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Sample records for prehospital therapeutic hypothermia

  1. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest--from current concepts to a future standard.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  2. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    PubMed Central

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  3. Induction of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest in prehospital patients using ice-cold Ringer's solution: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Silfvast, Tom

    2004-09-01

    The cooling and haemodynamic effects of prehospital infusion of ice-cold Ringer's solution were studied in 13 adult patients after successful resuscitation from non-traumatic cardiac arrest. After haemodynamics stabilisation, 30 ml/kg of Ringer's solution was infused at a rate of 100ml/min into the antecubital vein. Arterial blood pressure and blood gases, pulse rate, end-tidal CO(2) and oesophageal temperature were monitored closely. The mean core temperature decreased from 35.8 +/- 0.9 degrees C at the start of infusion to 34.0 +/- 1.2 degrees C on arrival at hospital (P < 0.0001). No serious adverse haemodynamic effects occurred. It is concluded that the induction of therapeutic hypothermia using this technique in the prehospital setting is feasible. PMID:15325449

  4. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Wartenberg, Katja E.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest recorded application of therapeutic hypothermia in medicine spans about 5000 years; however, its use has become widespread since 2002, following the demonstration of both safety and efficacy of regimens requiring only a mild (32°C-35°C) degree of cooling after cardiac arrest. We review the mechanisms by which hypothermia confers neuroprotection as well as its physiological effects by body system and its associated risks. With regard to clinical applications, we present evidence on the role of hypothermia in traumatic brain injury, intracranial pressure elevation, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, spinal cord injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and neonatal peripartum encephalopathy. Based on the current knowledge and areas undergoing or in need of further exploration, we feel that therapeutic hypothermia holds promise in the treatment of patients with various forms of neurologic injury; however, additional quality studies are needed before its true role is fully known. PMID:24982721

  5. Immediate prehospital hypothermia protocol in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Laure; Vitrat, François; Savary, Dominique; Debaty, Guillaume; Santre, Charles; Durand, Michel; Dessertaine, Geraldine; Timsit, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves the outcomes of cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of an immediate prehospital cooling procedure implemented just after the return of spontaneous circulation with a prehospital setting. During 30 months, the case records of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital CA presumably due to a cardiac disease were studied. A routine protocol of immediate postresuscitation cooling had been tested by an emergency team, which consisted of an infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline. We decided to assess the efficacy and tolerance of this procedure. A total of 99 patients were studied; 22 were treated with prehospital TH, and 77 consecutive patients treated with prehospital standard resuscitation served as controls. For all patients, TH was maintained for 12 to 24 hours. The demographic, clinical, and biological characteristics of the patients were similar in the 2 groups. The rate of patients with a body temperature of less than 35 degrees C upon admission was 41% in the cooling group and 18% in the control group. Rapid infusion of fluid was not associated with pulmonary edema. After 1 year of follow-up, 6 (27%) of 22 patients in the cooling group and 30 (39%) of 77 patients in the control group had a good outcome. Our preliminary observation suggests that in comatose survivors of CA, prehospital TH with infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline is feasible and can be used safely by mobile emergency and intensive care units. PMID:19497463

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Froehler, Michael T; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator remains the only US FDA-approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, the very limited time window for its administration restricts its usefulness. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly clear that, given the numerous pathways via which cerebral ischemia causes cell death, the capacity to inhibit multiple mechanisms simultaneously may provide additive or synergistic beneficial clinical effects for stroke patients. Although no clinical trials have yet investigated the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia in focal cerebral ischemia, its pleiotropic neuroprotective actions, positive results in preclinical studies, as well as proven enhancement of neurologic outcomes in survivors of cardiac arrest and newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, make this neuroprotective strategy highly promising. This review presents an overview of the potential role of hypothermia in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke and discusses ischemic cell death pathophysiology, neuroprotective mechanisms of hypothermia, methodologies employed for the induction of hypothermia, results from animal models of cerebral ischemia, and finally, currently available clinical trial data. Two valuable lessons learned thus far are that first, rapid induction of hypothermia is key and is best accomplished with a combination of ice-cold saline infusion and the use of endovascular cooling devices, and second, that shivering can be overcome with aggressive anti-shivering protocols including meperidine, buspirone and surface warming. We await the results of clinical trials to determine the utility of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke. If proven efficacious, hypothermia would be a welcome complement to established reperfusion therapies for ischemic stroke patients. PMID:20397832

  7. [Implementation of therapeutic hypothermia into clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Himmel, Friederike; Desch, Steffen; Wolfrum, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Implementation of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest into clinical practice is a continuing process. Although ILCOR recommendation was given in 2003, only 24% of the German hospitals reported the use of hypothermia in this setting in 2005. Growing evidence and most importantly the implementation of hypothermia into the guidelines led to a significant increase of acceptance of this therapeutic option leading to a user rate of 69% in 2009. Encouraged by the new guidelines from 2010 86% of German hospitals finally reported to use hypothermia after cardiac arrest routinely in 2012, a decade after publication of the mile stone studies. The phenomenon of a delayed implementation of hypothermia into clinical practice can be seen throughout the world as many surveys from different countries at different time points have shown. When hypothermia is used, hospitals go with the guidelines quite strictly with respect to indication, duration of treatment and target temperature. This strengthens the importance of guidelines in the process to implement new therapeutic options. However, although a recent study still promotes a strict target temperature management it questions the need for a markedly reduced target temperature of 33°C. It remains to be elucidated how this study will affect the daily routine in the hospitals and most interestingly how this study will change the coming guidelines in 2015. PMID:26261928

  8. Therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Cornette, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting newborn infants which can result in death and disability. There is now strong clinical evidence that moderate post-asphyxial total body cooling or hypothermia in full term neonates results in long-term neuroprotection, allowing us to proclaim this innovative therapy as “standard of care.” The treatment is a time-critical emergency and should be started within 6 hours after the insult. Such requires optimal collaboration among local hospitals, transport teams and the closest neonatal intensive care unit. The technique is only safe when applied according to published clinical trial protocols, and with admission of these patients to a neonatal intensive care unit. Future studies should be aimed at optimizing the onset, duration, and depth of hypothermia. Combination of hypothermia and drugs may further improve neuroprotection in asphyxiated full term neonates. PMID:24753900

  9. Effects of prehospital hypothermia on transfusion requirements and outcomes: a retrospective observatory trial

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Nora; Gräff, Ingo; Fleischer, Andreas; Boehm, Olaf; Guttenthaler, Vera; Baumgarten, Georg; Meybohm, Patrick; Wittmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Prehospital hypothermia is defined as a core temperature <36.0°C and has been shown to be an independent risk factor for early death in patients with trauma. In a retrospective study, a possible correlation between the body temperature at the time of admission to the emergency room and subsequent in-hospital transfusion requirements and the in-hospital mortality rate was explored. Setting This is a retrospective single-centre study at a primary care hospital in Germany. Participants 15 895 patients were included in this study. Patients were classified by admission temperature and transfusion rate. Excluded were ambulant patients and patients with missing data. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome values were length of stay (LOS) in days, in-hospital mortality, the transferred amount of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), and admission to an intensive care unit. Secondary influencing variables were the patient's age and the Glasgow Coma Scale. Results In 22.85% of the patients, hypothermia was documented. Hypothermic patients died earlier in the course of their hospital stay than non-hypothermic patients (p<0.001). The administration of 1–3 PRBC increased the LOS significantly (p<0.001) and transfused patients had an increased risk of death (p<0.001). Prehospital hypothermia could be an independent risk factor for mortality (adjusted OR 8.521; p=0.001) and increases the relative risk for transfusion by factor 2.0 (OR 2.007; p=0.002). Conclusions Low body temperature at hospital admission is associated with a higher risk of transfusion and death. Hence, a greater awareness of prehospital temperature management should be established. PMID:27029772

  10. [Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, Sladjana

    2008-01-01

    Organ injury caused by ischaemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35 degrees C) is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two randomised clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischaemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v.) fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia,will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal "therapeutic window" for gene therapy. PMID:19069351

  11. The therapeutic potential of regulated hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    2001-03-01

    Reducing body temperature of rodents has been found to improve their survival to ischaemia, hypoxia, chemical toxicants, and many other types of insults. Larger species, including humans, may also benefit from a lower body temperature when recovering from CNS ischaemia and other traumatic insults. Rodents subjected to these insults undergo a regulated hypothermic response (that is, decrease in set point temperature) characterised by preference for cooler ambient temperatures, peripheral vasodilatation, and reduced metabolic rate. However, forced hypothermia (that is, body temperature forced below set point) is the only method used in the study and treatment of human pathological insults. The therapeutic efficacy of the hypothermic treatment is likely to be influenced by the nature of the reduction in body temperature (that is, forced versus regulated). Homeostatic mechanisms counter forced reductions in body temperature resulting in physiological stress and decreased efficacy of the hypothermic treatment. On the other hand, regulated hypothermia would seem to be the best means of achieving a therapeutic benefit because thermal homeostatic systems mediate a controlled reduction in core temperature. PMID:11300205

  12. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: outcome predictors

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rodrigo Nazário; Ávila, Paulo; Cavaco, Raquel; Germano, Nuno; Bento, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Objective The determination of coma patient prognosis after cardiac arrest has clinical, ethical and social implications. Neurological examination, imaging and biochemical markers are helpful tools accepted as reliable in predicting recovery. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, these data need to be reconfirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine the validity of different markers, which can be used in the detection of patients with poor prognosis under hypothermia. Methods Data from adult patients admitted to our intensive care unit for a hypothermia protocol after cardiac arrest were recorded prospectively to generate a descriptive and analytical study analyzing the relationship between clinical, neurophysiological, imaging and biochemical parameters with 6-month outcomes defined according to the Cerebral Performance Categories scale (good 1-2, poor 3-5). Neuron-specific enolase was collected at 72 hours. Imaging and neurophysiologic exams were carried out in the 24 hours after the rewarming period. Results Sixty-seven patients were included in the study, of which 12 had good neurological outcomes. Ventricular fibrillation and electroencephalographic theta activity were associated with increased likelihood of survival and improved neurological outcomes. Patients who had more rapid cooling (mean time of 163 versus 312 minutes), hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging or neuron-specific enolase > 58ng/mL had poor neurological outcomes (p < 0.05). Conclusion Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging and neuron-specific enolase were strong predictors of poor neurological outcomes. Although there is the belief that early achievement of target temperature improves neurological prognoses, in our study, there were increased mortality and worse neurological outcomes with earlier target-temperature achievement. PMID:26761469

  13. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Cardioprotection in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, In Sook; Fumiaki, Ikeno

    2016-01-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia of 32–35℃ improved neurologic outcomes in outside hospital cardiac arrest survivor. Furthermore, in experimental studies on infarcted model and pilot studies on conscious patients with acute myocardial infarction, therapeutic hypothermia successfully reduced infarct size and microvascular resistance. Therefore, mild therapeutic hypothermia has received an attention as a promising solution for reduction of infarction size after acute myocardial infarction which are not completely solved despite of optimal reperfusion therapy. Nevertheless, the results from randomized clinical trials failed to prove the cardioprotective effects of therapeutic hypothermia or showed beneficial effects only in limited subgroups. In this article, we reviewed rationale for therapeutic hypothermia and possible mechanisms from previous studies, effective methods for clinical application to the patients with acute myocardial infarction, lessons from current clinical trials and future directions. PMID:26847278

  14. Effects of therapeutic hypothermia on the glial proteome and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Heon; Seo, Minchul; Suk, Kyoungho

    2013-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a useful intervention against brain injury in experimental models and patients, but its therapeutic applications are limited due to its ill-defined mode of action. Glia cells maintain homeostasis and protect the central nervous system from environmental change, but after brain injury, glia are activated and induce glial scar formation and secondary injury. On the other hand, therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to modulate glial hyperactivation under various brain injury conditions. We considered that knowledge of the effect of hypothermia on the molecular profiles of glia and on their phenotypes would improve our understanding of the neuroprotective mechanism of hypothermia. Here, we review the findings of recent studies that examined the effect of hypothermia on proteome changes in reactive glial cells in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic effects of hypothermia are associated with the inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, the maintenance of ion homeostasis, and the protection of neurovascular units in cultured glial cells. In an animal model, a distinct pattern of protein alterations was detected in glia following hypothermia under ischemic/reperfusion conditions. In particular, hypothermia was found to exert a neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury by regulating specific glial signaling pathways, such as, glutamate signaling, cell death, and stress response, and by influencing neural dysfunction, neurogenesis, neural plasticity, cell differentiation, and neurotrophic activity. Furthermore, the proteins that were differentially expressed belonged to various pathways and could mediate diverse phenotypic changes of glia in vitro or in vivo. Therefore, hypothermia-modulated glial proteins and subsequent phenotypic changes may form the basis of the therapeutic effects of hypothermia. PMID:23441897

  15. Therapeutic hypothermia and ischemic stroke: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Rizwan A.; Pabaney, Aqueel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ischemic stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the US. Clinical techniques aimed at helping to reduce the morbidity associated with stroke have been studied extensively, including therapeutic hypothermia. In this study, the authors review the literature regarding the role of therapeutic hypothermia in ischemic stroke to appreciate the evolution of hypothermia technology over several decades and to critically analyze several early clinical studies to validate its use in ischemic stroke. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Search terms included “hypothermia and ischemic stroke” and “therapeutic hypothermia.” A comprehensive search of the current clinical trials using clinicaltrials.gov was conducted using the keywords “stroke and hypothermia” to evaluate early and ongoing clinical trials utilizing hypothermia in ischemic stroke. Results: A comprehensive review of the evolution of hypothermia in stroke and the current status of this treatment was performed. Clinical studies were critically analyzed to appreciate their strengths and pitfalls. Ongoing and future registered clinical studies were highlighted and analyzed compared to the reported results of previous trials. Conclusion: Although hypothermia has been used for various purposes over several decades, its efficacy in the treatment of ischemic stroke is debatable. Several trials have proven its safety and feasibility; however, more robust, randomized clinical trials with large volumes of patients are needed to fully establish its utility in the clinical setting. PMID:27313963

  16. Comparison of three different prehospital wrapping methods for preventing hypothermia - a crossover study in humans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accidental hypothermia increases mortality and morbidity in trauma patients. Various methods for insulating and wrapping hypothermic patients are used worldwide. The aim of this study was to compare the thermal insulating effects and comfort of bubble wrap, ambulance blankets / quilts, and Hibler's method, a low-cost method combining a plastic outer layer with an insulating layer. Methods Eight volunteers were dressed in moistened clothing, exposed to a cold and windy environment then wrapped using one of the three different insulation methods in random order on three different days. They were rested quietly on their back for 60 minutes in a cold climatic chamber. Skin temperature, rectal temperature, oxygen consumption were measured, and metabolic heat production was calculated. A questionnaire was used for a subjective evaluation of comfort, thermal sensation, and shivering. Results Skin temperature was significantly higher 15 minutes after wrapping using Hibler's method compared with wrapping with ambulance blankets / quilts or bubble wrap. There were no differences in core temperature between the three insulating methods. The subjects reported more shivering, they felt colder, were more uncomfortable, and had an increased heat production when using bubble wrap compared with the other two methods. Hibler's method was the volunteers preferred method for preventing hypothermia. Bubble wrap was the least effective insulating method, and seemed to require significantly higher heat production to compensate for increased heat loss. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a combination of vapour tight layer and an additional dry insulating layer (Hibler's method) is the most efficient wrapping method to prevent heat loss, as shown by increased skin temperatures, lower metabolic rate and better thermal comfort. This should then be the method of choice when wrapping a wet patient at risk of developing hypothermia in prehospital environments. PMID:21699720

  17. Neonatal Encephalopathy: Update on Therapeutic Hypothermia and Other Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M; Juul, Sandra E

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is standard treatment for newborns at 36 weeks of gestation or greater with intrapartum hypoxia-related NE. Term and late preterm infants with moderate to severe encephalopathy show improved survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months of age after TH. TH can increase survival without increasing major disability, rates of an IQ less than 70, or cerebral palsy. Neonates with severe NE remain at risk of death or severe neurodevelopmental impairment. This review discusses the evidence supporting TH for term or near term neonates with NE. PMID:27524449

  18. Successful Use of Therapeutic Hypothermia in a Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Oguayo, Kevin N; Oyetayo, Ola O; Stewart, David; Costa, Steven M; Jones, Richard O

    2015-08-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States. Pregnant women are not immune to cardiac arrest, and the treatment of such patients can be difficult. Pregnancy is a relative contraindication to the use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A 20-year-old woman who was 18 weeks pregnant had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Upon her arrival at the emergency department, she was resuscitated and her circulation returned spontaneously, but her score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 3. After adequate family discussion of the risks and benefits of therapeutic hypothermia, a decision was made to initiate therapeutic hypothermia per established protocol for 24 hours. The patient was successfully cooled and rewarmed. By the time she was discharged, she had experienced complete neurologic recovery, apart from some short-term memory loss. Subsequently, at 40 weeks, she delivered vaginally a 7-lb 3-oz girl whose Apgar scores were 8 and 9, at 1 and 5 minutes respectively. To our knowledge, this is only the 3rd reported case of a successful outcome following the initiation of therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a pregnant woman. On the basis of this and previous reports of successful outcomes, we recommend that therapeutic hypothermia be considered an option in the management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the pregnant population. To facilitate a successful outcome, a multidisciplinary approach involving cardiology, emergency medicine, obstetrics, and neurology should be used. PMID:26413021

  19. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Activity in Hypothermia and Rewarming: Can RONS Modulate the Beneficial Effects of Therapeutic Hypothermia?

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Norma; Palomeque, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is a condition in which core temperature drops below the level necessary to maintain bodily functions. The decrease in temperature may disrupt some physiological systems of the body, including alterations in microcirculation and reduction of oxygen supply to tissues. The lack of oxygen can induce the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen free radicals (RONS), followed by oxidative stress, and finally, apoptosis and/or necrosis. Furthermore, since the hypothermia is inevitably followed by a rewarming process, we should also consider its effects. Despite hypothermia and rewarming inducing injury, many benefits of hypothermia have been demonstrated when used to preserve brain, cardiac, hepatic, and intestinal function against ischemic injury. This review gives an overview of the effects of hypothermia and rewarming on the oxidant/antioxidant balance and provides hypothesis for the role of reactive oxygen species in therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:24363826

  20. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Behringer, Wilhelm

    2008-12-01

    About 17 million people worldwide die from cardiovascular diseases each year. Impaired neurologic function after sudden cardiac arrest is a major cause of death in these patients. Up to now, no specific post-arrest therapy was available to improve outcome. Recently, two randomized clinical trials of mild therapeutic hypothermia after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest showed improvement of neurological outcome and reduced mortality. A broad implementation of this new therapy could save thousands of lives worldwide, as only 6 patients have to be treated to get one additional patient with favourable neurological recovery. At present, myocardial reperfusion by thrombolytic therapy or primary PCI as early as possible is the most effective therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Mild therapeutic hypothermia might be a promising new therapy to prevent reperfusion injury after myocardial infarction, but its use in daily clinical routine cannot be recommended with the available evidence. PMID:19137812

  1. Out-of-hospital therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest victims

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, Wilhelm; Arrich, Jasmin; Holzer, Michael; Sterz, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    Despite many years of research, outcome after cardiac arrest is dismal. Since 2005, the European Resuscitation Council recommends in its guidelines the use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (32-34°) for 12 to 24 hours in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. The benefit of resuscitative mild hypothermia (induced after resuscitation) is well established, while the benefit of preservative mild to moderate hypothermia (induced during cardiac arrest) needs further investigation before recommending it for clinical routine. Animal data and limited human data suggest that early and fast cooling might be essential for the beneficial effect of resuscitative mild hypothermia. Out-of-hospital cooling has been shown to be feasible and safe by means of intravenous infusion with cold fluids or non-invasively with cooling pads. A combination of these cooling methods might further improve cooling efficacy. If out-of-hospital cooling will further improve functional outcome as compared with in-hospital cooling needs to be determined in a prospective, randomised, sufficiently powered clinical trial. PMID:19821966

  2. Isolation Syndrome after Cardiac Arrest and Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Peter B.; Fridman, Esteban A.; Goldfine, Andrew M.; Schiff, Nicholas D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the first description of an isolation syndrome in a patient who suffered prolonged cardiac arrest and underwent a standard therapeutic hypothermia protocol. Two years after the arrest, the patient demonstrated no motor responses to commands, communication capabilities, or visual tracking at the bedside. However, resting neuronal metabolism and electrical activity across the entire anterior forebrain was found to be normal despite severe structural injuries to primary motor, parietal, and occipital cortices. In addition, using quantitative electroencephalography, the patient showed evidence for willful modulation of brain activity in response to auditory commands revealing covert conscious awareness. A possible explanation for this striking dissociation in this patient is that altered neuronal recovery patterns following therapeutic hypothermia may lead to a disproportionate preservation of anterior forebrain cortico-thalamic circuits even in the setting of severe hypoxic injury to other brain areas. Compared to recent reports of other severely brain-injured subjects with such dissociation of clinically observable (overt) and covert behaviors, we propose that this case represents a potentially generalizable mechanism producing an isolation syndrome of blindness, motor paralysis, and retained cognition as a sequela of cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia. Our findings further support that highly-preserved anterior cortico-thalamic integrity is associated with the presence of conscious awareness independent from the degree of injury to other brain areas. PMID:27375420

  3. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... That can cause hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature. It can make you sleepy, confused, and clumsy. ... help. That makes it especially dangerous. A body temperature below 95° F is a medical emergency and ...

  4. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hypothermia if you are: Very old or very young Chronically ill, especially persons who have heart or blood flow problems Malnourished Overly tired Taking certain prescription medicines Under the influence of alcohol or drugs

  5. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    Cold weather can affect your body in different ways. You can get frostbite, which is frozen body tissue. Your ... Anyone who spends much time outdoors in cold weather can get hypothermia. You can also get it ...

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia impacts leukocyte kinetics after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dufner, Matthias C.; Andre, Florian; Stiepak, Jan; Zelniker, Thomas; Chorianopoulos, Emmanuel; Preusch, Michael; Katus, Hugo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients admitted to the hospital after primarily successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are at a very high risk for neurologic deficits and death. Targeted temperature management (TTM) for mild therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival compared to standard treatment. Acute cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction (MI), are a major cause for cardiac arrest (CA) in patients who undergo CPR. Recent findings have demonstrated the importance and impact of the leukocyte response following acute MI. Methods In this retrospective, single center study we enrolled 169 patients with CA due to non-traumatic causes and primarily successful CPR. A total of 111 subjects (66%) underwent TTM aiming for a target temperature of 32–34 °C. Results Analysis of 30 day follow up showed a significantly improved survival of all patients who received TTM compared to patients without hypothermia (P=0.0001). Furthermore TTM was an independent variable of good neurological outcome after 6 months (P=0.0030). Therapeutic hypothermia was found to be beneficial independent of differences in age and sex between both groups. While a higher rate of pneumonia was observed with TTM, this diagnosis had no additional impact on survival or neurological outcome. The beneficial effect on mortality remained significant in patients with the diagnosis of an acute cardiac event (P=0.0145). Next, we evaluated the kinetics of leukocytes in this group over the course of 7 days after CA. At presentation, patients showed a mean level of 16.5±6.7 of leukocytes per microliter. While this level stayed stable in the group of patients without hypothermia, patients who received TTM showed a significant decline of leukocyte levels resulting in significantly lower numbers of leukocytes on days 3 and 5 after CPR. Interestingly, these differences in leukocyte counts remained beyond the time period of TTM while C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were suppressed only during

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and return of spontaneous circulation: it's complicated.

    PubMed

    Beseda, Ryan; Smith, Susan; Veenstra, Amy

    2014-12-01

    Providing evidence-based care to patients with return of spontaneous circulation after a cardiac arrest is a recent complex innovation. Once resuscitated patients must be assessed for appropriateness for therapeutic hypothermia, be cooled in a timely manner, maintained while hypothermic, rewarmed within a specified time frame, and then assessed for whether hypothermia was successful for the patient through neuroprognostication. Nurses caring for therapeutic hypothermia patients must be knowledgeable and prepared to provide care to the patient and family. This article provides an overview of the complexity of therapeutic hypothermia for patients with return of spontaneous circulation in the form of a case study. PMID:25438893

  8. Lower Incidence of Seizure among Neonates Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Orbach, Sharon A; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Kuzniewicz, Michael; Glass, Hannah C

    2013-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that hypothermia decreases seizure burden, while limited human data are inconclusive. This retrospective cohort study examines the relationship between therapeutic hypothermia and seizure in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Our center admitted 224 neonates from July 2004 to December 2011 who met institutional cooling criteria. Seventy-three neonates were born during the pre-cooling era, prior to November 2007, and 151 were born during the cooling era. Among neonates with moderate encephalopathy, the incidence of seizure in cooled infants was less than half the incidence in those not cooled (26% cooling versus 61% pre-cooling era; RR=0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.61). Among neonates with severe encephalopathy, there was no difference in the incidence (83% versus 87%; RR=1.05, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.39). These results support animal data and suggest a mechanism by which neonates with moderate encephalopathy may benefit more from cooling than neonates with severe encephalopathy. PMID:24334344

  9. Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, D; Edwards, A D

    2007-08-01

    Experimental studies show that, following hypoxic ischaemic injury, mild induced hypothermia-a reduction of body temperature by about 3 degrees C -- preserves cerebral energy metabolism, reduces cerebral tissue injury and improves neurological function. Randomized trials in full-term and near-full-term newborns suggest that treatment with mild hypothermia is safe and improves survival without disabilities up to 18 months of age. Although the optimal time of initiation, the depth and duration, and the method of cooling are uncertain, in the absence of specific treatments many clinicians will wish to consider treating asphyxiated infants with hypothermia. Guidance now needs to be provided to promote uniform practice, to avoid inappropriate treatment and to foster continuing collaboration in future studies of neuroprotection following asphyxia. If the promising results of the current trials are confirmed by the findings from other on-going studies, with longer follow-up, the impact of such a treatment on the babies, their families and health resources in the shorter and longer terms will be considerable. PMID:17392043

  10. The importance of cold-reactive autoantibodies in an asphyxiated infant before therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Beken, Serdar; Altuntaş, Nilgün; Koç, Esin; Yenicesu, Idil; Ergenekon, Ebru; Hirfanoğlu, Ibrahim Murat; Onal, Esra; Türkyilmaz, Canan; Atalay, Yildiz

    2013-11-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Hypothermia is an effective treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in infants. Cold agglutination is a primary or acquired autoimmune disease that involves autoantibodies that lead to hemagglutination at low temperatures lower than that of the body. In this case the importance of cold agglutinins during therapeutic hypothermia is presented. PMID:23271311

  11. The Practice of Therapeutic Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest in France: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Cattet, Florian; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Leone, Marc; Jaber, Samir; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Ichai, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Aims Cardiac arrest is a major health concern worldwide accounting for 375,000 cases per year in Europe with a survival rate of <10%. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve patients’ neurological outcome and is recommended by scientific societies. Despite these guidelines, different surveys report a heterogeneous application of this treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical practice of therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest patients. Methods This self-declarative web based survey was proposed to all registered French adult intensive care units (ICUs) (n = 357). Paediatrics and neurosurgery ICUs were excluded. The different questions addressed the structure, the practical modalities of therapeutic hypothermia and the use of prognostic factors in patients admitted after cardiac arrest. Results One hundred and thirty-two out of 357 ICUs (37%) answered the questionnaire. Adherence to recommendations regarding the targeted temperature and hypothermia duration were 98% and 94% respectively. Both guidelines were followed in 92% ICUs. During therapeutic hypothermia, sedative drugs were given in 99% ICUs, mostly midazolam (77%) and sufentanil (59%). Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) were used in 97% ICUs, mainly cisatracurium (77%). Numerous prognostic factors were used after cardiac arrest such as clinical factors (95%), biomarkers (53%), electroencephalography (78%) and evoked potentials (35%). Conclusions In France, adherence to recommendations for therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is higher than those previously reported in other countries. Numerous prognostic factors are widely used even if their reliability remains controversial. PMID:23049783

  12. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neonatal Encephalopathy and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, An; Rais-Bahrami, Khodayar; Chang, Taeun; Glass, Penny; Short, Billie Lou; Baumgart, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This case series describes clinical management of five infants who received whole-body cooling during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We maintained systemic hypothermia during ECMO with acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:20472254

  13. Urine Output Changes During Postcardiac Arrest Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Raper, Jaron D; Wang, Henry E

    2013-12-01

    While commonly described, no studies have characterized cold-induced diuresis or rewarm anti-diuresis occurring during the delivery of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). We sought to determine urine output changes during the provision of postcardiac arrest TH. We analyzed clinical data on patients receiving postcardiac arrest TH at an urban tertiary care center. TH measures included cooling by cold intravenous fluid, external ice packs, and a commercial external temperature management system. TH treatment was divided into phases: (1) induction, (2) maintenance, (3) rewarm, and (4) post-rewarm. The primary outcome measure was the mean urine output rate (mL/hour). We compared urine output rates between TH phases using a Generalized Estimating Equations model, defining urine output rate (mL/hour) as the dependent variable and TH phase (induction, maintenance, rewarm, and post-rewarm) as the primary exposure variable. We adjusted for age, sex, initial ECG rhythm, location of arrest, shock, acute kidney injury, rate of intravenous fluid input, and body mass index. Complete urine output data were available on 33 patients. Mean urine output rates during induction, maintenance, rewarm, and post-rewarm phases were 157 mL/hour (95% CI: 104-210), 103 mL/hour (95% CI: 82-125), 70 mL/hour (95% CI: 51-88), and 91 mL/hour (95% CI: 65-117), respectively. Compared with the post-rewarm phase, adjusted urine output was higher during the TH induction phase (output rate difference +51 mL/hour; 95% CI: 3-99). Adjusted urine output during the maintenance and rewarm phases did not differ from the post-rewarm phase. In this preliminary study, we observed modest increases in urine output during TH induction. We did not observe urine output changes during TH maintenance or rewarming. PMID:24380030

  14. Case of Recurrent Ventricular Fibrillations with Osborn Wave Developed during Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Yeon; Bae, Myung Hwan; Kim, Nam Kyun; Yang, Young Ae; Kim, Kyu Yeun; Lee, Jang Hoon; Eun, Jung Su; Cho, Yongkeun

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has been used to protect neurological functions in cardiac arrest patient. Although Osborn wave is not pathognomonic of hypothermia, it is a well-known electrocardiogram finding of hypothermic patients. The cellular and ionic mechanisms of the Osborn wave have been suggested, and its relationship to tachyarrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, is being explored. This case highlights the arrhythmogenic potential of Osborn wave and individual difference in response of TH. PMID:25653709

  15. Feasibility and Safety of Therapeutic Hypothermia and Short Term Outcome in Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Jayashree; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Bhat, Ramesh Y; Anusha, K M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is well known for neuroprotection in asphyxiated neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The authors aimed to study the feasibility and safety of therapeutic hypothermia and short term outcome in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Total 31 neonates with moderate to severe HIE were enrolled in the study. Continuous temperature recording was noted in 31 neonates; 17 neonates were studied prospectively while 14 neonates were studied retrospectively. Rectal temperature was monitored in 31 neonates and maintained between 33 and 34 °C by switching off the warmer and using ice packs. Reusable ice packs were used which were inexpensive. Therapeutic hypothermia was maintained for 72 h and babies were then rewarmed 0.5 °C every hour. Therapeutic hypothermia was feasible and inexpensive. There was no major complication during the study. MRI was done in 17 neonates; 52 % were found to have normal MRI at the end of first week. Among the study neonates (n = 31) 64.5 % were neurologically normal at the time of discharge. To conclude, therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in a low resource setting and is a safe way of neuroprotection. Short term outcome was also favourable in these neonates. PMID:26141549

  16. Pharmacologic options for reducing the shivering response to therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Weant, Kyle A; Martin, Julia E; Humphries, Roger L; Cook, Aaron M

    2010-08-01

    Recent literature has demonstrated significant improvements in neurologic outcomes in patients who have received induced hypothermia in the setting of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Through multiple metabolic mechanisms, the induction of hypothermia slows the progression and devastation of transient cerebral hypoxia. Despite these benefits, the desired reduction in core temperature is often a challenging venture as the body attempts to maintain homeostasis through the induction of thermoregulatory processes aimed at elevating body temperature. Shivering is an involuntary muscular activity that enhances heat production in an attempt to restore homeostasis. For successful induction and maintenance of induced hypothermia, shivering, as well as other thermoregulatory responses, must be overcome. Several pharmacologic options are available, either used alone or in combination, that safely and effectively prevent or treat shivering after the induction of hypothermia. We conducted a PubMed search (1966-March 2009) to identify all human investigations published in English that discussed pharmacologic mechanisms for the control of shivering. Among these options, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, and meperidine have demonstrated the greatest and most clinically relevant impact on depression of the shivering threshold. More research in this area is needed, however, and the role of the clinical pharmacist in the development and implementation of this therapy needs to be defined. PMID:20653360

  17. Therapeutic hypothermia after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a critique.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2014-06-01

    More than 210,000 in-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. Use of moderate therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in comatose survivors after return of spontaneous circulation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOH-CA) caused by ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia is recommended strongly by many professional organizations and societies. The use of TH after cardiac arrest associated with nonshockable rhythms and after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IH-CA) is recommended to be considered by these same organizations and is being applied widely. The use in these latter circumstances is based on an extrapolation of the data supporting its use after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest associated with shockable rhythms. The purpose of this article is to review the limitations of existing data supporting these extended application of TH after cardiac arrest and to suggest approaches to this dilemma. The data supporting its use for OOH-CA appear to this author, and to some others, to be rather weak, and the data supporting the use of TH for IH-CA appear to be even weaker and to include no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or supportive observational studies. The many reasons why TH might be expected to be less effective following IH-CA are reviewed. The degree of neurologic injury may be more severe in many of these cases and, thus, may not be responsive to TH as currently practiced following OOH-CA. The potential adverse consequences of the routine use of TH for IH-CA are listed and include complications associated with TH, interference with diagnostic and interventional therapy, and use of scarce personnel and financial resources. Most importantly, it inhibits the ability of researchers to conduct needed RCTs. The author believes that the proper method of providing TH in these cases needs to be better defined. Based on this analysis the author concludes that TH should not be used indiscriminantly following most cases of IH-CA, and

  18. Subdural haemorrhage and severe coagulopathy resulting in transtentorial uncal herniation in a neonate undergoing therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dianna; McMillan, Hugh; Bariciak, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to be efficacious for improving long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes following perinatal asphyxia. Thus, cooling protocols have been adopted at most tertiary neonatal centres. We present a case of a term neonate who underwent therapeutic whole-body cooling for hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy following a difficult forceps delivery. She abruptly deteriorated, exhibiting signs of transtentorial uncal herniation and severe disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. CT of the head confirmed a life-threatening subdural haematoma and a concealed skull fracture. Hypothermia has been shown to impair haemostasis in vivo and thus may potentially exacerbate occult haemorrhages in a clinical setting. Newborns that require instrument-assisted delivery are a particularly high-risk group for occult head injuries and should undergo careful clinical assessment for fractures and intracranial haemorrhage prior to initiation of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:25100805

  19. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spurkeland, Nancy; Bennett, Gregory; Alexander, Chandran; Chang, Dennis; Ceneviva, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA. PMID:25861505

  20. Temperature Control During Therapeutic Hypothermia for Newborn Encephalopathy Using Different Blanketrol Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kilbride, Howard; Shepherd, Edward; McDonald, Scott A.; Shankaran, Seetha; Truog, William; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves the survival and neurodevelopmental outcome of infants with newborn encephalopathy of a hypoxic-ischemic origin. The NICHD Neonatal Research Network (NRN) Whole Body Cooling trial used the Cincinnati Sub-Zero Blanketrol II to achieve therapeutic hypothermia. The Blanketrol III is now available and provides additional cooling modes that may result in better temperature control. This report is a retrospective comparison of infants undergoing hypothermia using two different cooling modes of the Blanketrol device. Infants from the NRN trial were cooled with the Blanketrol II using the Automatic control mode (B2 cohort) and were compared with infants from two new NRN centers that adopted the NRN protocol and used the Blanketrol III in a gradient mode (B3 cohort). The primary outcome was the percent time the esophageal temperature stayed between 33°C and 34°C (target 33.5°C) during maintenance of hypothermia. Cohorts had similar birth weight, gestational age, and level of encephalopathy at the initiation of therapy. Baseline esophageal temperature differed between groups (36.6°C±1.0°C for B2 vs. 33.9°C±1.2°C for B3, p<0.0001) reflecting the practice of passive cooling during transport prior to initiation of active device cooling in the B3 cohort. This difference prevented comparison of temperatures during induction of hypothermia. During maintenance of hypothermia the mean and standard deviation of the percent time between 33°C and 34°C was similar for B2 compared to B3 cohorts (94.8%±0.1% vs. 95.8%±0.1%, respectively). Both the automatic and gradient control modes of the Blanketrol devices appear comparable in maintaining esophageal temperature within the target range during maintenance of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:25285767

  1. Improved Therapeutic Benefits by Combining Physical Cooling With Pharmacological Hypothermia After Severe Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hwan; Wei, Ling; Gu, Xiaohuan; Won, Soonmi; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Dix, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Therapeutic hypothermia is a promising strategy for treatment of acute stroke. Clinical translation of therapeutic hypothermia, however, has been hindered because of the lack of efficiency and adverse effects. We sought to enhance the clinical potential of therapeutic hypothermia by combining physical cooling (PC) with pharmacologically induced hypothermia after ischemic stroke. Methods— Wistar rats were subjected to 90-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion by insertion of an intraluminal filament. Mild-to-moderate hypothermia was induced 120 minutes after the onset of stroke by PC alone, a neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) agonist HPI-201 (formally ABS-201) alone or the combination of both. The outcomes of stroke were evaluated at 3 and 21 days after stroke. Results— PC or HPI-201 each showed hypothermic effect and neuroprotection in stroke rats. The combination of PC and HPI-201 exhibited synergistic effects in cooling process, reduced infarct formation, cell death, and blood-brain barrier damages and improved functional recovery after stroke. Importantly, coapplied HPI-201 completely inhibited PC-associated shivering and tachycardia. Conclusions— The centrally acting hypothermic drug HPI-201 greatly enhanced the efficiency and efficacy of conventional PC; this combined cooling therapy may facilitate clinical translation of hypothermic treatment for stroke. PMID:27301934

  2. Effect of Temperature on Thromboelastography (TEG) and Implications for Clinical Use in Neonates Undergoing Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Katie R.; Wong, Edward; Gallagher, Meanavy; McCarter, Robert; Luban, Naomi L.C.; Massaro, An N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Encephalopathic neonates undergoing therapeutic hypothermia have increased risk for coagulopathy secondary to perinatal asphyxia and effects of cooling on the coagulation enzyme cascade. Thromboelastography (TEG) allows for a comprehensive assessment of coagulation that can be regulated for temperature. TEG has not been previously evaluated in newborns undergoing hypothermia treatment. Methods Encephalopathic neonates treated with systemic hypothermia were enrolled in this prospective observational study. Daily blood specimens were collected for standard coagulation tests and platelet counts during hypothermia and after rewarming. Concurrent TEG assays were performed at 33.5°C and 37.0°C for comparison. Results A total of 48 paired TEGs from 24 subjects were performed. Mean (± SD) birthweight was 3.2±0.7 Kg, gestational age 38.4±1.4 weeks, and 40% were male. TEG results differed significantly between assays performed at 37.0°C versus 33.5°C, indicating more impaired coagulation at 33.5°C. TEG parameters K, α, MA and CI were significantly associated with clinical bleeding (p<0.05). These remained significant (except for MA) after controlling for transfusion therapy. Conclusions TEG results are affected by temperature, consistent with the known association of hypothermia with coagulopathy. Several TEG parameters are predictive of clinical bleeding in newborns undergoing hypothermia. Selected cutpoints to predict bleeding risk are temperature dependent. PMID:24522100

  3. [The role of therapeutic hypothermia in post-resuscitation care - review of the literature and personal experience].

    PubMed

    Pilecky, Dávid; Szudi, Gábor; Kovács, Enikő; Jenei, Zsigmond; Gellér, László; Heltai, Krisztina; Molnár, Levente; Bárczi, György; Becker, Dávid; Merkely, Béla; Zima, Endre

    2016-04-17

    In the last fifteen years mild therapeutic hypothermia became an accepted and widespread therapeutic method in the treatment of successfully resuscitated patients due to sudden cardiac death. Based on the available evidence therapeutic hypothermia is part of the resuscitation guidelines, however, many aspects of its therapeutic use are based on empirical facts. In particular, the subjects of intense debate are the ideal target temperature and the benefit of hypothermia in patients found with non-shockable rhythm. Hypothermia affects almost all organ systems and, therefore, early detection and treatment of side effects are essential. The aim of the authors is to summarize the clinical role and pathophysiologic effects of therapeutic hypothermia in the treatment of resuscitated patients based on current evidence and their practical experience. PMID:27063428

  4. Therapeutic Hypothermia in Spinal Cord Injury: The Status of Its Use and Open Questions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaqiong; Pearse, Damien D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major health problem and is associated with a diversity of neurological symptoms. Pathophysiologically, dysfunction after SCI results from the culmination of tissue damage produced both by the primary insult and a range of secondary injury mechanisms. The application of hypothermia has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective after SCI in both experimental and human studies. The myriad of protective mechanisms of hypothermia include the slowing down of metabolism, decreasing free radical generation, inhibiting excitotoxicity and apoptosis, ameliorating inflammation, preserving the blood spinal cord barrier, inhibiting astrogliosis, promoting angiogenesis, as well as decreasing axonal damage and encouraging neurogenesis. Hypothermia has also been combined with other interventions, such as antioxidants, anesthetics, alkalinization and cell transplantation for additional benefit. Although a large body of work has reported on the effectiveness of hypothermia as a neuroprotective approach after SCI and its application has been translated to the clinic, a number of questions still remain regarding its use, including the identification of hypothermia’s therapeutic window, optimal duration and the most appropriate rewarming rate. In addition, it is necessary to investigate the neuroprotective effect of combining therapeutic hypothermia with other treatment strategies for putative synergies, particularly those involving neurorepair. PMID:26213924

  5. Therapeutic hypothermia protects against ischemia-induced impairment of synaptic plasticity following juvenile cardiac arrest in sex-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dietz, R M; Deng, G; Orfila, J E; Hui, X; Traystman, R J; Herson, P S

    2016-06-14

    Pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) often leads to poor neurologic outcomes, including deficits in learning and memory. The only approved treatment for CA is therapeutic hypothermia, although its utility in the pediatric population remains unclear. This study analyzed the effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia after CA in juvenile mice on hippocampal neuronal injury and the cellular model of learning and memory, termed long-term potentiation (LTP). Juvenile mice were subjected to cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) followed by normothermia (37°C) and hypothermia (30°C, 32°C). Histological injury of hippocampal CA1 neurons was performed 3days after resuscitation using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded from acute hippocampal slices 7days after CA/CPR to determine LTP. Synaptic function was impaired 7days after CA/CPR. Mice exposed to hypothermia showed equivalent neuroprotection, but exhibited sexually dimorphic protection against ischemia-induced impairment of LTP. Hypothermia (32°C) protects synaptic plasticity more effectively in females, with males requiring a deeper level of hypothermia (30°C) for equivalent protection. In conclusion, male and female juvenile mice exhibit equivalent neuronal injury following CA/CPR and hypothermia protects both males and females. We made the surprising finding that juvenile mice have a sexually dimorphic response to mild therapeutic hypothermia protection of synaptic function, where males may need a deeper level of hypothermia for equivalent synaptic protection. PMID:27033251

  6. Improving neurological outcome after cardiac arrest: Therapeutic hypothermia the best treatment

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Suchitra; Dhama, Satyavir S.; Kumar, Mohinder; Jain, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest, irrespective of its etiology, has a high mortality. This event is often associated with brain anoxia which frequently causes severe neurological damage and persistent vegetative state. Only one out of every six patients survives to discharge following in-hospital cardiac arrest, whereas only 2-9% of patients who experience out of hospital cardiac arrest survive to go home. Functional outcomes of survival are variable, but poor quality survival is common, with only 3-7% able to return to their previous level of functioning. Therapeutic hypothermia is an important tool for the treatment of post-anoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It has been shown to reduce mortality and has improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Nevertheless, hypothermia is underused in critical care units. This manuscript aims to review the mechanism of hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors and to propose a simple protocol, feasible to be implemented in any critical care unit. PMID:25885714

  7. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neonatal Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy – Where to from Here?

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Joanne O.; Wassink, Guido; van den Heuij, Lotte G.; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia–ischemia before or around the time of birth occurs in approximately 2/1000 live births and is associated with a high risk of death or lifelong disability. Therapeutic hypothermia is now well established as standard treatment for infants with moderate to severe hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy but is only partially effective. There is compelling preclinical and clinical evidence that hypothermia is most protective when it is started as early as possible after hypoxia–ischemia. Further improvements in outcome from therapeutic hypothermia are very likely to arise from strategies to reduce the delay before starting treatment of affected infants. In this review, we examine evidence that current protocols are reasonably close to the optimal depth and duration of cooling, but that the optimal rate of rewarming after hypothermia is unclear. The potential for combination treatments to augment hypothermic neuroprotection has considerable promise, particularly with endogenous targets such as melatonin and erythropoietin, and noble gases such as xenon. We dissect the critical importance of preclinical studies using realistic delays in treatment and clinically relevant cooling protocols when examining combination treatment, and that for many strategies overlapping mechanisms of action can substantially attenuate any effects. PMID:26441818

  8. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moler, Frank W.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Clark, Amy E.; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Bennett, Kimberly S.; Berger, John T.; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A.; Koch, Joshua D.; Schleien, Charles L.; Dalton, Heidi J.; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M.; Fink, Ericka L.; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J.; Thomas, Neal J.; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Porter, Melissa B.; Meyer, Michael T.; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J.; Nowak, Jeffrey E.; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S.; Bhalala, Utpal S.; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Dean, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. Methods We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children’s hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. Results A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P = 0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P = 0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P = 0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. Conclusions In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a

  9. Rapid induction of therapeutic hypothermia using convective-immersion surface cooling: Safety, efficacy and outcomes☆

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Daniel; Ohley, William; Dorian, Paul; Klock, Cathy; Freedman, Robert; Schock, Robert; Krizanac, Danica; Holzer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become an accepted part of post-resuscitation care. Efforts to shorten the time from return of spontaneous circulation to target temperature have led to the exploration of different cooling techniques. Convective-immersion uses a continuous shower of 2°C water to rapidly induce hypothermia. The primary purpose of this multi-center trial was to evaluate the feasibility and speed of convective-immersion cooling in the clinical environment. The secondary goal was to examine the impact of rapid hypothermia induction on patient outcome. 24 post-cardiac arrest patients from 3 centers were enrolled in the study; 22 agreed to participate until the 6-month evaluations were completed. The median rate of cooling was 3.0°C/h. Cooling times were shorter than reported in previous studies. The median time to cool the patients to target temperature (<34°C) was 37 min (range 14–81 min); and only 27 min in a subset of patients sedated with propofol. Survival was excellent, with 68% surviving to 6 months; 87% of survivors were living independently at 6 months. Conductive-immersion surface cooling using the ThermoSuit® System is a rapid, effective method of inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Although the study was not designed to demonstrate impact on outcomes, survival and neurologic function were superior to those previously reported, suggesting comparative studies should be undertaken. Shortening the delay from return of spontaneous circulation to hypothermic target temperature may significantly improve survival and neurologic outcome and warrants further study. PMID:20122778

  10. Therapeutic Hypothermia as a Neuroprotective Strategy in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H.; Sinha, B.; Pandya, R.S.; Lin, N.; Popp, A.J.; Li, J.; Yao, J.; Wang, X.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence shows that artificially lowering body and brain temperature can significantly reduce the deleterious effects of brain injury in both newborns and adults. Although the benefits of therapeutic hypothermia have long been known and applied clinically, the underlying molecular mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and traumatic brain injury both trigger a series of biochemical and molecular events that cause additional brain insult. Induction of therapeutic hypothermia seems to ameliorate the molecular cascade that culminates in neuronal damage. Hypothermia attenuates the toxicity produced by the initial injury that would normally produce reactive oxygen species, neurotransmitters, inflammatory mediators, and apoptosis. Experiments have been performed on various depths and levels of hypothermia to explore neuroprotection. This review summarizes what is currently known about the beneficial effects of therapeutic hypothermia in experimental models of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and traumatic brain injury, and explores the molecular mechanisms that could become the targets of novel therapies. In addition, this review summarizes the clinical implications of therapeutic hypothermia in newborn hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and adult traumatic brain injury. PMID:22834830

  11. Optimization of induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia with cold saline infusion: A laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Fluher, Jure; Markota, Andrej; Stožer, Andraž; Sinkovič, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    Cold fluid infusions can be used to induce mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Fluid temperature higher than 4°C can increase the volume of fluid needed, prolong the induction phase of hypothermia and thus contribute to complications. We performed a laboratory experiment with two objectives. The first objective was to analyze the effect of wrapping fluid bags in ice packs on the increase of fluid temperature with time in bags exposed to ambient conditions. The second objective was to quantify the effect of insulating venous tubing and adjusting flow rate on fluid temperature increase from bag to the level of an intravenous cannula during a simulated infusion. The temperature of fluid in bags wrapped in ice packs was significantly lower compared to controls at all time points during the 120 minutes observation. The temperature increase from the bag to the level of intravenous cannula was significantly lower for insulated tubing at all infusion rates (median temperature differences between bag and intravenous cannula were: 8.9, 4.8, 4.0, and 3.1°C, for non-insulated and 5.9, 3.05, 1.1, and 0.3°C, for insulated tubing, at infusion rates 10, 30, 60, and 100 mL/minute, respectively). The results from this study could potentially be used to decrease the volume of fluid infused when inducing mild hypothermia with an infusion of cold fluids. PMID:26614854

  12. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke: ready to start large randomized trials?

    PubMed Central

    van der Worp, H Bart; Macleod, Malcolm R; Kollmar, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a means of neuroprotection well established in the management of acute ischemic brain injuries such as anoxic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest and perinatal asphyxia. As such, it is the only neuroprotective strategy for which there is robust evidence for efficacy. Although there is overwhelming evidence from animal studies that cooling also improves outcome after focal cerebral ischemia, this has not been adequately tested in patients with acute ischemic stroke. There are still some uncertainties about crucial factors relating to the delivery of hypothermia, and the resolution of these would allow improvements in the design of phase III studies in these patients and improvements in the prospects for successful translation. In this study, we discuss critical issues relating first to the targets for therapy including the optimal depth and duration of cooling, second to practical issues including the methods of cooling and the management of shivering, and finally, of factors relating to the design of clinical trials. Consideration of these factors should inform the development of strategies to establish beyond doubt the place of hypothermia in the management of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:20354545

  13. Platelet inhibition with prasugrel in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Ulrike; Röntgen, Philipp; Zauner, Florian; Tongers, Jörn; Berliner, Dominik; Bauersachs, Johann; Schäfer, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Therapeutic hypothermia improves neurological outcome in combination with early revascularisation, but seems to affect clopidogrel responsiveness. The more potent thienopyridine prasugrel has not yet been sufficiently evaluated during therapeutic hypothermia. We investigated 23 consecutive AMI patients (61 ± 11 years) following out-of-hospital resuscitation undergoing revascularisation and therapeutic hypothermia. Prasugrel efficacy was assessed by the platelet-reactivity-index (PRI) before and 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours (h) following a loading dose of 60 mg via a gastric tube. Mean PRI (± SD) was 70 ± 12 % prior to loading and 60 ± 16 % (2 h, ns), 52 ± 21 % (4 h, p< 0.01), 42 ± 26 % (6 h, p< 0.01), 37 ± 21 % (12 h, p< 0.01), 27 ± 23 % (24 h, p< 0.01), 18 ± 14 % (48 h, p< 0.01), and 13 ± 10 % (72 h, p< 0.01) after loading. Sufficient platelet inhibition occurred later compared to stable AMI patients (6 h vs 2 h); however, high on-treatment platelet reactivity significantly decreased over time and was non-existent after 72 h (PRI> 50 %: 2 h: 72 %, 4 h: 52 %, 6 h: 43 %, 12 h: 29 %, 24 h: 17 %, 48 h: 5 %, 72 h: 0 %). There was no relation between 30-day mortality rate (26 %) and PRI values. Prasugrel significantly reduced platelet reactivity even during vasopressor use, analgosedation and therapeutic hypothermia. Despite a significant delay compared to stable AMI patients, sufficient platelet inhibition was reached in 83 % of patients within 24 h. Therefore, prasugrel administration via gastric tube might be a useful therapeutic strategy in these patients at high risk, providing potent and effective P2Y12 inhibition. PMID:26790884

  14. The use of pre-hospital mild hypothermia after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Kim, Francis; Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K; Cobb, Leonard A

    2009-03-01

    Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4 degrees C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  15. The Use of Pre-Hospital Mild Hypothermia after Resuscitation from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K.; Cobb, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4°C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  16. Therapeutic hypothermia and targeted temperature management in traumatic brain injury: Clinical challenges for successful translation.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W Dalton; Bramlett, Helen M

    2016-06-01

    The use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) and targeted temperature management (TTM) for severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been tested in a variety of preclinical and clinical situations. Early preclinical studies showed that mild reductions in brain temperature after moderate to severe TBI improved histopathological outcomes and reduced neurological deficits. Investigative studies have also reported that reductions in post-traumatic temperature attenuated multiple secondary injury mechanisms including excitotoxicity, free radical generation, apoptotic cell death, and inflammation. In addition, while elevations in post-traumatic temperature heightened secondary injury mechanisms, the successful implementation of TTM strategies in injured patients to reduce fever burden appear to be beneficial. While TH has been successfully tested in a number of single institutional clinical TBI studies, larger randomized multicenter trials have failed to demonstrate the benefits of therapeutic hypothermia. The use of TH and TTM for treating TBI continues to evolve and a number of factors including patient selection and the timing of the TH appear to be critical in successful trial design. Based on available data, it is apparent that TH and TTM strategies for treating severely injured patients is an important therapeutic consideration that requires more basic and clinical research. Current research involves the evaluation of alternative cooling strategies including pharmacologically-induced hypothermia and the combination of TH or TTM approaches with more selective neuroprotective or reparative treatments. This manuscript summarizes the preclinical and clinical literature emphasizing the importance of brain temperature in modifying secondary injury mechanisms and in improving traumatic outcomes in severely injured patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26746342

  17. Capillary leakage in post-cardiac arrest survivors during therapeutic hypothermia - a prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluids are often given liberally after the return of spontaneous circulation. However, the optimal fluid regimen in survivors of cardiac arrest is unknown. Recent studies indicate an increased fluid requirement in post-cardiac arrest patients. During hypothermia, animal studies report extravasation in several organs, including the brain. We investigated two fluid strategies to determine whether the choice of fluid would influence fluid requirements, capillary leakage and oedema formation. Methods 19 survivors with witnessed cardiac arrest of primary cardiac origin were allocated to either 7.2% hypertonic saline with 6% poly (O-2-hydroxyethyl) starch solution (HH) or standard fluid therapy (Ringer's Acetate and saline 9 mg/ml) (control). The patients were treated with the randomised fluid immediately after admission and continued for 24 hours of therapeutic hypothermia. Results During the first 24 hours, the HH patients required significantly less i.v. fluid than the control patients (4750 ml versus 8010 ml, p = 0.019) with comparable use of vasopressors. Systemic vascular resistance was significantly reduced from 0 to 24 hours (p = 0.014), with no difference between the groups. Colloid osmotic pressure (COP) in serum and interstitial fluid (p < 0.001 and p = 0.014 respectively) decreased as a function of time in both groups, with a more pronounced reduction in interstitial COP in the crystalloid group. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not reveal vasogenic oedema. Conclusions Post-cardiac arrest patients have high fluid requirements during therapeutic hypothermia, probably due to increased extravasation. The use of HH reduced the fluid requirement significantly. However, the lack of brain oedema in both groups suggests no superior fluid regimen. Cardiac index was significantly improved in the group treated with crystalloids. Although we do not associate HH with the renal failures that developed, caution should be taken when using hypertonic

  18. Automated analysis of background EEG and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lehembre, Rémy; Lugo, Zulay Del Rosario; Lesenfants, Damien; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2014-01-01

    Visual analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) background and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia provides important outcome information, but is time-consuming and not always consistent between reviewers. Automated EEG analysis may help quantify the brain damage. Forty-six comatose patients in therapeutic hypothermia, after cardiac arrest, were included in the study. EEG background was quantified with burst-suppression ratio (BSR) and approximate entropy, both used to monitor anesthesia. Reactivity was detected through change in the power spectrum of signal before and after stimulation. Automatic results obtained almost perfect agreement (discontinuity) to substantial agreement (background reactivity) with a visual score from EEG-certified neurologists. Burst-suppression ratio was more suited to distinguish continuous EEG background from burst-suppression than approximate entropy in this specific population. Automatic EEG background and reactivity measures were significantly related to good and poor outcome. We conclude that quantitative EEG measurements can provide promising information regarding current state of the patient and clinical outcome, but further work is needed before routine application in a clinical setting. PMID:24452769

  19. Early Absent Pupillary Light Reflexes After Cardiac Arrest in Patients Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Laxmi P; Sen, Ayan; Stanko, Carlene M; Rawal, Bhupendra; Heckman, Michael G; Hoyne, Jonathan B; Dimberg, Elliot L; Freeman, Michelle L; Ng, Lauren K; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Freeman, William D

    2016-08-01

    Loss of pupillary light reactivity is one recognized indicator of poor prognosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, drug overdose, low cardiac output, and/or resuscitation drugs can lead to impaired pupillary light reflex. To investigate pupillary light reflex status before therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in relation to neurological outcome, we retrospectively reviewed the data of a prospectively implemented TH protocol in patients with cardiac arrest (CA) at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida (January 2006-January 2012), and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona (August 2010-March 2014). During this period, all CA patients who underwent hypothermia were included. These patients were selected from an institutional database and hypothermia data set. The Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) at time of discharge was our primary outcome measure. A CPC of 1 to 2 was defined as good outcome and a CPC from 3 to 5 was defined as poor outcome. We identified 99 patients who had CA treated with TH. Twenty-nine patients (29%) had pupils that were nonreactive to light on admission examination before TH, eight of whom later had return of pupil reactivity by day 3. Two of these 29 patients (6.9%) had good outcome, compared to 24 of 70 patients (34.3%) with pupils that were reactive to light (p = 0.005). Both of these patients had CA after illicit drug overdose. Early nonreactive pupils occurred in almost a third of patients after CPR and before TH in our patient population. Recovery of pupillary light reactivity is possible, and in a small minority of those cases (particularly when CA is preceded by the use of illicit drugs), a good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27135180

  20. Cost-effective therapeutic hypothermia treatment device for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, John J; Buchbinder, Nathan; Ammanuel, Simon; Kim, Robert; Moore, Erika; O'Donnell, Neil; Lee, Jennifer K; Kulikowicz, Ewa; Acharya, Soumyadipta; Allen, Robert H; Lee, Ryan W; Johnston, Michael V

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in neonatal care and monitoring, asphyxia globally accounts for 23% of the 4 million annual deaths of newborns, and leads to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Occurring in five of 1000 live-born infants globally and even more in developing countries, HIE is a serious problem that causes death in 25%-50% of affected neonates and neurological disability to at least 25% of survivors. In order to prevent the damage caused by HIE, our invention provides an effective whole-body cooling of the neonates by utilizing evaporation and an endothermic reaction. Our device is composed of basic electronics, clay pots, sand, and urea-based instant cold pack powder. A larger clay pot, lined with nearly 5 cm of sand, contains a smaller pot, where the neonate will be placed for therapeutic treatment. When the sand is mixed with instant cold pack urea powder and wetted with water, the device can extract heat from inside to outside and maintain the inner pot at 17°C for more than 24 hours with monitoring by LED lights and thermistors. Using a piglet model, we confirmed that our device fits the specific parameters of therapeutic hypothermia, lowering the body temperature to 33.5°C with a 1°C margin of error. After the therapeutic hypothermia treatment, warming is regulated by adjusting the amount of water added and the location of baby inside the device. Our invention uniquely limits the amount of electricity required to power and operate the device compared with current expensive and high-tech devices available in the United States. Our device costs a maximum of 40 dollars and is simple enough to be used in neonatal intensive care units in developing countries. PMID:23319871

  1. Still cooling after all these years: Meta-analysis of pre-clinical trials of therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dumitrascu, Oana M; Lamb, Jessica; Lyden, Patrick D

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is the most potent neuroprotectant for experimental cerebral ischemia, illustrated in a 2007 meta-analysis published in this journal. To address recent therapeutic nihilism, we systematically reviewed recent experimental literature. Quality scoring showed considerable improvement in study design. Using several outcome measures in a variety of models and species, therapeutic hypothermia was protective compared with normothermia, with powerful and statistically significant normalized treatment effect sizes, in 60 papers comprising 216 comparisons. In the past 5 years, preclinical studies of ischemic stroke re-emphasize that therapeutic hypothermia is potently effective, justifying further development in larger human clinical trials. PMID:27089911

  2. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Prolonged Cardiac Arrest: Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Garg, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Patients who survive cardiac arrest often develop severe neurological dysfunction due to the hypoxic brain injury and reperfusion induced cell death. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has become a standard therapy of cerebral protection following the successful return of spontaneous circulation in patients of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to American heart association guidelines. This is a case report of a 30-year-old patient who developed in-hospital cardiac arrest and was revived after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and also required primary angioplasty. TH was then established with local measures for 24 hours for cerebral protection. The patient was gradually and successfully weaned off from ventilator with no neurological impairment. There is an increasing evidence of TH and its protective mechanisms in patients with non-shockable arrest rhythms with particular emphasis on neurological outcomes. This article emphasizes the role of TH in every successful CPR irrespective of the cardiac rhythm. PMID:26500937

  3. Bullous Lesions After Use of a Commercial Therapeutic Hypothermia Temperature Management System: A Possible Burn Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James M.; Rizk, Dana V.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is a novel technique for improving the likelihood of survival with good neurologic outcome after cardiopulmonary arrest. While commercial temperature management systems (TMS) are intended to facilitate cooling of the body during TH, their operation also involves body exposure to heat. We describe the case of a 72-year-old female postarrest patient who underwent TH using a commercial water-circulating TMS and concurrent continuous renal replacement therapy. The patient developed bullous lesions on the thigh and torso suspected to constitute a scald burn injury from the TMS. Clinicians must be aware of this important adverse event when providing TH, especially in the setting of concurrent hemodialysis therapy. PMID:24066269

  4. Therapeutic Effects of Pharmacologically Induced Hypothermia against Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hwan; Wei, Ling; Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng; Dix, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical and clinical studies have shown therapeutic potential of mild-to-moderate hypothermia for treatments of stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Physical cooling in humans, however, is usually slow, cumbersome, and necessitates sedation that prevents early application in clinical settings and causes several side effects. Our recent study showed that pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using a novel neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) agonist, HPI-201 (also known as ABS-201), is efficient and effective in inducing therapeutic hypothermia and protecting the brain from ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in mice. The present investigation tested another second-generation NTR1 agonist, HPI-363, for its hypothermic and protective effect against TBI. Adult male mice were subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) (velocity=3 m/sec, depth=1.0 mm, contact time=150 msec) to the exposed cortex. Intraperitoneal administration of HPI-363 (0.3 mg/kg) reduced body temperature by 3–5°C within 30–60 min without triggering a shivering defensive reaction. An additional two injections sustained the hypothermic effect in conscious mice for up to 6 h. This PIH treatment was initiated 15, 60, or 120 min after the onset of TBI, and significantly reduced the contusion volume measured 3 days after TBI. HPI-363 attenuated caspase-3 activation, Bax expression, and TUNEL-positive cells in the pericontusion region. In blood–brain barrier assessments, HPI-363 ameliorated extravasation of Evans blue dye and immunoglobulin G, attenuated the MMP-9 expression, and decreased the number of microglia cells in the post-TBI brain. HPI-363 decreased the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), but increased IL-6 and IL-10 levels. Compared with TBI control mice, HPI-363 treatments improved sensorimotor functional recovery after TBI. These findings suggest that the second generation NTR-1 agonists, such as HPI-363, are efficient

  5. Xenon Combined with Therapeutic Hypothermia Is Not Neuroprotective after Severe Hypoxia-Ischemia in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Hemmen; Osredkar, Damjan; Maes, Elke; Wood, Thomas; Thoresen, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is standard treatment following perinatal asphyxia in newborn infants. Experimentally, TH is neuroprotective after moderate hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in seven-day-old (P7) rats. However, TH is not neuroprotective after severe HI. After a moderate HI insult in newborn brain injury models, the anesthetic gas xenon (Xe) doubles TH neuroprotection. The aim of this study was to examine whether combining Xe and TH is neuroprotective as applied in a P7 rat model of severe HI. Design/Methods 120 P7 rat pups underwent a severe HI insult; unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by hypoxia (8% O2 for 150min at experimental normothermia (NT-37: Trectal 37°C). Surviving pups were randomised to immediate NT-37 for 5h (n = 36), immediate TH-32: Trectal 32°C for 5h (n = 25) or immediate TH-32 plus 50% inhaled Xe for 5h (n = 24). Pups were sacrificed after one week of survival. Relative area loss of the ligated hemisphere was measured, and neurons in the subventricular zone of this injured hemisphere were counted, to quantify brain damage. Results Following the HI insult, median (interquartile range, IQR) hemispheric brain area loss was similar in all groups: 63.5% (55.5–75.0) for NT-37 group, 65.0% (57.0–65.0) for TH-32 group, and 66.5% (59.0–72.0) for TH-32+Xe50% group (not significant). Correspondingly, there was no difference in neuronal cell count (NeuN marker) in the subventricular zone across the three treatment groups. Conclusions Immediate therapeutic hypothermia with or without additional 50% inhaled Xe, does not provide neuroprotection one week after severe HI brain injury in the P7 neonatal rat. This model aims to mimic the clinical situation in severely asphyxiated neonates and treatment these newborns remains an ongoing challenge. PMID:27253085

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia attenuates tissue damage and cytokine expression after traumatic brain injury by inhibiting necroptosis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Zhao, Dong-xu; Cui, Hua; Chen, Lei; Bao, Ying-hui; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis has been shown as an alternative form of cell death in many diseases, but the detailed mechanisms of the neuron loss after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rodents remain unclear. To investigate whether necroptosis is induced after TBI and gets involved in the neuroprotecton of therapeutic hypothermia on the TBI, we observed the pathological and biochemical change of the necroptosis in the fluid percussion brain injury (FPI) model of the rats. We found that receptor-interacting protein (RIP) 1 and 3, and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL), the critical downstream mediators of necroptosis recently identified in vivo, as well as HMGB1 and the pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18, were increased at an early phase (6 h) in cortex after TBI. Posttraumatic hypothermia (33 °C) led to the decreases in the necroptosis regulators, inflammatory factors and brain tissue damage in rats compared with normothermia-treated TBI animals. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that posttraumatic hypothermia also decreased the necroptosis-associated proteins staining in injured cortex and hippocampal CA1. Therefore, we conclude that the RIP1/RIP3-MLKL-mediated necroptosis occurs after experimental TBI and therapeutic hypothermia may protect the injured central nervous system from tissue damage and the inflammatory responses by targeting the necroptosis signaling after TBI. PMID:27080932

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia in acute liver failure: a multi-center retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karvellas, Constantine J.; Stravitz, R. Todd; Battenhouse, Holly; Lee, William M.; Schilsky, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefit of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Acute Liver Failure (ALF) has not been previously demonstrated in a controlled fashion. This study aimed to determine the impact of TH on 21-day survival and complications in ALF patients at high risk for cerebral edema. Methods Retrospective cohort study of ALF patients in the US ALFSG with Grade III or IV hepatic encephalopathy. TH (32°C – 35°C) was used in 97 (8%) patients; 1135 (92%) not cooled were controls. Results Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored in 38 (40%) TH ALF patients (vs. 22% controls, p=0.0001). Rates of bleeding (12% in both), bloodstream (17% vs. 18) and tracheal infections (21% vs. 23%, p> 0.5 for all) were similar. Unadjusted 21-day overall (62% vs. 60%) and transplant-free survival (45 vs. 39%, p>0.4 for both) were similar. Multivariable models were created for acetaminophen (APAP) (n= 582) and non-APAP (n=613) patients. For APAP patients, MELD (Odds ratio 0.91 per increment; 95% CI 0.89–0.94, p <0.001) and vasopressors (OR 0.16; 0.11–0.24, p < 0.0001) were associated with decreased 21-day spontaneous survival. Survival was improved with TH in APAP patients aged < 25y (Age 25: OR 2.735; 95% CI 1.001 – 7.467) but worsened in 64y or older APAP patients (Age = 64: OR 0.167; 95%CI 0.028 – 0.999). For non-APAP patients, MELD (OR 0.93 per increment; 0.91–0.95, p < 0.0001) and vasopressors (OR 0.60; 0.40–0.90, p=0.01) were associated with worse outcomes while TH had no impact (p= 0.93). Conclusions Therapeutic hypothermia in ALF was not associated with increased bleeding or infections. While young APAP-ALF patients may benefit, TH did not consistently impact 21-day survival. A prospective trial is required to clarify the utility of TH in ALF patients. PMID:25308108

  8. Evidence for the Therapeutic Efficacy of Either Mild Hypothermia or Oxygen Radical Scavengers after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Takashi; Wei, Enoch P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Repetitive brain injury, particularly that occurring with sporting-related injuries, has recently garnered increased attention in both the clinical and public settings. In the laboratory, we have demonstrated the adverse axonal and vascular consequences of repetitive brain injury and have demonstrated that moderate hypothermia and/or FK506 exerted protective effects after repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) when administered within a specific time frame, suggesting a range of therapeutic modalities to prevent a dramatic exacerbation. In this communication, we revisit the utility of targeted therapeutic intervention to seek the minimal level of hypothermia needed to achieve protection while probing the role of oxygen radicals and their therapeutic targeting. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to repetitive mTBI by impact acceleration injury. Mild hypothermia (35°C, group 2), superoxide dismutase (group 3), and Tempol (group 4) were employed as therapeutic interventions administered 1 h after the repetitive mTBI. To assess vascular function, cerebral vascular reactivity to acetylcholine was evaluated 3 and 4 h after the repetitive mTBI, whereas to detect the burden of axonal damage, amyloid precursor protein (APP) density in the medullospinal junction was measured. Whereas complete impairment of vascular reactivity was observed in group 1 (without intervention), significant preservation of vascular reactivity was found in the other groups. Similarly, whereas remarkable increase in the APP-positive axon was observed in group 1, there were no significant increases in the other groups. Collectively, these findings indicate that even mild hypothermia or the blunting free radical damage, even when performed in a delayed period, is protective in repetitive mTBI. PMID:24341607

  9. Cerebral oxygen metabolism in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy during and after therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Aggarwal, Alpna; Lin, Pei-Yi; Rosa Fortuno, C; Fenoglio, Angela; Roche-Labarbe, Nadège; Soul, Janet S; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Grant, P Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) are associated with complex changes of blood flow and metabolism. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is effective in reducing the extent of brain injury, but it remains uncertain how TH affects cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. Ten neonates undergoing TH for HIE and seventeen healthy controls were recruited from the NICU and the well baby nursery, respectively. A combination of frequency domain near infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) systems was used to non-invasively measure cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic variables at the bedside. Results showed that cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i) and CBF indices (CBFi) in neonates with HIE during TH were significantly lower than post-TH and age-matched control values. Also, cerebral blood volume (CBV) and hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) were significantly higher in neonates with HIE during TH compared with age-matched control neonates. Post-TH CBV was significantly decreased compared with values during TH whereas SO2 remained unchanged after the therapy. Thus, FDNIRS–DCS can provide information complimentary to SO2 and can assess individual cerebral metabolic responses to TH. Combined FDNIRS–DCS parameters improve the understanding of the underlying physiology and have the potential to serve as bedside biomarkers of treatment response and optimization. PMID:24064492

  10. Therapeutic hypothermia for cardiovascular collapse and severe respiratory distress after amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Ocegueda-Pacheco, Cynthia; García, J Carlos; Varon, Joseph; Polderman, Kees H

    2014-06-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the most catastrophic complications that can occur during pregnancy or in the immediate postpartum period, frequently complicated by profound shock and cardiovascular collapse as well as severe respiratory distress. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is now commonly used to improve neurological outcomes after various types of hypoxic injury and is widely used in the treatment of postanoxic injury after cardiac arrest (CA). To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated whether TH could be effectively used in AFE, and its use for this indication has not been described previously. We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman, who developed clinical manifestations of AFE and suffered a CA in the 29th week of her pregnancy. She received prolonged CPR (40 minutes until ROSC) and remained comatose. TH was induced and maintained for a total of 60 hours using an endovascular device, followed by controlled rewarming and maintenance of strict normothermia. The patient survived and was neurologically intact (CPC 1) at 6 months of follow up. PMID:24670228

  11. Successful use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to amitriptyline and venlafaxine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kontio, Terhi; Salo, Ari; Kantola, Teemu; Toivonen, Lauri; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to intoxication is dismal. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are widely used in the treatment of depression, but possess significant cardiotoxicity, and are one of the most common medications used in suicide attempts worldwide. TCA poisoning can cause hypotension, seizures, and cardiac conduction disturbances, which can lead to life-threatening arrhythmia. Current guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for unconscious survivors of OHCA, but hypothermia treatment itself can cause disturbances in cardiac conduction, which could aggravate the effect of TCAs on cardiac conduction. We report the successful use of TH in a 19-year-old woman who was resuscitated from ventricular tachycardia after intentional ingestion of amitriptyline and venlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. The cardiac arrest was witnessed, but no bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed. The initial rhythm was ventricular tachycardia with no detectable pulse. Three defibrillations, magnesium sulfate, and sodium bicarbonate were given and her trachea was intubated, after which return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 26 minutes. After ROSC, she had seizures and was sedated with propofol. Out-of-hospital TH was initiated with 1500 mL of cold Ringer's acetate. An infusion of norepinephrine was initiated for low blood pressure. On arrival at the university hospital, she was unconscious and had dilated pupils. She was tachycardic with a body temperature of 33.5°C. She was transferred to the intensive care unit and TH was maintained with invasive cooling. During the TH treatment, she did not experience any serious cardiac arrhythmia, transthoracic echocardiogram was normal, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) returned to normal. The patient was extubated 45 hours after the cardiac arrest. After the extubation, she was alert and cooperative, but slightly delusional. She was

  12. The influence of body composition on therapeutic hypothermia: a prospective observational study of patients after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jimmink, Joost J; Binnekade, Jan M; Paulus, Frederique; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisebeth MH; Schultz, Marcus J; Vroom, Margreeth B

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) benefit from therapeutic hypothermia for 24 hours. The time needed to reach hypothermia (target temperature of 32°C to 34°C) varies widely. In this study, we explore the relation between measures of body composition and the time needed to reach target temperature with hypothermia. Method We conducted a prospective observational study in patients treated with hypothermia after OHCA. Data collected included weight and height, body composition by anthropometric measures and by single-frequency body impedance, and waist-to-hip ratio. Analysis of concordance between impedance and anthropometric measures and hazard ratios of achieving target temperature (event) corrected for different body composition measures. Results Twenty-seven patients were included. The median (interquartile range) time to reach target temperature after admission to the intensive care unit was 191 (105 to 382) minutes. Intraclass correlation for total body fat (TBF) measures was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89 to 0.97). Only TBF percentage (anthropometrics by the Durnin's table) appeared to be associated with time to reach target temperature: 0.93 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.99; P = 0.03). Conclusion The body composition measures from single-frequency impedance and anthropometrics appear to be very concordant. Only TBF percentage (anthropometrics) showed a significant but clinically irrelevant influence on time needed to achieve target temperature with hypothermia. We conclude that there are no indications to adjust current cooling practice toward the body composition of patients. PMID:18616810

  13. Feasibility Study Evaluating Therapeutic Hypothermia for Refractory Status Epilepticus in Children.

    PubMed

    Buttram, Sandra D W; Au, Alicia K; Koch, Joshua; Lidsky, Karen; McBain, Kristin; O'Brien, Nicole; Zielinski, Brandon A; Bell, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is a neurological emergency with significant morbidity and mortality, which lacks consensus regarding diagnosis and treatment(s). Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is an effective treatment for RSE in preclinical models and small series. In addition, TH is a standard care for adults after cardiac arrest and neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The purpose of this study was to identify the feasibility of a study of pediatric RSE within a research group (Pediatric Neurocritical Care Research Group [PNCRG]). Pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admissions at seven centers were prospectively screened from October 2012 to July 2013 for RSE. Experts within the PNCRG estimated that clinicians would be unwilling to enroll a child, unless the child required at least two different antiepileptic medications and a continuous infusion of another antiepileptic medication with ongoing electrographic seizure activity for ≥2 hours after continuous infusion initiation. Data for children meeting the above inclusion criteria were collected, including the etiology of RSE, history of epilepsy, and maximum dose of continuous antiepileptic infusions. There were 8113 PICU admissions over a cumulative 52 months (October 2012-July 2013) at seven centers. Of these, 69 (0.85%) children met inclusion criteria. Twenty children were excluded due to acute diagnoses affected by TH, contraindications to TH, or lack of commitment to aggressive therapies. Sixteen patients had seizure cessation within 2 hours, resulting in 33 patients who had inadequate seizure control after 2 hours and a continuous antiepileptic infusion. Midazolam (21/33, 64%) and pentobarbital (5/33, 15%) were the most common infusions with a wide maximum dose range. More than one infusion was required for seizure control in four patients. There are substantial numbers of subjects at clinical sites within the PNCRG with RSE that would meet the proposed inclusion criteria for a

  14. Drug-induced mild therapeutic hypothermia obtained by administration of a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 agonist

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of mechanical/physical devices for applying mild therapeutic hypothermia is the only proven neuroprotective treatment for survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest. However, this type of therapy is cumbersome and associated with several side-effects. We investigated the feasibility of using a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist for obtaining drug-induced sustainable mild hypothermia. Methods First, we screened a heterogeneous group of TRPV1 agonists and secondly we tested the hypothermic properties of a selected candidate by dose-response studies. Finally we tested the hypothermic properties in a large animal. The screening was in conscious rats, the dose-response experiments in conscious rats and in cynomologus monkeys, and the finally we tested the hypothermic properties in conscious young cattle (calves with a body weight as an adult human). The investigated TRPV1 agonists were administered by continuous intravenous infusion. Results Screening: Dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), a component of chili pepper, displayed a desirable hypothermic profile with regards to the duration, depth and control in conscious rats. Dose-response experiments: In both rats and cynomologus monkeys DHC caused a dose-dependent and immediate decrease in body temperature. Thus in rats, infusion of DHC at doses of 0.125, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 mg/kg/h caused a maximal ΔT (°C) as compared to vehicle control of -0.9, -1.5, -2.0, and -4.2 within approximately 1 hour until the 6 hour infusion was stopped. Finally, in calves the intravenous infusion of DHC was able to maintain mild hypothermia with ΔT > -3°C for more than 12 hours. Conclusions Our data support the hypothesis that infusion of dihydrocapsaicin is a candidate for testing as a primary or adjunct method of inducing and maintaining therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20932337

  15. Treatment temperature and insult severity influence the neuroprotective effects of therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Thomas; Osredkar, Damjan; Puchades, Maja; Maes, Elke; Falck, Mari; Flatebø, Torun; Walløe, Lars; Sabir, Hemmen; Thoresen, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (HT) is standard care for moderate and severe neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE), the leading cause of permanent brain injury in term newborns. However, the optimal temperature for HT is still unknown, and few preclinical studies have compared multiple HT treatment temperatures. Additionally, HT may not benefit infants with severe encephalopathy. In a neonatal rat model of unilateral hypoxia-ischaemia (HI), the effect of five different HT temperatures was investigated after either moderate or severe injury. At postnatal-day seven, rat pups underwent moderate or severe HI followed by 5 h at normothermia (37 °C), or one of five HT temperatures: 33.5 °C, 32 °C, 30 °C, 26 °C, and 18 °C. One week after treatment, neuropathological analysis of hemispheric and hippocampal area loss, and CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neuron count, was performed. After moderate injury, a significant reduction in hemispheric and hippocampal loss on the injured side, and preservation of CA1 pyramidal neurons, was seen in the 33.5 °C, 32 °C, and 30 °C groups. Cooling below 33.5 °C did not provide additional neuroprotection. Regardless of treatment temperature, HT was not neuroprotective in the severe HI model. Based on these findings, and previous experience translating preclinical studies into clinical application, we propose that milder cooling should be considered for future clinical trials. PMID:26997257

  16. First Use of a New Device for Administration of Buspirone and Acetaminophen to Suppress Shivering During Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Honasoge, Akilesh; Parker, Braden; Wesselhoff, Kelly; Lyons, Neal; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia or targeted temperature management has been used after cardiac arrest to improve neurological outcomes and mortality. However, a side effect of temperature modulation is a centrally mediated shivering response. The Columbia Anti-Shivering Protocol sets up a systematic method of intravenous (IV) and oral medication escalation to suppress this response and preserve the benefits of this therapy. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who began shivering after therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest, leading to a persistent rise in core temperature despite adequate sedation. He was also found to have gastric contents similar to coffee grounds through nasogastric tube suction. The shivering was effectively suppressed and the rising core temperature plateaued using rectal acetaminophen and buspirone administered by means of a novel device, the Macy Catheter. Also, when used in conjunction with other protocol-driven medications, the patient was able to achieve a core temperature of 33°C. The Macy Catheter appears to be a useful approach to rectally administer buspirone and acetaminophen, using an easy-to-place, nonsterile atraumatic device that requires no radiographic confirmation of placement. PMID:26807775

  17. First Use of a New Device for Administration of Buspirone and Acetaminophen to Suppress Shivering During Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Braden; Wesselhoff, Kelly; Lyons, Neal; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia or targeted temperature management has been used after cardiac arrest to improve neurological outcomes and mortality. However, a side effect of temperature modulation is a centrally mediated shivering response. The Columbia Anti-Shivering Protocol sets up a systematic method of intravenous (IV) and oral medication escalation to suppress this response and preserve the benefits of this therapy. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who began shivering after therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest, leading to a persistent rise in core temperature despite adequate sedation. He was also found to have gastric contents similar to coffee grounds through nasogastric tube suction. The shivering was effectively suppressed and the rising core temperature plateaued using rectal acetaminophen and buspirone administered by means of a novel device, the Macy Catheter. Also, when used in conjunction with other protocol-driven medications, the patient was able to achieve a core temperature of 33°C. The Macy Catheter appears to be a useful approach to rectally administer buspirone and acetaminophen, using an easy-to-place, nonsterile atraumatic device that requires no radiographic confirmation of placement. PMID:26807775

  18. Prehospital intranasal evaporative cooling for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a pilot, feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard M; Van Antwerp, Jerry; Henderson, Charles; Weaver, Anne; Davies, Gareth; Lockey, David

    2014-10-01

    Intranasal evaporative cooling presents a novel means of initiating therapeutic hypothermia after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Few studies have evaluated the use of intranasal therapeutic hypothermia using the Rhinochill device in the prehospital setting. We sought to evaluate the use of Rhinochill in the Physician Response Unit of London's Air Ambulance, aiming to describe the feasibility of employing it during prehospital resuscitation for OHCA. We prospectively evaluated the Rhinochill device over a 7-month period. Inclusion criteria for deployment included: age above 18 years, Physician Response Unit on-scene within maximum of 10 min after return-of-spontaneous circulation (ROSC), witnessed OHCA or unwitnessed downtime of less than 10 min, pregnancy not suspected, normal nasal anatomy, and likely ICU candidate if ROSC were to be achieved. Thirteen patients were included in the evaluation. The average time from the 999 call to initiation of cooling was 39.5 min (range 22-61 min). The average prehospital temperature change in patients who achieved ROSC was -1.9°C. Patients were cooled for an average of 38 min prehospital. In all cases, the doctor and paramedic involved with the resuscitation reported that the Rhinochill was easy to set up and use during resuscitation and that it did not interfere with standard resuscitation practice. Intranasal evaporative cooling using the Rhinochill system is feasible in an urban, prehospital, doctor/paramedic response unit. Cooling with Rhinochill was not found to interfere with prehospital resuscitation and resulted in significant core body temperature reduction. Further research on the potential benefit of intra-arrest and early initiation of intranasal evaporative cooling is warranted. PMID:24300245

  19. [The first application of therapeutic hypothermia in Poland--selective head cooling (Cool-Cap) with whole-body moderate hypothermia in a newborn with features of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Gulczyńska, Ewa; Kesiak, Marcin; Kryszczyńska, Joanna; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Oszukowski, Przemysław

    2012-05-01

    The authors present the first application of therapeutic hypothermia in a newborn in Poland. The female newborn, born with severe asphyxia, was transported to a referral perinatal center where the method of brain cooling was possible. Severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy was confirmed by an integrated EEG. During the cooling procedure (which lasted 72 hours), no important side effects were noticed. The neurodevelopmental outcome of the baby assessed during the first 2 years of her life is normal. PMID:22708339

  20. Induction of therapeutic hypothermia by pharmacological modulation of temperature-sensitive TRP channels: theoretical framework and practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Feketa, Viktor V; Marrelli, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has emerged as a remarkably effective method of neuroprotection from ischemia and is being increasingly used in clinics. Accordingly, it is also a subject of considerable attention from a basic scientific research perspective. One of the fundamental problems, with which current studies are concerned, is the optimal method of inducing hypothermia. This review seeks to provide a broad theoretical framework for approaching this problem, and to discuss how a novel promising strategy of pharmacological modulation of the thermosensitive ion channels fits into this framework. Various physical, anatomical, physiological and molecular aspects of thermoregulation, which provide the foundation for this text, have been comprehensively reviewed and will not be discussed exhaustively here. Instead, the first part of the current review, which may be helpful for a broader readership outside of thermoregulation research, will build on this existing knowledge to outline possible opportunities and research directions aimed at controlling body temperature. The second part, aimed at a more specialist audience, will highlight the conceptual advantages and practical limitations of novel molecular agents targeting thermosensitive Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels in achieving this goal. Two particularly promising members of this channel family, namely TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), will be discussed in greater detail. PMID:27227027

  1. Microdialysis as Clinical Evaluation of Therapeutic Hypothermia in Rat Subdural Hematoma Model.

    PubMed

    Yokobori, Shoji; Spurlock, Markus S; Lee, Stephanie W; Gajavelli, Shyam; Bullock, Ross M

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral microdialysis (MD) is a fine laboratory technique which has been established for studying physiological, pharmacological, and pathological changes in the experimental studies of traumatic brain injury (TBI). This technique has also been well translated and widely applied to clinical bedside monitoring to provide pathophysiological analysis in severe TBI patients. The MD technique is thus well suited for straightforward translation from basic science to clinical application.In this chapter, we describe our evaluation of MD method in acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) rat model. With 100 kDa cut-off microdialysis membrane, we could measure several biomarkers such as ubiquitin carboxy hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1), a neuronal marker and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and a glial marker in extracellular fluid. In this experiment, we could detect that the peak of extracellular UCH-L1 in the early hypothermia group was significantly lower than in the normothermia group. Also, in the late phase of reperfusion (>2.5 h after decompression), extracellular GFAP in the early hypothermia group was lower than in the normothermia. These data thus suggested that early, preoperatively induced hypothermia could mediate the reduction of neuronal and glial damage in the reperfusion phase of ischemia/reperfusion brain injury.Microdialysis allows for the direct measurement of extracellular molecules in an attempt to characterize metabolic derangements before they become clinically relevant. Advancements in technology have allowed for the bedside assay of multiple markers of ischemia and metabolic dysfunction, and the applications for traumatic brain injury have been well established. As clinicians become more comfortable with these tools their widespread use and potential for clinical impact with continue to rise. PMID:27604731

  2. Dominique-Jean Larrey: the effects of therapeutic hypothermia and the first ambulance.

    PubMed

    Remba, Salomon Jasqui; Varon, Joseph; Rivera, Alma; Sternbach, George L

    2010-03-01

    The fields of emergency medicine and resuscitation are indebted to the Baron Dominique-Jean Larrey (1766-1842) for significant advances in patient care. Larrey was a great surgeon who served in the French army during Napoleon's rule. He developed one of the first ambulance services, utilized positive pressure ventilation, and introduced hypothermia as a form of therapy. He dedicated his professional life to improving the care of wounded soldiers on the battlefield. Larrey coined the term "Triage" to allocate resources to those most in need of emergent care. Today, many of his techniques still prevail in modern medicine. PMID:20036046

  3. [The neuroprotective effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with successful reanimation - a case report].

    PubMed

    Szczygieł, Jarosław; Mazurek, Justyna; Świątkowski, Andrzej; Broniec-Siekaniec, Katarzyna; Czapnik, Marta; Średniawa, Beata; Opara, Józef; Oleszczyk, Krystian

    2016-03-01

    The use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) in adult patients remaining in a coma following cardiac arrest, regardless of its mechanism and location, is recommended by the European Resuscitation Council. The study presents a case of a 52-year-old man in whom MTH was used following successfully resuscitated out-of- hospital sudden cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation. On the basis of this case it was indicated that the use of low temperatures may be an effective method of neuroprotective treatment since such activity is compatible with later observed great possibility of the brain to compensate and with the maintenance of brain plasticity which is crucial for neuropsychological rehabilitation. PMID:27088200

  4. Therapeutic hypothermia achieves neuroprotection via a decrease in acetylcholine with a concurrent increase in carnitine in the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Sugiura, Yuki; Morikawa, Takayuki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Sugioka, Tadao; Honda, Kurara; Kubo, Akiko; Hishiki, Takako; Matsuura, Tomomi; Hoshino, Takao; Takahashi, Takao; Suematsu, Makoto; Kajimura, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia is known to improve neurologic outcomes after perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, etiology remains unknown. To decipher the mechanisms whereby hypothermia regulates metabolic dynamics in different brain regions, we used a two-step approach: a metabolomics to target metabolic pathways responding to cooling, and a quantitative imaging mass spectrometry to reveal spatial alterations in targeted metabolites in the brain. Seven-day postnatal rats underwent the permanent ligation of the left common carotid artery followed by exposure to 8% O2 for 2.5 hours. The pups were returned to normoxic conditions at either 38°C or 30°C for 3 hours. The brain metabolic states were rapidly fixed using in situ freezing. The profiling of 107 metabolites showed that hypothermia diminishes the carbon biomass related to acetyl moieties, such as pyruvate and acetyl-CoA; conversely, it increases deacetylated metabolites, such as carnitine and choline. Quantitative imaging mass spectrometry demarcated that hypothermia diminishes the acetylcholine contents specifically in hippocampus and amygdala. Such decreases were associated with an inverse increase in carnitine in the same anatomic regions. These findings imply that hypothermia achieves its neuroprotective effects by mediating the cellular acetylation status through a coordinated suppression of acetyl-CoA, which resides in metabolic junctions of glycolysis, amino-acid catabolism, and ketolysis. PMID:25586144

  5. Neuroprotective effect of therapeutic hypothermia versus standard care alone after convulsive status epilepticus: protocol of the multicentre randomised controlled trial HYBERNATUS.

    PubMed

    Legriel, Stephane; Pico, Fernando; Tran-Dinh, Yves-Roger; Lemiale, Virginie; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is a major medical emergency associated with a 50 % morbidity rate. CSE guidelines have recommended prompt management for many years, but there is no evidence to date that they have significantly improved practices or outcomes. Developing neuroprotective strategies for use after CSE holds promise for diminishing morbidity and mortality rates. Hypothermia has been shown to afford neuroprotection in various health conditions. We therefore designed a trial to determine whether 90-day outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients with CSE requiring management in the intensive care unit (ICU) are improved by early therapeutic hypothermia (32-34 °C) for 24 h with propofol sedation. We are conducting a multicentre, open-label, parallel-group, randomised, controlled trial (HYBERNATUS) of potential neuroprotective effects of therapeutic hypothermia and routine propofol sedation started within 8 h after CSE onset in ICU patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Included patients are allocated to receive therapeutic hypothermia (32-34 °C) plus standard care or standard care alone. We plan to enrol 270 patients in 11 ICUs. An interim analysis is scheduled after the inclusion of 135 patients. The main study objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia (32-34 °C) for 24 h in diminishing 90-day morbidity and mortality (defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score <5). The HYBERNATUS trial is expected to a decreased proportion of patients with a Glasgow Outcome Scale score lower than 5 after CSE requiring ICU admission and mechanical ventilation. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01359332 (registered on 23 May 2011). PMID:27325409

  6. Fever After Rewarming: Incidence of Pyrexia in Post-Cardiac Arrest Patients who have Undergone Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Cocchi, Michael N.; Boone, Myles D.; Giberson, Brandon; Giberson, Tyler; Farrell, Emily; Salciccioli, Justin D.; Talmor, Daniel; Williams, Donna; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia, or TH (temperature 32–34°C), has become standard of care in many hospitals for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Pyrexia, or fever, is known to be detrimental in patients with neurologic injuries such as stroke or trauma. The incidence of pyrexia in the post-rewarming phase of TH is unknown. We attempted to determine the incidence of fever after TH, and hypothesized that those patients who were febrile after rewarming would have worse clinical outcomes than those who maintained normothermia in the post-rewarming period. Methods Retrospective data analysis of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) over a period of 29 months (12/2007–4/2010). Inclusion criteria: OHCA, age > 18, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and treatment with TH. Exclusion criteria: traumatic arrest, pregnancy. Data collected included age, sex, neurologic outcome, mortality, and whether the patient developed a fever (temperature > 100.4°F, 38°C) within 24 hours after being fully rewarmed to a normal core body temperature after TH. We used simple descriptive statistics and Fisher’s exact test to report our findings. Results A total of 149 patients were identified; of these, 82 (55%) underwent TH. The mean age of the TH cohort was 66 years, and 28 (31%) were female. 54 patients survived for > 24 hours after rewarming and were included in the analysis. Among the analyzed cohort, 28/54 (52 %) developed fever within 24 hours after being rewarmed. Outcome measures included in-hospital mortality, as well as neurologic outcome as defined by a dichotomized Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score. 1, 2 When comparing neurologic outcomes between the groups, 16/28 (57%) in the post-rewarming fever group had a poor outcome (CPC score 3–5), while 15/26 (58%) in the no-fever group had a favorable outcome (P=0.62). In the fever group, 15/28 (52%) died, while in the no-fever group, 14/26 (54%) died (P=0.62). Conclusion

  7. Relationship Between Cerebral Oxygenation and Metabolism During Rewarming in Newborn Infants After Therapeutic Hypothermia Following Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Meek, Judith; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Robertson, Nicola J; Tachtsidis, Ilias

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has become a standard of care following hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). After TH, body temperature is brought back to 37 °C over 14 h. Lactate/N-acetylasperatate (Lac/NAA) peak area ratio on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) is the best available outcome biomarker following HIE. We hypothesized that broadband near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measured changes in the oxidation state of cytochrome-c-oxidase concentration (Δ[oxCCO]) and cerebral hemodynamics during rewarming would relate to Lac/NAA. Broadband NIRS and systemic data were collected during rewarming from 14 infants following HIE over a mean period of 12.5 h. (1)H MRS was performed on day 5-9. Heart rate increased by 20/min during rewarming while blood pressure and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) remained stable. The relationship between mitochondrial metabolism and oxygenation (measured as Δ[oxCCO] and Δ[HbD], respectively) was calculated by linear regression analysis. This was reviewed in three groups: Lac/NAA values <0.5, 0.5-1, >1. Mean regression coefficient (r (2)) values in these groups were 0.41 (±0.27), 0.22 (±0.21) and 0.01, respectively. The relationship between mitochondrial metabolism and oxygenation became impaired with rising Lac/NAA. Cardiovascular parameters remained stable during rewarming. PMID:27526150

  8. The effects of therapeutic hypothermia on cerebral metabolism in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: An in vivo 1H-MR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Wisnowski, Jessica L; Wu, Tai-Wei; Reitman, Aaron J; McLean, Claire; Friedlich, Philippe; Vanderbilt, Douglas; Ho, Eugenia; Nelson, Marvin D; Panigrahy, Ashok; Blüml, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has emerged as the first empirically supported therapy for neuroprotection in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to characterize the effects of hypothermia on energy metabolites, neurotransmitters, and antioxidants. Thirty-one neonates with HIE were studied during hypothermia and after rewarming. Metabolite concentrations (mmol/kg) were determined from the thalamus, basal ganglia, cortical grey matter, and cerebral white matter. In the thalamus, phosphocreatine concentrations were increased by 20% during hypothermia when compared to after rewarming (3.49 ± 0.88 vs. 2.90 ± 0.65, p < 0.001) while free creatine concentrations were reduced to a similar degree (3.00 ± 0.50 vs. 3.74 ± 0.85, p < 0.001). Glutamate (5.33 ± 0.82 vs. 6.32 ± 1.12, p < 0.001), aspartate (3.39 ± 0.66 vs. 3.87 ± 1.19, p < 0.05), and GABA (0.92 ± 0.36 vs. 1.19 ± 0.41, p < 0.05) were also reduced, while taurine (1.39 ± 0.52 vs. 0.79 ± 0.61, p < 0.001) and glutathione (2.23 ± 0.41 vs. 2.09 ± 0.33, p < 0.05) were increased. Similar patterns were observed in other brain regions. These findings support that hypothermia improves energy homeostasis by decreasing the availability of excitatory neurotransmitters, and thereby, cellular energy demand. PMID:26661180

  9. [Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A cold intravenous fluid, a cooling helmet and a cooling blanket efficiently reduce body temperature].

    PubMed

    Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Cronberg, Tobias; Widner, Håkan; Englund, Elisabet; Ersson, Anders

    2004-07-22

    Two controlled randomized trials have shown that mild systemic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is beneficial for neurological outcome and one of the studies shows an improved survival rate. A pilot study was performed to evaluate a model of induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest, using cold intravenous fluids and surface cooling with a cold helmet and a coldwater blanket (Thermowrap). The main purpose was to evaluate our cooling method regarding efficacy, safety and usability. Five unconscious patients after cardiac arrest were treated with induced hypothermia of whom three survived with good recovery to six-month follow up. Two patients died in the ICU without regaining consciousness. There were no adverse events during treatment. We conclude that our method is reasonably fast compared to other published methods, it is easy to perform and it offers a good temperature control during cooling and rewarming. Routines for evaluating prognosis and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment need to be revised. PMID:15314936

  10. Number needed to treat = six: therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest – an effective and cheap approach to save lives

    PubMed Central

    Böttiger, Bernd W; Schneider, Andreas; Popp, Erik

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines stated: Unconscious adult patients with spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest should be cooled to 32 to 34°C for 12 to 24 hours. Patients with cardiac arrest from a non-shockable rhythm, in-hospital patients and children may also benefit from hypothermia. There is no argument to wait. We have to treat the next unconscious cardiac arrest patient with hypothermia. PMID:17850681

  11. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Refractory Status Epilepticus in a Child with Malignant Migrating Partial Seizures of Infancy and SCN1A Mutation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shein, Steven L.; Reynolds, Thomas Q.; Gedela, Satyanarayana; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a common indication for neurocritical care and can be refractory to standard measures. Refractory SE (RSE) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Unconventional therapies may be utilized in certain cases, including therapeutic hypothermia (TH), bumetanide, and the ketogenic diet. However, the literature describing the use of such therapies in RSE is limited. Details of a case of TH for RSE in an infant with malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy were obtained from the medical record. A 4-month-old child developed SE that was refractory to treatment with concurrent midazolam, phenobarbital, fosphenytoin, topiramate, levetiracetam, folinic acid, and pyridoxal-5-phosphate. This led to progressive implementation of three unconventional therapies: TH, bumetanide, and the ketogentic diet. Electrographic seizures ceased for the entirety of a 43-hour period of TH with a target rectal temperature of 33.0°C–34.0°C. No adverse effects of hypothermia were noted other than a single episode of asymptomatic hypokalemia. Seizures recurred 10 hours after rewarming was begun and did not abate with reinstitution of hypothermia. No effect was seen with administration of bumetanide. Seizures were controlled long-term within 48 hours of institution of the ketogenic diet. TH and the ketogenic diet may be effective for treating RSE in children. PMID:23667778

  12. The effect of therapeutic hypothermia on the expression of inflammatory response genes following moderate traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Truettner, Jessie S; Suzuki, Takamoto; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2005-08-18

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates a cascade of cellular and molecular responses including both pro- and anti-inflammatory. Although post-traumatic hypothermia has been shown to improve outcome in various models of brain injury, the underlying mechanisms responsible for these effects have not been clarified. In this study, inflammation cDNA arrays and semi-quantitative RT-PCR were used to detect genes that are differentially regulated after TBI. In addition, the effect of post-traumatic hypothermia on the expression of selective genes was also studied. Rats (n = 6-8 per group) underwent moderate fluid-percussion (F-P) brain injury with and without hypothermic treatment (33 degrees C/3 h). RNA from 3-h or 24-h survival was analyzed for the expression of IL1-beta, IL2, IL6, TGF-beta2, growth-regulated oncogene (GRO), migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and MCP (a transcription factor). The interleukins IL-1beta, IL-2, and IL-6 and TGF-beta and GRO were strongly upregulated early and transiently from 2- to 30-fold over sham at 3 h, with normalization by 24 h. In contrast, the expressions of MIF and MCP were both reduced by TBI compared to sham. Post-traumatic hypothermia had no significant effect on the acute expression of the majority of genes investigated. However, the expression of TGF-beta2 at 24 h was significantly reduced by temperature manipulation. The mechanism by which post-traumatic hypothermia is protective may not involve a general genetic response of the inflammatory genes. However, specific genes, including TGF-beta2, may be altered and effect cell death mechanisms after TBI. Hypothermia differentially regulates certain genes and may target more delayed responses underlying the secondary damage following TBI. PMID:15922484

  13. Hibernation, Hypothermia and a Possible Therapeutic "Shifted Homeostasis" Induced by Central Activation of A1 Adenosine Receptor (A1AR).

    PubMed

    Tupone, Domenico; Cetas, Justin S; Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-04-01

    The positive outcome that hypothermia contributes to brain and cardiac protection following ischemia has stimulated research in the development of pharmacological approaches to induce a hypothermic/hypometabolic state. Pharmacological manipulation of central autonomic thermoregulatory circuits could represent a potential target for the induction of a hypothermic state. Here we present a brief description of the CNS thermoregulatory centers and how the manipulation of these circuits can be useful in the treatment of pathological conditions such as stroke or brain hemorrhage. PMID:27333659

  14. Handling Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saho, S. Bamba

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on the body's response to hypothermia. Includes activities in which students measure the amount of heat absorbed by a white piece of cloth and a black piece of the same material, use cooperative-learning techniques to design a graphic organizer that explains metabolic responses to cold stress, and study the effect of temperature on…

  15. Highlights in basic autonomic neurosciences: Central adenosine A1 receptor – The key to a hypometabolic state and therapeutic hypothermia?

    PubMed Central

    Tupone, D.; Madden, C.J.; Morrison, S.F.

    2016-01-01

    The positive outcome that hypothermia contributes to brain and cardiac protection following ischemia has stimulated research in the development of pharmacological approaches to induce a hypothermic/hypometabolic state. Here we review three papers to highlight the role of the adenosine 1 receptor (A1AR) as a potential mediator and physiological regulator of a hypothermic state in both hibernating and non-hibernating mammals. We would like to emphasize the importance of comparative studies between hibernating and non-hibernating species that could lead to important discoveries on the mechanisms inducing hibernation and how they might be translated to induce a clinically useful hypothermic state. PMID:23465354

  16. Fever Control Management Is Preferable to Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients with Abbreviated Injury Scale 3-4: A Multi-Center, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Hifumi, Toru; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kawakita, Kenya; Yamashita, Susumu; Oda, Yasutaka; Dohi, Kenji; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    In our prospective, multi-center, randomized controlled trial (RCT)-the Brain Hypothermia (B-HYPO) study-we could not show any difference on neurological outcomes in patients probably because of the heterogeneity in the severity of their traumatic condition. We therefore aimed to clarify and compare the effectiveness of the two therapeutic temperature management regimens in severe (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] 3-4) or critical trauma patients (AIS 5). In the present post hoc B-HYPO study, we re-evaluated data based on the severity of trauma as AIS 3-4 or AIS 5 and compared Glasgow Outcome Scale score and mortality at 6 months by per-protocol analyses. Consequently, 135 patients were enrolled. Finally, 129 patients, that is, 47 and 31 patients with AIS 3-4 and 36 and 15 patients with AIS 5 were allocated to the mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) and fever control groups, respectively. No significant intergroup differences were observed with regard to age, gender, scores on head computed tomography (CT) scans, and surgical operation for traumatic brain injury (TBI), except for Injury Severity Score (ISS) in AIS 5. The fever control group demonstrated a significant reduction of TBI-related mortality compared with the MTH group (9.7% vs. 34.0%, p = 0.02) and an increase of favorable neurological outcomes (64.5% vs. 51.1%, p = 0.26) in patients with AIS 3-4, although the latter was not statistically significant. There was no difference in mortality or favorable outcome in patients with AIS 5. Fever control may be considered instead of MTH in patients with TBI (AIS 3-4). PMID:26413933

  17. Mild hypothermia during advanced life support: a preliminary study in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Cédric; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Marie, William; Arrot, Xavier; Daubin, Cédric; Du Cheyron, Damien; Massetti, Massimo; Charbonneau, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest may confer neuroprotection. We assessed the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of therapeutic infusion of 2 l of normal saline at 4°C before return of spontaneous circulation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation after out of hospital cardiac arrest. Methods This was a prospective, observational, multicenter clinical trial conducted in Emergency Medical Services units and in a medical intensive care unit at Caen University Hospital, Cen, France. Results In patients who had suffered out of hospital cardiac arrest, hypothermia was induced by infusing 2 l of 4°C NaCl 0.9% over 30 minutes during advanced life support prior to arrival at the hospital. A total of 33 patients were included in the study. Eight patients presented with ventricular fibrillation as the initial cardiac rhythm. Mild hypothermia was achieved after a median of 16 minutes (interquartile range 11.5 to 25.0 minutes) after return of spontaneous circulation. After intravenous cooling, the temperature decreased by 2.1°C (P < 0.0001) to a mean body temperature of 33.3°C (interquartile range 32.3 to 34.3°C). The only observed adverse event was pulmonary oedema, which occurred in one patient. Conclusion We concluded that prehospital induction of therapeutic hypothermia using infusion of 2 l of 4°C normal saline during advanced life support was feasible, effective and safe. Larger studies are required to assess the impact that this early cooling has on neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. PMID:18312676

  18. Better lactate clearance associated with good neurologic outcome in survivors who treated with therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several methods have been proposed to evaluate neurological outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Blood lactate has been recognized as a reliable prognostic marker for trauma, sepsis, or cardiac arrest. The objective of this study was to examine the association between initial lactate level or lactate clearance and neurologic outcome in OHCA survivors who were treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients who underwent protocol-based 24-hour therapeutic hypothermia after OHCA between January 2010 and March 2012. Serum lactate levels were measured at the start of therapy (0 hours), and after 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours. The 6 hour and 12 hour lactate clearance were calculated afterwards. Patients’ neurologic outcome was assessed at one month after cardiac arrest; good neurological outcome was defined as Cerebral Performance Category one or two. The primary outcome was an association between initial lactate level and good neurologic outcome. The secondary outcome was an association between lactate clearance and good neurologic outcome in patients with initial lactate level >2.5 mmol/l. Results Out of the 76 patients enrolled, 34 (44.7%) had a good neurologic outcome. The initial lactate level showed no significant difference between good and poor neurologic outcome groups (6.07 ±4 .09 mmol/L vs 7.13 ± 3.99 mmol/L, P = 0.42), However, lactate levels at 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours in the good neurologic outcome group were lower than in the poor neurologic outcome group (3.81 ± 2.81 vs 6.00 ± 3.22 P <0.01, 2.95 ± 2.07 vs 5.00 ± 3.49 P <0.01, 2.17 ± 1.24 vs 3.86 ± 3.92 P <0.01, 1.57 ± 1.02 vs 2.21 ± 1.35 P = 0.03, respectively). The secondary analysis showed that the 6-hour and 12-hour lactate clearance was higher for good neurologic outcome patients (35.3 ± 34.6% vs 6.89

  19. Transfontanellar Duplex Brain Ultrasonography Resistive Indices as a Prognostic Tool in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Before and After Treatment with Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Gerner, Gwendolyn J; Burton, V Joanna; Poretti, Andrea; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Cristofalo, Elizabeth; Tekes, Aylin; Seyfert, Donna; Parkinson, Charlamaine; Leppert, Mary; Allen, Marilee; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Northington, Frances J; Johnston, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Prior to therapeutic hypothermia (i.e., cooling), transfontanellar duplex brain sonography resistive indices (RI) were studied as bedside non-invasive measures of cerebral hemodynamics in neonates who suffered from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We compared pre- and post-cooling RI values and examined the relationships between RI values and specific long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. STUDY DESIGN Transfontanellar duplex brain sonography, including RI, were obtained for 28 neonates prior to brain cooling and for 20 neonates following brain cooling. All RI values were sampled in the anterior cerebral artery at the beginning of each ultrasound study. Neurodevelopmental assessment was conducted between ages 20-32 months with the Mullen Scale of Early Learning. The relationships between pre- and post-cooling RI and cognitive and motor outcomes were studied. RESULT Neonates with RI values <0.60 prior to and following cooling were more likely to die or have severe neurodevelopmental disability by ages 20-32 months than those with RI >0.60. Lower RI values were associated with specific neurodevelopmental deficits in motor skill attainment. CONCLUSION Pre- and post-cooling transfontanellar duplex brain sonography RI values may be a useful prognostic tool, in conjunction with other clinical information, for neonates diagnosed with HIE. The results of this study suggest that further study of the prognostic value of RI values for short- and long-term outcomes is warranted. PMID:26609871

  20. Mild therapeutic hypothermia in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Villablanca, Pedro A.; Makkiya, Mohammed; Einsenberg, Evann; Briceno, David F.; Panagiota, Christia; Menegus, Mark; Garcia, Mario; Sims, Daniel; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) for survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, there is little literature demonstrating a survival benefit. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of MTH in patients successfully resuscitated from OHCA. Materials and Methods: Electronic databases were searched for RCT involving MTH in survivors of OHCA, and the results were put through a meta-analysis. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality, and the secondary endpoint was favorable neurological function. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using the Mantel–Haenszel method. A fixed-effect model was used and, if heterogeneity (I2) was >40, effects were analyzed using a random model. Results: Six RCT (n = 1400 patients) were included. Overall survival was 50.7%, and favorable neurological recovery was 45.5%. Pooled data demonstrated no significant all-cause mortality (OR, 0.81; 95% CI 0.55–1.21) or neurological recovery (OR, 0.77; 95% CI 0.47–1.24). No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated that MTH did not confer benefit on overall survival rate and neurological recovery in patients resuscitated from OHCA. PMID:26750667

  1. Pre-hospital cooling of patients following cardiac arrest is effective using even low volumes of cold saline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pre-hospital induction of therapeutic mild hypothermia (TH) may reduce post-cardiac arrest brain injury in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Most often, it is induced by a rapid intravenous administration of as much as 30 ml/kg of cold crystalloids. We decided to assess the pre-hospital cooling effectivity of this approach by using a target dose of 15-20 ml/kg of 4°C cold normal saline in the setting of the physician-staffed Emergency Medical Service. The safety and impact on the clinical outcome have also been analyzed. Methods We performed a prospective observational study with a retrospective control group. A total of 40 patients were cooled by an intravenous administration of 15-20 ml/kg of 4°C cold normal saline during transport to the hospital (TH group). The pre-hospital decrease of tympanic temperature (TT) was analyzed as the primary endpoint. Patients in the control group did not undergo any pre-hospital cooling. Results In the TH group, administration of 12.6 ± 6.4 ml/kg of 4°C cold normal saline was followed by a pre-hospital decrease of TT of 1.4 ± 0.8°C in 42.8 ± 19.6 min (p < 0.001). The most effective cooling was associated with a transport time duration of 38-60 min and with an infusion of 17 ml/kg of cold saline. In the TH group, a trend toward a reduced need for catecholamines during transport was detected (35.0 vs. 52.5%, p = 0.115). There were no differences in demographic variables, comorbidities, parameters of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation and in other post-resuscitation characteristics. The coupling of pre-hospital cooling with subsequent in-hospital TH predicted a favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (OR 4.1, CI95% 1.1-18.2, p = 0.046). Conclusions Pre-hospital induction of TH by the rapid intravenous administration of cold normal saline has been shown to be efficient even with a lower dose of coolant than reported in previous studies. This dose can be associated with a

  2. What is Hypothermia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weather! Heath and Aging Stay Safe in Cold Weather! What is hypothermia? If you are like most ... Keep warm inside Related Publications Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard There's No Place Like Home - For Growing ...

  3. Induced hypothermia in neurocatastrophes: feeling the chill.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2004-01-01

    Reducing core temperature to protect the injured brain has become a new therapeutic measure. The scientific underpinnings based on animal experiments seem sound. Evidence of the therapy's effect in human trials is insufficient or even possibly absent, but the techniques to produce moderate hypothermia are available, without apparent significant complications, and are relatively easy to use for neurointensivists. This review summarizes the mechanisms of neuroprotection due to hypothermia and its application in clinical practice. PMID:16397446

  4. Antiplatelet efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel, ticagrelor, clopidogrel) in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Frantisek; Kroupa, Josef; Ondrakova, Martina; Osmancik, Pavel; Kopa, Milos; Motovska, Zuzana

    2016-05-01

    Survivors after cardiac arrest (CA) due to AMI undergo PCI and then receive dual antiplatelet therapy. Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) is recommended for unconscious patients after CA to improve neurological outcomes. MTH can attenuate the effectiveness of P2Y12 inhibitors by reducing gastrointestinal absorption and metabolic activation. The combined effect of these conditions on the efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors is unknown. We compared the antiplatelet efficacies of new P2Y12 inhibitors in AMI patients after CA treated with MTH. Forty patients after CA for AMI treated with MTH and received one P2Y12 inhibitor (clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor) were enrolled in a prospective observational single-center study. Platelet inhibition was measured by VASP (PRI) on days 1, 2, and 3 after drug administration. In-hospital clinical data and 1-year survival data were obtained. The proportion of patients with ineffective platelet inhibition (PRI > 50 %, high on-treatment platelet reactivity) for clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor was 77 vs. 19 vs. 1 % on day 1; 77 vs. 17 vs. 0 % on day 2; and 85 vs. 6 vs. 0 % on day 3 (P < 0.001). The platelet inhibition was significantly worse in clopidogrel group than in prasugrel or ticagrelor group. Prasugrel and ticagrelor are very effective for platelet inhibition in patients treated with MTH after CA due to AMI, but clopidogrel is not. Using prasugrel or ticagrelor seems to be a more suitable option in this high-risk group of acute patients. PMID:26340851

  5. Guideline Implementation: Preventing Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-03-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for prevention of unplanned patient hypothermia" provides guidance for identifying factors associated with intraoperative hypothermia, preventing hypothermia, educating perioperative personnel on this topic, and developing relevant policies and procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline, which addresses performing a preoperative assessment for factors that may contribute to hypothermia, measuring and monitoring the patient's temperature in all phases of perioperative care, and implementing interventions to prevent hypothermia. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:26924369

  6. Prehospital risk factors of mortality and impaired consciousness after severe traumatic brain injury: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health concern and a major burden for society. The period between trauma event and hospital admission in an emergency department (ED) could be a determinant for secondary brain injury and early survival. The aim was to investigate the relationship between prehospital factors associated with secondary brain injury (arterial hypotension, hypoxemia, hypothermia) and the outcomes of mortality and impaired consciousness of survivors at 14 days. Methods A multicenter, prospective cohort study was performed in dedicated trauma centres of Switzerland. Adults with severe TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale score of head region (HAIS) >3) were included. Main outcome measures were death and impaired consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤13) at 14 days. The associations between risk factors and outcome were assessed with univariate and multivariate regression models. Results 589 patients were included, median age was 55 years (IQR 33, 70). The median GCS in ED was 4 (IQR 3-14), with abnormal pupil reaction in 167 patients (29.2%). Median ISS was 25 (IQR 21, 34). Three hundred seven patients sustained their TBI from falls (52.1%) and 190 from a road traffic accidents (32.3%). Median time from Out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service (OHEMS) departure on scene to arrival in ED was 50 minutes (IQR 37-72); 451 patients had a direct admission (76.6%). Prehospital hypotension was observed in 24 (4.1%) patients, hypoxemia in 73 (12.6%) patients and hypothermia in 146 (24.8%). Prehospital hypotension and hypothermia (apart of age and trauma severity) was associated with mortality. Prehospital hypoxemia (apart of trauma severity) was associated with impaired consciousness; indirect admission was a protective factor. Conclusion Mortality and impaired consciousness at 14 days do not have the same prehospital risk factors; prehospital hypotension and hypothermia is associated with mortality, and prehospital hypoxemia with

  7. Unintended Perioperative Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Stuart R.; Bordes, Brianne; Hart, Jennifer; Corsino, Daniel; Harmon, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypothermia, defined as a core body temperature less than 36°C (96.8°F), is a relatively common occurrence in the unwarmed surgical patient. A mild degree of perioperative hypothermia can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A threefold increase in the frequency of surgical site infections is reported in colorectal surgery patients who experience perioperative hypothermia. As part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project, guidelines aim to decrease the incidence of this complication. Methods We review the physiology of temperature regulation, mechanisms of hypothermia, effects of anesthetics on thermoregulation, and consequences of hypothermia and summarize recent recommendations for maintaining perioperative normothermia. Results Evidence suggests that prewarming for a minimum of 30 minutes may reduce the risk of subsequent hypothermia. Conclusions Monitoring of body temperature and avoidance of unintended perioperative hypothermia through active and passive warming measures are the keys to preventing its complications. PMID:21960760

  8. Induced Hypothermia Does Not Harm Hemodynamics after Polytrauma: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Weuster, Matthias; Mommsen, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Mohr, Juliane; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Flohé, Sascha; Fröhlich, Matthias; Keibl, Claudia; Seekamp, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Witte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The deterioration of hemodynamics instantly endangers the patients' life after polytrauma. As accidental hypothermia frequently occurs in polytrauma, therapeutic hypothermia still displays an ambivalent role as the impact on the cardiopulmonary function is not yet fully understood. Methods. We have previously established a porcine polytrauma model including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, and hemorrhagic shock. Therapeutic hypothermia (34°C) was induced for 3 hours. We documented cardiovascular parameters and basic respiratory parameters. Pigs were euthanized after 15.5 hours. Results. Our polytrauma porcine model displayed sufficient trauma impact. Resuscitation showed adequate restoration of hemodynamics. Induced hypothermia had neither harmful nor major positive effects on the animals' hemodynamics. Though heart rate significantly decreased and mixed venous oxygen saturation significantly increased during therapeutic hypothermia. Mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and wedge pressure showed no significant differences comparing normothermic trauma and hypothermic trauma pigs during hypothermia. Conclusions. Induced hypothermia after polytrauma is feasible. No major harmful effects on hemodynamics were observed. Therapeutic hypothermia revealed hints for tissue protective impact. But the chosen length for therapeutic hypothermia was too short. Nevertheless, therapeutic hypothermia might be a useful tool for intensive care after polytrauma. Future studies should extend therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:26170533

  9. Therapeutic hypothermia for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction-combined analysis of the RAPID MI-ICE and the CHILL-MI trials.

    PubMed

    Erlinge, David; Götberg, Matthias; Noc, Marko; Lang, Irene; Holzer, Michael; Clemmensen, Peter; Jensen, Ulf; Metzler, Bernhard; James, Stefan; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Omerovic, Elmir; Koul, Sasha; Engblom, Henrik; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan; Östlund, Ollie; Wallentin, Lars; Klos, Bradley; Harnek, Jan; Olivecrona, Göran K

    2015-06-01

    In the randomized rapid intravascular cooling in myocardial infarction as adjunctive to percutaneous coronary intervention (RAPID MI-ICE) and rapid endovascular catheter core cooling combined with cold saline as an adjunct to percutaneous coronary intervention for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction CHILL-MI studies, hypothermia was rapidly induced in conscious patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) by a combination of cold saline and endovascular cooling. Twenty patients in RAPID MI-ICE and 120 in CHILL-MI with large STEMIs, scheduled for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within <6 hours after symptom onset were randomized to hypothermia induced by rapid infusion of 600-2000 mL cold saline combined with endovascular cooling or standard of care. Hypothermia was initiated before PCI and continued for 1-3 hours after reperfusion aiming at a target temperature of 33°C. The primary endpoint was myocardial infarct size (IS) as a percentage of myocardium at risk (IS/MaR) assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 4±2 days. Patients randomized to hypothermia treatment achieved a mean core body temperature of 34.7°C before reperfusion. Although significance was not achieved in CHILL-MI, in the pooled analysis IS/MaR was reduced in the hypothermia group, relative reduction (RR) 15% (40.5, 28.0-57.6 vs. 46.6, 36.8-63.8, p=0.046, median, interquartile range [IQR]). IS/MaR was predominantly reduced in early anterior STEMI (0-4h) in the hypothermia group, RR=31% (40.5, 28.8-51.9 vs. 59.0, 45.0-67.8, p=0.01, median, IQR). There was no mortality in either group. The incidence of heart failure was reduced in the hypothermia group (2 vs. 11, p=0.009). Patients with large MaR (>30% of the left ventricle) exhibited significantly reduced IS/MaR in the hypothermia group (40.5, 27.0-57.6 vs. 55.1, 41.1-64.4, median, IQR; hypothermia n=42 vs. control n=37, p=0.03), while patients with MaR<30% did not show effect of hypothermia (35

  10. Therapeutic hypothermia following perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A D; Azzopardi, D V

    2006-01-01

    Well constructed and carefully analysed trials of hypothermic neural rescue therapy for infants with neonatal encephalopathy have recently been reported. The data suggest that either selective head cooling or total body cooling reduces the combined chance of death or disability after birth asphyxia. However, as there are still unanswered questions about these treatments, many may still feel that further data are needed before health care policy can be changed to make cooling the standard of care for all babies with suspected birth asphyxia. PMID:16492950

  11. Hibernation, Hypothermia and a Possible Therapeutic “Shifted Homeostasis” Induced by Central Activation of A1 Adenosine Receptor (A1AR)*

    PubMed Central

    Tupone, Domenico; Cetas, Justin S.; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2016-01-01

    The positive outcome that hypothermia contributes to brain and cardiac protection following ischemia has stimulated research in the development of pharmacological approaches to induce a hypothermic/hypometabolic state. Pharmacological manipulation of central autonomic thermoregulatory circuits could represent a potential target for the induction of a hypothermic state. Here we present a brief description of the CNS thermoregulatory centers and how the manipulation of these circuits can be useful in the treatment of pathological conditions such as stroke or brain hemorrhage. PMID:27333659

  12. Predictive value of the amplitude integrated EEG in infants with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy: data from a randomised trial of therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG) is reputed to be one of the best predictors of neurological outcome following hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in term newborns and was used to select infants into trials of neuroprotection with hypothermia, but its predictive value and the effect of moderate hypothermia on the aEEG have not previously been examined in a randomised study. The positive predictive value (PPV) of the aEEG recorded within 6 h of birth for death or disability at 18 months of age was determined in 314 infants born after 35 weeks gestation who were randomised to receive standard care with or without cooling for 72 h. The aEEG was classified according to voltage and by pattern. The PPV of a severely abnormal aEEG assessed by the voltage and pattern methods was 0.63 and 0.59 respectively in non-cooled infants and 0.55 and 0.51 in cooled infants (p>0.05). Although the differences in PPV between cooled and non-cooled groups were not significant, they are consistent with observational studies showing a lower PPV in infants treated with hypothermia, probably due to a neuroprotective effect of cooling. PMID:23800393

  13. Intra-arrest hypothermia during cardiac arrest: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic hypothermia is largely used to protect the brain following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (CA), but it is unclear whether we should start therapeutic hypothermia earlier, that is, before ROSC. Methods We performed a systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Ovid/Medline databases using "arrest" OR "cardiac arrest" OR "heart arrest" AND "hypothermia" OR "therapeutic hypothermia" OR "cooling" as keywords. Only studies using intra-arrest therapeutic hypothermia (IATH) were selected for this review. Three authors independently assessed the validity of included studies and extracted data regarding characteristics of the studied cohort (animal or human) and the main outcomes related to the use of IATH: Mortality, neurological status and cardiac function (particularly, rate of ROSC). Results A total of 23 animal studies (level of evidence (LOE) 5) and five human studies, including one randomized controlled trial (LOE 1), one retrospective and one prospective controlled study (LOE 3), and two prospective studies without a control group (LOE 4), were identified. IATH improved survival and neurological outcomes when compared to normothermia and/or hypothermia after ROSC. IATH was also associated with improved ROSC rates and with improved cardiac function, including better left ventricular function, and reduced myocardial infarct size, when compared to normothermia. Conclusions IATH improves survival and neurological outcome when compared to normothermia and/or conventional hypothermia in experimental models of CA. Clinical data on the efficacy of IATH remain limited. PMID:22397519

  14. Hypothermia as a clinical neuroprotectant.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Andrew L; Wang, Michael Y

    2014-08-01

    Applying therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for the purposes of neuroprotection, originally termed "hibernation," started nearly 100 years ago. Because TH cooling systems have improved to the point where it is practical and safe for general application, interest in providing such treatment in conditions such as spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke, and cardiac arrest has increased. This article reviews the mechanisms by which TH mitigates secondary neurologic injury, the clinical scenarios where TH is being applied, and reviews selected published studies using TH for central nervous system neuroprotection. PMID:25064786

  15. Pilot randomized trial of therapeutic hypothermia with serial cranial ultrasound and 18-22 month follow-up for neonatal encephalopathy in a low resource hospital setting in uganda: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is now convincing evidence that in industrialized countries therapeutic hypothermia for perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy increases survival with normal neurological function. However, the greatest burden of perinatal asphyxia falls in low and mid-resource settings where it is unclear whether therapeutic hypothermia is safe and effective. Aims Under the UCL Uganda Women's Health Initiative, a pilot randomized controlled trial in infants with perinatal asphyxia was set up in the special care baby unit in Mulago Hospital, a large public hospital with ~20,000 births in Kampala, Uganda to determine: (i) The feasibility of achieving consent, neurological assessment, randomization and whole body cooling to a core temperature 33-34°C using water bottles (ii) The temperature profile of encephalopathic infants with standard care (iii) The pattern, severity and evolution of brain tissue injury as seen on cranial ultrasound and relation with outcome (iv) The feasibility of neurodevelopmental follow-up at 18-22 months of age Methods/Design Ethical approval was obtained from Makerere University and Mulago Hospital. All infants were in-born. Parental consent for entry into the trial was obtained. Thirty-six infants were randomized either to standard care plus cooling (target rectal temperature of 33-34°C for 72 hrs, started within 3 h of birth) or standard care alone. All other aspects of management were the same. Cooling was performed using water bottles filled with tepid tap water (25°C). Rectal, axillary, ambient and surface water bottle temperatures were monitored continuously for the first 80 h. Encephalopathy scoring was performed on days 1-4, a structured, scorable neurological examination and head circumference were performed on days 7 and 17. Cranial ultrasound was performed on days 1, 3 and 7 and scored. Griffiths developmental quotient, head circumference, neurological examination and assessment of gross motor function were obtained at 18

  16. The Use of Hypothermia Therapy in Traumatic Ischemic/Reperfusional Brain Injury: Review of the Literatures

    PubMed Central

    Frantzen, Janek; Bullock, Ross; Gajavelli, Shyam; Burks, Stephen; Bramlett, Helen; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic mild hypothermia has been widely used in brain injury. It has been evaluated in numerous clinical trials, and there is strong evidence for the use of hypothermia in treating patients with several types of ischemic/reperfusional (I/R) injuries, the examples being cardiac arrest and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In spite of many basic research projects demonstrating effectiveness, therapeutic hypothermia has not been proved effective for the heterogeneous group of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in multicenter clinical trials. In the latest clinical trial, however, researchers were able to demonstrate the significant beneficial effects of hypothermia in one specific group; patients with mass evacuated lesions. This suggested that mild therapeutic hypothermia might be effective for I/R related TBI. In this article, we have reviewed much of the previous literature concerning the mechanisms of I/R injury to the protective effects of mild therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:23439678

  17. Pre-hospital oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Johannigman, Jay A

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen use in prehospital care is aimed at treating or preventing hypoxemia. However, excess oxygen delivery has important consequences in select patients, and hyperoxia can adversely impact outcome. The unique environment of prehospital care poses logistical and educational challenges. Oxygen therapy in prehospital care should be provided to patients with hypoxemia and titrated to achieve normoxemia. Changes to the current practice of oxygen delivery in prehospital care are needed. PMID:23271821

  18. [Obesity in prehospital emergency care].

    PubMed

    Kruska, Patricia; Kappus, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased steadily in recent years. Obese people often suffer from diseases which acute decompensation requires a prompt prehospital therapy. The Emergency Medical Service will be confronted with difficulties in clinical diagnostic, therapy and especially with a delayed management of rescue and transport. It is most important to avoid prehospital depreciation in quality and time management. This article reviews the specific requirements of prehospital care of obese persons and discusses possible solutions to optimize the prehospital therapy. PMID:22968983

  19. Management of neonatal morbidities during hypothermia treatment.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subrata; Barks, John

    2015-04-01

    Although the primary goal of therapeutic hypothermia is to improve the neurodevelopmental outcome in asphyxiated infants, optimal management of the full range of multi-organ system complications typically presented by such infants during cooling treatment is necessary for improvement of the overall outcome. For this reason, adequate knowledge of how cooling affects all organ systems of asphyxiated infants with multi-organ hypoxic-ischemic injury is essential. Adequate diagnostic resources, readily available subspecialty consultant services and trained multidisciplinary staff to monitor and manage multi-organ system complications in asphyxiated infants during therapeutic cooling must be ensured during implementation of a cooling program. As therapeutic hypothermia is being used more widely, centers should consider participation in national or international benchmarking of outcomes and short-term adverse events during cooling to facilitate continuous quality improvement efforts. PMID:25701292

  20. The neurovascular protection afforded by delayed local hypothermia after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Heon; Seo, Minchul; Han, Hyung Soo; Park, Jaechan; Suk, Kyoungho

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a robust therapeutic tool in experimental stroke models but its clinical applications are limited. Furthermore, optimal conditions for therapeutic hypothermia, such as, temperature and the initiation and duration of cooling must be individualized. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of delayed local hypothermia, administered for 44 hr after 4 hr of reperfusion in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo), using a cooling device that allowed controlled local hypothermia (31 °C) in brain. Histological data revealed that local hypothermia significantly reduced infarct volumes and glial hypertrophic activation. Brain water contents, IgG leakage, and Evans Blue extravasation were notably reduced by local hypothermia. Furthermore, local hypothermia had strong vasculoprotective effects, as determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses for endothelial barrier antigen (EBA), laminin, aquaporin-4, and tight junction proteins in brain. Our data indicate that delayed/prolonged local hypothermia confers neurovascular protection, reduces brain edema, and inhibits inflammatory glial activation, and suggest that hypothermic conservation of vascular structures and functions account for the therapeutic effects of local hypothermia observed in this model of experimental stroke. PMID:23469955

  1. Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weather Hazard Heath and Aging Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard What Are The Signs Of Hypothermia? Taking ... cold air. But, not everyone knows that cold weather can also lower the temperature inside your body. ...

  2. Rescue hypothermia for refractory hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, Domenico; Pennisi, Mariano; Vitale, Francesca; Pulitanò, Silvia Maria; Conti, Giorgio; Mancino, Aldo; Piastra, Marco; De Luca, Daniele

    2012-12-01

    Hypothermia may reduce the CO(2) production by decreasing the metabolism of the cooled tissue. We describe the first clinical use of hypothermia to lower hypercarbia in a case of bronchiolitis related respiratory failure unresponsive to maximal respiratory support. In this case, hypothermia allowed sparing the use of extracorporeal life support. Conclusion Hypothermia might be useful for severe acute respiratory failure unresponsive to aggressive respiratory support. PMID:22692802

  3. When, where and how to initiate hypothermia after adult cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Taccone, F S; Donadello, K; Beumier, M; Scolletta, S

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutich hypothermia (TH) has been shown to improve neurological outcome and survival after witnessed cardiac arrest (CA) that is due to ventricular fibrillation. Although TH is widely used following witnessed CA as well as all forms of initial rhythm, the mortality rate after CA remains unacceptably high, and additional study is needed to understand when and how to implement hypothermia in the post-resuscitation phase. Experimental studies have emphasized the importance of initiating cooling soon after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or even during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Clinical studies have shown that pre-hospital induction of hypothermia is feasible and has no major adverse events-even when used intra-arrest-and may provide some additional benefits compared to delayed in-hospital cooling. Thus, hypothermia use should not be limited to the Intensive Care Unit but can be initiated in the field/ambulance or in the Emergency Department, then continued after hospital admission- even during specific procedures such as coronary angiography-as part of the global management of CA patients. Various methods (both non-invasive and invasive) are available to achieve and maintain the target temperature; however, only some of these methods-which include cold fluids, ice packs, iced pads and helmet and trans-nasal cooling- are easily deployed in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:21878875

  4. Prehospital care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, E; Pusponegoro, A

    2005-01-01

    Current system: Hospitals of varying standards are widespread but have no system of emergency ambulance or patient retrieval. Indonesia's only public emergency ambulance service, 118, is based in five of the biggest cities and is leading the way in paramedic training and prehospital care. Challenges and developments: There are many challenges faced including the culture of acceptance, vast geographical areas, traffic, inadequate numbers of ambulances, and access to quality training resources. Recently there have been a number of encouraging developments including setting up of a disaster response brigade, better provision of ambulances, and development of paramedic training. Conclusions: An integrated national regionalised hospital and prehospital system may seem fantastic but with the enthusiasm of those involved and perhaps some help from countries with access to training resources it may not be an unrealistic goal. PMID:15662073

  5. Endogenous hypothermic response to hypoxia reduces brain injury: Implications for modeling hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Reinboth, Barbara S; Köster, Christian; Abberger, Hanna; Prager, Sebastian; Bendix, Ivo; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Herz, Josephine

    2016-09-01

    Hypothermia treatment (HT) is the only formally endorsed treatment recommended for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). However, its success in protecting against brain injury is limited with a number to treat of 7-8. The identification of the target mechanisms of HIE in combination with HT will help to explain ineffective therapy outcomes but also requires stable experimental models in order to establish further neuroprotective therapies. Despite clinical and experimental indications for an endogenous thermoregulatory response to HIE, the potential effects on HIE-induced brain injury have largely been neglected in pre-clinical studies. In the present study we analyzed gray and white matter injury and neurobehavioral outcome in neonatal mice considering the endogenous thermoregulatory response during HIE combined with HT. HIE was induced in postnatal day (PND) 9 C57BL/6 mice through occlusion of the right common carotid artery followed by one hour of hypoxia. Hypoxia was performed at 8% or 10% oxygen (O2) at two different temperatures based on the nesting body core temperature. Using the model which mimics the clinical situation most closely, i.e. through maintenance of the nesting temperature during hypoxia we compared two mild HT protocols (rectal temperature difference 3°C for 4h), initiated either immediately after HIE or with delay of 2h. Injury was determined by histology, immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses at PND 16 and PND 51. Functional outcome was evaluated by Rota Rod, Elevated Plus Maze, Open Field and Novel Object Recognition testing at PND 30-PND 36 and PND 44-PND 50. We show that HIE modeling in neonatal mice is associated with a significant endogenous drop in body core temperature by 2°C resulting in profound neuroprotection, expressed by reduced neuropathological injury scores, reduced loss of neurons, axonal structures, myelin and decreased astrogliosis. Immediately applied post-hypoxic HT revealed slight advantages over a delayed

  6. Renal Insufficiency and Early Bystander CPR Predict In-Hospital Outcomes in Cardiac Arrest Patients Undergoing Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia and Cardiac Catheterization: Return of Spontaneous Circulation, Cooling, and Catheterization Registry (ROSCCC Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Chelvanathan, Anjala; Allen, David; Bews, Hilary; Ducas, John; Minhas, Kunal; Ravandi, Amir; Jassal, Davinder S.; Hussain, Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients are a critically ill patient population with high mortality. Combining mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) with early coronary intervention may improve outcomes in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of mortality in OHCA patients undergoing MTH with and without cardiac catheterization. Design. A retrospective cohort of OHCA patients who underwent MTH with catheterization (MTH + C) and without catheterization (MTH + NC) between 2006 and 2011 was analyzed at a single tertiary care centre. Predictors of in-hospital mortality and neurologic outcome were determined. Results. The study population included 176 patients who underwent MTH for OHCA. A total of 66 patients underwent cardiac catheterization (MTH + C) and 110 patients did not undergo cardiac catheterization (MTH + NC). Immediate bystander CPR occurred in approximately half of the total population. In the MTH + C and MTH + NC groups, the in-hospital mortality was 48% and 78%, respectively. The only independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with MTH + C, after multivariate analysis, was baseline renal insufficiency (OR = 8.2, 95% CI 1.8–47.1, and p = 0.009). Conclusion. Despite early cardiac catheterization, renal insufficiency and the absence of immediate CPR are potent predictors of death and poor neurologic outcome in patients with OHCA. PMID:26885436

  7. Hypothermia and the trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Chun, Rosaleen; Brown, Ross; Simons, Richard K.

    Hypothermia has profound effects on every system in the body, causing an overall slowing of enzymatic reactions and reduced metabolic requirements. Hypothermic, acutely injured patients with multisystem trauma have adverse outcomes when compared with normothermic control patients. Trauma patients are inherently predisposed to hypothermia from a variety of intrinsic and iatrogenic causes. Coagulation and cardiac sequelae are the most pertinent physiological concerns. Hypothermia and coagulopathy often mandate a simplified approach to complex surgical problems. A modification of traditional classification systems of hypothermia, applicable to trauma patients is suggested. There are few controlled investigations, but clinical opinion strongly supports the active prevention of hypothermia in the acutely traumatized patient. Preventive measures are simple and inexpensive, but the active reversal of hypothermia is much more complicated, often invasive and controversial. The ideal method of rewarming is unclear but must be individualized to the patient and is institution specific. An algorithm reflecting newer approaches to traumatic injury and technical advances in equipment and techniques is suggested. Conversely, hypothermia has selected clinical benefits when appropriately used in cases of trauma. Severe hypothermia has allowed remarkable survivals in the course of accidental circulatory arrest. The selective application of mild hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury is an area with promise. Deliberate circulatory arrest with hypothermic cerebral protection has also been used for seemingly unrepairable injuries and is the focus of ongoing research. PMID:10526517

  8. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services. PMID:25494913

  9. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  10. [Time costs cardiac muscle tissue--prehospital therapy of acute myocardial infarct--a case report].

    PubMed

    Eschenburg, G; Pappert, D; Ohlmeier, H

    2003-01-01

    Symptoms of an acute myocardial infarction are a common reason for calling the emergency physician. Pre-hospital mortality caused by cardiac infarction is constantly high. The main potential for decreasing infarction mortality lies in the pre-hospital period. The problems and prospects of treatment in the early period are described in the case of a 73-year-old patient with an acute anterior infarction. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach is shown and discussed in this concrete case, taking into consideration the guidelines for diagnostics and therapy of acute myocardial infarction in the pre-hospital period of the German Society for Cardiology. A particular focus is the management of pre-hospital thrombolysis, the preconditions, realization and risks of which are described. In this context, the experience and competence of the emergency physician is prerequisite for the exact diagnosis and therapy. Furthermore, the importance of a smooth transition from pre-hospital therapy to intensive care is emphasized. PMID:12666508

  11. Drug-induced hypothermia in stroke models: does it always protect?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meijuan; Wang, Haiying; Zhao, Jinbing; Chen, Cong; Leak, Rehana K.; Xu, Yun; Vosler, Peter; Gao, Yanqin; Zhang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a common neurological disorder lacking a cure. Recent studies show that therapeutic hypothermia is a promising neuroprotective strategy against ischemic brain injury. Several methods to induce therapeutic hypothermia have been established; however, most of them are not clinically feasible for stroke patients. Therefore, pharmacological cooling is drawing increasing attention as a neuroprotective alternative worthy of further clinical development. We begin this review with a brief introduction to the commonly used methods for inducing hypothermia; we then focus on the hypothermic effects of eight classes of hypothermia-inducing drugs: the cannabinoids, opioid receptor activators, transient receptor potential vanilloid, neurotensins, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine receptor activators, hypothermia-inducing gases, adenosine, and adenine nucleotides. Their neuroprotective effects as well as the complications associated with their use are both considered. This article provides guidance for future clinical trials and animal studies on pharmacological cooling in the setting of acute stroke. PMID:23469851

  12. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care. PMID:26738719

  13. Mild therapeutic hypothermia is superior to controlled normothermia for the maintenance of blood pressure and cerebral oxygenation, prevention of organ damage and suppression of oxidative stress after cardiac arrest in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild therapeutic hypothermia (HT) has been implemented in the management of post cardiac arrest (CA) syndrome after the publication of clinical trials comparing HT with common practice (ie, usually hyperthermia). Current evidence on the comparison between therapeutic HT and controlled normothermia (NT) in CA survivors, however, remains insufficient. Methods Eight female swine (sus scrofa domestica; body weight 45 kg) were randomly assigned to receive either mild therapeutic HT or controlled NT, with four animals per group. Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was established and at minimal ECMO flow (0.5 L/min) ventricular fibrillation was induced by rapid ventricular pacing. After 20 min of CA, circulation was restored by increasing the ECMO flow to 4.5 L/min; 90 min of reperfusion followed. Target core temperatures (HT: 33°C; NT: 36.8°C) were maintained using the heat exchanger on the oxygenator. Invasive blood pressure was measured in the aortic arch, and cerebral oxygenation was assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy. After 60 min of reperfusion, up to three defibrillation attempts were performed. After 90 min of reperfusion, blood samples were drawn for the measurement of troponin I (TnI), myoglobin (MGB), creatine-phosphokinase (CPK), alanin-aminotransferase (ALT), neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and cystatin C (CysC) levels. Reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) levels and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) were also measured. Results Significantly higher blood pressure and cerebral oxygenation values were observed in the HT group (P<0.05). Sinus rhythm was restored in all of the HT animals and in one from the NT group. The levels of TnI, MGB, CPK, ALT, and ROM were significantly lower in the HT group (P<0.05); levels of NSE, CysC, and BAP were comparable in both groups. Conclusions Our results from animal model of cardiac arrest indicate that HT may be superior to NT for the maintenance of blood pressure, cerebral

  14. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  15. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  16. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  17. Hypothermia inhibits the propagation of acute ischemic injury by inhibiting HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Ho; Yoon, Eun Jang; Seo, Jeho; Kavoussi, Adriana; Chung, Yong Eun; Chung, Sung Phil; Park, Incheol; Kim, Chul Hoon; You, Je Sung

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke causes significant chronic disability worldwide. We designed this study to clarify the mechanism by which hypothermia helps alleviate acute ischemic stroke. In a middle cerebral artery occlusion model (4 h ischemia without reperfusion), hypothermia effectively reduces mean infarct volume. Hypothermia also prevents neurons in the infarct area from releasing high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), the most well-studied damage-associated molecular pattern protein. By preventing its release, hypothermia also prevents the typical middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced increase in serum HMGB1. We also found that both glycyrrhizin-mediated inhibition of HMGB1 and intracerebroventricular neutralizing antibody treatments before middle cerebral artery occlusion onset diminish infarct volume. This suggests a clear neuroprotective effect of HMGB1 inhibition by hypothermia in the brain. We next used real-time polymerase chain reaction to measure the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in peri-infarct regions. Although middle cerebral artery occlusion increases the expression of interleukin-1β and tissue necrosis factor-α, this elevation is suppressed by both hypothermia and glycyrrhizin treatment. We show that hypothermia reduces the production of inflammatory cytokines and helps salvage peri-infarct regions from the propagation of ischemic injury via HMGB1 blockade. In addition to suggesting a potential mechanism for hypothermia's therapeutic effects, our results suggest HMGB1 modulation may lengthen the therapeutic window for stroke treatments. PMID:27544687

  18. Prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Leona; Fitzpatrick, Jane

    All patients undergoing surgery are at risk of developing hypothermia; up to 70% develop hypothermia perioperatively. Inadvertent hypothermia is associated with complications such as impaired wound healing, increased blood loss, cardiac arrest and increased risk of wound infection. Anaesthesia increases the risk as the normal protective shivering reflex is absent. Ambient temperature also has a major effect on the patient's body temperature. Prevention of hypothermia not only reduces the incidence of complications, but patients also experience a greater level of comfort, and avoid postoperative shivering and the unpleasant sensation of feeling cold. Nurses should be aware of the risks of hypothermia so that preventative interventions can be employed to minimize the risk of hypothermia. Preoperative assessment is essential to enable identification of at-risk patients. Simple precautionary measures initiated by nurses can considerably reduce the amount of heat lost, minimize the risk of associated complications and ultimately improve patients' short- and long-term recovery. Minimizing skin exposure, providing adequate bed linen for the transfer to theatre and educating patients about the importance of keeping warm perioperatively are all extremely important. It is also worth considering using forced-air warmers preoperatively as research suggests that initiating active warming preoperatively may be successful in preventing hypothermia during the perioperative period. PMID:19966730

  19. Prehospital thrombolysis perfomed by a ship's nurse with on-line physician consultation.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Olli; Mäkijärvi, Markku; Silfvast, Tom

    2005-02-01

    Prehospital thrombolysis for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been shown to improve recovery from myocardial function. We describe prehospital thrombolytic treatment in two patients suffering from STEMI complicated by ventricular fibrillation (VF) on a passenger ship. The importance of a functioning Emergency Medical Service (EMS) system providing guidance for paramedical personnel is discussed briefly. Both our patients survived and returned back to normal life. It is concluded that EMS physician guided prehospital thrombolytic treatment may offer an important therapeutic option for nurses or paramedics in locations out of reach of ordinary EMS services. PMID:15680535

  20. Functional laser speckle imaging of cerebral blood flow under hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minheng; Miao, Peng; Zhu, Yisheng; Tong, Shanbao

    2011-08-01

    Hypothermia can unintentionally occur in daily life, e.g., in cardiovascular surgery or applied as therapeutics in the neurosciences critical care unit. So far, the temperature-induced spatiotemporal responses of the neural function have not been fully understood. In this study, we investigated the functional change in cerebral blood flow (CBF), accompanied with neuronal activation, by laser speckle imaging (LSI) during hypothermia. Laser speckle images from Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8, male) were acquired under normothermia (37°C) and moderate hypothermia (32°C). For each animal, 10 trials of electrical hindpaw stimulation were delivered under both temperatures. Using registered laser speckle contrast analysis and temporal clustering analysis (TCA), we found a delayed response peak and a prolonged response window under hypothermia. Hypothermia also decreased the activation area and the amplitude of the peak CBF. The combination of LSI and TCA is a high-resolution functional imaging method to investigate the spatiotemporal neurovascular coupling in both normal and pathological brain functions.

  1. Study on the priority of coronary arteriography or therapeutic hypothermia after return of spontaneous circulation in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: results from the SOS-KANTO 2012 study.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Shuichi

    2016-06-01

    Many emergency physicians struggle with the clinical question of whether to perform therapeutic hypothermia (TH) or coronary angiography (CAG) first after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We analyzed the results of the SOS-KANTO 2012 study, which is a prospective, multicenter (67 emergency hospitals), observational study about OHCA conducted between January 2012 and March 2013 (n = 16,452). We compared two groups: the group in which TH was first performed (TH group), and the group in which CAG was performed first (CAG group) within 24 h after arrival. Two hundred and twenty-one patients were treated TH and CAG (TH group, 76 patients; CAG group, 145 patients). In addition, we selected patients who underwent coronary treatment. 164 patients underwent coronary treatment after CAG (TH group, 52 patients; CAG group, 112 patients). In patients in whom TH and CAG and coronary artery treatment were done, 42 patients (55.3 %) in the TH group and 86 patients (59.3 %) in the CAG group survived at 90 days. The cerebral performance category (CPC) 1 and 2 were 26.3 % (20 patients) in TH group, and 31.0 % (45 patients) in CAG group. In patients in whom TH and CAG with coronary artery treatment were performed, 29 patients (55.8 %) in the TH group and 64 patients (57.1 %) in the CAG group survived at 90 days. The rates of CPC 1 and 2 were 26.9 % (14 patients) in TH group, and 23.2 % (26 patients) in CAG group. There was no significant difference in 90-day survival between the two groups although it tended to be better in the CAG group than in the TH group. Whether TH or CAG was performed first did not affect the 90-day survival and 30-day neurological situation among patients with ROSC after OHCA. PMID:26832353

  2. Clinical hypothermia temperatures increase complement activation and cell destruction via the classical pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is a treatment modality that is increasingly used to improve clinical neurological outcomes for ischemia-reperfusion injury-mediated diseases. Antibody-initiated classical complement pathway activation has been shown to contribute to ischemia-reperfusion injury in multiple disease processes. However, how therapeutic hypothermia affects complement activation is unknown. Our goal was to measure the independent effect of temperature on complement activation, and more specifically, examine the relationship between clinical hypothermia temperatures (31–33°C), and complement activation. Methods Antibody-sensitized erythrocytes were used to assay complement activation at temperatures ranging from 0-41°C. Individual complement pathway components were assayed by ELISA, Western blot, and quantitative dot blot. Peptide Inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1) was used to specifically inhibit activation of C1. Results Antibody-initiated complement activation resulting in eukaryotic cell lysis was increased by 2-fold at 31°C compared with 37°C. Antibody-initiated complement activation in human serum increased as temperature decreased from 37°C until dramatically decreasing at 13°C. Quantitation of individual complement components showed significantly increased activation of C4, C3, and C5 at clinical hypothermia temperatures. In contrast, C1s activation by heat-aggregated IgG decreased at therapeutic hypothermia temperatures consistent with decreased enzymatic activity at lower temperatures. However, C1q binding to antibody-coated erythrocytes increased at lower temperatures, suggesting that increased classical complement pathway activation is mediated by increased C1 binding at therapeutic hypothermia temperatures. PIC1 inhibited hypothermia-enhanced complement-mediated cell lysis at 31°C by up to 60% (P = 0.001) in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions In summary, therapeutic hypothermia temperatures increased antibody

  3. Glibenclamide enhances the effects of delayed hypothermia after experimental stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhou; Zhu, Shu-Zhen; Hu, Ya-Fang; Gu, Yong; Wang, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Zhen-Zhou; Xie, Zuo-Shan; Pan, Su-Yue

    2016-07-15

    In order to evaluate whether glibenclamide can extend the therapeutic window during which induced hypothermia can protect against stroke, we subjected adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). We first verified the protective effects of hypothermia induced at 0, 2, 4 or 6h after MCAO onset, and then we assessed the effects of the combination of glibenclamide and hypothermia at 6, 8 or 10h after MCAO onset. At 24h after MCAO, we assessed brain edema, infarct volume, modified neurological severity score, Evans Blue leakage and expression of Sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) protein and pro-inflammatory factors. No protective effects were observed when hypothermia was induced too long after MCAO. At 6h after MCAO onset, hypothermia alone failed to decrease cerebral edema and infarct volume, but the combination of glibenclamide and hypothermia decreased both. The combination also improved neurological outcome, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage and decreased levels of COX-2, TNF-α and IL-1β. These results suggest that glibenclamide enhances and extends the therapeutic effects of delayed hypothermia against ischemia stroke, potentially by ameliorating blood-brain barrier damage and declining levels of pro-inflammatory factors. PMID:27134036

  4. Halting Hypothermia: Cold Can Be Dangerous

    MedlinePlus

    ... who spends much time outdoors in very cold weather can get hypothermia. But hypothermia can happen anywhere— ... just outside and not just in bitter winter weather. It can strike when temperatures are cool—for ...

  5. Inadvertent Perianesthetic Hypothermia in Small Animal Patients.

    PubMed

    Clark-Price, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Inadvertent perianesthetic hypothermia is one of the most common complications in anesthesia of dogs and cats. Hypothermia during anesthesia can lead to altered pharmacokinetics of anesthetic and analgesic drugs, dysfunction of organ systems, increased patient susceptibility to infection, reduced wound healing, altered coagulation, hypotension, and delayed recovery. An understanding of the pathophysiology, complications, and techniques to minimize hypothermia during anesthesia can help veterinarians optimize care of patients. This article provides an overview of inadvertent perianesthetic hypothermia. PMID:26014270

  6. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  7. Neuroprotection and hypothermia in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, Domenico; Piastra, Marco; Luca, Ersilia; Mancino, Aaldo; Conti, Giorgio; Cavaliere, Franco; De Luca, Daniele

    2012-06-01

    Brain injury is the leading cause of death in pediatric ICU. Current evidence supports the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in unconscious patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest when the initial heart rhythm was ventricular fibrillation. TH has been proved to be also beneficial in term neonates after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent reports have also investigated TH for the treatment of superrefractory status epilepticus. The clinical application of TH is based on the possibility to inhibit or lessen a myriad of destructive processes (including excitotoxicty, neuroinflammation, apoptosis, free radical production, seizure activity, blood- brain barrier disruption, blood vessel leakage) that take place in the injured tissue following ischemia-reperfusion. TH may also represent a useful tool when conventional therapy fails to achieve an effective control of elevated intracranial pressure. This review is aimed to provide an update of the available literature concerning this intriguing topic. PMID:22512392

  8. [Hypothermia--mechanism of action and pathophysiological changes in the human body].

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Przemysław; Mikrut, Kinga; Krauss, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the physiological responses and pathophysiological changes induced by hypothermia. Normal body function depends on its ability to maintain thermal homeostasis. The human body can be divided arbitrarily into two thermal compartments: a core compartment (trunk and head), with precisely regulated temperature around 37°C, and a peripheral compartment (skin and extremities) with less strictly controlled temperature, and lower than the core temperature. Thermoregulatory processes occur in three phases: afferent thermal sensing, central regulation, mainly by the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, and efferent response. Exposure to cold induces thermoregulatory responses including cutaneous vasoconstriction, shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis, and behavioral changes. Alterations of body temperature associated with impaired thermoregulation, decreased heat production or increased heat loss can lead to hypothermia. Hypothermia is defined as a core body temperature below 35ºC, and may be classified according to the origin as accidental (e.g. caused by exposure to a cold environment, drugs, or illness) or intentional (i.e. therapeutic), or by the degree of hypothermia as mild, moderate or severe. Classification by temperature is not universal. Lowering of body temperature disrupts the physiological processes at the molecular, cellular and system level, but hypothermia induced prior to cardiosurgical or neurosurgical procedures, by the decrease in tissue oxygen demand, can reduce the risk of cerebral or cardiac ischemic damage. Therapeutic hypothermia has been recommended as a clinical procedure in situations characterized by ischemia, such as cardiac arrest, stroke and brain injuries. PMID:25614675

  9. Prehospital emergency trauma care and management.

    PubMed

    Kerby, Jeffrey D; Cusick, Marianne V

    2012-08-01

    Prehospital care of the trauma patient is continuing to evolve; however, the principles of airway maintenance, hemorrhage control, and appropriate resuscitative maneuvers remain central to the role of the emergency medical care provider. Recent changes in the regulations for research in emergency settings will allow randomized trials to proceed to test new devices, drugs, and resuscitative strategies in the prehospital environment. The creation of prehospital research networks will provide the appropriate infrastructure to greatly facilitate the development of new protocols and the execution of large-scale randomized trials with the potential to change current prehospital practice. PMID:22850149

  10. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P < 0.01). Examinations by transmission electron microscopy showed that mitochondria in the left ventricle of rats in the hypothermia group were significantly less swollen compared to such mitochondria in the normothermia group (P < 0.001). Additionally, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P < 0.05). The amount of STAT-3 phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 and its expression in mitochondria were significantly higher under hypothermia treatment compared to normothermia treatment. In vitro studies showed that inhibition STAT-3 activation abolished the ability of hypothermia to protect H9C2 cardiomyocytes against injury produced by simulated ischemia and reperfusion. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and help preserve both mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity. PMID:26471891

  11. Innovation possibilities for prehospital providers.

    PubMed

    Galli, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The national interest in disaster management and a burgeoning technology field are leading to the development of new approaches to emergency evaluation, triage, and treatment in prehospital and all hospital arenas. The ability to bring "hands-on" expertise, both physically and technologically, as quickly as possible to the trauma patient brings the potential for real advancement in the field. This descriptive report presents several such concepts that are moving into reality. PMID:16801269

  12. [Nurses and prehospital CBRN risk].

    PubMed

    Béguec, Francis; Pallier, Jérôme; Travers, Stéphane; Calamal, Franck; Lefort, Hugues; Bignand, Milichel

    2014-09-01

    With events presenting a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear risk, treating victims in the field can decrease lethality. in this context, the mismatch between the availability of care and the number of victims adds to the constraints of working in protective clothing. In the prehospital setting, nurses from the Paris fire brigade have a distinct role to play and Use specific equipment and antidotes, Theoretical and practical training is essential to be prepared for these situations. PMID:25508268

  13. [Nurses and prehospital CBRN risk].

    PubMed

    Béguec, Francis; Pallier, Jérôme; Travers, Stéphane; Calamal, Franck; Lefort, Hugues; Bignand, Milichel

    2014-09-01

    With events presenting a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear risk, treating victims in the field can decrease lethality. in this context, the mismatch between the availability of care and the number of victims adds to the constraints of working in protective clothing. In the prehospital setting, nurses from the Paris fire brigade have a distinct role to play and Use specific equipment and antidotes, Theoretical and practical training is essential to be prepared for these situations. PMID:25464637

  14. Moderate hypothermia induces marked increase in levels and nuclear accumulation of SUMO2/3-conjugated proteins in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liangli; Ma, Qing; Yang, Wei; Mackensen, G. Burkhard; Paschen, Wulf

    2012-01-01

    Deep hypothermia protects the brain from ischemic damage and is therefore used during major cardiovascular surgeries requiring cardiopulmonary bypass and a period of circulatory arrest. Here, we demonstrated that small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO1-3) conjugation is markedly activated in the brain during deep to moderate hypothermia. Animals were subjected to normothermic (37°C) or deep to moderate (18°C, 24°C, 30°C) hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and the effects of hypothermia on SUMO conjugation were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Exposure to moderate 30°C hypothermia was sufficient to markedly increased levels and nuclear accumulation of SUMO2/3-conjugated proteins in these cells. Deep hypothermia induced nuclear translocation of the SUMO conjugating enzyme Ubc9, suggesting that the increase in nuclear levels of SUMO2/3-conjugated proteins observed in brains of hypothermic animals is an active process. Exposure of primary neuronal cultures to deep hypothermia induced only a moderate rise in levels of SUMO2/3-conjugated proteins. This suggests that neurons in vivo have a higher capacity than neurons in vitro to activate this endogenous potentially neuroprotective pathway upon exposure to hypothermia. Identifying proteins that are SUMO2/3 conjugated during hypothermia could help to design new strategies for preventive and therapeutic interventions to make neurons more resistant to a transient interruption of blood supply. PMID:22891650

  15. Advances in prehospital airway management

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, PE; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts. PMID:24741499

  16. Myocardial protection with mild hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Tissier, Renaud; Ghaleh, Bijan; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M; Berdeaux, Alain

    2012-05-01

    Mild hypothermia, 32-35° C, is very potent at reducing myocardial infarct size in rabbits, dogs, sheep, pigs, and rats. The benefit is directly related to reduction in normothermic ischaemic time, supporting the relevance of early and rapid cooling. The cardioprotective effect of mild hypothermia is not limited to its recognized reduction of infarct size, but also results in conservation of post-ischaemic contractile function, prevention of no-reflow or microvascular obstruction, and ultimately attenuation of left ventricular remodelling. The mechanism of the anti-infarct effect does not appear to be related to diminished energy utilization and metabolic preservation, but rather to survival signalling that involves either the extracellular signal-regulated kinases and/or the Akt/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Initial clinical trials of hypothermia in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were disappointing, probably because cooling was too slow to shorten normothermic ischaemic time appreciably. New approaches to more rapid cooling have recently been described and may soon be available for clinical use. Alternatively, it may be possible to pharmacologically mimic the protection provided by cooling soon after the onset of ischaemia with an activator of mild hypothermia signalling, e.g. extracellular signal-regulated kinase activator, that could be given by emergency medical personnel. Finally, the protection afforded by cooling can be added to that of pre- and post-conditioning because their mechanisms differ. Thus, myocardial salvage might be greatly increased by rapidly cooling patients as soon as possible and then giving a pharmacological post-conditioning agent immediately prior to reperfusion. PMID:22131353

  17. The big chill: accidental hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert Allan

    2012-01-01

    A potential cause of such emergent issues as cardiac arrhythmias, hypotension, and fluid and electrolyte shifts, accidental hypothermia can be deadly, is common among trauma patients, and is often difficult to recognize. The author discusses predisposing conditions, the classic presentation, and the effects on normal thermoregulatory processes; explains how to conduct a systems assessment of the hypothermic patient; and describes crucial management strategies. PMID:22186703

  18. Heart Rate and Arterial Pressure Changes during Whole-Body Deep Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Giacomo; Filippi, Luca; Raffaeli, Genny; Cristofori, Gloria; Schena, Federico; Agazzani, Elisa; Amodeo, Ilaria; Griggio, Alice; Boccacci, Simona; Fiorini, Patrizio; Mosca, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Whole-body deep hypothermia (DH) could be a new therapeutic strategy for asphyxiated newborn. This retrospective study describes how DH modified the heart rate and arterial blood pressure if compared to mild hypothermia (MH). Fourteen in DH and 17 in MH were cooled within the first six hours of life and for the following 72 hours. Hypothermia criteria were gestational age ≥36 weeks; birth weight ≥1800 g; clinical signs of moderate/severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Rewarming was obtained in the following 6-12 hours (0.5°C/h) after cooling. Heart rates were the same between the two groups; there was statistically significant difference at the beginning of hypothermia and during rewarming. Three babies in the DH group and 2 in the MH group showed HR < 80 bpm and QTc > 520 ms. Infant submitted to deep hypothermia had not bradycardia or Qtc elongation before cooling and after rewarming. Blood pressure was significantly lower in DH compared to MH during the cooling, and peculiar was the hypotension during rewarming in DH group. Conclusion. The deeper hypothermia is a safe and feasible, only if it is performed by a well-trained team. DH should only be associated with a clinical trial and prospective randomized trials to validate its use. PMID:23691350

  19. Heart Rate and Arterial Pressure Changes during Whole-Body Deep Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Cavallaro, Giacomo; Filippi, Luca; Raffaeli, Genny; Cristofori, Gloria; Schena, Federico; Agazzani, Elisa; Amodeo, Ilaria; Griggio, Alice; Boccacci, Simona; Fiorini, Patrizio; Mosca, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Whole-body deep hypothermia (DH) could be a new therapeutic strategy for asphyxiated newborn. This retrospective study describes how DH modified the heart rate and arterial blood pressure if compared to mild hypothermia (MH). Fourteen in DH and 17 in MH were cooled within the first six hours of life and for the following 72 hours. Hypothermia criteria were gestational age ≥36 weeks; birth weight ≥1800 g; clinical signs of moderate/severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Rewarming was obtained in the following 6–12 hours (0.5°C/h) after cooling. Heart rates were the same between the two groups; there was statistically significant difference at the beginning of hypothermia and during rewarming. Three babies in the DH group and 2 in the MH group showed HR < 80 bpm and QTc > 520 ms. Infant submitted to deep hypothermia had not bradycardia or Qtc elongation before cooling and after rewarming. Blood pressure was significantly lower in DH compared to MH during the cooling, and peculiar was the hypotension during rewarming in DH group. Conclusion. The deeper hypothermia is a safe and feasible, only if it is performed by a well-trained team. DH should only be associated with a clinical trial and prospective randomized trials to validate its use. PMID:23691350

  20. Dantrolene enhances the protective effect of hypothermia on cerebral cortex neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sui-yi; Hu, Feng-yun; Ren, Li-jie; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Zhu-qing; Zhang, Xie-jun; Li, Wei-ping

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is the most promising non-pharmacological neuroprotective strategy against ischemic injury. However, shivering is the most common adverse reaction. Many studies have shown that dantrolene is neuroprotective in in vitro and in vivo ischemic injury models. In addition to its neuroprotective effect, dantrolene neutralizes the adverse reaction of hypothermia. Dantrolene may be an effective adjunctive therapy to enhance the neuroprotection of hypothermia in treating ischemic stroke. Cortical neurons isolated from rat fetuses were exposed to 90 minutes of oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation. Neurons were treated with 40 μM dantrolene, hypothermia (at 33°C), or the combination of both for 12 hours. Results revealed that the combination of dantrolene and hypothermia increased neuronal survival and the mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced intracellular active oxygen cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, and apoptosis. Furthermore, improvements in cell morphology were observed. The combined treatment enhanced these responses compared with either treatment alone. These findings indicate that dantrolene may be used as an effective adjunctive therapy to enhance the neuroprotective effects of hypothermia in ischemic stroke. PMID:26487856

  1. A comparison of invasive airway management and rates of pneumonia in prehospital and hospital

    PubMed Central

    Andrusiek, Douglas L; Szydlo, Danny; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J; Minei, Joseph; van Heest, Rardi; MacDonald, Russell; Schreiber, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma. Infection in trauma is poorly understood. The impact of prehospital invasive airway management (IAM) on the incidence of pneumonia and health services utilization is unknown. We hypothesized that trauma patients exposed to prehospital IAM will suffer higher rates of pneumonia compared to no IAM or exposure to IAM performed in the hospital. We hypothesized that patients who develop pneumonia subsequent to prehospital IAM will have longer ICU and hospital LOS compared to patients who acquired pneumonia after IAM performed in the hospital. Methods This is an observational cohort study of data previously collected for the ROC hypertonic resuscitation randomized trial. Patients were included if traumatic injury resulted in shock, traumatic brain injury or both. Patients were excluded if they died 24 hours after injury, or pneumonia data were missing. Adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio of pneumonia if exposed in the prehospital setting compared to no exposure or exposure in the hospital. Results Of 2222 patients enrolled in HS, 1676 patients met enrolment criteria for this study. Four and a half percent of patients suffered pneumonia. IAM in the prehospital setting resulted in 6.8 fold increase (C.I. 2.0, 23.0, p=0.003) in the adjusted odds of developing pneumonia compared to not being intubated, while in hospital intubation resulted in 4.8 fold increase (C.I. 1.4, 16.6, p=0.01), which was not statistically significantly different to the odds ratio of prehospital IAM. There were no statistically significant increases in health services utilization resulting from pneumonia incurred after IAM. Conclusion Exposure to IAM in prehospital and in hospital setting results in an increase in pneumonia, however, there does not appear to be a link between the source of pneumonia and an increase in ICU or hospital LOS. Levels of Evidence Level III, therapeutic

  2. Adult Status Epilepticus: A Review of the Prehospital and Emergency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Billington, Michael; Kandalaft, Osama R; Aisiku, Imoigele P

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation in the prehospital and emergency department setting and status epilepticus represents an emergency neurologic condition. The classification and various types of seizures are numerous. The objectives of this narrative literature review focuses on adult patients with a presentation of status epilepticus in the prehospital and emergency department setting. In summary, benzodiazepines remain the primary first line therapeutic agent in the management of status epilepticus, however, there are new agents that may be appropriate for the management of status epilepticus as second- and third-line pharmacological agents. PMID:27563928

  3. [Prehospital thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Carlsson, J; Schuster, H P; Tebbe, U

    1997-10-01

    The extent of myocardial damage occurring during acute myocardial infarction is time dependent, and there is abundant evidence from most clinical trials that mortality reduction is greatest in patients treated early with thrombolytic agents, although beneficial effects have been shown with treatment initiated up to 12 h after onset of symptoms. All studies on prehospital thrombolysis have conclusively shown the practicability and safety of patient selection and administration of the thrombolytic agent. The accuracy of diagnosis in the prehospital setting was comparable to trials of in-hospital thrombolysis, e.g., in the Myocardial Infarction Triage and Intervention Project (MITI) 98% of the patients enrolled had subsequent evidence of acute myocardial infarction. With regard to time savings, all randomized studies showed positive results. The smallest time gain was observed in the MITI trial: prehospital-treated patients received thrombolytic therapy an average of 33 min earlier than those treated in hospital. In the European Myocardial Infarction Project (EMIP) the difference in time between prehospital and hospital treatment was a median of 55 min. However, none of these trials was able to show a significant short-term mortality difference between the two groups. Only a meta analysis of five randomized studies with a combined median time gain of about 60 min showed a significant 17% reduction in short-term mortality for patients who received thrombolytic therapy in the prehospital phase. In the Grampian Region Early Anistreplase Trial (GREAT), a study performed in a more rural area than other studies, the time gain by prehospital initiation of thrombolysis was a median of 130 min. GREAT was the only study to date reporting a significant mortality benefit for prehospital-treated patients after 3 months and 1 year. In conclusion, prehospital thrombolysis is feasible and safe. Patients with acute myocardial infarction can be correctly identified and treated with

  4. MicroRNA-155 potentiates the inflammatory response in hypothermia by suppressing IL-10 production.

    PubMed

    Billeter, Adrian T; Hellmann, Jason; Roberts, Henry; Druen, Devin; Gardner, Sarah A; Sarojini, Harshini; Galandiuk, Susan; Chien, Sufan; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Spite, Matthew; Polk, Hiram C

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is commonly used to improve neurological outcomes in patients after cardiac arrest. However, therapeutic hypothermia increases sepsis risk and unintentional hypothermia in surgical patients increases infectious complications. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms by which hypothermia dysregulates innate immunity are incompletely understood. We found that exposure of human monocytes to cold (32°C) potentiated LPS-induced production of TNF and IL-6, while blunting IL-10 production. This dysregulation was associated with increased expression of microRNA-155 (miR-155), which potentiates Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling by negatively regulating Ship1 and Socs1. Indeed, Ship1 and Socs1 were suppressed at 32°C and miR-155 antagomirs increased Ship1 and Socs1 and reversed the alterations in cytokine production in cold-exposed monocytes. In contrast, miR-155 mimics phenocopied the effects of cold exposure, reducing Ship1 and Socs1 and altering TNF and IL-10 production. In a murine model of LPS-induced peritonitis, cold exposure potentiated hypothermia and decreased survival (10 vs. 50%; P < 0.05), effects that were associated with increased miR-155, suppression of Ship1 and Socs1, and alterations in TNF and IL-10. Importantly, miR-155-deficiency reduced hypothermia and improved survival (78 vs. 32%, P < 0.05), which was associated with increased Ship1, Socs1, and IL-10. These results establish a causal role of miR-155 in the dysregulation of the inflammatory response to hypothermia. PMID:25231976

  5. Study of therapeutic hypothermia (32 to 35°C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial): outcome of the pilot phase of the trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical trials in traumatic brain injury (TBI) are challenging. Previous trials of complex interventions were conducted in high-income countries, reported long lead times for site setup and low screened-to-recruitment rates. In this report we evaluate the internal pilot phase of an international, multicentre TBI trial of a complex intervention to assess: design and implementation of an online case report form; feasibility of recruitment (sites and patients); feasibility and effectiveness of delivery of the protocol. Methods All aspects of the pilot phase of the trial were conducted as for the main trial. The pilot phase had oversight by independent Steering and Data Monitoring committees. Results Forty sites across 12 countries gained ethical approval. Thirty seven of 40 sites were initiated for recruitment. Of these, 29 had screened patients and 21 randomized at least one patient. Lead times to ethics approval (6.8 weeks), hospital approval (18 weeks), interest to set up (61 weeks), set up to screening (11 weeks), and set up to randomization (31.6 weeks) are comparable with other international trials. Sixteen per cent of screened patients were eligible. We found 88% compliance rate with trial protocol. Conclusion The pilot data demonstrated good feasibility for this large international multicentre randomized controlled trial of hypothermia to control intracranial pressure. The sample size was reduced to 600 patients because of homogeneity of the patient group and we showed an optimized cooling intervention could be delivered. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN34555414. PMID:24004918

  6. Extending the duration of hypothermia does not further improve white matter protection after ischemia in term-equivalent fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Joanne O.; Yuill, Caroline A.; Zhang, Frank G.; Wassink, Guido; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in modern neonatal care is to further improve outcomes after therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. In this study we tested whether extending the duration of cooling might reduce white matter damage. Term-equivalent fetal sheep (0.85 gestation) received either sham ischemia followed by normothermia (n = 8) or 30 minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by three days of normothermia (n = 8), three days of hypothermia (n = 8) or five days of hypothermia (n = 8) started three hours after ischemia. Histology was assessed 7 days after ischemia. Ischemia was associated with loss of myelin basic protein (MBP) and Olig-2 positive oligodendrocytes and increased Iba-1-positive microglia compared to sham controls (p < 0.05). Three days and five days of hypothermia were associated with a similar, partial improvement in MBP and numbers of oligodendrocytes compared to ischemia-normothermia (p < 0.05). Both hypothermia groups had reduced microglial activation compared to ischemia-normothermia (p < 0.05). In the ischemia-five-day hypothermia group, but not ischemia-three-day, numbers of microglia remained higher than in sham controls (p < 0.05). In conclusion, delayed cerebral hypothermia partially protected white matter after global cerebral ischemia in fetal sheep. Extending cooling from 3 to 5 days did not further improve outcomes, and may be associated with greater numbers of residual microglia. PMID:27121655

  7. Hypothermia, torpor and the fundamental importance of understanding the central control of thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Tupone, Domenico; Morrison, Shaun

    2014-01-01

    Activation of central adenosine A1 receptors in the rat, a non-hibernating species, mimics the physiological characteristics of torpor and could thus represent a basis for the development of pharmacological approaches to induce therapeutic hypothermia in pathologies such as brain hemorrhage and ischemia, and to facilitate long-term space travel.

  8. The Effects of Local and General Hypothermia on Temperature Profiles of the Central Nervous System Following Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bazley, Faith A.; Pashai, Nikta; Kerr, Candace L.

    2014-01-01

    Local and general hypothermia are used to treat spinal cord injury (SCI), as well as other neurological traumas. While hypothermia is known to provide significant therapeutic benefits due to its neuroprotective nature, it is unclear how the treatment may affect healthy tissues or whether it may cause undesired temperature changes in areas of the body that are not the targets of treatment. We performed 2-hour moderate general hypothermia (32°C core) or local hypothermia (30°C spinal cord) on rats that had received either a moderate contusive SCI or laminectomy (control) while monitoring temperatures at three sites: the core, spinal cord, and cortex. First, we identified that injured rats that received general hypothermia exhibited larger temperature drops at the spinal cord (−3.65°C, 95% confidence intervals [CIs] −3.72, −3.58) and cortex (−3.64°C, CIs −3.73, −3.55) than uninjured rats (spinal cord: −3.17°C, CIs −3.24, −3.10; cortex: −3.26°C, CIs −3.34, −3.17). This was found due to elevated baseline temperatures in the injured group, which could be due to inflammation. Second, both general hypothermia and local hypothermia caused a significant reduction in the cortical temperature (−3.64°C and −1.18°C, respectively), although local hypothermia caused a significantly lower drop in cortical temperature than general hypothermia (p<0.001). Lastly, the rates of rewarming of the cord were not significantly different among the methods or injury groups that were tested; the mean rate of rewarming was 0.13±0.1°C/min. In conclusion, local hypothermia may be more suitable for longer durations of hypothermia treatment for SCI to reduce temperature changes in healthy tissues, including the cortex. PMID:25019643

  9. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... not possible, get the person out of the wind and use a blanket to provide insulation from ... protect your body. These include: Mittens (not gloves) Wind-proof, water-resistant, many-layered clothing Two pairs ...

  10. Prevention of perioperative hypothermia in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Young, V Leroy; Watson, Marla E

    2006-01-01

    While inadvertent perioperative hypothermia has received serious attention in many surgical specialties, few discussions of hypothermia have been published in the plastic surgery literature. This article reviews the physiology of thermoregulation, describes how both general and regional anesthesia alter the normal thermoregulatory mechanisms, indicates risk factors particularly associated with hypothermia, and discusses the most effective current methods for maintaining normothermia. Hypothermia is typically defined as a core body temperature of /=36.5 degrees C is maintained. Unless preventive measures are instituted, inadvertent hypothermia occurs in 50% to 90% of surgical patients, even those undergoing relatively short procedures lasting one to one-and-a-half hours. During either general or regional anesthesia, a patient's natural behavioral and autonomic responses to cold are unavailable or impaired, and the combination of general and neuraxial anesthesia produces the highest risk for inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Unless hypothermia is prevented, the restoration of normothermia can take more than 4 hours once anesthesia is stopped. Consequences of hypothermia are serious and affect surgical outcomes in plastic surgery patients. Potential complications include morbid cardiac events, coagulation disorders and blood loss, increased incidence of surgical wound infection, postoperative shivering, longer hospital stays, and increased costs associated with surgery. Measures for preventing hypothermia are emphasized in this article, especially those proven most effective in prospective and controlled clinical studies. Perhaps the most important step in maintaining normothermia is to prewarm patients in the preoperative area with forced-air heating systems. Intraoperative warming with forced-air and fluid warming are also essential. Other strategies

  11. Prehospital activated charcoal: the way forward

    PubMed Central

    Greene, S; Kerins, M; O'Connor, N

    2005-01-01

    Methods: A postal questionnaire was used to determine the current level of use of prehospital activated charcoal by ambulance NHS trusts, the incidence of associated complications, and barriers preventing the routine use of prehospital SDAC. Results: A completed questionnaire was returned by 36 of the 39 ambulance NHS trusts in the UK (response rate 92%). Currently none of the trusts that responded to the questionnaire provides prehospital SDAC as an intervention. The most common barriers to the provision of prehospital SDAC are the current lack of evidence in the medical literature proving it is effective in improving patient outcome and the lack of a recognised protocol for its administration. Other issues included concerns regarding potential complications, ambulance turnaround times, lack of availability of SDAC, and lack of funding. Conclusions: A lack of published evidence proving efficacy remains the most important factor in preventing the routine administration of SDAC to appropriate patients in the prehospital environment. Further research in this setting is required to determine the usefulness of this therapy. PMID:16189043

  12. Streamlining of prehospital stroke management: the golden hour.

    PubMed

    Fassbender, Klaus; Balucani, Clotilde; Walter, Silke; Levine, Steven R; Haass, Anton; Grotta, James

    2013-06-01

    Thrombolysis with alteplase administered within a narrow therapeutic window provides an effective therapy for acute ischaemic stroke. However, mainly because of prehospital delay, patients often arrive too late for treatment, and no more than 1-8% of patients with stroke obtain this treatment. We recommend that all links in the prehospital stroke rescue chain must be optimised so that in the future more than a small minority of patients can profit from time-sensitive acute stroke therapy. Measures for improvement include continuous public awareness campaigns, education of emergency medical service personnel, the use of standardised, validated scales for recognition of stroke symptoms and for triaging to the appropriate institution, and advance notification to the receiving hospital. In the future, use of telemedicine technologies for interaction between the emergency site and hospital, and the strategy of treatment directly at the emergency site (mobile stroke unit concept), could contribute to more efficient use of resources and reduce the time taken to instigate treatment to within 60 min--the golden hour--of the onset of the symptoms of stroke. PMID:23684084

  13. A recommended early goal-directed management guideline for the prevention of hypothermia-related transfusion, morbidity, and mortality in severely injured trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Ryan; Callum, Jeannie; Laflamme, Claude; Tien, Homer; Nascimento, Barto; Beckett, Andrew; Alam, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is present in up to two-thirds of patients with severe injury, although it is often disregarded during the initial resuscitation. Studies have revealed that hypothermia is associated with mortality in a large percentage of trauma cases when the patient's temperature is below 32 °C. Risk factors include the severity of injury, wet clothing, low transport unit temperature, use of anesthesia, and prolonged surgery. Fortunately, associated coagulation disorders have been shown to completely resolve with aggressive warming. Selected passive and active warming techniques can be applied in damage control resuscitation. While treatment guidelines exist for acidosis and bleeding, there is no evidence-based approach to managing hypothermia in trauma patients. We synthesized a goal-directed algorithm for warming the severely injured patient that can be directly incorporated into current Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines. This involves the early use of warming blankets and removal of wet clothing in the prehospital phase followed by aggressive rewarming on arrival at the hospital if the patient's injuries require damage control therapy. Future research in hypothermia management should concentrate on applying this treatment algorithm and should evaluate its influence on patient outcomes. This treatment strategy may help to reduce blood loss and improve morbidity and mortality in this population of patients. PMID:27095272

  14. Prehospital care in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lo, C B; Lai, K K; Mak, K P

    2000-09-01

    A quick and efficient prehospital emergency response depends on immediate ambulance dispatch, patient assessment, triage, and transport to hospital. During 1999, the Ambulance Command of the Hong Kong Fire Services Department responded to 484,923 calls, which corresponds to 1329 calls each day. Cooperation between the Fire Services Department and the Hospital Authority exists at the levels of professional training of emergency medical personnel, quality assurance, and a coordinated disaster response. In response to the incident at the Hong Kong International Airport in the summer of 1999, when an aircraft overturned during landing, the pre-set quota system was implemented to send patients to designated accident and emergency departments. Furthermore, the 'first crew at the scene' model has been adopted, whereby the command is established and triage process started by the first ambulance crew members to reach the scene. The development of emergency protocols should be accompanied by good field-to-hospital and interhospital communication, the upgrading of decision-making skills, a good monitoring and auditing structure, and commitment to training and skills maintenance. PMID:11025847

  15. BIOMARKERS S100B AND NSE PREDICT OUTCOME IN HYPOTHERMIA-TREATED ENCEPHALOPATHIC NEWBORNS

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, An N.; Chang, Taeun; Baumgart, Stephen; McCarter, Robert; Nelson, Karin B.; Glass, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if serum S100B protein and neuron specific enolase (NSE) measured during therapeutic hypothermia are predictive of neurodevelopmental outcome at 15 months in children with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study Setting A level IV neonatal intensive care unit in a free-standing children’s hospital. Patients Term newborns with moderate to severe NE referred for therapeutic hypothermia during the study period. Interventions Serum NSE and S100B were measured at 0, 12, 24 and 72 hrs of hypothermia. Measurements and Main Reseults Of the 83 infants were enrolled, fifteen (18%) died in the newborn period. Survivors were evaluated by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-II) at 15 months of age. Outcomes were assessed in 49/68 (72%) survivors at a mean age of 15.2±2.7 months. Neurodevelopmental outcome was classified by BSID-II Mental (MDI) and Psychomotor (PDI) Developmental Index scores, reflecting cognitive and motor outcomes respectively. Four-level outcome classifications were defined a priori: normal= MDI/PDI within 1SD (>85), mild= MDI/PDI <1SD (70–85), moderate/severe= MDI/PDI <2SD (<70), or died. Elevated serum S100B and NSE levels measured during hypothermia were associated with increasing outcome severity after controlling for baseline and soceioeconomic characteristics in ordinal regression models. Adjusted odds ratios for cognitive outcome were: S100B 2.5 (95% CI 1.3–4.8) and NSE 2.1 (1.2–3.6); for motor outcome: S100B 2.6 (1.2–5.6) and NSE 2.1 (1.2–3.6). Conclusions Serum S100B and NSE levels in babies with NE are associated with neurodevelopmental outcome at 15 months. These putative biomarkers of brain injury may help direct care during therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:24777302

  16. A consensus-based template for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physician-staffed pre-hospital units are employed in many Western emergency medical services (EMS) systems. Although these services usually integrate well within their EMS, little is known about the quality of care delivered, the precision of dispatch, and whether the services deliver a higher quality of care to pre-hospital patients. There is no common data set collected to document the activity of physician pre-hospital activity which makes shared research efforts difficult. The aim of this study was to develop a core data set for routine documentation and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services in Europe. Methods Using predefined criteria, we recruited sixteen European experts in the field of pre-hospital care. These experts were guided through a four-step modified nominal group technique. The process was carried out using both e-mail-based communication and a plenary meeting in Stavanger, Norway. Results The core data set was divided into 5 sections: "fixed system variables", "event operational descriptors", " patient descriptors", "process mapping", and "outcome measures and quality indicators". After the initial round, a total of 361 variables were proposed by the experts. Subsequent rounds reduced the number of core variables to 45. These constituted the final core data set. Emphasis was placed on the standardisation of reporting time variables, chief complaints and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions Using a modified nominal group technique, we have established a core data set for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services. We believe that this template could facilitate future studies within the field and facilitate standardised reporting and future shared research efforts in advanced pre-hospital care. PMID:22107787

  17. Inadvertant hypothermia and active warming for surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Judith

    Inadvertant hypothermia is common among surgical patients and can result in serious complications. This article describes active warming systems which can be used preoperatively and intraoperatively to prevent hypothermia and maintain normothermia (normal body temperature). PMID:22067488

  18. Data on the gene expression of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xue, Xiaodong; Xu, Yinli; Zhang, Yuji; Li, Zhi; Wang, Huishan

    2016-09-01

    Hypothermia is widely used in neurosurgery and cardiac surgeries. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. We previously reported that the transcriptome responses of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia, "The transcriptome responses of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia" [4]. Herein, we provide the hypothermia inhibited proliferation of cardiomyocyte cells in vitro and the details of transcription factors in regulation of differentially expressed genes. PMID:27274530

  19. Induced hypothermia for trauma-related ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Gagandeep; Gopal, Palepu B.; Kamat, Akshata S.; Mulavisala, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of 27-year-old male with lung contusions related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) managed by ARDSNet guidelines and additional hypothermia. On 4th day, post trauma partial pressure of oxygen dropped to 38 mm of mercury (Hg), not improving even on high positive end-expiratory pressure of 18 cm water (H2O), inverse ratio ventilation and fraction of inspired oxygen of 1. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was ruled out due to the risk of hemorrhage from trauma sites. Thereafter, hypothermia along with muscle paralysis was considered to reduce total body oxygen consumption. Patient's condition improved under hypothermia, and he was extubated and taken up for fracture fixation surgeries and discharged later in stable condition. PMID:26195862

  20. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  1. Systemic Administration of the TRPV3 Ion Channel Agonist Carvacrol Induces Hypothermia in Conscious Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Feketa, Viktor V.; Marrelli, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a promising new strategy for neuroprotection. However, the methods for safe and effective hypothermia induction in conscious patients are lacking. The current study explored the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) channel activation by the agonist carvacrol as a potential hypothermic strategy. It was found that carvacrol lowers core temperature after intraperitoneal and intravenous administration in mice and rats. However, the hypothermic effect at safe doses was modest, while higher intravenous doses of carvacrol induced a pronounced drop in blood pressure and substantial toxicity. Experiments on the mechanism of the hypothermic effect in mice revealed that it was associated with a decrease in whole-body heat generation, but not with a change in cold-seeking behaviors. In addition, the hypothermic effect was lost at cold ambient temperature. Our findings suggest that although TRPV3 agonism induces hypothermia in rodents, it may have a limited potential as a novel pharmacological method for induction of hypothermia in conscious patients due to suboptimal effectiveness and high toxicity. PMID:26528923

  2. Drugs and alcohol in hypothermia and hyperthermia related deaths: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Kortelainen, M L

    1987-11-01

    Hypothermia and hyperthermia related cases recorded for the period 1973 to 1984 were collected from the files of the Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Oulu, and the necropsy protocols including toxicological results were analyzed. The fact that similar alcohol concentrations were found in both types of fatalities points to the poikilothermic effect of alcohol in humans, as found in animal studies. Both types of deaths seem to be associated with the alcohol elimination phase. Antidepressants and neuroleptics were most often found in the hypothermia cases, but benzodiazepines were also quite frequently present. In spite of the diminished use of barbiturates, these still appear in hypothermia fatalities. Certain other drugs that affect thermoregulation were also noted in solitary cases. Extended toxicological analysis was seldom made in the cases of hyperthermia deaths, and no firm conclusions on the poikilothermic effect of psychotropic drugs could be reached, for example. Therapeutic drug concentrations did not alone predispose the subjects to hypothermia, but appeared in connection with alcohol consumption or chronic diseases. PMID:3430138

  3. Utilization of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and Induced Hypothermia After Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mir J.; Exline, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic gas produced as a byproduct of organic waste and many industrial processes. Hydrogen sulfide exposure symptoms may vary from mild (dizziness, headaches, nausea) to severe lactic acidosis via its inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias and death. Treatment is generally supportive. We report the case of a patient presenting with cardiac arrest secondary to hydrogen sulfide exposure treated with both hyperbaric oxygen therapy and therapeutic hypothermia with great improvement in neurologic function. PMID:22004989

  4. Hypothermia and the Elderly: Perceptions and Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Carol E.; Pestle, Ruth E.

    1987-01-01

    Interviewed 381 older adults participating in Area Agency on Aging meal programs in Florida. Found that only 10 percent were aware of dangers of accidental hypothermia. Many low-income elderly are vulnerable to cold because of poorly insulated homes, inadequate heating, and lack of warm clothing. States need initiatives to increase comfort levels…

  5. [Hypothermia in people in situations of precarity].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Serge

    2011-05-01

    Human beings are physiologically warm blooded. Confronted with extreme cold, they become subject to hypothermia. Between a mountain climber and a person living in the street, the functions of resistance to a drop in external temperature are not the same. Studies on this subject remain to be carried out. PMID:21717680

  6. Posttraumatic hypothermia increases doublecortin expressing neurons in the dentate gyrus after traumatic brain injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bregy, Amade; Nixon, Ryan; Lotocki, George; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Atkins, Coleen M.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that moderate hypothermia reduces histopathological damage and improves behavioral outcome after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). Further investigations have clarified the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of hypothermia by showing that cooling reduces multiple cell injury cascades. The purpose of this study was to determine whether hypothermia could also enhance endogenous reparative processes following TBI such as neurogenesis and the replacement of lost neurons. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent moderate fluid-percussion brain injury and then were randomized into normothermia (37°C) or hypothermia (33°C) treatment. Animals received injections of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to detect mitotic cells after brain injury. After 3 or 7 days, animals were perfusion-fixed and processed for immunocytochemistry and confocal analysis. Sections were stained for markers selective for cell proliferation (BrdU), neuroblasts and immature neurons (doublecortin), and mature neurons (NeuN) and then analyzed using non-biased stereology to quantify neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG). At 7 days after TBI, both normothermic and hypothermic TBI animals demonstrated a significant increase in the number of BrdU-immunoreactive cells in the DG as compared to sham-operated controls. At 7 days post-injury, hypothermia animals had a greater number of BrdU (ipsilateral cortex) and doublecortin (ipsilateral and contralateral cortex) immunoreactive cells in the DG as compared to normothermia animals. Because adult neurogenesis following injury may be associated with enhanced functional recovery, these data demonstrate that therapeutic hypothermia sustains the increase in neurogenesis induced by TBI and this may one of the mechanisms by which hypothermia promotes reparative strategies in the injured nervous system. PMID:22197046

  7. Hypothermia for Increased Intracranial Pressure: Is It Dead?

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Christos; Robertson, Claudia S

    2016-09-01

    Mild to moderate therapeutic hypothermia (HT) has been used to alleviate intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Its main contribution is thought to be via reduction in cerebral metabolic requirement leading both to favorable oxygen/metabolic delivery-demand ratios as well as a reduction of cerebral blood volume resulting in decreased ICP. Nevertheless, HT is a clinically complex, labor-intensive procedure with numerous potential adverse effects. Furthermore, randomized controlled trials suggest either no effect or harm. These facts challenge the role of HT in TBI. We address this challenge by posing three questions that relate to the overarching value of controlling ICP, the effectiveness of HT in reducing ICP, and the benefit-risk ratio of the intervention. We conclude that HT should not be used as an "early" intervention unless as a part of a clinical trial, although it may still have a role in patients with refractory intracranial hypertension. PMID:27443645

  8. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; Danzl, Daniel F; Brugger, Hermann; Sagalyn, Emily B; Walpoth, Beat; Weiss, Eric A; Auerbach, Paul S; McIntosh, Scott E; Némethy, Mária; McDevitt, Marion; Dow, Jennifer; Schoene, Robert B; Rodway, George W; Hackett, Peter H; Bennett, Brad L; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of victims of accidental hypothermia. The guidelines present the main diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and provide recommendations for the management of hypothermic patients. The panel graded the recommendations based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between benefits and risks/burdens according the criteria published by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested general approaches to the evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia that incorporate specific recommendations. PMID:25443771

  9. Angiogenesis Dysregulation in Term Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Henna; Boudes, Elodie; Khoja, Zehra; Shevell, Michael; Wintermark, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal encephalopathy following birth asphyxia is a major predictor of long-term neurological impairment. Therapeutic hypothermia is currently the standard of care to prevent brain injury in asphyxiated newborns but is not protective in all cases. More robust and versatile treatment options are needed. Angiogenesis is a demonstrated therapeutic target in adult stroke. However, no systematic study examines the expression of angiogenesis-related markers following birth asphyxia in human newborns. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the expression of angiogenesis-related protein markers in asphyxiated newborns developing and not developing brain injury compared to healthy control newborns. Design/Methods Twelve asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were prospectively enrolled; six developed eventual brain injury and six did not. Four healthy control newborns were also included. We used Rules-Based Medicine multi-analyte profiling and protein array technologies to study the plasma concentration of 49 angiogenesis-related proteins. Mean protein concentrations were compared between each group of newborns. Results Compared to healthy newborns, asphyxiated newborns not developing brain injury showed up-regulation of pro-angiogenic proteins, including fatty acid binding protein-4, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, neuropilin-1, and receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-3; this up-regulation was not evident in asphyxiated newborns eventually developing brain injury. Also, asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury showed a decreased expression of anti-angiogenic proteins, including insulin-growth factor binding proteins -1, -4, and -6, compared to healthy newborns. Conclusions These findings suggest that angiogenesis pathways are dysregulated following birth asphyxia and are putatively involved in brain injury pathology and recovery. PMID:25996847

  10. [Prehospital thrombolysis. Evaluation of preliminary experiences at Val-de-Marne].

    PubMed

    Dubois-Randé, J L; Herve, C; Duval-Moulin, A M; Gaillard, M; Boesch, C; Louvard, Y; Wolf, M; Jan, F; Castaigne, A

    1989-12-01

    Benefits of thrombolysis have been shown to be greater when therapy is administered early, and this led us to consider the value of starting thrombolytic treatment in the patient's home. However, this implies the transfer of responsibility of patient management from the cardiologist to the physician in charge of the mobile emergency care team. A study was undertaken in the Val-de-Marne department to assess the benefits and risks of this therapeutic approach. The first phase was designed to evaluate the reliability of the emergency care team's diagnosis and the second phase of the study was a randomised double blind prehospital therapeutic trial of a thrombolytic agent, acylated streptokinase (intravenous bolus of 30 units in 4 minutes) against placebo. The nature of prehospital treatment was revealed on hospital admission and thrombolytic therapy was immediately given to those patients allocated to placebo at home providing the admitting cardiologist confirmed the indication. A total of 100 patients were included; 57 were allocated to thrombolytic therapy and 43 to placebo in the prehospital phase. The diagnosis of acute coronary insufficiency was confirmed in all cases and 97 p. 100 of patients had signs of acute myocardial infarction. No complications were attributable to prehospital administration of the thrombolytic. The average time gain in instituting treatment was 60 minutes. At control coronary angiography, 72 p. 100 of the coronary arteries thought to the responsible for the infarct were shown to be patent. The global left ventricular ejection fraction of patients treated with thrombolysis at home was 56.7 p. 100 compared with 53.4 p. 100 in the placebo group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2515822

  11. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:27482221

  12. Multiscale Entropy Analysis of EEG for Assessment of Post-Cardiac Arrest Neurological Recovery Under Hypothermia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G.; Maybhate, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the α-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological examinations. Ten Wistar rats, upon post-CA resuscitation, were randomly subjected to hypothermia (32 °C–34 °C, N = 5) or normothermia (36.5 °C–37.5 °C, N = 5). EEG was recorded and analyzed using MSE during seven recovery phases for each experiment: baseline, CA, and five early recovery phases (R1–R5). Postresuscitation neurological examination was performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h to obtain neurological deficit scores (NDSs). Results showed MSE to be a sensitive marker of changes in α-rhythms. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the MSE for two groups during recovery, suggesting that MSE can successfully reflect temperature modulation. A comparison of short-term MSE and long-term NDS suggested that MSE could be used for predicting favorability of long-term outcome. These experiments point to the role of cortical rhythms in reporting early neurological response to ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19174339

  13. Multiscale entropy analysis of EEG for assessment of post-cardiac arrest neurological recovery under hypothermia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Thakor, Nitish V; Maybhate, Anil

    2009-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the alpha-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological examinations. Ten Wistar rats, upon post-CA resuscitation, were randomly subjected to hypothermia (32 degrees C-34 degrees C, N = 5) or normothermia (36.5 degrees C-37.5 degrees C, N = 5). EEG was recorded and analyzed using MSE during seven recovery phases for each experiment: baseline, CA, and five early recovery phases (R1-R5). Postresuscitation neurological examination was performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h to obtain neurological deficit scores (NDSs). Results showed MSE to be a sensitive marker of changes in alpha-rhythms. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the MSE for two groups during recovery, suggesting that MSE can successfully reflect temperature modulation. A comparison of short-term MSE and long-term NDS suggested that MSE could be used for predicting favorability of long-term outcome. These experiments point to the role of cortical rhythms in reporting early neurological response to ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19174339

  14. A case of unrecognized prehospital anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Ryan C; Gratton, Matthew C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A case of prehospital anaphylactic shock that presented atypically, without a known exposure, is discussed. Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction that requires prompt recognition and aggressive treatment. While there is little diagnostic dilemma (specifically used in the conclusion section of this paper) in the recognition and management of "classic" presentations of anaphylaxis there is likely a need for further education of prehospital providers, as well as emergency physicians, on how to recognize atypical cases of anaphylaxis. These cases can be equally severe, with potentially fatal consequences if missed. The diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis are reviewed, as well as barriers that providers encounter in diagnosing uncommon presentations. PMID:20954971

  15. [Prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries].

    PubMed

    Samokhvallov, I M; Reva, V A; Pronchenko, A A; Seleznev, A B

    2011-09-01

    The problem of temporary hemorrhage control is one of the most important issues of modern war surgery and surgery of trauma. It is a review of literature devoted to prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries, embraced up-to-date domestic materials as well as the modern foreign papers in this area. The most important historical landmarks of temporary hemorrhage control system are considered. We paid special attention to the most usable methods and means of hemorrhage control which are utilized at the modern time: pressure bandages, tourniquets, local haemostatic agents. The comprehensive analysis of the contamporary haemostatic means concerning U.S. Army has done. The experience of foreign colleagues in development of prehospital care for the injured, creation and progress of new haemostatic methods, application of temporary hemorrhage control system is analyzed. PMID:22165585

  16. Strategies for therapeutic hypometabothermia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shimin; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2013-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia and metabolic suppression have shown robust neuroprotection in experimental brain ischemia, systemic complications have limited their use in treating acute stroke patients. The core temperature and basic metabolic rate are tightly regulated and maintained in a very stable level in mammals. Simply lowering body temperature or metabolic rate is actually a brutal therapy that may cause more systemic as well as regional problems other than providing protection. These problems are commonly seen in hypothermia and barbiturate coma. The main innovative concept of this review is to propose thermogenically optimal and synergistic reduction of core temperature and metabolic rate in therapeutic hypometabothermia using novel and clinically practical approaches. When metabolism and body temperature are reduced in a systematically synergistic manner, the outcome will be maximal protection and safe recovery, which happen in natural process, such as in hibernation, daily torpor and estivation. PMID:24179563

  17. Emergency center thoracotomy: impact of prehospital resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Durham, L A; Richardson, R J; Wall, M J; Pepe, P E; Mattox, K L

    1992-06-01

    Emergency center thoracotomy was performed at our facility on 389 patients from 1984 through 1989. There were no patients excluded from the study, and survival for all patients was 8.3% with survival rates of 15.2% and 7.3% for stab and gunshot wounds, respectively. Emergency center thoracotomy was performed on 42 patients suffering from isolated extrathoracic injuries with 7% survival. There were no survivors of blunt trauma in this study. Fifty-three percent of the patients arrived with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in progress. The average time of prehospital CPR for survivors was 5.1 minutes compared with 9.1 minutes for nonsurvivors. Of the survivors, prehospital endotracheal intubation prolonged successful toleration of CPR to 9.4 minutes compared with 4.2 minutes for nonintubated surviving patients (p less than 0.001). Emergency center thoracotomy is useful in the resuscitation of victims dying of penetrating truncal trauma. Prehospital endotracheal intubation significantly lengthened the time of successful CPR. PMID:1613838

  18. [Management of peri-operative hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Meré, L A; Alvarez-Blanco, M

    2012-01-01

    Hypothermia (body temperature under 36°C) is the thermal disorder most frequently found in surgical patients, but should be avoided as a means of reducing morbidity and costs. Temperature should be considered as a vital sign and all staff involved in the care of surgical patients must be aware that it has to be maintained within normal limits. Maintaining body temperature is the result, as in any other system, of the balance between heat production and heat loss. Temperature regulation takes place through a system of positive and negative feedback in the central nervous system, being developed in three phases: thermal afferent, central regulation and efferent response. Prevention is the best way to ensure a normal temperature. The active warming of the patient during surgery is mandatory. Using warm air is the most effective, simple and cheap way to prevent and treat hypothermia. PMID:22789615

  19. Therapeutic hypothermia and frostbite injury: a preventable source.

    PubMed

    Lohana, Parkash; Hart, Andrew

    2011-05-01

    Frostbite injury from cold exposure is not uncommon. The application of ice pack is well known in clinical practice; however, its improper use can pose danger to the patient. We report a case of frostbite injury due to prolonged use of ice packs in a ventilated patient. PMID:21680308

  20. The small chill: mild hypothermia for cardioprotection?

    PubMed

    Tissier, Renaud; Chenoune, Mourad; Ghaleh, Bijan; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M; Berdeaux, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Reducing the heart's temperature by 2-5°C is a potent cardioprotective treatment in animal models of coronary artery occlusion. The anti-infarct benefit depends upon the target temperature and the time at which cooling is instituted. Protection primarily results from cooling during the ischaemic period, whereas cooling during reperfusion or beyond offers little protection. In animal studies, protection is proportional to both the depth and duration of cooling. An optimal cooling protocol must appreciably shorten the normothermic ischaemic time to effectively salvage myocardium. Patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction could be candidates for mild hypothermia since the current door-to-balloon time is typically 90 min. But they would have to be cooled quickly shortly after their arrival. Several strategies have been proposed for ultra-fast cooling, but most like liquid ventilation and pericardial perfusion are too invasive. More feasible strategies might include cutaneous cooling, peritoneal lavage with cold solutions, and endovascular cooling with intravenous thermodes. This last option has been investigated clinically, but the results have been disappointing possibly because the devices lacked capacity to cool the patient quickly or cooling was not implemented soon enough. The mechanism of hypothermia's protection has been assumed to be energy conservation. However, whereas deep hypothermia clearly preserves ATP, mild hypothermia has only a modest effect on ATP depletion during ischaemia. Some evidence suggests that intracellular signalling pathways might be responsible for the protection. It is unknown how cooling could trigger these pathways, but, if true, then it might be possible to duplicate cooling's protection pharmacologically. PMID:20621922

  1. Biomarkers of Brain Injury in Neonatal Encephalopathy Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, An N.; Chang, Taeun; Kadom, Nadja; Tsuchida, Tammy; Scafidi, Joseph; Glass, Penny; McCarter, Robert; Baumgart, Stephen; Vezina, Gilbert; Nelson, Karin B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if early serum S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels are associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in newborns with encephalopathy. Study design Patients who received therapeutic whole-body hypothermia were prospectively enrolled in this observational study. Serum specimens were collected at 0, 12, 24, and 72 hours of cooling. S100B and NSE levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in surviving infants at 7–10 days of life. Standardized neurologic examination was performed by a child neurologist at 14 days of life. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between S100B and NSE levels and unfavorable outcome (death or severe magnetic resonance imaging injury/significant neurologic deficit). Cutoff values were determined by receiver operating curve analysis. Results Newborns with moderate to severe encephalopathy were enrolled (n = 75). Median pH at presentation was 6.9 (range, 6.5–7.35), and median Apgar scores of 1 at 1 minute, 3 at 5 minutes, and 5 at 10 minutes. NSE and S100B levels were higher in patients with unfavorable outcomes across all time points. These results remained statistically significant after controlling for covariables, including encephalopathy grade at presentation, Apgar score at 5 minutes of life, initial pH, and clinical seizures. Conclusion Elevated serum S100B and NSE levels measured during hypothermia were associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in encephalopathic newborns. These brain-specific proteins may be useful immediate biomarkers of cerebral injury severity. PMID:22494878

  2. Outcome-related metabolomic patterns from 1H/31P NMR after mild hypothermia treatments of oxygen–glucose deprivation in a neonatal brain slice model of asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Litt, Lawrence; Segal, Mark R; Kelly, Mark J S; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; James, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Human clinical trials using 72 hours of mild hypothermia (32°C–34°C) after neonatal asphyxia have found substantially improved neurologic outcomes. As temperature changes differently modulate numerous metabolite fluxes and concentrations, we hypothesized that 1H/31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of intracellular metabolites can distinguish different insults, treatments, and recovery stages. Three groups of superfused neonatal rat brain slices underwent 45 minutes oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) and then were: treated for 3 hours with mild hypothermia (32°C) that began with OGD, or similarly treated with hypothermia after a 15-minute delay, or not treated (normothermic control group, 37°C). Hypothermia was followed by 3 hours of normothermic recovery. Slices collected at different predetermined times were processed, respectively, for 14.1 Tesla NMR analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) cell-death quantification, and superoxide production. Forty-nine NMR-observable metabolites underwent a multivariate analysis. Separated clustering in scores plots was found for treatment and outcome groups. Final ATP (adenosine triphosphate) levels, severely decreased at normothermia, were restored equally by immediate and delayed hypothermia. Cell death was decreased by immediate hypothermia, but was equally substantially greater with normothermia and delayed hypothermia. Potentially important biomarkers in the 1H spectra included PCr-1H (phosphocreatine in the 1H spectrum), ATP-1H (adenosine triphosphate in the 1H spectrum), and ADP-1H (adenosine diphosphate in the 1H spectrum). The findings suggest a potential role for metabolomic monitoring during therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20717124

  3. Outcome-related metabolomic patterns from 1H/31P NMR after mild hypothermia treatments of oxygen-glucose deprivation in a neonatal brain slice model of asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Litt, Lawrence; Segal, Mark R; Kelly, Mark J S; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; James, Thomas L

    2011-02-01

    Human clinical trials using 72 hours of mild hypothermia (32°C-34°C) after neonatal asphyxia have found substantially improved neurologic outcomes. As temperature changes differently modulate numerous metabolite fluxes and concentrations, we hypothesized that (1)H/(31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of intracellular metabolites can distinguish different insults, treatments, and recovery stages. Three groups of superfused neonatal rat brain slices underwent 45 minutes oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and then were: treated for 3 hours with mild hypothermia (32°C) that began with OGD, or similarly treated with hypothermia after a 15-minute delay, or not treated (normothermic control group, 37°C). Hypothermia was followed by 3 hours of normothermic recovery. Slices collected at different predetermined times were processed, respectively, for 14.1 Tesla NMR analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) cell-death quantification, and superoxide production. Forty-nine NMR-observable metabolites underwent a multivariate analysis. Separated clustering in scores plots was found for treatment and outcome groups. Final ATP (adenosine triphosphate) levels, severely decreased at normothermia, were restored equally by immediate and delayed hypothermia. Cell death was decreased by immediate hypothermia, but was equally substantially greater with normothermia and delayed hypothermia. Potentially important biomarkers in the (1)H spectra included PCr-(1)H (phosphocreatine in the (1)H spectrum), ATP-(1)H (adenosine triphosphate in the (1)H spectrum), and ADP-(1)H (adenosine diphosphate in the (1)H spectrum). The findings suggest a potential role for metabolomic monitoring during therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20717124

  4. Hypothermia attenuates apoptosis and protects contact between myelin basic protein-expressing oligodendroglial-lineage cells and neurons against hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Mari; Kamei, Yoshimasa; Iriyama, Takayuki; Imada, Shinya; Seyama, Takahiro; Toshimitsu, Masatake; Asou, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2014-10-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a major form of brain injury among preterm infants, which is characterized by extensive loss and dysfunction of premyelinating oligodendrocytes (pre-OLs) induced by hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Therapeutic hypothermia, which is a standard treatment for term infants with HI encephalopathy, is not indicated for preterm infants because its safety and effect have not been established. Here we investigate the effectiveness and mechanism of hypothermia for the inhibition of pre-OLs damage in PVL. For in vivo studies, 6-day-old rats underwent left carotid artery ligation, followed by exposure to 6% oxygen for 1 hr under hypothermic or normothermic conditions. The loss of myelin basic protein (MBP) was inhibited by hypothermia. For in vitro studies, primary pre-OLs cultures were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) under normothermic or hypothermic conditions, and dorsal root ganglion neurons were subsequently added. Hypothermia inhibited apoptosis of pre-OLs, and, despite specific downregulation of 21.5- and 17-kDa MBP mRNA expression during hypothermia, recovery of the expression after OGD was superior compared with normothermia. OGD caused disarrangement of MBP distribution, decreased the levels of phosphorylated 21.5-kDa MBP, and disturbed the capacity to contact with neurons, all of which were restored by hypothermia. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation with U0126 during and after OGD significantly reduced the protective effects of hypothermia on apoptosis and myelination, respectively. These data suggest that phosphorylated exon 2-containing (21.5- and possibly 17-kDa) MBP isoforms may play critical roles in myelination and that hypothermia attenuates apoptosis and preserves the contact between OLs and neurons via ERK1/2 phosphorylation. PMID:24865975

  5. Mild hypothermia attenuates post-resuscitation brain injury through a V-ATPase mechanism in a rat model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J C; Lu, W; Xie, X M; Pan, H; Wu, Z Q; Yang, G T

    2016-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia is an effective treatment for post-resuscitation brain injury after cardiac arrest (CA), the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) plays a key role in cellular adaption to a hypoxic environment. This study sought to evaluate the effect of mild hypothermia on V-ATPase and its involvement in neuroprotection after CA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 6-min CA, resuscitated successfully, and then assigned to either the normothermia (NT) group or the hypothermia (HT) group. Rats were further divided into 2 subgroups based on the time of euthanasia, either 3 or 24 h after CA (NT-3 h, HT-3 h; NT-24 h, HT-24 h). Mild hypothermia was induced following CA and maintained at 33°C for 2 h. Neurologic deficit scores were used to determine the status of neurological function. Brain specimens were analyzed by TUNEL assay, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. V-ATPase activity was estimated by subtracting total ATP hydrolysis from the bafilomycin-sensitive activity. Mild hypothermia improved the neurological outcome (HT-24 h: 34.3 ± 16.4 vs NT-24 h: 50.3 ± 17.4) and significantly decreased neurocyte apoptosis 24 h after resuscitation. Mild hypothermia significantly increased V0a1 compared to NT-3 h; V0a1 expression was associated with a decrease in the cleaved caspase 3 expression. These findings suggested that mild hypothermia inhibits CA-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus, which may be associated with reduced V-ATPase impairment. These data provide new insights into the protective effects of hypothermia in vivo. PMID:27323115

  6. Prehospital Emergency Nursing students' experiences of learning during prehospital clinical placements.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Kim; Fridlund, Bengt; Thorén, Ann-Britt

    2013-07-01

    Clinical placements play an important role in learning a new profession, but students report about poor placement experiences. Standards have been laid down for improvements within clinical training in Prehospital Emergency Nursing programmes in Sweden, but no studies have been carried out in this field in a Swedish context. The purpose of this study was thus to describe the experiences of Prehospital Emergency Nursing (PEN) students of their clinical placement and the effect on their learning process. Data were collected in 28 individual interviews and analyzed in accordance with Flanagan's Critical Incident Technique. Three main areas emerged: the professional clinical supervisor, the clinical placement setting and the learning strategy. All these areas played a significant role in the PEN students' learning progress and development into a new professional role. The choice of clinical supervisor (CS) and clinical placement is important if PEN students' learning is to be an effective and positive experience. The prehospital environment is unique and can have positive and negative effects on student learning depending on the support and structure given during their clinical placement. A learning strategy based on reflective dialogue, CS continuity and a learning structure based on the prehospital environment is presented. PMID:23140791

  7. Hyperbilirubinemia exaggerates endotoxin-induced hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Pakai, Eszter; Garami, Andras; Nucci, Tatiane B; Ivanov, Andrei I; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is accompanied by an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by either fever or hypothermia (or both). To study aseptic systemic inflammation, it is often induced in rats by the intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knowing that bilirubin is a potent ROS scavenger, we compared responses to LPS between normobilirubinemic Gunn rats (heterozygous, asymptomatic; J/+) and hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats (homozygous, jaundiced; J/J) to establish whether ROS mediate fever and hypothermia in aseptic systemic inflammation. These two genotypes correspond to undisturbed versus drastically suppressed (by bilirubin) tissue accumulation of ROS, respectively. A low dose of LPS (10 μg/kg) caused a typical triphasic fever in both genotypes, without any intergenotype differences. A high dose of LPS (1,000 μg/kg) caused a complex response consisting of early hypothermia followed by late fever. The hypothermic response was markedly exaggerated, whereas the subsequent fever response was strongly attenuated in J/J rats, as compared to J/+ rats. J/J rats also tended to respond to 1,000 μg/kg with blunted surges in plasma levels of all hepatic enzymes studied (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase), thus suggesting an attenuation of hepatic damage. We propose that the reported exaggeration of LPS-induced hypothermia in J/J rats occurs via direct inhibition of nonshivering thermogenesis by bilirubin and possibly via a direct vasodilatatory action of bilirubin in the skin. This hypothermia-exaggerating effect might be responsible, at least in part, for the observed tendency of J/J rats to be protected from LPS-induced hepatic damage. The attenuation of the fever response to 1,000 μg/kg could be due to either direct actions of bilirubin on thermoeffectors or the ROS-scavenging action of bilirubin. However, the experiments with 10 μg/kg strongly suggest that ROS signaling is

  8. [Severe accidental hypothermia in an elderly woman].

    PubMed

    Knobel, B; Mikhlin, A

    2001-11-01

    Profound hypothermia (core temperature of less than 28 degrees C) is a life threatening state and a medical emergency associated with a high mortality rate. The prognosis depends on underlying diseases, advanced or very early age, the duration prior to treatment, the degree of hemodynamic deterioration, and especially, the methods of treatment, including active external or internal rewarming. This is a case study of an 80-year-old female patient with severe accidental hypothermia (core temperature 27 degrees C). She was found in her home lying immobile on the cold floor after a fall. The patient was in a profound coma with cardiocirculatory collapse, and the medical staff treating her was inclined to pronounce her deceased. On her arrival at the hospital, she was resuscitated, put on a respirator and actively warmed. Very severe metabolic disorders were found, including a marked metabolic acidosis composed of diabetic ketoacidosis (she had suffered from insulin treated type 2 diabetes mellitus) and lactic acidosis with a very high anion gap (42) and a hyperosmotic state (blood glucose 1202 mg/dl). There were pathognomonic electrocardiographic abnormalities, J-wave of Osborn and prolonged repolarization. Slow atrial fibrillation with a ventricular response of 30 bpm followed by a nodal rhythm of 12 bpm and reversible cardiac arrest were recorded. The pulse and blood pressure were unobtainable. Despite the successful resuscitation and hemodynamic and cognitive improvement, rhabdomyolysis (CKP 6580 u/L), renal failure and hepatic damage developed. She was extubated and treated with intravenous fluids containing dopamine, bicarbonate, insulin and antibiotics. Her medical condition gradually improved, and she was discharged clear minded, functioning very well and independent. Renal and liver tests returned eventually to normal limits. Progressive bradycardia, hypotension and death due to ventricular fibrillation or asystole commonly occur during severe hypothermia

  9. Hyperbilirubinemia exaggerates endotoxin-induced hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Pakai, Eszter; Garami, Andras; Nucci, Tatiane B; Ivanov, Andrei I; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is accompanied by an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by either fever or hypothermia (or both). To study aseptic systemic inflammation, it is often induced in rats by the intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knowing that bilirubin is a potent ROS scavenger, we compared responses to LPS between normobilirubinemic Gunn rats (heterozygous, asymptomatic; J/+) and hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats (homozygous, jaundiced; J/J) to establish whether ROS mediate fever and hypothermia in aseptic systemic inflammation. These two genotypes correspond to undisturbed versus drastically suppressed (by bilirubin) tissue accumulation of ROS, respectively. A low dose of LPS (10 μg/kg) caused a typical triphasic fever in both genotypes, without any intergenotype differences. A high dose of LPS (1,000 μg/kg) caused a complex response consisting of early hypothermia followed by late fever. The hypothermic response was markedly exaggerated, whereas the subsequent fever response was strongly attenuated in J/J rats, as compared to J/+ rats. J/J rats also tended to respond to 1,000 μg/kg with blunted surges in plasma levels of all hepatic enzymes studied (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase), thus suggesting an attenuation of hepatic damage. We propose that the reported exaggeration of LPS-induced hypothermia in J/J rats occurs via direct inhibition of nonshivering thermogenesis by bilirubin and possibly via a direct vasodilatatory action of bilirubin in the skin. This hypothermia-exaggerating effect might be responsible, at least in part, for the observed tendency of J/J rats to be protected from LPS-induced hepatic damage. The attenuation of the fever response to 1,000 μg/kg could be due to either direct actions of bilirubin on thermoeffectors or the ROS-scavenging action of bilirubin. However, the experiments with 10 μg/kg strongly suggest that ROS signaling is not

  10. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia via TRPV1 channel agonism provides neuroprotection following ischemic stroke when initiated 90 min after reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhijuan; Balasubramanian, Adithya

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of therapeutic hypothermia show promise for neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R), however, with limitations. We examined effectiveness and specificity of pharmacological hypothermia (PH) by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel agonism in the treatment of focal cerebral I/R. Core temperature (Tcore) was measured after subcutaneous infusion of TRPV1 agonist dihydrocapsaicin (DHC) in conscious C57BL/6 WT and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. Acute measurements of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cerebral perfusion were measured before and after DHC treatment. Focal cerebral I/R (1 h ischemia + 24 h reperfusion) was induced by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. Hypothermia (>8 h) was initiated 90 min after start of reperfusion by DHC infusion (osmotic pump). Neurofunction (behavioral testing) and infarct volume (TTC staining) were measured at 24 h. DHC (1.25 mg/kg) produced a stable drop in Tcore (33°C) in naive and I/R mouse models but not in TRPV1 KO mice. DHC (1.25 mg/kg) had no measurable effect on HR and cerebral perfusion but produced a slight transient drop in MAP (<6 mmHg). In stroke mice, DHC infusion produced hypothermia, decreased infarct volume by 87%, and improved neurofunctional score. The hypothermic and neuroprotective effects of DHC were absent in TRPV1 KO mice or mice maintained normothermic with heat support. PH via TRPV1 agonist appears to be a well-tolerated and effective method for promoting mild hypothermia in the conscious mouse. Furthermore, TRPV1 agonism produces effective hypothermia in I/R mice and significantly improves outcome when initiated 90 min after start of reperfusion. PMID:24305062

  11. Short- and long-latency somatosensory neuronal responses reveal selective brain injury and effect of hypothermia in global hypoxic ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Xiong, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2012-01-01

    Evoked potentials recorded from the somatosensory cortex have been shown to be an electrophysiological marker of brain injury in global hypoxic ischemia (HI). The evoked responses in somatosensory neurons carry information pertaining to signal from the ascending pathway in both the subcortical and cortical areas. In this study, origins of the subcortical and cortical signals are explored by decomposing the evoked neuronal activities into short- and long-latency responses (SLR and LLR), respectively. We evaluated the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on SLR and LLR during early recovery from cardiac arrest (CA)-induced HI in a rodent model. Twelve rats were subjected to CA, after which half of them were treated with hypothermia (32–34°C) and the rest were kept at normal temperature (36–37°C). Evoked neuronal activities from the primary somatosensory cortex, including multiunit activity (MUA) and local field potential (LFP), were continuously recorded during injury and early recovery. Results showed that upon initiation of injury, LLR disappeared first, followed by the disappearance of SLR, and after a period of isoelectric silence SLR reappeared prior to LLR. This suggests that cortical activity, which primarily underlies the LLR, may be more vulnerable to ischemic injury than SLR, which relates to subcortical activity. Hypothermia potentiated the SLR but suppressed the LLR by delaying its recovery after CA (hypothermia: 38.83 ± 5.86 min, normothermia: 23.33 ± 1.15 min; P < 0.05) and attenuating its amplitude, suggesting that hypothermia may selectively downregulate cortical activity as an approach to preserve the cerebral cortex. In summary, our study reveals the vulnerability of the somatosensory neural structures to global HI and the differential effects of hypothermia on these structures. PMID:22157111

  12. Hypothermia improves disease manifestations in SMA mice via SMN augmentation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Tsai, Yi-Chieh; Ting, Chen-Hung; Chien, Yin-Hsio; Lee, Ni-Chong; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2016-02-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by a deficiency of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intermittent transient hypothermia in a mouse model of SMA. SMA mice were exposed to ice for 50 s to achieve transient hypothermia (below 25°C) daily beginning on postnatal day 1. Neonatal SMA mice (Smn(-/-)SMN2(+/-)) who received daily transient hypothermia exhibited reduced motor neuron degeneration and muscle atrophy and preserved the architecture of neuromuscular junction when compared with untreated controls at day 8 post-treatment. Daily hypothermia also prolonged the lifespan, increased body weight and improved motor coordination in SMA mice. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses showed that transient hypothermia led to an increase in SMN transcript and protein levels in the spinal cord and brain. In in vitro studies using an SMN knockdown motor neuron-like cell-line, transient hypothermia increased intracellular SMN protein expression and length of neurites, confirming the direct effect of hypothermia on motor neurons. These data indicate that the efficacy of intermittent transient hypothermia in improving outcome in an SMA mouse model may be mediated, in part, via an upregulation of SMN levels in the motor neurons. PMID:26647309

  13. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  14. Gastric Mucosal Petechial Hemorrhages (Wischnewsky Lesions), Hypothermia, and Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kenneth Howard; Stoppacher, Robert

    2016-09-01

    For more than 100 years since their initial description, gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages have been discovered at autopsy in cases where environmental hypothermia was determined to be the cause of death. Although these lesions are frequently seen in deaths caused by environmental hypothermia, they can also be seen in cases where hypothermia is not implicated; however, this has been seldom described. We present a series of autopsy cases where hypothermia has been conclusively ruled out as a cause of death, in which Wischnewsky lesions are found. In all of these cases, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was determined to be the proximate cause of death, as confirmed through clinical history, laboratory analysis, and absence of other anatomic or toxicological findings. We provide a mechanism of Wischnewsky lesion formation and how that mechanism relates to both hypothermia and ketoacidosis. Our data show that gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages are not specific for hypothermia-related deaths, and are likely indicative of a state in which hypothermia and DKA have a common underlying pathophysiology, most likely a coagulopathy. Our data also illustrate that in autopsy cases where Wischnewsky lesions are found, DKA should be seriously considered as the underlying cause of death, particularly in the absence of indications of environmental hypothermia. PMID:27356011

  15. GABAB receptors as a common target for hypothermia and spike and wave seizures: intersecting mechanisms of thermoregulation and absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Z S; Ilić, T V; Vesković, S M; Andjus, P R

    2013-05-15

    wave discharges, registered during the spontaneous rewarming from deep hypothermia, were completely prevented by CGP 35348. These findings show that systemic hypothermia should definitely be regarded as a marker of GABAB receptor activation. Moreover, the results of this study clearly show that initial mild temperature decrease should be considered as strong absence-provoking factor. Hypothermia-induced nonconvulsive seizures also highlight the importance of continuous EEG monitoring in children undergoing therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Since every change in peripheral or systemic temperature ultimately must be perceived by preoptic region of the anterior hypothalamus as the primary thermoregulatory and sleep-inducing center, the preoptic thermosensitive neurons in general and warm-sensitive neurons in particular, simply have to be regarded as the most probable candidate for connected thermoregulatory and absence generating mechanisms. Therefore, additional studies are needed to confirm their potential role in the generation and propagation of absence seizures. PMID:23415784

  16. [Pathophysiology and management of perioperative hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Wojciech; Maj, Jakub

    2006-06-01

    The paper is a review of pathophysiology and management of perioperative hypothermia. The advanced methods of rewarming, such as passive and active: external and core used in clinic allow for efficient management ant prophylactics of hypothermia. Thermotherapy with use of infrared ceiling heaters CTS and mobile MTC as well as Infutherm system applying by authors are desirable and even indispensable in contemporary equipment of surgery clinics, cardiovascular surgery clinics and burn centers. The ideal rewarming method should be safe and enable fast, reliable and predictable warming or rewarming. The clinical parameter to determine the efficacy of rewarming is the change of core temperature. There is no doubt that active warming with forced-air warmers (Warm Touch 5700 and Bair Hugger 500) or radiative heaters (IR-A:Hydrosun 500, IR-C radiation: CTC X, MTC) is more effective than use of standard, passive insulation hospital blankets or convectional heaters. Actually the forced-air warmers are counted to be more useful in cardiovascular surgery hypothermia management, because of fast rate core temperature rise and faster rise in mean skin temperature compared to the control group. CTC X and MTC Aragona radiative heaters are useful in burn management being the most effective when the distance of heater from the patient body is less than 80 cm. The observation of 60 consecutive extensive burns leads to conclusion that long-lasting dressings in burn patients when the whole body is not covered and protected, can be performed safely only in conditions excluding heat losses and core temperature drop. While the cold intravenous fluids may significantly contribute to the temperature drop depending on the volume infused, the use of fluids warming systems as well as external heat application is absolutely indicated to improve the heat balance of the patient body. PMID:17007255

  17. Hypothermia Decreases Cerebrospinal Fluid Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Levels in Traumatic Brain Injury Children

    PubMed Central

    Thampatty, Bhavani P; Klamerus, Megan M; Oberly, Patrick J; Feldman, Kerri L; Bell, Michael J; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Adelson, P. David; Clark, Robert SB; Kochanek, Patrick M; Poloyac, Samuel M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pathological increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, have been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and vascular diseases. Reduced NO early after traumatic brain injury (TBI) may contribute to hypoperfusion. Currently, methods to quantify ADMA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have not been fully explored. We aimed to develop and validate a method to determine ADMA in the CSF of a pediatric TBI population and to use this method to assess the effects of (i) TBI and (ii) therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on this mediator. Design, Setting, Patients An ancillary study to a prospective, phase II randomized clinical trial (RCT) of early hypothermia in a tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit for children with TBI admitted to Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results A UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated to quantitate ADMA. A total of 56 samples collected over 3 days starting with injury onset were analyzed from the CSF of consented therapeutic hypothermia (n=9) and normothermia (n=10) children. Children undergoing diagnostic lumbar puncture (n=5) were controls. ADMA was present at a quantifiable level in all samples. Mean ADMA levels were significantly increased in normothermic TBI children compared to control (0.19± 0.08 μmol/L and 0.11± 0.02μmol/L respectively, p=0.01), and hypothermic children had significantly reduced mean ADMA levels (0.11 ± 0.05 μmol/L) vs. normothermic (p=0.03) measured on day 3. Patient demographics including age, gender, and NO levels (measured as nitrite and nitrate using liquid chromatography coupled with Griess reaction) did not significantly differ between normothermia and hypothermia groups. Also, NO levels did not correlate with ADMA concentrations. Conclusions ADMA levels were significantly increased in the CSF of TBI children. Early hypothermia attenuated this increase. The implications of attenuated ADMA on

  18. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  19. Hypothermia during Carotid Endarterectomy: A Safety Study

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Serena; Dito, Raffaele; Casolla, Barbara; Silvestri, Emanuele; Sette, Giuliano; Filippi, Federico; Taurino, Maurizio; Brancadoro, Domitilla; Orzi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background CEA is associated with peri-operative risk of brain ischemia, due both to emboli production caused by manipulation of the plaque and to potentially noxious reduction of cerebral blood flow by carotid clamping. Mild hypothermia (34–35°C) is probably the most effective approach to protect brain from ischemic insult. It is therefore a substantial hypothesis that hypothermia lowers the risk of ischemic brain damage potentially associated with CEA. Purpose of the study is to test whether systemic endovascular cooling to a target of 34.5–35°C, initiated before and maintained during CEA, is feasible and safe. Methods The study was carried out in 7 consecutive patients referred to the Vascular Surgery Unit and judged eligible for CEA. Cooling was initiated 60–90 min before CEA, by endovascular approach (Zoll system). The target temperature was maintained during CEA, followed by passive, controlled rewarming (0.4°C/h). The whole procedure was carried out under anesthesia. Results All the patients enrolled had no adverse events. Two patients exhibited a transient bradycardia (heart rate 30 beats/min). There were no significant differences in the clinical status, laboratory and physiological data measured before and after CEA. Conclusions Systemic cooling to 34.5–35.0°C, initiated before and maintained during carotid clamping, is feasible and safe. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02629653 PMID:27058874

  20. Prehospital care and the community hospital as a base station.

    PubMed

    Morhaim, D K

    1989-03-01

    In Maryland's coordinated, regionalized emergency medical system, prehospital care is given to an injured or ill person at home, on the street, or in a doctor's office before the patient is transported to a hospital. Prehospital care of patients has advanced significantly since the federal government passed emergency medical service (EMS) legislation in 1966. In Maryland there are several functioning levels of prehospital care providers who perform skills unique to their particular environment and training. It is reasonable for all hospitals operating a full-service Emergency Department to consider becoming base stations for consultation to prehospital care providers bringing patients to that hospital. This is well within the province of the Emergency Medicine specialist and will provide improved service to patients. PMID:2927265

  1. Long-Term Effects of Induced Hypothermia on Local and Systemic Inflammation - Results from a Porcine Long-Term Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Horst, K.; Eschbach, D.; Pfeifer, R.; Relja, B.; Sassen, M.; Steinfeldt, T.; Wulf, H.; Vogt, N.; Frink, M.; Ruchholtz, S.; Pape, H. C.; Hildebrand, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothermia has been discussed as playing a role in improving the early phase of systemic inflammation. However, information on the impact of hypothermia on the local inflammatory response is sparse. We therefore investigated the kinetics of local and systemic inflammation in the late posttraumatic phase after induction of hypothermia in an established porcine long-term model of combined trauma. Materials & Methods Male pigs (35 ± 5kg) were mechanically ventilated and monitored over the study period of 48 h. Combined trauma included tibia fracture, lung contusion, liver laceration and pressure-controlled hemorrhagic shock (MAP < 30 ± 5 mmHg for 90 min). After resuscitation, hypothermia (33°C) was induced for a period of 12 h (HT-T group) with subsequent re-warming over a period of 10 h. The NT-T group was kept normothermic. Systemic and local (fracture hematoma) cytokine levels (IL-6, -8, -10) and alarmins (HMGB1, HSP70) were measured via ELISA. Results Severe signs of shock as well as systemic and local increases of pro-inflammatory mediators were observed in both trauma groups. In general the local increase of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediator levels was significantly higher and prolonged compared to systemic concentrations. Induction of hypothermia resulted in a significantly prolonged elevation of both systemic and local HMGB1 levels at 48 h compared to the NT-T group. Correspondingly, local IL-6 levels demonstrated a significantly prolonged increase in the HT-T group at 48 h. Conclusion A prolonged inflammatory response might reduce the well-described protective effects on organ and immune function observed in the early phase after hypothermia induction. Furthermore, local immune response also seems to be affected. Future studies should aim to investigate the use of therapeutic hypothermia at different degrees and duration of application. PMID:27144532

  2. Pre-Hospital Emergency in Iran: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ghardashi, Fatemeh; Izadi, Ahmad Reza; Ravangard, Ramin; Mirhashemi, Sedigheh; Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-hospital care plays a vital role in saving trauma patients. Objectives This study aims to review studies conducted on the pre-hospital emergency status in Iran. Data Sources Data were sourced from Iranian electronic databases, including SID, IranMedex, IranDoc, Magiran, and non-Iranian electronic databases, such as Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar. In addition, available data and statistics for the country were used. Data Selection All Persian-language articles published in Iranian scientific journals and related English-language articles published in Iranian and non-Iranian journals indexed on valid sites for September 2005 - 2014 were systematically reviewed. Data Extraction To review the selected articles, a data extraction form developed by the researchers as per the study’s objective was adopted. The articles were examined under two categories: structure and function of pre-hospital emergency. Results A total of 19 articles were selected, including six descriptive studies (42%), four descriptive-analytical studies (21%), five review articles (16%), two qualitative studies (10.5%), and two interventional (experimental) studies (10.5%). In addition, of these, 14 articles (73.5%) had been published in the English language. The focus of these selected articles were experts (31.5%), bases of emergency medical services (26%), injured (16%), data reviews (16%), and employees (10.5%). A majority of the studies (68%) investigated pre-hospital emergency functions and 32% reviewed the pre-hospital emergency structure. Conclusions The number of studies conducted on pre-hospital emergency services in Iran is limited. To promote public health, consideration of prevention areas, processes to provide pre-hospital emergency services, policymaking, foresight, systemic view, comprehensive research programs and roadmaps, and assessments of research needs in pre-hospital emergency seem necessary. PMID:27626016

  3. Preventing admission hypothermia in very low birth weight neonates.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypothermia, temperature < 36.5°C, is a major contributor to neonatal mortality and morbidity. hypothermia of preterm infants remains a challenge in the NiCU for many reasons. preterm very low birth weight (VlBW) infants, those infants born <1,500 g, are prone to very rapid heat losses through mechanisms of convection, evaporation, conduction, and radiation. this article reviews current research to reduce and prevent mortality and morbidity from hypothermia in preterm VlBW infants by implementing interventions in the delivery room to minimize heat loss and maintain core body temperatures. PMID:24816875

  4. Hypothermia induced by WR-2721 in the rat.

    PubMed

    Benova, D; Kiradzhiev, G; Nikolova, M A

    1987-01-01

    Hypothermic response to a range of doses of WR-2721 (S-2-/3 aminopropylamino/-ethylthiophosphate) was studied in the rat. Time of hypothermia appearance, time and extent of maximum hypothermia, and pattern of body temperature recovery were all observed to depend upon the level of drug dose administered. The role of such hypothermia in systemic toxicity of the drug is discussed. The authors believe it to result from insufficiency of thermoregulation in small mammals, and to be of no practical importance for clinical application of the drug. PMID:2834914

  5. Mechanisms responsible for decreased glomerular filtration in hibernation and hypothermia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.; Jones, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, red blood cell and plasma volumes, and relative distribution of cardiac output were made on hibernating and hypothermic adult male and female golden hamsters weighing 120-140 g to study the mechanisms underlying the elimination or marked depression of renal function in hibernation and hypothermia. The results suggest that the elimination or marked depression in renal function reported in hibernation and hypothermia may partly be explained by alterations in cardiovascular system function. Renal perfusion pressure which decreases nearly 60% in both hibernation and hypothermia and a decrease in plasma volume of roughly 35% in the hypothermic animal might both be expected to markedly alter glomerular function.

  6. Spine immobilization: prehospitalization to final destination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Care of the combat casualty with spinal column or spinal cord injury has not been previously described, particularly in regards to spinal immobilization. The ultimate goal of spinal immobilization in the combat casualty is to first ``do no further harm'' and then provide a stable, painless spine and an optimal neurologic recovery. The protocol for treatment of the combat casualty with suspected spinal column or spinal cord injury from the battlefield to final arrival at a definitive treatment center is discussed, and the special considerations for medical evacuation off the battlefield and for aeromedical transport are delineated. Selective prehospital spine immobilization, which involves spinal immobilization with backboard, semi-rigid cervical collar, lateral supports, and straps or tape, is recommended if there is suspicion of spinal column or spinal cord injury in the combat casualty and when conditions and resources permit. The authors do not recommend spinal immobilization for the combat casualty with isolated penetrating trauma. PMID:21477526

  7. Neurotensin analog NT77 induces regulated hypothermia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; McMahon, Beth; Richelson, Elliott; Padnos, Beth; Katz, Laurence

    2003-10-01

    The potential use of hypothermia as a therapeutic treatment for stroke and other pathological insults has prompted the search for drugs that can lower core temperature. Ideally, a drug is needed that reduces the set-point for control of core temperature (T(c)) and thereby induces a regulated reduction in T(c). To this end, a neurotensin analog (NT77) that crosses the blood brain barrier and induces hypothermia was assessed for its effects on the set-point for temperature regulation in the Sprague-Dawley rat by measuring behavioral and autonomic thermoregulatory responses. Following surgical implanation of radiotransmitters to monitor T(c), rats were placed in a temperature gradient and allowed to select from a range of ambient temperatures (T(a)) while T(c) was monitored by radiotelemetry. There was an abrupt decrease in selected T(a) from 29 to 16 degrees C and a concomitant reduction in T(c) from 37.4 to 34.0 degrees C 1 hr after IP injection of 5.0 mg/kg NT77. Selected T(a) and T(c) then recovered to control levels by 1.5 hr and 4 hr, respectively. Oxygen consumption (M) and heat loss (H) were measured in telemetered rats housed in a direct calorimeter maintained at a T(a) of 23.5 degrees C. Injection of NT77 initially led to a reduction in M, little change in H, and marked decrease in T(c). H initially rose but decreased around the time of the maximal decrease in T(c). Overall, NT77 appears to induce a regulated hypothermic response because the decrease in T(c) was preceded by a reduction in heat production, no change in heat loss, and preference for cold T(a)'s. Inducing a regulated hypothermic response with drugs such as NT77 may be an important therapy for ischemic disease and other insults. PMID:12967685

  8. Principles of prehospital care of musculoskeletal injuries.

    PubMed

    Worsing, R A

    1984-05-01

    Prehospital management of musculoskeletal injuries in the traumatized patient is based on the application of a few basic principles in an orderly but expeditious manner. The patient must be assessed for immediate life-threatening conditions involving airway, respiratory, and circulatory functions while the cervical spine is protected. Resuscitative efforts to reestablish and preserve an adequate circulating volume of oxygenated blood must follow, using airways, oxygen therapy, and fluid replacement through MAST trousers and intravenous fluids. Cardiac function must be maintained as well. Respiratory function must be monitored and assisted as required. Finally, neurologic status must be assessed and monitored. Secondary assessment of all pertinent history and physical findings is made to delineate all other injuries that do not pose an immediate threat to the life or limb of the patient. Definitive care follows but is limited to basic resuscitation, stabilization, and immobilization techniques under medical control through telemetry and radio communication. Immediate definitive care of the traumatized patient requires the expeditious intervention of the trauma team in a hospital setting with surgical, blood banking, radiographic, laboratory, and other hospital-based capabilities available. Field management of the traumatized patient is directed at the expeditious delivery of the viable patient to the trauma team. In the multiply traumatized patient with severe injuries to several organ systems, prehospital care may need to be expedited to provide this patient the in-hospital care required to save his or her life. Appropriate treatment in such life-threatening trauma situations will consist of a rapid primary assessment, airway and cervical spine control, appropriate respiratory and cardiovascular assistance, gross whole body fracture immobilization using a backboard, and immediate transport. For less severely injured patients, primary assessment, resuscitation

  9. Prehospital care at a major international airport.

    PubMed

    Cwinn, A A; Dinerman, N; Pons, P T; Marlin, R

    1988-10-01

    Medical emergencies at a major metropolitan airport have a significant impact on prehospital care capabilities for the rest of the community in which the airport is located. Stapleton International Airport in Denver, Colorado, is a facility that in 1985 had 14.4 million passengers and a static employee population of 12,000 to 15,000. In 1981, there were 1,182 ambulance trips to the airport, 40.4% of which did not result in the transport of a patient. The expense of sending an ambulance and fire engine out on such calls was great, and paramedics were out of service for approximately 300 hours on these nontransport cases. In order to improve prehospital services to the airport and the city, a paramedic has been stationed in the concourse at the airport 16 hours a day since 1982. The records for airport paramedic services for the 12 months ending September 1985 were reviewed. Paramedic services were requested for 1,952 patients. Of these, 696 (35.7%) were transported to hospital by ambulance; 115 (5.9%) went by private car; 284 (14.6%) refused any paramedic care or transport; and 857 (43.9%) were released, after base station contact, with instructions to seek definitive care at the final destination. Presenting complaints were classified into 55 categories and the frequencies and dispositions are described. The most common presentations resulting in transport were chest pain, 110 (5.6%); syncope, 60 (3.1%); psychiatric, 57 (2.9%); abdominal pain, 49 (2.5%); seizure, 36 (1.8%); fracture, 31 (1.6%); and cardiac arrest, 29 (1.5%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3177992

  10. 5′-Adenosine Monophosphate-Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Brain Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in a Rat Model by Inhibiting the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yi-Feng; Wu, Hui; Yang, Shao-Feng; Dai, Jiong; Qiu, Yong-Ming; Tao, Zhen-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia treatment is a promising therapeutic strategy for brain injury. We previously demonstrated that 5′-adenosine monophosphate (5′-AMP), a ribonucleic acid nucleotide, produces reversible deep hypothermia in rats when the ambient temperature is appropriately controlled. Thus, we hypothesized that 5′-AMP-induced hypothermia (AIH) may attenuate brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. Transient cerebral ischemia was induced by using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in rats. Rats that underwent AIH treatment exhibited a significant reduction in neutrophil elastase infiltration into neuronal cells and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R), tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), and Toll-like receptor (TLR) protein expression in the infarcted area compared to euthermic controls. AIH treatment also decreased the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling- (TUNEL-) positive neuronal cells. The overall infarct volume was significantly smaller in AIH-treated rats, and neurological function was improved. By contrast, rats with ischemic brain injury that were administered 5′-AMP without inducing hypothermia had ischemia/reperfusion injuries similar to those in euthermic controls. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of AIH were primarily related to hypothermia. PMID:25873763

  11. Influence of hypothermia and subsequent rewarming upon leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of Junctional-Adhesion-Molecules A and B

    PubMed Central

    Bogert, Nicolai V.; Werner, Isabella; Kornberger, Angela; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Keller, Till; Stock, Ulrich A.; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Patients with risks of ischemic injury, e.g. during circulatory arrest in cardiac surgery, or after resuscitation are subjected to therapeutic hypothermia. For aortic surgery, the body is traditionally cooled down to 18 °C and then rewarmed to body temperature. The role of hypothermia and the subsequent rewarming process on leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of junctional-adhesion-molecules is not clarified yet. Thus, we investigated in an in-vitro model the influence of temperature modulation during activation and transendothelial migration of leukocytes through human endothelial cells. Additionally, we investigated the expression of JAMs in the rewarming phase. Exposure to low temperatures alone during transmigration scarcely affects leukocyte extravasation, whereas hypothermia during treatment and transendothelial migration improves leukocyte-endothelial interactions. Rewarming causes a significant up-regulation of transmigration with falling temperatures. JAM-A is significantly modulated during rewarming. Our data suggest that transendothelial migration of leukocytes is not only modulated by cell-activation itself. Activation temperatures and the rewarming process are essential. Continued hypothermia significantly inhibits transendothelial migration, whereas the rewarming process enhances transmigration strongly. The expression of JAMs, especially JAM-A, is strongly modulated during the rewarming process. Endothelial protection prior to warm reperfusion and mild hypothermic conditions reducing the difference between hypothermia and rewarming temperatures should be considered. PMID:26912257

  12. Improving neurological outcomes post-cardiac arrest in a rat model: immediate hypothermia and quantitative EEG monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaofeng; Koenig, Matthew A.; Shin, Hyun-Chool; Zhen, Gehua; Pardo, Carlos A.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objectives Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after cardiac arrest (CA) improves outcomes in a fraction of patients. To enhance the administration of TH, we studied brain electrophysiological monitoring in determining the benefit of early initiation of TH compared to conventional administration in a rat model. Methods Using an asphyxial CA model, we compared the benefit of immediate hypothermia (IH, T=33°C, immediately post-resuscitation, maintained 6 hours) to conventional hypothermia (CH, T=33°C, starting 1 hour post-resuscitation, maintained 12 hours) via surface cooling. We tracked quantitative EEG using relative entropy (qEEG) with outcome verification by serial Neurological Deficit Score (NDS) and quantitative brain histopathological damage scoring (HDS). Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups based on CH/IH and 7/9-minute duration of asphyxial CA. Four sham rats were included for evaluation of the effect of hypothermia on qEEG. Results The 72-hour NDS of the IH group was significantly better than the CH group for both 7-minute (74/63; Median, IH/CH, p<0.001) and 9-minute (54/47, p=0.022) groups. qEEG showed greater recovery with IH (p<0.001) and significantly less neuronal cortical injury by HDS (IH: 18.9±2.5% versus CH: 33.2±4.4%, p=0.006). The 1-hour post-resuscitation qEEG correlated well with 72-hour NDS (p<0.05) and 72-hour behavioral subgroup of NDS (p<0.01). No differences in qEEG were noted in the sham group. Conclusions Immediate but shorter hypothermia compared to CH leads to better functional outcome in rats after 7- and 9- minute CA. The beneficial effect of IH was readily detected by neuro-electrophysiological monitoring and histological changes supported the value of this observation. PMID:17936492

  13. Combination of Temperature-Sensitive Stem Cells and Mild Hypothermia: A New Potential Therapy for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Chen, Chong; Sun, Hong-Tao; Cheng, Shi-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Zhi; Qu, Yang; Li, Xiao-hong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell transplantation holds great potential for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the micro-environment of reduced oxygen and accumulated toxins leads to low survival rates of grafted cells, which dramatically limits their clinical application. Mild hypothermia has been demonstrated to improve the micro-environment after severe TBI. Thus, we speculate that combinational therapy of mild hypothermia may promote survival of grafted cells, especially temperature-sensitive stem cells, which show the most activity in mild temperatures. In this study, we first isolated mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord (UCSMCs) and generated the temperature-sensitive UCSMCs (tsUCSMCs) by infection with a retrovirus carrying the temperature-sensitive tsA58 SV40 LT antigen gene. We demonstrated that tsUCSMCs grew and proliferated with more activity at 33°C than at 37°C by counting cell numbers with a hematocytometer, measuring the cell cycle with flow cytometry, and detecting proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) with immunofluorescence staining. Thereafter, we established the rat severe TBI model by fluid percussion, and injected PBS, UCSMCs, or tsUCSMCs into the injured region, and subject the animals to normothermia or mild hypothermia (33°C). We found that, compared with UCSMC or tsUCSMC treatment alone, their combination with hypothermia could significantly improve motor and cognitive function with more survival of the grafted cells. Furthermore, we observed that combined therapy with hypothermia and tsUCSMCs exerted the most protective effect on the recovery of neurological function of all the tested treatments, with the highest survival and proliferation rates, and the lowest apoptosis rate. Thus this may represent a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of severe TBI. PMID:22655683

  14. Hypothermia Severely Effects Performance of Nitinol-Based Endovascular Grafts In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Robich, Michael P.; Hagberg, Robert; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Nilson, Michael C.; Gendron, Michelle L.; Sellke, Frank W.; Rodriguez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitinol is an alloy that serves as the base for numerous medical devices, including the GORE TAG Thoracic Endoprosthesis (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) thoracic aortic graft device. Given the increasing use of therapeutic hypothermia used during the placement these devices and in post– cardiac arrest situations, we sought to understand the impact of hypothermia on this device. Methods Five 34-mm TAG devices were deployed in a temperature-controlled chamber at 20°C, 25°C, 30°C, 35°, and 37°C (25 total devices). A halographic measurement device was used to measure radial expansive force and normalized to the force at 37°C. Three 34-mm TAG devices were similarly deployed in a temperature-controlled water bath at each of the above temperatures. A laser micrometer was utilized to measure deployed diameter. Results A statistically significant decrease in expansive force at 20°C, 25°C, and 30°C of 65%, 46%, and 6%, respectively, was noted. A statistically significant decrease in radial diameter at 20°C and 25°C of 17% and 11%, respectively, was noted. Although a 9% difference was noted at 30°C, it was not significant. Conclusions The nitinol-based TAG device shows marked decreases in radial expansive force and deployed diameter at temperatures at or below 30°C. Surgeons should be aware of the potential implications of placing nitinol-based endoprostheses in hypothermic conditions. In addition, all health care providers should be aware of the changes that occur in nitinol-based endoprostheses during therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:22385821

  15. A team approach to the prevention of unplanned postoperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bitner, Jason; Hilde, Leana; Hall, Kenneth; Duvendack, Tammy

    2007-05-01

    Postoperative hypothermia (ie, a core temperature lower than 96.8 degrees F [36 degrees C]), is a problem frequently seen in surgical patients, especially those undergoing total joint replacement. Patients who experience hypothermia may have increased recovery times and postoperative complications. A team of clinical staff members and personnel from the performance improvement (PI) department of a hospital used a PI model to incorporate use of preoperative forced-air warming blankets that resulted in improved postoperative core temperatures. PMID:17499055

  16. Pre-hospital anaesthesia: the same but different.

    PubMed

    Lockey, D J; Crewdson, K; Lossius, H M

    2014-08-01

    Advanced airway management is one of the most controversial areas of pre-hospital trauma care and is carried out by different providers using different techniques in different Emergency Medical Services systems. Pre-hospital anaesthesia is the standard of care for trauma patients arriving in the emergency department with airway compromise. A small proportion of severely injured patients who cannot be managed with basic airway management require pre-hospital anaesthesia to avoid death or hypoxic brain injury. The evidence base for advanced airway management is inconsistent, contradictory and rarely reports all key data. There is evidence that poorly performed advanced airway management is harmful and that less-experienced providers have higher intubation failure rates and complication rates. International guidelines carry many common messages about the system requirements for the practice of advanced airway management. Pre-hospital rapid sequence induction (RSI) should be practiced to the same standard as emergency department RSI. Many in-hospital standards such as monitoring, equipment, and provider competence can be achieved. Pre-hospital and emergency in-hospital RSI has been modified from standard RSI techniques to improve patient safety, physiological disturbance, and practicality. Examples include the use of opioids and long-acting neuromuscular blocking agents, ventilation before intubation, and the early release of cricoid pressure to improve laryngoscopic view. Pre-hospital RSI is indicated in a small proportion of trauma patients. Where pre-hospital anaesthesia cannot be carried out to a high standard by competent providers, excellent quality basic airway management should be the mainstay of management. PMID:25038153

  17. The transcriptome responses of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xue, Xiaodong; Xu, Yinli; Zhang, Yuji; Li, Zhi; Wang, Huishan

    2016-06-01

    Hypothermia has positive and negative consequences on the body. Hypothermia depresses myocardial contraction, conduction, and metabolic rate in the heart. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Herein, we compared the gene expression of human adult ventricular cardiomyocytes (AC16) under hypothermia to find differences between different temperatures, and elucidate the candidate genes that may play important roles in the response to hypothermia. A total of 2413 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by microarray hybridization, which provided abundant data for further analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis revealed that genes related to transcription, and protein and lipid metabolism were significantly enriched. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis showed that DEGs were significantly enriched in TGF-β pathway and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, which may play important roles in changes affected by hypothermia. A set of transcription factors (TFs) (CPBP, Churchill, NF-AT1, GKLF, SRY, ZNF333, ING4, myogenin, DRI1 and CRX) was recognized to be the functional layer of key nodes, which mapped the signal of hypothermia to transcriptome. The identified DEGs, pathways and predicted TFs could facilitate further investigations of the detailed molecular mechanisms. PMID:27039159

  18. Hypothermia associated with clobazam use in adult epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Angela C; Quraishi, Imran H; Mattson, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Clobazam, a 1,5-benzodiazepine FDA-approved in 2011, is commonly used to treat anxiety and epilepsy. It has not associated with hypothermia until very recently, in a case report involving two pediatric patients. Here, we report the first case of hypothermia development in an adult patient with epilepsy associated with clobazam use. A couple months after starting clobazam, the patient started developing episodes of hypothermia every several weeks, with temperatures ranging from 90 °F-95 °F. Normothermia was achieved with Bair Hugger therapy. Thyroid-stimulating hormone and cortisol levels were normal, and there was no evidence of infection in most instances. After 11 total episodes of hypothermia over a year of clobazam use, the drug was discontinued. It has now been 7 months after discontinuation, and the patient has not experienced any more episodes of hypothermia. Early recognition of the link between clobazam and hypothermia may prevent avoidable Emergency Department visits and hospitalizations. PMID:26870662

  19. Architecture of a prehospital emergency patient care report system (PEPRS).

    PubMed

    Majeed, Raphael W; Stöhr, Mark R; Röhrig, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, prehospital emergency care adapted to the technology shift towards tablet computers and mobile computing. In particular, electronic patient care report (e-PCR) systems gained considerable attention and adoption in prehospital emergency medicine [1]. On the other hand, hospital information systems are already widely adopted. Yet, there is no universal solution for integrating prehospital emergency reports into electronic medical records of hospital information systems. Previous projects either relied on proprietary viewing workstations or examined and transferred only data for specific diseases (e.g. stroke patients[2]). Using requirements engineering and a three step software engineering approach, this project presents a generic architecture for integrating prehospital emergency care reports into hospital information systems. Aim of this project is to describe a generic architecture which can be used to implement data transfer and integration of pre hospital emergency care reports to hospital information systems. In summary, the prototype was able to integrate data in a standardized manner. The devised methods can be used design generic software for prehospital to hospital data integration. PMID:23920925

  20. Theater Blood Support in the Prehospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Audra L; Corley, Jason B

    2016-01-01

    The Army Blood Program (ABP) is charged with the responsibility of supporting the Warfighter on the battlefield, in addition to meeting garrison hospital blood requirements on a daily basis. Blood support concepts developed in response to Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom combat operations are the cornerstone to maintaining current capabilities and shaping future endeavors.. The ABP is actively engaged with research, advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy for both our conventional and operational forces. The feasibility of frozen/deglycerolized red blood cell use in theater has been demonstrated. The use of Blood Group A plasma in the place of Blood Group AB plasma has been successful. Placement of cryoprecipitate at Role 2 medical facilities and the placement of blood products on MEDEVAC (Vampire Program missions) have proven invaluable in moving transfusion therapy closer to the point of Injury. The improved patient outcomes from earlier transfusion of blood products has driven the requirement for far-forward blood support. Now (more than ever), there are products and processes in place to meet the requirements for blood use in the prehospital setting. PMID:27215865

  1. Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Quell, Robin; Sørlie, Venke

    2008-10-01

    The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation. PMID:18929341

  2. Psychotropic drugs attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia by altering hypothalamic levels of inflammatory mediators in rats.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Ahmad; Sharon-Granit, Yael; Azab, Abed N

    2016-07-28

    Recent evidence suggests that inflammation may contribute to the pathophysiology of mental disorders and that psychotropic drugs exert various effects on brain inflammation. The administration of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) to mammals is associated with robust production of inflammatory mediators and pathological changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of four different psychotropic drugs on LPS-induced hypothermia and production of prostaglandin (PG) E2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and phosphorylated-p65 (P-p65) levels in hypothalamus of LPS-treated rats. Rats were treated once daily with lithium (100mg/kg), carbamazepine (40mg/kg), haloperidol (2mg/kg), imipramine (20mg/kg) or vehicle (NaCl 0.9%) for 29 days. On day 29, rats were injected with LPS (1mg/kg) or saline. At 1.5h post LPS injection body temperature was measured, rats were sacrificed, blood was collected and their hypothalami were excised, homogenized and centrifuged. PGE2, TNF-α and nuclear P-p65 levels were determined by specific ELISA kits. We found that lithium, carbamazepine, haloperidol and imipramine significantly attenuated LPS-induced hypothermia, resembling the effect of classic anti-inflammatory drugs. Moreover, lithium, carbamazepine, haloperidol and imipramine differently but significantly affected the levels of PGE2, TNF-α and P-p65 in plasma and hypothalamus of LPS-treated rats. The results suggest that psychotropic drugs attenuate LPS-induced hypothermia by reducing hypothalamic production of inflammatory constituents, particularly PGE2. The effects of psychotropic drugs on brain inflammation may contribute to their therapeutic mechanism but also to their toxicological profile. PMID:27181513

  3. HYPOTHERMIA AND VALPROIC ACID ACTIVATE PRO-SURVIVAL PATHWAYS AFTER HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E.; Liu, Baoling; Maxwell, Jake; Chatraklin, Kiril; Linzel, Durk; Li, Yongqing; Alam, Hasan B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia (Hypo) and valproic acid (VPA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor) have independently been shown to be protective in models of trauma and hemorrhagic shock (HS), but require logistically challenging doses to be effective. Theoretically, combined treatment may further enhance effectiveness, allowing us to use lower doses of each modality. The aim of this study was to determine whether a combination of mild hypothermia and VPA treatments would offer better cytoprotection compared to individual treatments in a hemorrhage model. Materials and methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 40% volume-controlled hemorrhage, kept in shock for 30 minutes, and assigned to one of the following treatment groups: normothermia (36–37°C), Hypo (30±2°C), normothermia+VPA (300mg/kg), and Hypo+VPA (n=5/group). After three hours of observation, the animals were sacrificed, liver tissue was harvested and subjected to whole cell lysis, and levels of key proteins in the pro-survival Akt pathway were measured using Western Blot. Results Activation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved-caspase-3 was significantly lower in the combined treatment group relative to normothermia (P<0.05). Levels of the pro-survival Bcl-2 was significantly higher in the combined treatment group relative to sham, normothermia, and normothermia+VPA groups (P<0.005). The downstream pro-survival protein phospho-GSK-3β was significantly higher in the sham, Hypo, and combined treatment groups compared to normothermia groups with or without VPA (P<0.05). Levels of the pro-survival β-catenin were significantly higher in the combined treatment group relative to normothermia (P<0.01). Conclusions This is the first in-vivo study to demonstrate that combined treatment with VPA and hypothermia offers better cytoprotection than these treatments given independently. PMID:25777823

  4. Effect of extreme temperatures on drugs for prehospital ACLS.

    PubMed

    Johansen, R B; Schafer, N C; Brown, P I

    1993-09-01

    Advanced cardiac life support drugs undergo a wide range of temperature exposures in the prehospital setting. Although manufacturers place temperature restrictions for drug stability on their products, it has been shown that these limits are often exceeded in the prehospital environment. We exposed four different drugs to temperatures of -20 degrees C (-6 degrees F) and 70 degrees C (150 degrees F) and subsequently performed assays to determine their respective chemical stability compared with that of control samples. We determined that no significant difference in chemical structure occurred between the standard sample and the four drugs exposed to extreme temperatures (P > .05). This information has obvious implications in making further recommendations for drug storage. More work to determine bioactivity of temperature-exposed drugs may show results with implications for success in prehospital cardiac resuscitation. PMID:8363680

  5. Management of pain in pre-hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Rodgers, Antony

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and management of pain in pre-hospital care settings are important aspects of paramedic and clinical team roles. As emergency department waiting times and delays in paramedic-to-nurse handover increase, it becomes more and more vital that patients receive adequate pre-hospital pain relief. However, administration of analgesia can be inadequate and can result in patients experiencing oligoanalgesia, or under-treated pain. This article examines these issues along with the aetiology of trauma and the related socioeconomic background of traumatic injury. It reviews validated pain-assessment tools, outlines physiological responses to traumatic pain and discusses some of the misconceptions about the provision of effective analgesia in pre-hospital settings. PMID:26050779

  6. Outcome following physician supervised prehospital resuscitation: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Krüger, Andreas J; Zwisler, Stine T; Brøchner, Anne C

    2015-01-01

    Background Prehospital care provided by specially trained, physician-based emergency services (P-EMS) is an integrated part of the emergency medical systems in many developed countries. To what extent P-EMS increases survival and favourable outcomes is still unclear. The aim of the study was thus to investigate ambulance runs initially assigned ‘life-saving missions’ with emphasis on long-term outcome in patients treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark Methods All MECU runs are registered in a database by the attending physician, stating, among other parameters, the treatment given, outcome of the treatment and the patient's diagnosis. Over a period of 80 months from May 1 2006 to December 31 2012, all missions in which the outcome of the treatment was registered as ‘life saving’ were scrutinised. Initial outcome, level of competence of the caretaker and diagnosis of each patient were manually established in each case in a combined audit of the prehospital database, the discharge summary of the MECU and the medical records from the hospital. Outcome parameters were final outcome, the aetiology of the life-threatening condition and the level of competences necessary to treat the patient. Results Of 25 647 patients treated by the MECU, 701 (2.7%) received prehospital ‘life saving treatment’. In 596 (2.3%) patients this treatment exceeded the competences of the attending emergency medical technician or paramedic. Of these patients, 225 (0.9%) were ultimately discharged to their own home. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that anaesthesiologist administrated prehospital therapy increases the level of treatment modalities leading to an increased survival in relation to a prehospital system consisting of emergency medical technicians and paramedics alone and thus supports the concept of applying specialists in anaesthesiology in the prehospital setting especially when treating patients with cardiac arrest, patients in

  7. [Case Report: prehospital treatment on a major injured motorcycle driver].

    PubMed

    Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Knacke, Peer G; Heller, Gilbert; Naguschewski, Jörg; Scholz, Jens

    2008-09-01

    This case report describes the prehospital care of a 42-year-old person damaged by a severe motorcycle accident in a rural scene. The injured person was unconscious, one pupil was dilated and rib fractures were palpable. Purposeful therapy without delay was necessary. The prehospital therapy took 35 minutes in total. The time benefit by using a rescue helicopter is illustrated: time to initial treatment is minimized and duration of transport as well - direct transport to a trauma center is possible. PMID:18792860

  8. Skills required for maritime pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care (PHEC) in the military has undergone major changes during the last 10 years of warfighting in the land environment. Providing this care in the maritime environment presents several unique challenges. This paper examines the clinical capabilities required of a PHEC team in the maritime environment and how this role can be fulfilled as part of Role 2 Afloat. It applies to Pre-hospital emergency care projected from a hospital not to General Duties Medical Officers at Role 1. PMID:22558737

  9. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia. PMID:27320243

  10. Environmental hypothermia in porcine polytrauma and hemorrhagic shock is safe.

    PubMed

    Iyegha, Uroghupatei P; Greenberg, Joseph J; Mulier, Kristine E; Chipman, Jeffrey; George, Mark; Beilman, Greg J

    2012-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated survival benefit to induced hypothermia in a porcine model of controlled hemorrhagic shock simulating an associated delay to definitive care. In the current study, we wished to evaluate the effects of environmental hypothermia in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock with the addition of polytrauma. Sixteen pigs were randomized to normothermic (39°C, n = 7) or hypothermic (34°C, n = 9) groups. The model included instrumentation, chest injury (captive bolt device), hemorrhage to systolic blood pressure (SBP) of ∼50 mmHg, and crush liver injury. Animals received limited fluid resuscitation for a 1-h period with goal SBP of greater than 80 mmHg and ice packs or warming blankets to achieve goal temperatures, followed by full resuscitation with goal SBP of greater than 90 mmHg, adequate urine output, and hemoglobin by protocol for 20 h. Survivors were observed for an additional 24 h with end points including mortality, markers of organ injury, and neurologic function. There were no differences in survival between the groups (mortality = 1/9, hypothermia group vs. 2/7, normothermia group, P = 0.39). Markers of organ injury were elevated in the hypothermia group at 24 h after injury but were identical between groups at the end of the experimental protocol (48 h after injury). There were no noted differences in neurologic function between the two groups. Environmental hypothermia in a model of polytrauma and hemorrhagic shock was not associated with worse outcomes. PMID:22777118