets were presented for athletic training educators (ATEs) to teach the skill in the classroom. This article, Part 2 of advanced bleeding control,…

  7. Pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Ru, Xiaojuan; Sun, Haixin; Liu, Hongmei; Sun, Dongling; Liu, Yunhai; Huang, Jiuyi; He, Li; Wang, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China. The rates of delay greater than or equal to 2 hours were calculated and factors associated with delays were determined by non-conditional binary logistic regression, after adjusting for different explanatory factors. Among the 403 cases of stroke with an accurate documented time of prehospital delay, the median time (interquartile range) was 4.00 (1.50-14.00) hours. Among the 544 cases of stroke with an estimated time range of prehospital delay, 24.8% of patients were transferred to the emergency department or hospital within 2 hours, only 16.9% of patients with stroke were aware that the initial symptom represented a stroke, only 18.8% used the emergency medical service and one-third of the stroke cases were not identified by ambulance doctors. In the multivariate analyses, 8 variables or sub-variables were identified. In conclusion, prehospital delay of stroke was common in communities. Thus, intervention measures in communities should focus on education about the early identification of stroke and appropriate emergency medical service (EMS) use, as well as the development of organized stroke care. PMID:27411494

  8. Recent advances in TeleStroke: a systematic review on applications in prehospital management and Stroke Unit treatment or TeleStroke networking in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Gordian J; Müller-Barna, Peter; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2014-12-01

    TeleStroke has become an increasing means to overcome shortage of stroke expertise in underserved areas. This rapidly growing field has triggered a large amount of publications in recent years. We aimed to analyze recent advances in the field of telemedicine for acute stroke, with main focus on prehospital management, Stroke Unit treatment and network implementations in developing countries. Out of 260 articles, 25 were selected for this systematic review: 9 regarding prehospital management, 14 regarding Stroke Unit treatment and 2 describing a network in developing countries. Prehospital management showed that stroke recognition can start at the dispatch emergency call, important clinical information can be electronically transmitted to hospitals before admission and even acute treatment such as thrombolysis can be initiated in the prehospital field if ambulances are equipped with CT scan and point-of-care laboratory. Articles on remote clinical examination, telemedical imaging interpretation, trial recruitment and cost-effectiveness described various aspects of Stroke Unit treatment within TeleStroke networks, underlining reliability, safety and cost savings of these systems of care. Only one network was described to have been implemented in a developing/emerging nation. TeleStroke is a growing field expanding its focus to a broader spectrum of stroke care. It still seems to be underused, particularly in developing countries. PMID:25381687

  9. Prehospital antiplatelet use and functional status on admission of patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease: a nationwide retrospective cohort study (J-ASPECT study)

    PubMed Central

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Kada, Akiko; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ono, Junichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Aruga, Toru; Miyachi, Shigeru; Nagata, Izumi; Toyoda, Kazunori; Matsuda, Shinya; Suzuki, Akifumi; Kataoka, Hiroharu; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Kamitani, Satoru; Nishimura, Ataru; Kurogi, Ryota; Sayama, Tetsuro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To elucidate the association between antiplatelet use in patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease before hospital admission and good functional status on admission in Japan. Design Retrospective, multicentre, non-randomised, observational study. Setting Nationwide registry data in Japan. Participants A total of 1925 patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease admitted between 1 April 2012 and 31 March 2014 in Japan. Main outcome measure We performed propensity score-matched analysis to examine the association between prehospital antiplatelet use and no significant disability on hospital admission, as defined by a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1. Results Propensity-matched patients who received prehospital antiplatelet drugs were associated with a good outcome on hospital admission (OR adjusted for all covariates, 3.82; 95% CI 1.22 to 11.99) compared with those who did not receive antiplatelet drugs prior to hospital admission. Conclusions Prehospital antiplatelet use was significantly associated with good functional status on hospital admission among patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease in Japan. Our results suggest that prehospital antiplatelet use should be considered when evaluating outcomes of patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease. PMID:27008684

  10. Up-regulation of hypertonicity-activated myo-inositol transporter SMIT1 by the cell volume-sensitive protein kinase SGK1.

    PubMed

    Klaus, F; Palmada, M; Lindner, R; Laufer, J; Jeyaraj, S; Lang, F; Boehmer, C

    2008-03-15

    Mechanisms of regulatory cell volume increase following cell shrinkage include accumulation of organic osmolytes such as betaine, taurine, sorbitol, glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) and myo-inositol. Myo-inositol is taken up by the sodium-myo-inositol-transporter SMIT1 (SLC5A3) expressed in a wide variety of cell types. Hypertonicity induces the transcription of the SMIT1 gene upon binding of the transcription factor tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) to tonicity responsive enhancers (TonE) in the SMIT1 promoter region. However, little is known about post-translational regulation of the carrier protein. In this study we show that SMIT1 is modulated by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, a protein genomically up-regulated by hypertonicity. As demonstrated by two-electrode voltage-clamp in the Xenopus oocyte expression system, SMIT1-mediated myo-inositol-induced currents are up-regulated by coexpression of wild type SGK1 and constitutively active (S422D)SGK1 but not by inactive (K127N)SGK1. The increase in SMIT1 activity is due to an elevated cell surface expression of the carrier while its kinetic properties remain unaffected. According to the decay of SMIT1 activity in the presence of brefeldin A, SGK1 stabilizes the SMIT1 protein in the plasma membrane. The SGK isoforms SGK2, SGK3 and the closely related protein kinase B (PKB) are similarly capable of activating SMIT1 activity. SMIT1-mediated currents are decreased by coexpression of the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4-2, an effect counteracted by additional coexpression of SGK1. In conclusion, the present observations disclose SGK isoforms and protein kinase B as novel regulators of SMIT1 activity. PMID:18202099

  11. Fluid deprivation increases isotonic NaCl intake, but not hypertonic salt intake, under normal and heated conditions in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Omouessi, S T; Lemamy, G J; Kiki-Mvouaka, S; Fernette, B; Falconetti, C; Ndeboko, B; Mouecoucou, J; Thornton, S N

    2016-02-01

    In the course of exposure to fluid deprivation and heated environment, mammals regulate their hydromineral balance and body temperature by a number of mechanisms including sweating, water and salt intakes. Here we challenged obese Zucker rats, known to have a predisposition to hypertension, with 0.9%NaCl alone or with 2%NaCl solution + water to drink under fluid deprivation and heated conditions. Food and fluid intakes, body weight, diuresis and natriuresis were measured daily throughout. Serum aldosterone levels and Na(+) concentration were also analyzed. Data showed that obese and lean rats presented similar baseline measurements of food, 0.9%NaCl and fluid intakes, diuresis and fluid balance; whereas hypertonic 2%NaCl consumption was almost absent. Before and during fluid deprivation animals increased isotonic but not hypertonic NaCl intake; the obese showed significant increases in diuresis and Na(+) excretion, whereas, total fluid intake was similar between groups. Heat increased isotonic NaCl intake and doubled natriuresis in obese which were wet on their fur and displayed a paradoxical increase of fluid gain. Fluid deprivation plus heat produced similar negative fluid balance in all groups. Body weight losses, food intake and diuresis reductions were amplified under the combined conditions. Animals exposed to 2%NaCl showed higher circulating levels of aldosterone and obese were lower than leans. In animals which drank 0.9%NaCl, obese showed higher serum levels of Na(+) than leans. We conclude that in spite of their higher sensitivity to high salt and heat obese Zucker rats can control hydromineral balance in response to fluid deprivation and heat by adjusting isotonic NaCl preference with sodium balance and circulating levels of aldosterone. This suggests a key hormonal role in the mechanisms underlying thermoregulation, body fluid homeostasis and sodium intake. PMID:26621332

  12. Mass Media Campaigns’ Influence on Prehospital Behavior for Acute Coronary Syndromes: An Evaluation of the Australian Heart Foundation’s Warning Signs Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Janet E; Stub, Dion; Ngu, Philip; Cartledge, Susie; Straney, Lahn; Stewart, Michelle; Keech, Wendy; Patsamanis, Harry; Shaw, James; Finn, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the awareness of a recent mass media campaign, and its influence on knowledge and prehospital times, in a cohort of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients admitted to an Australian hospital. Methods and Results We conducted 199 semistructured interviews with consecutive ACS patients who were aged 35 to 75 years, competent to provide consent, and English speaking. Questions addressed the factors known to predict prehospital delay, awareness of the campaign, and whether it increased knowledge and influenced actions. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between campaign awareness and a 1-hour delay in deciding to seek medical attention (patient delay) and a 2-hour delay in presenting to hospital (prehospital delay). The median age was 62 years (IQR=53 to 68 years), and 68% (n=136) were male. Awareness of the campaign was reported by 127 (64%) patients, with most of these patients stating the campaign (1) increased their understanding of what is a heart attack (63%), (2) increased their awareness of the signs and symptoms of heart attack (68%), and (3) influenced their actions in response to symptoms (43%). After adjustment for other predictors, awareness of the campaign was significantly associated with patient delay time of ≤1 hour (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.25, 95% CI: 1.03 to 4.91, P=0.04) and prehospital delay time ≤2 hours (AOR=3.11, 95% CI: 1.36 to 7.08, P=0.007). Conclusions Our study showed reasonably high awareness of the warning signs campaign, which was significantly associated with shorter prehospital decision-making and faster presentation to hospital. PMID:26150478

  13. The nurse-patient relationship in pre-hospital emergency care--from the perspective of Swedish specialist ambulance nursing students.

    PubMed

    Berntsson, Tommy; Hildingh, Cathrine

    2013-10-01

    The development of the Swedish ambulance service has resulted in three different competence levels in Swedish ambulance teams: specialist ambulance nurses, registered nurses and emergency medical technicians. A nursing scientific model developed by Peplau (Peplau, H., 1991. Interpersonal Relations in Nursing. Springer Publishing Company, New York.) breaks down the nurse-patient relationship into a number of phases: an orientation, an identification, an exploitation and a resolution phase. This model has then been adapted to the pre-hospital emergency care by Suserud (Dahlberg, K., Segesten, K., Nyström, M., Suserud, B.-O., Fagerberg, I., 2003. Att förstå vårdvetenskap [To Understand Caring Science]. Studentlitteratur, Lund.). The purpose of this study was to explore, by direct content analysis, how the phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship described by Suserud (Dahlberg et al., 2003), emerge in 17 specialist ambulance nursing students descriptions of ambulance missions. The results show that the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship could be identified and each phase includes several different parts. Furthermore, the results show that the parts of each phase can vary depending on the patient's condition and the environmental circumstances of the ambulance mission. This improved understanding of the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship, and their parts, could be used by ambulance team members as a support during the pre-hospital caring process in ambulance missions. This new knowledge could also be used in education. PMID:23245810

  14. Goal Directed Resuscitation in the Prehospital Setting: A Propensity Adjusted Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua B.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Minei, Joseph P.; Maier, Ronald V.; West, Michael A.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Moore, Ernest E.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Sperry, Jason L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The scope of prehospital (PH) interventions has expanded recently; not always with clear benefit. PH crystalloid resuscitation has been challenged, particularly in penetrating trauma. Optimal PH crystalloid resuscitation strategies remain unclear in blunt trauma as does the influence of PH hypotension. The objective was to characterize outcomes for PH crystalloid volume in patients with and without PH hypotension. Methods Data were obtained from a multicenter prospective study of blunt injured adults transported from the scene with ISS > 15. Subjects were divided into HIGH (>500cc) and LOW (≤500cc) PH crystalloid groups. Propensity adjusted regression determined the association of PH crystalloid group with mortality and acute coagulopathy (admission INR>1.5) in subjects with and without PH hypotension (SBP<90mmHg) after controlling for confounders. Results Of 1,216 subjects, 822 (68%) received HIGH PH crystalloid and 616 (51%) had PH hypotension. Initial base deficit and ISS were similar between HIGH and LOW crystalloid groups in subjects with and without PH hypotension. In subjects without PH hypotension, HIGH crystalloid was associated with an increase in the risk of mortality (HR 2.5; 95%CI 1.3 – 4.9, p<0.01) and acute coagulopathy (OR 2.2; 95%CI 1.01–4.9, p=0.04) but not in subjects with PH hypotension. HIGH crystalloid was associated with correction of PH hypotension on ED arrival (OR 2.02; 1.06–3.88, p=0.03). The mean corrected SBP in the ED was 104mmHg. Each 1mmHg increase in ED systolic blood pressure was associated with a 2% increase in survival in subjects with PH hypotension (OR 1.02; 1.01–1.03, p<0.01). Conclusions In severely injured blunt trauma patients, PH crystalloid >500cc was associated with worse outcome in patients without PH hypotension but not with PH hypotension. HIGH crystalloid was associated with corrected PH hypotension. This suggests PH resuscitation should be goal directed based on the presence or absence of PH

  15. A prediction model for prehospital triage of patients with suspected cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, M; Zalenski, R J; Ross, M A; Bock, B

    2000-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology recommends that patients with high risk acute myocardial infarction (AMI) be triaged to hospitals with percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty capability. However, there are no prehospital triage criteria to select candidates for bypassing community hospitals and being taken directly to "cardiac centers." This article assesses which independent variables predict death within 7 days in patients with suspected AMI transported by EMS. This is a retrospective study of 291 AMI patients transported by ambulance to 3 hospitals during 1996-1997. Included were patients who were (n = 244) > or =18 years of age, had a ED chief complaint of chest pain or dyspnea for whom we had mortality data. Mortality at 7 days, our primary outcome measure, was obtained by using a metropolitan Detroit tricounty death index records. Differences between the survivors and nonsurvivors were assessed using the Student's t-test and chi-square tests. Multiple triage criteria were assessed for optimal identification of high risk patients by constructing a logistic multivariate model. Among the study population, 15% died within 7 days (95% confidence interval (CI) 10.3-19.2), and this group represented 63.2% of all deaths over a 2 year surveillance period. Survivors, compared to nonsurvivors, were 14.1 years younger (P < or = .001) and more often men (P < or = 0.001). The dispatch time to ED arrival was less among survivors than nonsurvivors (42.8 vs. 50.6 min, P < or = .01). EMS vital signs differed by survivor status. Among survivors, HR was lower (-11.9 bpm; P < or = 0.01), RR was lower (-6.7 rpm; P < or = .001), SBP was higher (+14.5 mmHg; P < or = 0.05) and DBP was higher (+13.2 mm Hg; P < or = .01). A multivariate model identified the following as independent predictors of early mortality: female gender (OR = 2.3; P < or = .05), age > or =65 (OR = 5.9; P < or = .01), RR > or = 20 (OR = 4.6; P < or = .001), SBP < 120 (OR = 2.4; P < or = .05). The overall

  16. Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) ? One Year Later A Joint Theater Trauma System and Joint Trauma System Review of Prehospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) Final Report, 30 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Samual W; Robinson, John B; Smith, Michael P; Gross, Kirby R; Kotwal, Russ S; Mabry, Robert L; Butler, Frank K; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Mavity, Mark E; Gillies, Duncan A

    2015-01-01

    The United States has achieved unprecedented survival rates, as high as 98%, for casualties arriving alive at the combat hospital. Our military medical personnel are rightly proud of this achievement. Commanders and Servicemembers are confident that if wounded and moved to a Role II or III medical facility, their care will be the best in the world. Combat casualty care, however, begins at the point of injury and continues through evacuation to those facilities. With up to 25% of deaths on the battlefield being potentially preventable, the prehospital environment is the next frontier for making significant further improvements in battlefield trauma care. Strict adherence to the evidence-based Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) Guidelines has been proven to reduce morbidity and mortality on the battlefield. However, full implementation across the entire force and commitment from both line and medical leadership continue to face ongoing challenges. This report on prehospital trauma in the Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) is a follow-on to the one previously conducted in November 2012 and published in January 2013. Both assessments were conducted by the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) Joint Theater Trauma System (JTTS). Observations for this report were collected from December 2013 to January 2014 and were obtained directly from deployed prehospital providers, medical leaders, and combatant leaders. Significant progress has been made between these two reports with the establishment of a Prehospital Care Division within the JTTS, development of a prehospital trauma registry and weekly prehospital trauma conferences, and CJOA-A theater guidance and enforcement of prehospital documentation. Specific prehospital trauma-care achievements include expansion of transfusion capabilities forward to the point of injury, junctional tourniquets, and universal approval of tranexamic acid. PMID:26125162

  17. Impact of regional pre-hospital emergency medical services in treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sozener, Cemal B; Barsan, William G

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a major public health concern afflicting an estimated 795,000 Americans annually. The associated morbidity and mortality is staggering. Early treatment with thrombolytics is beneficial. The window for treatment is narrow and minimization of the time from symptom onset to treatment is vital. The general population is not well informed as to the warning signs or symptoms of stroke, leading to substantial delays in emergency medical services (EMS) activation. Ambulance transport of stroke patients to the hospital has demonstrated improvements in key benchmarks such as door to physician evaluation, door to CT initiation, and increased thrombolytic treatment. Pre-hospital notification of the impending arrival of a stroke patient allows for vital preparation in the treating emergency department, and improving timely evaluation and treatment upon arrival of the stroke patient. EMS systems are a vital component of the management of stroke patients, and resources used to improve these systems are beneficial. PMID:22994221

  18. [Traffic accidents: characterization of the victims by the Revised Trauma Score in the pre-hospital period].

    PubMed

    Malvestio, Marisa Amaro; de Sousa, Regina Márcia Cardoso

    2002-12-01

    This report describes age, gender, trauma mechanics aspects and procedures from 643 motor vehicle crashes, MVC, victims in Tietê and Pinheiros expressways, by considering the prehospital Revised Trauma Score (RTS). The RTS = 12 victims' were 90.8%, with RTS = 11 added 4.0% and in group with RTS < 10, 5.2%. Among the RTS < 10 victims, the pedestrians stand out (36.4%), the frontal impacts (24.2%) and the projected (36.4%) or trapped victims (15.1%), and those that received advanced life support procedures. The motorcyclists and the male victims with 21 with 30 years of age were predominant. This study is expected to contribute to a better assistance to MVC victims. PMID:12876852

  19. Survey of WBSNs for Pre-Hospital Assistance: Trends to Maximize the Network Lifetime and Video Transmission Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Enrique; Peña, Raul; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Avila, Alfonso; Perez-Diaz de Cerio, David

    2015-01-01

    This survey aims to encourage the multidisciplinary communities to join forces for innovation in the mobile health monitoring area. Specifically, multidisciplinary innovations in medical emergency scenarios can have a significant impact on the effectiveness and quality of the procedures and practices in the delivery of medical care. Wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs) are a promising technology capable of improving the existing practices in condition assessment and care delivery for a patient in a medical emergency. This technology can also facilitate the early interventions of a specialist physician during the pre-hospital period. WBSNs make possible these early interventions by establishing remote communication links with video/audio support and by providing medical information such as vital signs, electrocardiograms, etc. in real time. This survey focuses on relevant issues needed to understand how to setup a WBSN for medical emergencies. These issues are: monitoring vital signs and video transmission, energy efficient protocols, scheduling, optimization and energy consumption on a WBSN. PMID:26007741

  20. Survey of WBSNs for Pre-Hospital Assistance: Trends to Maximize the Network Lifetime and Video Transmission Techniques.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Enrique; Peña, Raul; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Avila, Alfonso; de Cerio, David Perez-Diaz

    2015-01-01

    This survey aims to encourage the multidisciplinary communities to join forces for innovation in the mobile health monitoring area. Specifically, multidisciplinary innovations in medical emergency scenarios can have a significant impact on the effectiveness and quality of the procedures and practices in the delivery of medical care. Wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs) are a promising technology capable of improving the existing practices in condition assessment and care delivery for a patient in a medical emergency. This technology can also facilitate the early interventions of a specialist physician during the pre-hospital period. WBSNs make possible these early interventions by establishing remote communication links with video/audio support and by providing medical information such as vital signs, electrocardiograms, etc. in real time. This survey focuses on relevant issues needed to understand how to setup a WBSN for medical emergencies. These issues are: monitoring vital signs and video transmission, energy efficient protocols, scheduling, optimization and energy consumption on a WBSN. PMID:26007741

  1. Pre-hospital Utility of Rapid Stroke evaluation Using In-ambulance Telemedicine (PURSUIT): A Pilot Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzu-Ching; Nguyen, Claude; Ankrom, Christy; Yang, Julian; Persse, David; Vahidy, Farhaan; Grotta, James C.; Savitz, Sean I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose : Pre-hospital evaluation using telemedicine (TM) may accelerate acute stroke treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). We explored the feasibility and reliability of using TM in the field and ambulance to help evaluate acute stroke patients. Methods : Ten unique, scripted stroke scenarios, each conducted four times, were portrayed by trained actors retrieved and transported by Houston Fire Department emergency medical technicians (EMT) to our stroke center. The vascular neurologists (VN) performed remote assessments in real-time, obtaining clinical data points and NIH Stroke-Scale (NIHSS) using the In-Touch RP-Xpress TM device. Each scripted scenario was recorded for a subsequent evaluation by a second blinded VN. Study feasibility was defined by the ability to conduct 80% of the sessions without major technological limitations. Reliability of video interpretation was defined by a 90% concordance between the data derived during the real-time sessions and the scripted scenarios. Results In 34/40 (85%) scenarios, the teleconsultation was conducted without major technical complication. The absolute agreement for intra-class-correlation (ICC) was 0.997 (95% CI: 0.992-0.999) for the NIHSS obtained during the real-time sessions and 0.993 (95% CI: 0.975-0.999) for the recorded sessions. Inter-rater agreement using κ-statistics showed that for live-raters, 10/15 items on the NIHSS showed excellent agreement, and 5/15 showed moderate agreement. Matching of real-time assessments occurred for 88% (30/34) of NIHSS scores by ±2 points, and 96% of the clinical information. Conclusions Mobile TM is reliable and feasible in assessing actors simulating acute stroke in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:24938842

  2. Cross-sectional study of the prehospital management of adult patients with a suspected seizure (EPIC1)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Louise H; Shewan, Jane; Baldwin, Trevor; Grünewald, Richard A; Reuber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Suspected seizures are a common reason for emergency calls to ambulance services. Prehospital management of these patients is an important element of good quality care. The aim of this study, conducted in a regional ambulance service in the UK, was to quantify the number of emergency telephone calls for suspected seizures in adults, the associated costs, and to describe the patients’ characteristics, their prehospital management and their immediate outcomes. Design Quantitative cross-sectional study using routinely collected data and a detailed review of the clinical records of a consecutive series of adult patients (≥16 years). Setting A regional ambulance service within the National Health Service in England. Participants Cross-sectional data from all 605 481 adult emergency incidents managed by the ambulance service from 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013. We selected a consecutive series of 178 individual incidents from May 2012 for more detailed analysis (132 after exclusions and removal of non-seizure cases). Results Suspected seizures made up 3.3% of all emergency incidents. True medical emergencies were uncommon but 3.3% had partially occluded airways, 6.8% had ongoing seizure activity and 59.1% had clinical problems in addition to the seizure (29.1% involving injury). Emergency vehicles were dispatched for 97.2% of suspected seizures, the seizure had terminated on arrival in 93.2% of incidents, 75% of these patients were transported to hospital. The estimated emergency management cost per annum of suspected seizures in the English ambulance services is £45.2 million (€64.0 million, $68.6 million). Conclusions Many patients with suspected seizures could potentially be treated more effectively and at lower cost by modifying ambulance call handling protocols. The development of innovative care pathways could give call handlers and paramedics alternatives to hospital transportation. Increased adoption of care plans could reduce 999 calls and

  3. Barriers to Real-Time Medical Direction via Cellular Communication for Prehospital Emergency Care Providers in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, Matthew C; Rao, G.V. Ramana; Newberry, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many low- and middle-income countries depend on emergency medical technicians (EMTs), nurses, midwives, and layperson community health workers with limited training to provide a majority of emergency medical, trauma, and obstetric care in the prehospital setting. To improve timely patient care and expand provider scope of practice, nations leverage cellular phones and call centers for real-time online medical direction. However, there exist several barriers to adequate communication that impact the provision of emergency care. We sought to identify obstacles in the cellular communication process among GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute (GVK EMRI) EMTs in Gujarat, India. Methods: A convenience sample of practicing EMTs in Gujarat, India were surveyed regarding the barriers to call initiation and completion. Results: 108 EMTs completed the survey. Overall, ninety-seven (89.8%) EMTs responded that the most common reason they did not initiate a call with the call center physician was insufficient time. Forty-six (42%) EMTs reported that they were unable to call the physician one or more times during a typical workweek (approximately 5-6 twelve-hour shifts/week) due to their hands being occupied performing direct patient care. Fifty-eight (54%) EMTs reported that they were unable to reach the call center physician, despite attempts, at least once a week. Conclusion: This study identified multiple barriers to communication, including insufficient time to call for advice and inability to reach call center physicians. Identification of simple interventions and best practices may improve communication and ensure timely and appropriate prehospital care.  PMID:27551654

  4. Do pre-hospital anaesthesiologists reliably predict mortality using the NACA severity score? A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    RAATINIEMI, L; MIKKELSEN, K; FREDRIKSEN, K; WISBORG, T

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics' (NACA) severity score is widely used in pre-hospital emergency medicine to grade the severity of illness or trauma in patient groups but is scarcely validated. The aim of this study was to assess the score's ability to predict mortality and need for advanced in-hospital interventions in a cohort from one anaesthesiologist-manned helicopter service in Northern Norway. Methods All missions completed by one helicopter service during January 1999 to December 2009 were reviewed. One thousand eight hundred forty-one patients were assessed by the NACA score. Pre-hospital and in-hospital interventions were collected from patient records. The relationship between NACA score and the outcome measures was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results A total of 1533 patients were included in the analysis; uninjured and dead victims were excluded per protocol. Overall mortality rate of the patients with NACA score 1–6 was 5.2%. Trauma patients with NACA score 1–6 had overall mortality rate of 1.9% (12/625) and non-trauma patients 7.4% (67/908). The NACA score's ability to predict mortality was assessed by using ROC area under curve (AUC) and was 0.86 for all, 0.82 for non-trauma and 0.98 for trauma patients. The NACA score's ability to predict a need for respiratory therapy within 24 h revealed an AUC of 0.90 for all patients combined. Conclusion The NACA score had good discrimination for predicting mortality and need for respiratory therapy. It is thus useful as a tool to measure overall severity of the patient population in this kind of emergency medicine system. PMID:24134443

  5. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC) trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC) trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods: Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control) or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. Conclusion The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. Trial Registration: The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942). PMID:21054860

  6. RUC-4: A Novel αIIbβ3 Antagonist for Pre-hospital Therapy of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Vootukuri, Spandana; Shang, Yi; Negri, Ana; Jiang, Jian-kang; Nedelman, Mark; Diacovo, Thomas G.; Filizola, Marta; Thomas, Craig J.; Coller, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) within the first 1–2 hours with a thrombolytic agent, percutaneous coronary intervention, or an αIIbβ3 antagonist decreases mortality and the later development of heart failure. We previously reported on a novel small molecule αIIbβ3 antagonist, RUC-2, that has a unique mechanism of action. We have now developed a more potent and more soluble congener of RUC-2, RUC-4, designed to be easily administered intramuscularly (IM) by autoinjector to facilitate its use in the pre-hospital setting. Here we report the properties of RUC-4 and the antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of RUC-2 and RUC-4 in animal models. Approach and Results RUC-4 was ~20% more potent than RUC-2 in inhibiting human ADP-induced platelet aggregation and much more soluble in aqueous solutions (60–80 mg/ml). It shared RUC-2’s specificity for αIIbβ3 vs αVβ3, did not prime the receptor to bind fibrinogen, or induce changes in β3 identified by a conformation-specific monoclonal antibody. Both RUC-2 and RUC-4 prevented FeCl3-induced thrombotic occlusion of the carotid artery in mice and decreased microvascular thrombi in response to laser injury produced by human platelets infused into transgenic mice containing a mutated von Willebrand factor that reacts with human, but not mouse platelets. IM injection of RUC-4 in non-human primates at 1.9 and 3.85 mg/kg led to complete inhibition of platelet aggregation within 15 minutes, with dose-dependent return of platelet aggregation after 4.5–24 hours. Conclusions RUC-4 has favorable biochemical, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, antithrombotic, and solubility properties as a pre-hospital therapy of MI, but the possibility of increased bleeding with therapeutic doses remains to be evaluated. PMID:25147334

  7. Pre-hospital non-invasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Pandor, Abdullah; Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Poku, Edith; Stevens, John W; Ren, Shijie; Cantrell, Anna; Perkins, Gavin D; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-invasive ventilation (NIV), in the form of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or bilevel inspiratory positive airway pressure (BiPAP), is used in hospital to treat patients with acute respiratory failure. Pre-hospital NIV may be more effective than in-hospital NIV but requires additional ambulance service resources. OBJECTIVES We aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of pre-hospital NIV compared with usual care for adults presenting to the emergency services with acute respiratory failure and to identify priorities for future research. DATA SOURCES Fourteen electronic databases and research registers (including MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) were searched from inception to August 2013, supplemented by hand-searching reference lists and contacting experts in the field. REVIEW METHODS We included all randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of pre-hospital NIV in patients with acute respiratory failure. Methodological quality was assessed according to established criteria. An aggregate data network meta-analysis (NMA) of mortality and intubation was used to jointly estimate intervention effects relative to usual care. A NMA, using individual patient-level data (IPD) and aggregate data where IPD were not available, was carried out to assess whether or not covariates were treatment effect modifiers. A de novo economic model was developed to explore the costs and health outcomes when pre-hospital NIV (specifically CPAP provided by paramedics) and standard care (in-hospital NIV) were applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. RESULTS The literature searches identified 2284 citations. Of the 10 studies that met the inclusion criteria, eight were randomised controlled trials and two were quasi-randomised trials (six CPAP; four BiPAP; sample sizes 23-207 participants). IPD were

  8. Regional suppression by lesions in the anterior third ventricle of c-fos expression induced by either angiotensin II or hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Herbert, J

    1995-07-01

    Angiotensin II (250 pmol) infused into the cerebral ventricles of male rats induces the expression of c-fos in the subfornical organ, supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, as well as in the lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus and the nucleus of the solitary tract in the brainstem. Electrolytic lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle, principally the subcommissural (ventral) median preoptic nucleus, inhibited the dipsogenic response to i.c.v. angiotensin II and also suppressed c-fos expression in supraoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus and nucleus of the solitary tract but not in the subfornical organ or dorsal median preoptic nucleus. The stimulating effect of i.c.v. angiotensin II on corticosterone was also reduced. Median preoptic nucleus lesions also suppressed the expression of c-fos following i.v. infusions of 6 micrograms angiotensin II in supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus but not in subfornical organ, dorsal median preoptic nucleus, lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus and nucleus of the solitary tract. Median preoptic nucleus lesions reduced the dipsogenic effects of an intragastric infusion of hypertonic (1.5 M) saline and suppressed c-fos expression in supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus compared to sham-lesioned rats. However, c-fos expression was unaltered in subfornical organ, dorsal median preoptic nucleus lesions had no effect on the increased corticosterone induced by hypertonic saline. Subfornical organ lesions did not alter dipsogenic responses to i.c.v. angiotensin II, nor was the i.c.v. angiotensin II-induced expression of c-fos suppressed in the basal forebrain. These experiments show that the ventral median preoptic nucleus (but not the subfornical organ), part of the anteroventral third ventricle, is critical for the expression of c-fos in more caudal areas of the brain following i.c.v. angiotensin II. c-fos expression in

  9. S.T.A.R.T.T. plus: addition of prehospital personnel to a national multidisciplinary crisis resource management trauma team training course

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Lawrence M.; Martin, Doug; Engels, Paul T.; Brindley, Peter; Widder, Sandy; French, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Simulated Trauma and Resuscitation Team Training (S.T.A.R.T.T.) course is a unique multidisciplinary trauma team training course deliberately designed to address the common crisis resource management (CRM) skills of trauma team members. Moreover, the curriculum has been updated to also target the specific learning needs of individual participating professionals: physicians, nurses and respiratory therapists. This commentary outlines further modifications to the course curriculum in order to address the needs of a relatively undertargeted group: prehospital personnel (i.e., emergency medical services). Maintenance of high participant satisfaction, regardless of profession, suggests that the S.T.A.R.T.T. course can be readily modified to incorporate prehospital personnel without losing its utility or popularity. PMID:26574706

  10. 'The first pulse you take is your own' - but don't forget your colleagues'. Emotion teamwork in pre-hospital emergency medical services.

    PubMed

    Henckes, Nicolas; Nurok, Michael

    2015-09-01

    This article examines the way that intense emotions, both positive and negative, are collectively regulated at work by pre-hospital emergency teams. We analyse the collective strategies and solutions that are developed in daily medical work by teams and individuals with a view to furthering the action. After a review of the literature on emotion work in work collectives, we discuss the nature of pre-hospital emergency work and the role of emotions in this work. We then examine the collective management of both disruptive and desired emotions by teams during interventions. The last section reflects on the long-term management of emotions at work using Randall Collins' concepts of interaction ritual and emotional energy. This study relies on fieldwork performed in emergency medical services in New York and Paris. PMID:25923836

  11. Mortality in primary angioplasty patients starting antiplatelet therapy with prehospital prasugrel or clopidogrel: a 1-year follow-up from the European MULTIPRAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Patrick; Grieco, Niccolò; Ince, Hüseyin; Danchin, Nicolas; Ramos, Yvonne; Goedicke, Jochen; Clemmensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aim MULTIPRAC was designed to provide insights into the use and outcomes associated with prehospital initiation of antiplatelet therapy with either prasugrel or clopidogrel in the context of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. After a previous report on efficacy and safety outcomes during hospitalization, we report here the 1-year follow-up data, including cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Methods and results MULTIPRAC is a multinational, prospective registry of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) from 25 hospitals in nine countries, all of which had an established practice of prehospital start of dual antiplatelet therapy in place. The key outcome was CV death at 1 year. Among 2,036 patients followed-up through 1 year, 49 died (2.4%), 10 during the initial hospitalization and 39 within 1 year after hospital discharge. The primary analysis was based on the P2Y12-inhibitor, used from prehospital loading dose through hospital discharge. Prasugrel (n=824) was more commonly used than clopidogrel (n=425). The observed 1-year rates for CV death were 0.5% with prasugrel and 2.6% with clopidogrel. After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, treatment with prasugrel was associated with a significantly lower risk of CV death than treatment with clopidogrel (odds ratio 0.248; 95% confidence interval 0.06–0.89). Conclusion In STEMI patients from routine practice undergoing primary angioplasty, who were able to start oral antiplatelet therapy prehospital, treatment with prasugrel as compared to clopidogrel was associated with a lower risk of CV death at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27143908

  12. Has increased nursing competence in the ambulance services impacted on pre-hospital assessment and interventions in severe traumatic brain-injured patients?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective Trauma is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in modern society, and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are the single leading cause of mortality among young adults. Pre-hospital acute care management has developed during recent years and guidelines have shown positive effects on the pre-hospital treatment and outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. However, reports of impacts on improved nursing competence in the ambulance services are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if increased nursing competence level has had an impact on pre-hospital assessment and interventions in severe traumatic brain-injured patients in the ambulance services. Method A retrospective study was conducted. It included all severe TBI patients (>15 years of age) with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of less than eight measured on admission to a level one trauma centre hospital, and requiring intensive care (ICU) during the years 2000–2009. Results 651 patients were included, and between the years 2000–2005, 395 (60.7%) severe TBI patients were injured, while during 2006–2009, there were 256 (39.3%) patients. The performed assessment and interventions made at the scene of the injury and the mortality in hospital showed no significant difference between the two groups. However, the assessment of saturation was measured more frequently and length of stay in the ICU was significantly less in the group of TBI patients treated between 2006–2009. Conclusion Greater competence of the ambulance personnel may result in better assessment of patient needs, but showed no impact on performed pre-hospital interventions or hospital mortality. PMID:24641814

  13. Protocol for a systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components compared to other resuscitative fluids in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the use of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation of patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. It has been speculated that early resuscitation with blood components may have benefits in terms of treating trauma-induced coagulopathy, which in turn may influence survival. The proposed systematic review will evaluate the evidence on the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components (red blood cells and/or plasma or whole blood), in both civilian and military settings, compared with other resuscitation strategies in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. Methods/design Standard systematic review methods aimed at minimising bias will be employed for study identification, selection and data extraction. General medical and specialist databases will be searched; the search strategy will combine terms for the population, intervention and setting. Studies will be selected for review if the population includes adult patients with major traumatic haemorrhage who receive blood components in a pre-hospital setting (civilian or military). Systematic reviews, randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and controlled observational studies will be included. Uncontrolled studies will be considered depending on the volume of controlled evidence. Quality assessment will be tailored to different study designs. Both patient related and surrogate outcomes will be considered. Synthesis is likely to be primarily narrative, but meta-analyses and subgroup analyses will be undertaken where clinical and methodological homogeneity exists. Discussion Given the increasing use by emergency services of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation, this is a timely systematic review, which will attempt to clarify the evidence base for this practice. As far as the authors are aware, the proposed systematic review will be the first to address this topic. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014013794 PMID:25344301

  14. SGEM Hot Off the Press: hypertonic saline in severe traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Eve; Thoma, Brent; Milne, Ken; Bond, Chris

    2016-09-01

    As part of the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine's (CJEM) developing social media strategy, 1 we are collaborating with the Skeptics' Guide to Emergency Medicine (SGEM) to summarize and critically appraise the current emergency medicine (EM) literature using evidence-based medicine principles. In the "Hot Off the Press" series, we select original research manuscripts published in CJEM to be featured on the SGEM website/podcast and discussed by the study authors and the online EM community. A similar collaboration is under way between the SGEM and Academic Emergency Medicine. What follows is a summary of the selected article, the immediate post-publication synthesis from the SGEM podcast, commentary by the first author, and the subsequent discussion from the SGEM blog and other social media. Through this series, we hope to enhance the value, accessibility, and application of important, clinically relevant EM research. In this, the second SGEM HOP hosted collaboratively with CJEM, we discuss a systematic review evaluating the use of hypertonic saline in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury. 2. PMID:27618977

  15. Inhibition of natriuresis in median eminence polydipsia: effects after intake of diets with different osmolalities and after hypertonic NaCl administration.

    PubMed

    Mahía, Javier; Bernal, Antonio; Puerto, Amadeo

    2013-01-01

    Lesions in the hypothalamic median eminence (ME) induce polydipsia and polyuria in male rats. A first experiment was designed to examine the effect of salt consumption (standard 0.25 percent Na+ vs. low-salt 0.04 percent Na+ diet) on the fluid-electrolytic balance (plasma sodium, urinary sodium excretion, urine osmolality) and water intake of ME polydipsic animals. In the first 6 h post-surgery, the natriuretic response was higher in ME-lesioned animals than in control groups. At 24 h post-surgery, however, less sodium was excreted by ME rats fed with a standard salt diet (ME/SS), despite showing no decrease in salt intake, and they evidenced an increase in plasma sodium concentration and water intake. Urine osmolality was significantly higher in control animals than in either ME-lesioned group. In experiment 2, hypertonic NaCl administration (2 ml/2M) increased the polydipsic behavior of ME-lesioned but not control rats (day 2). Animals deprived of food/salt showed a significant reduction (on day 2) in the initial (day 1) polydipsia, which increased on day 3 when the animals had access to a standard-salt diet. These results suggest that the reduced natriuretic response and the consequent sodium retention observed in ME animals may exacerbate the hydromineral imbalance of this polydipsic syndrome. PMID:24129482

  16. Prehospital heart rate and blood pressure increase the positive predictive value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for high-mortality traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Andrew; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Kumar, Kamal; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-05-15

    We hypothesized that vital signs could be used to improve the association between a trauma patient's prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and his or her clinical condition. Previously, abnormally low and high blood pressures have both been associated with higher mortality for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1384 adult prehospital trauma patients. Vital-sign data were electronically archived and analyzed. We examined the relative risk of severe head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 5-6 as a function of the GCS, systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR). We created multi-variate logistic regression models and, using DeLong's test, compared their area under receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC AUCs) for three outcomes: head AIS 5-6, all-cause mortality, and either head AIS 5-6 or neurosurgical procedure. We found significant bimodal relationships between head AIS 5-6 versus SBP and HR, but not RR. When the GCS was <15, ROC AUCs were significantly higher for a multi-variate regression model (GCS, SBP, and HR) versus GCS alone. In particular, patients with abnormalities in all parameters (GCS, SBP, and HR) were significantly more likely to have high-mortality TBI versus those with abnormalities in GCS alone. This could be useful for mobilizing resources (e.g., neurosurgeons and operating rooms at the receiving hospital) and might enable new prehospital management protocols where therapies are selected based on TBI mortality risk. PMID:24372334

  17. A strategy to implement and support pre-hospital emergency medical systems in developing, resource-constrained areas of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jared H; Shing, Rachel; Twomey, Michele; Wallis, Lee A

    2014-01-01

    Resource-constrained countries are in extreme need of pre-hospital emergency care systems. However, current popular strategies to provide pre-hospital emergency care are inappropriate for and beyond the means of a resource-constrained country, and so new ones are needed-ones that can both function in an under-developed area's particular context and be done with the area's limited resources. In this study, we used a two-location pilot and consensus approach to develop a strategy to implement and support pre-hospital emergency care in one such developing, resource-constrained area: the Western Cape province of South Africa. Local community members are trained to be emergency first aid responders who can provide immediate, on-scene care until a Transporter can take the patient to the hospital. Management of the system is done through local Community Based Organizations, which can adapt the model to their communities as needed to ensure local appropriateness and feasibility. Within a community, the system is implemented in a graduated manner based on available resources, and is designed to not rely on the whole system being implemented first to provide partial function. The University of Cape Town's Division of Emergency Medicine and the Western Cape's provincial METRO EMS intend to follow this model, along with sharing it with other South African provinces. PMID:22917929

  18. Evaluation of the Impact of Implementing the Emergency Medical Services Traumatic Brain Injury Guidelines in Arizona: The Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care (EPIC) Study Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Spaite, Daniel W.; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Stolz, Uwe; Sherrill, Duane; Chikani, Vatsal; Barnhart, Bruce; Sotelo, Michael; Gaither, Joshua B.; Viscusi, Chad; Adelson, P. David; Denninghoff, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) exacts a great toll on society. Fortunately, there is growing evidence that the management of TBI in the early minutes after injury may significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. In response, evidence-based prehospital and in-hospital TBI treatment guidelines have been established by authoritative bodies. However, no large studies have yet evaluated the effectiveness of implementing these guidelines in the prehospital setting. This article describes the background, design, implementation, emergency medical services (EMS) treatment protocols, and statistical analysis of a prospective, controlled (before/after), statewide study designed to evaluate the effect of implementing the EMS TBI guidelines—the Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care (EPIC) study (NIH/NINDS R01NS071049, “EPIC”; and 3R01NS071049-S1, “EPIC4Kids”). The specific aim of the study is to test the hypothesis that statewide implementation of the international adult and pediatric EMS TBI guidelines will significantly reduce mortality and improve nonmortality outcomes in patients with moderate or severe TBI. Furthermore, it will specifically evaluate the effect of guideline implementation on outcomes in the subgroup of patients who are intubated in the field. Over the course of the entire study (~9 years), it is estimated that approximately 25,000 patients will be enrolled. PMID:25112451

  19. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was

  20. The effect of a national quality improvement collaborative on prehospital care for acute myocardial infarction and stroke in England

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown wide variations in prehospital ambulance care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) for improving ambulance care for AMI and stroke. Methods We used an interrupted time series design to investigate the effect of a national QIC on change in delivery of care bundles for AMI (aspirin, glyceryl trinitrate [GTN], pain assessment and analgesia) and stroke (face-arm-speech test, blood pressure and blood glucose recording) in all English ambulance services between January 2010 and February 2012. Key strategies for change included local quality improvement (QI) teams in each ambulance service supported by a national coordinating expert group that conducted workshops educating staff in QI methods to improve AMI and stroke care. Expertise and ideas were shared between QI teams who met together at three national workshops, between QI leads through monthly teleconferences, and between the expert group and participants. Feedback was provided to services using annotated control charts. Results We analyzed change over time using logistic regression with three predictor variables: time, gender, and age. There were statistically significant improvements in care bundles in nine (of 12) participating trusts for AMI (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.04, 1.04), nine for stroke (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.05, 1.07), 11 for either AMI or stroke, and seven for both conditions. Overall care bundle performance for AMI increased in England from 43 to 79% and for stroke from 83 to 96%. Successful services all introduced provider prompts and individualized or team feedback. Other determinants of success included engagement with front-line clinicians, feedback using annotated control charts, expert support, and shared learning between participants and organizations. Conclusions This first national prehospital QIC led to significant improvements in ambulance care for AMI and

  1. Prehospital 12-Lead Electrocardiogram within 60 Minutes Differentiates Proximal versus Nonproximal Left Anterior Descending Artery Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Aertker, Robert A; Barker, Colin M; Anderson, H. Vernon; Denktas, Ali E; Giesler, Gregory M; Julapalli, Vinay R; Ledoux, John F; Persse, David E; Sdringola, Stefano; Vooletich, Mary T; McCarthy, James J; Smalling, Richard W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute anterior myocardial infarctions caused by proximal left anterior descending (LAD) artery occlusions are associated with a higher morbidity and mortality. Early identification of high-risk patients via the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) could assist physicians and emergency response teams in providing early and aggressive care for patients with anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMI). Approximately 25% of US hospitals have primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) capability for the treatment of acute myocardial infarctions. Given the paucity of hospitals capable of PCI, early identification of more severe myocardial infarction may prompt emergency medical service routing of these patients to PCI-capable hospitals. We sought to determine if the 12 lead ECG is capable of predicting proximal LAD artery occlusions. Methods In a retrospective, post-hoc analysis of the Pre-Hospital Administration of Thrombolytic Therapy with Urgent Culprit Artery Revascularization pilot trial, we compared the ECG findings of proximal and nonproximal LAD occlusions for patients who had undergone an ECG within 180 minutes of symptom onset. Results In this study, 72 patients had anterior STEMIs, with ECGs performed within 180 minutes of symptom onset. In patients who had undergone ECGs within 60 minutes (n = 35), the mean sum of ST elevation (STE) in leads V1 through V6 plus ST depression (STD) in leads II, III, and aVF was 19.2 mm for proximal LAD occlusions and 11.7 mm for nonproximal LAD occlusions (P = 0.007). A sum STE in V1 through V6 plus STD in II, III, and aVF of at least 17.5 mm had a sensitivity of 52.3%, specificity of 92.9%, positive predictive value of 91.7%, and negative predictive value of 56.5% for proximal LAD occlusions. When the ECG was performed more than 60 minutes after symptom onset (n = 37), there was no significant difference in ST-segment deviation between the 2 groups. Conclusion The sum STE (V1-V6) and STD (II, III, a

  2. Influence of prehospital fluid resuscitation on patients with multiple injuries in hemorrhagic shock in patients from the DGU trauma registry

    PubMed Central

    Huβmann, Björn; Lefering, Rolf; Taeger, Georg; Waydhas, Christian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Severe bleeding as a result of trauma frequently leads to poor outcome by means of direct or delayed mechanisms. Prehospital fluid therapy is still regarded as the main option of primary treatment in many rescue situations. Our study aimed to assess the influence of prehospital fluid replacement on the posttraumatic course of severely injured patients in a retrospective analysis of matched pairs. Materials and Methods: We reviewed data from 35,664 patients recorded in the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU). The following patients were selected: patients having an Injury Severity Score >16 points, who were ≥16 years of age, with trauma, excluding those with craniocerebral injuries, who were admitted directly to the participating hospitals from the accident site. All patients had recorded values for replaced volume and blood pressure, hemoglobin concentration, and units of packed red blood cells given. The patients were matched based on similar blood pressure characteristics, age groups, and type of accident to create pairs. Pairs were subdivided into two groups based on the volumes infused prior to hospitalization: group 1: 0-1500 (low), group 2: ≥2000 mL (high) volume. Results: We identified 1351 pairs consistent with the inclusion criteria. Patients in group 2 received significantly more packed red blood cells (group 1: 6.9 units, group 2: 9.2 units; P=0.001), they had a significantly reduced capacity of blood coagulation (prothrombin ratio: group 1: 72%, group 2: 61.4%; P≤0.001), and a lower hemoglobin value on arrival at hospital (group 1: 10.6 mg/dL, group 2: 9.1 mg/dL; P≤0.001). The number of ICU-free days concerning the first 30 days after trauma was significantly higher in group 1 (group 1: 11.5 d, group 2: 10.1 d; P≤0.001). By comparison, the rate of sepsis was significantly lower in the first group (group 1: 13.8%, group 2: 18.6%; P=0.002); the same applies to organ failure (group 1: 36.0%, group 2: 39

  3. The study protocol for the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The utility of advanced prehospital interventions for severe blunt traumatic brain injury (BTI) remains controversial. Of all trauma patient subgroups it has been anticipated that this patient group would most benefit from advanced prehospital interventions as hypoxia and hypotension have been demonstrated to be associated with poor outcomes and these factors may be amenable to prehospital intervention. Supporting evidence is largely lacking however. In particular the efficacy of early anaesthesia/muscle relaxant assisted intubation has proved difficult to substantiate. Methods This article describes the design and protocol of the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT) which is a randomised controlled single centre trial of physician prehospital care (delivering advanced interventions such as rapid sequence intubation and blood transfusion) in addition to paramedic care for severe blunt TBI compared with paramedic care alone. Results Primary endpoint is Glasgow Outcome Scale score at six months post injury. Issues with trial integrity resulting from drop ins from standard care to the treatment arm as the result of policy changes by the local ambulance system are discussed. Conclusion This randomised controlled trial will contribute to the evaluation of the efficacy of advance prehospital interventions in severe blunt TBI. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00112398 PMID:24034628

  4. Detailed Description of all Deaths in Both the Shock and Traumatic Brain Injury Hypertonic Saline Trials of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Schmicker, Robert H.; Brasel, Karen J; Bulger, Eileen M; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Minei, Joseph P; Powell, Judy L; Reiff, Donald A; Rizoli, Sandro B; Schreiber, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify causes and timing of mortality in trauma patients to determine targets for future studies. Summary Background Data In trials conducted by the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) in patients with traumatic hypovolemic shock (shock) or traumatic brain injury (TBI), hypertonic saline failed to improve survival. Selecting appropriate candidates is challenging. Methods Retrospective review of patients enrolled in multicenter, randomized, trials performed 2006–2009. Inclusion criteria were: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤ 70 mm Hg or SBP 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108) or severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) ≤8]. Initial fluid administered was 250 mL of either 7.5% saline with 6% dextran 70, 7.5% saline or 0.9% saline. Results 2061 subjects were enrolled (809 shock, 1252 TBI) and 571 (27.7%) died. Survivors were younger than non-survivors [30(IQR 23) vs 42(34)] and had a higher GCS, though similar hemodynamics. Most deaths occurred despite ongoing resuscitation. Forty six percent of deaths in the TBI cohort were within 24 hours, compared with 82% in the shock cohort and 72% in the cohort with both shock and TBI. Median time to death was 29 hours in the TBI cohort, 2 hours in the shock cohort, and 4 hours in patients with both. Sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction accounted for 2% of deaths. Conclusions Most deaths from trauma with shock or TBI occur within 24 hours of from hypovolemic shock or TBI. Novel resuscitation strategies should focus on early deaths, though prevention may have a greater impact. PMID:25072443

  5. An equiosmolar study on early intracranial physiology and long term outcome in severe traumatic brain injury comparing mannitol and hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Jagannatha, Aniruddha Tekkatte; Sriganesh, Kamath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira; Rao, Ganne Sesha Umamaheswara

    2016-05-01

    The impact of hypertonic saline (HTS) on long term control of intracranial hypertension (ICH) is yet to be established. The current prospective randomized controlled study was carried out in 38 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over 450 episodes of refractory ICH were treated with equiosmolar boluses of 20% mannitol in 20 patients and 3.0% HTS in 18 subjects. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored for 6days. ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were comparable between the groups. The mannitol group had a progressive increase in the ICP over the study period (p=0.01). A similar increase was not seen in the HTS group (p=0.1). The percentage time for which the ICP remained below a threshold of 20 mmHg on day6 was higher in the HTS group (63% versus 49%; p=0.3). The duration of inotrope requirement in the HTS group was less compared to the mannitol group (p=0.06). The slope of fall in ICP in response to a bolus dose at a given baseline value of ICP was higher with HTS compared to mannitol (p=0.0001). In-hospital mortality tended to be lower in the HTS group (3 versus 10; p=0.07) while mortality at 6 months was not different between the groups (6 versus 10; p=0.41). Dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale scores at 6months were comparable between the groups (p=0.21). To conclude, immediate physiological advantages seen with HTS over mannitol did not translate into long term benefit on ICP/CPP control or mortality of patients with TBI. PMID:26924183

  6. Improvement of Neuroenergetics by Hypertonic Lactate Therapy in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury Is Dependent on Baseline Cerebral Lactate/Pyruvate Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Quintard, Hervé; Patet, Camille; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Suys, Tamarah; Bouzat, Pierre; Pellerin, Luc; Meuli, Reto; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Energy dysfunction is associated with worse prognosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent data suggest that hypertonic sodium lactate infusion (HL) improves energy metabolism after TBI. Here, we specifically examined whether the efficacy of HL (3h infusion, 30–40 μmol/kg/min) in improving brain energetics (using cerebral microdialysis [CMD] glucose as a main therapeutic end-point) was dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state (assessed by CMD lactate/pyruvate ratio [LPR]) and cerebral blood flow (CBF, measured with perfusion computed tomography [PCT]). Using a prospective cohort of 24 severe TBI patients, we found CMD glucose increase during HL was significant only in the subgroup of patients with elevated CMD LPR >25 (n = 13; +0.13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08–0.19] mmol/L, p < 0.001; vs. +0.04 [–0.05–0.13] in those with normal LPR, p = 0.33, mixed-effects model). In contrast, CMD glucose increase was independent from baseline CBF (coefficient +0.13 [0.04–0.21] mmol/L when global CBF was <32.5 mL/100 g/min vs. +0.09 [0.04–0.14] mmol/L at normal CBF, both p < 0.005) and systemic glucose. Our data suggest that improvement of brain energetics upon HL seems predominantly dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state and support the concept that CMD LPR – rather than CBF – could be used as a diagnostic indication for systemic lactate supplementation following TBI. PMID:26421521

  7. Temporal profile of arginine vasopressin release from the neurohypophysis in response to hypertonic saline and hypotension measured using a fluorescent fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Yao, Song T; Antunes, Vagner R; Bradley, Peter M J; Kasparov, Sergey; Ueta, Yoichi; Paton, Julian F R; Murphy, David

    2011-09-30

    Methods currently employed to study the release of hormones such as arginine vasopressin (AVP), while sensitive, suffer from a low temporal resolution such that the monitoring of AVP release on a moment-to-moment basis is not possible. Here, we describe a new approach to indirectly monitor the temporal profile of AVP release from the neurohypophysis of transgenic rats expressing an AVP-eGFP fusion gene. Using fibre-optic probes (termed 'optrodes') we were able to indirectly monitor AVP release via a reporter moiety in real-time. This method is a major advance over current methods used to monitor AVP release. Intravenous administration of hypertonic saline (3M NaCl) induced a rapid (latency of 2-3s) increase in fluorescence detected in the neurohypophysis that lasted on average for 60s - a response that was highly reproducible. Infusion of sodium nitroprusside induced a rapid fall in blood pressure accompanied by a rapid, stimulus-locked increase in fluorescent signal that returned to baseline with the recovery of blood pressure to pre-stimulus levels - again this response was highly reproducible. Withdrawal of blood (to simulate haemorrhage) also resulted in a stimulus-locked increase in fluorescence that return to baseline after the withdrawn blood was returned to the animal. In conclusion, we developed a highly sensitive approach that allows the indirect measurement of AVP release via the monitoring of a reporter gene in real-time. This technology can be adapted to permit the study of a whole array of neurohormones/chemicals in transgenic animals expressing a fluorescent reporter construct. PMID:21855574

  8. The Evaluation of Time Performance in the Emergency Response Center to Provide Pre-Hospital Emergency Services in Kermanshah

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Nasiripour Amir, Ashkan; Fakhri, Mahmood; Bakhtiari, Ahad; Azari, Samad; Akbarzadeh, Arash; Goli, Ali; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah. This study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study 500 cases of patients from Shahrivar (September) 2012 to the end of Shahrivar (September) 2013 were selected and studied by the non-probability quota method. The measuring tool included a preset cases record sheet and sampling method was completing the cases record sheet by referring to the patients’ cases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test, benchmark Eta (Eta), Games-Howell post hoc test). The results showed that the interval mean between receiving the mission to reaching the scene, between reaching the scene to moving from the scene, and between moving from the scene to a health center was 7.28, 16.73 and 7.28 minutes. The overall mean of time performance from the scene to the health center was 11.34 minutes. Any intervention in order to speed up service delivery, reduce response times, ambulance equipment and facilities required for accuracy, validity and reliability of the data recorded in the emergency dispatch department, Continuing Education of ambulance staffs, the use of manpower with higher specialize levels such as nurses, supply the job satisfaction, and increase the coordination with other departments that are somehow involved in this process can provide the ground for reducing the loss and disability resulting from traffic accidents. PMID:25560357

  9. The evaluation of time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Nasiripour, Amir Ashkan; Fakhri, Mahmood; Bakhtiari, Ahad; Azari, Samad; Akbarzadeh, Arash; Goli, Ali; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah. This study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study 500 cases of patients from Shahrivar (September) 2012 to the end of Shahrivar (September) 2013 were selected and studied by the non-probability quota method. The measuring tool included a preset cases record sheet and sampling method was completing the cases record sheet by referring to the patients' cases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test, benchmark Eta (Eta), Games-Howell post hoc test). The results showed that the interval mean between receiving the mission to reaching the scene, between reaching the scene to moving from the scene, and between moving from the scene to a health center was 7.28, 16.73 and 7.28 minutes. The overall mean of time performance from the scene to the health center was 11.34 minutes. Any intervention in order to speed up service delivery, reduce response times, ambulance equipment and facilities required for accuracy, validity and reliability of the data recorded in the emergency dispatch department, Continuing Education of ambulance staffs, the use of manpower with higher specialize levels such as nurses, supply the job satisfaction, and increase the coordination with other departments that are somehow involved in this process can provide the ground for reducing the loss and disability resulting from traffic accidents. PMID:25560357

  10. Prehospital blood product transfusion by U.S. army MEDEVAC during combat operations in Afghanistan: a process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Malsby, Robert F; Quesada, Jose; Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Kinoshita, Ren; Kurtz, John; Gehlen, William; Adams, Colleen; Martin, Dustin; Shackelford, Stacy

    2013-07-01

    U.S. Army flight medics performed a process improvement initiative of 15 blood product transfusions on select Category A (Urgent) helicopter evacuation casualties meeting approved clinical indications for transfusion. These transfusions were initiated from point of injury locations aboard MEDEVAC aircraft originating from one of two locations in southern Afghanistan. All flight medics executing the transfusions were qualified through a standardized and approved program of instruction, which included day and night skills validation, and a 90% or higher written examination score. There was no adverse reaction or out-of-standard blood product temperature despite hazardous conditions and elevated cabin temperatures. All casualties within a 10-minute flight time who met clinical indications were transfused. Utilization of a standard operating procedure with strict handling and administration parameters, a rigorous training and qualification program, an elaborate cold chain system, and redundant documentation of blood product units ensured that flight medic initiated transfusions were safe and effective. Research study is needed to refine the indications for prehospital blood transfusion and to determine the effect on outcomes in severely injured trauma patients. PMID:23820353

  11. A comparison of serial halving and the rule of nines as a pre-hospital assessment tool in burns.

    PubMed

    Smith, J J; Malyon, A D; Scerri, G V; Burge, T S

    2005-10-01

    Following endorsement of serial halving by the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh this study aimed to determine whether the technique was comparable to the rule of nines in making initial assessments of body surface area burned. Ten 'casualties' were made up to represent burn victims (range 6-61%). An external panel of six consultants and one specialist registrar in plastic surgery were invited to assess the simulated casualties. They gave individual and a consensus estimate of the burned areas. One hundred and twenty-five members of local emergency services and military paramedical staff were given a brief video and slide presentation describing either the rule of nines or serial halving method of burn area assessment. These techniques were then used to assess the 10 simulated casualties, giving 1250 estimates of burn surface area. The understanding of both techniques appeared adequate in both test groups. Estimates from serial halving and rule of nines groups differed from the assessments of the external panel. No statistical difference was demonstrated between serial halving and the rule of nines as an initial assessment tool when determining disposal. Serial halving has an inherent weakness when assessing certain sizes of burn. The rule of nines requires that the assessor knows and understands the proportionate areas of the body. The mathematics of percentages and fractions appeared to confuse some assessors. PMID:16040012

  12. Pre-Hospital ECG E-Transmission for Patients with Suspected Myocardial Infarction in the Highlands of Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, Gordon F.; Bloe, Charlie; Diack, H. Lesley; Reilly, Rachel; Murray, Calum; Stewart, Derek; Leslie, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) require prompt treatment, best done by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). However, for patients unable to receive PPCI, immediate pre-hospital thrombolysis (PHT) is the best alternative. Evidence indicates that diagnostic and management support for staff increases the use of PHT. This study aimed to describe the patient demographics and management of patients, to determine any potential inter-area differences in referral rates to the ECG e-transmission service and to explore the views and experiences of key staff involved in ECG e-transmission within NHS Highland. Data from 2,025 patient episodes of ECG e-transmission identified a statistically significant geographical variation in ECG e-transmission and PHT delivery. Scottish Ambulance Service (SAS) staff were more likely than GPs to deliver PHT overall, however, GPs were more likely to deliver in remote areas. Interviews with six Cardiac Care Unit (CCU) nurses and six SAS staff highlighted their positive views of ECG e-transmission, citing perceived benefits to patients and interprofessional relationships. Poor access to network signal was noted to be a barrier to engaging in the system. This study has demonstrated that a specialist triage service based on e-transmission of ECGs in patients with suspected STEMI can be implemented in a diverse geographical setting. Work is needed to ensure equity of the service for all patients. PMID:24566058

  13. Pre-hospital ECG E-transmission for patients with suspected myocardial infarction in the highlands of Scotland.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, Gordon F; Bloe, Charlie; Diack, H Lesley; Reilly, Rachel; Murray, Calum; Stewart, Derek; Leslie, Stephen J

    2014-02-01

    Patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) require prompt treatment, best done by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). However, for patients unable to receive PPCI, immediate pre-hospital thrombolysis (PHT) is the best alternative. Evidence indicates that diagnostic and management support for staff increases the use of PHT. This study aimed to describe the patient demographics and management of patients, to determine any potential inter-area differences in referral rates to the ECG e-transmission service and to explore the views and experiences of key staff involved in ECG e-transmission within NHS Highland. Data from 2,025 patient episodes of ECG e-transmission identified a statistically significant geographical variation in ECG e-transmission and PHT delivery. Scottish Ambulance Service (SAS) staff were more likely than GPs to deliver PHT overall, however, GPs were more likely to deliver in remote areas. Interviews with six Cardiac Care Unit (CCU) nurses and six SAS staff highlighted their positive views of ECG e-transmission, citing perceived benefits to patients and interprofessional relationships. Poor access to network signal was noted to be a barrier to engaging in the system. This study has demonstrated that a specialist triage service based on e-transmission of ECGs in patients with suspected STEMI can be implemented in a diverse geographical setting. Work is needed to ensure equity of the service for all patients. PMID:24566058

  14. [Accident with biological material at the prehospital mobile care: reality for health and non-healthcare workers].

    PubMed

    Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Silva, Elisangelo Aparecido Costa; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Mendonça, Katiane Martins; Souza, Adenícia Custódia Silva E; Melo, Dulcelene Sousa

    2013-01-01

    Analytical transversal study that was conducted with the objectives of identifying the prevalence and characterizing the accidents with biological material among professionals in pre-hospital service (PHS) and comparing the risk behaviors adopted by healthcare and non-healthcare groups that can affect the occurrence and seriousness of such accidents. Data were obtained by questionnaire applied to all PHS workers in Goiânia-GO. The study revealed a high prevalence of accidents involving biological material which, although higher for the healthcare group, also affected the non-healthcare group. There were significant (p < 0.05) risk behaviors for these accidents in both groups: not using gloves, masks or eye protectors; inappropriate disposal of sharps; inadequate dress; re-capping of needles; and a lack of immunization against hepatitis B. The results underscore the importance of both groups in adhering to preventive measures, and further point to the need to structure and implement vigilance and control system for this type of accident. PMID:23887787

  15. [MCAU/MRAU session: point of view of the pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services, costs assessment].

    PubMed

    Surdey, C

    2011-05-01

    Since the 1970s, it has become possible to handle patients with serious pulmonary and cardiac failure with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) when conventional treatment fails, but only in specialized centers. When the latter were too far away, the risks of such transport were considered too high until the Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit (MCAU) and Mobile Respiratory Assistance Unit (MRAU) were created. We are first going to expose the point of view of the pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS). The M.D. in need of such assistance should call the cardiac surgeon of the reference center : if the indication is confirmed, they will call the EMS (Service d'Aide Médicale Urgente, SAMU), and decide together which means is the most appropriate for a quick transportation of the team and the ECMO to the patient's bedside, and then back to the ECMO center, depending on the problems raised by ground vehicles on the one hand and aircrafts or helicopters on the other. Then, we are going to evaluate the cost of such transportation, which is quite considerable. As a conclusion, because of its high cost, the mobile inter-hospital ECMO. service should only be used when the patient is considered too ill to be transported on conventional therapy : in that case, this procedure represents huge progress. PMID:21703484

  16. Ultra-acute increase in blood glucose during prehospital phase is associated with worse short-term and long-term survival in ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The current study was to investigate the blood glucose changes in ultra-acute phase in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and its associations with patient outcome. Methods This study was a retrospective population-based observational study utilizing prospectively collected registry data complemented with laboratory data. All adult patients with STEMI treated by emergency medical services (EMS) in the city of Helsinki from January 2006 to December 2010 were included in the study. Both prehospital and hospital admission glucose values were available from 152 (32%) of all STEMI patients (n = 469). Results Change in blood glucose from prehospital phase to emergency department admission was significantly higher in non-survivors within 30 days compared to survivors (+1.2 ± 5.1 vs. -0.3 ± 2.4 mmol/l [mean ± SD], P = 0.03). Furthermore, the 3-year survival rate was significantly lower in patients with an evident (≥2 mmol/l) rise in blood glucose (P = 0.02). In patients with impaired left ventricle function (best ejection fraction < 40%), blood glucose increased more compared to patients without it (1.2 ± 2.9 vs. 0.4 ± 2.7 mmol/l, P = 0.01). Increase in glucose was correlated with peak myocardial creatinine kinase (r = 0.17, P = 0.04) as a marker of increased size of infarct, but not with glycosylated haemoglobin A1C as a marker of chronic hyperglycaemia (r = −0.12, P = 0.27). Conclusions In patients with STEMI, ultra-acute hyperglycaemia during prehospital phase is associated with increased mortality, impaired cardiac function and increased size of infarct. PMID:24886984

  17. An evaluation of the professional, social and demographic profile and quality of life of physicians working at the Prehospital Emergency Medical System (SAMU) in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Tallo, Fernando Sabia; de Campos Vieira Abib, Simone; Baitello, André Luciano; Lopes, Renato Delascio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the profile of physicians working at the Prehospital Emergency Medical System (SAMU) in Brazil and to evaluate their quality of life. METHODS: Both a semi-structured questionnaire with 57 questions and the SF-36 questionnaire were sent to research departments within SAMU in the Brazilian state capitals, the Federal District and inland towns in Brazil. RESULTS: Of a total of 902 physicians, including 644 (71.4%) males, 533 (59.1%) were between 30 and 45 years of age and 562 (62.4%) worked in a state capital. Regarding education level, 45.1% had graduated less than five years before and only 43% were specialists recognized by the Brazilian Medical Association. Regarding training, 95% did not report any specific training for their work at SAMU. The main weaknesses identified were psychiatric care and surgical emergencies in 57.2 and 42.9% of cases, respectively; traumatic pediatric emergencies, 48.9%; and medical emergencies, 42.9%. As for procedure-related skills, the physicians reported difficulties in pediatric advanced support (62.4%), airway surgical access (45.6%), pericardiocentesis (64.4%) and thoracentesis (29.9%). Difficulties in using an artificial ventilator (43.3%) and in transcutaneous pacing (42.2%) were also reported. Higher percentages of young physicians, aged 25-30 years (26.7 vs 19.0%; p<0.01), worked exclusively in prehospital care (18.0 vs 7.7%; p<0.001), with workloads >48 h per week (12.8 vs 8.6%; p<0.001), and were non-specialists with the shortest length of service (<1 year) at SAMU (30.1 vs 18.2%; p<0.001) who were hired without having to pass public service exams* (i.e., for a temporary job) (61.8 vs 46.2%; p<0.001). Regarding quality of life, the pain domain yielded the worst result among physicians at SAMU. CONCLUSIONS: The doctors in this sample were young and within a few years of graduation, and they had no specific training in prehospital emergencies. Deficiencies were mostly found in pediatrics and psychiatry

  18. The effect of paramedic training on pre-hospital trauma care (EPPTC-study): a study protocol for a prospective semi-qualitative observational trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accidents are the leading cause of death in adults prior to middle age. The care of severely injured patients is an interdisciplinary challenge. Limited evidence is available concerning pre-hospital trauma care training programs and the advantage of such programs for trauma patients. The effect on trauma care procedures or on the safety of emergency crews on the scene is limited; however, there is a high level of experience and expert opinion. Methods I – Video-recorded case studies are the basis of an assessment tool and checklist being developed to verify the results of programs to train participants in the care of seriously injured patients, also known as “objective structured clinical examination” (OSCE). The timing, completeness and quality of the individual measures are assessed using appropriate scales. The evaluation of team communication and interaction will be analyzed with qualitative methods and quantified and verified by existing instruments (e.g. the Clinical Team Scale). The developed assessment tool is validated by several experts in the fields of trauma care, trauma research and medical education. II a) In a German emergency medical service, the subjective assessment of paramedics of their pre-hospital care of trauma patients is evaluated at three time points, namely before, immediately after and one year after training. b) The effect of a standardized course concept on the quality of documentation in actual field operations is determined based on three items relevant to patient safety before and after the course. c) The assessment tool will be used to assess the effect of a standardized course concept on procedures and team communication in pre-hospital trauma care using scenario-based case studies. Discussion This study explores the effect of training on paramedics. After successful study completion, further multicenter studies are conceivable, which would evaluate emergency-physician staffed teams. The influence on the patients

  19. Prehospital intubation of the moderately injured patient: a cause of morbidity? A matched-pairs analysis of 1,200 patients from the DGU Trauma Registry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxia and hypoxemia can lead to an unfavorable outcome after severe trauma, by both direct and delayed mechanisms. Prehospital intubation is meant to ensure pulmonary gas exchange. Limited evidence exists regarding indications for intubation after trauma. The aim of this study was to analyze prehospital intubation as an independent risk factor for the posttraumatic course of moderately injured patients. Therefore, only patients who, in retrospect, would not have required intubation were included in the matched-pairs analysis to evaluate the risks related to intubation. Methods The data of 42,248 patients taken from the trauma registry of the German Association for Trauma Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie (DGU)) were analyzed. Patients who met the following criteria were included: primary admission to a hospital; Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13 to 15; age 16 years or older; maximum injury severity per body region (AIS) ≤ 3; no administration of packed red blood cell units in the emergency trauma room; admission between 2005 and 2008; and documented data regarding intubation. The intubated patients were then matched with not-intubated patients. Results The study population included 600 matched pairs that met the inclusion criteria. The results indicated that prehospital intubation was associated with a prolonged rescue time (not intubated, 64.8 minutes; intubated, 82.3 minutes; P ≤ 0.001) and a higher volume replacement (not intubated, 911.3 ml; intubated, 1,573.8 ml; P ≤ 0.001). In the intubated patients, coagulation parameters, such as the prothrombin time ratio (PT) and platelet count, declined, as did the hemoglobin value (PT not intubated: 92.3%; intubated, 85.7%; P ≤ 0.001; hemoglobin not intubated, 13.4 mg/dl; intubated, 12.2 mg/dl; P ≤ 0.001). Intubation at the scene resulted in an elevated sepsis rate (not intubated, 1.5%; intubated, 3.7%; P ≤ 0.02) and an elevated prevalence of multiorgan failure (MOF) and organ

  20. Variation of pain and vasomotor responses evoked by intramuscular infusion of hypertonic saline in human subjects: influence of gender and its potential neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; You, Hao-Jun

    2012-04-10

    The aim of current study was to explore role of gender in pain and cutaneous vasomotor responses during the condition of intramuscular (i.m.) hypertonic (HT, 5.8%) saline induced muscle pain. In 20 healthy human subjects (10 females), 2-4.8ml of either HT or isotonic (IT, 0.9%) saline was infused into the left tibialis anterior muscle to elicit muscle pain, during which the intensity and distribution of pain together with skin vasomotor responses were investigated. Cutaneous blood flow was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry in 4 different skin areas: ipsilateral infusion area (5cm×5cm), ipsilateral referred pain area (5cm×10cm), contralateral area to the infusion site (5cm×5cm), and contralateral area to the referred pain site (5cm×10cm). Among the different i.m. infusions, 4.8ml HT saline evoked the highest pain intensity, the longest pain duration, and the largest pain distribution area in different subjects (P<0.001). Gender-related differences in pain and skin vasomotor responses were observed following the i.m. HT, but not IT, saline infusion while women exhibited stronger pain intensity and duration (P<0.001), and more expressed vasomotor responses (P<0.05) at the infusion area and contralateral mirror site. Intramuscularly pre-treating the infusion area with 1ml of 2% lidocaine markedly reduced the muscle pain and blocked the increased skin blood flow in both men and women (P<0.05). However, post-treatment with lidocaine significantly reduced the pain intensity and the increased skin blood flow only in men, but not women. The data demonstrate that gender-associated difference exists in HT saline intramuscularly induced local muscle pain and vasomotor responses. Neural mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in vasomotor responses is significantly different, suggesting that local pre-treatment, but not post-treatment, with anesthetic may provide superior analgesia to block sex-associated difference in pain and vasomotor responses. PMID

  1. Capability of hypertonic saline cough provocation test to predict the response to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough: a prospective, open-label study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic cough respond to treatment with inhaled corticosteroids but it is difficult to predict which patients are likely to respond. The primary aim of the present study was to define the capability of hypertonic saline cough provocation test to predict the responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough. The secondary aim was to assess the ability of the saline test to monitor the healing of cough during corticosteroid treatment. Methods Forty-three patients with chronic cough were recruited. Before therapy, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, histamine airway challenge, and saline test were performed. Those responding to the first saline test repeated it and the nitric oxide measurement during the subsequent visits. The patients used inhaled budesonide, 400 ug twice daily, for twelve weeks. The treatment response was assessed by Leicester Cough Questionnaire at baseline, and at one, four, and twelve weeks. Results Seventy-seven % of the patients demonstrated the minimal important difference in the Leicester Cough Questionnaire indicating a symptomatic response. Neither the response magnitude nor the speed was predicted by the saline test. Histamine challenge showed the strongest predictive ability: The maximal improvement in Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score was 5.08 (3.76 – 6.40) points in the histamine positive and 2.78 (1.55 – 4.01) points in the histamine negative subjects (p = 0.006). Baseline nitric oxide level also associated with the improvement in Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.02). During the treatment, the cough sensitivity to saline gradually decreased among the budesonide responders but not in the non-responders. Nitric oxide levels decreased very rapidly among the responders. Conclusions Saline test cannot predict the responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough but it may be utilized to monitor the effect of this

  2. Role of permissive hypotension, hypertonic resuscitation and the global increased permeability syndrome in patients with severe hemorrhage: adjuncts to damage control resuscitation to prevent intra-abdominal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Juan C; Kaplan, Lewis J; Balogh, Zsolt J; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    Secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are closely related to fluid resuscitation. IAH causes major deterioration of the cardiac function by affecting preload, contractility and afterload. The aim of this review is to discuss the different interactions between IAH, ACS and resuscitation, and to explore a new hypothesis with regard to damage control resuscitation, permissive hypotension and global increased permeability syndrome. Review of the relevant literature via PubMed search. The recognition of the association between the development of ACS and resuscitation urged the need for new approach in traumatic shock management. Over a decade after wide spread application of damage control surgery damage control resuscitation was developed. DCR differs from previous resuscitation approaches by attempting an earlier and more aggressive correction of coagulopathy, as well as metabolic derangements like acidosis and hypothermia, often referred to as the 'deadly triad' or the 'bloody vicious cycle'. Permissive hypotension involves keeping the blood pressure low enough to avoid exacerbating uncontrolled haemorrhage while maintaining perfusion to vital end organs. The potential detrimental mechanisms of early, aggressive crystalloid resuscitation have been described. Limitation of fluid intake by using colloids, hypertonic saline (HTS) or hyperoncotic albumin solutions have been associated with favourable effects. HTS allows not only for rapid restoration of circulating intravascular volume with less administered fluid, but also attenuates post-injury oedema at the microcirculatory level and may improve microvascular perfusion. Capillary leak represents the maladaptive, often excessive, and undesirable loss of fluid and electrolytes with or without protein into the interstitium that generates oedema. The global increased permeability syndrome (GIPS) has been articulated in patients with persistent systemic inflammation failing

  3. Lessons from the front lines: the prehospital experience of the 2009 novel H1N1 outbreak in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erin C; Burkle, Frederick M; Holman, Paul F; Dunlop, Justin M; Archer, Frank L

    2009-12-01

    The H1N1 (swine influenza) 2009 outbreak in Victoria, Australia, provided a unique opportunity to review the prehospital response to a public health emergency. As part of Ambulance Victoria's response to the outbreak, relevant emergency response plans and pandemic plans were instigated, focused efforts were aimed at encouraging the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and additional questions were included in the call-taking script for telephone triage of emergency calls to identify potential cases of H1N1 from the point of call. As a result, paramedics were alerted to all potential cases of H1N1 influenza or any patient who met the current case definition before their arrival on the scene and were advised to use appropriate PPE. During the period of May 1 to July 2, Ambulance Victoria telephone triaged 1598 calls relating to H1N1 (1228 in metropolitan areas and 243 in rural areas) and managed 127 calls via a referral service that provides specific telephone triage for potential H1N1 influenza cases based on the national call-taking script. The referral service determines whether a patient requires an emergency ambulance or can be diverted to other resources such as flu clinics. Key lessons learned during the H1N1 outbreak include a focused need for continued education and communication regarding infection control and the appropriate use of PPE. Current guidelines regarding PPE use are adequate for use during an outbreak of infectious disease. Compliance with PPE needs to be addressed through the use of intra-agency communications and regular information updates early in the progress of the outbreak. PMID:19952886

  4. Women’s perception of pre-hospital labour duration and obstetrical outcomes; a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Progress during early labour may impact subsequent labour trajectories. Women admitted to hospital in latent phase (<3 cm cervical dilation) labour have been shown to be at higher risk of obstetrical interventions. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of 1247 healthy nulliparous women in spontaneous labour at term with a singleton fetus in cephalic presentation at seven hospitals in Southwestern British Columbia. We computed relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals to examine our primary outcome of cesarean section and secondary outcomes including obstetrical interventions and maternal and newborn outcomes according to women’s perception of length of pre-hospital labour. Women were asked on admission to hospital how long they had been experiencing contractions prior to coming to hospital. Results Women indicating that they had been in labour for 24 hours or longer at the time of hospital admission were at elevated risk for cesarean birth, relative risk (RR) 1.40, (95% Confidence Intervals 1.15-1.72), admission with a cervical dilation of 3 cm or less, RR 1.21 (1.07-1.36), more obstetrical interventions including continuous electronic fetal monitoring RR 1.11 (1.03-1.20), augmentation of labour RR 1.33 (1.23-1.44), use of narcotic RR 1.21 (1.06-1.37) and epidural analgesia RR 1.18 (1.09-1.28). Adverse neonatal outcomes did not differ apart from a significant increase in meconium-stained amniotic fluid RR 1.60 (1.09-2.35). Conclusions A single question asked of women on presentation to hospital was an important predictor of cesarean birth and may have utility in identifying women who would benefit from close observation and more active management of labour. PMID:24884415

  5. A two-year retrospective review of the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration by alpine helicopter emergency medical physicians to patients with isolated limb injury.

    PubMed

    Eidenbenz, D; Taffé, P; Hugli, O; Albrecht, E; Pasquier, M

    2016-07-01

    Up to 75% of pre-hospital trauma patients experience moderate to severe pain but this is often poorly recognised and treated with insufficient analgesia. Using multi-level logistic regression analysis, we aimed to identify the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration and choice of analgesic agent in a single helicopter-based emergency medical service, where available analgesic drugs were fentanyl and ketamine. Of the 1156 patients rescued for isolated limb injury, 657 (57%) received analgesia. Mean (SD) initial pain scores (as measured by a numeric rating scale) were 2.8 (1.8), 3.3 (1.6) and 7.4 (2.0) for patients who did not receive, declined, and received analgesia, respectively (p < 0.001). Fentanyl as a single agent, ketamine in combination with fentanyl and ketamine as a single agent were used in 533 (84%), 94 (14%) and 10 (2%) patients, respectively. A high initial on-scene pain score and a presumptive diagnosis of fracture were the main determinants of analgesia administration. Fentanyl was preferred for paediatric patients and ketamine was preferentially administered for severe pain by physicians who had more medical experience or had trained in anaesthesia. PMID:27091515

  6. Severe sepsis and septic shock in pre-hospital emergency medicine: survey results of medical directors of emergency medical services concerning antibiotics, blood cultures and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Casu, Sebastian; Häske, David

    2016-06-01

    Delayed antibiotic treatment for patients in severe sepsis and septic shock decreases the probability of survival. In this survey, medical directors of different emergency medical services (EMS) in Germany were asked if they are prepared for pre-hospital sepsis therapy with antibiotics or special algorithms to evaluate the individual preparations of the different rescue areas for the treatment of patients with this infectious disease. The objective of the survey was to obtain a general picture of the current status of the EMS with respect to rapid antibiotic treatment for sepsis. A total of 166 medical directors were invited to complete a short survey on behalf of the different rescue service districts in Germany via an electronic cover letter. Of the rescue districts, 25.6 % (n = 20) stated that they keep antibiotics on EMS vehicles. In addition, 2.6 % carry blood cultures on the vehicles. The most common antibiotic is ceftriaxone (third generation cephalosporin). In total, 8 (10.3 %) rescue districts use an algorithm for patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Although the German EMS is an emergency physician-based rescue system, special opportunities in the form of antibiotics on emergency physician vehicles are missing. Simultaneously, only 10.3 % of the rescue districts use a special algorithm for sepsis therapy. Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock do not appear to be prioritized as highly as these deadly diseases should be in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:26719078

  7. Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Professionals Assaulted by Patients and/or Relatives: Importance of Severity and Experience of the Aggression.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, M Mar; Bernaldo-de-Quirós, Mónica; Piccini, Ana T; Cerdeira, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to violence from patients or relatives causes problems in emergency departments. To assess the development of posttraumatic symptoms in pre-hospital emergency care professionals assaulted by patients and/or relatives, it may be crucial to establish preventive measures at different levels. This study examined 358 pre-hospital emergency care professionals assaulted by patients and/or relatives. The aims of the present study were (a) to assess the presence of posttraumatic symptoms and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and (b) identify compliance diagnoses for PTSD depending on the experience of aggression (presence of fear, helplessness, or horror during the aggression), the perceived severity of aggression, and socio-demographic variables (gender, age, profession, employment status, and work experience). The results show that the experience of aggression with fear, helplessness, or horror is associated with the presence of posttraumatic symptoms related to re-experiencing but is not related to avoidance and emotional numbing and arousal. Furthermore, the perception of aggression as severe was associated with the presence of symptoms related to re-experiencing. These results are presented and discussed. PMID:25381283

  8. Relative importance of emergency medical system transport and the prehospital electrocardiogram on reducing hospital time delay to therapy for acute myocardial infarction: a preliminary report from the Cincinnati Heart Project.

    PubMed

    Kereiakes, D J; Gibler, W B; Martin, L H; Pieper, K S; Anderson, L C

    1992-04-01

    Substantial time delays from symptom onset to diagnosis and treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction have been demonstrated. To determine the relative importance of prehospital mode of patient transport and the relative impact of emergency medical system transport with or without a prehospital cellular electrocardiogram (ECG) on hospital time delays to initiation of thrombolytic therapy, four prospective parallel groups of patients with acute myocardial infarction were evaluated. The median hospital time delay to treatment median (twenty-fifth and seventy-fifth percentiles) was 64 minutes (46 and 87 minutes, respectively, for twenty-fifth and seventy-fifth percentiles) for patients transported by private automobile ("walk-in"); 55 minutes (45 and 68 minutes, respectively) for patients transported by local ambulance; 50 minutes (38 and 81 minutes, respectively) for patients transported by the emergency medical system without a prehospital ECG; and 30 minutes (27 and 35 minutes, respectively) for patients transported by the emergency medical system who had a 12-lead ECG transmitted from the field. Patients transported by the emergency medical system were randomized to receive cellular telephone transmission of a prehospital 12-lead ECG. Specialized emergency medical system transport alone did not facilitate in-hospital initiation of thrombolytic therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction when compared with those brought by local ambulance or by private automobile. A significant reduction in hospital time delay to treatment was observed only in patients transported by the emergency medical system who had cellular transmission of a prehospital 12-lead ECG from the field. PMID:1549989

  9. Chloride/bicarbonate exchanger SLC26A7 is localized in endosomes in medullary collecting duct cells and is targeted to the basolateral membrane in hypertonicity and potassium depletion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Worrell, Roger T; Li, Hong C; Barone, Sharon L; Petrovic, Snezana; Amlal, Hassane; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2006-04-01

    SLC26A7 is a Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger that is expressed on the basolateral membrane and in the cytoplasm of two distinct acid-secreting epithelial cells: The A-intercalated cells in the kidney outer medullary collecting duct and the gastric parietal cells. The intracellular localization of SLC26A7 suggests the possibility of trafficking between cell membrane and intracellular compartments. For testing this hypothesis, full-length human SLC26A7 cDNA was fused with green fluorescence protein and transiently expressed in MDCK epithelial cells. In monolayer cells in isotonic medium, SLC26A7 showed punctate distribution throughout the cytoplasm. However, in medium that was made hypertonic for 16 h, SLC26A7 was detected predominantly in the plasma membrane. The presence of mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors blocked the trafficking of SLC26A7 to the plasma membrane. Double-labeling studies demonstrated the localization of SLC26A7 to the transferrin receptor-positive endosomes. A chimera that was composed of the amino terminal fragment of SLC26A7 and the carboxyl terminal fragment of SLC26A1, and a C-terminal-truncated SLC26A7 were retained in the cytoplasm in hypertonicity. In separate studies, SLC26A7 showed predominant localization in plasma membrane in potassium-depleted isotonic medium (0.5 or 2 mEq/L KCl) versus cytoplasmic distribution in normal potassium isotonic medium (4 mEq/L). It is concluded that SLC26A7 is present in endosomes, and its targeting to the basolateral membrane is increased in hypertonicity and potassium depletion. The trafficking to the cell surface suggests novel functional upregulation of SLC26A7 in states that are associated with hypokalemia or increased medullary tonicity. Additional studies are needed to ascertain the role of SLC26A7 in enhanced bicarbonate absorption in outer medullary collecting duct in hypokalemia and in acid-base regulation in conditions that are associated with increased medullary tonicity. PMID:16524946

  10. Analysis of the incidence of postintubation injuries in patients intubated in the prehospital or early hospital conditions of the hospital emergency department and the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Marcin; Timler, Dariusz; Sobczak, Renata; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Sekalski, Przemyslaw; Borkowska, Natalia; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background Intubation is still one of the best methods to secure the airway. In the case of prehospital or early hospital conditions when factors such as urgency, stress, or inaccuracy of the undertaken activities are involved, the risk of causing complications, for instance, edema or postintubation injuries, increases, especially while dealing with a difficult intubation. The risk of improper inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff also increases, which is considered in this study. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of postintubation complications, such as postintubation injuries or edema, in a research sample, and to examine whether such complications occur more often, for example, while using a guidewire. In this study, we also evaluated the injuries associated with the inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff. Materials and methods This study was performed on a group of 153 patients intubated in prehospital conditions. The tests were carried out in three clinical sites that received patients from prehospital care. Postintubation injuries were revealed and photographed using videolar-yngoscope, such as the C-MAC and the McGrath series 5. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure was measured using a pressure gage manual (VBM Medizintechnik GmbH). The quantitative analyses of differences between incidence of variables were assessed using χ2 test for P<0.05. Analyses have been carried out using the Statistica software. Results In the group of 153 patients, postintubation injuries occurred in 17% of cases. The dependency between using the guidewire and the occurrence of the hematomas and loss of mucosa was statistically significant (P<0.01). In nearly half (42%) of the patients the endotracheal tube cuff pressure was excessively inflated over 30 cm H2O, and in two cases, endotracheal tube displacement was observed on account of poor cuff inflation (<20 cm H2O). Conclusion The highest percentage of overfilled cuffs were observed in the

  11. The ΔC splice-variant of TRPM2 is the hypertonicity-induced cation channel in HeLa cells, and the ecto-enzyme CD38 mediates its activation

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Tomohiro; Sato, Kaori; Christmann, Jens; Marx, Romy; Mori, Yasuo; Okada, Yasunobu; Wehner, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Hypertonicity-induced cation channels (HICCs) are key-players in proliferation and apoptosis but their molecular correlate remains obscure. Furthermore, the activation profile of HICCs is not well defined yet. We report here that, in HeLa cells, intracellular adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPr) and cyclic ADPr (cADPr), as supposed activators of TRPM2, elicited cation currents that were virtually identical to the osmotic activation of HICCs. Silencing of the expression of TRPM2 and of the ecto-enzyme CD38 (as a likely source of ADPr and cADPr) inhibited HICC as well as nucleotide-induced currents and, in parallel, the hypertonic volume response of cells (the regulatory volume increase, RVI) was attenuated. Quantification of intracellular cADPr levels and the systematic application of extra- vs. intracellular nucleotides indicate that the outwardly directed gradient rather than the cellular activity of ADPr and cADPr triggers TRPM2 activation, probably along with a simultaneous biotransformation of nucleotides. Cloning of TRPM2 identified the ΔC-splice variant as the molecular correlate of the HICC, which could be strongly supported by a direct comparison of the respective Ca2+ selectivity. Finally, immunoprecipitation and high-resolution FRET/FLIM imaging revealed the interaction of TRPM2 and CD38 in the native as well as in a heterologous (HEK293T) expression system. We propose transport-related nucleotide export via CD38 as a novel mechanism of TRPM2/HICC activation. With the biotransformation of nucleotides running in parallel, continuous zero trans-conditions are achieved which will render the system infinitely sensitive. PMID:22219339

  12. [Longer waiting time and higher mortality in older people with traumatic brain injuries. Mapping of emergency prehospital management and hospital management in Västerbotten].

    PubMed

    Holzmann, Martin; Bylund, Per O; Degerfält, Lisa; Carlsson, Axel C; Wändell, Per; Ruge, Toralph

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose was to study the prehospital and early intrahospital treatment of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the county of Västerbotten 2011-2012. In total, 162 patients were included. The main finding was that a large proportion of TBI patients were older men who fell in the same or from a different level. Older patients had higher mortality and had to wait longer for diagnostic imaging compared to younger patients. Furthermore, most patients were initially relatively unaffected by the injury and around 1/5 of the patients were transported to hospital by private transport. Finally, we observed that most patients were admitted to hospital and computer tomography scan of the head was performed within 4 hours. PMID:26440946

  13. An assessment blueprint for the Advanced Medical Life Support two-day prehospital emergency medical services training program in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Les R.; Vassar, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Traditional approaches to blueprint creation may focus on fine-grained detail at the expense of important foundational concepts. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for constructing an assessment blueprint to guide the creation of a new post-test for a two-day prehospital emergency medical services training program. Methods: In order to create the blueprint, we first determined the proportions of the total classroom and home-study minutes associated with the lower- and higher-order cognitive objectives of each chapter of the textbook and the two-day classroom activities during training courses conducted from January to April 2015. These proportions were then applied to a 50-question test structure in order to calculate the number of desired questions by chapter and content type. Results: Our blueprint called for the test to contain an almost even split of lower- and higher-order cognitive questions. One-best-answer multiple choice items and extended matching-type items were written to assess lower- and higher-order cognitive content, respectively. Conclusion: We report the first known application of an assessment blueprint to a prehospital professional development education program. Our approach to blueprint creation is computationally straightforward and could be easily adopted by a group of instructors with a basic understanding of lower- and higher-order cognitive constructs. By blueprinting at the chapter level, as we have done, item-writers should be more inclined to construct questions that focus on important central themes or procedures. PMID:26268832

  14. Color-coded prefilled medication syringes decrease time to delivery and dosing errors in simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitations: A randomized crossover trial☆, ☆

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Allen D.; Hernandez, Caleb; Jones, Seth; Moreira, Maria E.; Blumen, Jason R.; Hopkins, Emily; Sande, Margaret; Bakes, Katherine; Haukoos, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication dosing errors remain commonplace and may result in potentially life-threatening outcomes, particularly for pediatric patients where dosing often requires weight-based calculations. Novel medication delivery systems that may reduce dosing errors resonate with national healthcare priorities. Our goal was to evaluate novel, prefilled medication syringes labeled with color-coded volumes corresponding to the weight-based dosing of the Broselow Tape, compared to conventional medication administration, in simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitation scenarios. Methods We performed a prospective, block-randomized, cross-over study, where 10 full-time paramedics each managed two simulated pediatric arrests in situ using either prefilled, color-coded-syringes (intervention) or their own medication kits stocked with conventional ampoules (control). Each paramedic was paired with two emergency medical technicians to provide ventilations and compressions as directed. The ambulance patient compartment and the intravenous medication port were video recorded. Data were extracted from video review by blinded, independent reviewers. Results Median time to delivery of all doses for the intervention and control groups was 34 (95% CI: 28–39) seconds and 42 (95% CI: 36–51) seconds, respectively (difference = 9 [95% CI: 4–14] seconds). Using the conventional method, 62 doses were administered with 24 (39%) critical dosing errors; using the prefilled, color-coded syringe method, 59 doses were administered with 0 (0%) critical dosing errors (difference = 39%, 95% CI: 13–61%). Conclusions A novel color-coded, prefilled syringe decreased time to medication administration and significantly reduced critical dosing errors by paramedics during simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitations. PMID:26247145

  15. FASTER (Face, Arm, Speech, Time, Emergency Response): experience of Central Coast Stroke Services implementation of a pre-hospital notification system for expedient management of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, W; Crimmins, D; Donaldson, W; Risti, R; Clarke, T A; Whyte, S; Sturm, J

    2012-02-01

    Despite benefit in acute ischaemic stroke, less than 3% of patients receive tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in Australia. The FASTER (Face, Arm, Speech, Time, Emergency Response) protocol was constructed to reduce pre-hospital and Emergency Department (ED) delays and improve access to thrombolysis. This study aimed to determine if introduction of the FASTER protocol increases use of tPA using a prospective pre- and post-intervention cohort design in a metropolitan hospital. A pre-hospital assessment tool was used by ambulance services to screen potential tPA candidates. The acute stroke team was contacted, hospital bypass allowed, triage and CT radiology alerted, and the patient rapidly assessed on arrival to ED. Data were collected prospectively during the first 6 months of the new pathway and compared to a 6-month period 12 months prior to protocol initiation. In the 6 months following protocol introduction, 115 patients presented within 24 hours of onset of an ischaemic stroke: 22 (19%) received thrombolysis, significantly greater than five (7%) of 67 patients over the control period, p=0.03. Overall, 42 patients were referred via the FASTER pathway, with 21 of these receiving tPA (50%). One inpatient stroke was also treated. Only two referrals (<5%) were stroke mimics. Introduction of the FASTER pathway also significantly reduced time to thrombolysis and time to admission to the stroke unit. Therefore, fast-track referral of potential tPA patients involving the ambulance services and streamlined hospital assessment is effective and efficient in improving patient access to thrombolysis. PMID:22118794

  16. [Emergency care in the autonomous regions of Spain. Improvement in pre-hospital emergency care and welfare coordination. SESPAS Report 2012].

    PubMed

    Miguel García, Félix; Fernández Quintana, Ana Isabel; Díaz Prats, Amadeo

    2012-03-01

    The present article describes the general organization of pre-hospital emergency care in the autonomous regions and provides data on activity corresponding to 2010, drawn from the information available in the Primary Care Information System of the Ministry of Health, Social Policy and Equality. Emergency care is provided through various organizational structures covering 24-hour periods. Family medicine attended 17.8 million emergency consultations and nursing attended 10.2 million (year 2010, 14 autonomous communities, 79.7% of the National Health System population). Emergency department utilization ranged between 0.11 and 0.83 urgent family physician consultations per inhabitant/year and between 0.05 and 0.57 nursing consultations per inhabitant/year. Any reform in the management of pre-hospital emergency care will involve organizational changes and aims to produce measurable improvements in healthcare coordination. In the new organizational designs, most of the responsibility lies with human resources in order to achieve the new goals for the future aims to be presented in an operational teamwork structure. Undoubtedly, the main challenge is to achieve optimal coordination with other welfare levels, including the police, social services, nursing homes, etc. If optimal care of the population needs to count on the efforts of all these groups, mobility, individual differences, consistent achievement of high standards, and -most of all- the use of these services by citizens will determine the final result. The results can be quantified in various ways, but evaluation should concentrate on the resources used, the degree of satisfaction among all the parties involved and optimal management of demand, which will help to disseminate the need for a rational resource use. PMID:22321943

  17. Improving Use of Prehospital 12-Lead Electrocardiography for Early Identification and Treatment of Acute Coronary Syndrome and ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Daudelin, Denise H.; Sayah, Assaad J.; Kwong, Manlik; Restuccia, Marc C.; Porcaro, William A.; Ruthazer, Robin; Goetz, Jessica D.; Lane, William M.; Beshansky, Joni R.; Selker, Harry P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Performance of Prehospital electrocardiograms (PH-ECGs) expedites identification of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and reduces door-to-balloon (D2B) times for patients receiving reperfusion therapy. To fully realize this benefit, emergency medical service (EMS) performance must be measured and used in feedback reporting and quality improvement (QI). Methods and Results This quasi-experimental design trial tested an approach to improving EMS PH-ECG using feedback reporting and QI interventions in two cities' EMS agencies and receiving hospitals. All patients ≥ 30 years, calling 9-1-1 with possible acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. In total 6,994 patients were included: 1,589 patients in the baseline period without feedback and 5,405 in the intervention period when there were feedback reports and QI interventions. Mean age (SD) was 66 (±17) and women represented 51%. Feedback and QI increased PH-ECG performance for patients with ACS from 76% to 93% (p=<.0001) and for patients with STEMI from 77% to 99% (p= <.0001). Aspirin administration increased from 75% to 82% (p=0.001) but the median total EMS run time remained the same at 22 minutes. The proportion of patients with D2B times of ≤90 minutes increased from 27% to 67% (p=0.006). Conclusion Feedback reports and QI improved PH-ECG performance for patients with ACS and STEMI and increased aspirin administration, without prehospital transport delays. Improvements in D2B times were also seen. PMID:20484201

  18. Evidence for a U-Shaped Relationship Between Prehospital Vitamin D Status and Mortality: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Amrein, Karin; Quraishi, Sadeq A.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Gibbons, Fiona K.; Pieber, Thomas R.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Giovannucci, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the association between prehospital serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]and the risk of mortality after hospital admission. Design: We performed a retrospective cohort study of adults hospitalized for acute care between 1993 and 2011. Setting: The study was conducted at two Boston teaching hospitals. Patients: A total of 24 094 adult inpatients participated in the study. Intervention: There was no intervention. Measurements: All patients had serum 25(OH)D measured before hospitalization. The exposure of interest was 25(OH)D categorized as less than 10 ng/mL, 10–19.9 ng/mL, 20–29.9 ng/mL, 30–49.9 ng/mL, 50–59.9 ng/mL, 60–69.9 ng/mL, and 70 ng/mL or greater. The main outcome measure was 90-day mortality. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated by multivariable logistic regression with inclusion of potential confounders. Results: After adjustment for age, gender, race (white vs nonwhite), patient type (surgical vs medical), season of 25(OH)D draw, and the Deyo-Charlson index, patients with 25(OH)D levels less than 30 ng/mL or 60 ng/mL or greater had higher odds of 90-day mortality compared with patients with levels of 30–49.9 ng/mL [adjusted OR (95% confidence interval) for 25(OH)D <10 ng/mL, 10–19.9 ng/mL, 20–29.9 ng/mL, 50–59.9 ng/mL, 60–69.9 ng/mL, and ≥70 ng/mL was 2.01 (1.68–2.40), 1.89 (1.64–2.18), 1.34 (1.16–1.56), 0.94 (0.69–1.26), 1.52 (1.03–2.25), and 1.69 (1.09–2.61), respectively, compared with patients with 25(OH)D levels 30–49.9 ng/mL]. Limitations: A causal relationship between either low or high 25(OH)D levels and increased mortality can not necessarily be inferred from this observational study. Conclusions: Analysis of 24 094 adult patients showed that 25(OH)D levels less than 20 ng/mL and 60 ng/mL or greater before hospitalization were associated with an increased odds of 90-day mortality. Although previous reports have suggested an association between low

  19. The Quality of Pre-hospital Circulatory Management in Patients With Multiple Trauma Referred to the Trauma Center of Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, in the First Six Months of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulatory management is a critical issue in pre-hospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care did not receive enough attention. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital circulatory management in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services (EMS) to the central trauma department in Kashan Shahid Beheshti medical center, Kashan, Iran. We recruited a convenience sample of 400 patients with multiple trauma. Data were collected using the circulatory assessment questionnaire and controlling hemorrhage (CAQCH) that were designed by the researchers and were described by using frequency tabulations, central tendency measures, and variability indices. The chi-square test was used to analyze the data. Results The study sample consisted of 263 males (75.2%); 57.75% had lower levels of education and 28.75% were workers. The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (85.4%). We found that the quality of circulatory management was unfavorable in 61% of the cases. A significant relationship was observed between the quality of circulatory management and type of trauma and staff’s employment status. Conclusions The quality of pre-hospital circulatory management provided to patients with multiple trauma was unfavorable. Therefore, establishment of in-service training programs on circulatory management is recommended. PMID:27556056

  20. Abnormal urinary excretion of NKCC2 and AQP2 in response to hypertonic saline in chronic kidney disease: an intervention study in patients with chronic kidney disease and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal handling of sodium and water is abnormal in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that abnormal activity of the aquaporin-2 water channels (AQP2), the sodium-potassium-2chloride transporter (NKCC2) and/or the epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) contribute to this phenomenon. Methods 23 patients with CKD and 24 healthy controls at baseline and after 3% saline infusion were compared. The following measurements were performed: urinary concentrations of AQP2 (u-AQP2), NKCC2 (u-NKCC2), ENaC (u-ENaCγ), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimated by 51Cr-EDTA clearance, free water clearance (CH2O), urinary output (UO), fractional excretion of sodium (FENa), plasma concentrations of AVP, renin (PRC), Angiotensin II (ANG II), Aldosterone (Aldo) and body fluid volumes. Results At baseline, GFR was 34 ml/min in CKD patients and 89 ml/ml in controls. There were no significant differences in u-AQP2, u-NKCC2 or u-ENaCγ, but FENa, p-Aldo and p-AVP were higher in CKD patients than controls. In response to hypertonic saline, patients with CKD had an attenuated decrease in CH2O and UO. A greater increase in U-AQP2 was observed in CKD patients compared to controls. Furthermore, u-NKCC2 increased in CKD patients, whereas u-NKCC2 decreased in controls. Body fluid volumes did not significantly differ. Conclusions In response to hypertonic saline, u-NKCC2 increased, suggesting an increased sodium reabsorption via NKCC2 in patients with CKD. U-AQP2 increased more in CKD patients, despite an attenuated decrease in CH2O. Thus, though high levels of p-AVP and p-Aldo, the kidneys can only partly compensate and counteract acute volume expansion due to a defective tubular response. Trial registration Clinical trial no: NCT01623661. Date of trial registration: 18.06.2012. PMID:24970686

  1. Pre-hospital diagnosis and transfer of patients with acute myocardial infarction--a decade long experience from one of Europe's largest STEMI networks.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Peter; Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Lindholm, Matias Greve; Rasmussen, Lars S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Pedersen, Frants; Jørgensen, Erik; Holmvang, Lene; Sejersten, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Early reperfusion in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is essential. Although primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) is the preferred revascularization technique, it often involves longer primary transportation or secondary inter-hospital transfers and thus longer system related delays. The current ESC Guidelines state that PCI should be performed within 120 minutes from first medical contact, and door-to-balloon time should be <60 minutes in order to reduce long term mortality. STEMI networks should be established with regionalization of pPCI treatment to address the challenges regarding pre-hospital treatment, triage and transport of STEMI patients and collaborations between hospitals and Emergency Medical Services (EMS). We report on a regional decade long experience from one of Europe's largest STEMI networks located in Eastern Denmark, which serves a catchment area of 2.5 million inhabitants by processing ~4000 prehospital ECGs annually transmitted from 4 EMS systems to a single pPCI center treating 1100 patients per year. This organization has led to a significant improvement of the standard of therapy for acute myocardial infarction (MI) patients leading to historically low 30-day mortality for STEMI patients (<6%). About 70-80% of all STEMI patients are being triaged from the field and rerouted to the regional pPCI center. Significant delays are still found among patients who present to local hospitals and for those who are first admitted to a local emergency room and thus subject to inter-hospital transfer. In the directly transferred group, approximately 80% of patients can be treated within the current guideline time window of 120 minutes when triaged within a 185 km (~115 miles) radius. Since 2010, a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service has been implemented for air rescue. Air transfer was associated with a 20-30 minute decrease from first medical contact to pPCI, at distances down to 90 km from the pPCI center

  2. Thermal skin injury: II. Effects on edema formation and albumin extravasation of fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's, plasma, and hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H; Lund, T; Reed, R

    1989-01-01

    Pentobarbital anesthetized rats were subjected to a 40% body surface area full-thickness scald burn. Intravenous fluid therapy was given as lactated Ringer's (5 ml/hr), plasma (2.5 ml/hr), or very hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) (0.75 ml/hr) and compared to unburned or burned, untreated controls. At 3 hr postburn, skin water and albumin content and extravasation of radiolabelled albumin were determined. Water content in injured skin increased by 35-78% (least in the untreated group, most in the plasma group) compared to unburned controls (P less than 0.05). After lactated Ringer's therapy water content increased even in unburned skin and in muscle (P less than 0.05). Tissue albumin mass increased generally slightly more than the increase in water content, from 37% (lactated Ringer's group) to 126% (plasma group) in burned areas. Extravasation rate of radiolabelled albumin increased 5-80 times in burned areas, most following plasma treatment (equivalent to 0.6-1.0 ml plasma/g dry weight/180 min). A major part of the estimated total fluid loss following therapy by lactated Ringer's took place in noninjured tissue. Plasma therapy gave less fluid accumulation in unburned tissues but more edema in the injured areas than lactated Ringer's. PMID:2917371

  3. Efficacy of pre-hospital use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction before mechanical reperfusion in a rapid-transfer network (from the Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry of Brittany).

    PubMed

    Auffret, Vincent; Oger, Emmanuel; Leurent, Guillaume; Filippi, Emmanuelle; Coudert, Isabelle; Hacot, Jean Philippe; Castellant, Philippe; Rialan, Antoine; Delaunay, Régis; Rouault, Gilles; Druelles, Philippe; Boulanger, Bertrand; Treuil, Josiane; Avez, Bertrand; Bedossa, Marc; Boulmier, Dominique; Le Guellec, Marielle; Le Breton, Hervé

    2014-07-15

    Previous studies investigating prehospital use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPIs) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction reached conflicting conclusions. The benefit of this strategy in addition to in-ambulance loading of dual-antiplatelet therapy remains controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze data from a prospective registry of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions admitted <24 hours after symptom onset (July 2006 to May 2012). A total of 2,052 patients managed in a physician-staffed mobile intensive care unit (MICU)<12 hours after symptom onset and scheduled for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) were retrospectively included. Patients who received GPIs in the MICU were compared with those who did not. The primary end point was infarct-related artery patency, defined as pre-PPCI Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow grade 3. GPIs were administered in the MICU to 737 patients (36%), including 430<2 hours after symptom onset, and 1,315 patients (64%) did not received prehospital GPIs. Pre-PPCI TIMI flow grade 3 rate was lower in patients treated in the MICU (17.2% vs 21.3%, p=0.03) because of patients treated >2 hours after symptom onset, of whom only 12.7% reached the primary end point. There was no significant difference between groups in the rate of in-hospital major adverse cardiac events. In conclusion, prehospital GPI use in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions<12 hours after symptom onset scheduled for PPCI neither improved pre-PPCI infarct-related artery patency nor reduced in-hospital major adverse cardiac events. PMID:24878117

  4. Effect evaluation of a heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in prehospital emergency care – an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Aléx, Jonas; Karlsson, Stig; Björnstig, Ulf; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2015-01-01

    Background The ambulance milieu does not offer good thermal comfort to patients during the cold Swedish winters. Patients’ exposure to cold temperatures combined with a cold ambulance mattress seems to be the major factor leading to an overall sensation of discomfort. There is little research on the effect of active heat delivered from underneath in ambulance care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electrically heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in the prehospital emergency care. Methods A quantitative intervention study on ambulance care was conducted in the north of Sweden. The ambulance used for the intervention group (n=30) was equipped with an electrically heated mattress on the regular ambulance stretcher whereas for the control group (n=30) no active heat was provided on the stretcher. Outcome variables were measured as thermal comfort on the Cold Discomfort Scale (CDS), subjective comments on cold experiences, and finger, ear and air temperatures. Results Thermal comfort, measured by CDS, improved during the ambulance transport to the emergency department in the intervention group (p=0.001) but decreased in the control group (p=0.014). A significant higher proportion (57%) of the control group rated the stretcher as cold to lie down compared to the intervention group (3%, p<0.001). At arrival, finger, ear and compartment air temperature showed no statistical significant difference between groups. Mean transport time was approximately 15 minutes. Conclusions The use of active heat from underneath increases the patients’ thermal comfort and may prevent the negative consequences of cold stress. PMID:26374468

  5. Prehospital Trauma Triage Decision-making: A Model of What Happens between the 9-1-1 Call and the Hospital.

    PubMed

    Jones, Courtney Marie Cora; Cushman, Jeremy T; Lerner, E Brooke; Fisher, Susan G; Seplaki, Christopher L; Veazie, Peter J; Wasserman, Erin B; Dozier, Ann; Shah, Manish N

    2016-01-01

    We describe the decision-making process used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in order to understand how 1) injured patients are evaluated in the prehospital setting; 2) field triage criteria are applied in-practice; and 3) selection of a destination hospital is determined. We conducted separate focus groups with advanced and basic life support providers from rural and urban/suburban regions. Four exploratory focus groups were conducted to identify overarching themes and five additional confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify initial focus group findings and provide additional detail regarding trauma triage decision-making and application of field triage criteria. All focus groups were conducted by a public health researcher with formal training in qualitative research. A standardized question guide was used to facilitate discussion at all focus groups. All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Responses were coded and categorized into larger domains to describe how EMS providers approach trauma triage and apply the Field Triage Decision Scheme. We conducted 9 focus groups with 50 EMS providers. Participants highlighted that trauma triage is complex and there is often limited time to make destination decisions. Four overarching domains were identified within the context of trauma triage decision-making: 1) initial assessment; 2) importance of speed versus accuracy; 3) usability of current field triage criteria; and 4) consideration of patient and emergency care system-level factors. Field triage is a complex decision-making process which involves consideration of many patient and system-level factors. The decision model presented in this study suggests that EMS providers place significant emphasis on speed of decisions, relying on initial impressions and immediately observable information, rather than precise measurement of vital signs or systematic application of field triage criteria. PMID:26017368

  6. Achieving a Safe Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure in the Prehospital Setting: Is It Time to Revise the Standard Cuff Inflation Practice?

    PubMed

    Carhart, Elliot; Stuck, Logan H; Salzman, Joshua G

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported unsafe endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressures (CP) in the prehospital environment. The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal cuff inflation volume (CIV) to achieve a safe CP (20-30 cmH2O). This observational study utilized 30 recently harvested ovine tracheae, which were warmed from refrigeration in a water bath at 85°F prior to testing. Each trachea was intubated with five different ETT sizes (6.0-8.0 mm), and each size tube was tested with six cuff inflation volumes (5-10 cc). The order of ETT size for each trachea and CIV for each size ETT was randomly pre-assigned. Data were descriptively summarized and categorized before mixed-effects logistic regression was used to determine optimal CIV. Only 113 CP measurements (12.6%, N = 900) were within the optimal range (M = 54.75 cmH2O, SD = 38.52), all of which resulted from a CIV 6 or 7 cc (61% and 39%, respectively). CIVs of 5 cc (n = 150) resulted in underinflation (<20 cmH2O) in all instances, while CIVs of 8, 9, or 10 cc (n = 150 each) resulted in overinflation (>30 cmH2O) in all instances, regardless of ETT size. The odds of achieving a safe CP were greater with CIV of 6 cc for tube sizes 6.0 (OR = 15.9, 95% CI = 3.85-65.58, p < 0.01) and 6.5 mm (OR = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.06-9.39, p = 0.039); however, there was no significant difference in the odds of achieving a safe CP between CIV of 6 and 7 cc for tube sizes 7.0, 7.5, or 8.0 mm. Neither trachea circumference (M = 7.11 cm, SD = 0.40), nor tissue temperature (M = 81.32°F, SD = 0.93) were found to be significant predictors of CP (p = 0.20 and 0.81, respectively). Our study showed a high frequency of CP measurements outside of the desired norms. The CIV range of 6-7 cc resulted in the highest likelihood of achieving the desired cuff pressure range, while cuffs inflated with 8-10 cc resulted in dangerously high CPs in all instances. In the absence of a more ideal solution, the results of this study suggest that narrowing the

  7. Prehospital digital photography and automated image transmission in an emergency medical service – an ancillary retrospective analysis of a prospective controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Still picture transmission was performed using a telemedicine system in an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) during a prospective, controlled trial. In this ancillary, retrospective study the quality and content of the transmitted pictures and the possible influences of this application on prehospital time requirements were investigated. Methods A digital camera was used with a telemedicine system enabling encrypted audio and data transmission between an ambulance and a remotely located physician. By default, images were compressed (jpeg, 640 x 480 pixels). On occasion, this compression was deactivated (3648 x 2736 pixels). Two independent investigators assessed all transmitted pictures according to predefined criteria. In cases of different ratings, a third investigator had final decision competence. Patient characteristics and time intervals were extracted from the EMS protocol sheets and dispatch centre reports. Results Overall 314 pictures (mean 2.77 ± 2.42 pictures/mission) were transmitted during 113 missions (group 1). Pictures were not taken for 151 missions (group 2). Regarding picture quality, the content of 240 (76.4%) pictures was clearly identifiable; 45 (14.3%) pictures were considered “limited quality” and 29 (9.2%) pictures were deemed “not useful” due to not/hardly identifiable content. For pictures with file compression (n = 84 missions) and without (n = 17 missions), the content was clearly identifiable in 74% and 97% of the pictures, respectively (p = 0.003). Medical reports (n = 98, 32.8%), medication lists (n = 49, 16.4%) and 12-lead ECGs (n = 28, 9.4%) were most frequently photographed. The patient characteristics of group 1 vs. 2 were as follows: median age – 72.5 vs. 56.5 years, p = 0.001; frequency of acute coronary syndrome – 24/113 vs. 15/151, p = 0.014. The NACA scores and gender distribution were comparable. Median on-scene times were longer with picture transmission (26 vs. 22

  8. Effectiveness of prehospital wireless transmission of electrocardiograms to a cardiologist via hand-held device for patients with acute myocardial infarction (from the Timely Intervention in Myocardial Emergency, NorthEast Experience [TIME-NE]).

    PubMed

    Adams, George L; Campbell, Paul T; Adams, John M; Strauss, David G; Wall, Karen; Patterson, Janet; Shuping, Kathy B; Maynard, Charles; Young, Dwayne; Corey, Craig; Thompson, Alan; Lee, Benjamin A; Wagner, Galen S

    2006-11-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) decreases morbidity and mortality if performed within the first 2 hours of symptom onset. However, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline for percutaneous coronary intervention door-to-balloon time (<90 minutes) in patients with STEMI is a infrequently accomplished goal. This study enrolled 277 patients with STEMI who were self-transported or transported by emergency medical services to NorthEast Medical Center for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. This study tested the hypothesis that prehospital wireless transmission of an electrocardiogram to a cardiologist's hand-held device results in shorter emergency department door-to-reperfusion time. A comparison was made between patients whose electrocardiogram was successfully transmitted during the intervention phase with (1) patients transported by the emergency medical services in the preintervention, (2) patients self-transported in the intervention phase, and (3) patients whose wireless transmission failed in the intervention phase. During the preintervention phase (2001 to 2003), 48 patients were enrolled. During the intervention phase (2003 to 2005), the following patients were enrolled: 101 self-transported patients, 24 patients with successful electrocardiographic transmission, and 19 patients for whom transmission failed. The median door-to-reperfusion time for patients with successful electrocardiographic transmission was 50 minutes, which was significantly shorter than a preintervention time of 101 minutes (p <0.0001), an intervention phase self-transport time of 96 minutes (p <0.0001), and a failed transmission time of 78 minutes (p <0.0001). In conclusion, prehospital wireless electrocardiographic transmission to a cardiologist's hand-held device significantly decreased emergency department door-to-reperfusion time, thus achieving the American College of

  9. Combination of lung ultrasound (a comet-tail sign) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in differentiating acute heart failure from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma as cause of acute dyspnea in prehospital emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. Methods Our prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. Results The ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P < 0.05) and (2) Boston modified criteria (P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. Conclusions An ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182. PMID:21492424

  10. Efficiency of 7.2% hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 versus mannitol 15% in the treatment of increased intracranial pressure in neurosurgical patients – a randomized clinical trial [ISRCTN62699180

    PubMed Central

    Harutjunyan, Lilit; Holz, Carsten; Rieger, Andreas; Menzel, Matthias; Grond, Stefan; Soukup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Introduction This prospective randomized clinical study investigated the efficacy and safety of 7.2% hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 (7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5) in comparison with 15% mannitol in the treatment of increased intracranial pressure (ICP). Methods Forty neurosurgical patients at risk of increased ICP were randomized to receive either 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 or 15% mannitol at a defined infusion rate, which was stopped when ICP was < 15 mmHg. Results Of the 40 patients, 17 patients received 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 and 15 received mannitol 15%. In eight patients, ICP did not exceed 20 mmHg so treatment was not necessary. Both drugs decreased ICP below 15 mmHg (p < 0.0001); 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 within 6.0 (1.2–15.0) min (all results are presented as median (minimum-maximum range)) and mannitol within 8.7 (4.2–19.9) min (p < 0.0002). 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 caused a greater decrease in ICP than mannitol (57% vs 48%; p < 0.01). The cerebral perfusion pressure was increased from 60 (39–78) mmHg to 72 (54–85) mmHg by infusion with 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 (p < 0.0001) and from 61 (47–71) mmHg to 70 (50–79) mmHg with mannitol (p < 0.0001). The mean arterial pressure was increased by 3.7% during the infusion of 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 but was not altered by mannitol. There were no clinically relevant effects on electrolyte concentrations and osmolarity in the blood. The mean effective dose to achieve an ICP below 15 mmHg was 1.4 (0.3–3.1) ml/kg for 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 and 1.8 (0.45–6.5) ml/kg for mannitol (p < 0.05). Conclusion 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 is more effective than mannitol 15% in the treatment of increased ICP. A dose of 1.4 ml/kg of 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 can be recommended as effective and safe. The advantage of 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 might be explained by local osmotic effects, because there were no clinically relevant differences in hemodynamic clinical chemistry parameters. PMID:16277715

  11. An effective prehospital emergency system.

    PubMed

    McManus, W F; Tresch, D D; Darin, J C

    1977-04-01

    An Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system with the capabilities of rapid response, patient extrication, basic life support, advanced life support, radio communication, and transportation provides appropriate care for a wide spectrum of injured and acutely ill patients. The validity of the selective dual response system in demonstrated by: 1) rapid provision of basic life support, 2) appropriate availability of advanced life support, 3) conservation of educational and fiscal resources, and 4) the enchancement of knowledge and manipulative skill expertise of relatively few, but busy, EMT-paramedics who are provided close medical supervision and support. PMID:857049

  12. Pre-hospital care in burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Prabhat; Goel, Arun

    2010-01-01

    The care provided to the victims of burn injury immediately after sustaining burns can largely affect the extent and depth of the wound. Although standard guidelines have been formulated by various burn associations, they are still not well known to public at large in our country. In burn injuries, most often, the bystanders are the first care providers. The swift implementation of the measures described in this article for first aid in thermal, chemical, electrical and inhalational injuries in the practical setting, within minutes of sustaining the burn, plays a vital role and can effectively reduce the morbidity and mortality to a great extent. In case of burn disasters, triage needs to be carried out promptly as per the defined protocols. Proper communication and transport from the scene of the accident to the primary care centre and onto the burn care facility greatly influences the execution of the management plans PMID:21321651

  13. PHTLS (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) overseas.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, W

    2001-05-01

    There are many names and places that space will not allow here. In the future, I hope to write about these places one at a time and give more detailed reports on the people all over the world who are our brothers and sisters in EMS, covering the places they work and how they provide care. In any event, with each opportunity, we learn about people, ourselves and how small a place the world has become. We are reminded not to approach people and places with belligerence, implying that we have all the answers. By considering the culture and environment in which care is provided, we learn to bring the same open-mindedness back home to help when addressing the problems we face every day. What our neighbors have to teach us may be the next big step in our development. PMID:11373899

  14. [Explosion injuries - prehospital care and management].

    PubMed

    Holsträter, Thorsten; Holsträter, Susanne; Rein, Daniela; Helm, Matthias; Hossfeld, Björn

    2013-11-01

    Explosion injuries are not restricted to war-like military conflicts or terrorist attacks. The emergency physician may also encounter such injuries in the private or industrial fields, injuries caused by fireworks or gas explosions. In such cases the injury patterns are especially complex and may consist of blunt and penetrating injuries as well as thermal damage. Emergency medical personnel must be prepared to cope with explosion trauma not only in individual cases but also in major casualty incidents (MCI). This necessitates a sound knowledge about the mechanisms and processes of an explosion as well as the particular pathophysiological relationships of explosion injuries in order to be able to initiate the best possible, guideline-conform trauma therapy. PMID:24343140

  15. Tourniquet use in the civilian prehospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C; Porter, K M

    2007-01-01

    Tourniquets are an effective means of arresting life‐threatening external haemorrhage from limb injury. Their use has not previously been accepted practice for pre‐hospital civilian trauma care because of significant concerns regarding the potential complications. However, in a few rare situations tourniquet application will be necessary and life‐saving. This review explores the potential problems and mistrust of tourniquet use; explains the reasons why civilian pre‐hospital tourniquet use may be necessary; defines the clear indications for tourniquet use in external haemorrhage control; and provides practical information on tourniquet application and removal. Practitioners need to familiarise themselves with commercial pre‐hospital tourniquets and be prepared to use one without irrational fear of complications in the appropriate cases. PMID:17652690

  16. Hypertonic saline in the treatment of corneal jellyfish stings.

    PubMed

    Yu Yao, Hsin; Cho, Ta Hsiung; Lu, Ching Hsiang; Lin, Feng Chi; Horng, Chi Ting

    2016-02-01

    A 20-year-old male soldier was hit by the jellyfish. The ophthalmic examination revealed that epithelial keratitis and corneal oedema in the right eye. We prescribed 3% NaCl eyedrops and 0.3% Norfloxacin eyedrops in the treatment of the corneal jellyfish stings. Two weeks later, the cornea in the right eye healed. In this case report, 3% NaCl eyedrops was effective in the treatment of acute phase of jellyfish stings of the cornea. PMID:26883926

  17. [Therapy of acute myocardial infarction in the prehospital setting].

    PubMed

    Arntz, H R

    2008-09-01

    The time period from symptom onset to hospital admission is of outstanding importance for the prognosis of a patient with an acute myocardial infarction. He is threatened by sudden cardiac death triggered by ventricular fibrillation on the one hand and on the other hand this period offers the chance for a timely decision on the optimal reperfusion strategy. A broad spectrum of therapeutic opportunities regarding thrombolysis, antiplatelets and anticoagulation has been proven to be effective in large randomised trials and registries. These results should influence the individual decision on reperfusion treatment as well as the patient's conditions, time lines, logistics and local resources. PMID:18629465

  18. Subcutaneous Fluid Administration: A Potentially Useful Tool in Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Annette O.; Goodloe, Jeffrey M.; Thomas, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Mass casualty incidents (MCIs) and disaster medical situations are ideal settings in which there is need for a novel approach to infusing fluids and medications into a patient's intravascular space. An attractive new approach would avoid the potentially time-consuming needlestick and venous cannulation requiring a trained practitioner. In multiple-patient situations, trained practitioners are not always available in sufficient numbers to enable timely placement of intravenous catheters. The novel approach for intravascular space infusion, described in this paper involves the preadministration of the enzyme, human recombinant hyaluronidase (HRH), into the subcutaneous (SC) space, via an indwelling catheter. The enzyme “loosens” the SC space effectively enhancing the absorption of fluids and medication. PMID:22649733

  19. Management of Septic Shock in the Remote Prehospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Joynes, Emma Lucy; Martin, Jodie; Ross, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the management of septic shock by air medical retrieval teams in the remote setting. A retrospective observational study was performed over 36 months. Sixty-seven adult patients who met the criteria for septic shock were included. Respiratory sepsis was the working diagnosis for 53% of patients; this was confirmed on intensive care unit (ICU) discharge in 39% of patients. Intravenous antibiotics and oxygen were delivered in over 90% of patients. Central and arterial line insertions were performed in 48% and 40% of patients, respectively, and 79% of patients were catheterized. Thirty-three percent of patients required intubation, and 80% of patients received an initial crystalloid fluid bolus of 20 mL/kg. Vasopressors were started in 89% of patients. Upon reaching definitive care, 91% of patients were admitted to a high-dependency or ICU setting, with a median length of ICU stay of 4 days and a 30-day mortality of 13%. Of those admitted to the ICU, intubation was required in 48%, new renal support in 20%, and blood pressure support in 84% of patients, respectively. Septic shock was recognized early and managed aggressively by remote retrieval teams, which may have contributed to the low mortality rate observed. PMID:27393760

  20. [Emergency nurse faced with death in pre-hospital situations].

    PubMed

    Hugenschmitt, Delphine; Souquet, Marie-Laure; Lefort, Hugues; Bagur, Jacques; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of a death in the out-of-hospital environment is often brutal and the reactions of the deceased's family and friends, unprepared for this event, can be unpredictable. After the technical procedures have been carried out and within a limited period of intervention, the caregivers, and in particular the nurse of the mobile emergency and intensive care service, must provide the family and friends with support enabling them to begin the grieving process. To help the caregivers in this mission, a pedagogical tool remains to be developed. PMID:26145698

  1. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  2. [Analgesia and anesthesia in the prehospital stage of mechanical trauma].

    PubMed

    Beliakov, V A; Sinitsyn, L N; Maksimov, G A; Akulov, M S; Kalachev, S A; Medvedskiĭ

    1993-01-01

    The work reviews the results of the use of various analgesics and anesthetics in 965 outpatients with mechanical traumas, including 340 ones with shock and blood loss. Central hemodynamics has been studied in 60 patients during anesthesia with lexir, ketamine, sodium hydroxybutyrate, respiratory function has been assessed in 20 patients. The results have been confirmed experimentally on 160 rats, 50 cats, and 40 dogs. It is recommended to apply narcotic and nonnarcotic analgesics, lexir, ketamine intramuscularly not only to patients with shock and pronounced blood loss in whom infusion therapy and intravenous anesthesia with sodium hydroxybutyrate are necessary but in all other cases as well. PMID:8116897

  3. Update on prehospital emergency care of severe trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Tazarourte, K; Cesaréo, E; Sapir, D; Atchabahian, A; Tourtier, J-P; Briole, N; Vigué, B

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of severe trauma patients is determined by the ability of a healthcare system to provide high intensity therapeutic treatment on the field and to transport patients as quickly as possible to the structure best suited to their condition. Direct admission to a specialized center ("trauma center") reduces the mortality of the most severe trauma at 30 days and one year. Triage in a non-specialized hospital is a major risk of loss of chance and should be avoided whenever possible. Medical dispatching plays a major role in determining patient care. The establishment of a hospital care network is an important issue that is not formalized enough in France. The initial triage of severe trauma patients must be improved to avoid taking patients to hospitals that are not equipped to take care of them. For this purpose, the MGAP score can predict severity and help decide where to transport the patient. However, it does not help predict the need for urgent resuscitation procedures. Hemodynamic management is central to the care of hemorrhagic shock and severe head trauma. Transport helicopter with a physician on board has an important role to allow direct admission to a specialized center in geographical areas that are difficult to access. PMID:23916517

  4. Pre-hospital discharge planning: empowering elderly patients through choice.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Mary L

    2008-01-01

    Reductions in the length of stay for acute hospitalization have occurred as a result of Medicare cost containment strategies during the past 20 years. Thus, innovative approaches to the treatment of patients in the acute care hospital setting are necessary, particularly in the practice of discharge planning. The medical literature typically identifies the first day of admission as the time to begin discharge planning in order to minimize the patient's length of stay in the acute care hospital. This strategy has its limitations as elderly patients are often confused by unfamiliar surroundings, surgical anesthesia, postoperative pain, and the rapid pace of hospital recovery typically expected today. Consequently, options for discharge may be limited to the most expedient plan that will ensure safety and continued recovery. This article presents an alternative plan that begins with outpatient education preceding admission and follows the patient throughout the continuum of care including postdischarge. PMID:18316937

  5. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services. PMID:27596502

  6. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause...

  7. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause...

  8. Hypertonic Dextrose and Morrhuate Sodium Injections (Prolotherapy) for Lateral Epicondylosis (Tennis Elbow)

    PubMed Central

    Rabago, David; Lee, Ken S.; Ryan, Michael; Chourasia, Amrish O.; Sesto, Mary E.; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Kijowski, Rick; Grettie, Jessica; Wilson, John; Miller, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chronic lateral epicondylosis (CLE) is common, debilitating and often refractory. Prolotherapy (PrT) is an injection therapy for tendinopathy. The efficacy of two PrT solutions for CLE was evaluated. Design 3-arm randomized controlled trial. 26 adults (32 elbows) with ≥3 months of CLE were randomized to ultrasound-guided PrT with dextrose (PrT-D), PrT with dextrose-morrhuate (PrT-DM) or watchful waiting (Wait-and-see). The primary outcome was the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE; 100-points) at 4, 8 and 16 weeks, (all groups) and 32 weeks (PrT groups). Secondary outcomes included pain-free grip strength and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) score. Results PrT-D and PrT-DM participants reported improved PRTEE composite and subscale scores at 4, 8 and/or 16 weeks compared to Wait-and-see (p<0.05). At 16 weeks, compared to baseline, PrT-D and PrT-DM groups improved composite PRTEE scores by 18.7±9.6 (41.1%) and 17.5±11.6 (53.5%) points, respectively. Grip strength of PrT-D participants exceeded that of PrT-DM and Wait-and-see at 8 and 16 weeks (p<0.05). There were no differences in MRI scores. Satisfaction was high; there were no adverse events. Conclusions Prolotherapy resulted in safe, significant improvement of elbow pain and function compared to baseline status and wait-and-see control. This pilot study suggests the need for a definitive trial. PMID:23291605

  9. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause temporary... doctor....

  10. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause temporary... doctor....

  11. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause temporary... doctor....

  12. The Effects of Prolotherapy With Hypertonic Dextrose Versus Prolozone (Intraarticular Ozone) in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Masoud; Jalili, Parviz; Mennati, Shirin; Koosha, Alireza; Rohanifar, Ramin; Madadi, Firouz; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Taheri, Farinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common disabling disease. Limited studies have demonstrated that prolotherapy with dextrose or with prolozone can be helpful in the treatment of patients with KOA. Objectives: In the current study, we compared the results between these two treatment methods. Patients and Methods: In the current randomized clinical trial, 80 patients with mild to moderate KOA were randomly assigned equally into two groups (ozone group and dextrose group). In each group, injections were repeated three times with 10-day intervals. Before the treatment and 3 months after the injections, the pain intensity was measured by using a visual analogue scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster university arthritis index scores. Finally, the results were compared between the two groups. Results: In the two groups, the pain intensity and WOMAC scores significantly decreased and increased, respectively (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: Prolotherapy with dextrose and with prolozone result in the same pain relief or functional improvement in patients with mild to moderate KOA. PMID:26587401

  13. Management of Severe Hyponatremia: Infusion of Hypertonic Saline and Desmopressin or Infusion of Vasopressin Inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Raj, Dominic S.; Murata, Glen H.; Glew, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Rapid correction of severe hyponatremia carries the risk of osmotic demyelination. Two recently introduced methods of correction of hyponatremia have diametrically opposite effects on aquaresis. Inhibitors of vasopressin V2 receptor (vaptans) lead to the production of dilute urine, whereas infusion of desmopressin causes urinary concentration. Identification of the category of hyponatremia that will benefit from one or the other treatment is critical. In general, vaptans are effective in hyponatremias presenting with concentrated urine and, with the exception of hypovolemic hyponatremia, can be used as their primary treatment. Desmopressin is effective in hyponatremias presenting with dilute urine or developing urinary dilution after saline infusion. In this setting, desmopressin infusion helps prevent overcorrection of the hyponatremia. Monitoring of the changes in serum sodium concentration as a guide to treatment changes is imperative regardless of the initial treatment of severe hyponatremia. PMID:25247759

  14. Hypertonic saline reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse brain edema through inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Three percent sodium chloride (NaCl) treatment has been shown to reduce brain edema and inhibited brain aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in bacterial meningitis induced by Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main pathogenic component of E. coli. We aimed to explore the effect of 3% NaCl in mouse brain edema induced by LPS, as well as to elucidate the potential mechanisms of action. Methods Three percent NaCl was used to treat cerebral edema induced by LPS in mice in vivo. Brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, immunoglobulin G (IgG), AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in brain tissues. IL-1β, 3% NaCl and calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C) were used to treat the primary astrocytes in vitro. AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in astrocytes. Differences in various groups were determined by one-way analysis of variance. Results Three percent NaCl attenuated the increase of brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, IgG, AQP4 mRNA and protein in brain tissues induced by LPS. Three percent NaCl inhibited the increase of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by IL-1β in vitro. Calphostin C blocked the decrease of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by 3% NaCl in vitro. Conclusions Osmotherapy with 3% NaCl ameliorated LPS-induced cerebral edema in vivo. In addition to its osmotic force, 3% NaCl exerted anti-edema effects possibly through down-regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) and inhibiting the expression of AQP4 induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Three percent NaCl attenuated the expression of AQP4 through activation of protein kinase C in astrocytes. PMID:23036239

  15. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal; Sabat, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  16. Hypervolemia During Drinking of ISO and Hypertonic Fluids by Men at Rest and Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Looft-Wilson, R.; Wisherd, J. L.; Fung, P. P.; Erti, A. C.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Barnes, P. R.; Wong, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that drink composition is more important than osmolality (osm) for maintaining and increasing plasma vol. (PV, hypervolemia) at rest and exercise (21.8C Tdb, 50% rh), 6 men (22-39 vr) underwent six treatments while sitting for 90 min (0.39 l/min) followed by 70 min of sitting ergometer exercise (2.08 l/min, 70%vO2 peak). Resting, intermittent drinking (10 ml/kg, 768 ml) beverages were: P1 (20 mEq Na+, 365 mosmol/kg), P2 (40 mEq Na+. 791 mosm), P2G (40 mEq Na+, 80 ml glycerol, 1.392 mosm). AA (157 mEq Na+, 253 mosm), and 01 and 02 (nothing). The exercise drink (10 ml/kg, 768 ml) was P1 for all experiments, except 02 (nothing). Resting % delta PV (Hb-Hct) increased (P<0.05) by 3-6% only with P2 and AA, respectively, Exercise % delta PV was + 1 to + 3% (NS) with AA, -6% to 0% (KS) with P1, P2. P2G, and 01,and 8% to -5% (P<0.05) with 02- Thus, AA with 157 mEq Na+ and the lowest osmolality maintained PV at rest and exercise, while the other beverages with low Na+ and higher osmolality (365 to 1.382 mosm) did not.

  17. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  18. Fluid shifts following 7% hypertonic saline (2400 mosmol/L) infusion.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H

    1995-05-01

    Small volumes of hyperosmolar saline solutions may rapidly improve MAP and CO in hemorrhagic shock. In the present study, the effects of infusion of 7% NaCl on interstitial fluid volume and intracellular fluid volume were determined. In anesthetized, normovolemic rats either 7% NaCl (1.1 mL/100 g, intravenously), acetated Ringer's solution (10 mL/100 g), or no fluid (controls) were infused and extracellular volume (ECV) and plasma volume were determined in samples from skin, skeletal muscle, small intestine, liver, and lung. Intracellular volume was determined as local tissue water content minus ECV. Extracellular fluid volumes were 21.1 +/- .6 mL/ 100 g(mean +/- SEM; n = 6) (control animals), 26.1 +/- .4 mL/100 g (following 7% NaCl) (p < .05), and 32.8 +/- .5 mL/100 g (following Ringer's) (p < .05). Following 7% NaCl ECV increased by four to five times the infused volume. With 7% NaCl ECV in skin, muscle and intestine increased significantly, whereas cell volume was reduced by 10% in muscle and liver. Skeletal muscle, constituting > 40% of body mass with a large cell volume, was the main source for fluid mobilized by administration of 7% NaCl. PMID:7648336

  19. Diphenhydramine Overdose with Intraventricular Conduction Delay Treated with Hypertonic Sodium Bicarbonate and IV Lipid Emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Amin; Rose, Emily; Levine, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diphenhydramine toxicity commonly manifests with antimuscarinic features, including dry mucous membranes, tachycardia, urinary retention, mydriasis, tachycardia, and encephalopathy. Severe toxicity can include seizures and intraventricular conduction delay. We present here a case of a 23-year-old male presenting with recurrent seizures, hypotension and wide complex tachycardia who had worsening toxicity despite treatment with sodium bicarbonate. The patient was ultimately treated with intravenous lipid emulsion therapy that was temporally associated with improvement in the QRS duration. We also review the current literature that supports lipid use in refractory diphenhydramine toxicity. PMID:25493135

  20. Miniature oxygen resuscitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Teegen, J. T.; Waddell, H.

    1969-01-01

    Miniature, portable resuscitation system is used during evacuation of patients to medical facilities. A carrying case contains a modified resuscitator head, cylinder of oxygen, two-stage oxygen regulator, low pressure tube, and a mask for mouth and nose.

  1. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and after-care for upper limb hypertonicity in adults: international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Sheean, G; Lannin, N A; Turner-Stokes, L; Rawicki, B; Snow, B J

    2010-08-01

    Upper limb spasticity affecting elbow, wrist, and finger flexors can be safely and effectively reduced with injections of botulinum toxin type-A (BoNT-A). It has been best studied in adults in the context of post-stroke spasticity. The clinical benefits include reduction in pain and deformity, improvement in washing and dressing the upper limb, and a reduction in caregiver burden (Class I evidence, recommendation level A). Some patients show improvement in function performed by active movement of the affected upper limb (Class III evidence, recommendation C), but predicting and measuring this is difficult, and further research is needed. An individually based approach to treatment and outcome measurement is preferred (Class IV, recommendation U). More research is needed to resolve many unknown issues of assessment and treatment, using research methods appropriate to the question. PMID:20633180

  2. Comparison of HTK and hypertonic citrate to intraarterial cooling in human non-heart-beating kidney donors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C H; Asher, J F; Gupta, A; Vijayanand, D; Wyrley-Birch, H; Stamp, S; Rix, D A; Soomro, N; Manas, D M; Jaques, B C; Peaston, R; Talbot, D

    2007-03-01

    Intraarterial cooling (IAC) of non-heart-beating donors (NHBD) for renal donation requires a cheap, low-viscosity solution. HTK contains a high hydrogen ion buffer level that theoretically should reduce the observable acidosis associated with ongoing anaerobic metabolism. A retrospective comparison of all retrieved NHBD kidneys as well as of viability on the Organ Recovery Systems Lifeporter machine perfusion circuit was performed with respect to the preservation solution HTK or Marshall's HOC. Forty-two NHBD kidneys (19 HTK and 23 HOC) were machine perfused between February 2004 and May 2005. Most of the HTK kidneys were obtained from uncontrolled donors (12 vs 5; Fisher exact test, P = .01). As a consequence, the glutathione-s-transferase viability assay (411 vs 292 IU/L, P = .12) and the lactate concentrations (2.33 vs 1.94 mmol/L, P = .13) were higher among the HTK cohort. There was evidence of greater buffering capacity in HTK, since the lactate:hydrogen ion ratios were consistently lower during the first 2 perfusion hours (1 hour P = .03, 2 hour P = .02). A linear regression analysis confirmed that this was related to the IAC solution (ANCOVA, P < .001). All controlled donor kidneys passed viability testing and were transplanted. In contrast, 83% (10/12) of the uncontrolled donor kidneys preserved with HTK passed the viability test and were transplanted, compared with only 20% (1/5) of the HOC-treated comparators (Fisher exact test, P = .03). It may be concluded that the postulated advantages of improved pH buffering with HTK appear to have clinical relevance. PMID:17362727

  3. Add-on treatment with nebulized hypertonic saline in a child with plastic bronchitis after the Glenn procedure*, **

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Grzegorz; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Glowacka, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis (PB), although a rare cause of airway obstruction, has mortality rates up to 50% in children after Fontan-type cardiac surgery. We present the case of an 18-month-old female patient with PB following pneumonia. At 6 months of age, the patient underwent the Glenn procedure due to functionally univentricular heart. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed complete blockage of the left bronchus by mucoid casts. Pharmacotherapy consisted of glucocorticosteroids, azithromycin, and enalapril maleate. The child also received nebulized 3% NaCl solution, which proved to be beneficial. In children submitted to Fontan-type procedures, physicians must be alert for PB, which can be triggered by respiratory tract infection. PMID:24626275

  4. High dose botulinum toxin A for the treatment of lower extremity hypertonicity in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Allison W; Crowner, Beth; Brunstrom, Janice E; Kissel, Abigail; Racette, Brad A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the safety profile of high dose (15–25 units/kg) of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and increased lower extremity muscle tone. We performed a retrospective review of 929 patient encounters at the Movement Disorders Center at Washington University. A total of 261 patients (105 females; 156 males) were treated during these visits, ages 6 months to 21 years (mean 8y 4mo [SD 4y 8mo]). Ambulatory ability at the time of BTX-A injection was independent ambulation (36.4%, n=95), ambulation with a walker (27.6%, n=72), and non-ambulatory (31.8%, n=83). A few patients (4.2%, n=11) were able to ambulate with a cane or crutch at the time of injection. Participants were characterized according to BTX-A dose, CP etiology, motor involvement pattern, muscles injected, ambulatory ability, and use of oral tone medications. Follow-up records were searched for reported adverse events (AEs), with a mean time to AE assessment of 6.5 weeks (SD 3.38). The AE occurrence was determined for doses of 0 to 4.9 units/kg, 5 to 9.9 units/kg, 10 to 14.9 units/kg, 15 to 19.9 units/kg, and 20 to 25 units/kg. The overall AE occurrence was 4.2%. Standard doses of BTX-A had side-effect occurrences of 3.9% for 5 to 10 units/kg and 7.6% for 10 to 15 units/kg. Among higher doses (15–20 units/kg and 20–25 units/kg) the AE occurrence was 3.5% and 8.6% respectively. No patient developed botulism. AEs were randomly distributed across dosing groups, CP etiologies, clinical phenotypes, ambulatory status, and treatment duration. All doses were associated with a significant increase in passive range of motion using the Tardieu scale. We conclude that higher dose BTX-A is safe in children with a spectrum of CP phenotypes and are well tolerated over time. PMID:17979859

  5. Phosphorylation of MAP kinase-like proteins mediate the response of the halotolerant alga Dunaliella viridis to hypertonic shock.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Carlos; Berl, Tomas; Rivard, Christopher J; Edelstein, Charles L; Capasso, Juan M

    2004-02-01

    The microalga Dunaliella viridis has the ability to adapt to a variety of environmental stresses including osmotic and thermal shocks, UV irradiation and nitrogen starvation. Lacking a rigid cell wall, Dunaliella provides an excellent model to study stress signaling in eukaryotic unicellular organisms. When exposed to hyperosmotic stress, UV irradiation or high temperature, a 57-kDa protein is recognized by antibodies specific to mammalian p38, to its yeast homologue Hog1, and to the phospho-p38 MAP kinase motif. This 57-kDa protein appears to be both up-regulated and phosphorylated. Three other proteins (50, 45, 43 kDa) were transiently phosphorylated under stress conditions as detected with an antibody specific to the mammalian phospho c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) motif. Treatment with specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase (SB203580) and JNK (SP600125) activities markedly impaired the adaptation of Dunaliella to osmotic stress. From an evolutionary standpoint, these data strongly suggest that MAP kinase signaling pathways, other than ERK, were already operating in the common ancestor of plant and animal kingdoms, probably as early as 1400 million years ago. PMID:14741745

  6. Add-on treatment with nebulized hypertonic saline in a child with plastic bronchitis after the Glenn procedure.

    PubMed

    Lis, Grzegorz; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Glowacka, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis (PB), although a rare cause of airway obstruction, has mortality rates up to 50% in children after Fontan-type cardiac surgery. We present the case of an 18-month-old female patient with PB following pneumonia. At 6 months of age, the patient underwent the Glenn procedure due to functionally univentricular heart. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed complete blockage of the left bronchus by mucoid casts. Pharmacotherapy consisted of glucocorticosteroids, azithromycin, and enalapril maleate. The child also received nebulized 3% NaCl solution, which proved to be beneficial. In children submitted to Fontan-type procedures, physicians must be alert for PB, which can be triggered by respiratory tract infection. PMID:24626275

  7. Osmotic demyelination and hypertonic dehydration in a 9-year-old girl: changes in cerebrospinal fluid myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bobby; Tobias, Joseph D

    2006-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl was admitted for the treatment of hyper-natremic dehydration. Her history was significant for psychogenic polydipsia, hyponatremia, and a renal concentrating defect. She presented with a 2-day history of altered mental status, ataxia, lethargy, fever, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Meningitis was ruled out. Over the course of her illness, slow rehydration was maintained with a gradual decrease (10 mEq per 24 hours) of the serum sodium. Despite this care, she developed quadriparesis, and magnetic resonance imaging performed on day 6 of her illness was consistent with osmotic demyelination (central pontine myelinolysis). To rule out an excessively rapid correction of hypernatremia as the etiology of the problem, a myelin basic protein was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid that had been obtained on hospital day 1. The myelin basic protein was 649.50 ng/mL (normal, 0.07-4.10 ng/mL). The current literature is presented regarding the postulated pathogenesis of central pontine myelinolysis and suggested therapies, previous reports of central pontine myelinolysis in children are reviewed, and the potential role of myelin basic protein in its diagnosis is discussed. PMID:17095502

  8. Bumetanide-sensitive NaCl uptake in rabbit tracheal epithelial cells is stimulated by neurohormones and hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Liedtke, C M

    1992-05-01

    Loop diuretic-sensitive NaCl(K) cotransport plays a fundamental role in absorption and secretion of electrolytes in epithelial tissues. Cotransport activity was measured as uptake of 22Na, 36Cl, or 86Rb at 27 degrees C in isolated rabbit tracheal epithelial cells. Uptake of radiotracer was linear from 1 to 2 min after initiation of radiotracer transport. Bumetanide at 10 microM final concentration did not affect tracer uptake. The endogenous catecholamine l-epinephrine and alpha 2-adrenergic agent clonidine increased sodium and chloride uptake at least 5.5-fold. Bumetanide blocked sodium uptake by 85% and chloride uptake by 72%. 86Rb uptake was not affected by l-epinephrine, clonidine, or bumetanide. The alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine blocked the effects of l-epinephrine and clonidine on 22Na and 36Cl uptake. In Ca(2+)-depleted transport medium, baseline levels of sodium and chloride uptake increased 3.8- and 2.4-fold, respectively, in a bumetanide-independent manner. Nevertheless, l-epinephrine and clonidine induced a net stimulation of sodium and chloride uptake similar to that found in Ca(2+)-replete medium. This response was reduced by bumetanide and yohimbine. The Ca(2+)-elevating agent ionomycin increased bumetanide-sensitive sodium and chloride uptake 7.2- and 6.2-fold, respectively. Replacement of chloride with gluconate or sodium with N-methyl-D-glucamine in the extracellular medium inhibited l-epinephrine and clonidine-stimulated bumetanide-sensitive sodium and chloride uptake, respectively. Osmotic shrinkage in hyperosmotic (500 mM NaCl with all other electrolytes at normal concentration) transport medium markedly increased bumetanide-inhibitable sodium and chloride uptake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1590411

  9. Roles of the periaqueductal gray in descending facilitatory and inhibitory controls of intramuscular hypertonic saline induced muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; Sun, Tao; Lumb, Bridget M; You, Hao-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Despite the importance of the periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the modulation of nociception and pain, many aspects of the roles of the different columns of the PAG in descending controls: facilitation and inhibition, are not understood. Employing a tonic muscle pain model established by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, we now report the results of investigations designed to explore any differences in Fos expression in the different functional columns of the PAG in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In a second series of experiments, effects of the PAG on descending control of spinally-organized nociception were assessed by measuring hind paw withdrawal reflexes to noxious mechanical and heat stimulation before and after electrolytic lesion of specific columns of the PAG. Our results show that Fos expression within different columns of the PAG increases significantly and differentially following i.m. injection of 5.8% saline. The mean number of Fos positive neurons in the dorsolateral (dl), lateral (l), dorsomedial (dm) PAG elicited by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline reached a peak at 4h with a gradual decrease over time, whereas the maximum number of Fos-positive neurons in the ventrolateral (vl) PAG was observed 8h after i.m. injection. Contralateral lesion of the dl PAG significantly depressed ipsilateral secondary mechanical hyperalgesia in intramuscularly induced (5.8% saline) nociception (P<0.05), whereas heat hypoalgesia was not affected (P>0.05). By contrast, contralateral lesion of the vl PAG completely blocked the occurrence of ipsilateral heat hypoalgesia (P<0.05), while bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia was unaffected (P>0.05). In conclusion, functions of specific columns of the PAG in the control of spinal nociceptive activities are not homogeneous. It is suggested that, in this muscle pain model, the dl PAG and vl PAG participate in descending facilitation and inhibition of nociception, respectively. PMID:24792920

  10. Diphenhydramine overdose with intraventricular conduction delay treated with hypertonic sodium bicarbonate and i.v. lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Amin; Rose, Emily; Levine, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Diphenhydramine toxicity commonly manifests with antimuscarinic features, including dry mucous membranes, tachycardia, urinary retention, mydriasis, tachycardia, and encephalopathy. Severe toxicity can include seizures and intraventricular conduction delay. We present here a case of a 23-year-old male presenting with recurrent seizures, hypotension and wide complex tachycardia who had worsening toxicity despite treatment with sodium bicarbonate. The patient was ultimately treated with intravenous lipid emulsion therapy that was temporally associated with improvement in the QRS duration. We also review the current literature that supports lipid use in refractory diphenhydramine toxicity. PMID:25493135

  11. Evidence by calorimetry for an activation of sodium-hydrogen exchange of young rat skeletal muscle in hypertonic media.

    PubMed Central

    Chinet, A; Giovannini, P

    1989-01-01

    1. The rate of energy dissipation associated with Na(+)-H+ exchange in isolated, superfused soleus muscles from young rats was measured with an isothermal microcalorimeter during quasi-stationary states of oxidative metabolism. 2. Under normal physiological conditions, amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na(+)-H+ exchange across plasma membranes, had no measurable effect on the specific rate of muscle heat production (E); the ouabain-suppressible part of E was identical whether amiloride was absent or present. 3. E was increased under hyperosmotic conditions and the difference with respect to control (excess E) was proportional to the degree of hyperosmolarity of the superfusate. It was 48% of basal E during a +100 mosM stress (with no change of extracellular Na+ concentration, Na+o). Inhibition of Ca2+ release into the sarcoplasm with sodium dantrolene (10(-5) M) or tetracaine (5 x 10(-5) M) suppressed a substantial part (65 and 53%, respectively) of the steady-state excess E (1.2 mW (g wet weight)-1) induced by the +100 mosM stress. Practically 100% of excess E was suppressed in the nominal absence of extracellular sodium (Na+o = 0, Li+ substitution) or under 15 mM-Na+o, and excess E was enhanced when Na+o was increased (hyperosomolarity by addition of Na2SO4 instead of sucrose). 4. Under hyperosmotic conditions, amiloride at the 5 x 10(-7) M concentration had no effect on excess E whereas at 10(-4) M it induced a significant decrease of excess E. The absolute effect of 10(-4) M-amiloride was -0.34 mW (g wet weight)-1 (equal to 28% of the excess E due to a +100 mosM-sucrose stress and to 14% of the excess E due to a +100 mosM-Na2SO4 stress). It was left unaltered in the presence of dantrolene and was independent of the way the +100 mosM stress was obtained (i.e. 100 mM-sucrose or 50 mM-Na2SO4). It was suppressed at Na+o = 0-15 mM and could be mimicked by guanochlor, another potent inhibitor of Na(+)-H+ exchange. In the presence of 10(-4) M-amiloride, the ouabain-suppressible E was significantly reduced. In the presence of ouabain, amiloride had no effect. 5. Muscle tissue space available to [3H]inulin was measured in parallel experiments. It was 23.3% under control conditions and 30.6% after a 2 h exposure of the muscle to a +100 mosM-Na2SO4 stress.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2640465

  12. [Pre-hospital treatment of an anterior shoulder dislocation: medico-legal concerns].

    PubMed

    Möhler, A; Arikan, H; Gris, M

    2015-01-01

    A man of 23 years, diabetic of type 1, shows a functional handicap of the right upper limb following a convulsion in the context of hypoglycemia. On arrival of the "S.A.M.U.", the physician diagnoses an anterior shoulder dislocation that he decides to reduce on the spot after analgesic treatment. The X-ray examination at the emergency shows a reduction of the dislocation as well as a fracture of the greater tuberosity. Has the fracture followed the convulsion or the reduction movement ? The absence of an X-ray examination before the reduction movement presents a forensic medical problem. Certain criteria mentioned in several studies would allow the reduction without X-ray before. However, these studies remain controversial. PMID:26749634

  13. Prehospital ultrasound detects pericardial tamponade in a pregnant victim of stabbing assault.

    PubMed

    Byhahn, Christian; Bingold, Tobias M; Zwissler, Bernhard; Maier, Marcus; Walcher, Felix

    2008-01-01

    The development of handheld, portable ultrasound devices has enabled the use of this diagnostic tool also in the out-of-hospital environment. We report on a pregnant teenager who was found haemodynamically unstable after a stab assault. When she suffered cardiac arrest shortly