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Sample records for prehospital trauma care

  1. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  2. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services. PMID:25494913

  3. Prehospital emergency trauma care and management.

    PubMed

    Kerby, Jeffrey D; Cusick, Marianne V

    2012-08-01

    Prehospital care of the trauma patient is continuing to evolve; however, the principles of airway maintenance, hemorrhage control, and appropriate resuscitative maneuvers remain central to the role of the emergency medical care provider. Recent changes in the regulations for research in emergency settings will allow randomized trials to proceed to test new devices, drugs, and resuscitative strategies in the prehospital environment. The creation of prehospital research networks will provide the appropriate infrastructure to greatly facilitate the development of new protocols and the execution of large-scale randomized trials with the potential to change current prehospital practice. PMID:22850149

  4. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maegele, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries, Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid. The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care. The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system. The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept. The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first"). If no immediate treatment is necessary, a "Secondary Sur- vey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism. Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme. Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go")toTR-DGU® certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks. Due to the difficult pre- hospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and, as consequence, the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low. Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited. The present article provides a synopsis of rec- ommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multi- disciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung", the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible. PMID:26643236

  5. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; M. Rubiano, Andres; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Calderon-Miranda, Willem; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Blancas Rivera, Marco Antonio; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.  PMID:27162922

  6. Trauma in elderly people: access to the health system through pre-hospital care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Hilderjane Carla; Pessoa, Renata de Lima; de Menezes, Rejane Maria Paiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to identify the prevalence of trauma in elderly people and how they accessed the health system through pre-hospital care. Method: documentary and retrospective study at a mobile emergency care service, using a sample of 400 elderly trauma victims selected through systematic random sampling. A form validated by experts was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between the variables. Results: Trauma was predominant among women (52.25%) and in the age range between 60 and 69 years (38.25%), average age 74.19 years (standard deviation±10.25). Among the mechanisms, falls (56.75%) and traffic accidents (31.25%) stood out, showing a significant relation with the pre-hospital care services (p<0.001). Circulation, airway opening, cervical control and immobilization actions were the most frequent and Basic Life Support Services (87.8%) were the most used, with trauma referral hospitals as the main destination (56.7%). Conclusion: trauma prevailed among women, victims of falls, who received pre-hospital care through basic life support services and actions and were transported to the trauma referral hospital. It is important to reorganize pre-hospital care, avoiding overcrowded hospitals and delivering better care to elderly trauma victims. PMID:27143543

  7. Update on prehospital emergency care of severe trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Tazarourte, K; Cesaréo, E; Sapir, D; Atchabahian, A; Tourtier, J-P; Briole, N; Vigué, B

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of severe trauma patients is determined by the ability of a healthcare system to provide high intensity therapeutic treatment on the field and to transport patients as quickly as possible to the structure best suited to their condition. Direct admission to a specialized center ("trauma center") reduces the mortality of the most severe trauma at 30 days and one year. Triage in a non-specialized hospital is a major risk of loss of chance and should be avoided whenever possible. Medical dispatching plays a major role in determining patient care. The establishment of a hospital care network is an important issue that is not formalized enough in France. The initial triage of severe trauma patients must be improved to avoid taking patients to hospitals that are not equipped to take care of them. For this purpose, the MGAP score can predict severity and help decide where to transport the patient. However, it does not help predict the need for urgent resuscitation procedures. Hemodynamic management is central to the care of hemorrhagic shock and severe head trauma. Transport helicopter with a physician on board has an important role to allow direct admission to a specialized center in geographical areas that are difficult to access. PMID:23916517

  8. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador. PMID:26262065

  9. Barriers and facilitators to provide effective pre-hospital trauma care for road traffic injury victims in Iran: a grounded theory approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries are a major global public health problem. Improvements in pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize mortality and morbidity from road traffic injuries (RTIs) worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with a high rate of RTIs such as Iran. The current study aimed to explore pre-hospital trauma care process for RTI victims in Iran and to identify potential areas for improvements based on the experience and perception of pre-hospital trauma care professionals. Methods A qualitative study design using a grounded theory approach was selected. The data, collected via in-depth interviews with 15 pre-hospital trauma care professionals, were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results Seven categories emerged to describe the factors that hinder or facilitate an effective pre-hospital trauma care process: (1) administration and organization, (2) staff qualifications and competences, (3) availability and distribution of resources, (4) communication and transportation, (5) involved organizations, (6) laypeople and (7) infrastructure. The core category that emerged from the other categories was defined as "interaction and common understanding". Moreover, a conceptual model was developed based on the categories. Conclusions Improving the interaction within the current pre-hospital trauma care system and building a common understanding of the role of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) emerged as key issues in the development of an effective pre-hospital trauma care process. PMID:21059243

  10. Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) ? One Year Later A Joint Theater Trauma System and Joint Trauma System Review of Prehospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) Final Report, 30 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Samual W; Robinson, John B; Smith, Michael P; Gross, Kirby R; Kotwal, Russ S; Mabry, Robert L; Butler, Frank K; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Mavity, Mark E; Gillies, Duncan A

    2015-01-01

    The United States has achieved unprecedented survival rates, as high as 98%, for casualties arriving alive at the combat hospital. Our military medical personnel are rightly proud of this achievement. Commanders and Servicemembers are confident that if wounded and moved to a Role II or III medical facility, their care will be the best in the world. Combat casualty care, however, begins at the point of injury and continues through evacuation to those facilities. With up to 25% of deaths on the battlefield being potentially preventable, the prehospital environment is the next frontier for making significant further improvements in battlefield trauma care. Strict adherence to the evidence-based Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) Guidelines has been proven to reduce morbidity and mortality on the battlefield. However, full implementation across the entire force and commitment from both line and medical leadership continue to face ongoing challenges. This report on prehospital trauma in the Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) is a follow-on to the one previously conducted in November 2012 and published in January 2013. Both assessments were conducted by the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) Joint Theater Trauma System (JTTS). Observations for this report were collected from December 2013 to January 2014 and were obtained directly from deployed prehospital providers, medical leaders, and combatant leaders. Significant progress has been made between these two reports with the establishment of a Prehospital Care Division within the JTTS, development of a prehospital trauma registry and weekly prehospital trauma conferences, and CJOA-A theater guidance and enforcement of prehospital documentation. Specific prehospital trauma-care achievements include expansion of transfusion capabilities forward to the point of injury, junctional tourniquets, and universal approval of tranexamic acid. PMID:26125162

  11. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. Objectives To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. Patients and Methods This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. Results There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed. PMID:24350154

  12. [Obesity in prehospital emergency care].

    PubMed

    Kruska, Patricia; Kappus, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased steadily in recent years. Obese people often suffer from diseases which acute decompensation requires a prompt prehospital therapy. The Emergency Medical Service will be confronted with difficulties in clinical diagnostic, therapy and especially with a delayed management of rescue and transport. It is most important to avoid prehospital depreciation in quality and time management. This article reviews the specific requirements of prehospital care of obese persons and discusses possible solutions to optimize the prehospital therapy. PMID:22968983

  13. Prehospital care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, E; Pusponegoro, A

    2005-01-01

    Current system: Hospitals of varying standards are widespread but have no system of emergency ambulance or patient retrieval. Indonesia's only public emergency ambulance service, 118, is based in five of the biggest cities and is leading the way in paramedic training and prehospital care. Challenges and developments: There are many challenges faced including the culture of acceptance, vast geographical areas, traffic, inadequate numbers of ambulances, and access to quality training resources. Recently there have been a number of encouraging developments including setting up of a disaster response brigade, better provision of ambulances, and development of paramedic training. Conclusions: An integrated national regionalised hospital and prehospital system may seem fantastic but with the enthusiasm of those involved and perhaps some help from countries with access to training resources it may not be an unrealistic goal. PMID:15662073

  14. The effect of paramedic training on pre-hospital trauma care (EPPTC-study): a study protocol for a prospective semi-qualitative observational trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accidents are the leading cause of death in adults prior to middle age. The care of severely injured patients is an interdisciplinary challenge. Limited evidence is available concerning pre-hospital trauma care training programs and the advantage of such programs for trauma patients. The effect on trauma care procedures or on the safety of emergency crews on the scene is limited; however, there is a high level of experience and expert opinion. Methods I – Video-recorded case studies are the basis of an assessment tool and checklist being developed to verify the results of programs to train participants in the care of seriously injured patients, also known as “objective structured clinical examination” (OSCE). The timing, completeness and quality of the individual measures are assessed using appropriate scales. The evaluation of team communication and interaction will be analyzed with qualitative methods and quantified and verified by existing instruments (e.g. the Clinical Team Scale). The developed assessment tool is validated by several experts in the fields of trauma care, trauma research and medical education. II a) In a German emergency medical service, the subjective assessment of paramedics of their pre-hospital care of trauma patients is evaluated at three time points, namely before, immediately after and one year after training. b) The effect of a standardized course concept on the quality of documentation in actual field operations is determined based on three items relevant to patient safety before and after the course. c) The assessment tool will be used to assess the effect of a standardized course concept on procedures and team communication in pre-hospital trauma care using scenario-based case studies. Discussion This study explores the effect of training on paramedics. After successful study completion, further multicenter studies are conceivable, which would evaluate emergency-physician staffed teams. The influence on the patients

  15. [Prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries].

    PubMed

    Samokhvallov, I M; Reva, V A; Pronchenko, A A; Seleznev, A B

    2011-09-01

    The problem of temporary hemorrhage control is one of the most important issues of modern war surgery and surgery of trauma. It is a review of literature devoted to prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries, embraced up-to-date domestic materials as well as the modern foreign papers in this area. The most important historical landmarks of temporary hemorrhage control system are considered. We paid special attention to the most usable methods and means of hemorrhage control which are utilized at the modern time: pressure bandages, tourniquets, local haemostatic agents. The comprehensive analysis of the contamporary haemostatic means concerning U.S. Army has done. The experience of foreign colleagues in development of prehospital care for the injured, creation and progress of new haemostatic methods, application of temporary hemorrhage control system is analyzed. PMID:22165585

  16. Prehospital advanced trauma life support for critical blunt trauma victims.

    PubMed

    Cwinn, A A; Pons, P T; Moore, E E; Marx, J A; Honigman, B; Dinerman, N

    1987-04-01

    The ability of paramedics to deliver advanced trauma life support (ATLS) in an expedient fashion for victims of trauma has been strongly challenged. In this study, the records of 114 consecutive victims of blunt trauma who underwent laparotomy or thoracotomy were reviewed. Prehospital care was rendered by paramedics operating under strict protocols. The mean response time (minutes +/- SEM) to the scene was 5.6 +/- 0.27. On-scene time was 13.9 +/- 0.62. The time to return to the hospital was 8.0 +/- 0.4. On-scene time included assessing hazards at the scene, patient extrication, spine immobilization (n = 98), application of oxygen (n = 94), measurement of vital signs (n = 114), splinting of 59 limbs, and the following ATLS procedures: endotracheal intubation (n = 31), IV access (n = 106), ECG monitoring (n = 69), procurement of blood for tests including type and cross (n = 58), and application of a pneumatic antishock garment (PASG) (n = 31). On-scene times were analyzed according to the number of ATLS procedures performed: insertion of one IV line (n = 46), 14.8 +/- 1.03 minutes; two IV lines (n = 28), 13.4 +/- 0.92; one IV line plus intubation (n = 7), 14.0 +/- 2.94; two IV lines plus intubation (n = 9), 17.0 +/- 2.38; and two IV lines plus intubation plus PASG (n = 13), 12.4 +/- 1.36. Of the 161 IV attempts, 94% were completed successfully. Of 36 attempts at endotracheal intubation, 89% were successful.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3826807

  17. Supporting Information Use and Retention of Pre-Hospital Information during Trauma Resuscitation: A Qualitative Study of Pre-Hospital Communications and Information Needs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Burd, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-hospital communication is a critical first step towards ensuring efficient management of critically injured patients during trauma resuscitation. Information about incoming patients received from the field and en route serves a critical role in helping emergency medical teams prepare for patient care. Despite many efforts, inefficiencies persist. In this paper, we examine the pre-hospital communications between pre-hospital and hospital providers, including the types of information transferred during en-route calls, as well as the information needs of trauma teams. Our findings show that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) teams report a great deal of information from the field, most of which match the needs of trauma teams. We discuss design implications for a computerized system to support the use and retention of pre-hospital information during trauma resuscitation. PMID:24551428

  18. Principles of prehospital care of musculoskeletal injuries.

    PubMed

    Worsing, R A

    1984-05-01

    Prehospital management of musculoskeletal injuries in the traumatized patient is based on the application of a few basic principles in an orderly but expeditious manner. The patient must be assessed for immediate life-threatening conditions involving airway, respiratory, and circulatory functions while the cervical spine is protected. Resuscitative efforts to reestablish and preserve an adequate circulating volume of oxygenated blood must follow, using airways, oxygen therapy, and fluid replacement through MAST trousers and intravenous fluids. Cardiac function must be maintained as well. Respiratory function must be monitored and assisted as required. Finally, neurologic status must be assessed and monitored. Secondary assessment of all pertinent history and physical findings is made to delineate all other injuries that do not pose an immediate threat to the life or limb of the patient. Definitive care follows but is limited to basic resuscitation, stabilization, and immobilization techniques under medical control through telemetry and radio communication. Immediate definitive care of the traumatized patient requires the expeditious intervention of the trauma team in a hospital setting with surgical, blood banking, radiographic, laboratory, and other hospital-based capabilities available. Field management of the traumatized patient is directed at the expeditious delivery of the viable patient to the trauma team. In the multiply traumatized patient with severe injuries to several organ systems, prehospital care may need to be expedited to provide this patient the in-hospital care required to save his or her life. Appropriate treatment in such life-threatening trauma situations will consist of a rapid primary assessment, airway and cervical spine control, appropriate respiratory and cardiovascular assistance, gross whole body fracture immobilization using a backboard, and immediate transport. For less severely injured patients, primary assessment, resuscitation

  19. Strategically Leapfrogging Education in Prehospital Trauma Management: Four-Tiered Training Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Rohit; Vyas, Dinesh; Narayan, Mayur; Vyas, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Trauma-related injury in fast developing countries are linked to 90% of international mortality rates, which can be greatly reduced by improvements in often non-existent or non-centralized emergency medical systems (EMS)—particularly in the pre-hospital care phase. Traditional trauma training protocols—such as Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS), International Trauma Life Support (ITLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS)—have failed to produce an effective pre-hospital ground force of medical first responders. To overcome these barriers, we propose a new four-tiered set of trauma training protocols: Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Trauma Training, Acute Trauma Training (ATT), Broad Trauma Training (BTT), and Cardiac and Trauma Training (CTT). These standards are specifically differentiated to accommodate the educational and socioeconomic diversity found in fast developing settings, where each free course is taught in native, lay language while ensuring the education standards are maintained by fully incorporating high-fidelity simulation, video-recorded debriefing, and retraining. The innovative pedagogy of this trauma education program utilizes MOOC for global scalability and a “train-the-trainer” approach for exponential growth—both components help fast developing countries reach a critical mass of first responders needed for the base of an evolving EMS. PMID:27419222

  20. Prehospital Use of Cervical Collars in Trauma Patients: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Asbjørnsen, Helge; Habiba, Samer; Sunde, Geir Arne; Wester, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The cervical collar has been routinely used for trauma patients for more than 30 years and is a hallmark of state-of-the-art prehospital trauma care. However, the existing evidence for this practice is limited: Randomized, controlled trials are largely missing, and there are uncertain effects on mortality, neurological injury, and spinal stability. Even more concerning, there is a growing body of evidence and opinion against the use of collars. It has been argued that collars cause more harm than good, and that we should simply stop using them. In this critical review, we discuss the pros and cons of collar use in trauma patients and reflect on how we can move our clinical practice forward. Conclusively, we propose a safe, effective strategy for prehospital spinal immobilization that does not include routine use of collars. PMID:23962031

  1. Base station prehospital care: judgement errors and deviations from protocol.

    PubMed

    Wasserberger, J; Ordog, G J; Donoghue, G; Balasubramaniam, S

    1987-08-01

    During a three-year period 5,944 paramedic runs were reviewed at the King/Drew Medical Center for deviations from prehospital management protocols established by the Los Angeles Paramedic Training Institute, and from standard medical practice. An overall compliance to the prehospital management protocols of 94% was found. Compliance to standard medical care was 97%. The most common deviations were failure to administer prophylactic lidocaine to patients having chest pain suggestive of myocardial ischemia and failure to apply cervical spine precautions in patients with suspected head trauma. Fifty percent of the radio operators who deviated from algorithms also were found to be making errors in judgment in standard medical care. PMID:3619166

  2. Predetermining value analysis of the prehospital phase procedures in trauma victims survival.

    PubMed

    Malvestio, Marisa Aparecida Amaro; Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso de

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the determining value of the procedures carried out during prehospital care in the survival time of traffic accident victims. Data of 175 victims with Revised Trauma Score pound 11, cared for and transported by advanced life support to tertiary referral hospitals, were submitted to Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis and to Cox proportional hazards model. Four procedure groups associated with survival were identified: basic circulatory; advanced respiratory; volume replaced and medication. Until hospital discharge, the victims who underwent orotracheal intubation and chest compressions showed 3.6 and 6.4 times higher death hazards, respectively. The need for definitive airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the prehospital phase was predetermining with higher death hazard. The less than 1000 ml intravenous fluid replacement was the only predetermining factor with protective power against death hazard. PMID:18695818

  3. Prehospital care in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lo, C B; Lai, K K; Mak, K P

    2000-09-01

    A quick and efficient prehospital emergency response depends on immediate ambulance dispatch, patient assessment, triage, and transport to hospital. During 1999, the Ambulance Command of the Hong Kong Fire Services Department responded to 484,923 calls, which corresponds to 1329 calls each day. Cooperation between the Fire Services Department and the Hospital Authority exists at the levels of professional training of emergency medical personnel, quality assurance, and a coordinated disaster response. In response to the incident at the Hong Kong International Airport in the summer of 1999, when an aircraft overturned during landing, the pre-set quota system was implemented to send patients to designated accident and emergency departments. Furthermore, the 'first crew at the scene' model has been adopted, whereby the command is established and triage process started by the first ambulance crew members to reach the scene. The development of emergency protocols should be accompanied by good field-to-hospital and interhospital communication, the upgrading of decision-making skills, a good monitoring and auditing structure, and commitment to training and skills maintenance. PMID:11025847

  4. PHTLS (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) overseas.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, W

    2001-05-01

    There are many names and places that space will not allow here. In the future, I hope to write about these places one at a time and give more detailed reports on the people all over the world who are our brothers and sisters in EMS, covering the places they work and how they provide care. In any event, with each opportunity, we learn about people, ourselves and how small a place the world has become. We are reminded not to approach people and places with belligerence, implying that we have all the answers. By considering the culture and environment in which care is provided, we learn to bring the same open-mindedness back home to help when addressing the problems we face every day. What our neighbors have to teach us may be the next big step in our development. PMID:11373899

  5. Improving adjustments for older age in pre-hospital assessment and care.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Marius

    2013-01-01

    Population estimates projects a significant increase in the geriatric population making elderly trauma patients more common. The geriatric trauma patients experience higher incidence of pre-existing medical conditions, impaired age-dependent physiologic reserve, use potent drugs and suffer from trauma system related shortcomings that influence outcomes. To improve adjustments for older age in pre-hospital assessment and care, several initiatives should be implemented. Decision-makers should make system revisions and introduce advanced point-of-care initiatives to improve outcome after trauma for the elderly. PMID:23343340

  6. Epidemiology of Patients With Multiple Trauma and the Quality of Their Prehospital Respiration Management in Kashan, Iran: Six Months Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Maghaminejad, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Respiration management is an important and critical issue in prehospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care has not been assessed in Iran Emergency Medical Services’ (EMS). Objectives: This study was conducted to investigate the quality of prehospital respiration management in patients with multiple trauma, referred to the Shahid Beheshti Trauma Center, Kashan, Iran. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the first six months of 2013. All the 400 patients with multiple trauma, transferred by EMS to the Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, were recruited. The study instrument was a checklist, which was completed through observation. Descriptive statistics were presented. Results: Out of all included individuals, 301 were males (75.2%) and 99 were females (24.8%). The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (87.25%). Furthermore, 71.7% of the patients were injured in head and neck and chest areas. The quality of consciousness monitoring and airway management was desirable in 95% of the cases. However, the quality of monitoring patients’ respiration was only desirable in 42% of the cases. Only 18.6% of the patients received oxygen therapy during prehospital transportation. Conclusions: The quality of monitoring patients’ respiration and oxygen therapy was undesirable in most patients with multiple trauma. Therefore, the EMS workers should be retrained to apply proper respiration management in patients with multiple trauma. PMID:25147774

  7. The Quality of Pre-Hospital Oxygen Therapy in Patients With Multiple Trauma: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Paravar, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a major healthcare challenge worldwide. In developing countries, most road deaths happen during the pre-hospital phase; consequently, pre-hospital trauma care has received considerable attention during the past decades. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital oxygen therapy in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services to the central trauma department in Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, Kashan, Iran. The data collection instrument had three parts including demographic, a trauma assessment, and an oxygen therapy quality assessment questionnaires that were designed by the researchers. In total, 350 patients with multiple trauma were recruited from March through July 2013. Data were described by using frequency tables, central tendency measures, and variability indices. Moreover, we analyzed data by using the Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, and the logistic regression analysis. Results: The study sample consisted of 263 (75.1%) male and 87 (24.9%) female patients. Overall, 211 patients needed oxygen therapy during the pre-hospital phase; however, only 35 (16.60%) patients had received oxygen. The quality of oxygen therapy was undesirable in 92.42% of cases. In addition, 83.4% of patients, whose pre-hospital records indicated the administration of oxygen, reported that they had not received oxygen therapy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the place of accident and the level of patients' education were significant predictors for administration of oxygen during the pre-hospital phase (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The quality of pre-hospital oxygen therapy had been provided for the patients with multiple trauma was poor while these patients, particularly patients with chest traumas and head injuries, were in

  8. Review on pharmacological pain management in trauma patients in (pre-hospital) emergency medicine in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, B M; Berben, S A A; van Dongen, R T M; Schoonhoven, L

    2014-01-01

    Pain is one of the main complaints of trauma patients in (pre-hospital) emergency medicine. Significant deficiencies in pain management in emergency medicine have been identified. No evidence-based protocols or guidelines have been developed so far, addressing effectiveness and safety issues, taking the specific circumstances of pain management of trauma patients in the chain of emergency care into account. The aim of this systematic review was to identify effective and safe initial pharmacological pain interventions, available in the Netherlands, for trauma patients with acute pain in the chain of emergency care. Up to December 2011, a systematic search strategy was performed with MeSH terms and free text words, using the bibliographic databases CINAHL, PubMed and Embase. Methodological quality of the articles was assessed using standardized evaluation forms. Of a total of 2328 studies, 25 relevant studies were identified. Paracetamol (both orally and intravenously) and intravenous opioids (morphine and fentanyl) proved to be effective. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) showed mixed results and are not recommended for use in pre-hospital ambulance or (helicopter) emergency medical services [(H)EMS]. These results could be used for the development of recommendations on evidence-based pharmacological pain management and an algorithm to support the provision of adequate (pre-hospital) pain management. Future studies should address analgesic effectiveness and safety of various drugs in (pre-hospital) emergency care. Furthermore, potential innovative routes of administration (e.g., intranasal opioids in adults) need further exploration. PMID:23737462

  9. Mapping the use of simulation in prehospital care – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High energy trauma is rare and, as a result, training of prehospital care providers often takes place during the real situation, with the patient as the object for the learning process. Such training could instead be carried out in the context of simulation, out of danger for both patients and personnel. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the development and foci of research on simulation in prehospital care practice. Methods An integrative literature review were used. Articles based on quantitative as well as qualitative research methods were included, resulting in a comprehensive overview of existing published research. For published articles to be included in the review, the focus of the article had to be prehospital care providers, in prehospital settings. Furthermore, included articles must target interventions that were carried out in a simulation context. Results The volume of published research is distributed between 1984- 2012 and across the regions North America, Europe, Oceania, Asia and Middle East. The simulation methods used were manikins, films, images or paper, live actors, animals and virtual reality. The staff categories focused upon were paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), medical doctors (MDs), nurse and fire fighters. The main topics of published research on simulation with prehospital care providers included: Intubation, Trauma care, Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), Ventilation and Triage. Conclusion Simulation were described as a positive training and education method for prehospital medical staff. It provides opportunities to train assessment, treatment and implementation of procedures and devices under realistic conditions. It is crucial that the staff are familiar with and trained on the identified topics, i.e., intubation, trauma care, CPR, ventilation and triage, which all, to a very large degree, constitute prehospital care. Simulation plays an integral role in this. The current state of

  10. Prehospital Blood Product Resuscitation for Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Iain M.; James, Robert H.; Dretzke, Janine; Midwinter, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Administration of high ratios of plasma to packed red blood cells is a routine practice for in-hospital trauma resuscitation. Military and civilian emergency teams are increasingly carrying prehospital blood products (PHBP) for trauma resuscitation. This study systematically reviewed the clinical literature to determine the extent to which the available evidence supports this practice. Methods: Bibliographic databases and other sources were searched to July 2015 using keywords and index terms related to the intervention, setting, and condition. Standard systematic review methodology aimed at minimizing bias was used for study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment (protocol registration PROSPERO: CRD42014013794). Synthesis was mainly narrative with random effects model meta-analysis limited to mortality outcomes. Results: No prospective comparative or randomized studies were identified. Sixteen case series and 11 comparative studies were included in the review. Seven studies included mixed populations of trauma and non-trauma patients. Twenty-five of 27 studies provided only very low quality evidence. No association between PHBP and survival was found (OR for mortality: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.84–1.96, P = 0.24). A single study showed improved survival in the first 24 h. No consistent physiological or biochemical benefit was identified, nor was there evidence of reduced in-hospital transfusion requirements. Transfusion reactions were rare, suggesting the short-term safety of PHBP administration. Conclusions: While PHBP resuscitation appears logical, the clinical literature is limited, provides only poor quality evidence, and does not demonstrate improved outcomes. No conclusions as to efficacy can be drawn. The results of randomized controlled trials are awaited. PMID:26825635

  11. Prehospital care at a major international airport.

    PubMed

    Cwinn, A A; Dinerman, N; Pons, P T; Marlin, R

    1988-10-01

    Medical emergencies at a major metropolitan airport have a significant impact on prehospital care capabilities for the rest of the community in which the airport is located. Stapleton International Airport in Denver, Colorado, is a facility that in 1985 had 14.4 million passengers and a static employee population of 12,000 to 15,000. In 1981, there were 1,182 ambulance trips to the airport, 40.4% of which did not result in the transport of a patient. The expense of sending an ambulance and fire engine out on such calls was great, and paramedics were out of service for approximately 300 hours on these nontransport cases. In order to improve prehospital services to the airport and the city, a paramedic has been stationed in the concourse at the airport 16 hours a day since 1982. The records for airport paramedic services for the 12 months ending September 1985 were reviewed. Paramedic services were requested for 1,952 patients. Of these, 696 (35.7%) were transported to hospital by ambulance; 115 (5.9%) went by private car; 284 (14.6%) refused any paramedic care or transport; and 857 (43.9%) were released, after base station contact, with instructions to seek definitive care at the final destination. Presenting complaints were classified into 55 categories and the frequencies and dispositions are described. The most common presentations resulting in transport were chest pain, 110 (5.6%); syncope, 60 (3.1%); psychiatric, 57 (2.9%); abdominal pain, 49 (2.5%); seizure, 36 (1.8%); fracture, 31 (1.6%); and cardiac arrest, 29 (1.5%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3177992

  12. Prehospital care and the community hospital as a base station.

    PubMed

    Morhaim, D K

    1989-03-01

    In Maryland's coordinated, regionalized emergency medical system, prehospital care is given to an injured or ill person at home, on the street, or in a doctor's office before the patient is transported to a hospital. Prehospital care of patients has advanced significantly since the federal government passed emergency medical service (EMS) legislation in 1966. In Maryland there are several functioning levels of prehospital care providers who perform skills unique to their particular environment and training. It is reasonable for all hospitals operating a full-service Emergency Department to consider becoming base stations for consultation to prehospital care providers bringing patients to that hospital. This is well within the province of the Emergency Medicine specialist and will provide improved service to patients. PMID:2927265

  13. Tyranny of distance and rural prehospital care: Is there potential for a national rural responder network?

    PubMed

    Leeuwenburg, Tim; Hall, John

    2015-10-01

    Critical illness intersects with the workload of rural doctors in Australia, mostly via their on-call responsibilities to rural hospitals. A significant proportion of these are prehospital incidents - vehicle crashes, farming injuries, bushfire etc. Effective care for such patients requires an integration of prehospital ambulance services, retrieval services and tertiary level trauma services all the way through to rehabilitation. Ambulance services in rural areas are often volunteer based, and with increasing remoteness via the 'tyranny of distance' comes the likelihood of increased delay in arrival of specialist retrieval services. Potential exists to utilise rural clinicians to respond to prehospital incidents in certain defined circumstances, as suggested by a recent survey of rural doctors. PMID:26105215

  14. Risk assessment of pre-hospital trauma airway management by anaesthesiologists using the predictive Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Endotracheal intubation (ETI) has been considered an essential part of pre-hospital advanced life support. Pre-hospital ETI, however, is a complex intervention also for airway specialist like anaesthesiologists working as pre-hospital emergency physicians. We therefore wanted to investigate the quality of pre-hospital airway management by anaesthesiologists in severely traumatised patients and identify possible areas for improvement. Method We performed a risk assessment according to the predictive Bayesian approach, in a typical anaesthesiologist-manned Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS). The main focus of the risk assessment was the event where a patient arrives in the emergency department without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication for it. Results In the risk assessment, we assigned a high probability (29%) for the event assessed, that a patient arrives without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication. However, several uncertainty factors in the risk assessment were identified related to data quality, indications for use of ETI, patient outcome and need for special training of ETI providers. Conclusion Our risk assessment indicated a high probability for trauma patients with an indication for pre-hospital ETI not receiving it in the studied HEMS. The uncertainty factors identified in the assessment should be further investigated to better understand the problem assessed and consequences for the patients. Better quality of pre-hospital airway management data could contribute to a reduction of these uncertainties. PMID:20409306

  15. Trauma care systems in Spain.

    PubMed

    Queipo de Llano, E; Mantero Ruiz, A; Sanchez Vicioso, P; Bosca Crespo, A; Carpintero Avellaneda, J L; de la Torre Prado, M V

    2003-09-01

    Trauma care systems in Spain are provided by the Nacional Health Service in a decentralized way by the seventeen autonomous communities whose process of decentralization was completed in January 2002. Its organisation is similar in all of them. Public sector companies of sanitary emergencies look after the health of citizens in relation to medical and trauma emergencies with a wide range of up to date resources both technical and human. In the following piece there is a description of the emergency response teams divided into ground and air that are responsible for the on site care of the patients in coordination with other public services. They also elaborate the prehospital clinical history that is going to be a valuable piece of information for the teams that receive the patient in the Emergency Hospital Unit (EHU). From 1980 to 1996 the mortality rate per 10.000 vehicles and the deaths per 1.000 accidents dropped significantly: in 1980 6.4 and 96.19% and in 1996, 2.8 and 64.06% respectively. In the intrahospital organisation there are two differentiated areas to receive trauma patients the casualty department and the EHU. In the EHU the severe and multiple injured patients are treated by the emergency hospital doctors; first in the triage or resuscitation areas and after when stabilised they are passed too the observation area or to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and from there the EHU or ICU doctors call the appropriate specialists. There is a close collaboration and coordination between the orthopaedic surgeon the EHU doctors and the other specialists surgeons in order to comply with treatment prioritization protocols. Once the patient has been transferred an entire process of assistance continuity is developed based on interdisciplinary teams formed in the hospital from the services areas involved in trauma assistance and usually coordinated by the ICU doctors. There is also mentioned the assistance registry of trauma patients, the ICU professional training

  16. The Tanzanian trauma patients' prehospital experience: a qualitative interview-based study

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Kristin; Lim, Andrew George; Kepha, Bernard; Nalitolela, Neema Evelyne; Reynolds, Teri A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to characterise the prehospital experience of Tanzanian trauma patients, and identify barriers and facilitators to implement community-based emergency medical systems (EMS). Settings Our study was conducted in the emergency department of an urban national referral hospital in Tanzania. Participants A convenience sample of 34 adult trauma patients, or surrogate family members, presenting or referred to an urban referral emergency department in Tanzania for treatment of injury, participated in the study. Interventions Participation in semistructured, iteratively developed interviews until saturation of responses was reached. Outcomes A grounded theory-based approach to qualitative analysis was used to identify recurrent themes. Results We characterised numerous deficiencies within the existing clinic-to-hospital referral network, including missed/delayed diagnoses, limited management capabilities at pre-referral facilities and interfacility transfer delays. Potential barriers to EMS implementation include patient financial limitations and lack of insurance, limited public infrastructure and resources, and the credibility of potential first aid responders. Potential facilitators of EMS include communities’ tendency to pool resources, individuals’ trust of other community members to be first aid responders, and faith in community leaders to organise EMS response. Participants expressed a strong desire to learn first aid. Conclusions The composite themes generated by the data suggest that there are myriad structural, financial, institutional and cultural barriers to the implementation of a formal prehospital system. However, our analysis also revealed potential facilitators to a first-responder system that takes advantage of close-knit local communities and the trust of recognised leaders in society. The results suggest favourable acceptability for community-based response by trained lay people. There is significant opportunity for care

  17. Skills required for maritime pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care (PHEC) in the military has undergone major changes during the last 10 years of warfighting in the land environment. Providing this care in the maritime environment presents several unique challenges. This paper examines the clinical capabilities required of a PHEC team in the maritime environment and how this role can be fulfilled as part of Role 2 Afloat. It applies to Pre-hospital emergency care projected from a hospital not to General Duties Medical Officers at Role 1. PMID:22558737

  18. Architecture of a prehospital emergency patient care report system (PEPRS).

    PubMed

    Majeed, Raphael W; Stöhr, Mark R; Röhrig, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, prehospital emergency care adapted to the technology shift towards tablet computers and mobile computing. In particular, electronic patient care report (e-PCR) systems gained considerable attention and adoption in prehospital emergency medicine [1]. On the other hand, hospital information systems are already widely adopted. Yet, there is no universal solution for integrating prehospital emergency reports into electronic medical records of hospital information systems. Previous projects either relied on proprietary viewing workstations or examined and transferred only data for specific diseases (e.g. stroke patients[2]). Using requirements engineering and a three step software engineering approach, this project presents a generic architecture for integrating prehospital emergency care reports into hospital information systems. Aim of this project is to describe a generic architecture which can be used to implement data transfer and integration of pre hospital emergency care reports to hospital information systems. In summary, the prototype was able to integrate data in a standardized manner. The devised methods can be used design generic software for prehospital to hospital data integration. PMID:23920925

  19. Recognizing/accepting futility: prehospital, emergency center, operating room, and intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, Raul; Lee, Jeanne; Bansal, Vishal; Hollingsworth-Fridlund, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Trauma has been perceived by the public as occurring as an isolated event, always resulting in favorable outcomes. There has therefore been a lack of discussion of futility of care and termination of care when dealing with the sick trauma patient. Several stages exist where issues of futility and early termination of care must be considered. These include the prehospital setting and involve the emergency medical service system in recognizing those patients who are nonsurvivors. Next is in the emergency room, where heroic measures may not benefit the very sick patient. In the operating room, the surgeon must always reassess and recognize when massive resuscitation will not benefit a particular trauma patient. Lastly, the intensivist must recognize those patients who may or may not benefit from continued efforts to sustain life. PMID:17579324

  20. The Quality of Pre-hospital Circulatory Management in Patients With Multiple Trauma Referred to the Trauma Center of Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, in the First Six Months of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulatory management is a critical issue in pre-hospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care did not receive enough attention. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital circulatory management in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services (EMS) to the central trauma department in Kashan Shahid Beheshti medical center, Kashan, Iran. We recruited a convenience sample of 400 patients with multiple trauma. Data were collected using the circulatory assessment questionnaire and controlling hemorrhage (CAQCH) that were designed by the researchers and were described by using frequency tabulations, central tendency measures, and variability indices. The chi-square test was used to analyze the data. Results The study sample consisted of 263 males (75.2%); 57.75% had lower levels of education and 28.75% were workers. The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (85.4%). We found that the quality of circulatory management was unfavorable in 61% of the cases. A significant relationship was observed between the quality of circulatory management and type of trauma and staff’s employment status. Conclusions The quality of pre-hospital circulatory management provided to patients with multiple trauma was unfavorable. Therefore, establishment of in-service training programs on circulatory management is recommended. PMID:27556056

  1. Association of Prehospital Shock Index and Trauma Bay Uncrossmatched Red Blood Cell Transfusion With Multiple Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Day, Darcy L; Anzelon, Kathleen M; Conde, Franscisco A

    2016-01-01

    Early resuscitation of bleeding trauma patients with multiple blood products improves outcome, yet transfusion initiation is not standardized. Shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure) and trauma bay uncrossmatched red blood cell (RBC) transfusion were evaluated for association with multiple transfusions, defined as 6 or more RBCs during the first 6 hrs of hospital presentation. A prehospital shock index of 1 was significantly associated with multiple transfusions (p = .02). Subjects receiving uncrossmatched RBCs required more RBCs during the first 6 hrs (10.3 units, p < .01). Consideration of these simple variables may help trauma nurses anticipate the potentially bleeding patient. PMID:26953537

  2. Trauma Simulation Training Increases Confidence Levels in Prehospital Personnel Performing Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Archita D.; Meurer, David A.; Shuster, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Limited evidence is available on simulation training of prehospital care providers, specifically the use of tourniquets and needle decompression. This study focused on whether the confidence level of prehospital personnel performing these skills improved through simulation training. Methods. Prehospital personnel from Alachua County Fire Rescue were enrolled in the study over a 2- to 3-week period based on their availability. Two scenarios were presented to them: a motorcycle crash resulting in a leg amputation requiring a tourniquet and an intoxicated patient with a stab wound, who experienced tension pneumothorax requiring needle decompression. Crews were asked to rate their confidence levels before and after exposure to the scenarios. Timing of the simulation interventions was compared with actual scene times to determine applicability of simulation in measuring the efficiency of prehospital personnel. Results. Results were collected from 129 participants. Pre- and postexposure scores increased by a mean of 1.15 (SD 1.32; 95% CI, 0.88–1.42; P < 0.001). Comparison of actual scene times with simulated scene times yielded a 1.39-fold difference (95% CI, 1.25–1.55) for Scenario 1 and 1.59 times longer for Scenario 2 (95% CI, 1.43–1.77). Conclusion. Simulation training improved prehospital care providers' confidence level in performing two life-saving procedures. PMID:27563467

  3. Paramedics' and pre-hospital physicians' assessments of anatomic injury in trauma patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pre-hospital assessment of a blunt trauma is difficult. Common triage tools are the mechanism of injury (MOI), vital signs, and anatomic injury (AI). Compared to the other tools, the clinical assessment of anatomic injury is more subjective than the others, and, hence, more dependent on the skills of the personnel. The aim of the study was to estimate whether the training and qualifications of the personnel are associated with the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury and the completion of pre-hospital procedures indicated by local guidelines. Methods Adult trauma patients met by a trauma team at Helsinki University Trauma Centre during a 12-month period (n = 422) were retrospectively analysed. To evaluate the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury, clinically assessed pre-hospital injuries in six body regions were compared to injuries assessed at hospital in two patient groups, the patients treated by pre-hospital physicians (group 1, n = 230) and those treated by paramedics (group 2, n = 190). Results The groups were comparable in respect to age, sex, and MOI, but the patients treated by physicians were more severely injured than those treated by paramedics [ISS median (interquartile range) 16 (6-26) vs. 6 (2-10)], thus rendering direct comparison of the groups ineligible. The positive predictive values (95% confidence interval) of assessed injury were highest in head injury [0,91 (0,84-0,95) in group 1 and 0,86 (0,77-0,92) in group 2]. The negative predictive values were highest in abdominal injury [0,85 (0,79-0,89) in group 1 and 0,90 (0,84-0,93) in group 2]. The measurements of agreement between injuries assessed pre- and in-hospitally were moderate in thoracic and extremity injuries. Substantial kappa values (95% confidence interval) were achieved in head injury, 0,67 (0,57-0,77) in group 1 and 0,63 (0,52-0,74) in group 2. The rate of performing the pre-hospital procedures as indicated by the local instructions was 95-99%, except for

  4. Foregoing prehospital care: should ambulance staff always resuscitate?

    PubMed Central

    Iserson, K V

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 400,000 people die outside US hospitals or chronic care facilities each year. While there has been some recent movement towards initiating procedures for prehospital Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders, the most common situation in the US is that emergency medical systems (EMS) personnel are not authorized to pronounce patients dead, but are required to attempt resuscitation with all of the modalities at their disposal in virtually all patients. It is unfair and probably unrealistic for EMS personnel to have to make a determination of the validity of a non-standard prehospital DNR order (for example, a living will or a durable power of attorney for health care). Existing prehospital DNR protocols range from being very restrictive in the scope of patients allowed to participate and in their implementation, to those that are more liberal. Potential benefits of prehospital DNR orders include freeing up vital personnel and material for use by those who would more fully benefit, and alleviating the enormous emotional strain on patients, families, EMS personnel, and hospital medical staffs involved in unwanted resuscitations that only prolong the dying process. Given this, prehospital DNR orders present several legal and moral problems. These include proper patient identification, the nature of the document itself, precautions incorporated into a DNR system to prevent misuse, potential liability for EMS and hospital personnel, and potential errors in implementation. Functioning prehospital DNR systems need to include: 1) specific legislation detailing the circumstances in which such a document could be used, the wording of such a document, and protection from liability for those implementing the document's directives; 2) having the currently valid document immediately available to the EMS personnel or base station doctors; and 3) acceptable means of identifying the patient. Relatively few US jurisdictions as yet have a prehospital DNR order system, although it

  5. [Explosion injuries - prehospital care and management].

    PubMed

    Holsträter, Thorsten; Holsträter, Susanne; Rein, Daniela; Helm, Matthias; Hossfeld, Björn

    2013-11-01

    Explosion injuries are not restricted to war-like military conflicts or terrorist attacks. The emergency physician may also encounter such injuries in the private or industrial fields, injuries caused by fireworks or gas explosions. In such cases the injury patterns are especially complex and may consist of blunt and penetrating injuries as well as thermal damage. Emergency medical personnel must be prepared to cope with explosion trauma not only in individual cases but also in major casualty incidents (MCI). This necessitates a sound knowledge about the mechanisms and processes of an explosion as well as the particular pathophysiological relationships of explosion injuries in order to be able to initiate the best possible, guideline-conform trauma therapy. PMID:24343140

  6. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  7. [Analgesia and anesthesia in the prehospital stage of mechanical trauma].

    PubMed

    Beliakov, V A; Sinitsyn, L N; Maksimov, G A; Akulov, M S; Kalachev, S A; Medvedskiĭ

    1993-01-01

    The work reviews the results of the use of various analgesics and anesthetics in 965 outpatients with mechanical traumas, including 340 ones with shock and blood loss. Central hemodynamics has been studied in 60 patients during anesthesia with lexir, ketamine, sodium hydroxybutyrate, respiratory function has been assessed in 20 patients. The results have been confirmed experimentally on 160 rats, 50 cats, and 40 dogs. It is recommended to apply narcotic and nonnarcotic analgesics, lexir, ketamine intramuscularly not only to patients with shock and pronounced blood loss in whom infusion therapy and intravenous anesthesia with sodium hydroxybutyrate are necessary but in all other cases as well. PMID:8116897

  8. Prehospital advanced trauma life support for critical penetrating wounds to the thorax and abdomen.

    PubMed

    Pons, P T; Honigman, B; Moore, E E; Rosen, P; Antuna, B; Dernocoeur, J

    1985-09-01

    The role of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) in the prehospital care of the critically injured is highly controversial. This study analyzes the efficacy of ATLS in the management of critical penetrating wounds of the thorax and abdomen. In the 2 1/2-year period ending July 1984, 203 consecutive patients underwent emergency laparotomy or thoracotomy for gunshot and stab wounds. All patients were treated in the field by advanced paramedics (EMT-P). For gunshot wounds the mean time (+/- S.E.M.) responding to the scene was 4.5 (+/- 0.29) minutes, on the scene 10.1 (+/- 0.41) minutes, and returning to the hospital 6.4 (+/- 0.32) minutes. For stab wounds the mean time responding to the scene was 4.8 (+/- 0.21) minutes, on the scene 9.5 (+/- 0.37) minutes, and returning to the hospital 5.7 (+ 0.30) minutes. The number of intravenous lines started averaged 1.8 per patient. Eighty-one patients had PASG applied and 28 patients underwent endotracheal intubation (21 orally, seven nasally). Thirty-three patients had no obtainable blood pressure, of whom six survived (18%). One hundred sixty (94%) of the remaining 170 patients who had any initial blood pressure survived. One hundred nine (55%) patients had an increase in BP greater than or equal to 10 mm Hg (average, 35.6 mm Hg), 64 (32%) had no significant change, and 25 (13%) had a fall greater than or equal to 10 mm Hg (average, 24.2 mm Hg) from the field to the emergency department. Twenty (80%) of the 25 patients with a fall in blood pressure survived.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4032506

  9. Pre-hospital care in burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Prabhat; Goel, Arun

    2010-01-01

    The care provided to the victims of burn injury immediately after sustaining burns can largely affect the extent and depth of the wound. Although standard guidelines have been formulated by various burn associations, they are still not well known to public at large in our country. In burn injuries, most often, the bystanders are the first care providers. The swift implementation of the measures described in this article for first aid in thermal, chemical, electrical and inhalational injuries in the practical setting, within minutes of sustaining the burn, plays a vital role and can effectively reduce the morbidity and mortality to a great extent. In case of burn disasters, triage needs to be carried out promptly as per the defined protocols. Proper communication and transport from the scene of the accident to the primary care centre and onto the burn care facility greatly influences the execution of the management plans PMID:21321651

  10. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care. PMID:26738719

  11. A preliminary comparison of levalbuterol and albuterol in prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Monica; Wise, Suzanne; Rodenberg, Howard

    2004-04-01

    Nebulized levalbuterol has been documented as more efficacious than albuterol in enhancing airflow in Emergency Department (ED) patients with bronchospasm. This work attempts to determine if nebulized levalbuterol yields similar improvements in peak flow measurements as those produced by albuterol in the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arena. All adult EMS patients given a nebulized beta-agonist from January to June 2000 were included in this prospective, before-and-after, open-label study. Data collected included demographics, initial peak expiratory flow (PF), and use of home inhaled or nebulized bronchodilators before EMS arrival (PRE-TX). Outcome variable was the change in PF after a single EMS treatment with one of the study agents. Statistical analysis was performed using t-test and chi-square techniques; p was defined as 0.05. There were 298 patients enrolled; complete data for analysis were available for 196. Mean age was 68.0 years; 44.4% were male. Overall, albuterol produced a PF change of 19.7%; levalbuterol yielded a change of 20.4% (p = 0.9). In contrast to ED data, levalbuterol and albuterol produces similar changes in PF in the prehospital setting. Explanations for this finding may be linked to the pharmacokinetics of single vs. dual isomer preparations, and to the time frames of EMS care. Further efforts correlating EMS and ED data may better define the use of levalbuterol in prehospital care. PMID:15028323

  12. A Computerized Evaluation Methodology for Pre-Hospital EMS Cardiac Care

    PubMed Central

    Nagurney, Frank K.

    1980-01-01

    The computerized application of cardiac care protocols for pre-hospital EMS care is presented. The program logic is reviewed and an example of its application is provided. Uses of the results of the program in EMS management are suggested.

  13. Caring for Trauma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Although trauma exposure is common, few people develop acute and chronic psychiatric disorders. Those who develop posttraumatic stress disorder likely have coexisting psychiatric and physical disorders. Psychiatric nurses must be knowledgeable about trauma responses, implement evidence-based approaches to conduct assessments, and create safe environments for patients. Most researchers assert that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral approaches demonstrate the most efficacious treatment outcomes. Integrated approaches, offer promising treatment options. This article provides an overview of clinical factors necessary to help the trauma survivor begin the process of healing and recovery and attain an optimal level of functioning. PMID:27229285

  14. Prehospital versus Emergency Room Intubation of Trauma Patients in Qatar: A-2-year Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-01-01

    Background: The impact of prehospital intubation (PHI) in improving outcome of trauma patients has not been adequately evaluated in the developing countries. Aims: The present study analyzed the outcome of PHI versus emergency room intubation (ERI) among trauma patients in Qatar. Materials and Methods: Data were retrospectively reviewed for all intubated trauma patients between 2010 and 2011. Patients were classified according to location of intubation (PHI: Group-1 versus ERI: Group-2). Data were analyzed and compared. Results: Out of 570 intubated patients; 482 patients (239 in group-1 and 243 in group-2) met the inclusion criteria with a mean age of 32 ΁ 14.6 years Head injury (P = 0.003) and multiple trauma (P = 0.004) were more prevalent in group-1, whereas solid organ injury predominated in group-2 (P = 0.02). Group-1 had significantly higher mean injury severity scoring (ISS), lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS), greater head abbreviated injury score and longer activation, response, scene and total emergency medical services times. The mortality was higher in group-1 (53% vs. 18.5%; P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that GCS [odds ratio (OR) 0.78, P = 0.005) and ISS (OR 1.12, P = 0.001) were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: PHI is associated with high mortality when compared with ERI. However, selection bias cannot be ruled out and therefore, PHI needs further critical assessment in Qatar. PMID:24678471

  15. Emerging Technologies for Pediatric and Adult Trauma Care

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Steven L.; Haley-Andrews, Stephanie; Mulligan, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Review Current EMS protocols rely on provider directed care for evaluation, management and triage of injured patients from the field to a trauma center. New methods to quickly diagnose, support and coordinate the movement of trauma patients from the field to the most appropriate trauma center are in development. These methods will enhance trauma care and promote trauma system development. Recent Findings Recent advances in machine learning, statistical methods, device integration and wireless communication are giving rise to new methods for vital sign data analysis and a new generation of transport monitors. These monitors will collect and synchronize exponentially growing amounts of vital sign data with electronic patient care information. The application of advanced statistical methods to these complex clinical data sets has the potential to reveal many important physiological relationships and treatment effects. Summary Several emerging technologies are converging to yield a new generation of smart sensors and tightly integrated transport monitors. These technologies will assist pre-hospital providers in quickly identifying and triaging the most severely injured children and adults to the most appropriate trauma centers. They will enable the development of real-time clinical support systems of increasing complexity, able to provide timelier, more cost-effective, autonomous care. PMID:20407375

  16. A method to reduce response times in prehospital care: the motorcycle experience.

    PubMed

    Lin, C S; Chang, H; Shyu, K G; Liu, C Y; Lin, C C; Hung, C R; Chen, P H

    1998-11-01

    This study compared the response times of a motorcycle and a standard ambulance in a congested urban emergency medical services (EMS) setting. The study was performed in Taipei, Taiwan, a densely populated urban area. A basic life support (BLS) motorcycle (without defibrillation capability) and an advanced life support (ALS) ambulance were based at three study hospitals and simultaneously dispatched when there was a perceived need for ALS ambulance transport. Over a 3-month period, prehospital personnel evaluated 307 medical and trauma emergencies. Time data were insufficient for analysis in 33 cases, leaving a study population of 274. Response times of the motorcycle and the ambulance were prospectively assessed and compared. During rush hours, the response times of the motorcycle and ambulance were 4.9+/-3.0 minutes and 6.3+/-3.4 minutes (P < .05), respectively, and in non-rush hours, 4.2+/-2.1 minutes and 5.1+/-2.5 minutes (P < .05), respectively. Using motorcycles to transport EMTs to the emergency scene significantly reduced response time compared with a standard ambulance in a congested urban setting. Large prospective studies are required to determine the impact on patient outcome of shorter EMS response times using motorcycles. EMS motorcycles appear feasible and deserve consideration to help expedite prehospital care in other systems in densely populated cities. PMID:9827757

  17. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome. PMID:25635190

  18. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Amadi-Obi, Ahjoku; Gilligan, Peadar; Owens, Niall; O'Donnell, Cathal

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome. PMID:25635190

  19. Trauma care and referral patterns in Rwanda: implications for trauma system development

    PubMed Central

    Ntakiyiruta, Georges; Wong, Evan G.; Rousseau, Mathieu C.; Ruhungande, Landouald; Kushner, Adam L.; Liberman, Alexander S.; Khwaja, Kosar; Dakermandji, Marc; Wilson, Marnie; Razek, Tarek; Kyamanywa, Patrick; Deckelbaum, Dan L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trauma remains a leading cause of death worldwide. The development of trauma systems in low-resource settings may be of benefit. The objective of this study was to describe operative procedures performed for trauma at a tertiary care facility in Kigali, Rwanda, and to evaluate geographical variations and referral patterns of trauma care. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all prospectively collected operative cases performed at the largest referral hospital in Rwanda, the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Kigali (CHUK), between June 1 and Dec. 1, 2011, for injury-related diagnoses. We used the Pearson χ2 and Fisher exact tests to compare cases arising from within Kigali to those transferred from other provinces. Geospatial analyses were also performed to further elucidate transfer patterns. Results Over the 6-month study period, 2758 surgical interventions were performed at the CHUK. Of these, 653 (23.7%) were for trauma. Most patients resided outside of Kigali city, with 337 (58.0%) patients transferred from other provinces and 244 (42.0%) from within Kigali. Most trauma procedures were orthopedic (489 [84.2%]), although general surgery procedures represented a higher proportion of trauma surgeries in patients from other provinces than in patients from within Kigali (28 of 337 [8.3%] v. 10 of 244 [4.1%]). Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight geographical variations in access to trauma care in a low-income country and the first description of trauma procedures at a referral centre in Rwanda. Future efforts should focus on maturing prehospital and interfacility transport systems, strengthening district hospitals and further supporting referral institutions. PMID:26812407

  20. Migrants' and professionals' views on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, Diana; Hannig, Christian; Schmidt, Silke

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to explore the views of migrants and professionals on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care in order to adapt such care to migrants' needs. Interviews were conducted with 41 migrants who had received direct (as a patient) or indirect (as a significant other) pre-hospital emergency care. Furthermore, 20 professionals in the field of pre-hospital emergency care were interviewed. The content analysis showed five distinguishable categories based on the statements by the migrants and six categories based on the statements by the professionals. While migrants gave priority to basic proficiencies of first responders such as 'social/emotional competencies' and 'communication skills', the professionals considered '(basic) cultural knowledge', 'awareness' and 'attitude' the most important. Furthermore, migrants provided practical indications, e.g. regarding areas of cultural knowledge, whereas professionals seemed to view the issue of culturally pre-hospital emergency care from a more theoretical perspective. The issues of the culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care itself, as well as the varying points of view of the two groups interviewed, resulted in eight recommendations for culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care. PMID:26123882

  1. Trauma care systems in Saudi Arabia: an agenda for action

    PubMed Central

    Al-Naami, Mohammed Y.; Arafah, Maria A.; Al-Ibrahim, Fatimah S.

    2010-01-01

    Saudi Arabia is undergoing a rapid population growth that along with improved socioeconomics has led many individuals to own a car or even a number of cars per family, resulting in a greater number of vehicles on the roads. The reduced focus on good public transportation systems and the dependence on cars for transportation have created a diversity of drivers who are unfamiliar with the local driving rules and lack the basic skills for safe driving. This is in addition to some young drivers who frequently violate traffic laws and tend to speed most of the time. This unplanned expansion in road traffic has resulted in more car accidents, injuries, disabilities, and deaths. Accompanying that is an increased socioeconomic burden, depletion of human resources, emotional and psychological stress on families, and a strain on healthcare facilities. If this continues without prompt intervention, it will lead to increased insurance premiums and may become unmanageable. To minimize this impact, a national or regional multidisciplinary trauma system has to be developed and implemented. A trauma system is a preplanned, comprehensive, and coordinated regional injury response network that includes all facilities with the capability to care for the injured. Essential components of the system include trauma prevention, prehospital care, hospital care, rehabilitation, system administration, trauma care education and training, trauma care evaluation and quality improvement, along with the participation of society. Research has documented a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality from trauma after the implementation of such systems, depending on their efficiency. The purpose of this review is to discuss the problem of road traffic accidents in this country and address the trauma care system as an effective solution. PMID:20103958

  2. Risks associated with obese patient handling in emergency prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Réminiac, François; Jouan, Youenn; Cazals, Xavier; Bodin, Jean-François; Dequin, Pierre-François; Guillon, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The number of ambulance crewmembers may affect the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in particular situations. However, few studies have investigated how the number of emergency care providers affects the quality of CPR. Nonetheless, problems in the initial handling of patients due to small ambulance crew sizes may have significant consequences. These difficulties may be more frequent in an obese population than in a non-obese population. Hence such problems may be frequently encountered because obesity is epidemic in developed countries. In this report, we illustrate the fatal consequences of initial problems in patient handling due to a small ambulance crew size in an obese patient who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Following successful resuscitation, this patient presented humeral fractures that may have promoted a disorder of hemostasis. The patient eventually died. This case highlights the requirement for specific instructions for paramedics to manage obese patients in these emergency conditions. This case also highlights the need to take into account body mass index when deciding on appropriate pre-hospital care, especially regarding the number of ambulance crewmembers. PMID:24830962

  3. The Swiss bus accident on 13 March 2012: lessons for pre-hospital care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The recent bus crash in Switzerland involving many children provides several lessons for the pre-hospital care community. The use of multiple helicopters that are capable of flying at night and that carry advanced medical pre-hospital teams undoubtedly saved lives following the tragedy. We describe the medical response to the incident and the lessons that can be learned for emergency medical services. PMID:22784360

  4. Standard operating procedure changed pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour: a quality control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The ability of standard operating procedures to improve pre-hospital critical care by changing pre-hospital physician behaviour is uncertain. We report data from a prospective quality control study of the effect on pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour of implementing a standard operating procedure for pre-hospital controlled ventilation. Materials and methods Anaesthesiologists from eight pre-hospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region prospectively registered pre-hospital advanced airway-management data according to the Utstein-style template. We collected pre-intervention data from February 1st 2011 to January 31st 2012, implemented the standard operating procedure on February 1st 2012 and collected post intervention data from February 1st 2012 until October 31st 2012. We included transported patients of all ages in need of controlled ventilation treated with pre-hospital endotracheal intubation or the insertion of a supraglottic airways device. The objective was to evaluate whether the development and implementation of a standard operating procedure for controlled ventilation during transport could change pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists’ behaviour and thereby increase the use of automated ventilators in these patients. Results The implementation of a standard operating procedure increased the overall prevalence of automated ventilator use in transported patients in need of controlled ventilation from 0.40 (0.34-0.47) to 0.74 (0.69-0.80) with a prevalence ratio of 1.85 (1.57-2.19) (p = 0.00). The prevalence of automated ventilator use in transported traumatic brain injury patients in need of controlled ventilation increased from 0.44 (0.26-0.62) to 0.85 (0.62-0.97) with a prevalence ratio of 1.94 (1.26-3.0) (p = 0.0039). The prevalence of automated ventilator use in patients transported after return of spontaneous circulation following pre-hospital cardiac arrest increased from 0.39 (0

  5. Assuring optimal trauma care: the role of trauma centre accreditation

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Optimal care of the injured patient requires the delivery of appropriate, definitive care shortly after injury. Over the last 30 to 40 years, civilian trauma systems and trauma centres have been developed in the United States based on experience gained in military conflicts, particularly in Korea and Vietnam. A similar process is evolving in Canada. National trauma committees in the US and Canada have defined optimal resources to meet the goal of rapid, appropriate care in trauma centres. They have introduced programs (verification or accreditation) to externally audit trauma centre performance based on these guidelines. It is generally accepted that implementing trauma systems results in decreased preventable death and improved survival after trauma. What is less clear is the degree to which each facet of trauma system development contributes to this improvement. The relative importance of national performance guidelines and trauma centre audit as integral steps toward improved outcomes following injury are reviewed. Current Trauma Association of Canada guidelines for trauma centres are presented and the process of trauma centre accreditation is discussed. PMID:12174987

  6. Assessment of the Status of Prehospital Care in 13 Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Katie; Mock, Charles; Joshipura, Manjul; Rubiano, Andres M.; Zakariah, Ahmed; Rivara, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Injury and other medical emergencies are becoming increasingly common in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Many to most of the deaths from these conditions occur outside of hospitals, necessitating the development of prehospital care. Prehospital capabilities are inadequately developed to meet the growing needs for emergency care in most LMICs. In order to better plan for development of prehospital care globally, this study sought to better understand the current status of prehospital care in a wide range of LMICs. Methods A survey was conducted of emergency medical services (EMS) leaders and other key informants in 13 LMICs in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Questions addressed methods of transport to hospital, training and certification of EMS providers, organization and funding of EMS systems, public access to prehospital care, and barriers to EMS development. Results Prehospital care capabilities varied significantly, but in general, were less developed in low-income countries and in rural areas, where utilization of formal emergency medical services was often very low. Commercial drivers, volunteers, and other bystanders provided a large proportion of prehospital transport and occasionally also provide first aid in many locations. Although taxes and mandatory motor vehicle insurance provided supplemental funds to EMS in 85% of the countries, the most frequently cited barriers to further development of prehospital care was inadequate funding (36% of barriers cited). The next most commonly sited barriers were lack of leadership within the system (18%) and lack of legislation setting standards (18%). Conclusions Expansion of prehospital care to currently under- or un-served areas, especially in low-income countries and in rural areas, could make use of the already existing networks of first responders, such as commercial drivers and lay persons. Efforts to increase their effectiveness, such as more widespread first aid training, and better

  7. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was

  8. Quality improvement in pre-hospital critical care: increased value through research and publication.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Marius; Krüger, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Pre-hospital critical care is considered to be a complex intervention with a weak evidence base. In quality improvement literature, the value equation has been used to depict the inevitable relationship between resources expenditure and quality. Increased value of pre-hospital critical care involves moving a system from quality assurance to quality improvement. Agreed quality indicators can be integrated in existing quality improvement and complex intervention methodology. A QI system for pre-hospital critical care includes leadership involvement, multi-disciplinary buy-in, data collection infrastructure and long-term commitment. Further, integrating process control with governance systems allows evidence-based change of practice and publishing of results. PMID:24887186

  9. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  10. Advanced technologies in trauma critical care management.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jeremy W; Chung, Kevin K; King, David R

    2012-08-01

    Care of critically injured patients has evolved over the 50 years since Shoemaker established one of the first trauma units at Cook County Hospital in 1962. Modern trauma intensive care units offer a high nurse-to-patient ratio, physicians and midlevel providers who manage the patients, and technologically advanced monitors and therapeutic devices designed to optimize the care of patients. This article describes advances that have transformed trauma critical care, including bedside ultrasonography, novel patient monitoring techniques, extracorporeal support, and negative pressure dressings. It also discusses how to evaluate the safety and efficacy of future advances in trauma critical care. PMID:22850154

  11. [Nursing care in pre-hospital services and airmedical removal].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Patricia Kuerten; do Prado, Marta Lenise; Radünz, Vera; Wosny, Antônio de Miranda

    2003-01-01

    The present article is a description of an experience developed during the Conclusive Monography of the Nursing Course from Santa Catarina's Federal University, in the second semester year 2000. It discusses the importance of the Pre-hospital Attendiment Service and Airmedical Removal, and the need of nurses preparation to attend the increasing requests of those services. It presents a historical review on these kind of attention method in health, in Brazil and in the world. It discusses some aspects related to management of human and material resources, concerning its specificity in those kind of services. It also points out the importance of the Nurse roll, and the necessity of widening their skills to act in the field of pre-hospital attendiment and airmedical removal. PMID:15320626

  12. The Development of Sustainable Emergency Care in Ghana: Physician, Nursing and Prehospital Care Training Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Martel, John; Oteng, Rockefeller; Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Bell, Sue Anne; Zakariah, Ahmed; Oduro, George; Kowalenko, Terry; Donkor, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Ghana’s first Emergency Medicine residency and nursing training programs were initiated in 2009 and 2010, respectively, at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in the city of Kumasi in association with Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and the Universities of Michigan and Utah. In addition, the National Ambulance Service was commissioned initially in 2004 and has developed to include both prehospital transport services in all regions of the country and Emergency Medical Technician training. Over a decade of domestic and international partnership has focused on making improvements in emergency care at a variety of institutional levels, culminating in the establishment of comprehensive emergency care training programs. Objective We describe the history and status of novel post-graduate emergency physician, nurse and prehospital provider training programs as well as the prospect of creating a board certification process and formal continuing education program for practicing emergency physicians. Discussion Significant strides have been made in the development of emergency care and training in Ghana over the last decade, resulting in the first group of Specialist level EM physicians as of late 2012, as well as development of accredited emergency nursing curricula and continued expansion of a national EMS. Conclusion This work represents a significant move toward in-country development of sustainable, interdisciplinary, team-based emergency provider training programs designed to retain skilled healthcare workers in Ghana and may serve as a model for similar developing nations. PMID:25066956

  13. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  14. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces.

    PubMed

    Acker, Peter; Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard Bud F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia's most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam. PMID:27489749

  15. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard (Bud) F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia’s most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.  PMID:27489749

  16. [Traffic accidents: characterization of the victims by the Revised Trauma Score in the pre-hospital period].

    PubMed

    Malvestio, Marisa Amaro; de Sousa, Regina Márcia Cardoso

    2002-12-01

    This report describes age, gender, trauma mechanics aspects and procedures from 643 motor vehicle crashes, MVC, victims in Tietê and Pinheiros expressways, by considering the prehospital Revised Trauma Score (RTS). The RTS = 12 victims' were 90.8%, with RTS = 11 added 4.0% and in group with RTS < 10, 5.2%. Among the RTS < 10 victims, the pedestrians stand out (36.4%), the frontal impacts (24.2%) and the projected (36.4%) or trapped victims (15.1%), and those that received advanced life support procedures. The motorcyclists and the male victims with 21 with 30 years of age were predominant. This study is expected to contribute to a better assistance to MVC victims. PMID:12876852

  17. Barriers to Real-Time Medical Direction via Cellular Communication for Prehospital Emergency Care Providers in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, Matthew C; Rao, G.V. Ramana; Newberry, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many low- and middle-income countries depend on emergency medical technicians (EMTs), nurses, midwives, and layperson community health workers with limited training to provide a majority of emergency medical, trauma, and obstetric care in the prehospital setting. To improve timely patient care and expand provider scope of practice, nations leverage cellular phones and call centers for real-time online medical direction. However, there exist several barriers to adequate communication that impact the provision of emergency care. We sought to identify obstacles in the cellular communication process among GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute (GVK EMRI) EMTs in Gujarat, India. Methods: A convenience sample of practicing EMTs in Gujarat, India were surveyed regarding the barriers to call initiation and completion. Results: 108 EMTs completed the survey. Overall, ninety-seven (89.8%) EMTs responded that the most common reason they did not initiate a call with the call center physician was insufficient time. Forty-six (42%) EMTs reported that they were unable to call the physician one or more times during a typical workweek (approximately 5-6 twelve-hour shifts/week) due to their hands being occupied performing direct patient care. Fifty-eight (54%) EMTs reported that they were unable to reach the call center physician, despite attempts, at least once a week. Conclusion: This study identified multiple barriers to communication, including insufficient time to call for advice and inability to reach call center physicians. Identification of simple interventions and best practices may improve communication and ensure timely and appropriate prehospital care.  PMID:27551654

  18. Trauma Care Training for National Police Nurses in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Rubiano, Andrés M.; Sánchez, Álvaro I.; Guyette, Francis; Puyana, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In response to a requirement for advanced trauma care nurses to provide combat tactical medical support, the antinarcotics arm of the Colombian National Police (CNP) requested the Colombian National Prehospital Care Association to develop a Combat Tactical Medicine Course (MEDTAC course). Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of this course in imparting knowledge and skills to the students. Methods We trained 374 combat nurses using the novel MEDTAC course. We evaluated students using pre-and postcourse performance with a 45-question examination. Field simulations and live tissue exercises were evaluated by instructors using a Likert scale with possible choices of 1 to 4. Interval estimation of proportions was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Differences in didactic test scores were assessed using a t-test at 0.05 level of statistical significance. Results Between March 2006 and July 2007, 374 combat nursing students of the CNP were trained. The difference between examination scores before and after the didactic part of the course was statistically significant (p < 0.01). After the practical session of the course, all participants (100%) demonstrated competency on final evaluation. Conclusions The MEDTAC course is an effective option improving the knowledge and skills of combat nurses serving in the CNP. MEDTAC represents a customized approach for military trauma care training in Colombia. This course is an example of specialized training available for groups that operate in austere environments with limited resources. PMID:19947877

  19. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Savino, P. Brian; Sporer, Karl A.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either), as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine). Prehospital 12-Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26759642

  20. Instrument for assessing the quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care: content validation.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Rodrigo Assis Neves; Torres, Gilson de Vasconcelos; Salvetti, Marina de Góes; Dantas, Daniele Vieira; Mendonça, Ana Elza Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To validate an instrument to assess quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care. METHOD A methodological study where 20 professionals gave their opinions on the items of the proposed instrument. The analysis was performed using Kappa test (K) and Content Validity Index (CVI), considering K> 0.80 and CVI ≥ 0.80. RESULTS Three items were excluded from the instrument: Professional Compensation; Job Satisfaction and Services Performed. Items that obtained adequate K and CVI indexes and remained in the instrument were: ambulance conservation status; physical structure; comfort in the ambulance; availability of material resources; user/staff safety; continuous learning; safety demonstrated by the team; access; welcoming; humanization; response time; costumer privacy; guidelines on care; relationship between professionals and costumers; opportunity for costumers to make complaints and multiprofessional conjunction/actuation. CONCLUSION The instrument to assess quality of care has been validated and may contribute to the evaluation of pre-hospital care in mobile emergency services. PMID:26107697

  1. An evidence-based prehospital guideline for external hemorrhage control: American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma.

    PubMed

    Bulger, Eileen M; Snyder, David; Schoelles, Karen; Gotschall, Cathy; Dawson, Drew; Lang, Eddy; Sanddal, Nels D; Butler, Frank K; Fallat, Mary; Taillac, Peter; White, Lynn; Salomone, Jeffrey P; Seifarth, William; Betzner, Michael J; Johannigman, Jay; McSwain, Norman

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the development of an evidence-based guideline for external hemorrhage control in the prehospital setting. This project included a systematic review of the literature regarding the use of tourniquets and hemostatic agents for management of life-threatening extremity and junctional hemorrhage. Using the GRADE methodology to define the key clinical questions, an expert panel then reviewed the results of the literature review, established the quality of the evidence and made recommendations for EMS care. A clinical care guideline is proposed for adoption by EMS systems. Key words: tourniquet; hemostatic agents; external hemorrhage. PMID:24641269

  2. Prehospital Trauma Triage Decision-making: A Model of What Happens between the 9-1-1 Call and the Hospital.

    PubMed

    Jones, Courtney Marie Cora; Cushman, Jeremy T; Lerner, E Brooke; Fisher, Susan G; Seplaki, Christopher L; Veazie, Peter J; Wasserman, Erin B; Dozier, Ann; Shah, Manish N

    2016-01-01

    We describe the decision-making process used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in order to understand how 1) injured patients are evaluated in the prehospital setting; 2) field triage criteria are applied in-practice; and 3) selection of a destination hospital is determined. We conducted separate focus groups with advanced and basic life support providers from rural and urban/suburban regions. Four exploratory focus groups were conducted to identify overarching themes and five additional confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify initial focus group findings and provide additional detail regarding trauma triage decision-making and application of field triage criteria. All focus groups were conducted by a public health researcher with formal training in qualitative research. A standardized question guide was used to facilitate discussion at all focus groups. All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Responses were coded and categorized into larger domains to describe how EMS providers approach trauma triage and apply the Field Triage Decision Scheme. We conducted 9 focus groups with 50 EMS providers. Participants highlighted that trauma triage is complex and there is often limited time to make destination decisions. Four overarching domains were identified within the context of trauma triage decision-making: 1) initial assessment; 2) importance of speed versus accuracy; 3) usability of current field triage criteria; and 4) consideration of patient and emergency care system-level factors. Field triage is a complex decision-making process which involves consideration of many patient and system-level factors. The decision model presented in this study suggests that EMS providers place significant emphasis on speed of decisions, relying on initial impressions and immediately observable information, rather than precise measurement of vital signs or systematic application of field triage criteria. PMID:26017368

  3. Maritime pre-hospital emergency care primary retrieval team--operational considerations.

    PubMed

    Newman, Darryl A

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the non clinical skills and training required for effective maritime pre-hospital emergency care provision within a Role Two Afloat facility, allowing for a Primary Retrieval Team to be deployed in support of boarding operations. The provision of pre-hospital emergency care and sending a retrieval team forward has been trialled in various forms. In 2010 and 2011 a R2A team was deployed aboard RFA FORT VICTORIA. This included a Primary Retrieval Team consisting of an Emergency Nurse Specialist, a Medical Assistant which can be enhanced when required by an Emergency Care or Anaesthetic Consultant. This differs from the land operations support provided by the airborne Medical Emergency Response Team (MERT) as the maritime environment requires a bespoke solution for casualty retrieval as the method of deployment and the type of casualties and their locations may be more varied, requiring greater flexibility of approach. PMID:22558736

  4. [Pre-hospital care for wounded in military conflicts: state and prospects].

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, I M; Reva, V A

    2015-10-01

    Pre-hospital care is one of the most important links in a chain of the military medical tenet. A survival of the most of severe casualties at the scene depends on a good quality and well-timed first aid and paramedic care. Based on the current state of medical equipment and training of the soldiers of the Russian and foreign armies, we summarized the data about the main medical products designed for pre-hospital care, briefly analyzed and compared their effectiveness to the foreign analogues. It is currently obvious, that fundamental changes in First aid kit modification and Medical Bags are warranted according to the reality and soldier's demands in combat operations. Proposals for modernization of military medical equipment were put forward. PMID:26827503

  5. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. PMID:21996444

  6. Influence of prehospital fluid resuscitation on patients with multiple injuries in hemorrhagic shock in patients from the DGU trauma registry

    PubMed Central

    Huβmann, Björn; Lefering, Rolf; Taeger, Georg; Waydhas, Christian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Severe bleeding as a result of trauma frequently leads to poor outcome by means of direct or delayed mechanisms. Prehospital fluid therapy is still regarded as the main option of primary treatment in many rescue situations. Our study aimed to assess the influence of prehospital fluid replacement on the posttraumatic course of severely injured patients in a retrospective analysis of matched pairs. Materials and Methods: We reviewed data from 35,664 patients recorded in the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU). The following patients were selected: patients having an Injury Severity Score >16 points, who were ≥16 years of age, with trauma, excluding those with craniocerebral injuries, who were admitted directly to the participating hospitals from the accident site. All patients had recorded values for replaced volume and blood pressure, hemoglobin concentration, and units of packed red blood cells given. The patients were matched based on similar blood pressure characteristics, age groups, and type of accident to create pairs. Pairs were subdivided into two groups based on the volumes infused prior to hospitalization: group 1: 0-1500 (low), group 2: ≥2000 mL (high) volume. Results: We identified 1351 pairs consistent with the inclusion criteria. Patients in group 2 received significantly more packed red blood cells (group 1: 6.9 units, group 2: 9.2 units; P=0.001), they had a significantly reduced capacity of blood coagulation (prothrombin ratio: group 1: 72%, group 2: 61.4%; P≤0.001), and a lower hemoglobin value on arrival at hospital (group 1: 10.6 mg/dL, group 2: 9.1 mg/dL; P≤0.001). The number of ICU-free days concerning the first 30 days after trauma was significantly higher in group 1 (group 1: 11.5 d, group 2: 10.1 d; P≤0.001). By comparison, the rate of sepsis was significantly lower in the first group (group 1: 13.8%, group 2: 18.6%; P=0.002); the same applies to organ failure (group 1: 36.0%, group 2: 39

  7. S.T.A.R.T.T. plus: addition of prehospital personnel to a national multidisciplinary crisis resource management trauma team training course

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Lawrence M.; Martin, Doug; Engels, Paul T.; Brindley, Peter; Widder, Sandy; French, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Simulated Trauma and Resuscitation Team Training (S.T.A.R.T.T.) course is a unique multidisciplinary trauma team training course deliberately designed to address the common crisis resource management (CRM) skills of trauma team members. Moreover, the curriculum has been updated to also target the specific learning needs of individual participating professionals: physicians, nurses and respiratory therapists. This commentary outlines further modifications to the course curriculum in order to address the needs of a relatively undertargeted group: prehospital personnel (i.e., emergency medical services). Maintenance of high participant satisfaction, regardless of profession, suggests that the S.T.A.R.T.T. course can be readily modified to incorporate prehospital personnel without losing its utility or popularity. PMID:26574706

  8. A Comprehensive Review of Prehospital and In-hospital Delay Times in Acute Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Foraker, Randi; Morris, Dexter L.; Rosamond, Wayne D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize prehospital and in-hospital stroke evaluation and treatment delay times. We identified 123 unique peer-reviewed studies published from 1981 to 2007 of prehospital and in-hospital delay time for evaluation and treatment of patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms. Based on studies of 65 different population groups, the weighted Poisson regression indicated a 6.0% annual decline (p<0.001) in hours/year for prehospital delay, defined from symptom onset to emergency department (ED) arrival. For in-hospital delay, the weighted Poisson regression models indicated no meaningful changes in delay time from ED arrival to ED evaluation (3.1%, p=0.49 based on 12 population groups). There was a 10.2% annual decline in hours/year from ED arrival to neurology evaluation or notification (p=0.23 based on 16 population groups) and a 10.7% annual decline in hours/year for delay time from ED arrival to initiation of computed tomography (p=0.11 based on 23 population groups). Only one study reported on times from arrival to computed tomography scan interpretation, two studies on arrival to drug administration, and no studies on arrival to transfer to an in-patient setting, precluding generalizations. Prehospital delay continues to contribute the largest proportion of delay time. The next decade provides opportunities to establish more effective community based interventions worldwide. It will be crucial to have effective stroke surveillance systems in place to better understand and improve both prehospital and in-hospital delays for acute stroke care. PMID:19659821

  9. Pre-hospital oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Johannigman, Jay A

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen use in prehospital care is aimed at treating or preventing hypoxemia. However, excess oxygen delivery has important consequences in select patients, and hyperoxia can adversely impact outcome. The unique environment of prehospital care poses logistical and educational challenges. Oxygen therapy in prehospital care should be provided to patients with hypoxemia and titrated to achieve normoxemia. Changes to the current practice of oxygen delivery in prehospital care are needed. PMID:23271821

  10. Pre-hospital care seeking behaviour for childhood acute respiratory infections in south-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ukwaja, Kingsley N; Talabi, Ademola A; Aina, Olufemi B

    2012-12-01

    WHO/UNICEF currently recommend that childhood malaria and pneumonia be managed together in the community; most African countries are in the process of developing this policy. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine maternal awareness of general danger signs of childhood illnesses and the prevalence, determinants and sources of pre-hospital treatment by mothers during their child's acute respiratory illness in a poor urban community in south-western Nigeria. A total of 226 mothers were interviewed. Only 4.9% of the mothers were aware of the two pneumonia symptoms: difficult breathing and fast breathing. About 75% of the children were given pre-hospital medication at home and only 16.5% of them received the drugs within 24 hour of symptom recognition. Drug shops/patent medicine vendors (PMVs; 70.6%) were the most common source of care. Wishing to try home management first (46.6%); waiting for the child to improve (14.4%) and lack of money (31.6%) delayed care-seeking. Older maternal age (aOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.2-4.4) and having a child with cough and difficult and/or fast breathing (aOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.1-5.2) were positive predictors of pre-hospital treatment. Maternal education and adequately equipping PMVs could improve prompt access to integrated community-based child health services in Nigeria. PMID:24029675

  11. Trauma-Informed Care in the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jessica Dym; Barto, Beth; Griffin, Jessica L; Fraser, Jenifer Goldman; Hodgdon, Hilary; Bodian, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    Child maltreatment is a serious public health concern, and its detrimental effects can be compounded by traumatic experiences associated with the child welfare (CW) system. Trauma-informed care (TIC) is a promising strategy for addressing traumatized children's needs, but research on the impact of TIC in CW is limited. This study examines initial findings of the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project, a statewide TIC initiative in the CW system and mental health network. After 1 year of implementation, Trauma-Informed Leadership Teams in CW offices emerged as key structures for TIC systems integration, and mental health providers' participation in evidence-based treatment (EBT) learning collaboratives was linked to improvements in trauma-informed individual and agency practices. After approximately 6 months of EBT treatment, children had fewer posttraumatic symptoms and behavior problems compared to baseline. Barriers to TIC that emerged included scarce resources for trauma-related work in the CW agency and few mental providers providing EBTs to young children. Future research might explore variations in TIC across service system components as well as the potential for differential effects across EBT models disseminated through TIC. PMID:26564909

  12. [The use of pre-hospital tourniquets in life-threatening extremity traumas].

    PubMed

    Lyngsaa Lang, Christian; Lauridsen, Trine; Boel, Thomas

    2015-08-17

    Tourniquets have been used for centuries. They have been called lifesavers and "an invention of the evil one". 90.9% of deaths on the battlefields result from haemorrhage. Lessons learned du­ring the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have developed the treat­ment given to hypovolaemic patients on the battlefield. Treating bleeding and hypovolaemia is now considered as the primary intervention. The tourniquet has proven to be an indis­pensable tool treating wounded soldiers, with little risk of complications. The tourniquet might also show to be a valuable asset in a pre-hospital urban setting. PMID:26561659

  13. Pre-hospital, Maritime In-Transit care from a Role 2 Afloat platform.

    PubMed

    Whalley, L; Smith, S

    2013-01-01

    Maritime In-Transit Care (MITC) is a new concept to allow the provision of pre-hospital care in the maritime environment within Role 2 Afloat (R2A) teams. This article describes the experiences of an Emergency Medicine nurse and a Medical Assistant who made up the MITC team on the recent R2A exercise on RFA CARDIGAN BAY. As well as describing their personal experiences, the concept of the MITC team is introduced and their role within R2A outlined. PMID:24511798

  14. High Yield Research Opportunities in Geriatric Emergency Medicine: Prehospital Care, Delirium, Adverse Drug Events, and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Shah, Manish N.; Hustey, Fredric M.; Heard, Kennon; Gerson, Lowell W.

    2011-01-01

    Emergency services constitute crucial and frequently used safety nets for older persons, an emergency visit by a senior very often indicates high vulnerability for functional decline and death, and interventions via the emergency system have significant opportunities to change the clinical course of older patients who require its services. However, the evidence base for widespread employment of emergency system-based interventions is lacking. In this article, we review the evidence and offer crucial research questions to capitalize on the opportunity to optimize health trajectories of older persons seeking emergency care in four areas: prehospital care, delirium, adverse drug events, and falls. PMID:21498881

  15. Impact of Prehospital Care on Outcomes in Sepsis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is a common and potentially life-threatening response to an infection. International treatment guidelines for sepsis advocate that treatment be initiated at the earliest possible opportunity. It is not yet clear if very early intervention by ambulance clinicians prior to arrival at hospital leads to improved clinical outcomes among sepsis patients. Methoda We systematically searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. We adopted the GRADE (grading recommendations assessment, development and evaluation) methodology to conduct the review and follow PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations to report findings. Results Nine studies met the eligibility criteria – one study was a randomized controlled trial while the remaining studies were observational in nature. There was considerable variation in the methodological approaches adopted and outcome measures reported across the studies. Because of these differences, the studies did not answer a unique research question and meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Conclusion There is little robust evidence addressing the impact of prehospital interventions on outcomes in sepsis. That which is available is of low quality and indicates that prehospital interventions have limited impact on outcomes in sepsis beyond improving process outcomes and expediting the patient’s passage through the emergency care pathway. Evidence indicating that prehospital antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation improve patient outcomes is currently lacking. PMID:27429693

  16. Uptake of the World Health Organization’s trauma care guidelines: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Riggle, Kevin; Joshipura, Manjul; Quansah, Robert; Reynolds, Teri; Sherr, Kenneth; Mock, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand the degree to which the trauma care guidelines released by the World Health Organization (WHO) between 2004 and 2009 have been used, and to identify priorities for the future implementation and dissemination of such guidelines. Methods We conducted a systematic review, across 19 databases, in which the titles of the three sets of guidelines – Guidelines for essential trauma care, Prehospital trauma care systems and Guidelines for trauma quality improvement programmes – were used as the search terms. Results were validated via citation analysis and expert consultation. Two authors independently reviewed each record of the guidelines’ implementation. Findings We identified 578 records that provided evidence of dissemination of WHO trauma care guidelines and 101 information sources that together described 140 implementation events. Implementation evidence could be found for 51 countries – 14 (40%) of the 35 low-income countries, 15 (32%) of the 47 lower-middle income, 15 (28%) of the 53 upper-middle-income and 7 (12%) of the 59 high-income. Of the 140 implementations, 63 (45%) could be categorized as needs assessments, 38 (27%) as endorsements by stakeholders, 20 (14%) as incorporations into policy and 19 (14%) as educational interventions. Conclusion Although WHO’s trauma care guidelines have been widely implemented, no evidence was identified of their implementation in 143 countries. More serial needs assessments for the ongoing monitoring of capacity for trauma care in health systems and more incorporation of the guidelines into both the formal education of health-care providers and health policy are needed. PMID:27516636

  17. Rural trauma management.

    PubMed

    Wayne, R

    1989-05-01

    Rural trauma is a major problem in the United States. Up to 70 percent of trauma fatalities occur in rural areas, even though 70 percent of the population live in urban areas. Over the past 3 decades, numerous studies have defined the concept of preventable trauma death in both rural and urban populations. With the development of a regional trauma care system in Oregon, preventable trauma mortality should decrease. An effort was made to improve the quality of trauma care in Clatsop County, Oregon, a community of 30,000 people with 2 small rural hospitals. To obtain this goal, four steps were taken: (1) physician and nurse education was improved, (2) trauma protocols promoting prompt resuscitation and stabilization of patients were established, (3) regular trauma case reviews were conducted, and (4) emergency medical technician and prehospital management were coordinated. This study reviews the trail from sporadic, uncoordinated rural trauma care to the designation process. PMID:2712202

  18. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services. PMID:27596502

  19. [Pre-hospital conduct for patients with a severe craniocerebral trauma according to new guidelines].

    PubMed

    Demyda, Iwanna; Maciejewski, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    About 10% of patients with head injury (most common cause of death and persistent disability with patients in young age) are found to develop a severe craniocerebral trauma. The underlying cause of secondary brain damage in such cases is the cerebral ischaemia or hypoxia, which can be effectively prevented by introducing procedures of conduct at the accident site and during the transportation of the patient. Introducing new diagnostic techniques and the right treatment reduces the death rate among diseased with severe craniocerebral trauma by about 20-30%. The article elaborates on a pathophysiological mechanism of head trauma, conduct at the accident site and during the transportation according to BTLS, oxygen therapy, fluid therapy and pharmacological treatment with head injury, direction of the transportation of such patients from the place of accident according to new guidelines. PMID:20229715

  20. Prehospital intubation of the moderately injured patient: a cause of morbidity? A matched-pairs analysis of 1,200 patients from the DGU Trauma Registry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxia and hypoxemia can lead to an unfavorable outcome after severe trauma, by both direct and delayed mechanisms. Prehospital intubation is meant to ensure pulmonary gas exchange. Limited evidence exists regarding indications for intubation after trauma. The aim of this study was to analyze prehospital intubation as an independent risk factor for the posttraumatic course of moderately injured patients. Therefore, only patients who, in retrospect, would not have required intubation were included in the matched-pairs analysis to evaluate the risks related to intubation. Methods The data of 42,248 patients taken from the trauma registry of the German Association for Trauma Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie (DGU)) were analyzed. Patients who met the following criteria were included: primary admission to a hospital; Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13 to 15; age 16 years or older; maximum injury severity per body region (AIS) ≤ 3; no administration of packed red blood cell units in the emergency trauma room; admission between 2005 and 2008; and documented data regarding intubation. The intubated patients were then matched with not-intubated patients. Results The study population included 600 matched pairs that met the inclusion criteria. The results indicated that prehospital intubation was associated with a prolonged rescue time (not intubated, 64.8 minutes; intubated, 82.3 minutes; P ≤ 0.001) and a higher volume replacement (not intubated, 911.3 ml; intubated, 1,573.8 ml; P ≤ 0.001). In the intubated patients, coagulation parameters, such as the prothrombin time ratio (PT) and platelet count, declined, as did the hemoglobin value (PT not intubated: 92.3%; intubated, 85.7%; P ≤ 0.001; hemoglobin not intubated, 13.4 mg/dl; intubated, 12.2 mg/dl; P ≤ 0.001). Intubation at the scene resulted in an elevated sepsis rate (not intubated, 1.5%; intubated, 3.7%; P ≤ 0.02) and an elevated prevalence of multiorgan failure (MOF) and organ

  1. An organized approach to trauma care: legacy of R Adams Cowley.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Wish, John R; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2004-01-01

    results of the Health Resources and Services Administration Report in 2002 show serious limitations in our nation's organized approach to emergency and trauma care. This report indicates that many Americans do not have access to well-trained pre-hospital emergency personnel. Between 10 and 15% of the US population does not have access to basic emergency medical and communication services. Moreover, the presence of key trauma system components continues to vary throughout the country, most likely because of growing economic constraints. Emergency communication systems remain fragmented, and adequate training programs and protective equipment for health personnel remains notably absent. The threat of inadequate funding for the state manifests itself in the consistent uneasiness regarding the recruitment and continued retention of trauma care providers. Federal authorities must devise national emergency medical and organized trauma programs to save the lives of injured Americans. PMID:15698376

  2. A Challenging Penetrating Trauma Case.

    PubMed

    Snoek, Seetal; Butson, Benjamin; Wittenberg, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We present the prehospital management of a 23-year-old Australian Aboriginal man with an isolated knife stab wound to the posterior right chest. The lead author attended to the prehospital management of this young man during tenure as a registrar in retrieval medicine for CareFlight Medical Services (CMS) in North Queensland, Australia. The case is noteworthy because it involved a combination of a life-threatening injury with a superimposed iatrogenic injury. The case will be of interest to physicians and clinicians in prehospital medicine as well as those in low-volume emergency departments or facilities in which major trauma may present infrequently. PMID:27021676

  3. [Major Burn Trauma Management and Nursing Care].

    PubMed

    Lo, Shu-Fen

    2015-08-01

    Major burn injury is one of the most serious and often life-threatening forms of trauma. Burn patients not only suffer from the physical, psychological, social and spiritual impacts of their injury but also experience considerable changes in health-related quality of life. This paper presents a review of the literature on the implications of previous research and clinical care guidelines related to major burn injuries in order to help clinical practice nurses use evidence-based care guidelines to respond to initial injury assessments, better manage the complex systemic response to these injuries, and provide specialist wound care, emotional support, and rehabilitation services. PMID:26242439

  4. Faculty of Prehospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh guidance for medical provision for wilderness medicine.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian; Dodds, Naomi; Joshi, Raj; Hall, John; Dhillon, Sundeep; Hollis, Sarah; Davis, Pete; Hillebrandt, David; Howard, Eva; Wilkes, Matthew; Langdana, Burjor; Lee, David; Hinson, Nigel; Williams, Thomas Harcourt; Rowles, Joe; Pynn, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    To support leaders and those involved in providing medical care on expeditions in wilderness environments, the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care (FPHC) of The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh convened an expert panel of leading healthcare professionals and expedition providers. The aims of this panel were to: (1) provide guidance to ensure the best possible medical care for patients within the geographical, logistical and human factor constraints of an expedition environment. (2) Give aspiring and established expedition medics a 'benchmark' of skills they should meet. (3) Facilitate expedition organisers in selecting the most appropriate medical cover and provider for their planned activity. A system of medical planning is suggested to enable expedition leaders to identify the potential medical risks and their mitigation. It was recognised that the scope of practice for wilderness medicine covers elements of primary healthcare, pre-hospital emergency medicine and preventative medicine. Some unique competencies were also identified. Further to this, the panel recommends the use of a matrix and advisory expedition medic competencies relating to the remoteness and medical threat of the expedition. This advice is aimed at all levels of expedition medic, leader and organiser who may be responsible for delivering or managing the delivery of remote medical care for participants. The expedition medic should be someone equipped with the appropriate medical competencies, scope of practice and capabilities in the expedition environment and need not necessarily be a qualified doctor. In addition to providing guidance regarding the clinical competencies required of the expedition medic, the document provides generic guidance and signposting to the more pertinent aspects of the role of expedition medic. PMID:26629337

  5. Pre-hospital anaesthesia: the same but different.

    PubMed

    Lockey, D J; Crewdson, K; Lossius, H M

    2014-08-01

    Advanced airway management is one of the most controversial areas of pre-hospital trauma care and is carried out by different providers using different techniques in different Emergency Medical Services systems. Pre-hospital anaesthesia is the standard of care for trauma patients arriving in the emergency department with airway compromise. A small proportion of severely injured patients who cannot be managed with basic airway management require pre-hospital anaesthesia to avoid death or hypoxic brain injury. The evidence base for advanced airway management is inconsistent, contradictory and rarely reports all key data. There is evidence that poorly performed advanced airway management is harmful and that less-experienced providers have higher intubation failure rates and complication rates. International guidelines carry many common messages about the system requirements for the practice of advanced airway management. Pre-hospital rapid sequence induction (RSI) should be practiced to the same standard as emergency department RSI. Many in-hospital standards such as monitoring, equipment, and provider competence can be achieved. Pre-hospital and emergency in-hospital RSI has been modified from standard RSI techniques to improve patient safety, physiological disturbance, and practicality. Examples include the use of opioids and long-acting neuromuscular blocking agents, ventilation before intubation, and the early release of cricoid pressure to improve laryngoscopic view. Pre-hospital RSI is indicated in a small proportion of trauma patients. Where pre-hospital anaesthesia cannot be carried out to a high standard by competent providers, excellent quality basic airway management should be the mainstay of management. PMID:25038153

  6. Trauma care documentation: a comprehensive guide.

    PubMed

    Southard, P; Frankel, P

    1989-01-01

    The medical record serves numerous functions. It provides chronologic evidence of patient evaluation, treatment, and response to therapy, and a means to review the quality of the care. Communication among members of the health care team regarding the patient's status and plan of care also occurs by means of the medical record. The medical and legal importance of a comprehensive, accurate trauma resuscitation record cannot be overemphasized. The success of this type of documentation will depend on the design of the record and the understanding of the personnel involved. In addition, nursing managers responsible for the fiscal accountability of their departments understand the value of accurate documentation. The trauma resuscitation record can be used to demonstrate to insurance companies the reason for charging trauma patients additional fees. Inadequate documentation can cause charges to be disallowed by the third-party payors. Perhaps one of the most important functions of the medical record is to assist in protecting the legal interest of the patient and the health care provider. Minimum documentation for care provided in the emergency department must include patient identification, how the patient arrived, care that was rendered before arrival, pertinent history, chronologic notation of results of physical examination including vital signs, and the results of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and tests. The physician's orders and diagnostic impression should be recorded. It is important that the patient's response to the interventions, not just the intervention itself, be described. The patient's disposition and condition on discharge from the emergency department must be documented. For the trauma patient, mechanisms of injury, GCS, trauma score (or essential components), spinal immobilization, and the status of airway, breathing, and circulatory systems also must be recorded. The importance of accurate and comprehensive documentation on every medical

  7. Computer-assisted trauma care prototype.

    PubMed

    Holzman, T G; Griffith, A; Hunter, W G; Allen, T; Simpson, R J

    1995-01-01

    Each year, civilian accidental injury results in 150,000 deaths and 400,000 permanent disabilities in the United States alone. The timely creation of and access to dynamically updated trauma patient information at the point of injury is critical to improving the state of care. Such information is often non-existent, incomplete, or inaccurate, resulting in less than adequate treatment by medics and the loss of precious time by medical personnel at the hospital or battalion aid station as they attempt to reassess and treat the patient. The Trauma Care Information Management System (TCIMS) is a prototype system for facilitating information flow and patient processing decisions in the difficult circumstances of civilian and military trauma care activities. The program is jointly supported by the United States Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and a consortium of universities, medical centers, and private companies. The authors' focus has been the human-computer interface for the system. We are attempting to make TCIMS powerful in the functions it delivers to its users in the field while also making it easy to understand and operate. To develop such a usable system, an approach known as user-centered design is being followed. Medical personnel themselves are collaborating with the authors in its needs analysis, design, and evaluation. Specifically, the prototype being demonstrated was designed through observation of actual civilian trauma care episodes, military trauma care exercises onboard a hospital ship, interviews with civilian and military trauma care providers, repeated evaluation of evolving prototypes by potential users, and study of the literature on trauma care and human factors engineering. This presentation at MedInfo '95 is still another avenue for soliciting guidance from medical information system experts and users. The outcome of this process is a system that provides the functions trauma care personnel desire in a manner that can be easily and

  8. Basic trauma life support.

    PubMed

    Werman, H A; Nelson, R N; Campbell, J E; Fowler, R L; Gandy, P

    1987-11-01

    The impact of traumatic injuries on modern society in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic cost is enormous. Studies have shown that both advanced life support skills and rapid stabilization and transport of the trauma victim have a beneficial effect on the patient's ultimate outcome. The Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) course was designed to provide pre-hospital care providers with the skills necessary to provide a thorough assessment, initial resuscitation, and rapid transportation of the trauma victim. Early studies suggest that the material is easily learned by prehospital care providers and that the on-scene time for trauma cases is reduced following training in BTLS. More widespread training in BTLS may have a significant effect on the mortality and morbidity associated with traumatic injuries. PMID:3662184

  9. Novel wireless electroencephalography system with a minimal preparation time for use in emergencies and prehospital care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although clinical applications such as emergency medicine and prehospital care could benefit from a fast-mounting electroencephalography (EEG) recording system, the lack of specifically designed equipment restricts the use of EEG in these environments. Methods This paper describes the design and testing of a six-channel emergency EEG (emEEG) system with a rapid preparation time intended for use in emergency medicine and prehospital care. The novel system comprises a quick-application cap, a device for recording and transmitting the EEG wirelessly to a computer, and custom software for displaying and streaming the data in real-time to a hospital. Bench testing was conducted, as well as healthy volunteer and patient measurements in three different environments: a hospital EEG laboratory, an intensive care unit, and an ambulance. The EEG data was evaluated by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists and compared with recordings from a commercial system. Results The bench tests demonstrated that the emEEG system's performance is comparable to that of a commercial system while the healthy volunteer and patient measurements confirmed that the system can be applied quickly and that it records quality EEG data in a variety of environments. Furthermore, the recorded data was judged to be of diagnostic quality by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists. Conclusions In the future, the emEEG system may be used to record high-quality EEG data in emergency medicine and during ambulance transportation. Its use could lead to a faster diagnostic, a more accurate treatment, and a shorter recovery time for patients with neurological brain disorders. PMID:24886096

  10. Selecting cases for feedback to pre-hospital clinicians - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brichko, Lisa; Jennings, Paul; Bain, Christopher; Smith, Karen; Mitra, Biswadev

    2016-06-01

    Background There are currently limited avenues for routine feedback from hospitals to pre-hospital clinicians aimed at improvements in clinical practice. Objective The aim of this study was to pilot a method for selectively identifying cases where there was a clinically significant difference between the pre-hospital and in-hospital diagnoses that could have led to a difference in pre-hospital patient care. Methods This was a single-centre retrospective study involving cases randomly selected through informatics extraction of final diagnoses at hospital discharge. Additional data on demographics, triage and diagnoses were extracted by explicit chart review. Blinded groups of pre-hospital and in-hospital clinicians assessed data to detect clinically significant differences between pre-hospital and in-hospital diagnoses. Results Most (96.9%) patients were of Australasian Triage Scale category 1-3 and in-hospital mortality rate was 32.9%. Of 353 cases, 32 (9.1%; 95% CI: 6.1-12.1) were determined by both groups of clinical assessors to have a clinically significant difference between the pre-hospital and final in-hospital diagnoses, with moderate inter-rater reliability (kappa score 0.6, 95% CI: 0.5-0.7). Conclusion A modest proportion of cases demonstrated discordance between the pre-hospital and in-hospital diagnoses. Selective case identification and feedback to pre-hospital services using a combination of informatics extraction and clinician consensus approach can be used to promote ongoing improvements to pre-hospital patient care. What is known about the topic? Highly trained pre-hospital clinicians perform patient assessments and early interventions while transporting patients to healthcare facilities for ongoing management. Feedback is necessary to allow for continual improvements; however, the provision of formal selective feedback regarding diagnostic accuracy from hospitals to pre-hospital clinicians is currently not routine. What does this paper add? For a

  11. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  12. Care related and transit neuronal injuries after cervical spine trauma: state of care and practice in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Mezue, Wilfred C; Onyia, Ephraim; Illoabachie, Izuchukwu C; Chikani, Mark C; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C

    2013-09-15

    Suboptimal care during extraction and transfer after spinal trauma predisposes patients to additional spinal cord injury. This study examines the factors that contribute to care related and transit injuries and suggests steps to improve standard of care in spinal trauma patients in Nigeria. It is a questionnaire-based prospective study of patients admitted with cervical cord injury to two neurosurgical centers in Enugu, Nigeria, between March 2008 and October 2010. Demography, mechanism of injury, mode of extraction from the scene and transportation to first visited hospital, precautions taken during transportation, and treatment received before arriving at the neurosurgical unit were analyzed. There were 53 (77.9%) males, the mean age was 33.9 years, and 23.5% had concomitant head injury. Average delay was 3.5 h between trauma and presentation to initial care and 10.4 days before presentation to definitive care. Only 26.5% presented primarily to tertiary centers with trauma services. About 94.1% were extracted by passersby. None of the patients received cervical spine protection either during extrication or in the course of transportation to initial care, and 35.3% were sitting in a motor vehicle or supported on a motorbike during transport. Of the 43 patients transported lying down, 41.9% were in the back seat of a sedan, and only 11.8% were transported in an ambulance. Neurological dysfunction was first noticed after removal from the scene by 41.2% of patients, while 7.4% noticed it on the way to or during initial care. During subsequent transfer to definitive centers, only 36% had cervical support, although 78% were transported in ambulances. Ignorance of pre-hospital management of cervically injured patients exists in the general population and even among medical personnel and results in preventable injuries. There is need for urgent training, provision of paramedical services, and public enlightenment. PMID:23758277

  13. Battlefield Documentation of Tactical Combat Casualty Care in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Robinson, John B; Smith, Michael P; Gross, Kirby R; Sauer, Samual W; Geracci, James J; Day, Charlie D; Kotwal, Russ S

    2016-01-01

    Performance improvement is reliant on information and data, as you cannot improve what you do not measure. The US military went to war in 2001 without an integrated trauma care system to collect and analyze combat casualty care data. By 2006, the conflict in Afghanistan began appreciating the capture and consolidation of hospital care documentation into the Department of Defense Trauma Registry. In contrast, a paucity of documentation has existed for prehospital or tactical combat casualty care (TCCC). Using the 75th Ranger casualty documentation model established in 2005, the Joint Trauma System developed a casualty data collection system for prehospital care using the TCCC Card, the TCCC After Action Report (AAR), and the Prehospital Trauma Registry. In 2013, this system was mandated for use by US forces in Afghanistan. The Joint Trauma System also created and deployed a prehospital team to be an integral part of the Joint Theater Trauma System in Afghanistan. This prehospital team provided prehospital training and facilitated prehospital data capture. Described and analyzed in this report are prehospital data captured in Afghanistan from 2013 to 2014 using the TCCC Card and the TCCC AAR. PMID:27215873

  14. Year in review 2009: Critical Care--cardiac arrest, trauma and disasters.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jeffery C; Eastman, Alexander L; Pepe, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    During 2009, Critical Care published nine papers on various aspects of resuscitation, prehospital medicine, trauma care and disaster response. One article demonstrated that children as young as 9 years of age can learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) effectively, although, depending on their size, some may have difficulty performing it. Another paper showed that while there was a trend toward mild therapeutic hypothermia reducing S-100 levels, there was no statistically significant change. Another predictor study also showed a strong link between acute kidney injury and neurologic outcome while another article described a program in which kidneys were harvested from cardiac arrest patients and showed an 89% graft survival rate. One experimental investigation indicated that when a pump-less interventional lung assist device is present, leaving the device open (unclamped) while performing CPR has no harmful effects on mean arterial pressures and it may have positive effects on blood oxygenation and CO2 clearance. One other study, conducted in the prehospital environment, found that end-tidal CO2 could be useful in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Three articles addressed disaster medicine, the first of which described a triage system for use during pandemic influenza that demonstrated high reliability in delineating patients with a good chance of survival from those likely to die. The other two studies, both drawn from the 2008 Sichuan earthquake experience, showed success in treating crush injured patients in an on-site tent ICU and, in the second case, how the epidemiology of earthquake injuries and related factors predicted mortality. PMID:21122166

  15. [Case Report: prehospital treatment on a major injured motorcycle driver].

    PubMed

    Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Knacke, Peer G; Heller, Gilbert; Naguschewski, Jörg; Scholz, Jens

    2008-09-01

    This case report describes the prehospital care of a 42-year-old person damaged by a severe motorcycle accident in a rural scene. The injured person was unconscious, one pupil was dilated and rib fractures were palpable. Purposeful therapy without delay was necessary. The prehospital therapy took 35 minutes in total. The time benefit by using a rescue helicopter is illustrated: time to initial treatment is minimized and duration of transport as well - direct transport to a trauma center is possible. PMID:18792860

  16. Are we prepared for high standards of trauma care?

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    For some years emergency nurses have speculated about what a competent standard of emergency nursing should look like. This is particularly important when managing complex trauma cases. The Trauma Quality Improvement Network System (TQuINS) was created to assess whether trauma care is safe and carried out by practitioners proficient in dealing with complex cases (analysis, page 8 ). PMID:27615325

  17. Trauma systems in Kenya: a qualitative analysis at the district level.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Hadley K H; Stevens, Kent A; Bachani, Abdulgafoor M; Mogere, Stephen; Akungah, Daniel; Nyamari, Jackim; Masasabi Wekesa, John; Hyder, Adnan A

    2015-05-01

    Injury is a leading cause of death and disability in low- and middle-income countries. Kenya has a particularly high burden of injuries, accounting for 88.4 deaths per 100,000 population. Despite recent attempts to prioritize injury prevention in Kenya, trauma care systems have not been assessed. We assessed perceptions of formal and informal district-level trauma systems through 25 qualitative semi-structured interviews and 16 focus group discussions with Ministry of Health officials, district hospital administrators, health care providers, police, and community members. We used the principles of theoretical analysis to identify common themes of prehospital and hospital trauma care. We found prehospital care relied primarily on "good Samaritans" and police. We described hospital care in terms of human resources, infrastructure, and definitive care. The interviewers repeatedly emphasized the lack of hospital infrastructure. We showed the need to develop prehospital care systems and strengthen hospital trauma care services. PMID:25563630

  18. [A procedure for infusion-transfusion therapy and autohemodilution in severe trauma and shock (apropos the article by B. N. Salamatin et al., The use of the "internal autotransfusion" method in complex shock-control measures at the prehospital stage)].

    PubMed

    Tsybuliak, G N; Nasonkin, O S; Chechëtkin, A V

    1992-05-01

    The infusion of hypertonic solution is thought by the authors to be effective due to its reflectory action for treatment of patients who are in the state of anaphylactic and cardiogenic shock. This method seems to be expedient for massive blood loss under conditions of prehospital medical aid to victims with very low level of arterial pressure, with craniocerebral trauma and critical trauma of the chest. PMID:1302953

  19. The Tactical Combat Casualty Care Casualty Card TCCC Guidelines ? Proposed Change 1301.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Russ S; Butler, Frank K; Montgomery, Harold R; Brunstetter, Tyson J; Diaz, George Y; Kirkpatrick, James W; Summers, Nancy L; Shackelford, Stacy A; Holcomb, John B; Bailey, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing trauma care delivery is paramount to saving lives on the battlefield. During the past decade of conflict, trauma care performance improvement at combat support hospitals and forward surgical teams in Afghanistan and Iraq has increased through Joint Trauma System and DoD Trauma Registry data collection, analysis, and rapid evidence-based adjustments to clinical practice guidelines. Although casualties have benefitted greatly from a trauma system and registry that improves hospital care, still lacking is a comprehensive and integrated system for data collection and analysis to improve performance at the prehospital level of care. Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) based casualty cards, TCCC after action reports, and unit-based prehospital trauma registries need to be implemented globally and linked to the DoD Trauma Registry in a seamless manner that will optimize prehospital trauma care delivery. PMID:23877773

  20. Transforming US Army trauma care: an evidence-based review of the trauma literature.

    PubMed

    Remick, Kyle N; Dickerson, James A; Nessen, Shawn C; Rush, Robert M; Beilman, Greg J

    2010-01-01

    The US Army has been charged to transform to meet the demands of current and anticipated near-future combat needs, covering a full spectrum of military operations. The US Army combat trauma care system was created to deliver combat casualty care in a variety of situations and has been adapted to meet the needs of such care in both Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. Questions related to our current system include the use and positioning of medical evacuation assets, the type of training for our trauma care providers, the positioning of these providers in proximity to the battlefield, and the type of units most suited to the wide variety of medical operations required of today's military medical team. The review was performed to evaluate available information in light of anticipated future needs to ensure preparedness. We reviewed trauma literature regarding the areas of civilian trauma systems, military trauma systems, presurgical trauma care, medical evacuation times, and the medical evacuation system. Among the conclusions drawn from the reviewed data include the following: regional trauma systems improve outcomes in significantly-injured patients; rural trauma care as part of a trauma system yields improved results compared to nontrauma hospitals and comparable results to those at a higher level center; and delivery of advanced trauma life support care has the potential to extend the period of time of safe medical evacuation to surgical capabilities. These lessons are used to discuss components of an improved system of trauma care, flexible for the varied needs of modern battlefield trauma and adaptable to provide support for anticipated future conflicts. PMID:21181650

  1. A critical care helicopter system in trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, L. M.; Bennett, B.

    1989-01-01

    Civilian helicopters and emergency medical services in the United States have been in existence for approximately 15 years. The rapid growth of this type of health care delivery coupled with an increasing number of accidents has prompted professional and lay scrutiny of these programs. Although they have a demonstrated history of benefit to patients, the type and severity of injuries to patients who are eligible for helicopter transportation need further definition. The composition of the medical crews and the benefits that particular crew members bring to the patients require ongoing evaluation. Significant questions regarding the number of pilots in a helicopter and in a program remain to be answered. This article reviews the role of emergency medical air transport services in providing care to trauma patients, staff training and evaluation, and safety criteria and offers recommendations to minimize risks to patients and crews. PMID:2695653

  2. Better trauma care. How Maryland does it.

    PubMed

    Wish, John R; Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F

    2005-01-01

    In March, 1970, the Maryland State Police, in cooperation with the University of Maryland, started the first statewide airborne transportation system. It was modeled after the army's success in Korea and Vietnam, where battlefield injuries were flown to front-line MASH units. The world's premier statewide medical aviation division was made possible through a cooperative effort between the Maryland State Police Aviation Division and Dr. R Adams Cowley at the University of Maryland Hospital as a public service to the citizens of the state. The Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS) has five components: (1) aircraft, (2) state troopers, (3) system communications (SYSCOM) center, (4) ambulance and fire emergency rescue, and (5) Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers and a regional burn center. The Maryland State Police Aviation Division now has 12 Aerospace Dauphin AS365N helicopters that operate out of eight fixed points throughout the state. Each helicopter has a two-person crew that consists of a pilot and a paramedic. Since 1993, the overall coordination of emergency medical services (EMS) has been under the purview of MIEMSS, an independent executive-level state agency that is governed by an appointed board and advisory council. To ensure stable funding for Maryland's world renowned emergency medical services (EMS) system, including med-evac helicopters, ambulances, fire equipment, rescue squads, and trauma units, a "surcharge" of $13.50 per year is collected with the automobile registration fee where applicable. The SYSCOM center in Baltimore coordinates the helicopter transport to the scene of the accident as well as referral to the specialty care facility: Adult Level I Trauma Center, Pediatric Level I Trauma Center, and Regional Burn Center. An on-the-scene evaluation of this exemplary emergency medical system in Maryland provides further convincing evidence of the performance of the Maryland State Police Aviation Division as

  3. Pre-Hospital Emergency in Iran: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ghardashi, Fatemeh; Izadi, Ahmad Reza; Ravangard, Ramin; Mirhashemi, Sedigheh; Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-hospital care plays a vital role in saving trauma patients. Objectives This study aims to review studies conducted on the pre-hospital emergency status in Iran. Data Sources Data were sourced from Iranian electronic databases, including SID, IranMedex, IranDoc, Magiran, and non-Iranian electronic databases, such as Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar. In addition, available data and statistics for the country were used. Data Selection All Persian-language articles published in Iranian scientific journals and related English-language articles published in Iranian and non-Iranian journals indexed on valid sites for September 2005 - 2014 were systematically reviewed. Data Extraction To review the selected articles, a data extraction form developed by the researchers as per the study’s objective was adopted. The articles were examined under two categories: structure and function of pre-hospital emergency. Results A total of 19 articles were selected, including six descriptive studies (42%), four descriptive-analytical studies (21%), five review articles (16%), two qualitative studies (10.5%), and two interventional (experimental) studies (10.5%). In addition, of these, 14 articles (73.5%) had been published in the English language. The focus of these selected articles were experts (31.5%), bases of emergency medical services (26%), injured (16%), data reviews (16%), and employees (10.5%). A majority of the studies (68%) investigated pre-hospital emergency functions and 32% reviewed the pre-hospital emergency structure. Conclusions The number of studies conducted on pre-hospital emergency services in Iran is limited. To promote public health, consideration of prevention areas, processes to provide pre-hospital emergency services, policymaking, foresight, systemic view, comprehensive research programs and roadmaps, and assessments of research needs in pre-hospital emergency seem necessary. PMID:27626016

  4. Management of pain in pre-hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Rodgers, Antony

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and management of pain in pre-hospital care settings are important aspects of paramedic and clinical team roles. As emergency department waiting times and delays in paramedic-to-nurse handover increase, it becomes more and more vital that patients receive adequate pre-hospital pain relief. However, administration of analgesia can be inadequate and can result in patients experiencing oligoanalgesia, or under-treated pain. This article examines these issues along with the aetiology of trauma and the related socioeconomic background of traumatic injury. It reviews validated pain-assessment tools, outlines physiological responses to traumatic pain and discusses some of the misconceptions about the provision of effective analgesia in pre-hospital settings. PMID:26050779

  5. Adapting prehospital care to a large rural geographic area: a review of the Emergency Health Services Nova Scotia implementation.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Michael K

    2003-01-01

    Nova Scotia is building a system of prehospital care based on four principles: "Fail Safe" government ownership; "Full Service" advanced life support capable; "High Performance" resource efficiency; and "Fiscally Responsible" performance goals, incentives and penalties. Emergency Health Services Nova Scotia exercises funding and regulatory control through service provided by a private contractor. Benefits include improved fleet and equipment management, information systems, 911 dispatch and performance tracking, medical control and paramedic care, and public accountability. Problems include rural dispatch, budget costs, labour issues and stakeholder communication. PMID:14981841

  6. Trauma-Informed Care for Youth in Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Carolyn M

    2016-06-01

    For decades, evidence has shown an undeniable connection between childhood trauma and chronic adverse reactions across the lifespan (Bilchik & Nash, 2008; Perry, 2001; Perry, 2006). Childhood traumatic experiences are associated with serious and persistent, long-term physical, psychological, and substance abuse issues. In addition to adverse effects on physical health, research indicates that early childhood trauma has particularly adverse effects on adolescent self-esteem, coping skills, school performance, self-regulation, critical thinking, self-motivation, and the ability to build healthy relationships (O'Connell, Boat, & Warner, 2009). A traumatic event is a dangerous or distressing experience, outside the range of usual human experience that overwhelms the capacity to cope and frequently results in intense emotional and physical reactions, feelings of helplessness and terror, and threatens serious injury or death (The National Child Traumatic Stress Network [NCTSNET], 2014). Approximately five million children each year in the United States experience some type of traumatic experience (Perry, 2006). Nationwide community studies estimate between 25% and 61% of children and adolescents have a history of at least one exposure to a potentially traumatic event and 38.5% of American adults claim to have experienced at least one traumatic event before the age of 13 (Briggs et al., 2012; Gerson & Rappaport, 2013). According to results of a 2002-2003 survey of 900 New York City adolescents, 24% reported a history of witnessing someone being shot, 12% reported exposure to someone being killed, and 51% reported witnessing someone being beaten or mugged (O'Connell et al., 2009). Each year, 2-3 million children are victims of maltreatment, a type of trauma, including physical and/or sexual abuse (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014; Perry, 2006). Compared to the general population, youth in foster care are significantly more likely to have experienced

  7. Case studies in prehospital care from London HEMS: pre-hospital administration of prothrombin complex concentrate to the head-injured patient.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, Robbie A; Kotze, Jean-Pierre; Lockey, David J; Weaver, Anne E

    2013-03-01

    A case of pre-hospital administration of prothrombin complex concentrate to a patient anticoagulated with warfarin and with suspected intracranial haemorrhage is described. Effective, early reversal of anticoagulation by the time of arrival at hospital was achieved. PMID:23349352

  8. Optimizing the use of blood products in trauma care.

    PubMed

    Hess, John R; Hiippala, Seppo

    2005-01-01

    Blood transfusion has been used to treat the injured since the US Civil War. Now, it saves the lives of tens of thousands of injured patients each year. However, not everyone who receives blood benefits, and some recipients are injured by the transfusion itself. Effective blood therapy in trauma management requires an integration of information from diverse sources, including data relating to trauma and blood use epidemiology, medical systems management, and clinical care. Issues of current clinical concern in highly developed trauma systems include how to manage massive transfusion events, how to limit blood use and so minimize exposure to transfusion risks, how to integrate new hemorrhage control modalities, and how to deal with blood shortages. Less developed trauma systems are primarily concerned with speeding transport to specialized facilities and assembling trauma center resources. This article reviews the factors that effect blood use in urgent trauma care. PMID:16221314

  9. Optimizing the use of blood products in trauma care

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Blood transfusion has been used to treat the injured since the US Civil War. Now, it saves the lives of tens of thousands of injured patients each year. However, not everyone who receives blood benefits, and some recipients are injured by the transfusion itself. Effective blood therapy in trauma management requires an integration of information from diverse sources, including data relating to trauma and blood use epidemiology, medical systems management, and clinical care. Issues of current clinical concern in highly developed trauma systems include how to manage massive transfusion events, how to limit blood use and so minimize exposure to transfusion risks, how to integrate new hemorrhage control modalities, and how to deal with blood shortages. Less developed trauma systems are primarily concerned with speeding transport to specialized facilities and assembling trauma center resources. This article reviews the factors that effect blood use in urgent trauma care. PMID:16221314

  10. Pre-Hospital Care Management of a Potential Spinal Cord Injured Patient: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Henry; Singh, Jeffrey; Nathens, Avery; MacDonald, Russell D.; Travers, Andrew; Tallon, John; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An interdisciplinary expert panel of medical and surgical specialists involved in the management of patients with potential spinal cord injuries (SCI) was assembled. Four key questions were created that were of significant interest. These were: (1) what is the optimal type and duration of pre-hospital spinal immobilization in patients with acute SCI?; (2) during airway manipulation in the pre-hospital setting, what is the ideal method of spinal immobilization?; (3) what is the impact of pre-hospital transport time to definitive care on the outcomes of patients with acute spinal cord injury?; and (4) what is the role of pre-hospital care providers in cervical spine clearance and immobilization? A systematic review utilizing multiple databases was performed to determine the current evidence about the specific questions, and each article was independently reviewed and assessed by two reviewers based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Guidelines were then created related to the questions by a national Canadian expert panel using the Delphi method for reviewing the evidence-based guidelines about each question. Recommendations about the key questions included: the pre-hospital immobilization of patients using a cervical collar, head immobilization, and a spinal board; utilization of padded boards or inflatable bean bag boards to reduce pressure; transfer of patients off of spine boards as soon as feasible, including transfer of patients off spinal boards while awaiting transfer from one hospital institution to another hospital center for definitive care; inclusion of manual in-line cervical spine traction for airway management in patients requiring intubation in the pre-hospital setting; transport of patients with acute traumatic SCI to the definitive hospital center for care within 24 h of injury; and training of emergency medical personnel in the pre-hospital setting to apply criteria to clear patients of cervical spinal injuries, and immobilize patients

  11. Prehospital Electronic Patient Care Report Systems: Early Experiences from Emergency Medical Services Agency Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Lee, Christopher H.; Sasson, Comilla; Van Gelder, Carin M.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2012-01-01

    Background As the United States embraces electronic health records (EHRs), improved emergency medical services (EMS) information systems are also a priority; however, little is known about the experiences of EMS agencies as they adopt and implement electronic patient care report (e-PCR) systems. We sought to characterize motivations for adoption of e-PCR systems, challenges associated with adoption and implementation, and emerging implementation strategies. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews with EMS agency leaders. Participants were recruited through a web-based survey of National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) members, a didactic session at the 2010 NAEMSP Annual Meeting, and snowball sampling. Interviews lasted approximately 30 minutes, were recorded and professionally transcribed. Analysis was conducted by a five-person team, employing the constant comparative method to identify recurrent themes. Results Twenty-three interviewees represented 20 EMS agencies from the United States and Canada; 14 EMS agencies were currently using e-PCR systems. The primary reason for adoption was the potential for e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts. Challenges to e-PCR system adoption included those common to any health information technology project, as well as challenges unique to the prehospital setting, including: fear of increased ambulance run times leading to decreased ambulance availability, difficulty integrating with existing hospital information systems, and unfunded mandates requiring adoption of e-PCR systems. Three recurring strategies emerged to improve e-PCR system adoption and implementation: 1) identify creative funding sources; 2) leverage regional health information organizations; and 3) build internal information technology capacity. Conclusion EMS agencies are highly motivated to adopt e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts; however, adoption and implementation of e

  12. Prior Trauma Exposure for Youth in Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorsey, Shannon; Burns, Barbara J.; Southerland, Dannia G.; Cox, Julia Revillion; Wagner, H. Ryan; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Very little research has focused on rates of trauma exposure for youth in treatment foster care (TFC). Available research has utilized record review for assessing exposure, which presents limitations for the range of trauma types examined, as records are predominantly focused on abuse and neglect. The current study examines exposure rates and…

  13. Trauma system development.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, R A; Lockey, D J

    2013-01-01

    The word 'trauma' describes the disease entity resulting from physical injury. Trauma is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and deaths due to injury look set to increase. As early as the 1970s, it became evident that centralisation of resources and expertise could reduce the mortality rate from serious injury and that organisation of trauma care delivery into formal systems could improve outcome further. Internationally, trauma systems have evolved in various forms, with widespread reports of mortality and functional outcome benefits when major trauma management is delivered in this way. The management of major trauma in England is currently undergoing significant change. The London Trauma System began operating in April 2010 and others throughout England became operational this year. Similar systems exist internationally and continue to be developed. Anaesthetists have been and continue to be involved with all levels of trauma care delivery, from the provision of pre-hospital trauma and retrieval teams, through to chronic pain management and rehabilitation of patients back into society. This review examines the international development of major trauma care delivery and the components of a modern trauma system. PMID:23210554

  14. [Preclinical treatment of multiple trauma : what is important?].

    PubMed

    Schweigkofler, U; Hoffmann, R

    2013-09-01

    Multiple trauma is still the most common cause of death in the age group below 40 years but rarely occurs in prehospital emergencies in Germany. Therefore, personal experience of emergency physicians in prehospital treatment of multiple trauma is often limited. Priority-based therapy according to standardized algorithms and advances in clinical and intensive care have reduced hospital mortality down to 13 %. Time factors, treatment and transport by Helicopter Emergency Medical Services seem to have had a significant impact on the outcome. The current German multiple trauma S3 guidelines provide algorithms for preclinical treatment. The underlying scientific evidence in this respect is, however, low. PMID:23942888

  15. Outcome following physician supervised prehospital resuscitation: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Krüger, Andreas J; Zwisler, Stine T; Brøchner, Anne C

    2015-01-01

    Background Prehospital care provided by specially trained, physician-based emergency services (P-EMS) is an integrated part of the emergency medical systems in many developed countries. To what extent P-EMS increases survival and favourable outcomes is still unclear. The aim of the study was thus to investigate ambulance runs initially assigned ‘life-saving missions’ with emphasis on long-term outcome in patients treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark Methods All MECU runs are registered in a database by the attending physician, stating, among other parameters, the treatment given, outcome of the treatment and the patient's diagnosis. Over a period of 80 months from May 1 2006 to December 31 2012, all missions in which the outcome of the treatment was registered as ‘life saving’ were scrutinised. Initial outcome, level of competence of the caretaker and diagnosis of each patient were manually established in each case in a combined audit of the prehospital database, the discharge summary of the MECU and the medical records from the hospital. Outcome parameters were final outcome, the aetiology of the life-threatening condition and the level of competences necessary to treat the patient. Results Of 25 647 patients treated by the MECU, 701 (2.7%) received prehospital ‘life saving treatment’. In 596 (2.3%) patients this treatment exceeded the competences of the attending emergency medical technician or paramedic. Of these patients, 225 (0.9%) were ultimately discharged to their own home. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that anaesthesiologist administrated prehospital therapy increases the level of treatment modalities leading to an increased survival in relation to a prehospital system consisting of emergency medical technicians and paramedics alone and thus supports the concept of applying specialists in anaesthesiology in the prehospital setting especially when treating patients with cardiac arrest, patients in

  16. Prehospital transport practices prevalent among patients presenting to the pediatric emergency of a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Jhuma; Singh, Archana; Narsaria, Praveen; Dev, Nishanth; Singh, Pradeep; Dubey, Nandkishore

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Prehospital transport practices prevalent among children presenting to the emergency are under-reported. Our objectives were to evaluate the prehospital transport practices prevalent among children presenting to the pediatric emergency and their subsequent clinical course and outcome. Methods: In this prospective observational study we enrolled all children ≤17 years of age presenting to the pediatric emergency (from January to June 2013) and recorded their demographic data and variables pertaining to prehospital transport practices. Data was entered into Microsoft Excel and analyzed using Stata 11 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA). Results: A total of 319 patients presented to the emergency during the study period. Acute gastroenteritis, respiratory tract infection and fever were the most common reasons for presentation to the emergency. Seventy-three (23%) children required admission. Most commonly used public transport was auto-rickshaw (138, 43.5%) and median time taken to reach hospital was 22 min (interquartile range: 5, 720). Twenty-six patients were referred from another health facility. Of these, 25 were transported in ambulance unaccompanied. About 8% (25) of parents reported having difficulties in transporting their child to the hospital and 57% (181) of parents felt fellow passengers and drivers were unhelpful. On post-hoc analysis, only time taken to reach the hospital (30 vs. 20 min; relative risk [95% confidence interval]: 1.02 [1.007, 1.03], P = 0.003) and the illness nature were significant (45% vs. 2.6%; 0.58 [0.50, 0.67], P ≤ 0.0001) on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: In relation to prehospital transport among pediatric patients we observed that one-quarter of children presenting to the emergency required admission, the auto-rickshaw was the commonest mode of transport and that there is a lack of prior communication before referring patients for further management. PMID:26321808

  17. Evaluation of a thoracic ultrasound training module for the detection of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema by prehospital physician care providers

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Vicki E; Lamhaut, Lionel; Capp, Roberta; Bosson, Nichole; Liteplo, Andrew; Marx, Jean-Sebastian; Carli, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background While ultrasound (US) has continued to expedite diagnosis and therapy for critical care physicians inside the hospital system, the technology has been slow to diffuse into the pre-hospital system. Given the diagnostic benefits of thoracic ultrasound (TUS), we sought to evaluate image recognition skills for two important TUS applications; the identification of B-lines (used in the US diagnosis of pulmonary edema) and the identification of lung sliding and comet tails (used in the US diagnosis of pneumothorax). In particular we evaluated the impact of a focused training module in a pre-hospital system that utilizes physicians as pre-hospital providers. Methods 27 Paris Service D'Aide Médicale Urgente (SAMU) physicians at the Hôpital Necker with varying levels of US experience were given two twenty-five image recognition pre-tests; the first test had examples of both normal and pneumothorax lung US and the second had examples of both normal and pulmonary edema lung US. All 27 physicians then underwent the same didactic training modules. A post-test was administered upon completing the training module and results were recorded. Results Pre and post-test scores were compared for both the pneumothorax and the pulmonary edema modules. For the pneumothorax module, mean test scores increased from 10.3 +/- 4.1 before the training to 20.1 +/- 3.5 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased as well, indicating a collective improvement. For the pulmonary edema module, mean test scores increased from 14.1 +/- 5.2 before the training to 20.9 +/- 2.4 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased again by more than half, indicating a collective improvement. Conclusion This brief training module resulted in significant improvement of image recognition skills for physicians both with and without previous ultrasound experience. Given that rapid diagnosis of these conditions in the pre-hospital system

  18. Orthopaedic Trauma Care Specialist Program for Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Slobogean, Gerard; Sprague, Sheila; Furey, Andrew; Pollak, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    The dire challenges faced in Haiti, both preearthquake and postearthquake, highlight the need for developing surgical infrastructure to care for traumatic musculoskeletal injuries. The proposed Orthopaedic Trauma Care Specialist (OTCS) residency program aims to close the critical human resource gap that limits the appropriate care of musculoskeletal trauma in Haiti. The OTCS program is a proposal for a 2-year residency program that will focus primarily on the management of orthopaedic trauma. The proposed program will be a comprehensive approach for implementing affordable and sustainable strategies to improve orthopaedic trauma care. Its curriculum will be tailored to the injuries seen in Haiti, and the treatments that can be delivered within their health care system. Its long-term sustainability will be based on a "train-the-trainers" approach for developing local faculty to continue the program. This proposal outlines the OTCS framework specifically for Haiti; however, this concept is likely applicable to other low- and middle-income environments in a similar need for improved trauma and fracture care. PMID:26356211

  19. Educating the Educator: Use of Advanced Bleeding Control Mechanisms in Athletic Training: A Shift in the Thought Process of Prehospital Care. Part 2: Hemostatic Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ellen K.; Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of this series [see: EJ1044392], the concepts of hemorrhaging, shock, and controlling bleeding as they relate to athletic training and prehospital emergency care along with the use of tourniquets were presented for athletic training educators (ATEs) to teach the skill in the classroom. This article, Part 2 of advanced bleeding control,…

  20. The development and features of the Spanish prehospital advanced triage method (META) for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Garijo Gonzalo, Gracia; Martinez Monzon, Carlos; Pelaez Corres, Nieves; Rodriguez Soler, Alberto; Turegano Fuentes, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This text describes the process of development of the new Spanish Prehospital Advanced Triage Method (META) and explain its main features and contribution to prehospital triage systems in mass casualty incidents. The triage META is based in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols, patient's anatomical injuries and mechanism of injury. It is a triage method with four stages including early identification of patients with severe trauma that would benefit from a rapid evacuation to a surgical facility and introduces a new patient flow by-passing the advanced medical post to improve evacuation. The stages of triage META are: I) Stabilization triage that classifies patients according to severity to set priorities for initial emergency treatment; II) Identifying patients requiring urgent surgical treatment, this is done at the same time than stage I and creates a new flow of patients with high priority for evacuation; III) Implementation of Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols to patients previously classified according to stablished priority; and IV) Evacuation triage, stablishing evacuation priorities in case of lacks of appropriate transport resources. The triage META is to be applied only by prehospital providers with advanced knowledge and training in advanced trauma life support care and has been designed to be implemented as prehospital procedure in mass casualty incidents (MCI). PMID:27130042

  1. Effects of a standard operating procedure on prehospital emergency care of patients presenting with symptoms of the acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Francis, Roland C; Bubser, Florian; Schmidbauer, Willi; Spies, Claudia D; Sörensen, Marc; Bosse, Götz; Kerner, Thoralf

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether a standard operating procedure (SOP) for prehospital management of patients with the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) improves the quality of patient care in terms of adherence to treatment guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology. Among a total of 1025 patient medical records collected from a period before and after the introduction of the SOP, 269 records included the working diagnosis of ACS and were then reviewed for guideline adherence. Most aspects of patient evaluation, monitoring, treatment, and hospital allocation were fairly guideline adherent (>70%) before the SOP was introduced and were not affected by the SOP. The percentage of cases in whom sublingual nitrate (55.2 vs. 66.7%) or intravenous morphine (26.9 vs. 43.0%) was administered without contraindications was higher after the SOP had been introduced. Therefore, the use of an SOP in prehospital emergency medicine can partly improve the adherence to guideline recommendations for the treatment of patients with ACS. PMID:23411814

  2. LSCI in Trauma-Informed Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fecser, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness that many children who present behavioral challenges have experienced relational trauma. These youngsters are not well served by traditional interventions in schools, treatment settings, and communities. Adults responsible for these young people often get drawn into conflict cycles and coercive interventions that only…

  3. Triage in the Tower of Babel: interpreter services for children in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Tate, Ramsey C; Kelley, Maureen C

    2013-12-01

    Minority pediatric populations have higher rates of emergency medical services use than the general pediatric population, and prior studies have documented that limited-English proficiency patients are more likely to undergo invasive procedures, require more resources, and be admitted once they arrive in the emergency department. Furthermore, limited-English proficiency patients may be particularly vulnerable because of immigration or political concerns. In this case report, we describe an infant with breath-holding spells for whom a language barrier in the prehospital setting resulted in an escalation of care to the highest level of trauma team activation. This infant underwent unnecessary, costly, and harmful interventions because of a lack of interpreter services. In a discussion of the legal, ethical, and medical implications of this case, we conclude that further investigation into prehospital strategies for overcoming language barriers is required to provide optimal prehospital care for pediatric patients. PMID:24300472

  4. National Trauma Database (NTrD)--improving trauma care: first year report.

    PubMed

    Sabariah, F J; Ramesh, N; Mahathar, A W

    2008-09-01

    The first Malaysian National Trauma Database was launched in May 2006 with five tertiary referral centres to determine the fundamental data on major trauma, subsequently to evaluate the major trauma management and to come up with guidelines for improved trauma care. A prospective study, using standardized and validated questionnaires, was carried out from May 2006 till April 2007 for all cases admitted and referred to the participating hospitals. During the one year period, 123,916 trauma patients were registered, of which 933 (0.75%) were classified as major trauma. Patients with blunt injury made up for 83.9% of cases and RTA accounted for 72.6% of injuries with 64.9% involving motorcyclist and pillion rider. 42.8% had severe head injury with an admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 3-8 and the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) of 5-6 were recorded in 28.8% of patients. The distribution of Injury Severity Score (ISS) showed that 42.9% of cases were in the range of 16-24. Only 1.9% and 6.3% of the patients were reviewed by the Emergency Physician and Surgeon respectively. Patients with admission systolic blood pressure of less than 90 mmHg had a death rate of 54.6%. Patients with severe head injury (GCS < 9), 45.1% died while 79% patients with moderate head injury survived. There were more survivors within the higher RTS range compared to the lower RTS. Patients with direct admission accounted for 52.3% of survivors and there were 61.7% survivors for referred cases. In conclusion, NTrD first report has successfully demonstrated its significance in giving essential data on major trauma in Malaysia, however further expansion of the study may reflect more comprehensive trauma database in this country. PMID:19227673

  5. Lightweight physiologic sensor performance during pre-hospital care delivered by ambulance clinicians.

    PubMed

    Mort, Alasdair J; Fitzpatrick, David; Wilson, Philip M J; Mellish, Chris; Schneider, Anne

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of motion generated by ambulance patient management on the performance of two lightweight physiologic sensors. Two physiologic sensors were applied to pre-hospital patients. The first was the Contec Medical Systems CMS50FW finger pulse oximeter, monitoring heart rate (HR) and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The second was the RESpeck respiratory rate (RR) sensor, which was wireless-enabled with a Bluetooth(®) Low Energy protocol. Sensor data were recorded from 16 pre-hospital patients, who were monitored for 21.2 ± 9.8 min, on average. Some form of error was identified on almost every HR and SpO2 trace. However, the mean proportion of each trace exhibiting error was <10 % (range <1-50 % for individual patients). There appeared to be no overt impact of the gross motion associated with road ambulance transit on the incidence of HR or SpO2 error. The RESpeck RR sensor delivered an average of 4.2 (±2.2) validated breaths per minute, but did not produce any validated breaths during the gross motion of ambulance transit as its pre-defined motion threshold was exceeded. However, this was many more data points than could be achieved using traditional manual assessment of RR. Error was identified on a majority of pre-hospital physiologic signals, which emphasised the need to ensure consistent sensor attachment in this unstable and unpredictable environment, and in developing intelligent methods of screening out such error. PMID:25804608

  6. The effect of a national quality improvement collaborative on prehospital care for acute myocardial infarction and stroke in England

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown wide variations in prehospital ambulance care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) for improving ambulance care for AMI and stroke. Methods We used an interrupted time series design to investigate the effect of a national QIC on change in delivery of care bundles for AMI (aspirin, glyceryl trinitrate [GTN], pain assessment and analgesia) and stroke (face-arm-speech test, blood pressure and blood glucose recording) in all English ambulance services between January 2010 and February 2012. Key strategies for change included local quality improvement (QI) teams in each ambulance service supported by a national coordinating expert group that conducted workshops educating staff in QI methods to improve AMI and stroke care. Expertise and ideas were shared between QI teams who met together at three national workshops, between QI leads through monthly teleconferences, and between the expert group and participants. Feedback was provided to services using annotated control charts. Results We analyzed change over time using logistic regression with three predictor variables: time, gender, and age. There were statistically significant improvements in care bundles in nine (of 12) participating trusts for AMI (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.04, 1.04), nine for stroke (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.05, 1.07), 11 for either AMI or stroke, and seven for both conditions. Overall care bundle performance for AMI increased in England from 43 to 79% and for stroke from 83 to 96%. Successful services all introduced provider prompts and individualized or team feedback. Other determinants of success included engagement with front-line clinicians, feedback using annotated control charts, expert support, and shared learning between participants and organizations. Conclusions This first national prehospital QIC led to significant improvements in ambulance care for AMI and

  7. [Rehabilitation care for children after trauma in the earthquake disaster].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Qing-Min

    2013-06-01

    For the children who suffer trauma in earthquake, rehabilitation care aims to promote functional recovery, shorten hospital stay, and reduce the incidence of complications or disability by evidence-based, multidisciplinary, and comprehensive early rehabilitation intervention on the basis of first aid and clinical treatment. Children are likely to suffer traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, peripheral nerve injury, limb fracture, and amputation in the earthquake disaster, so the clinical rehabilitation care designed considering the characteristics of children should be provided immediately after acute phase of trauma to promote functional recovery. PMID:23791056

  8. Critical Care for the Patient With Multiple Trauma.

    PubMed

    Radomski, Michal; Zettervall, Sara; Schroeder, Mary Elizabeth; Messing, Jonathan; Dunne, James; Sarani, Babak

    2016-06-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of death worldwide and the leading cause of death in those less than 44 years old in the United States. Admission to a verified trauma center has been shown to decrease mortality following a major injury. This decrease in mortality has been a direct result of improvements in the initial evaluation and resuscitation from injury as well as continued advances in critical care. As such, it is vital that intensive care practitioners be familiar with various types of injuries and their associated treatment strategies as well as their potential complications in order to minimize the morbidity and mortality frequently seen in this patient population. PMID:25673631

  9. The nurse-patient relationship in pre-hospital emergency care--from the perspective of Swedish specialist ambulance nursing students.

    PubMed

    Berntsson, Tommy; Hildingh, Cathrine

    2013-10-01

    The development of the Swedish ambulance service has resulted in three different competence levels in Swedish ambulance teams: specialist ambulance nurses, registered nurses and emergency medical technicians. A nursing scientific model developed by Peplau (Peplau, H., 1991. Interpersonal Relations in Nursing. Springer Publishing Company, New York.) breaks down the nurse-patient relationship into a number of phases: an orientation, an identification, an exploitation and a resolution phase. This model has then been adapted to the pre-hospital emergency care by Suserud (Dahlberg, K., Segesten, K., Nyström, M., Suserud, B.-O., Fagerberg, I., 2003. Att förstå vårdvetenskap [To Understand Caring Science]. Studentlitteratur, Lund.). The purpose of this study was to explore, by direct content analysis, how the phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship described by Suserud (Dahlberg et al., 2003), emerge in 17 specialist ambulance nursing students descriptions of ambulance missions. The results show that the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship could be identified and each phase includes several different parts. Furthermore, the results show that the parts of each phase can vary depending on the patient's condition and the environmental circumstances of the ambulance mission. This improved understanding of the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship, and their parts, could be used by ambulance team members as a support during the pre-hospital caring process in ambulance missions. This new knowledge could also be used in education. PMID:23245810

  10. Developing Self-Care Practices in a Trauma Treatment Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patricia J.; Simmelink-McCleary, Jennifer; Im, Hyojin; Becher, Emily; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of self-care practices of social work students who were part of a larger study of students' experiences in a graduate course on the treatment of trauma. Consensual qualitative research methods were used to analyze 17 participant journals submitted at 4 times during the course. Findings indicated that…

  11. Compassionate Accountability in Residential Care: A Trauma Informed Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimmarusti, Rocco A.; Gamero, Soe L.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines techniques for holding youth in residential care accountable for their behavior. Based on the use of trauma treatment theory, the authors believe that holding one accountable can actually be conceptualized and put into practice as a nurturing operation. For traumatized individuals, more traditional approaches to…

  12. Closing The Gap: Improving Trauma Care On The Ukrainian Battlefield.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Stephen K; Jones, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Since early 2014, Ukraine has been involved in a violent social and political revolution that has taken more than 7,000 lives. Many of these deaths were due to limited field medical care and prolonged evacuation times because the Ukrainian military has been slow to adopt standard combat medical processes. We deployed with the US Army's 173rd Airborne Brigade to train soldiers in the National Guard of Ukraine (NGU) on combat first aid. We discovered that a major deficiency limiting the quality of trauma care and evacuation is an endemic lack of prior coordination and planning. The responsibility for this coordination falls on military leaders; therefore, we delivered medical operations training to officers of the NGU unit and observed great improvement in medical care sustainment. We recommend systematic leader education in best medical practices be institutionalized at all levels of the Ukrainian Army to foster sustained improvement and refinement of trauma care. PMID:27045509

  13. Addressing trauma in collaborative mental health care for refugee children.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Cecile; Measham, Toby; Nadeau, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    Primary care institutions, including clinics, schools and community organizations, because of their closeness to the family living environment, are often in a privileged position to detect problems in traumatized refugee children and to provide help. In a collaborative care model, the child psychiatrist consultant can assist the primary care consultee and family in holding the trauma narrative and organizing a safe network around the child and family. The consultant can support the establishment of a therapeutic alliance, provide a cultural understanding of presenting problems and negotiate with the consultee and the family a treatment plan. In many settings, trauma focused psychotherapy may not be widely available, but committed community workers and primary care professionals may provide excellent psychosocial support and a forum for empathic listening that may provide relief to the family and the child. PMID:22626671

  14. The Affordable Care Act and orthopaedic trauma.

    PubMed

    Issar, Neil M; Jahangir, A Alex

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act has resulted in a dramatic governmental restructuring of the healthcare insurance market and delivery system. Orthopaedic traumatologists must be aware of the law's impact on their clinical practice, finances, and overall business model. This includes the effect of accountable care organizations, the Independent Payment Advisory Board, and the Physician Value-Based Payment Modifier program, as well as the impact of the Affordable Care Act's grace period provision, medical device excise tax, and cuts to funding for the Disproportionate Share Hospital program. PMID:25229683

  15. [Emergency care in the autonomous regions of Spain. Improvement in pre-hospital emergency care and welfare coordination. SESPAS Report 2012].

    PubMed

    Miguel García, Félix; Fernández Quintana, Ana Isabel; Díaz Prats, Amadeo

    2012-03-01

    The present article describes the general organization of pre-hospital emergency care in the autonomous regions and provides data on activity corresponding to 2010, drawn from the information available in the Primary Care Information System of the Ministry of Health, Social Policy and Equality. Emergency care is provided through various organizational structures covering 24-hour periods. Family medicine attended 17.8 million emergency consultations and nursing attended 10.2 million (year 2010, 14 autonomous communities, 79.7% of the National Health System population). Emergency department utilization ranged between 0.11 and 0.83 urgent family physician consultations per inhabitant/year and between 0.05 and 0.57 nursing consultations per inhabitant/year. Any reform in the management of pre-hospital emergency care will involve organizational changes and aims to produce measurable improvements in healthcare coordination. In the new organizational designs, most of the responsibility lies with human resources in order to achieve the new goals for the future aims to be presented in an operational teamwork structure. Undoubtedly, the main challenge is to achieve optimal coordination with other welfare levels, including the police, social services, nursing homes, etc. If optimal care of the population needs to count on the efforts of all these groups, mobility, individual differences, consistent achievement of high standards, and -most of all- the use of these services by citizens will determine the final result. The results can be quantified in various ways, but evaluation should concentrate on the resources used, the degree of satisfaction among all the parties involved and optimal management of demand, which will help to disseminate the need for a rational resource use. PMID:22321943

  16. Sustaining an inclusive trauma system in a rural state: the role of regional care systems, partnerships, and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Vernberg, Dee Katherine; Rotondo, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    Different approaches exist for developing inclusive trauma systems with a regional system approach. The purpose of this article is to describe a sustainable and replicable structure for developing a trauma system with urban and rural environments. A relatively new trauma system is presented to show (1) how rural health networks and relationships can support rural trauma system development; (2) how partnerships help to support trauma system development; and (3) how the trauma system infrastructure has used assessment and assurance strategies to support regional systems of care to foster optimal care of the trauma patient. PMID:20838161

  17. Using a Checklist to Improve Family Communication in Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Bradley M; Nolan, Tracy L; Brown, Cecil E; Vogel, Robert L; Flowers, Kristin A; Ashley, Dennis W; Nakayama, Don K

    2016-01-01

    Modern concepts of patient-centered care emphasize effective communication with patients and families, an essential requirement in acute trauma settings. We hypothesized that using a checklist to guide the initial family conversation would improve the family's perception of the interaction. Institutional Review Board-approved, prospective pre/post study involving families of trauma patients admitted to our Level I trauma center for >24 hours. In the control group, families received information according to existing practices. In the study group, residents gave patient information to a first-degree family member using a checklist that guided the interaction. The checklist included a physician introduction, patient condition, list of known injuries, admission unit or intensive care unit, any consultants involved, plans for additional studies or operations, and opportunity for family to ask questions. An 11-item survey was administered 24 to 48 hours after admission to each group that evaluated the trauma team's communication in the areas of physician introduction, patient condition, ongoing treatment, and family perception of the interaction. Responses were on a Likert scale and analyzed using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. There were 130 patients in each group. The study group had significantly (P < 0.05) better responses in 8 of 11 items surveyed: physician spoke to family, physician introduction, understanding of their relative's injuries, admitting unit, consultants involved, urgent surgical procedures required, ongoing diagnostic studies, and understanding of the treatment plan. In conclusion, using a checklist improves the perception of the initial communication between the trauma team and family members of trauma patients, especially their understanding of the treatment plan. PMID:26802859

  18. Emergency ultrasound in the prehospital setting: the impact of environment on examination outcomes.

    PubMed

    Snaith, B; Hardy, M; Walker, A

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to compare ultrasound examinations performed within a land ambulance (stationary and moving) with those completed in a simulated emergency department (ED) to determine the feasibility of undertaking ultrasound examinations within the UK prehospital care environment. The findings suggest that abdominal aortic aneurysm and extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma emergency ultrasound examinations can be performed in the stationary or moving land ambulance environment to a standard consistent with those performed in the hospital ED. PMID:21450758

  19. Trauma Experiences, Maltreatment-Related Impairments, and Resilience among Child Welfare Youth in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin-Vezina, Delphine; Coleman, Kim; Milne, Lise; Sell, Jody; Daigneault, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide a description of the trauma experiences, trauma-related sequels, and resilience features of a sample of Canadian youth in residential care facilities, as well as to explore the impact of gender and of the number of different traumas experienced on trauma-related sequels and resilience features. A convenience…

  20. Improving Trauma Care in India: the Potential Role of the Rural Trauma Team Development Course (RTTDC).

    PubMed

    Ali, Jameel; Kumar, Subodh; Gautam, Subash; Sorvari, Anne; Misra, Mahesh C

    2015-12-01

    The Rural Trauma Team Development Course (RTTDC) was devised to optimize trauma resuscitation training in under-resourced rural institutions. This program appears ideal for India because of its dense traffic, large population, and high frequency of rural trauma. We report on the feasibility and desirability of introducing RTTDC in India. An instructor course for 20 faculties and a provider course for 23 were conducted in New Delhi, India. The courses were evaluated by multiple choice question (MCQ) performance, by rating the modules on a three-point scale (1 = very relevant, 2 = relevant, and 3 = not relevant) for communication skills, principles of performance improvement and patient safety (PIPS), and clinical scenarios. Evaluation questionnaires including desirability of promulgation in India were completed using a five-point Likert Scale (1 = strongly agree, 2 = agree, 3 = neutral, 4 = disagree, and 5 = strongly disagree). Overall written comments were also provided. Both faculty and providers improved post-course MCQ scores (p < 0.05) with lower scores in the provider group. Seventy-eight percent faculty and 74 % providers rated the communication module very relevant. PIPS was rated very relevant by 72 % faculty and 65 % providers. There were over 150 comments, generally positive with over 90 % of both faculty and providers rating strongly agree to agree that the course be promulgated widely in India. The RTTDC including plans for promulgation was enthusiastically received in India, and its potential for improving trauma care including communication skills and PIPS appears excellent. PMID:26729998

  1. Shock trauma.

    PubMed

    Trunkey, D D

    1984-09-01

    Trauma - accidental or intentional injury - is a major health and social problem. It is still the chief cause of death in people between the ages of 1 and 38 years. In the United States, the mortality due to trauma between the ages of 15 and 24 years increased by 13% from 1960 to 1978. During the same period, the mortality for people aged 25 to 64 years declined by 16%. Murders have increased from 8464 in 1960, to 26 000 in 1982. The overall death rate of American teenagers and young adults is 50% higher than that of their counterparts in Britain, Sweden and Japan. Trauma affects young, productive citizens, and the estimated costs for death, disability and loss of productivity exceed $230 million a day. The most tragic statistic is that at least 40% of the deaths are needless and preventable if better treatment and prevention programs were available. Trauma deaths that might be prevented are those due to motor vehicle accidents, homicide, burns, and alcohol and drug abuse. In this paper suggestions for prevention are made. They include improved crash worthiness of motor vehicles, revocation of drunk drivers' licences, use of devices that limit drunk drivers, increased tax on alcohol and random breathalyser tests, and the use of seat belts and motorcycle helmets. Control of hand-guns and burn characteristics of cigarettes could also reduce deaths. The problems and issues in trauma care can be divided into two broad categories: system and professional. System problems include prehospital care, in-hospital care, rehabilitation and prevention. Professional problems include education, research, economics, and quality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6478325

  2. [The challenges faced in the field of trauma care in China].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Baoguo

    2015-06-01

    With the continuous development of China's urbanization and socio-economic, death and disability caused by trauma has increased prominently, and trauma has become the first cause of death in the people younger than 45 years old. Compared with the treatment of other diseases, China are facing many problems and challenges in terms of trauma treatment, specifically focused in three areas: First, the medical profession and society had not attach enough attention to trauma; Second, trauma centers in our country is insufficient; The level of trauma care vary greatly between different regions, the doctors and nurses commitment to trauma care lack of standardized training; Third, scientific treatment process and treatment system that compliance with international standards and meet the geographical features of China is insufficient. In view of the above situation and existing problems, learn from the successful experience of foreign countries, we think we should proceed from the following three aspects to change the status of China's treatment of trauma gradually: First of all, we should establish Traumatology that deals with the treatment of serious wounds and injuries. Secondly we should establish the right trauma care system that suitable for China's conditions; The third point is the establishment of trauma specialist training system composed by "basic training" and "targeted training"; Final we should establish severe trauma multidisciplinary treatment team model in the process of trauma care. Thereby improving our overall level of trauma treatment through above means, reduce the disability and mortality caused by trauma, thus promoting the development of trauma forward. PMID:26359050

  3. Spine immobilization: prehospitalization to final destination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Care of the combat casualty with spinal column or spinal cord injury has not been previously described, particularly in regards to spinal immobilization. The ultimate goal of spinal immobilization in the combat casualty is to first ``do no further harm'' and then provide a stable, painless spine and an optimal neurologic recovery. The protocol for treatment of the combat casualty with suspected spinal column or spinal cord injury from the battlefield to final arrival at a definitive treatment center is discussed, and the special considerations for medical evacuation off the battlefield and for aeromedical transport are delineated. Selective prehospital spine immobilization, which involves spinal immobilization with backboard, semi-rigid cervical collar, lateral supports, and straps or tape, is recommended if there is suspicion of spinal column or spinal cord injury in the combat casualty and when conditions and resources permit. The authors do not recommend spinal immobilization for the combat casualty with isolated penetrating trauma. PMID:21477526

  4. The effect of pre-hospital care for venomous snake bite on outcome in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Michael, Godpower C; Thacher, Tom D; Shehu, Mohammed I L

    2011-02-01

    We studied pre-hospital practices of 72 consecutive snake bite victims at a hospital in north-central Nigeria. The primary outcome assessed was death or disability at hospital discharge. Victims were predominantly male farmers, and in 54 cases (75%) the snake was identified as a carpet viper (Echis ocellatus), with the remainder unidentified. Most subjects (58, 81%) attempted at least one first aid measure after the bite, including tourniquet application (53, 74%), application (15, 21%) or ingestion (10, 14%) of traditional concoctions, bite site incision (8, 11%), black stone application (4, 5.6%), and suction (3, 4.2%). The majority (44, 61%) presented late (after 4 hours). Most (53, 74%) had full recovery at hospital discharge. Three deaths (4.2%) and thirteen (18%) disabilities (mainly tissue necrosis) occurred. The use of any first aid was associated with a longer hospital stay than no use (4.6 ± 2.0 days versus 3.6 ± 2.7 days, respectively, P = 0.02). The antivenom requirement was greater in subjects who had used a tourniquet (P = 0.03) and in those who presented late (P = 0.02). Topical application (Odds Ratio 15, 95% CI 1.4-708) or ingestion of traditional concoctions (OR 20, 95% CI 1.4-963) were associated with increased risk of death or disability. Ingestion and application of concoctions were associated with a longer time interval before presentation, a higher cost of hospitalization, and an increased risk of wound infection. PMID:21035155

  5. Innovation possibilities for prehospital providers.

    PubMed

    Galli, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The national interest in disaster management and a burgeoning technology field are leading to the development of new approaches to emergency evaluation, triage, and treatment in prehospital and all hospital arenas. The ability to bring "hands-on" expertise, both physically and technologically, as quickly as possible to the trauma patient brings the potential for real advancement in the field. This descriptive report presents several such concepts that are moving into reality. PMID:16801269

  6. Damage control – trauma care in the first hour and beyond: a clinical review of relevant developments in the field of trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Midwinter, M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Trauma provision in the UK is a topic of interest. Regional trauma networks and centres are evolving and research is blossoming, but what bearing does all this have on the care that is delivered to the individual patient? This article aims to provide an overview of key research concepts in the field of trauma care, to guide the clinician in decision making in the management of major trauma. Methods The Ovid MEDLINE®, EMBASE™ and PubMed databases were used to search for relevant articles on haemorrhage control, damage control resuscitation and its exceptions, massive transfusion protocols, prevention and correction of coagulopathy, acidosis and hypothermia, and damage-control surgery. Findings A wealth of research is available and a broad range has been reviewed to summarise significant developments in trauma care. Research has been categorised into disciplines and it is hoped that by considering each, a tailored management plan for the individual trauma patient will evolve, potentially improving patient outcome. PMID:23827287

  7. Multidisciplinary trauma team care in Kandahar, Afghanistan: current injury patterns and care practices.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Pelletier, Pierre; Mamczak, Christiaan; Benfield, Rodd; Elster, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Multidisciplinary trauma care systems have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Medical care in support of the global war on terror has provided opportunities to refine these systems. We report on the multidisciplinary trauma care system at the Role III Hospital at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. We reviewed the Joint Trauma System Registry, Kandahar database from 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010 and extracted data regarding patient demographics, clinical variables and outcomes. We also queried the operating room records from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. In the study period of 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010, 2599 patients presented to the trauma bay, with the most common source of injury being from Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blasts (915), followed by gunshot wounds (GSW) (327). Importantly, 19 patients with triple amputations as a result of injuries from IEDs were seen. 127 patients were massively transfused. The in-hospital mortality was 4.45%. From 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2010, 4106.24 operating room hours were logged to complete 1914 patient cases. The mean number of procedures per case in 2009 was 1.27, compared to 3.11 in 2010. Multinational, multidisciplinary care is required for the large number of severely injured patients seen at Kandahar Airfield. Multidisciplinary trauma care in Kandahar is effective and can be readily employed in combat hospitals in Afghanistan and serve as a model for civilian centres. PMID:22305587

  8. Evaluation of the Impact of Implementing the Emergency Medical Services Traumatic Brain Injury Guidelines in Arizona: The Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care (EPIC) Study Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Spaite, Daniel W.; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Stolz, Uwe; Sherrill, Duane; Chikani, Vatsal; Barnhart, Bruce; Sotelo, Michael; Gaither, Joshua B.; Viscusi, Chad; Adelson, P. David; Denninghoff, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) exacts a great toll on society. Fortunately, there is growing evidence that the management of TBI in the early minutes after injury may significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. In response, evidence-based prehospital and in-hospital TBI treatment guidelines have been established by authoritative bodies. However, no large studies have yet evaluated the effectiveness of implementing these guidelines in the prehospital setting. This article describes the background, design, implementation, emergency medical services (EMS) treatment protocols, and statistical analysis of a prospective, controlled (before/after), statewide study designed to evaluate the effect of implementing the EMS TBI guidelines—the Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care (EPIC) study (NIH/NINDS R01NS071049, “EPIC”; and 3R01NS071049-S1, “EPIC4Kids”). The specific aim of the study is to test the hypothesis that statewide implementation of the international adult and pediatric EMS TBI guidelines will significantly reduce mortality and improve nonmortality outcomes in patients with moderate or severe TBI. Furthermore, it will specifically evaluate the effect of guideline implementation on outcomes in the subgroup of patients who are intubated in the field. Over the course of the entire study (~9 years), it is estimated that approximately 25,000 patients will be enrolled. PMID:25112451

  9. Vascular access, fluid resuscitation, and blood transfusion in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel; Bhananker, Sanjay; Ramaiah, Ramesh

    2012-09-01

    Trauma care in the general population has largely become protocol-driven, with an emphasis on fast and efficient treatment, good team communication at all levels of care including prehospital care, initial resuscitation, intensive care, and rehabilitation. Most available literature on trauma care has focused on adults, allowing the potential to apply concepts from adult care to pediatric care. But there remain issues that will always be specific to pediatric patients that may not translate from adults. Several new devices such as intraosseous (IO) needle systems and techniques such as ultrasonography to cannulate central and peripheral veins have become available for integration into our pre-existing trauma care system for children. This review will focus specifically on the latest techniques and evidence available for establishing intravenous access, rational approaches to fluid resuscitation, and blood product transfusion in the pediatric trauma patient. PMID:23181207

  10. Magnitude of Enterococcal Bacteremia in Trauma Patients Admitted for Intensive Trauma Care: A Tertiary Care Experience from South Asian Country

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumari, Nonika; Mathur, Purva; Thanbuana, Bariamtak; Sajan, Swaminathan; Misra, Mahesh C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bloodstream infection (BSI) and bacteremias due to Enterococcus spp. are increasing worldwide with the current need to understand its causes among hospitalized trauma patients. Hence, the study was conducted. Methodology: A 3-year retrospective laboratory cum clinical based study was performed at a level I trauma center in India. Patients with health care associated enterococcal bacteremia were identified using the hospital database, their episodes of BSI/bacteremia calculated and their clinical records and treatment were noted. Results: A total of 104 nonrepetitive Enterococcus spp. was isolated of which Enterococcus faecium was the most common (52%). High-level resistance to gentamicin high-level aminoglycoside resistance was seen in all the Enterococcus spp. causing bacteremia, whereas a low resistance to vancomycin and teichoplanin was observed. Overall mortality was more in patients infected with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (5/11, 46%) compared to those with vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus (9/93, 10%); though no significant association of mortality with Enterococcus spp. bacteremia (P > 0.05) was seen. The rate of bacteremia due to Enterococcus spp. was 25.4 episodes/1,000 admissions (104/4,094) during the study period. Conclusion: Enterococcal bacteremia is much prevalent in trauma care facilities. Here, a microbiologist can act as a sentinel and help in preventing such infections. PMID:25949058

  11. When Caring for Perpetrators Becomes a Sentence: Recognizing Vicarious Trauma.

    PubMed

    Munger, Tanya; Savage, Teresa; Panosky, Denise M

    2015-10-01

    Correctional health nurses are not exempt from vicarious traumatization, but this concept has yet to be explored. Correctional health nurses practice in environments that come with significant risk for traumatic exposure from inmates and coworkers. The Professional Quality of Life Scale was used as a proxy to measure vicarious trauma. Surveys were mailed to 2,000 correctional health nurses that were on the mailing list of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care, with a total response rate of 10.1%. Respondents were asked to complete the Professional Quality of Life Scale and a short demographic survey. Findings reveal that vicarious traumatization does exist among correctional health nurses. PMID:26377382

  12. Intravenous access during pre-hospital emergency care of non-injured patients: a population-based outcome study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Cooke, Colin R.; Hebert, Paul L.; Rea, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Advanced, pre-hospital procedures such as intravenous access are commonly performed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, yet little evidence supports their use among non-injured patients. We evaluated the association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients. Methods We analyzed a population-based cohort of adult (aged ≥18 years) non-injured, non-arrest patients transported by four advanced life support agencies to one of 16 hospitals from January 1, 2002 until December 31, 2006. We linked eligible EMS records to hospital administrative data, and used multivariable logistic regression to determine the risk-adjusted association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and hospital mortality. We also tested whether this association differed by patient acuity using a previously published, out-of-hospital triage score. Results Among 56,332 eligible patients, one half (N=28,978, 50%) received pre-hospital intravenous access from EMS personnel. Overall hospital mortality in patients who did and did not receive intravenous access was 3%. However, in multivariable analyses, the placement of pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with an overall reduction in odds of hospital mortality (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.56, 0.81). The beneficial association of intravenous access appeared to depend on patient acuity (p=0.13 for interaction). For example, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 1.38 (95%CI: 0.28, 7.0) among those with lowest acuity (score = 0). In contrast, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 0.38 (95%CI: 0.17, 0.9) among patients with highest acuity (score ≥ 6). Conclusions In this population-based cohort, pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with a reduction in hospital mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients with the highest acuity. PMID:21872970

  13. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: A CME Communication Training for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bonnie L.; Saunders, Pamela A.; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and healthcare costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. METHODS: We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; waitlist groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were Family Medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13; 83% Family Medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington DC metropolitan area. RESULTS: Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient-centeredness than did the delayed PCPs (p < .09), with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient-centeredness pre to post training, p < .01, Cohen’s D = .61. CONCLUSIONS: This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans. PMID:25646872

  14. Medical Management and Trauma-Informed Care for Children in Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Samantha; Fortin, Kristine; Forkey, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Children enter foster care with a myriad of exposures and experiences, which can threaten their physical and mental health and development. Expanding evidence and evolving guidelines have helped to shape the care of these children over the past two decades. These guidelines address initial health screening, comprehensive medical evaluations, and follow-up care. Information exchange, attention to exposures, and consideration of how the adversities, which lead to foster placement, can impact health is crucial. These children should be examined with a trauma lens, so that the child, caregiver, and community supports can be assisted to view their physical and behavioral health from the perspective of what we now understand about the impact of toxic stress. Health care providers can impact the health of foster children by screening for the negative health consequences of trauma, advocating for trauma-informed services, and providing trauma-informed anticipatory guidance to foster parents. By taking an organized and comprehensive approach, the health care provider can best attend to the needs of this vulnerable population. PMID:26381646

  15. Convergence of Health Level Seven Version 2 Messages to Semantic Web Technologies for Software-Intensive Systems in Telemedicine Trauma Care

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Timothy Wayne; Cavalini, Luciana Tricai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To present the technical background and the development of a procedure that enriches the semantics of Health Level Seven version 2 (HL7v2) messages for software-intensive systems in telemedicine trauma care. Methods This study followed a multilevel model-driven approach for the development of semantically interoperable health information systems. The Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) ABCDE protocol was adopted as the use case. A prototype application embedded the semantics into an HL7v2 message as an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) file, which was validated against an XML schema that defines constraints on a common reference model. This message was exchanged with a second prototype application, developed on the Mirth middleware, which was also used to parse and validate both the original and the hybrid messages. Results Both versions of the data instance (one pure XML, one embedded in the HL7v2 message) were equally validated and the RDF-based semantics recovered by the receiving side of the prototype from the shared XML schema. Conclusions This study demonstrated the semantic enrichment of HL7v2 messages for intensive-software telemedicine systems for trauma care, by validating components of extracts generated in various computing environments. The adoption of the method proposed in this study ensures the compliance of the HL7v2 standard in Semantic Web technologies. PMID:26893947

  16. Experiential Learning in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care: A Qualitative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melby, Vidar

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of 141 nursing students' diaries and focus group interviews about their work with an ambulance service revealed the following: holistic nursing played a role; they developed appreciation for paramedics' skills; and experiential learning helped them understand the complete care process from the emergency call to patient discharge. (SK)

  17. Transesophageal echocardiographic assessment in trauma and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Tousignant, Claude

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac ultrasonography, in particular transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) provides high-quality real-time images of the beating heart and mediastinal structures. The addition of Doppler technology introduces a qualitative and quantitative assessment of blood flow in the heart and vascular structures. Because of its ease of insertion and ready accessibility, TEE has become an important tool in the routine management of critically ill patients, as a monitor in certain operative settings and in the aortic and cardiac evaluation of trauma patients. The rapid assessment of cardiac preload, contractility and valve function are invaluable in patients with acute hemodynamic decompensation in the intensive care unit as well as in the operating room. Because of its ease and portability, the TEE assessment of traumatic aortic injury after blunt chest trauma can be rapidly undertaken even in patients undergoing life-saving procedures. The role of TEE in the surgical and critical care setting will no doubt increase as more people become aware of its potential. PMID:10372012

  18. Implementing a Trauma-Informed Approach in Pediatric Health Care Networks.

    PubMed

    Marsac, Meghan L; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Hildenbrand, Aimee K; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Winston, Flaura K; Leff, Stephen S; Fein, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric health care networks serve millions of children each year. Pediatric illness and injury are among the most common potentially emotionally traumatic experiences for children and their families. In addition, millions of children who present for medical care (including well visits) have been exposed to prior traumatic events, such as violence or natural disasters. Given the daily challenges of working in pediatric health care networks, medical professionals and support staff can experience trauma symptoms related to their work. The application of a trauma-informed approach to medical care has the potential to mitigate these negative consequences. Trauma-informed care minimizes the potential for medical care to become traumatic or trigger trauma reactions, addresses distress, provides emotional support for the entire family, encourages positive coping, and provides anticipatory guidance regarding the recovery process. When used in conjunction with family-centered practices, trauma-informed approaches enhance the quality of care for patients and their families and the well-being of medical professionals and support staff. Barriers to routine integration of trauma-informed approaches into pediatric medicine include a lack of available training and unclear best-practice guidelines. This article highlights the importance of implementing a trauma-informed approach and offers a framework for training pediatric health care networks in trauma-informed care practices. PMID:26571032

  19. Anaesthesiologist-provided prehospital airway management in patients with traumatic brain injury: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Troels M.; Kirkegaard, Hans; Tønnesen, Else

    2014-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend that patients with brain trauma with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of less than 9 should have an airway established. Hypoxia, hypotension and hypertension as well as hypoventilation and hyperventilation may worsen outcome in these patients. Objectives The objectives were to investigate guideline adherence, reasons for nonadherence and the incidences of complications related to prehospital advanced airway management in patients with traumatic brain injury. Materials and methods We prospectively collected data from eight anaesthesiologist-staffed prehospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region according to the Utstein-style template. Results Among 1081 consecutive prehospital advanced airway management patients, we identified 54 with a traumatic brain injury and an initial GCS score of less than 9. Guideline adherence in terms of airway management was 92.6%. The reasons for nonadherence were the patient’s condition, anticipated difficult airway management and short distance to the emergency department. Following rapid sequence intubation (RSI), 11.4% developed oxygen saturation below 90%, 9.1% had a first post-RSI systolic blood pressure below 90 mmHg and 48.9% had a first post-RSI systolic blood pressure below 120 mmHg. The incidence of hypertension following prehospital RSI was 4.5%. The incidence of postendotracheal intubation hyperventilation was as high as 71.1%. Conclusion The guideline adherence was high. The incidences of post-RSI hypoxia and systolic blood pressure below 90 compare with the results reported from other physician-staffed prehospital services. The incidence of systolic blood pressure below 120 as well as that of hyperventilation following prehospital endotracheal intubation in patients with traumatic brain injury call for a change in our current practice. PMID:24368407

  20. [Telemedicine: Improving the quality of care for critical patients from the pre-hospital phase to the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Murias, G; Sales, B; García-Esquirol, O; Blanch, L

    2010-01-01

    The Health System is in crisis and critical care (from transport systems to the ICU) cannot escape from that. Lack of integration between ambulances and reference Hospitals, a deep shortage of critical care specialists and assigned economical resources that increase less than critical care demand are the cornerstones of the problem. Moreover, the analysis of the situation anticipated that the problem will be worse in the future. "Closed" ICUs in which critical care specialists direct patient care outperform "open" ones in which primary admitting physicians direct patient care in consultation with critical care specialists. However, the current paradigm in which a critical care specialist is close to the patient is in the edge of the trouble so, only a new paradigm could help to increase the number of patients under intensivist care. Current information technology and networking capabilities should be fully exploited to improve both the extent and quality of intensivist coverage. Far to be a replacement of the existing model Telemedicine might be a complimentary tool. In fact, to centralize medical data into servers has many additional advantages that could even improve the way in which critical care physicians take care of their patients under the traditional system. PMID:19811855

  1. A new model for providing prehospital medical care in large stadiums.

    PubMed

    Spaite, D W; Criss, E A; Valenzuela, T D; Meislin, H W; Smith, R; Nelson, A

    1988-08-01

    To determine proper priorities for the provision of health care in large stadiums, we studied the medical incident patterns occurring in a major college facility and combined this with previously reported information from four other large stadiums. Medical incidents were an uncommon occurrence (1.20 to 5.23 per 10,000 people) with true medical emergencies being even more unusual (0.09 to 0.31 per 10,000 people). Cardiac arrest was rare (0.01 to 0.04 events per 10,000 people). However, the rates of successful resuscitation in three studies were 85% or higher. The previous studies were descriptive in nature and failed to provide specific recommendations for medical aid system configuration or response times. A model is proposed to provide rapid response of advanced life support care to victims of cardiac arrest. We believe that the use of this model in large stadiums throughout the United States could save as many as 100 lives during each football season. PMID:3394987

  2. Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Professionals Assaulted by Patients and/or Relatives: Importance of Severity and Experience of the Aggression.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, M Mar; Bernaldo-de-Quirós, Mónica; Piccini, Ana T; Cerdeira, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to violence from patients or relatives causes problems in emergency departments. To assess the development of posttraumatic symptoms in pre-hospital emergency care professionals assaulted by patients and/or relatives, it may be crucial to establish preventive measures at different levels. This study examined 358 pre-hospital emergency care professionals assaulted by patients and/or relatives. The aims of the present study were (a) to assess the presence of posttraumatic symptoms and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and (b) identify compliance diagnoses for PTSD depending on the experience of aggression (presence of fear, helplessness, or horror during the aggression), the perceived severity of aggression, and socio-demographic variables (gender, age, profession, employment status, and work experience). The results show that the experience of aggression with fear, helplessness, or horror is associated with the presence of posttraumatic symptoms related to re-experiencing but is not related to avoidance and emotional numbing and arousal. Furthermore, the perception of aggression as severe was associated with the presence of symptoms related to re-experiencing. These results are presented and discussed. PMID:25381283

  3. Assessment of acute trauma care training in Kenya.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Jana B A; Gravelin, Sara; Jones, Tait; Gololov, Alex; Thomas, Michelle; Omondi, Benson; Bukusi, E

    2009-11-01

    An Acute Trauma Care (ATC) course was adapted for resource-limited healthcare systems based on the American model of initial care for injured patients. The course was taught to interested medical personnel in Kenya. This study undertook a survey of the participants' healthcare facilities to maximize the applicability of ATC across healthcare settings. The ATC course was conducted three times in Kenya in 2006. A World Health Organization (WHO) Needs Assessment survey was administered to 128 participants. The data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Ninety-two per cent had a physician available in the emergency department and 63 per cent had a clinical officer. A total of 71.7 per cent reported having a designated trauma room. A total of 96.7 per cent reported running water, but access was uninterrupted more often in private hospitals as opposed to public facilities (92.5 vs 63.6%, P = 0.0005). Private and public employees equally had an oxygen cylinder (95.6 vs 98.5%, P > 0.05), oxygen concentrator (69.2 vs 54.2%, P = 0.12), and oxygen administration equipment (95.7 vs 91.4%, P > 0.05) at their facilities. However, private employees were more likely to report that "all" of their equipment was in working order (53 vs 7.9%, P < 0.0001). Private employees were also more likely to report that they had access to information on emergency procedures and equipment (64.4 vs 33.3%, P = 0.001) and that they had learned new procedures (54.8 vs 25.4%, P = 0.002). Despite a perception of public facility lack, this survey showed that public institutions and private institutions have similar basic equipment availability. Yet, problems with equipment malfunction, lack of repair, and availability of required information and training are far greater in the public sector. The content of the ATC course is valid for both private and public sector institutions, but refinements of the course should focus on varying facets of inexpensive and alternative equipment resources

  4. Guideline validation in multiple trauma care through business process modeling.

    PubMed

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Bilir, Hüseyin; Waydhas, Christian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2003-07-01

    Clinical guidelines can improve the quality of care in multiple trauma. In our Department of Trauma Surgery a specific guideline is available paper-based as a set of flowcharts. This format is appropriate for the use by experienced physicians but insufficient for electronic support of learning, workflow and process optimization. A formal and logically consistent version represented with a standardized meta-model is necessary for automatic processing. In our project we transferred the paper-based into an electronic format and analyzed the structure with respect to formal errors. Several errors were detected in seven error categories. The errors were corrected to reach a formally and logically consistent process model. In a second step the clinical content of the guideline was revised interactively using a process-modeling tool. Our study reveals that guideline development should be assisted by process modeling tools, which check the content in comparison to a meta-model. The meta-model itself could support the domain experts in formulating their knowledge systematically. To assure sustainability of guideline development a representation independent of specific applications or specific provider is necessary. Then, clinical guidelines could be used for eLearning, process optimization and workflow management additionally. PMID:12909182

  5. Consensus statement on decision making in junctional trauma care.

    PubMed

    Parker, P

    2011-09-01

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) cause 60% of all UK fatalities in the current campaign in Afghanistan. Shorter evacuation timelines now deliver patients at the edge of the physiological envelope of survivability meaning that the available time period for haemorrhage control and initial wound surgery is short--often no more than 75 minutes. The concepts and practise of 'right turn resuscitation', damage control general and orthopaedic surgery, on-table 'ITU' pause/catch-up and then further resuscitative surgery are commonplace. In Helmand in 2011, multiple team operating is now the norm on these casualties with up to seven surgeons and three anaesthetists simultaneously involved in the operative care of one patient. This usually involves one consultant orthopaedic surgeon and trainee per lower limb, a plastic surgeon on the upper limb or faceleyes and two general surgeons obtaining proximal vascular control or in-cavity haemorrhage control. A combined meeting in 2010 of the Lower Limb and Torso Trauma Working Groups of the Academic Department of Military Surgery and Trauma produced 25 clear, didactic statements to provide advice to the consultant team. The fundamental message is that bleeding is always a surgical problem. Some adjuncts are available; pressure (direct and indirect), compressive bandaging, haemostatic dressings and tourniquets. However, only formal surgical control, by whatever means is definitive. Early proximal control is mandatory: in all cases, rapidly obtain the most distally appropriate proximal control above the zone of injury. PMID:22053391

  6. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-01

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  7. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-14

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  8. Prehospital Evaluation of Effusion, Pneumothorax, and Standstill (PEEPS): Point-of-care Ultrasound in Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sundeep R.; Johnson, David A.; Pierog, Jessica E.; Zaia, Brita E.; Williams, Sarah R.; Gharahbaghian, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, there are limited studies regarding use of prehospital ultrasound (US) by emergency medical service (EMS) providers. Field diagnosis of life-threatening conditions using US could be of great utility. This study assesses the ability of EMS providers and students to accurately interpret heart and lung US images. Methods We tested certified emergency medical technicians (EMT-B) and paramedics (EMT-P) as well as EMT-B and EMT-P students enrolled in prehospital training programs within two California counties. Participants completed a pre-test of sonographic imaging of normal findings and three pathologic findings: pericardial effusion, pneumothorax, and cardiac standstill. A focused one-hour lecture on emergency US imaging followed. Post-tests were given to all EMS providers immediately following the lecture and to a subgroup one week later. Results We enrolled 57 prehospital providers (19 EMT-B students, 16 EMT-P students, 18 certified EMT-B, and 4 certified EMT-P). The mean pre-test score was 65.2%±12.7% with mean immediate post-test score of 91.1%±7.9% (95% CI [22%–30%], p<0.001). Scores significantly improved for all three pathologic findings. Nineteen subjects took the one-week post-test. Their mean score remained significantly higher: pre-test 65.8%±10.7%; immediate post-test 90.5%±7.0% (95% CI [19%–31%], p<0.001), one-week post-test 93.1%±8.3% (95% CI [21%–34%], p<0.001). Conclusion Using a small sample of EMS providers and students, this study shows the potential feasibility for educating prehospital providers to accurately identify images of pericardial effusion, pneumothorax, and cardiac standstill after a focused lecture. PMID:26265961

  9. Impact of advanced technologies on rural trauma care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, Michael J.; Gainor, Dia; Buttrey, Jan M.; Taska, John D.; Pierce, Gregg E.; Wolff, Barack

    1994-03-01

    The high incidence of traumatic injury and death is significant among the western, rural United States. A number of characteristics and factors contribute to this concern, among them extremes in population, distance, terrain, and resources. Opportunity exists to apply current and future advanced technology to impact trauma prevention, communication, emergency response, trauma system support and monitor trauma outcome.

  10. [Nurses and prehospital CBRN risk].

    PubMed

    Béguec, Francis; Pallier, Jérôme; Travers, Stéphane; Calamal, Franck; Lefort, Hugues; Bignand, Milichel

    2014-09-01

    With events presenting a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear risk, treating victims in the field can decrease lethality. in this context, the mismatch between the availability of care and the number of victims adds to the constraints of working in protective clothing. In the prehospital setting, nurses from the Paris fire brigade have a distinct role to play and Use specific equipment and antidotes, Theoretical and practical training is essential to be prepared for these situations. PMID:25508268

  11. [Nurses and prehospital CBRN risk].

    PubMed

    Béguec, Francis; Pallier, Jérôme; Travers, Stéphane; Calamal, Franck; Lefort, Hugues; Bignand, Milichel

    2014-09-01

    With events presenting a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear risk, treating victims in the field can decrease lethality. in this context, the mismatch between the availability of care and the number of victims adds to the constraints of working in protective clothing. In the prehospital setting, nurses from the Paris fire brigade have a distinct role to play and Use specific equipment and antidotes, Theoretical and practical training is essential to be prepared for these situations. PMID:25464637

  12. Torture and war trauma survivors in primary care practice.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, H M; Dansky, L; Iacopino, V

    1996-01-01

    Close to 1 million refugees from around the world have entered the United States, fleeing repression, war, terrorism, and disease. It has been estimated that among these are thousands who have experienced torture. Many refugees and immigrants will appear in the offices of health care professionals with symptoms that may be related either directly or indirectly to torture. Both physical and psychological torture may result in long-term sequelae. Physical effects may be found in every organ system, but psychological effects are most commonly manifest in the symptoms of the post-traumatic stress disorder. For physicians to recognize how torture can affect health status, it is important to understand that history taking may be difficult and that little information may emerge that would explain the origins of scars, fractures, or disabilities. Recognizing the clues to a torture history allows physicians to assist patients in describing the trauma. In addition, knowing the subacute and chronic signs and symptoms of torture enables physicians to diagnose and treat often obscure symptoms with a much clearer understanding of the sources of the difficulty. Paying special attention to the interview process will support torture survivors in detailing often horrific events. PMID:8909162

  13. The Three Pillars of Trauma-Informed Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bath, Howard

    2008-01-01

    The past decade has brought with it a greatly increased awareness about the impact of trauma on children, which has, in turn, led to a focus on the treatment of trauma-related conditions. Much of the recent literature describes different approaches to therapy. However, there are a few consistent propositions arising from the research and clinical…

  14. The study protocol for the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The utility of advanced prehospital interventions for severe blunt traumatic brain injury (BTI) remains controversial. Of all trauma patient subgroups it has been anticipated that this patient group would most benefit from advanced prehospital interventions as hypoxia and hypotension have been demonstrated to be associated with poor outcomes and these factors may be amenable to prehospital intervention. Supporting evidence is largely lacking however. In particular the efficacy of early anaesthesia/muscle relaxant assisted intubation has proved difficult to substantiate. Methods This article describes the design and protocol of the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT) which is a randomised controlled single centre trial of physician prehospital care (delivering advanced interventions such as rapid sequence intubation and blood transfusion) in addition to paramedic care for severe blunt TBI compared with paramedic care alone. Results Primary endpoint is Glasgow Outcome Scale score at six months post injury. Issues with trial integrity resulting from drop ins from standard care to the treatment arm as the result of policy changes by the local ambulance system are discussed. Conclusion This randomised controlled trial will contribute to the evaluation of the efficacy of advance prehospital interventions in severe blunt TBI. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00112398 PMID:24034628

  15. Analysis of the incidence of postintubation injuries in patients intubated in the prehospital or early hospital conditions of the hospital emergency department and the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Marcin; Timler, Dariusz; Sobczak, Renata; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Sekalski, Przemyslaw; Borkowska, Natalia; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background Intubation is still one of the best methods to secure the airway. In the case of prehospital or early hospital conditions when factors such as urgency, stress, or inaccuracy of the undertaken activities are involved, the risk of causing complications, for instance, edema or postintubation injuries, increases, especially while dealing with a difficult intubation. The risk of improper inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff also increases, which is considered in this study. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of postintubation complications, such as postintubation injuries or edema, in a research sample, and to examine whether such complications occur more often, for example, while using a guidewire. In this study, we also evaluated the injuries associated with the inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff. Materials and methods This study was performed on a group of 153 patients intubated in prehospital conditions. The tests were carried out in three clinical sites that received patients from prehospital care. Postintubation injuries were revealed and photographed using videolar-yngoscope, such as the C-MAC and the McGrath series 5. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure was measured using a pressure gage manual (VBM Medizintechnik GmbH). The quantitative analyses of differences between incidence of variables were assessed using χ2 test for P<0.05. Analyses have been carried out using the Statistica software. Results In the group of 153 patients, postintubation injuries occurred in 17% of cases. The dependency between using the guidewire and the occurrence of the hematomas and loss of mucosa was statistically significant (P<0.01). In nearly half (42%) of the patients the endotracheal tube cuff pressure was excessively inflated over 30 cm H2O, and in two cases, endotracheal tube displacement was observed on account of poor cuff inflation (<20 cm H2O). Conclusion The highest percentage of overfilled cuffs were observed in the

  16. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Childhood Trauma and Compliance With General Health Care Among Adult Primary Care Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Jordan Bohinc, R.; Wiederman, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Beyond the examination of medication compliance among individuals with substance abuse or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), few studies have examined relationships between childhood trauma and health care compliance in adulthood—the focus of the present study. Method: Using a cross-sectional approach and a self-report survey methodology, we examined 5 types of childhood trauma (ie, witnessing violence, physical neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse) in relationship to 4 measures of general health care compliance (ie, self-rated general conscientiousness with medical treatment; 5 items pertaining to general health care compliance such as scheduling regular dental checkups, timely arrival for doctor’s appointments, and timely completion of laboratory work; 2 medication compliance items; and the Medical Outcomes Study general adherence score) among a sample of adult primary care outpatients (N = 272). Data were collected in March 2014. Results: According to findings, some health care adherence variables demonstrated relationships with the summed childhood trauma score, whereas others did not. It could be interpreted that the more subjective health care compliance variables (eg, self-rated conscientiousness with regard to medical treatment) demonstrated no relationship with a summed childhood trauma score, whereas the more objective health care compliance variables (eg, frequency of regular dental checkups, ability to remember to take all medications, Medical Outcomes Study general adherence score) did demonstrate statistically significant relationships with a summed childhood trauma score (most at P < .01). Conclusions: Patients with histories of childhood trauma demonstrate some deficits with health care compliance in comparison to those without childhood trauma. One interpretation is that the mistreated appear to believe that they are fairly compliant with health care treatment, but

  17. Practical translation of hemorrhage control techniques to the civilian trauma scene.

    PubMed

    Lockey, David J; Weaver, Anne E; Davies, Gareth E

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how established and innovative techniques in hemorrhage control can be practically applied in a civilian physician-based prehospital trauma service. A "care bundle" of measures to control hemorrhage on scene are described. Interventions discussed include the implementation of a system to achieve simple endpoints such as shorter scene times, appropriate triage, careful patient handling, use of effective splints and measures to control external hemorrhage. More complex interventions include prehospital activation of massive hemorrhage protocols and administration of on-scene tranexamic acid, prothrombin complex concentrate, and red blood cells. Radical resuscitation interventions, such as prehospital thoracotomy for cardiac tamponade, and the potential future role of other interventions are also considered. PMID:23301967

  18. [Geriatric trauma centers - requirements catalog. An initiative to promote and guarantee the quality of care of elderly trauma patients receiving inpatient care].

    PubMed

    Gogol, M; van den Heuvel, D; Lüttje, D; Püllen, R; Reingräber, A C; Schulz, R-J; Veer, A; Wittrich, A

    2014-06-01

    For the care of the elderly, specific geriatric care facilities in hospitals and specialized rehabilitation centers have been established in the last 20 years throughout Germany. In addition, trauma surgery departments in hospitals and clinics also provide comprehensive care for trauma patients. The present requirements catalog was developed with the aim to ensure the standardization and quality assurance of these care facilities. Thus, the structural basics and, in particular, the structured cooperation between geriatrics and trauma surgery are described and defined in terms of structure, process, and outcome quality. The Bundesverband Geriatrie, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geriatrie, and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gerontologie und Geriatrie offer documentation for external and internal use and evaluation of the structures and processes for certification of geriatric trauma centers. Prerequisite for certification is to meet the technical requirements defined in the requirements catalogue or documents derived from it, and proof of a quality management system according to ISO 9001. PMID:25088386

  19. Musculoskeletal trauma service in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Mahaisavariya, Banchong

    2008-10-01

    Trauma is becoming a leading cause of death in most of the low-income and middle-income countries worldwide. The growing number of motor vehicles far surpasses the development and upkeep of the road and highway networks, traffic laws, and driver training and licensing. In Thailand, road traffic injuries have become the second leading cause of death and morbidity overall since 1990. The lack of improvement to existing roadways, implementation of traffic safety and ridership laws including seatbelt regulations, and poor emergency medical assistance support systems all contribute to these statistics. An insufficient number and inequitable distribution of healthcare professionals is also a national problem, especially at the district level. Prehospital care of trauma patients remains insufficient and improvements at the national level are suggested. PMID:18629597

  20. Civilian field surgery in the rural trauma setting: a proposal for providing optimal care.

    PubMed Central

    Foil, M. B.; Cunningham, P. R.; Hale, J. C.; Benson, N. H.; Treurniet, S.

    1992-01-01

    Rural trauma presents unique problems for surgical care. While military surgeons are prepared to provide care at or near the scene of battle, civilian literature is devoid of reports for care provided by surgeons at sites of injury occurrences. Although these injuries are infrequent, they are more likely to occur in rural trauma settings. This article describes two cases of extremity injury that required amputation at the scene and presents a proposal for swift mobilization of appropriately trained surgeons to the scene with adequate instrumentation and lighting, which can significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of these victims. PMID:1404476

  1. A plan to improve end-of-life care for trauma victims and their families.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lenworth M; Jacobs, Barbara Bennett; Burns, Karyl J

    2005-01-01

    End-of-life care for trauma patients is unique in that clinicians rarely have the advantage of knowing victims prior to the event. In this setting, the unfamiliarity with patients' wishes and values, the critical nature of the injury, the overwhelming feelings of guilt that families often experience, the suddenness and acuity of the crisis, and the need to make life-and-death decisions, can result in end-of-life care scenarios that are challenging to manage and often difficult to experience. This article describes a plan to develop, implement, and test a best practice model of end-of-life care for trauma victims and their families. PMID:16382585

  2. Putting Trauma Care in Writing: Parallels between Doctors' and Nurses' Responsibilities and Textbook Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesselring, Linda J.

    1993-01-01

    Compares the style, emphasis, and tone in textbook chapters on trauma care written for and by doctors and nurses. Discusses ways physicians' and nurses' roles are mirrored in the writing. Notes that doctors' prose is focused, with attention given to injuries and their repair; whereas nurses' prose adopts a holistic view, caring for patients'…

  3. Motivational Interviewing: A Practical Intervention for School Nurses to Engage in Trauma Informed Care.

    PubMed

    Sypniewski, Rebekah

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of motivational interviewing (MI) as an effective intervention for trauma informed care. It offers a description of trauma and its most commonly associated negative side effects in the school setting. Within this context, basic theoretical concepts of MI are discussed. The article closes by examining the need for future research regarding MI as an effective, school-based intervention for adolescents. PMID:26739933

  4. Trauma admissions to the Intensive care unit at a reference hospital in Northwestern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Major trauma has been reported to be a major cause of hospitalization and intensive care utilization worldwide and consumes a significant amount of the health care budget. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics and treatment outcome of major trauma patients admitted into our ICU and to identify predictors of outcome. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2010, a descriptive prospective study of all trauma admissions to a multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) of Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania was conducted. Results A total of 312 cases of major trauma were admitted in the ICU, representing 37.1% of the total ICU admissions. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 5.5:1. Their median age was 27 years. Trauma admissions were almost exclusively emergencies (95.2%) and came mainly from the Accident and Emergency (60.6%) and Operating room (23.4%). Road traffic crash (RTC) was the most common cause of injuries affecting 70.8% of patients. Two hundred fourteen patients (68.6%) required surgical intervention. The overall ICU length of stay (LOS) for all trauma patients ranged from 1 to 59 days (median = 8 days). The median ICU length of hospital stay (LOS) for survivors and non-survivors were 8 and 5 days respectively. (P = 0.002). Mortality rate was 32.7%. Mortality rate of trauma patients was significantly higher than that of all ICU admissions (32.7% vs. 18.8%, P = 0.0012). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, multiple injuries, severe head injuries and burns were responsible for a longer mean ICU stay (P < 0.001) whereas admission Glasgow Coma Score < 9, systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg, injury severity core >16, prolonged duration of loss of consciousness, delayed ICU admission (0.028), the need for ventilatory support and finding of space occupying lesion on computed tomography scan significantly influenced mortality (P < 0.001). Conclusion Trauma resulting from road traffic crashes is a

  5. [Accident with biological material at the prehospital mobile care: reality for health and non-healthcare workers].

    PubMed

    Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Silva, Elisangelo Aparecido Costa; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Mendonça, Katiane Martins; Souza, Adenícia Custódia Silva E; Melo, Dulcelene Sousa

    2013-01-01

    Analytical transversal study that was conducted with the objectives of identifying the prevalence and characterizing the accidents with biological material among professionals in pre-hospital service (PHS) and comparing the risk behaviors adopted by healthcare and non-healthcare groups that can affect the occurrence and seriousness of such accidents. Data were obtained by questionnaire applied to all PHS workers in Goiânia-GO. The study revealed a high prevalence of accidents involving biological material which, although higher for the healthcare group, also affected the non-healthcare group. There were significant (p < 0.05) risk behaviors for these accidents in both groups: not using gloves, masks or eye protectors; inappropriate disposal of sharps; inadequate dress; re-capping of needles; and a lack of immunization against hepatitis B. The results underscore the importance of both groups in adhering to preventive measures, and further point to the need to structure and implement vigilance and control system for this type of accident. PMID:23887787

  6. Cellular Therapies in Trauma and Critical Care Medicine: Forging New Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Shibani; Pilia, Marcello; Grimsley, Juanita M.; Karanikas, Alexia T.; Oyeniyi, Blessing; Holcomb, John B.; Cap, Andrew P.; Rasmussen, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trauma is a leading cause of death in both military and civilian populations worldwide. Although medical advances have improved the overall morbidity and mortality often associated with trauma, additional research and innovative advancements in therapeutic interventions are needed to optimize patient outcomes. Cell-based therapies present a novel opportunity to improve trauma and critical care at both the acute and chronic phases that often follow injury. Although this field is still in its infancy, animal and human studies suggest that stem cells may hold great promise for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, organ injuries, and extremity injuries such as those caused by orthopedic trauma, burns, and critical limb ischemia. However, barriers in the translation of cell therapies that include regulatory obstacles, challenges in manufacturing and clinical trial design, and a lack of funding are critical areas in need of development. In 2015, the Department of Defense Combat Casualty Care Research Program held a joint military–civilian meeting as part of its effort to inform the research community about this field and allow for effective planning and programmatic decisions regarding research and development. The objective of this article is to provide a “state of the science” review regarding cellular therapies in trauma and critical care, and to provide a foundation from which the potential of this emerging field can be harnessed to mitigate outcomes in critically ill trauma patients. PMID:26428845

  7. Cellular Therapies in Trauma and Critical Care Medicine: Forging New Frontiers.

    PubMed

    Pati, Shibani; Pilia, Marcello; Grimsley, Juanita M; Karanikas, Alexia T; Oyeniyi, Blessing; Holcomb, John B; Cap, Andrew P; Rasmussen, Todd E

    2015-12-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death in both military and civilian populations worldwide. Although medical advances have improved the overall morbidity and mortality often associated with trauma, additional research and innovative advancements in therapeutic interventions are needed to optimize patient outcomes. Cell-based therapies present a novel opportunity to improve trauma and critical care at both the acute and chronic phases that often follow injury. Although this field is still in its infancy, animal and human studies suggest that stem cells may hold great promise for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, organ injuries, and extremity injuries such as those caused by orthopedic trauma, burns, and critical limb ischemia. However, barriers in the translation of cell therapies that include regulatory obstacles, challenges in manufacturing and clinical trial design, and a lack of funding are critical areas in need of development. In 2015, the Department of Defense Combat Casualty Care Research Program held a joint military-civilian meeting as part of its effort to inform the research community about this field and allow for effective planning and programmatic decisions regarding research and development. The objective of this article is to provide a "state of the science" review regarding cellular therapies in trauma and critical care, and to provide a foundation from which the potential of this emerging field can be harnessed to mitigate outcomes in critically ill trauma patients. PMID:26428845

  8. Development of Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Alison; Scheeringa, Michael S.; Cohen, Judith A.; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Young children who are exposed to traumatic events are at risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While effective psychosocial treatments for childhood PTSD exist, novel interventions that are more accessible, efficient, and cost-effective are needed to improve access to evidence-based treatment. Stepped care models currently being developed for mental health conditions are based on a service delivery model designed to address barriers to treatment. This treatment development article describes how trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT), a well-established evidence-based practice, was developed into a stepped care model for young children exposed to trauma. Considerations for developing the stepped care model for young children exposed to trauma, such as the type and number of steps, training of providers, entry point, inclusion of parents, treatment components, noncompliance, and a self-correcting monitoring system, are discussed. This model of stepped care for young children exposed to trauma, called Stepped Care TF-CBT, may serve as a model for developing and testing stepped care approaches to treating other types of childhood psychiatric disorders. Future research needed on Stepped Care TF-CBT is discussed. PMID:25411544

  9. Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis. The purposes of this chapter are to: (1) discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI/TSI in children; (2) review the anatomic and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric TBI/TSI and their complications; (3) comprehensively review frequent primary and secondary brain injuries; and (4) to give a short overview of two special types of pediatric TBI/TSI: birth-related and nonaccidental injuries. PMID:27430465

  10. Advancing critical care: joint combat casualty research team and joint theater trauma system.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Elizabeth; Biever, Kimberlie

    2010-01-01

    Despite the severity and complexity of injuries, survival rates among combat casualties are equal to or better than those from civilian trauma. This article summarizes the evidence regarding innovations from the battlefield that contribute to these extraordinary survival rates, including preventing hemorrhage with the use of tourniquets and hemostatic dressings, damage control resuscitation, and the rapid evacuation of casualties via MEDEVAC and the US Air Force Critical Care Air Transport Teams. Care in the air for critically injured casualties with pulmonary injuries and traumatic brain injury is discussed to demonstrate the unique considerations required to ensure safe en route care. Innovations being studied to decrease sequelae associated with complex orthopedic and extremity trauma are also presented. The role and contributions of the Joint Combat Casualty Research Team and the Joint Theater Trauma System are also discussed. PMID:20683227

  11. Impact of emergency medical helicopter transport directly to a university hospital trauma center on mortality of severe blunt trauma patients until discharge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of transporting severely injured patients by helicopter remain controversial. This study aimed to analyze the impact on mortality of helicopter compared to ground transport directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. Methods The French Intensive Care Research for Severe Trauma cohort study enrolled 2,703 patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to University hospital intensive care units within 72 hours. Pre-hospital and hospital clinical data, including the mode of transport, (helicopter (HMICU) versus ground (GMICU), both with medical teams), were recorded. The analysis was restricted to patients admitted directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. The main endpoint was mortality until ICU discharge. Results Of the 1,958 patients analyzed, 74% were transported by GMICU, 26% by HMICU. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 26 (interquartile range (IQR) 19 to 34) for HMICU patients and 25 (IQR 18 to 34) for GMICU patients. Compared to GMICU, HMICU patients had a higher median time frame before hospital admission and were more intensively treated in the pre-hospital phase. Crude mortality until hospital discharge was the same regardless of pre-hospital mode of transport. After adjustment for initial status, the risk of death was significantly lower (odds ratio (OR): 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 0.98, P = 0.035) for HMICU compared with GMICU. This result did not change after further adjustment for ISS and overall surgical procedures. Conclusions This study suggests a beneficial impact of helicopter transport on mortality in severe blunt trauma. Whether this association could be due to better management in the pre-hospital phase needs to be more thoroughly assessed. PMID:23131068

  12. Emergency center thoracotomy: impact of prehospital resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Durham, L A; Richardson, R J; Wall, M J; Pepe, P E; Mattox, K L

    1992-06-01

    Emergency center thoracotomy was performed at our facility on 389 patients from 1984 through 1989. There were no patients excluded from the study, and survival for all patients was 8.3% with survival rates of 15.2% and 7.3% for stab and gunshot wounds, respectively. Emergency center thoracotomy was performed on 42 patients suffering from isolated extrathoracic injuries with 7% survival. There were no survivors of blunt trauma in this study. Fifty-three percent of the patients arrived with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in progress. The average time of prehospital CPR for survivors was 5.1 minutes compared with 9.1 minutes for nonsurvivors. Of the survivors, prehospital endotracheal intubation prolonged successful toleration of CPR to 9.4 minutes compared with 4.2 minutes for nonintubated surviving patients (p less than 0.001). Emergency center thoracotomy is useful in the resuscitation of victims dying of penetrating truncal trauma. Prehospital endotracheal intubation significantly lengthened the time of successful CPR. PMID:1613838

  13. Effect evaluation of a heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in prehospital emergency care – an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Aléx, Jonas; Karlsson, Stig; Björnstig, Ulf; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2015-01-01

    Background The ambulance milieu does not offer good thermal comfort to patients during the cold Swedish winters. Patients’ exposure to cold temperatures combined with a cold ambulance mattress seems to be the major factor leading to an overall sensation of discomfort. There is little research on the effect of active heat delivered from underneath in ambulance care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electrically heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in the prehospital emergency care. Methods A quantitative intervention study on ambulance care was conducted in the north of Sweden. The ambulance used for the intervention group (n=30) was equipped with an electrically heated mattress on the regular ambulance stretcher whereas for the control group (n=30) no active heat was provided on the stretcher. Outcome variables were measured as thermal comfort on the Cold Discomfort Scale (CDS), subjective comments on cold experiences, and finger, ear and air temperatures. Results Thermal comfort, measured by CDS, improved during the ambulance transport to the emergency department in the intervention group (p=0.001) but decreased in the control group (p=0.014). A significant higher proportion (57%) of the control group rated the stretcher as cold to lie down compared to the intervention group (3%, p<0.001). At arrival, finger, ear and compartment air temperature showed no statistical significant difference between groups. Mean transport time was approximately 15 minutes. Conclusions The use of active heat from underneath increases the patients’ thermal comfort and may prevent the negative consequences of cold stress. PMID:26374468

  14. Trauma Deserts: Distance From a Trauma Center, Transport Times, and Mortality From Gunshot Wounds in Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Douglas; Unger, Erin; Straus, David; Brasel, Karen; Hsia, Renee; Esposito, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether urban patients who suffered gunshot wounds (GSWs) farther from a trauma center would have longer transport times and higher mortality. Methods. We used the Illinois State Trauma Registry (1999–2009). Scene address data for Chicago-area GSWs was geocoded to calculate distance to the nearest trauma center and compare prehospital transport times. We used multivariate regression to calculate the effect on mortality of being shot more than 5 miles from a trauma center. Results. Of 11 744 GSW patients during the study period, 4782 were shot more than 5 miles from a trauma center. Mean transport time and unadjusted mortality were higher for these patients (P < .001 for both). In a multivariate model, suffering a GSW more than 5 miles from a trauma center was associated with an increased risk of death (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.02, 1.47; P = .03). Conclusions. Relative “trauma deserts” with decreased access to immediate care were found in certain areas of Chicago and adversely affected mortality from GSWs. These results may inform decisions about trauma systems planning and funding. PMID:23597339

  15. Prevalence of Oral and Maxillofacial Trauma in Elders Admitted to a Reference Hospital in Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Filho, Marcus Antonio Melo; Saintrain, Maria Vieira de Lima; Dos Anjos, Rita Edna da Silveira; Pinheiro, Solange Sousa; Cardoso, Luciana de Carvalho Pádua; Moizan, Jean André Hervé; de Aguiar, Andréa Silvia Walter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To know the prevalence and etiology of oral and maxillofacial trauma in elders. Methods Analytical quantitative cross-sectional study conducted at a public trauma hospital located in Fortaleza-Ceará, Brazil. The study population comprised patients with trauma who were hospitalized from April to August 2014. Of these patients, patients with oral and maxillofacial trauma were chosen to be included in the research. A questionnaire was administered in order to obtain information on socio-demographics, systemic comorbidities, use of medication, deleterious habits (smoking and alcohol consumption), etiology of oral and maxillofacial trauma and type of pre-hospital care. Results Of the 280 elderly hospitalized with trauma, 47 had oral and maxillofacial trauma, with a prevalence of 16.8%. In this group, the age ranged from 60 to 88 years, with a mean age of 72.4 years (SD± 8.38). The elderly were mostly women (55.3%), self-declared pardos (53.2%), who presented with cardiovascular disorders (48.9%), and who received formal pre-hospital care (70.2%). Elderly who were in the 60–69 years age group, spent 6–9 years at school and drank alcohol were 2.64, 3.75, and 1.97, respectively, more likely to suffer oral and maxillofacial trauma. The main causes of trauma were physical aggression, traffic accidents, falls and domestic accidents. All of the physical aggressions resulted in oral and maxillofacial traumas, and the elderly who suffered traffic accidents were four times more likely to have oral and maxillofacial trauma. Conclusion The prevalence of 16.8% and the lack of research on oral and maxillofacial traumas in the elderly is worrisome and should be included in the oral health indicators for the elderly population to support the importance of oral health. PMID:26288229

  16. Application of variable life adjusted display (VLAD) in early detection of deficiency in trauma care.

    PubMed

    Tan, H B; Cross, S F; Goodacre, S W

    2005-10-01

    Early detection of deficient care is an increasingly important element of trauma audit. We aimed to assess the feasibility and demonstrate the use of a variable life adjusted display (VLAD) in trauma audit. Data from the Trauma Audit and Research Network database of Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust were used to create a VLAD. A cumulative display of survival was plotted in which survivors were incorporated as a positive value equal to 1 minus the probability of survival, and deaths were incorporated as a negative value equal to the probability of survival. Downward deflections of the display thus indicated potentially deficient trauma care. Data from 191 consecutive patients over 1 year were plotted and displayed. The first 2 months of this period were characterised by a downward trend in the line, which may indicate suboptimum performance and provides an example of a trend that would prompt detailed review. The VLAD chart is a potentially useful "early warning" system for poor performance in trauma care. Further work should to be carried out to evaluate VLAD prospectively as an audit tool, perhaps involving comparison of VLAD charts from different institutions. PMID:16189037

  17. Continuing Care and Trauma in Women Offenders’ Substance Use, Psychiatric Status, and Self-Efficacy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Preeta; Grella, Christine E.; Messina, Nena P.

    2015-01-01

    Using secondary data analysis of 3 separate trauma-informed treatment programs for women offenders, we examine outcomes between those who received both prison and community-based substance abuse treatment (i.e., continuing care; n = 85) and those who received either prison or community aftercare treatment (n = 108). We further account for differences in trauma exposure to examine whether continuing care moderates this effect on substance use, psychiatric severity, and self-efficacy outcomes at follow-up. The main effect models of continuing care showed a significant association with high psychiatric status and did not yield significant associations with substance use or self-efficacy. However, the interaction between trauma history and continuing care showed significant effects on all 3 outcomes. Findings support the importance of a continuing care treatment model for women offenders exposed to multiple forms of traumatic events, and provide evidence of the effectiveness of integrating trauma-informed treatment into women’s substance abuse treatment. PMID:26924891

  18. Scene disposition and mode of transport following rural trauma: a prospective cohort study comparing patient costs.

    PubMed

    Cummings, G; O'Keefe, G

    2000-04-01

    This prospective cohort study was performed from 1994 to 1996 to compare the impact of scene disposition on prehospital and hospital costs incurred by rural trauma patients transported to a trauma center by helicopter or ground ambulance. The study included all rural adult injury victims who arrived at the tertiary trauma center by ambulance within 24 h of injury. Inclusion criteria consisted of inpatient admission or death in the emergency department, and any traumatic injury except burns. Data collected included mortality, mode of transport, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and costs from impact to discharge or death. Of 105 study patients, 52 initially went to a rural hospital, while 53 went directly to the trauma center. There was no significant difference in survival in the two groups. The ISS was significantly higher for patients taken directly to the trauma center from the scene. The ISS of trauma patients transported from the rural hospital was highest for patients sent by ground transport. The prehospital transport costs were significantly more for patients transported to a rural hospital first. The costs incurred at the trauma center were highest for those patients transported directly from the scene. Many severely injured patients were initially transported to a rural hospital rather than directly to the trauma center. At both the scene and rural hospital, consistent use of triage criteria appeared to be lacking in determining the severity of injury, appropriate destination, and mode of transport for trauma patients. Since no significant difference in prehospital helicopter and ground transport costs was demonstrated, the decision on mode of transport should be in the best interest of patient care. PMID:10729675

  19. Improving outcome in severe trauma: trauma systems and initial management: intubation, ventilation and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tim; Davenport, Ross; Hurst, Tom; Jones, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    Severe trauma is an increasing global problem mainly affecting fit and healthy younger adults. Improvements in the entire pathway of trauma care have led to improvements in outcome. Development of a regional trauma system based around a trauma centre is associated with a 15-50% reduction in mortality. Trauma teams led by senior doctors provide better care. Although intuitively advantageous, the involvement of doctors in the pre-hospital care of trauma patients currently lacks clear evidence of benefit. Poor airway management is consistently identified as a cause of avoidable morbidity and mortality. Rapid sequence induction/intubation is frequently indicated but the ideal drugs have yet to be identified. The benefits of cricoid pressure are not clear cut. Dogmas in the management of pneumothoraces have been challenged: chest x-ray has a role in the diagnosis of tension pneumothoraces, needle aspiration may be ineffective, and small pneumothoraces can be managed conservatively. Identification of significant haemorrhage can be difficult and specific early resuscitation goals are not easily definable. A hypotensive approach may limit further bleeding but could worsen significant brain injury. The ideal initial resuscitation fluid remains controversial. In appropriately selected patients early aggressive blood product resuscitation is beneficial. Hypothermia can exacerbate bleeding and the benefit in traumatic brain injury is not adequately studied for firm recommendations. PMID:23014941

  20. Quality of early care and childhood trauma: a prospective study of developmental pathways to dissociation.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Lissa; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Holmes, Bjarne; Lyubchik, Amy; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    2009-06-01

    Kihlstrom (2005) has recently called attention to the need for prospective longitudinal studies of dissociation. The present study assesses quality of early care and childhood trauma as predictors of dissociation in a sample of 56 low-income young adults followed from infancy to age 19. Dissociation was assessed with the Dissociative Experiences Scale; quality of early care was assessed by observer ratings of mother-infant interaction at home and in the laboratory; and childhood trauma was indexed by state-documented maltreatment, self-report, and interviewer ratings of participants' narratives. Regression analysis indicated that dissociation in young adulthood was significantly predicted by observed lack of parental responsiveness in infancy, while childhood verbal abuse was the only type of trauma that added to the prediction of dissociation. Implications are discussed in the context of previous prospective work also pointing to the important contribution of parental emotional unresponsiveness in the development of dissociation. PMID:19525736

  1. Supporting women with substance use issues: trauma-informed care as a foundation for practice in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Marcellus, Lenora

    2014-01-01

    Infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome and their mothers require extended support through health and social service systems. Practitioners are interested in exploring innovative approaches to caring for infants and mothers. There is now compelling evidence linking women's substance use to experiences of trauma and violence. A significant shift in the fields of addiction and mental health has been awareness of the impact of trauma and violence on infants and children, women, their families, and communities. In this article, the current state of knowledge of trauma-informed care is reviewed, in particular for application to practice within the NICU. Trauma survivors are at risk of being retraumatized because of health care providers' limited understanding of how to work effectively with them. Recognizing the impact of trauma and implementing evidence-based trauma-informed practices in the NICU holds promise for improving outcomes for women and their infants. PMID:25391589

  2. Responder Status Criterion for Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salloum, Alison; Scheeringa, Michael S.; Cohen, Judith A.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In order to develop Stepped Care trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT), a definition of early response/non-response is needed to guide decisions about the need for subsequent treatment. Objective: The purpose of this article is to (1) establish criterion for defining an early indicator of response/non-response to the…

  3. Abusive Head Trauma at a Tertiary Care Children's Hospital in Mexico City. A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Garcia-Pina, Corina A.; Loredo-Abdala, Arturo; Paz, Francisco; Garcia, Sandra G.; Schilmann, Astrid

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the prevalence, clinical signs and symptoms, and demographic and family characteristics of children attending a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City, Mexico, to illustrate the characteristics of abusive head trauma among this population. Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of infants and children under 5,…

  4. Changing models of care for emergency surgical and trauma patients in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sachin; Goo, Tiong Thye; Tan, T’zu Jen; Tan, Kok Yang; Mak, Kenneth Seck Wai

    2016-01-01

    The last 15 years have seen changing patterns of injury in emergency surgery and trauma patients. The ability to diagnose, treat and manage these patients nonoperatively has led to a decline in interest in trauma surgery as a career. In addition, healthcare systems face multiple challenges, including limited resources, an ageing population and increasing subspecialisation of medical care, while maintaining government-directed standards and managing public expectations. In the West, these challenges have led to the emergence of a new subspecialty, ‘acute care surgery’, with some models of care providing dedicated acute surgical units or separating acute and elective streams with the existing manpower resources. The outcomes for emergency surgery patients and efficiency gains are promising. In Singapore, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital has implemented its first dedicated acute surgical unit. This article outlines the evolution of acute care surgery and its relevance to Asia. PMID:27353030

  5. Girls in residential care: from child maltreatment to trauma-related symptoms in emerging adulthood.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Eveline; Lanctôt, Nadine; Paquette, Geneviève; Collin-Vézina, Delphine; Lemieux, Annie

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the association between child maltreatment and trauma-related symptoms in emerging adulthood--over and above the incidence of such symptoms and conduct problems during adolescence--among a sample of female adolescents in residential care. This study used data from a longitudinal study. The sample was composed of 89 adolescent females who were first interviewed at time of admission in a residential center (M(age)=15.33 years, SD=1.31) and later in young adulthood (M(age)=19.27, SD=1.55). At time 1, trauma-related symptoms were assessed with the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children and conduct problems with a composite measure. At time 2, child maltreatment was assessed retrospectively with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and trauma-related symptoms were reassessed with the Trauma Symptom Inventory-2. Results indicated that child maltreatment, especially emotional abuse and neglect, was related to anxious arousal, depression, and anger in emerging adulthood. This study showed that females from our sample often reported different types of maltreatment during childhood and that these traumatic experiences were significantly associated with poor adult psychological functioning. PMID:24262310

  6. Medium-fidelity medical simulators: use in a pre-hospital, operational, military environment.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J J; Forbes, K; Woolrich-Burt, L; Russell, R; Mahoney, P F

    2006-09-01

    On Operation Telic 6, the UK Med Group consisting of 3 Close Support Medical Regiment and 205 Field Hospital (Volunteers) deployed to provide medical support to coalition forces in Iraq. Personnel were drawn from Regular and Territorial Units, plus additional medical support from Armies of the Czech Republic and Denmark. The efficient delivery of operational emergency medical care hinged upon the successful integration of personnel from these units. We report on the use of a medium-fidelity simulator, in a pre-hospital and hospital environment over a three month period on an operational tour. In conducting 42 exercises (12 of which commenced in a pre-hospital environment), we have demonstrated the feasibility of the system in rehearsing the management of the major trauma patient. This training was used to enhance teamwork, identify system deficiencies and practise solutions in a safe environment. This paper discusses our experiences in relation to the current literature on this expanding area of trauma training. PMID:17295008

  7. Refugees' perspectives on barriers to communication about trauma histories in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study explores refugees' perspectives regarding the nature of communication barriers that impede the exploration of trauma histories in primary care. Method Brief interviews were conducted with 53 refugee patients in a suburban primary care clinic in the Midwest USA. Participants were asked if they or their doctors had initiated conversations about the impact of political conflict in their home countries. Qualitative data analysis was guided by grounded theory. Peer debriefings of refugee healthcare professionals were incorporated into the analysis. Results Two-thirds of refugee patients reported that they never shared how they were affected by political conflict with their doctors and that their doctors never asked them about it. Most refugees stated that they would like to learn more about the impact of trauma on their health and to discuss their experiences with their doctors. Conclusion Refugees are hesitant to initiate conversations with physicians due to cultural norms requiring deference to the doctor's authority. They also lack knowledge about how trauma affects health. Physicians should be educated to inquire directly about trauma histories with refugee patients. Refugees can benefit from education about the effects of trauma on health and about the collaborative nature of the doctor–patient relationship. PMID:23277798

  8. Creating trauma-informed correctional care: a balance of goals and environment

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Niki A.; Najavits, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Rates of posttraumatic stress disorder and exposure to violence among incarcerated males and females in the US are exponentially higher than rates among the general population; yet, abrupt detoxification from substances, the pervasive authoritative presence and sensory and environmental trauma triggers can pose a threat to individual and institutional stability during incarceration. Objective The authors explore the unique challenges and promises of trauma-informed correctional care and suggest strategies for administrative support, staff development, programming, and relevant clinical approaches. Method A review of literature includes a comparison of gendered responses, implications for men's facilities, and the compatibility of trauma recovery goals and forensic programming goals. Results Trauma-informed care demonstrates promise in increasing offender responsivity to evidence-based cognitive behavioral programming that reduces criminal risk factors and in supporting integrated programming for offenders with substance abuse and co-occurring disorders. Conclusions Incorporating trauma recovery principles into correctional environments requires an understanding of criminal justice priorities, workforce development, and specific approaches to screening, assessment, and programming that unify the goals of clinical and security staff. PMID:22893828

  9. Virtual reality, robotics, and other wizardry in 21st century trauma care.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco-Theberge, M E; Elliott, D C

    1999-12-01

    The former Special Assistant to the Director on Biomedical Technology, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), COL RM Satava, notes "Predicting the future trends in any profession jeopardizes the credibility of the author." Thus, we have attempted to outline current systems and prototype models in testing phases. Technologic advances will enable enhanced care of trauma patients. In the acute care setting, they also will affect the educational system in theory and practice. PMID:10625975

  10. An innovative nursing approach to caring for an obstetric patient with rape trauma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parker, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Rape trauma syndrome (RTS) is a posttraumatic stress disorder that can be triggered by routine procedures experienced during childbirth. An explanation of the signs and symptoms of RTS is provided, including how to avoid retraumatization during intrapartum care. A case report is presented from a provider perspective to illustrate the seriousness of this disorder and the importance of delivering respectful care. A new approach to obstetric routines is warranted to avoid further traumatizing the woman with RTS. PMID:25870039

  11. Assessment and Availability of Trauma Care Services in a District Hospital of South India; A Field Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Uthkarsh, Pallavi Sarji; Gururaj, Gopalkrishna; Reddy, Sai Sabharish; Rajanna, Mandya Siddalingaiah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the availability of trauma care services in a district referral hospital of Southern India. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study being performed during 2013 in a tertiary healthcare centre in Southern Indian. A detailed assessment of trauma care services was done in a 400 bed speciality hospital which is an apex referral hospital in the public health system using a check list based on WHO guidelines for evaluation of essential trauma care services, along with in-depth interviews of hospital stake holders and key informants. Results: The hospital had physical infrastructure in terms of emergency room, inpatient wards, operation theatres, intensive care unit and blood bank facilities. The recently constructed designated building for trauma care services was not operational and existing facilities were used beyond capacity. A designated trauma team was lacking and speciality services for managing polytrauma were deficient and thus, existing personnel were performing multiple tasks. Neurosurgeons and rehabilitative nursing staff were unavailable, and a radiographer was not available on a 24/7 basis. Existing nursing personnel had not received any formal training in trauma care and standard operating protocols were not available for trauma care. Resources for acute resuscitation were partially adequate. The hospital lacked adequate resources to manage head, abdomen, chest and spine injuries, and most of the polytrauma cases were referred to nearby city hospitals. Conclusion: District hospital, the only referral hospital in public health system for trauma victims of that region, had inadequate resources to manage trauma victims, which was probably responsible for delay in trauma care, improper referrals, high cost of care and poor outcomes. PMID:27331066

  12. Trauma-Informed Care for Children in the Child Welfare System: An Initial Evaluation of a Trauma-Informed Parenting Workshop.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly M; Murray, Kathryn J; Ake, George S

    2016-05-01

    An essential but often overlooked component to promoting trauma-informed care within the child welfare system is educating and empowering foster, adoptive, and kinship caregivers (resource parents) with a trauma-informed perspective to use in their parenting as well as when advocating for services for their child. In this first evaluation of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network's trauma-informed parenting workshop (Caring for Children who Have Experienced Trauma, also known as the Resource Parent Curriculum), participant acceptance and satisfaction and changes in caregiver knowledge and beliefs related to trauma-informed parenting were examined. Data from 159 ethnically diverse resource parents were collected before and after they participated in the workshop. Results demonstrate that kinship and nonkinship caregivers showed significant increases in their knowledge of trauma-informed parenting and their perceived self-efficacy parenting a child who experienced trauma. Nonkinship caregivers increased on their willingness to tolerate difficult child behaviors, whereas kinship caregivers did not show a significant change. Participants also demonstrated high levels of satisfaction with the workshop. Although these preliminary results are important as the first empirical study supporting the workshop's effectiveness, the limitations of this study and the directions for future research are discussed. PMID:26603357

  13. Do Child Abuse and Maternal Care Interact to Predict Military Sexual Trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura C.; Kimbrel, Nathan A.; Meyer, Eric C.; Young, Keith A.; Morissette, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present research tested the hypothesis that maternal care moderates the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and subsequent military sexual trauma (MST). Method Measures of childhood sexual abuse, maternal care, and MST were administered to 197 Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans. Results After accounting for gender, age, and the main effects of maternal care and childhood sexual abuse, the maternal care × childhood sexual abuse interaction was a significant predictor of MST (odds ratio = .28, β = −1.26, 95% confidence intervals of .10, .80). As hypothesized, rates of MST were higher among veterans who reported childhood sexual abuse and low levels of maternal care (43%) compared with veterans who reported childhood sexual abuse and high levels of maternal care (11%). Conclusions These findings suggest that high levels of maternal care may act as a protective factor against future revictimization among military service members. These findings have the potential to inform both prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:25534500

  14. The case against using the APACHE system to predict intensive care unit outcome in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Vassar, M J; Holcroft, J W

    1994-01-01

    The use of outcome indices as a means of evaluating institutional performance for delivery of medical care is at the forefront of federal health policy reforms. Because an enormous number of clinical and financial data are generated by ICU patients, it is inevitable that integrated bedside computers will be necessary to supply the type of information that is being sought by governmental and private insurance agencies involved in assessment of hospital performance. The Health Care Financing Administration already has adopted the APACHE data collection protocols and predictive models for the severity of illness adjustments that were used in assessing the 1986 hospital-specific death rate for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, and pneumonia. In our opinion, however, it is unlikely that any single system will be developed that can accurately estimate more than 50% of ICU deaths. The intention of the APACHE III system to include 78 diagnostic categories seems unrealistic. Furthermore, the number of data needed to document outcomes for both low- and high-risk admissions is impractical. We are evaluating APACHE III to determine whether the revisions to the definition for head trauma will represent a significant improvement in predicting outcomes for trauma patients. In the interim, the financial investment in the APACHE III automated bedside data collection system cannot be justified for trauma patients. Neither should it be used in ICUs that admit a large number of trauma patients as a tool for monitoring unit efficiency, guiding triage decisions, allocating staff and ICU beds, identifying risks of iatrogenic or other potential complications, or assessing quality of life, in spite of marketing efforts by the APACHE Corporation. We believe that using any of the APACHE systems for these purposes, at best, is premature, and potentially misrepresents the trauma patient population. Standards for patient classification already are in place for use

  15. Use of Advanced Bleeding Control Mechanisms in Athletic Training: A Shift in the Thought Process of Prehospital Care. Part 1: Tourniquets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert; Payne, Ellen K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this column is to provide athletic training educators (ATE) with evidence regarding the use of tourniquets in the prehospital setting as well as to be a resource on how to teach the management of external hemorrhage using tourniquets.

  16. Quality of Care Delivered Before versus After A Quality Improvement Intervention for Acute Geriatric Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Min, Lillian; Cryer, Henry; Chan, Chiao-Li; Roth, Carol; Tillou, Areti

    2014-01-01

    Background Older trauma injury patients had improved recovery after we implemented routine geriatric consultation for patients ≥ age 65 at a level-1 academic trauma center. The intervention aimed to improve quality of geriatric care. However, the specific care processes that improved are unknown. Study Design Prospective observation comparing medical care after (December 2007-November 2009) versus before (December 2006-November 2007) implementation of the geriatric consult-based intervention. To measure quality-of-care (QOC) we used 33 previously-validated care-process quality indicators (QIs) from the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) study, measured by review of medical records for 76 Geriatric Consult [GC] versus 71 control group patients. As pre-specified subgroup analyses, we aggregated QIs by type: geriatric (e.g., delirium screening) versus non-geriatric condition-based care (e.g., thrombosis prophylaxis) and compared QI scores by type of care. Last, we aggregated QI scores into overall, geriatric, and non-geriatric QOC scores for each patient (# QIs passed/# QIs eligible), and compared patient-level QOC for the GC versus control group, adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, comorbidity, and injury severity. Results 63% of the GC versus 11% of the control group patients received a geriatric consultation. We evaluated 2505 QIs overall (1664 geriatric-type and 841 non-geriatric QIs). In general, fewer geriatric-type QIs were passed than non-geriatric QIs (71% vs 81%, p<.001). We provided better overall-QOC to the GC (77%) than control group patients (73%, p<.05). However, the difference was not statistically significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.08). We improved geriatric-QOC for the GC (74%) compared to the control group (68%, p<.01), a difference that was significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.01). Conclusion Geriatricians and surgeons can collaboratively improve geriatric QOC for older trauma patients. PMID:25840534

  17. Trauma systems, shock, and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fallon, W F

    1993-01-01

    This review of early care covers issues pertaining to the analysis of system function, prehospital intravascular volume replacement, diagnosis of proximity vascular injury, the role of emergency thoracotomy, and the value of transesophageal echocardiography. The first six articles deal with various aspects of system function, from triage to analysis of outcome. The next series of articles reviews work in progress evaluating optimal fluid for resuscitation. Hypertonic saline and dextran combinations have been shown to restore vital signs better than isotonic solutions; they are safe, require smaller volumes, and may improve head injury outcome. Danger lies in the restoration of perfusion without hemorrhage control. Two articles on emergency thoracotomy review the indications and outcome in blunt and penetrating trauma. Survival in blunt trauma is virtually zero. An article and two editorials summarize state of the art for diagnosis and treatment of proximity vascular injury. Two articles describe the potential use of the new technique of transesophageal echocardiography. This new modality has not formed a solid indication at present and can be considered investigational in trauma care. PMID:7584006

  18. Has increased nursing competence in the ambulance services impacted on pre-hospital assessment and interventions in severe traumatic brain-injured patients?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective Trauma is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in modern society, and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are the single leading cause of mortality among young adults. Pre-hospital acute care management has developed during recent years and guidelines have shown positive effects on the pre-hospital treatment and outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. However, reports of impacts on improved nursing competence in the ambulance services are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if increased nursing competence level has had an impact on pre-hospital assessment and interventions in severe traumatic brain-injured patients in the ambulance services. Method A retrospective study was conducted. It included all severe TBI patients (>15 years of age) with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of less than eight measured on admission to a level one trauma centre hospital, and requiring intensive care (ICU) during the years 2000–2009. Results 651 patients were included, and between the years 2000–2005, 395 (60.7%) severe TBI patients were injured, while during 2006–2009, there were 256 (39.3%) patients. The performed assessment and interventions made at the scene of the injury and the mortality in hospital showed no significant difference between the two groups. However, the assessment of saturation was measured more frequently and length of stay in the ICU was significantly less in the group of TBI patients treated between 2006–2009. Conclusion Greater competence of the ambulance personnel may result in better assessment of patient needs, but showed no impact on performed pre-hospital interventions or hospital mortality. PMID:24641814

  19. [Optimising care structures for severe hand trauma and replantation and chances of launching a national network].

    PubMed

    Haas, E M; Volkmer, E; Holzbach, T; Wallmichrath, J; Engelhardt, T O; Giunta, R E

    2013-12-01

    Severe hand traumata have a significant impact on our health system and on insurance companies, respectively. It is estimated that 33% of all occupational injuries and 9% of all invalidity pensions are due to severe hand trauma. Unfortunately, these high numbers are not only due to the severity of the trauma but to organisational deficiencies. Usually, the patient is treated at the general surgical emergency in the first place and only then forwarded to a microsurgeon. This redirection increases the time that is required for the patient to finally arrive at an expert for hand surgery. On the one hand, this problem can be explained by the population's lack of awareness for distinguished experts for hand and microsurgery, on the other hand, the emergency network, or emergency doctors in particular are not well informed about where to take a patient with a severe hand trauma - clearly a problem of communication between the hospitals and the ambulance. It is possible to tackle this problem, but put participating hand trauma centres have to work hand in hand as a network and thus exploit synergy effects. The French system "FESUM" is a good example for such a network and even comprises centres in Belgium and Switzerland. To improve the treatment of severe hand trauma, a similar alliance was initiated in Germany just recently. The pilot project "Hand Trauma Alliance" (www.handverletzung.com) was started in April 2013 and currently comprises two hospitals within the region of upper Bavaria. The network provides hand trauma replantation service on a 24/7 basis and aims at shortening the way from the accident site to the fully qualified hand surgeon, to improve the therapy of severe hand injuries and to optimise acute patient care in general. In order to further increase the alliance's impact it is intended to extend the project's scope from regional to national coverage - nevertheless, such an endeavour can only be done in collaboration with the German Society for Hand

  20. Enhancing the population impact of collaborative care interventions: Mixed method development and implementation of stepped care targeting posttraumatic stress disorder and related comorbidities after acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zatzick, Douglas; Rivara, Frederick; Jurkovich, Gregory; Russo, Joan; Trusz, Sarah Geiss; Wang, Jin; Wagner, Amy; Stephens, Kari; Dunn, Chris; Uehara, Edwina; Petrie, Megan; Engel, Charles; Davydow, Dimitri; Katon, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop and implement a stepped collaborative care intervention targeting PTSD and related co-morbidities to enhance the population impact of early trauma-focused interventions. Method We describe the design and implementation of the Trauma Survivors Outcomes & Support Study (TSOS II). An interdisciplinary treatment development team was comprised of trauma surgical, clinical psychiatric and mental health services “change agents” who spanned the boundaries between front-line trauma center clinical care and acute care policy. Mixed method clinical epidemiologic and clinical ethnographic studies informed the development of PTSD screening and intervention procedures. Results Two-hundred and seven acutely injured trauma survivors with high early PTSD symptom levels were randomized into the study. The stepped collaborative care model integrated care management (i.e., posttraumatic concern elicitation and amelioration, motivational interviewing, and behavioral activation) with cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy targeting PTSD. The model was feasibly implemented by front-line acute care MSW and ARNP providers. Conclusions Stepped care protocols targeting PTSD may enhance the population impact of early interventions developed for survivors of individual and mass trauma by extending the reach of collaborative care interventions to acute care medical settings and other non-specialty posttraumatic contexts. PMID:21596205

  1. Advanced trauma life support training: How useful it is?

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2016-01-01

    We have tried in a recently published systematic review (World J of Surg 2014; 38: 322-329) to study the educational value of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) courses and whether they improve survival of multiple trauma patients. This Frontier article summarizes what we have learned and reflects on future perspectives in this important area. Our recently published systematic review has shown that ATLS training is very useful from an educational point view. It significantly increased knowledge, and improved practical skills and the critical decision making process in managing multiple trauma patients. These positive changes were evident in a wide range of learners including undergraduate medical students and postgraduate residents from different subspecialties. In contrast, clear evidence that ATLS training reduces trauma death is lacking. It is obvious that it is almost impossible to perform randomized controlled trials to study the effect of ATLS courses on trauma mortality. Studying factors predicting trauma mortality is a very complex issue. Accordingly, trauma mortality does not depend solely on ATLS training but on other important factors, like presence of well-developed trauma systems including advanced pre-hospital care. We think that the way to answer whether ATLS training improves survival is to perform large prospective cohort studies of high quality data and use advanced statistical modelling. PMID:26855889

  2. Advanced trauma life support training: How useful it is?

    PubMed

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2016-02-01

    We have tried in a recently published systematic review (World J of Surg 2014; 38: 322-329) to study the educational value of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) courses and whether they improve survival of multiple trauma patients. This Frontier article summarizes what we have learned and reflects on future perspectives in this important area. Our recently published systematic review has shown that ATLS training is very useful from an educational point view. It significantly increased knowledge, and improved practical skills and the critical decision making process in managing multiple trauma patients. These positive changes were evident in a wide range of learners including undergraduate medical students and postgraduate residents from different subspecialties. In contrast, clear evidence that ATLS training reduces trauma death is lacking. It is obvious that it is almost impossible to perform randomized controlled trials to study the effect of ATLS courses on trauma mortality. Studying factors predicting trauma mortality is a very complex issue. Accordingly, trauma mortality does not depend solely on ATLS training but on other important factors, like presence of well-developed trauma systems including advanced pre-hospital care. We think that the way to answer whether ATLS training improves survival is to perform large prospective cohort studies of high quality data and use advanced statistical modelling. PMID:26855889

  3. Effects of prehospital hypothermia on transfusion requirements and outcomes: a retrospective observatory trial

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Nora; Gräff, Ingo; Fleischer, Andreas; Boehm, Olaf; Guttenthaler, Vera; Baumgarten, Georg; Meybohm, Patrick; Wittmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Prehospital hypothermia is defined as a core temperature <36.0°C and has been shown to be an independent risk factor for early death in patients with trauma. In a retrospective study, a possible correlation between the body temperature at the time of admission to the emergency room and subsequent in-hospital transfusion requirements and the in-hospital mortality rate was explored. Setting This is a retrospective single-centre study at a primary care hospital in Germany. Participants 15 895 patients were included in this study. Patients were classified by admission temperature and transfusion rate. Excluded were ambulant patients and patients with missing data. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome values were length of stay (LOS) in days, in-hospital mortality, the transferred amount of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), and admission to an intensive care unit. Secondary influencing variables were the patient's age and the Glasgow Coma Scale. Results In 22.85% of the patients, hypothermia was documented. Hypothermic patients died earlier in the course of their hospital stay than non-hypothermic patients (p<0.001). The administration of 1–3 PRBC increased the LOS significantly (p<0.001) and transfused patients had an increased risk of death (p<0.001). Prehospital hypothermia could be an independent risk factor for mortality (adjusted OR 8.521; p=0.001) and increases the relative risk for transfusion by factor 2.0 (OR 2.007; p=0.002). Conclusions Low body temperature at hospital admission is associated with a higher risk of transfusion and death. Hence, a greater awareness of prehospital temperature management should be established. PMID:27029772

  4. Development and Validation of a Portable Platform for Deploying Decision-Support Algorithms in Prehospital Settings

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, A. T.; Khitrov, M. Y.; Chen, L.; Blood, A.; Wilkins, K.; Doyle, W.; Wilcox, S.; Denison, T.; Reifman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Advanced decision-support capabilities for prehospital trauma care may prove effective at improving patient care. Such functionality would be possible if an analysis platform were connected to a transport vital-signs monitor. In practice, there are technical challenges to implementing such a system. Not only must each individual component be reliable, but, in addition, the connectivity between components must be reliable. Objective We describe the development, validation, and deployment of the Automated Processing of Physiologic Registry for Assessment of Injury Severity (APPRAISE) platform, intended to serve as a test bed to help evaluate the performance of decision-support algorithms in a prehospital environment. Methods We describe the hardware selected and the software implemented, and the procedures used for laboratory and field testing. Results The APPRAISE platform met performance goals in both laboratory testing (using a vital-sign data simulator) and initial field testing. After its field testing, the platform has been in use on Boston MedFlight air ambulances since February of 2010. Conclusion These experiences may prove informative to other technology developers and to healthcare stakeholders seeking to invest in connected electronic systems for prehospital as well as in-hospital use. Our experiences illustrate two sets of important questions: are the individual components reliable (e.g., physical integrity, power, core functionality, and end-user interaction) and is the connectivity between components reliable (e.g., communication protocols and the metadata necessary for data interpretation)? While all potential operational issues cannot be fully anticipated and eliminated during development, thoughtful design and phased testing steps can reduce, if not eliminate, technical surprises. PMID:24155791

  5. Implementation and Evaluation of a Wiki Involving Multiple Stakeholders Including Patients in the Promotion of Best Practices in Trauma Care: The WikiTrauma Interrupted Time Series Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Alexis F; Witteman, Holly O; Lauzier, François; Moore, Lynne; Lamontagne, François; Horsley, Tanya; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Droit, Arnaud; Weiss, Matthew; Tremblay, Sébastien; Lachaine, Jean; Le Sage, Natalie; Émond, Marcel; Berthelot, Simon; Plaisance, Ariane; Lapointe, Jean; Razek, Tarek; van de Belt, Tom H; Brand, Kevin; Bérubé, Mélanie; Clément, Julien; Grajales III, Francisco Jose; Eysenbach, Gunther; Kuziemsky, Craig; Friedman, Debbie; Lang, Eddy; Muscedere, John; Rizoli, Sandro; Roberts, Derek J; Scales, Damon C; Sinuff, Tasnim; Stelfox, Henry T; Gagnon, Isabelle; Chabot, Christian; Grenier, Richard; Légaré, France

    2015-01-01

    Background Trauma is the most common cause of mortality among people between the ages of 1 and 45 years, costing Canadians 19.8 billion dollars a year (2004 data), yet half of all patients with major traumatic injuries do not receive evidence-based care, and significant regional variation in the quality of care across Canada exists. Accordingly, our goal is to lead a research project in which stakeholders themselves will adapt evidence-based trauma care knowledge tools to their own varied institutional contexts and cultures. We will do this by developing and assessing the combined impact of WikiTrauma, a free collaborative database of clinical decision support tools, and Wiki101, a training course teaching participants how to use WikiTrauma. WikiTrauma has the potential to ensure that all stakeholders (eg, patients, clinicians, and decision makers) can all contribute to, and benefit from, evidence-based clinical knowledge about trauma care that is tailored to their own needs and clinical setting. Objective Our main objective will be to study the combined effect of WikiTrauma and Wiki101 on the quality of care in four trauma centers in Quebec. Methods First, we will pilot-test the wiki with potential users to create a version ready to test in practice. A rapid, iterative prototyping process with 15 health professionals from nonparticipating centers will allow us to identify and resolve usability issues prior to finalizing the definitive version for the interrupted time series. Second, we will conduct an interrupted time series to measure the impact of our combined intervention on the quality of care in four trauma centers that will be selected—one level I, one level II, and two level III centers. Participants will be health care professionals working in the selected trauma centers. Also, five patient representatives will be recruited to participate in the creation of knowledge tools destined for their use (eg, handouts). All participants will be invited to

  6. Hypothermia as a predictor for mortality in trauma patients at admittance to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Balvers, Kirsten; Van der Horst, Marjolein; Graumans, Maarten; Boer, Christa; Binnekade, Jan M.; Goslings, J. Carel; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the impact of hypothermia upon admission to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on early and late mortality and to develop a prediction model for late mortality in severely injured trauma patients. Materials and Methods: A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed in adult trauma patients admitted to the ICU of two Level-1 trauma centers between 2007 and 2012. Hypothermia was defined as a core body temperature of ≤35° Celsius. Logistic regression analyses were performed to quantify the effect of hypothermia on 24-hour and 28-day mortality and to develop a prediction model. Results: A total of 953 patients were included, of which 354 patients had hypothermia (37%) upon ICU admission. Patients were divided into a normothermic or hypothermic group. Hypothermia was associated with a significantly increased mortality at 24 hours and 28 days (OR 2.72 (1.18-6.29 and OR 2.82 (1.83-4.35) resp.). The variables included in the final prediction model were hypothermia, age, APACHE II score (corrected for temperature), INR, platelet count, traumatic brain injury and Injury Severity Score. The final prediction model discriminated between survivors and non-survivors with high accuracy (AUC = 0.871, 95% CI 0.844-0.898). Conclusions: Hypothermia, defined as a temperature ≤35° Celsius, is common in critically ill trauma patients and is one of the most important physiological predictors for early and late mortality in trauma patients. Trauma patients admitted to the ICU may be at high risk for late mortality if the patient is hypothermic, coagulopathic, severely injured and has traumatic brain injury or an advanced age. PMID:27512330

  7. Nursing Workload in Intensive Care Unit Trauma Patients: Analysis of Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Domingues, Cristiane de Alencar; Poggetti, Renato Sérgio; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Background From the perspective of nurses, trauma patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) demand a high degree of nursing workload due to hemodynamic instability and the severity of trauma injuries. This study aims to identify the factors related to the high nursing workload required for trauma victims admitted to the ICU. Methods This is a prospective, cross-sectional study using descriptive and correlation analyses, conducted with 200 trauma patients admitted to an ICU in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The nursing workload was measured using the Nursing Activities Score (NAS). The distribution of the NAS values into tertiles led to the identification of two research groups: medium/low workload and high workload. The Chi-square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney and multiple logistic regression tests were utilized for the analyses. Findings The majority of patients were male (82.0%) and suffered blunt trauma (94.5%), with traffic accidents (57.5%) and falls (31.0%) being prevalent. The mean age was 40.7 years (±18.6) and the mean NAS was 71.3% (±16.9). Patient gender, the presence of pulmonary failure, the number of injured body regions and the risk of death according to the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II were factors associated with a high degree of nursing workload in the first 24 hours following admission to the ICU. Conclusion Workload demand was higher in male patients with physiological instability and multiple severe trauma injuries who developed pulmonary failure. PMID:25375369

  8. The sequential trauma score - a new instrument for the sequential mortality prediction in major trauma*

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are several well established scores for the assessment of the prognosis of major trauma patients that all have in common that they can be calculated at the earliest during intensive care unit stay. We intended to develop a sequential trauma score (STS) that allows prognosis at several early stages based on the information that is available at a particular time. Study design In a retrospective, multicenter study using data derived from the Trauma Registry of the German Trauma Society (2002-2006), we identified the most relevant prognostic factors from the patients basic data (P), prehospital phase (A), early (B1), and late (B2) trauma room phase. Univariate and logistic regression models as well as score quality criteria and the explanatory power have been calculated. Results A total of 2,354 patients with complete data were identified. From the patients basic data (P), logistic regression showed that age was a significant predictor of survival (AUCmodel p, area under the curve = 0.63). Logistic regression of the prehospital data (A) showed that blood pressure, pulse rate, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), and anisocoria were significant predictors (AUCmodel A = 0.76; AUCmodel P + A = 0.82). Logistic regression of the early trauma room phase (B1) showed that peripheral oxygen saturation, GCS, anisocoria, base excess, and thromboplastin time to be significant predictors of survival (AUCmodel B1 = 0.78; AUCmodel P +A + B1 = 0.85). Multivariate analysis of the late trauma room phase (B2) detected cardiac massage, abbreviated injury score (AIS) of the head ≥ 3, the maximum AIS, the need for transfusion or massive blood transfusion, to be the most important predictors (AUCmodel B2 = 0.84; AUCfinal model P + A + B1 + B2 = 0.90). The explanatory power - a tool for the assessment of the relative impact of each segment to mortality - is 25% for P, 7% for A, 17% for B1 and 51% for B2. A spreadsheet for the easy calculation of the sequential trauma score is

  9. Portrait of trauma care in Quebec's rural emergency departments and identification of priority intervention needs to improve the quality of care: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Fleet, Richard; Tounkara, Fatoumata Korika; Ouimet, Mathieu; Dupuis, Gilles; Poitras, Julien; Tanguay, Alain; Fortin, Jean Paul; Trottier, Jean-Guy; Ouellet, Jean; Lortie, Gilles; Plant, Jeff; Morris, Judy; Chauny, Jean Marc; Lauzier, François; Légaré, France

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Trauma remains the primary cause of death in individuals under 40 years of age in Canada. In Quebec, the Trauma Care Continuum (TCC) has been demonstrated to be effective in decreasing the mortality rate among trauma victims. Although rural citizens are at greater risk for trauma and trauma death, no empirical data concerning the effectiveness of the TCC for the rural population in Quebec are available. The emergency departments (EDs) are important safety nets for rural citizens. However, our data indicate that access to diagnostic support services, such as intensive care units and CT is limited in rural areas. The objectives are to (1) draw a portrait of trauma services in rural EDs; (2) explore geographical variations in trauma care in Quebec; (3) identify adaptable factors that could reduce variation; and (4) establish consensus solutions for improving the quality of care. Methods and analysis The study will take place from November 2015 to November 2018. A mixed methodology (qualitative and quantitative) will be used. We will include data (2009–2013) from all trauma victims treated in the 26 rural EDs and tertiary/secondary care centres in Quebec. To meet objectives 1 and 2, data will be gathered from the Ministry's Database of the Quebec Trauma Registry Information System. For objectives 3 and 4, the project will use the Delphi method to develop consensus solutions for improving the quality of trauma care in rural areas. Data will be analysed using a Poisson regression to compare mortality rate during hospital stay or death on ED arrival (objectives 1 and 2). Average scores and 95% CI will be calculated for the Delphi questionnaire (objectives 3 and 4). Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been approved by CSSS Alphonse-Desjardins research ethics committee (Project MP-HDL-2016-003). The results will be published in peer-reviewed journals. PMID:27098826

  10. Collaborative Implementation of a Sequenced Trauma-Focused Intervention for Youth in Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Kliethermes, Matthew D.; Juedemann, David; Dunn, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Few evidence-based interventions have been developed or tested with youth in residential care. Moreover, models for transferring implementation knowledge from clinical trials to service settings are sparse. This paper addresses the lessons learned about addressing this technology transfer gap by presenting a case study of a collaborative effort to implement a trauma-informed pilot program with youth in residential care. Key considerations are the collaborative nature of implementation efforts, the requirement of organizational support, the need for interventions to be sensitive to the child and the milieu, and the lack of fit between Medicaid reimbursement and evidence-based intervention. PMID:20824117

  11. A comparative cost analysis of polytrauma and neurosurgery Intensive Care Units at an apex trauma care facility in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, V.; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although Intensive Care Units (ICUs) only account for 10% of the hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of the hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multispecialty and neurosurgery ICUs at an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203-bedded Level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India, from May 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in the study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's two tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multispecialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU, it was Rs. 14,306.7/-, workforce constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist health-care decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multispecialty ICUs are more cost-effective, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that needs to be designed. PMID:27555693

  12. Pretransfer computed tomography delays arrival to definitive care without affecting pediatric trauma outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Aodhnait S.; Antiel, Ryan M.; Polites, Stephanie F.; Ishitani, Michael B.; Moir, Christopher R.; Zielinski, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Children with thoracic or abdominal trauma, presenting to referring hospitals, may undergo CT imaging prior to transfer to a pediatric trauma center (PTC). We sought to determine if children who undergo pretransfer imaging experience a delay in definitive care and worse clinical outcomes. Methods Pediatric blunt trauma patients transferred to our level I PTC were identified in this IRB approved study. Those transferred with CT imaging of the chest or abdomen/pelvis prior to transfer were compared to those transferred without imaging. Results Of 246 patients with a mean age of 12.4 ± 5.3 years (64% male), 128 patients (52%) underwent chest (n = 85) and/or abdominal (n = 115) CT studies prior to transfer. Among those patients with pretransfer CT, 14% of CT scans were repeated. On multivariate analysis accounting for distance, time from injury to arrival at our PTC was significantly greater in children who underwent pretransfer CT (320 ± 216 vs. 208 ± 149 minutes, p < 0.001). Median length of stay (3 vs. 3 days) and mortality (3% vs. 3%) were similar between groups (all p > 0.05). Conclusions A substantial number of pediatric blunt trauma patients underwent CT scans prior to transfer, which is associated with a delay in transfer but not worse outcomes. PMID:26778842

  13. [Current aspects of war surgery. From the trauma center to precarious medical care].

    PubMed

    Houdelette, P

    1997-01-01

    War, said Carl von Clausewitz, is a cameleon. In this century, each armed conflict has proved to be unique, particularly in its medical aspects, with its own features and teaching its won lessons. As recent events show, no conflict is a fact of the past. Medical care delivered to war casualties depend on the circumstances of the war, on the medical resources available, but also on the price that cultures or circumstances place on it. Everything separates these two paradigms; on the one hand the "precious" casualty of western armies whose medical support is organized in a concept (forward medical and surgical care, ultra-rapid medical evacuation) tailored to each case, and as close as possible to the medical care of a civilian trauma patient whose models remains the North-American ballistic wound managed in trauma centers; on the other hand, civilian victims, in large numbers, in poor and disorganized countries, often abandoned to their own fate or sorted by "epidemiological" triage, which guarantees a distribution, as efficient as possible, of limited medical care. In war, advanced medical care and precarious medicine may work side by side according to two logics which do not exclude one another and constantly improve. PMID:9297902

  14. Prehospital diagnosis of massive ethylene glycol poisoning and use of an early antidote.

    PubMed

    Amathieu, Roland; Merouani, Medhi; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Smail, Nadia; Adnet, Frédéric

    2006-08-01

    We report the case of a patient suspected of voluntary massive poisoning by ethylene glycol. Prehospital diagnosis was established by portable blood analyser and an early antidote with 4 MP treatment initiated in out-of-hospital setting. Use of portable blood analyser in prehospital care should be considered in case of suspected massive poisoning by ethylene glycol. PMID:16808995

  15. Clinical and critical care concerns of cranio-facial trauma: A retrospective study in a tertiary care institute

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Kaur, Jasbir; Singh, Amarjit; Kapoor, Vinod; Bindra, Gavinder Singh; Ghai, Gagandeep Singh

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Maxillofacial trauma is commonly associated with other injuries, predominantly head injuries. The predictors of outcome in such concomitant injuries have been studied the least. The present study aims at the evaluation of types of injury, management and outcome of patients sustaining maxillofacial trauma and concomitant cranial injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out in the department of anesthesiology and intensive care. A case series of 129 patients was evaluated who were admitted in ICU (Intensive Care Unit) with maxillofacial trauma and head injuries. The data was then compiled systematically and analyzed using SPSS windows and value of P < 0.05 was considered significant and P < 0.001 as highly significant. Results: Among the 129 patients, majority of them had roadside accidents (RSA > 90%) and male gender predominance with male to female ratio of 5: 1. Fracture maxilla and nasal bones were the most commonly encountered injuries (51.93%) followed by mandibular fractures (39.53%) and fracture of zygomatic bones (28.68%). Eighty five patients (65.90%) required mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy was needed in 29 (22.48%) patients and 81 (62.8%) patients were operated for head injuries as well. Majority of the victims were aged between 15 and 40 years. Conclusions: Maxillofacial trauma and cranial injuries are common among young males and so is the nature of injuries, that is, RSA. Besides facial injuries, head injuries are important determinant of outcome in such patients. Timely resuscitation and surgical interventions at specialized centers are of prime importance as far as a better prognosis is concerned in such injuries. PMID:23833486

  16. Is military sexual trauma associated with trading sex among women veterans seeking outpatient mental health care?

    PubMed

    Strauss, Jennifer L; Marx, Christine E; Weitlauf, Julie C; Stechuchak, Karen M; Straits-Troster, Kristy; Worjoloh, Ayaba W; Sherrod, Christina B; Olsen, Maren K; Butterfield, Marian I; Calhoun, Patrick S

    2011-01-01

    A robust association between sexual trauma and trading sex has been documented in civilian samples but has not been examined in veterans. Women veterans experience high rates of sexual victimization across the lifespan, including during military service (military sexual trauma [MST]). Associations between MST and trading sex were examined in 200 women enrolled in a crosssectional study of HIV risks and seroprevalence among women receiving outpatient mental health care at a Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center. Each woman completed an assessment interview composed of validated measures that queried childhood sexual trauma; substance use; and risk behaviors, including trading sex for money, drugs, shelter, food, or other things. History of MST was derived from mandated VA screening results and chart notes. Overall, 19.7% reported a history of trading sex. Those who reported trading sex had a higher rate of MST than those who did not report trading sex (87.2% vs. 62.9%, respectively). A multivariable logistic regression model examined the relationship between trading sex and MST, controlling a priori for substance abuse and childhood sexual trauma (both associated with trading sex in civilian samples) and education, which was associated with trading sex in our sample. In this adjusted model, MST was associated with trading sex: odds ratio = 3.26, p = .025, 95% confidence interval = [1.16, 9.18]. To our knowledge, this is the 1st report of an association between MST and trading sex. Results extend previously observed associations between sexual trauma and trading sex in civilian cohorts and underscore the pernicious influence of sexual victimization across the lifespan. PMID:21534097

  17. Trauma and cultural safety: providing quality care to HIV-infected women of aboriginal descent.

    PubMed

    McCall, Jane; Lauridsen-Hoegh, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    In Canada, the Aboriginal community is most at risk for HIV infection. Aboriginal peoples have disproportionately high rates of violence, drug use, and challenging socioeconomic circumstances. All of this is related to a history of colonization that has left Aboriginal people vulnerable to HIV infection through unsafe sex, needle sharing, and lack of access to health promotion and education. Aboriginal women are at particular risk for HIV infection. They experience a disproportionate degree of trauma, which is associated with colonization, high rates of childhood sexual abuse, and illicit drug use. A history of trauma impacts on access to health care, uptake of antiretroviral therapy, and mortality and morbidity in people with HIV. We describe the case of a 52-year-old, HIV-infected Aboriginal woman. We review the current evidence related to her case, including colonization, intersectionality, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, revictimization, and substance use. PMID:24012166

  18. [Coagulation therapy in multiple trauma without point-of-care testing].

    PubMed

    Lier, H; Hinkelbein, J

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of blood coagulation with thrombelastometry (ROTEM™) and thrombelastography (TEG™) and analysis of thrombocyte function by a Multiplate™ assay is possible in only a few hospitals in Germany. Recently, the grade of recommendation (GoR) for point-of-care (POC) testing in official guidelines was increased and is now classified as GoR 1C. If a POC-based option is not available alternatives must be used. Besides blood products (RBC, FFP, TC), coagulation factor concentrates are used to treat trauma-induced coagulopathy. The benefits of therapy with factor concentrates are fewer immunological and infection side effects as well as faster effects after administration of specific coagulation factors. A good outcome in patients with multiple trauma is only possible by an adequate transfusion regime and administration of coagulation factors. PMID:24482058

  19. Action Stations! 100 years of trauma care on maritime and amphibious operations in the Royal Navy.

    PubMed

    Osborne, M; Smith, J E

    2015-01-01

    Over the past century trauma care within the Royal Navy (RN) has evolved; wartime experiences and military medical research have combined to allow significant improvement in the care of casualties. This article describes the key maritime and amphibious operations that have seen the Royal Navy Medical Service (RNMS) deliver high levels of support to wherever the Naval Service has deployed in the last 100 years. Key advancements in which progress has led to improved outcomes for injured personnel are highlighted--the control and treatment of blood loss, wound care, and the prevention and management of organ failure with optimal resuscitation. Historians often point out how slowly military medicine progressed for the first few thousand years of its recorded history, and how quickly it has progressed in the last century. This reflective article will show how the RNMS has been an integral part of that story, and how the lessons learnt by our predecessors have shaped our modern day doctrine surrounding trauma care. PMID:26292385

  20. The spectrum of emergency care of agricultural trauma in central Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Stueland, D; Zoch, T; Stamas, P; Krieg, G; Boulet, W

    1990-11-01

    Agriculture is among the most dangerous occupations in the United States. When injuries do occur, the emergency department (ED) is the primary source of care. Over a 2-year period, the emergency medicine section of the Marshfield Clinic/St Joseph's Hospital, cared for 913 victims of agricultural trauma. Although 11% were initially admitted and 4% were later treated, the remainder received their care solely in the ED. Unlike most occupational injuries, people of any age may be involved in agricultural injuries; 27% in this series were less than 18 years of age and 5% were 65 years or older. Just over half of all injuries were from mechanical devices, including tractor and farm machinery. The remainder were from animals, falls, or exposure. Although several different types of injuries occurred, the most common diagnoses were soft tissue injuries and fractures and the most common procedure was diagnostic radiography followed by wound and fracture care. An ED in a rural setting should be prepared to deal with agricultural trauma. PMID:2222598

  1. Epidemiology of traumatic cardiac arrest in patients presenting to emergency department at a level 1 trauma center

    PubMed Central

    Bhoi, Sanjeev; Mishra, Prakash Ranjan; Soni, Kapil Dev; Baitha, Upendra; Sinha, Tej Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is a paucity of literature on prehospital care and epidemiology of traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) in India. This study highlights the profile and characteristics of TCA. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted to study epidemiological profile of TCA patients ≥1 year presenting to a level 1 trauma center of India. Results: One thousand sixty-one patients were recruited in the study. The median age (interquartile range) was 32 (23–45) years (male:female ratio of 5.9:1). Asystole (253), pulseless electrical activity (11), ventricular fibrillation (six), and ventricular tachycardia (five) were initial arrest rhythm. Road traffic crash (RTC) (57.16%), fall from height (18.52%), and assault (10.51%) were modes of injury. Prehospital care was provided by police (36.59%), ambulance (10.54%), relatives (45.40%), and bystanders (7.47% cases). Return of spontaneous circulation was seen in 69 patients, of which only three survived to hospital discharge. Conclusion: RTC in young males was a major cause of TCA. Asystole was the most common arrest rhythm. Police personnel were major prehospital service provider. Prehospital care needs improvement including the development of robust TCA registry.

  2. Prehospital risk factors of mortality and impaired consciousness after severe traumatic brain injury: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health concern and a major burden for society. The period between trauma event and hospital admission in an emergency department (ED) could be a determinant for secondary brain injury and early survival. The aim was to investigate the relationship between prehospital factors associated with secondary brain injury (arterial hypotension, hypoxemia, hypothermia) and the outcomes of mortality and impaired consciousness of survivors at 14 days. Methods A multicenter, prospective cohort study was performed in dedicated trauma centres of Switzerland. Adults with severe TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale score of head region (HAIS) >3) were included. Main outcome measures were death and impaired consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤13) at 14 days. The associations between risk factors and outcome were assessed with univariate and multivariate regression models. Results 589 patients were included, median age was 55 years (IQR 33, 70). The median GCS in ED was 4 (IQR 3-14), with abnormal pupil reaction in 167 patients (29.2%). Median ISS was 25 (IQR 21, 34). Three hundred seven patients sustained their TBI from falls (52.1%) and 190 from a road traffic accidents (32.3%). Median time from Out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service (OHEMS) departure on scene to arrival in ED was 50 minutes (IQR 37-72); 451 patients had a direct admission (76.6%). Prehospital hypotension was observed in 24 (4.1%) patients, hypoxemia in 73 (12.6%) patients and hypothermia in 146 (24.8%). Prehospital hypotension and hypothermia (apart of age and trauma severity) was associated with mortality. Prehospital hypoxemia (apart of trauma severity) was associated with impaired consciousness; indirect admission was a protective factor. Conclusion Mortality and impaired consciousness at 14 days do not have the same prehospital risk factors; prehospital hypotension and hypothermia is associated with mortality, and prehospital hypoxemia with

  3. Health and Economic Benefits of Improved Injury Prevention and Trauma Care Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Kotagal, Meera; Agarwal-Harding, Kiran J.; Mock, Charles; Quansah, Robert; Arreola-Risa, Carlos; Meara, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Injury is a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and often disproportionately affects younger, more productive members of society. While many have made the case for improved injury prevention and trauma care, health system development in low- and middle-income countries is often limited by resources. This study aims to determine the economic benefit of improved injury prevention and trauma care in low- and middle-income countries. Methods This study uses existing data on injury mortality worldwide from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study to estimate the number of lives that could be saved if injury mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries could be reduced to rates in high-income countries. Using economic modeling – through the human capital approach and the value of a statistical life approach – the study then demonstrates the associated economic benefit of these lives saved. Results 88 percent of injury-related deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. If injury mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries were reduced to rates in high-income countries, 2,117,500 lives could be saved per year. This would result in between 49 million and 52 million disability adjusted life years averted per year, with discounting and age weighting. Using the human capital approach, the associated economic benefit of reducing mortality rates ranges from $245 to $261 billion with discounting and age weighting. Using the value of a statistical life approach, the benefit is between 758 and 786 billion dollars per year. Conclusions Reducing injury mortality in low- and middle-income countries could save over 2 million lives per year and provide significant economic benefit globally. Further investments in trauma care and injury prevention are needed. PMID:24626472

  4. Interprofessional Implementation of a Pain/Sedation Guideline on a Trauma Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Tara L; LaRiccia, Brenton

    2016-01-01

    Trauma patients experience pain and agitation during their hospitalization. Many complications have been noted both in the absence of symptom management and the in presence of oversedation/narcotization. To combat noted untoward effects of pain and sedation management, an interprofessional team convened to develop a pain and sedation guideline for use in a trauma intensive care unit. Guideline development began with a comprehensive review of the literature. With the input of unit stakeholders, a nurse-driven analgosedation guideline was implemented for a 6-month trial. During this time, unit champions were integral to successful trial execution. Outcome measurement included patient and unit outcomes, nursing satisfaction, and a pre- and postimplementation patient comparison. Following implementation, unit length of stay decreased by 4.16% and there was a 17.81% decrease in average time on the ventilator following the initiation of weaning. Patient reports of nurse sensitivity and responsiveness to pain increased from 93.7 to 94.9. Nurses reported satisfaction with the practice change and improvements in care. In comparing pre- and postimplementation patient data, there was a significant decrease in mean analgesic treatment duration and an increase in the use of antipsychotics for delirium management. Following the trial period, this guideline was permanently adopted across the adult critical care service. The development of a nurse-driven analgosedation guideline was noted to be both feasible and successful. PMID:27163223

  5. Progressive Mobility Protocol Reduces Venous Thromboembolism Rate in Trauma Intensive Care Patients: A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Booth, Kathryn; Rivet, Josh; Flici, Richelle; Harvey, Ellen; Hamill, Mark; Hundley, Douglas; Holland, Katelyn; Hubbard, Sandra; Trivedi, Apurva; Collier, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) trauma population is at high risk for complications associated with immobility. The purpose of this project was to compare ICU trauma patient outcomes before and after implementation of a structured progressive mobility (PM) protocol. Outcomes included hospital and ICU stays, ventilator days, falls, respiratory failure, pneumonia, or venous thromboembolism (VTE). In the preintervention cohort, physical therapy (PT) consults were placed 53% of the time. This rose to more than 90% during the postintervention period. PT consults seen within 24 hr rose from a baseline 23% pre- to 74%-94% in the 2 highest compliance postintervention months. On average, 40% of patients were daily determined to be too unstable for mobility per protocol guidelines-most often owing to elevated intracranial pressure. During PM sessions, there were no adverse events (i.e., extubation, hypoxia, fall). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes between the 2 cohorts regarding hospital and ICU stays, average ventilator days, mortality, falls, respiratory failure, or pneumonia overall or within ventilated patients specifically. There was, however, a difference in the incidence of VTE between the preintervention cohort (21%) and postintervention cohort (7.5%) (p = .0004). A PM protocol for ICU trauma patients is safe and may reduce patient deconditioning and VTE complications in this high-risk population. Multidisciplinary commitment, daily protocol reinforcement, and active engagement of patients/families are the cornerstones to success in this ICU PM program. PMID:27618376

  6. A Qualitative Evaluation of Barriers to Care for Trauma-Related Mental Health Problems Among Low-Income Minorities in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Joyce Y.; Frank, Lori; Subramanian, Asha; Galen, Steve; Leonhard, Sarah; Green, Bonnie L.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identify barriers and facilitators of mental health care for patients with trauma histories via qualitative methods with clinicians and administrators from primary care clinics for the underserved. Individual interviews were conducted, followed by a combined focus group with administrators from three jurisdictions; there were three focus groups with clinicians from each clinic system. Common themes were identified, and responses from groups were compared. Administrators and clinicians report extensive trauma histories among patients. Clinician barriers include lack of time, patient resistance, and inadequate referral options; administrators cite reimbursement issues, staff training, and lack of clarity about the term trauma. A key facilitator is doctor-patient relationship. There were differences in perceived barriers and facilitators at the institutional and clinical levels for mental health care for patients with trauma. Importantly, there is agreement about better access to and development of trauma-specific interventions. Findings will aid the development and implementation of trauma-focused interventions embedded in primary care. PMID:22551798

  7. A public-private trauma center network in Florida harnesses data to improve care quality for an aging population.

    PubMed

    DuVernay, Christina

    2013-12-01

    As the US population ages, trauma systems face new challenges in addition to the long-standing problem of access. Patients ages sixty-five and older are more likely than younger patients to fall and suffer serious injury or death as a result. This older patient population, when compared with younger cohorts, suffers higher mortality rates, has more comorbidities-diabetes, cancer, and heart conditions being the more serious among them-and takes more medications, which can complicate treatment. The University of South Florida (USF) Medical School and the HCA hospital system have partnered to create a network of five trauma centers in underserved areas of the state to increase access to trauma care for all Floridians while maintaining a special focus on geriatric trauma care. Collecting and analyzing data for improving care quality and undertaking research is a central aim of the partnership. Based on their research findings, trauma surgeons in the USF/HCA Trauma Network have identified best practices and codified them in standard operating procedures. PMID:24301397

  8. Perspectives on trauma-informed care from mothers with a history of childhood maltreatment: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Muzik, Maria; Ads, Menatalla; Bonham, Caroline; Lisa Rosenblum, Katherine; Broderick, Amanda; Kirk, Rosalind

    2013-12-01

    Women who experienced abuse or neglect as children are more likely to have health problems during pregnancy and postpartum, but can be reluctant to seek help due to a lack of trauma-informed services. As part of a larger mixed method study, this component aimed to obtain qualitative data from trauma-exposed new mothers about their health care preferences during the perinatal period with the ultimate goal to design personalized, supportive interventions. Fifty-two trauma-exposed mothers completed a semi-structured interview at seven months postpartum about health care preferences including ideas for programs that promote wellness, thoughts about the influences of being a new mother and possible names for a program serving trauma-exposed mothers. Interviews were transcribed and coded using N-Vivo. Participants described ambivalence about seeking help but also a sincere desire for healing, coupled with hope for the future. This tension was apparent in the discussions highlighting the importance of access to experienced, nonjudgmental, and knowledgeable health and social care staff and volunteers, the wish for both formal, integrated physical and mental health services, and for informal opportunities to meet other trauma-exposed mothers in a non-stigmatizing, child-friendly setting. Finally, positive relationship-building, respect, and safety were identified as key elements of services critical to counteract trauma-related shame and mistrust in others. Services for trauma-exposed mothers should acknowledge the normal ambivalence surrounding seeking help, but promote hope-affirming practices in a family-centered, safe, non-clinical setting that involves children, builds social support, and provides peer interaction. Program names should reflect optimism and healing rather than trauma. PMID:23978576

  9. Alcohol use, military sexual trauma, expectancies, and coping skills in women veterans presenting to primary care

    PubMed Central

    Creech, Suzannah K.; Borsari, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding alcohol use and its correlates in women veterans. An understanding of these variables is of utility to providers in primary care at Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, who are among the first to identify and intervene for problem drinking. Objective The objective of this study was to describe and explore the associations between posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, experience of military sexual trauma (MST), expectancies for alcohol use, and coping skills in predicting drinking behavior. Design Each month all women veterans attending appointments in primary care were mailed a letter alerting them to the study. Women then received a call asking them to participate, and many were directly recruited at their primary care appointment. Participants then completed a survey of current alcohol use and related variables in a private room. Participants Participants were 93 women veterans seeking care at VA. Main measures Measures included the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, a modified version of the VA MST screen, the Davidson Trauma Scale; the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, and the Brief Comprehensive Effects of Alcohol Questionnaire. Key results Positive expectancies and evaluations emerged as significant correlates of AUDIT scores, while PTSD symptoms were not related to AUDIT scores. A hierarchical regression revealed a significant positive interaction between avoidance coping and positive evaluations. Depression, positive evaluations and avoidance coping were significant independent predictors of AUDIT scores in the final model, but MST was not. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of considering of the function of alcohol use when delivering clinical interventions and the need for further research on the association between MST and drinking in women veterans. PMID:23498717

  10. [Time costs cardiac muscle tissue--prehospital therapy of acute myocardial infarct--a case report].

    PubMed

    Eschenburg, G; Pappert, D; Ohlmeier, H

    2003-01-01

    Symptoms of an acute myocardial infarction are a common reason for calling the emergency physician. Pre-hospital mortality caused by cardiac infarction is constantly high. The main potential for decreasing infarction mortality lies in the pre-hospital period. The problems and prospects of treatment in the early period are described in the case of a 73-year-old patient with an acute anterior infarction. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach is shown and discussed in this concrete case, taking into consideration the guidelines for diagnostics and therapy of acute myocardial infarction in the pre-hospital period of the German Society for Cardiology. A particular focus is the management of pre-hospital thrombolysis, the preconditions, realization and risks of which are described. In this context, the experience and competence of the emergency physician is prerequisite for the exact diagnosis and therapy. Furthermore, the importance of a smooth transition from pre-hospital therapy to intensive care is emphasized. PMID:12666508

  11. A comparison of invasive airway management and rates of pneumonia in prehospital and hospital

    PubMed Central

    Andrusiek, Douglas L; Szydlo, Danny; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J; Minei, Joseph; van Heest, Rardi; MacDonald, Russell; Schreiber, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma. Infection in trauma is poorly understood. The impact of prehospital invasive airway management (IAM) on the incidence of pneumonia and health services utilization is unknown. We hypothesized that trauma patients exposed to prehospital IAM will suffer higher rates of pneumonia compared to no IAM or exposure to IAM performed in the hospital. We hypothesized that patients who develop pneumonia subsequent to prehospital IAM will have longer ICU and hospital LOS compared to patients who acquired pneumonia after IAM performed in the hospital. Methods This is an observational cohort study of data previously collected for the ROC hypertonic resuscitation randomized trial. Patients were included if traumatic injury resulted in shock, traumatic brain injury or both. Patients were excluded if they died 24 hours after injury, or pneumonia data were missing. Adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio of pneumonia if exposed in the prehospital setting compared to no exposure or exposure in the hospital. Results Of 2222 patients enrolled in HS, 1676 patients met enrolment criteria for this study. Four and a half percent of patients suffered pneumonia. IAM in the prehospital setting resulted in 6.8 fold increase (C.I. 2.0, 23.0, p=0.003) in the adjusted odds of developing pneumonia compared to not being intubated, while in hospital intubation resulted in 4.8 fold increase (C.I. 1.4, 16.6, p=0.01), which was not statistically significantly different to the odds ratio of prehospital IAM. There were no statistically significant increases in health services utilization resulting from pneumonia incurred after IAM. Conclusion Exposure to IAM in prehospital and in hospital setting results in an increase in pneumonia, however, there does not appear to be a link between the source of pneumonia and an increase in ICU or hospital LOS. Levels of Evidence Level III, therapeutic

  12. Systemic trauma.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering. PMID:24617751

  13. Pre-hospital assessment with ultrasound in emergencies: implementation in the field

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Kevin P.; Lahham, Sari; Lahham, Shadi; Anderson, Craig L.; Bledsoe, Bryan; Sloane, Bryan; Joseph, Linda; Osborn, Megan B.; Fox, John C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasound (US) is a proven diagnostic imaging tool in the emergency department (ED). Modern US devices are now more compact, affordable and portable, which has led to increased usage in austere environments. However, studies supporting the use of US in the prehospital setting are limited. The primary outcome of this pilot study was to determine if paramedics could perform cardiac ultrasound in the field and obtain images that were adequate for interpretation. A secondary outcome was whether paramedics could correctly identify cardiac activity or the lack thereof in cardiac arrest patients. METHODS: We performed a prospective educational study using a convenience sample of professional paramedics without ultrasound experience. Eligible paramedics participated in a 3-hour session on point-of-care US. The paramedics then used US during emergency calls and saved the scans for possible cardiac complaints including: chest pain, dyspnea, loss of consciousness, trauma, or cardiac arrest. RESULTS: Four paramedics from two distinct fire stations enrolled a total of 19 unique patients, of whom 17 were deemed adequate for clinical decision making (89%, 95%CI 67%–99%). Paramedics accurately recorded 17 cases of cardiac activity (100%, 95%CI 84%–100%) and 2 cases of cardiac standstill (100%, 95%CI 22%–100%). CONCLUSION: Our pilot study suggests that with minimal training, paramedics can use US to obtain cardiac images that are adequate for interpretation and diagnose cardiac standstill. Further large-scale clinical trials are needed to determine if prehospital US can be used to guide care for patients with cardiac complaints. PMID:27313806

  14. Patients with detectable cocaethylene are more likely to require intensive care unit admission after trauma.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Sage E; Sutijono, Darrell; Moon, Cynthia H; Subramanian, Ramanand A; Calaycay, Jim; Rushbrook, Julie I; Zehtabchi, Shahriar

    2010-11-01

    Cocaethylene (CE) is a toxic metabolite that is formed after simultaneous consumption of cocaine and ethanol. This potent stimulant is more toxic than cocaine and has a longer half-life. The deleterious hemodynamic and cardiovascular effects of CE have been proven in animal models. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of CE on clinical outcomes after trauma. We prospectively enrolled adult (≥13 years) trauma patients requiring admission. Predictor variables were age, sex, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, base deficit, and toxicology groups (ethanol alone, cocaine alone, CE, and none). The outcomes examined were mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and length of hospital stay (LOS). We used nonparametric tests to compare continuous variables and χ² test to compare categorical data. We constructed a logistic regression to identify variables that could predict mortality and ICU admission. We enrolled 417 patients (74% male; 70% blunt injury; median age, 40 [range, 13-95]; overall mortality, 2.2%). Urine toxicology and serum ethanol level screens classified patients into the following groups: 13.4% ethanol only, 4.1% cocaine only, 8.9% CE, and 46% none. Mortality and LOS were not statistically different among the groups. In logistic regression analysis, none of the variables were statistically significant in predicting mortality. However, the presence of CE significantly increased the likelihood of ICU admission (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-22). The presence of detectable CE in the urine does not increase the mortality or LOS in trauma patients requiring admission but does increase the likelihood of ICU admission. PMID:20825763

  15. Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Medzon, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Within the next 15 years, 1 in 5 Americans will be over age 65. $34 billion will be spent yearly on trauma care of this age group. This section covers situations in trauma unique to the geriatric population, who are often under-triaged and have significant injuries underestimated. Topics covered include age-related pathophysiological changes, underlying existing medical conditions and certain daily medications that increase the risk of serious injury in elderly trauma patients. Diagnostic evaluation of this group requires liberal testing, imaging, and a multidisciplinary team approach. Topics germane to geriatric trauma including hypothermia, elder abuse, and depression and suicide are also covered. PMID:27475011

  16. The Impact of Trauma Exposure and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder on Healthcare Utilization Among Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kartha, Anand; Brower, Victoria; Saitz, Richard; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Keane, Terence M.; Liebschutz, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Background Trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increase healthcare utilization in veterans, but their impact on utilization in other populations is uncertain. Objectives To examine the association of trauma exposure and PTSD with healthcare utilization, in civilian primary care patients. Research Design Cross-sectional study. Subjects English speaking patients at an academic, urban primary care clinic. Measures Trauma exposure and current PTSD diagnoses were obtained from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Outcomes were nonmental health outpatient and emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and mental health outpatient visits in the prior year from an electronic medical record. Analyses included bivariate unadjusted and multivariable Poisson regressions adjusted for age, gender, income, substance dependence, depression, and comorbidities. Results Among 592 subjects, 80% had ≥1 trauma exposure and 22% had current PTSD. In adjusted regressions, subjects with trauma exposure had more mental health visits [incidence rate ratio (IRR), 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–14.1] but no other increased utilization. After adjusting for PTSD, this effect of trauma exposure was attenuated (IRR, 3.2; 95% CI, 0.9–11.7). Subjects with PTSD had more hospitalizations (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4–3.7), more hospital nights (IRR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4–5.0), and more mental health visits (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1–4.1) but no increase in outpatient and emergency department visits. Conclusions PTSD is associated with more hospitalizations, longer hospitalizations, and greater mental healthcare utilization in urban primary care patients. Although trauma exposure is independently associated with greater mental healthcare utilization, PTSD mediates a portion of this association. PMID:18362818

  17. Two-day primary trauma care workshop: early and late evaluation of knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hassan; Gholipour, Changiz; Mokhtarpour, Mohammad; Shams Vahdati, Samad; Hashemi Aghdam, Yashar; Bakhshayeshi, Mina

    2013-04-01

    The management of multiply injured trauma patients is a skill requiring broad knowledge and remarkable skills. The aim of the primary trauma care (PTC) module is to orient medical staff to the initial assessment of an injured patient. This workshop was held in the Education Development Center of Tabriz Medical University in April, September, and November 2007. The participants were given lectures, completed practices, and case scenarios about the management of traumatic patients. All participants were given a pretest and a post-test including a questionnaire and procedural skill exams. Finally, the same post-tests were performed 6-12 months later. Sixty-four individuals were interested in attending the workshop from the total of 90 invited, and 53 individuals responded to the late post-test. The mean score in the pretest, early post-test, and late post-test was 18.84, 26.72, and 22.17, respectively (P<0.001). Most of the medical staff did not have sufficient knowledge of basic PTC. We have shown that the incorporation of hands-on patient scenarios into an expanded course on the basis of PTC principles helps medical staff gain the knowledge and skills needed to perform the primary survey sequence correctly. Furthermore, extra educational planning seems to be necessary to retain these abilities as needed. PMID:22717774

  18. Chiropractic Care for a Patient with Spasmodic Dysphonia Associated with Cervical Spine Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Roger K.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss the diagnosis and response to treatment of spasmodic dysphonia in a 25-year-old female vocalist following an auto accident. Clinical Features The voice disorder and neck pain appeared after the traumatic incident. Examination of the cervical spine revealed moderate pain, muscle spasm and restricted joint motion at C-1 and C-5 on the left side. Cervical range of motion was reduced on left rotation. Bilateral manual muscle testing of the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles, which share innervation with the laryngeal muscles by way of the spinal accessory nerve, were weak on the left side. Pre and post accident voice range profiles (phonetograms) that measure singing voice quality were examined. The pre- and post-accident phonetograms revealed significant reduction in voice intensity and fundamental frequency as measured in decibels and hertz. Intervention and Outcome Low-force chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy to C-1 and C-5 was employed. Following a course of care, the patient's singing voice returned to normal, as well as a resolution of her musculo- skeletal complaints. Conclusion It appears that in certain cases, the singing voice can be adversely affected if neck or head trauma is severe enough. This case proposes that trauma with irritation to the cervical spine nerve roots as they communicate with the spinal accessory, and in turn the laryngeal nerves, may be contributory in some functional voice disorders or muscle tension dysphonia. PMID:19674642

  19. Emergency prehospital on-scene thoracotomy: a novel method.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Hutan; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2010-12-01

    The necessity for prehospital thoracotomy is rare, but can be lifesaving. Occasionally an emergency practitioner or surgeon coincidentally arrives at a trauma scene before the arrival of emergency medical teams. In such a circumstance, even when thoracotomy may be indicated, it is not usually performed in view of the lack of equipment (e.g., dissecting tools or rib retractor). We present a novel technique of "L" shape thoracotomy, or Thoraco-sterno-costochondrotomy, whereby in a prehospital setting, and with minimal equipment (such as a penknife) a thoracotomy can be performed with adequate exposure of the heart and great vessels. The similarities of this pragmatic procedure are considered within the context of ancient Aztec and Mesoamerican thoracotomies. PMID:21874737

  20. [Sense and content of care pathways in orthopaedic and trauma surgery].

    PubMed

    Quint, U; Greiling, M

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the study was to find the best possible methodology to evaluate the perioperative processes in the main diagnosis-related groups in an orthopaedic and trauma centre. A model in five phases was followed to develop the care pathways. Optimization potentials were derived from estimated problems and their origin. Cases of missing objectives led to re-organization and the necessary quality in treatment could be prepared as a new work flow management. The cost-effectiveness of treatment procedures and the costs of processes conditionally led to a change in management. The advantages of the study were increased knowledge of the processes involved in diagnosis and therapy with regard to the evoked costs. So the limited budget became more calculable. PMID:20644909

  1. [Safe:Trac course series of the German Society for Trauma Surgery on patient safety].

    PubMed

    Burghofer, K; Lackner, C K

    2009-08-01

    Based on crew resource management of the airline industry the German Society for Trauma Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie, DGU) was the first scientific community in Germany to develop and implement a training course for patient safety. The S:training courses contain four course formats which focus on the prehospital life support (S:PLS), the operating room (S:OR), the trauma room (S:TR) and the intensive care unit (S:ICU). In the training the importance of the human factor for the management of acute major trauma is developed by means of presentations, training videos, practical training, discussions and realistic case scenarios associated with the special working environment of the participants. A specially developed course manual acts as a work and reference book and course booking is possible at http://www.safe-trac.de. PMID:19644664

  2. The effect of resilience on posttraumatic stress disorder in trauma-exposed inner-city primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, Glenda L; Wingo, Aliza P; Moore, Renee; Pelletier, Tiffany; Gutman, Alisa R; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J

    2011-07-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has previously been associated with increased risk for a variety of chronic medical conditions and it is often underdiagnosed in minority civilian populations. The current study examined the effects of resilience on the likelihood of having a diagnosis of PTSD in an inner-city sample of primary care patients (n=767). We measured resilience with the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, trauma with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and Trauma Events Inventory, and assessed for PTSD with the modified PTSD symptom scale. Multiple logistic regression model with presence/absence of PTSD as the outcome yielded 3 significant factors: childhood abuse, nonchild abuse trauma, and resilience. One type of childhood abuse in moderate to severe range (OR, 2.01; p = .0001), 2 or more types of childhood abuse in moderate to severe range (OR, 4.00; p < or = .0001), and 2 or more types of nonchildhood abuse trauma exposure (OR, 3.33; p < or = .0001), were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of PTSD, while resilience was robustly and significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of PTSD (OR, 0.93; p < or = .0001). By understanding the role of resilience in recovery from adverse experiences, improved treatment and interventional methods may be developed. Furthermore, these results suggest a role for assessing resilience in highly traumatized primary care populations as a way to better characterize risk for PTSD and direct screening/psychiatric referral efforts. PMID:21999030

  3. Holistic self-care for rehabilitation experienced by thai buddhist trauma patients in areas of political and social unrest.

    PubMed

    Songwathana, Praneed; Watanasiriwanich, Wachiraya; Kitrungrote, Luppana

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the meaning and practice of holistic self-care for rehabilitation among Thai Buddhist trauma patients living in areas of political unrest where acts of terrorism occur. Eleven Thai Buddhist trauma patients were selected as specified. The data were collected by in-depth interviews between November 2011 and April 2012, and analyzed using the Van Manen method.Those interviewed described "holistic self-care for rehabilitation" as learning (1) to acquire a new life and (2) to bear the increased demands of care as a chronic disease. Health care responses fell into 3 categories: (1) improving physical self-sufficiency and rehabilitation by increasing muscle strength, pain management, and pressure sores; (2) improving psychological well-being by applying positive thinking, making an effort to live independently, and following a set of religious practices; and (3) finding harmony in life through caution and a willingness to adjust one's lifestyle. Although the participants seemed to adapt well to their new lifestyles, extensive support from health care professionals was necessary. This study promotes better understanding of the holistic health care experiences the survivors of trauma have as a result of an unstable political situation that includes aspects of social unrest and terrorism. PMID:24305082

  4. Prehospital use of adenosine by ambulance services in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R.; Bon, V.

    2003-01-01

    Background The prehospital use of adenosine in the treatment of supraventricular arrhythmias has recently been implemented in standard ambulance care. However, establishing the origin and nature of the arrhythmia with certainty is an absolute requirement for using adenosine. Methods The ability of the ambulance nurse to predict supraventricular arrhythmias and the necessity of prehospital treatment of arrhythmias in general was evaluated. To do this, cardiologists at the Academic Medical Centre of Amsterdam were consulted and a literature search by means of an electronic search in Pubmed was performed. The search was complemented by a second survey concerning antagonists of adenosine using the keywords: adenosine and theophylline. Moreover, the Ambulance Nurse textbook, the National Protocol for Ambulance Care as well as the explanatory memorandum to the protocol were consulted. Results No strong indication for the prehospital use of adenosine was found, while detrimental effects of the drug can occur. There is no literature showing the ability of ambulance staff to correctly interpret complex cardiac arrhythmias in the Netherlands; the current ambulance protocol does not prevent an incorrect choice of therapy and medication. Conclusion It is strongly advised against using antiarrhythmic medication for the treatment of tachycardias in a prehospital setting if this treatment can be postponed to the hospital environment. PMID:25696211

  5. Responder Status Criterion for Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Alison; Scheeringa, Michael S.; Cohen, Judith A.; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to develop Stepped Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), a definition of early response/non-response is needed to guide decisions about the need for subsequent treatment. Objective The purpose of this article is to (1) establish criterion for defining an early indicator of response/nonresponse to the first step within Stepped Care TF-CBT, and (2) to explore the preliminary clinical utility of the early response/non-response criterion. Method Data from two studies were used: (1) treatment outcome data from a clinical trial in which 17 young children (ages 3 to 6 years) received therapist-directed CBT for children with PTSS were examined to empirically establish the number of posttraumatic stress symptoms to define early treatment response/non-response; and (2) three case examples with young children in Stepped Care TF-CBT were used to explore the utility of the treatment response criterion. Results For defining the responder status criterion, an algorithm of either 3 or fewer PTSS on a clinician-rated measure or being below the clinical cutoff score on a parent-rated measure of childhood PTSS, and being rated as improved, much improved or free of symptoms functioned well for determining whether or not to step up to more intensive treatment. Case examples demonstrated how the criterion were used to guide subsequent treatment, and that responder status criterion after Step One may or may not be aligned with parent preference. Conclusion Although further investigation is needed, the responder status criterion for young children used after Step One of Stepped Care TF-CBT appears promising. PMID:25663796

  6. [Pre-hospital medicine and medical control system in Japan].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Seizan

    2016-02-01

    It is necessary to treat the patient from the site of the emergency to raise a lifesaving rate of the patient. As a prime example would be out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Once you start the treatment after hospital arrival, cardiac arrest patient can't be life-saving. It is necessary to start the chest compression, etc. from the site of the emergency. Medical care to be carried out on the scene of emergency is the pre-hospital care. In recent years, improvement of the pre-hospital care is remarkable in Japan. It is because of that the quantity and quality of the emergency life-saving technician are being enhanced. And also doctor-helicopter system have been enhanced. Medical control is a critical component of the improvement. PMID:26915258

  7. Impact of Domestic Care Environment on Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Orphans in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Atwoli, Lukoye; Ayuku, David; Hogan, Joseph; Koech, Julius; Vreeman, Rachel Christine; Ayaya, Samuel; Braitstein, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the domestic care environment on the prevalence of potentially traumatic events (PTEs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among orphaned and separated children in Uasin Gishu County, western Kenya. Methods A total of 1565 (55.5% male) orphaned and separated adolescents aged 10–18 years (mean 13.8 years, sd 2.2), were assessed for PTSD and PTEs including bullying, physical abuse and sexual abuse. In this sample, 746 lived in extended family households, 746 in Charitable Children's Institutions (CCIs), and 73 on the street. Posttraumatic stress symptom (PTSS) scores and PTSD were assessed using the Child PTSD Checklist. Results Bullying was the commonest PTE in all domestic care environments, followed by physical and sexual abuse. All PTEs were commonest among the street youth followed by CCIs. However, sexual abuse was more prevalent in households than in CCIs. Prevalence of PTSD was highest among street youth (28.8%), then households (15.0%) and CCIs (11.5%). PTSS scores were also highest among street youth, followed by CCIs and households. Bullying was associated with higher PTSS scores and PTSD odds than either sexual or physical abuse. Conclusion This study demonstrated differences in distribution of trauma and PTSD among orphaned and separated children in different domestic care environments, with street youth suffering more than those in CCIs or households. Interventions are needed to address bullying and sexual abuse, especially in extended family households. Street youth, a heretofore neglected population, are urgently in need of dedicated mental health services and support. PMID:24625395

  8. Lessons learned from the casualties of war: battlefield medicine and its implication for global trauma care.

    PubMed

    Chatfield-Ball, Catherine; Boyle, Peter; Autier, Philippe; van Wees, Sibylle Herzig; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-03-01

    According to the Global Burden of Disease, trauma is now responsible for five million deaths each year. High-income countries have made great strides in reducing trauma-related mortality figures but low-middle-income countries have been left behind with high trauma-related fatality rates, primarily in the younger population. Much of the progress high-income countries have made in managing trauma rests on advances developed in their armed forces. This analysis looks at the recent advances in high-income military trauma systems and the potential transferability of those developments to the civilian health systems particularly in low-middle-income countries. It also evaluates some potential lifesaving trauma management techniques, proven effective in the military, and the barriers preventing these from being implemented in civilian settings. PMID:25792616

  9. A Tribute to William B. Long, Jr., and William B. Long, III: A Celebration of Their Revolutionary Contributions to Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F

    2005-01-01

    An emergency medical system for trauma care has been conceived in our nation in an effort to improve delivery of emergency care to the accidentally injured patient. There are an estimated 20 million disabling injuries in our nation that should be cared for in trauma centers each year. This report has been written to acknowledge Dr. William Long, Jr., as well as Dr. William B. Long, III, for their unique contributions in establishing the Maryland Statewide Trauma System. Dr. William Long, Jr., played an instrumental role in working with Dr. R Adams Cowley to verify the life-saving value of the Maryland State Police helicopter system. In addition, Dr. Long, Jr., crafted a plan with Dr. R Adams Cowley that allowed Dr. Cowley the autonomy from the University of Maryland Medical School to develop a separate and distinct trauma facility, which is recognized throughout the world. It is indeed fortuitous that Dr. William B Long, III, experienced these landmark changes in trauma care in Maryland, which provided a catalyst for his future career that included extensive training in general surgery in Edinburgh as well as training in trauma surgery with Dr R Adams Cowley. These unique experiences convinced him to expand his training into cardiothoracic surgery. During these academic adventures, he became an international authority on the mathematics of trauma scores, cardiothoracic trauma resuscitation, and the components of a Level I trauma center. These empowering experiences became a catalyst for Dr. William Long, III, to undertake the scientific and clinical studies that would allow him to develop the only American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACSCOT) Verified Level I Trauma Center in the Pacific Northwest. This report describes in considerable detail Dr. William B. Long, III,'s Trauma Center at Legacy Emanuel Trauma Center (Portland, Oregon) as well as to outline his plans to further improve trauma care in the state of Oregon so that it remains a legacy for his

  10. A mental health intervention strategy for low-income, trauma-exposed Latina immigrants in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Kaltman, Stacey; de Mendoza, Alejandra Hurtado; Serrano, Adriana; Gonzales, Felisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Latinos in the United States face significant mental health disparities related to access to care, quality of care, and outcomes. Prior research suggests that Latinos prefer to receive care for common mental health problems (e.g., depression and anxiety disorders) in primary care settings, suggesting a need for evidence-based mental health services designed for delivery in these settings. This study sought to develop and preliminarily evaluate a mental health intervention for trauma-exposed Latina immigrants with depression and/or PTSD for primary care clinics that serve the uninsured. The intervention was designed to be simultaneously responsive to patients’ preferences for individual psychotherapy, to the needs of safety-net primary care clinics for efficient services, and to address the social isolation that is common to the Latina immigrant experience. Developed based on findings from the research team’s formative research, the resulting intervention incorporated individual and group sessions and combined evidence-based interventions to reduce depression and PTSD symptoms, increase group readiness, and improve perceived social support. Twenty-eight trauma-exposed low-income Latina immigrant women who screened positive for depression and/or PTSD participated in an open pilot trial of the intervention at a community primary care clinic. Results indicated that the intervention was feasible, acceptable, and safe. A randomized controlled trial of the intervention is warranted. PMID:26913774

  11. An open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology network architecture.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam B; Rokos, Ivan C; Burns, Kevin; Van Gelder, Carin M; Fisher, Roger M; Dunford, James V; Cone, David C; Bogucki, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most intractable challenges in prehospital medicine include response time optimization, inefficiencies at the emergency medical services (EMS)-emergency department (ED) interface, and the ability to correlate field interventions with patient outcomes. Information technology (IT) can address these and other concerns by ensuring that system and patient information is received when and where it is needed, is fully integrated with prior and subsequent patient information, and is securely archived. Some EMS agencies have begun adopting information technologies, such as wireless transmission of 12-lead electrocardiograms, but few agencies have developed a comprehensive plan for management of their prehospital information and integration with other electronic medical records. This perspective article highlights the challenges and limitations of integrating IT elements without a strategic plan, and proposes an open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology (PHIT) architecture. The two core components of this PHIT architecture are 1) routers with broadband network connectivity to share data between ambulance devices and EMS system information services and 2) an electronic patient care report to organize and archive all electronic prehospital data. To successfully implement this comprehensive PHIT architecture, data and technology requirements must be based on best available evidence, and the system must adhere to health data standards as well as privacy and security regulations. Recent federal legislation prioritizing health information technology may position federal agencies to help design and fund PHIT architectures. PMID:21294627

  12. Providing effective trauma care: the potential for service provider views to enhance the quality of care (qualitative study nested within a multicentre longitudinal quantitative study)

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Kate; Earthy, Sarah; Sleney, Jude; Barnes, Jo; Kellezi, Blerina; Barker, Marcus; Clarkson, Julie; Coffey, Frank; Elder, Georgina; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore views of service providers caring for injured people on: the extent to which services meet patients’ needs and their perspectives on factors contributing to any identified gaps in service provision. Design Qualitative study nested within a quantitative multicentre longitudinal study assessing longer term impact of unintentional injuries in working age adults. Sampling frame for service providers was based on patient-reported service use in the quantitative study, patient interviews and advice of previously injured lay research advisers. Service providers’ views were elicited through semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Setting Participants were recruited from a range of settings and services in acute hospital trusts in four study centres (Bristol, Leicester, Nottingham and Surrey) and surrounding areas. Participants 40 service providers from a range of disciplines. Results Service providers described two distinct models of trauma care: an ‘ideal’ model, informed by professional knowledge of the impact of injury and awareness of best models of care, and a ‘real’ model based on the realities of National Health Service (NHS) practice. Participants’ ‘ideal’ model was consistent with standards of high-quality effective trauma care and while there were examples of services meeting the ideal model, ‘real’ care could also be fragmented and inequitable with major gaps in provision. Service provider accounts provide evidence of comprehensive understanding of patients’ needs, awareness of best practice, compassion and research but reveal significant organisational and resource barriers limiting implementation of knowledge in practice. Conclusions Service providers envisage an ‘ideal’ model of trauma care which is timely, equitable, effective and holistic, but this can differ from the care currently provided. Their experiences provide many suggestions for service improvements to bridge the gap

  13. Trauma--the disease that was neglected. Progress: past and that to be.

    PubMed

    Howard, J M

    1994-12-01

    Sir Harold Stiles has a historic spot in the annals of trauma care to which he and his military colleagues so richly contributed. For this we honour him today. Tremendous progress has been achieved during our lifetime in the field of trauma. Injury prevention has been the most important facet with progress underway in the fields of gun control, seatbelts, motorcycle and bicycle helmets, child restraint seats, airbags and particularly alcohol restraint. Overall, traffic fatalities are being reduced. Of great importance is the need for de-emphasis and deglamorization of violence by television, movie, and news media. Improved prehospital care has taken the form of professionalism of emergency medical services comparable to that in law enforcement and fire services. Improved hospital care is resulting, in part, from the widespread development of trauma and burn centres. Continued progress is needed in each field, particularly in gun control, alcohol control, overall traffic accident prevention, and in the understanding of cerebral oedema after head injury. The teaching of the principles of trauma prevention and community organization for better emergency medical response should be introduced into the Health or Civics curriculum perhaps at the 5th or 6th grade level in elementary schools. Perhaps the greatest potential for progress in the field of trauma which we have witnessed in our lifetime may prove to have been the actions of the United Nations in Korea in 1950 and Kuwait in 1991, proclaiming that 'war will no longer be tolerated as an instrument of national aggression'. PMID:7869286

  14. Tertiary survey of the trauma patient in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M D; Born, C

    2000-06-01

    The issues surrounding the arrival of trauma patients to the ICU have been defined. By necessity, many of these topics are dealt with elsewhere in greater detail. The basic framework within which this phase of care could be optimized has been provided. Pitfalls related to patients' mode of arrival to the ICU affect subsequent management and should direct specific clinical activity. The tertiary survey is a complete summation and cataloguing of a patient's injuries. The need for ongoing resuscitation determines how much attention can be paid to the tertiary survey. Clinical suspicion based on mechanism and pattern of injury and thorough, repeated, complete physical examination are the essential elements of the tertiary survey. The survey is affected by factors that alter patients' mental status because examination is most reliable in patients who can localize pain. Medications, intoxication, and head injuries are common factors that interfere with the reliability of the tertiary survey for variable periods. Radiographic assessment is used to identify injuries suspected on the basis of mechanism of injury, injury pattern, and findings on physical examination. Some studies may be done portably; others require transport within the hospital. The intensivist must prioritize these ongoing diagnostic studies based on patient stability and the need for ongoing resuscitation. PMID:10897262

  15. Earthquakes and trauma: review of triage and injury-specific, immediate care.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Cadosch, Dieter; Rajan, Gunesh; Zellweger, René

    2008-01-01

    Earthquakes present a major threat to mankind. Increasing knowledge about geophysical interactions, progressing architectural technology, and improved disaster management algorithms have rendered modern populations less susceptible to earthquakes. Nevertheless, the mass casualties resulting from earthquakes in Great Kanto (Japan), Ancash (Peru), Tangshan (China), Guatemala, Armenia, and Izmit (Turkey) or the recent earthquakes in Bhuj (India), Bam (Iran), Sumatra (Indonesia) and Kashmir (Pakistan) indicate the devastating effect earthquakes can have on both individual and population health. Appropriate preparation and implementation of crisis management algorithms are of utmost importance to ensure a large-scale medical-aid response is readily available following a devastating event. In particular, efficient triage is vital to optimize the use of limited medical resources and to effectively mobilize these resources so as to maximize patient salvage. However, the main priorities of disaster rescue teams are the rescue and provision of emergency care for physical trauma. Furthermore, the establishment of transport evacuation corridors, a feature often neglected, is essential in order to provide the casualties with a chance for survival. The optimal management of victims under such settings is discussed, addressing injuries of the body and psyche by means of simple diagnostic and therapeutic procedures globally applicable and available. PMID:18557301

  16. Fracture clinic redesign reduces the cost of outpatient orthopaedic trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Morton, A.; Anderson, G.; Van Der Meer, R. B.; Rymaszewski, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives “Virtual fracture clinics” have been reported as a safe and effective alternative to the traditional fracture clinic. Robust protocols are used to identify cases that do not require further review, with the remainder triaged to the most appropriate subspecialist at the optimum time for review. The objective of this study was to perform a “top-down” analysis of the cost effectiveness of this virtual fracture clinic pathway. Methods National Health Service financial returns relating to our institution were examined for the time period 2009 to 2014 which spanned the service redesign. Results The total staffing costs rose by 4% over the time period (from £1 744 933 to £1 811 301) compared with a national increase of 16%. The total outpatient department rate of attendance fell by 15% compared with a national fall of 5%. Had our local costs increased in line with the national average, an excess expenditure of £212 705 would have been required for staffing costs. Conclusions The virtual fracture clinic system was associated with less overall use of staff resources in comparison to national cost data. Adoption of this system nationally may have the potential to achieve significant cost savings. Cite this article: P. J. Jenkins. Fracture clinic redesign reduces the cost of outpatient orthopaedic trauma care. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:33–36. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000506 PMID:26851287

  17. TraumaTalk: content-to-speech generation for decision support at point of care.

    PubMed Central

    Bierner, G.

    1998-01-01

    Communicating information in clinical environments is a crucial concern for medical decision support systems. Some systems can provide this support through text output that can be read by the clinician either from a screen or hard copy. However, speech is often a more appropriate way of conveying information in cases where the decision maker's eyes are already committed to another task or in cases where the telephone is the mode of communication. Some systems synthesize speech directly from text, while others piece together bits of pre-recorded human speech. In either case, producing correct intonation is vital because intonation both aids the listener's comprehension and conveys discourse meaning not necessarily evident in the words alone. Although systems that use text-to-speech or human recorded speech segments sometimes attempt to provide good intonation, they are severely hampered by the fact that intonation spans entire clauses. Systems that connect phonemes, words, or phrases fail to capture this. This paper describes a content-to-speech system that provides spoken decision support for trauma care that is correctly intoned over full clauses. PMID:9929309

  18. Integrated trauma treatment in correctional health care and community-based treatment upon reentry.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Barbara C; Conner, Latoya C; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla

    2011-10-01

    Given the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States and the high prevalence of trauma histories among those incarcerated, it is imperative to improve service delivery to inmates in correctional facilities and to those undergoing reentry in community-based treatment settings. This article provides trauma definitions and categories, describes the sequelae of trauma, reviews research on the high prevalence of incarceration in this nation, and reviews research on the high prevalence of trauma among the incarcerated. This article also provides a menu of evidence-based and promising treatment approaches to address the overlap among trauma, mental illness, substance abuse, and behavioral problems. A synthesis of research via seven points is meant to guide practitioner and policy responses to the national challenge of meeting the needs of those undergoing reentry. PMID:21948808

  19. Prehospital triage and communication performance in small mass casualty incidents: a gauge for disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G A; Calkins, A

    1999-03-01

    Because of their infrequency, disasters are difficult to train for. Emergency prehospital personnel frequently participate in small mass casualty incidents (MCIs) (3 to 50 victims). This study sought to examine prehospital performance in small MCIs in areas that are frequently mismanaged in disasters. Prospective data from the resource physician and retrospective data from tape recorded prehospital conversations were collected for a 9-month period. Clinical patient data, patient demographics, emergency medical services squad characteristics, and triage information were recorded. Forty-five consecutive MCIs were studied. Most of these were motor vehicle accidents. Prehospital providers included paid providers, nonpaid providers, and air and ground transport. The mean number of victims first identified (4.6%) was greatly different than the mean number of victims eventually transported from a scene (7.1%). Most patients were treated at a level 1 trauma center. Frequent errors included having multiple communicators on site (38%), misidentifying the number of victims (56%), and having unclear information for the resource physician (43%). Only 38% of events had prehospital triage information that was deemed appropriate in total. These results show that scene and triage errors are frequent in MCIs of small scale. This information can be used to assay a system's readiness for disasters. PMID:10102314

  20. Development and Evaluation of Educational Materials for Pre-Hospital and Emergency Department Personnel on the Care of Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonigle, John J.; Migyanka, Joann M.; Glor-Scheib, Susan J.; Cramer, Ryan; Fratangeli, Jeffrey J.; Hegde, Gajanan G.; Shang, Jennifer; Venkat, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    With the rising prevalence of patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there has been an increase in the acute presentation of these individuals to the general health care system. Emergency medical services and emergency department personnel commonly address the health care needs of patients with ASD at times of crisis. Unfortunately, there…

  1. Toolkit for Adapting Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) or Supporting Students Exposed to Trauma (SSET) for Implementation with Youth in Foster Care. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Dana; Barnes-Proby, Dionne; Chandra, Anita; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Maher, Erin; Pecora, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) was developed for use by school-based mental health professionals for any student with symptoms of distress following exposure to trauma. The Supporting Students Exposed to Trauma (SSET) was adapted from CBITS for use by any school personnel with the time and interest to work with…

  2. Evaluation of the Relationship Between Mechanism of Injury and Outcome in Pediatric Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Randall S.; Jang, Tai S.; Nair, Satish S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most prehospital triage strategies are based on physiologic, anatomic, and mechanism-related variables. Although previous studies have suggested the value of physiologic and anatomic triage criteria, the predictive capacity of mechanism of injury has been questioned. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between mechanism of injury and resource utilization and outcome among injured children treated at trauma centers. Methods The relationship between mechanism of injury and mortality and resource utilization (need for operative care, total and ICU length of stay) was analyzed using the records of pediatric patients (age <15 years) included in the National Pediatric Trauma Registry between 1995 and 2001. Results Significant variability in the outcome, resources requirements, and need for inpatient rehabilitation after discharge were observed among the mechanisms analyzed. Mechanisms such as firearm injuries were more likely to be severe and require significant trauma center resources, whereas other mechanisms such as falls related to stairs were more likely to result in injuries that were less severe and require relatively few resources. A proposed framework is presented into which mechanisms are stratified according to severity of injury (high vs. low severity) and need for trauma center resources (high vs. low requirement). Conclusions Mechanism of injury is associated with the need for trauma center care but this association is highly dependent on the measure used to determine appropriateness of triage. PMID:17426560

  3. Health Care Professionals’ Beliefs About Using Wiki-Based Reminders to Promote Best Practices in Trauma Care

    PubMed Central

    Bilodeau, Andrea; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Aubin, Karine; Lavoie, André; Lapointe, Jean; Poitras, Julien; Croteau, Sylvain; Pham-Dinh, Martin; Légaré, France

    2012-01-01

    Background Wikis are knowledge translation tools that could help health professionals implement best practices in acute care. Little is known about the factors influencing professionals’ use of wikis. Objectives To identify and compare the beliefs of emergency physicians (EPs) and allied health professionals (AHPs) about using a wiki-based reminder that promotes evidence-based care for traumatic brain injuries. Methods Drawing on the theory of planned behavior, we conducted semistructured interviews to elicit EPs’ and AHPs’ beliefs about using a wiki-based reminder. Previous studies suggested a sample of 25 EPs and 25 AHPs. We purposefully selected participants from three trauma centers in Quebec, Canada, to obtain a representative sample. Using univariate analyses, we assessed whether our participants’ gender, age, and level of experience were similar to those of all eligible individuals. Participants viewed a video showing a clinician using a wiki-based reminder, and we interviewed participants about their behavioral, control, and normative beliefs—that is, what they saw as advantages, disadvantages, barriers, and facilitators to their use of a reminder, and how they felt important referents would perceive their use of a reminder. Two reviewers independently analyzed the content of the interview transcripts. We considered the 75% most frequently mentioned beliefs as salient. We retained some less frequently mentioned beliefs as well. Results Of 66 eligible EPs and 444 eligible AHPs, we invited 55 EPs and 39 AHPs to participate, and 25 EPs and 25 AHPs (15 nurses, 7 respiratory therapists, and 3 pharmacists) accepted. Participating AHPs had more experience than eligible AHPs (mean 14 vs 11 years; P = .04). We noted no other significant differences. Among EPs, the most frequently reported advantage of using a wiki-based reminder was that it refreshes the memory (n = 14); among AHPs, it was that it provides rapid access to protocols (n = 16). Only 2 EPs

  4. Shifting the focus: Nonpathologizing approaches to healing from betrayal trauma through an emphasis on relational care.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Jennifer M; Lewis, Jenn K; Noll, Laura K; Smidt, Alec M; Birrell, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    As the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders has become increasingly medicalized (Conrad & Slodden, 2013), consideration for the relational nature of trauma has been minimized in the healing process. As psychiatrist R. D. Laing (1971) outlined in his essays, the medical model is an approach to pathology that seeks to find medical treatments for symptoms and syndromes based on categorized diagnoses. We argue that such a model implicitly locates the pathology of trauma within the individual instead of within the person(s) who perpetrated the harm or the social and societal contexts in which it took place. In this article, we argue that this framework is pathologizing insofar as it both prioritizes symptom reduction as the goal of treatment and minimizes the significance of relational harm. After providing a brief overview of betrayal trauma (Freyd, 1996) and the importance of relational processes in healing, we describe standard treatments for betrayal trauma that are grounded in the medical model. In discussing the limitations of this framework, we offer an alternative to the medicalization of trauma-related distress: relational cultural therapy (e.g., Miller & Stiver, 1997). Within this nonpathologizing framework, we highlight the importance of attending to contextual, societal, and cultural influences of trauma as well as how these influences might impact the therapeutic relationship. We then detail extratherapeutic options as additional nonpathologizing avenues for healing, as freedom to choose among a variety of options may be particularly liberating for people who have experienced trauma. Finally, we discuss the complex process of truly healing from betrayal trauma. PMID:26460888

  5. Fluid resuscitation in modern combat casualty care: lessons learned from Somalia.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, John B

    2003-05-01

    The medical issues faced by military medics in the combat environment frequently represent a significant variation from their training and civilian experience. The differences between care delivered by military medics under fire and care rendered by civilian medics are profound. The lessons assimilated from extensive discussion and focused conferences form the basis for the proposed changes in combat prehospital care. These differences revolve around a lack of basic monitoring capability, significant logistical constraints, and prolonged evacuation times. The resuscitation algorithm presented in this article represents a consensus of military and civilian trauma experts. PMID:12768103

  6. The prehospital phase of acute myocardial infarction in the era of thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S B; Borsch, M A

    1990-06-15

    To evaluate the factors affecting the time between symptom onset and hospital arrival in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), we gave a detailed questionnaire to all who were admitted or transferred with AMI from January 1988 to February 1989. In these 126 patients (94 men, 32 women) the mean prehospital time was 5.9 +/- 11.0 hours (median 2.0, range 0.4 to 69.0). The time between symptom onset and reaching a decision that medical care should be sought was 62% of the mean prehospital time. In 100 (79%) patients, the prehospital time was less than or equal to 6 hours; of these, 61 (61%) were retrospectively judged to have been optimal candidates for lytic therapy. Stepwise multiple regression selected the following 4 variables as independent predictors of prehospital time: slow symptom progression; low income; female gender; and advanced age. All of these variables are predictive (p less than 0.03) of increased prehospital time; absence of prior AMI was of borderline additional significance (p = 0.053). Similarly, logistic regression analysis selected slow symptom progression, female gender and low income as significant (p less than or equal to 0.02) independent predictors of prehospital time greater than 6 hours. The logistic regression model incorporating these 3 variables had a sensitivity of 54%, a specificity of 95% and a positive predictive value of 72% in identifying patients with prehospital time greater than 6 hours. Thus, these data indicate it is possible to characterize patients likely to experience undue prehospital delay during AMI, which may be of importance to future public education efforts. PMID:2353644

  7. Advances in prehospital airway management

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, PE; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts. PMID:24741499

  8. [Analysis of the prehospitalization period in myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Benzer, W; Mähr, G

    1983-01-01

    56 patients with acute myocardial infarction during the period 1973/74, and 58 during the period 1979/80, were questioned immediately after arrival in the coronary care unit about their pre-hospitalization phase. We were able to determine, that the patients' decision time followed by the transportation time accounted for the greater part of the pre-hospitalization period. The contact time between general practitioner and patient played only an insignificant role in the total time-lag. In a comparison of the years 1973/74 and 1979/80 an increase in the patients' decision time and a decrease in the transportation time became evident. Noteworthy was, that in approximately one-fifth of the cases the telephone call to the doctor was not answered. Since an improvement in informing the general public about prodromal symptoms of heart attacks does not seem to bring about a decrease in the decision time, a shortening of the pre-hospitalization period could succeed through a reduction in transportation time and an improvement in doctor accessibility. The use of mobile coronary care units, in particular in rural areas, and improvement in doctors' radio communication services would in that case be matters for discussion. PMID:6868942

  9. Understanding prehospital delay behavior in acute myocardial infarction in women.

    PubMed

    Waller, Cynthia G

    2006-12-01

    Studies demonstrate that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality can be reduced if reperfusion therapy is initiated within 1 hour of AMI symptom onset. However, a considerable number of men and women arrive at the emergency department outside of the time frame for thrombolytic and angioplasty effectiveness. This is especially true for women who have been shown to delay longer than men due to their prehospital decision-making process utilized. With a mean total delay time greater than 4 hours, the time interval from symptom onset to transport activation to the hospital consumes the majority of the prehospital phase of emergency cardiac care. The health belief model, self-regulation model, theory of reasoned action, and theory of planned behavior have all been used to describe the prehospital decision-making process of both men and women with an AMI and the variables that impact that process. These models have identified the importance of symptom attribution to cardiac-related causes as a target variable for research and interventions related to care-seeking behavior. PMID:18340239

  10. Intraosseous access in trauma by air medical retrieval teams.

    PubMed

    Sheils, Mark; Ross, Mark; Eatough, Noel; Caputo, Nicholas D

    2014-01-01

    Trauma accounts for a significant portion of overall mortality globally. Hemorrhage is the second major cause of mortality in the prehospital environment. Air medical retrieval services throughout the world have been developed to help improve the outcomes of patients suffering from a broad range of medical conditions, including trauma. These services often utilize intraosseous (IO) devices as an alternative means for access of both medically ill and traumatically injured patients in austere environments. However, studies have suggested that IO access cannot reach acceptable rates for massive transfusion. We review the subject to find the answer of whether IO access should be performed by air medical teams in the prehospital setting, or would central venous (CVC) access be more appropriate? We decided to assess the literature for capacity of IO access to meet resuscitation requirements in the prehospital management of trauma. We also decided to compare the insertion and complication characteristics of IO and CVC access. PMID:25049187

  11. Simplifying prehospital analgesia. Why certain medications should or should not be used for pain management in the field.

    PubMed

    Bledsoe, Bryan; Braude, Darren; Dailey, Michael W; Myers, Jeff; Richards, Mike; Wesley, Keith

    2005-07-01

    Prehospital analgesia can be safely provided with only three agents: fentanyl, morphine and the mixed-gas nitrous oxide/oxygen. Of these three, fentanyl is by far the best agent for general EMS analgesic therapy by paramedics. However, to initiate prehospital analgesia earlier in the EMS response time frame, EMT's should administer nitrous oxide/oxygen. This protocol can easily be added to the EMT education program or through a continuing education session. All of the other agents discussed have absolutely no role in modern prehospital care. PMID:16027666

  12. Pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of severe injuries: changes and trends.

    PubMed

    Hussmann, Bjoern; Lendemans, Sven

    2014-10-01

    The pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of most severely injured patients has dramatically changed over the last 20 years. In this context, the factor time has gained more and more attention, particularly in German-speaking countries. While the management in the early 1990s aimed at comprehensive and complete therapy at the accident site, the premise today is to stabilise trauma patients at the accident site and transfer them into the hospital rapidly. In addition, the introduction of training and education programmes such as Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS(®)), Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS(®)) concept or the TEAM(®) concept has increased the quality of treatment of most severely injured trauma patients both in the preclinical field and in the emergency trauma room. Today, all emergency surgical procedures in severely injured patients are generally performed in accordance with the Damage Control Orthopaedics (DCO) principle. The advancements described in this article provide examples for the improved quality of the management of severely injured patients in the preclinical field and during the initial in-hospital treatment phase. The implementation of trauma networks, the release of the S3 polytrauma guidelines, and the DGU "Weißbuch" have contributed to a more structured management of most severely injured patients. PMID:25284232

  13. Injury-related mortality audit in a regional trauma center at Puducherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Radjou, Angeline Neetha; Balliga, Dillip Kumar; Pal, Ranabir; Mahajan, Preetam

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is an alarming trend of injuries leading to poor outcome of victims in India. Objective: To study the profile of patients who died due to trauma and to identify factors involved in both pre-hospital and hospital care. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based study was performed at a trauma center in Puducherry from June 2009 to May 2010. Patients who had at least one sign of life on admission and later died were included. The demographic characteristics, injury mechanism, nature and site of injury, influence of alcohol, pre-hospital time and care, distance traveled, number of referrals, time spent in study hospital, cause of death, and missed injuries revealed at post mortem were noted. Results: Of the 204 fatal cases, most were between 25-65 years of age (77%); sustained injuries over weekends (36%) and between 4 pm and midnight (41%); had at least one halt in a medical facility before reaching definitive care (56%); and died within a week (63%). Adults (25-65 y) sustained most injuries (77%) on two wheelers. In those aged over 65 years, 79 percent were pedestrians. Road traffic injuries were responsible for 82 % of deaths; 16 percent were reportedly under the influence of alcohol at the time of injury. Mean delay from the time of accident to admission was 14.9 hours and median distance traveled was 30 kilometers. Head injury was the most common (66%) cause of death. Post mortem revealed skull fractures (37%), while missed injuries were noted in 8 percent, mostly involving the cervical spine and chest wall. Conclusion: The problem of trauma care needs to be addressed urgently in this part of southern India to reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:22416154

  14. Outcome of major trauma patients in a Hong Kong general hospital.

    PubMed

    Kam, C W; Kitchell, A K; Yau, H H; Kan, C H

    1998-09-01

    This is a retrospective study on the outcome using the TRISS methodology of 94 significantly injured patients over a 24-month period, managed by the Hospital Trauma Team in a general hospital since the formation of the Team in August 1994. There were 37 deaths and nine (24.3%) of these were 'potentially preventable' according to TRISS methodology. Seven of these nine 'potentially preventable or unexpected deaths' were transferred from a nearby district hospital where there was no acute operative facilities. There was no significant difference between the sex, age, mode of injury or Injury Severity Score between the direct admission and transfer-in cases and the M-statistic values of the two groups were similar. Five of the nine deaths happened in the first 4 months after the formation of the Trauma Team and the other four were scattered in the subsequent 20 months. The rate of preventable deaths was 50% (five out of 10 deaths) in the first 4 months, and was 15% (four out of 26) in the subsequent period. The probable causes for the 'potentially preventable trauma deaths' were delay owing to interhospital transfer, delay in activation of the trauma team, unidentified intra-peritoneal haemorrhage, failure to control haemorrhage and delayed or inadequate definitive operation. The evident improvement in the reduction of unexpected trauma deaths were likely associated with the success factors of the improvement of the multi-disciplinary cooperation including mutual understanding, simultaneous patient assessment, higher readiness to use diagnostic peritoneal lavage or ultrasonography to evaluate blunt abdominal trauma, earlier senior participation in patient care, shortening in response time of supportive facilities and a gradual cultural change towards dedicated trauma patient care. Further reduction in unexpected deaths can be expected if better prehospital triage by ambulance staff is attained to transfer trauma patients to the most appropriate instead of the nearest

  15. Compassion fatigue, moral distress, and work engagement in surgical intensive care unit trauma nurses: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mason, Virginia M; Leslie, Gail; Clark, Kathleen; Lyons, Pat; Walke, Erica; Butler, Christina; Griffin, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Preparation for replacing the large proportion of staff nurses reaching retirement age in the next few decades in the United States is essential to continue delivering high-quality nursing care and improving patient outcomes. Retaining experienced critical care nurses is imperative to successfully implementing the orientation of new inexperienced critical care nurses. It is important to understand factors that affect work engagement to develop strategies that enhance nurse retention and improve the quality of patient care. Nurses' experience of moral distress has been measured in medical intensive care units but not in surgical trauma care units, where nurses are exposed to patients and families faced with sudden life-threatening, life-changing patient consequences.This pilot study is a nonexperimental, descriptive, correlational design to examine the effect of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, moral distress, and level of nursing education on critical care nurses' work engagement. This is a partial replication of Lawrence's dissertation. The study also asked nurses to describe sources of moral distress and self-care strategies for coping with stress. This was used to identify qualitative themes about the nurse experiences. Jean Watson's theory of human caring serves as a framework to bring meaning and focus to the nursing-patient caring relationship.A convenience sample of 26 of 34 eligible experienced surgical intensive care unit trauma nurses responded to this survey, indicating a 77% response rate. Twenty-seven percent of the nurses scored high, and 73% scored average on compassion satisfaction. On compassion fatigue, 58% scored average on burnout and 42% scored low. On the secondary traumatic stress subscale, 38% scored average, and 62% scored low. The mean moral distress situations subscale score was 3.4, which is elevated. The mean 9-item Utrecht Work Engagement Scale total score, measuring work engagement, was 3.8, which is considered low

  16. Project Kealahou: improving Hawai'i's system of care for at-risk girls and young women through gender-responsive, trauma-informed care.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Edward; Jackson, David S; Slavin, Lesley A; Michels, M Stanton; McGeehan, Kathleen M

    2014-12-01

    Project Kealahou (PK) is a six-year, federally-funded program aimed at improving services and outcomes for Hawai'i's female youth who are at risk for running away, truancy, abuse, suicide, arrest and incarceration. PK builds upon two decades of sustained cross-agency efforts among the state's mental health, juvenile justice, education, and child welfare systems to promote system-of-care (SOC) principles of community-based, individualized, culturally and linguistically competent, family driven, youth-guided, and evidence-based services. In addition, PK emphasizes trauma-informed and gender-responsive care in serving its target population of females ages 11-18 years who have experienced psychological trauma. Results from the first four years of the implementation of PK in the Department of Health's (DOH) Child and Adolescent Mental Health Division (CAMHD) highlight the serious familial, socioeconomic, functional, and interpersonal challenges faced by the young women who receive services in Hawai'i's SOC. Despite the challenges faced by PK youth and their families, preliminary results of the evaluation of PK show significant improvements across multiple clinical and functional domains of service recipients. A financial analysis indicates that these outcomes were obtained with a minimal overall increase in costs when compared to standard care alone. Overall, these results suggest that PK may offer a cost effective way to improve access, care, and outcomes for at-risk youth and their families in Hawai'i. PMID:25628971

  17. A mental health intervention strategy for low-income, trauma-exposed Latina immigrants in primary care: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kaltman, Stacey; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Serrano, Adriana; Gonzales, Felisa A

    2016-01-01

    Latinos in the United States face significant mental health disparities related to access to care, quality of care, and outcomes. Prior research suggests that Latinos prefer to receive care for common mental health problems (e.g., depression and anxiety disorders) in primary care settings, suggesting a need for evidence-based mental health services designed for delivery in these settings. This study sought to develop and preliminarily evaluate a mental health intervention for trauma-exposed Latina immigrants with depression and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for primary care clinics that serve the uninsured. The intervention was designed to be simultaneously responsive to patients' preferences for individual psychotherapy and to the needs of safety-net primary care clinics for efficient services and to address the social isolation that is common to the Latina immigrant experience. The resulting intervention, developed on the basis of findings from the research team's formative research, incorporated individual and group sessions and combined evidence-based interventions to reduce depression and PTSD symptoms, increase group readiness, and improve perceived social support. Low-income Latina immigrant women (N = 28), who screened positive for depression and/or PTSD participated in an open pilot trial of the intervention at a community primary care clinic. Results indicated that the intervention was feasible, acceptable, and safe. A randomized controlled trial of the intervention is warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26913774

  18. Quality of care after early childhood trauma and well-being in later life: child Holocaust survivors reaching old age.

    PubMed

    van der Hal-Van Raalte, Elisheva; Van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2007-10-01

    The link between deprivation and trauma during earliest childhood and psychosocial functioning and health in later life was investigated in a group of child Holocaust survivors. In a nonconvenience sample 203 survivors, born between 1935 and 1944, completed questionnaires on Holocaust survival experience and several inventories on current health, depression, posttraumatic stress, loneliness, and attachment style. Quality of postwar care arrangements and current physical health independently predicted lack of well-being in old age. Loss of parents during the persecution, year of birth of the survivors (being born before or during the war), and memories of the Holocaust did not significantly affect present well-being. Lack of adequate care after the end of World War II is associated with lower well-being of the youngest Holocaust child survivors, even after an intervening period of 60 years. Our study validates Keilson's (1992) concept of "sequential traumatization," and points to the importance of aftertrauma care in decreasing the impact of early childhood trauma. PMID:18194031

  19. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, Vishwanathan; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Context: Though intensive care units (ICUs) only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Fisher's two-tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed. PMID:25829909

  20. Post-Traumatic Stress, Trauma-Informed Care, and Compassion Fatigue in Psychiatric Hospital Staff: A Correlational Study.

    PubMed

    Jacobowitz, William; Moran, Christine; Best, Cheryl; Mensah, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Assault of staff in psychiatric hospitals is a frequent occurrence, and studies indicate that hospital staff are at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We performed a correlational study with a convenience sample of 172 staff in a psychiatric hospital and compared the rate of traumatic events (TEs), resilience, confidence, and compassion fatigue to PTSD symptoms (PTSS). Regression analyses identified two variables that were unique predictors of PTSS: (1) trauma-informed care (TIC) meeting attendance and (2) burnout symptoms. Severe TEs, age, and compassion satisfaction also contributed to the model. Attention to these factors may help reduce PTSS in psychiatric staff. PMID:26631861

  1. Group attachment-based intervention: trauma-informed care for families with adverse childhood experiences.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Anne; Steele, Howard; Bate, Jordan; Nikitiades, Adella; Allman, Brooke; Bonuck, Karen; Meissner, Paul; Steele, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the main premises of an innovative trauma-informed intervention, group attachment-based intervention, specifically developed to target vulnerable families with infants and toddlers, living in one of the poorest urban counties in the nation. It also reports on the trauma-relevant characteristics of 60 families entering a clinical trial to study the effectiveness of Group Attachment-Based Intervention. Initial survey results revealed high levels of neglect, abuse, and household dysfunction in mothers' histories (77% reported ≥4 adverse childhood experiences, with more than 90% reporting 2 or more current toxic stressors, including poverty, obesity, domestic and community violence, and homelessness). PMID:26017004

  2. Needle Thoracotomy in Trauma.

    PubMed

    Rottenstreich, Misgav; Fay, Shmuel; Gendler, Sami; Klein, Yoram; Arkovitz, Marc; Rottenstreich, Amihai

    2015-12-01

    Tension pneumothorax is one of the leading causes of preventable death in trauma patients. Needle thoracotomy (NT) is the currently accepted first-line intervention but has not been well validated. In this review, we have critically discussed the evidence for NT procedure, re-examined the recommendations by the Advanced Trauma Life Support organization and investigated the safest and most effective way of NT. The current evidence to support the use of NT is limited. However, when used, it should be applied in the 2nd intercostal space at midclavicular line using a catheter length of at least 4.5 cm. Alternative measures should be studied for better prehospital management of tension pneumothorax. PMID:26633663

  3. Use of a lighted stylet for guided orotracheal intubation in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T P; Stewart, R D; Paris, P M; Ellis, D; Berkebile, P E

    1985-04-01

    Management of the airway in acutely injured patients demands special skills of the emergency physician. A technique of light-guided orotracheal intubation has been described in the literature and was performed under protocol by resident physicians in an urban mobile intensive care system. The method utilizes a flexible lighted stylet to provide a guide to correct placement through transillumination of the soft tissues of the neck. During the 12-month period of the study, 24 intubations were attempted in 21 patients using this technique. Twenty-one attempts (88%) were successful. The average time for intubation was 20 seconds, with none requiring more than 45 seconds. Fourteen intubations (67%) were successful on the first attempt. Of the three unsuccessful procedures, two were attempted in bright sunlight, and all three patients had vomited prior to the attempts. Trauma to the soft tissues in one successfully intubated patient was the only complication reported with the technique. The advantages of this method, including rapidity of intubation, ability to intubate without manipulation of the head or neck, and the apparently few complications, make it particularly attractive to emergency personnel. We conclude that guided orotracheal intubation using a lighted stylet is an effective and safe method of emergency intubation, even in the adverse prehospital environment. PMID:3985444

  4. Trauma Resilience among Youth in Substitute Care Demonstrating Sexual Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Scott C.; Ragsdale, Brian; Miller, Steven A.; Spacarelli, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the relationship between several proposed protective factors and trauma symptoms among highly vulnerable youth in the child welfare system. Methods: Participants were 142 youth identified with a sexual behavior problem and their caregivers. Two waves of data were collected for each…

  5. Understanding Safety in Prehospital Emergency Medical Services for Children

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Erika K.; O’Brien, Kerth; Curry, Merlin; Meckler, Garth D.; Engle, Philip P.; Jui, Jonathan; Summers, Caitlin; Lambert, William; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Objective For over a decade, the field of medicine has recognized the importance of studying and designing strategies to prevent safety issues in hospitals and clinics. However, there has been less focus on understanding safety in prehospital emergency medical services, particularly in regard to children. Roughly 27.7 million (or 27%) of the annual ED visits are by children under the age of 19, and about 2 million of these children reach the hospital via EMS. This paper adds to our qualitative understanding of the nature and contributors to safety events in the prehospital emergency care of children. Methods We conducted four 8–12 person focus groups among paid and volunteer Emergency Medical Services providers to understand: 1) patient safety issues that occur in the prehospital care of children, and 2) factors that contribute to these safety issues (e.g. patient, family, systems, environmental, or individual provider factors). Focus groups were conducted in rural and urban settings. Interview transcripts were coded for overarching themes. Results Key factors and themes identified in the analysis were grouped into categories using an ecological approach that distinguishes between systems, team, child and family, and individual provider level contributors. At the systems level, focus group participants cited challenges such as lack of appropriately sized equipment or standardized pediatric medication dosages, insufficient human resources, limited pediatric training and experience, and aspects of emergency medical services culture. EMS team level factors centered on communication with other EMS providers (both prehospital and hospital). Family and child factors included communication barriers and challenging clinical situations or scene characteristics. Finally, focus group participants highlighted a range of provider level factors including heightened levels of anxiety, insufficient experience and training with children and errors in assessment and decision

  6. [A historical retrospect of Pre-hospital emergency treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Peng; Cui, Yong-Ying; Wang, Zhen-E

    2013-07-01

    In 1240, the first organization of first aid medical service for rescuing and transferring the wounded in the world was established at Florence, Italy. The stations of Air Ambulances were set up in most of the developed countries at the end of the 1960s. In the middle of the 1970s, the International Red Cross put forward the principles of internationalization, international cooperation and its standardization, thus, promoting the development of pre-hospital emergency treatment. In 1972, the first Emergency Medical Service Center was established and in 1973, Congress of the United States passed the Emergency Medical Services Act (EMSS). In 1976, the legislative procedure was finished and the National Emergency Network was formed, afterwards, pre-hospital emergency treatment, on-site rescue and transfer care, patient monitoring system of ICU-CCU were set up successively. Since the first rescue group of "three failure" (heart failure, lung failure and renal failure) was first formed at Tianjin First Center Hospital in August 1974, the pre-hospital emergency of China had been developing gradually. PMID:24345547

  7. Measurement of Serum Melatonin in Intensive Care Unit Patients: Changes in Traumatic Brain Injury, Trauma, and Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Seifman, Marc A.; Gomes, Keith; Nguyen, Phuong N.; Bailey, Michael; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.; Cooper, David J.; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous hormone mainly produced by the pineal gland whose dysfunction leads to abnormal sleeping patterns. Changes in melatonin have been reported in acute traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the impact of environmental conditions typical of the intensive care unit (ICU) has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to compare daily melatonin production in three patient populations treated at the ICU to differentiate the role of TBI versus ICU conditions. Forty-five patients were recruited and divided into severe TBI, trauma without TBI, medical conditions without trauma, and compared to healthy volunteers. Serum melatonin levels were measured at four daily intervals at 0400 h, 1000 h, 1600 h, and 2200 h for 7 days post-ICU admission by commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The geometric mean concentrations (95% confidence intervals) of melatonin in these groups showed no difference being 8.3 (6.3–11.0), 9.3 (7.0–12.3), and 8.9 (6.6–11.9) pg/mL, respectively, in TBI, trauma, and intensive care cohorts. All of these patient groups demonstrated decreased melatonin concentrations when compared to control patients. This study suggests that TBI as well as ICU conditions, may have a role in the dysfunction of melatonin. Monitoring and possibly substituting melatonin acutely in these settings may assist in ameliorating long-term sleep dysfunction in all of these groups, and possibly contribute to reducing secondary brain injury in severe TBI. PMID:25477861

  8. ROC trials update on prehospital hypertonic saline resuscitation in the aftermath of the US-Canadian trials

    PubMed Central

    Dubick, Michael A; Shek, Pang; Wade, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to assess the current state of hypertonic saline as a prehospital resuscitation fluid in hypotensive trauma patients, particularly after the 3 major Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trauma trials in the US and Canada were halted due to futility. Hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury are the leading causes of death in both military and civilian populations. Prehospital fluid resuscitation remains controversial in civilian trauma, but small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic fluids is of utility in military scenarios with prolonged or delayed evacuation times. A large body of pre-clinical and clinical literature has accumulated over the past 30 years on the hemodynamic and, most recently, the anti-inflammatory properties of hypertonic saline, alone or with dextran-70. This review assesses the current state of hypertonic fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of the failed Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trials. PMID:23778489

  9. Endotracheal Intubation in Patients Treated for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph B.; Nicholas, Katherine S.; Varelas, Panayiotis N.; Harsh, Donna M.; Durkalski, Valerie; Silbergleit, Robert; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data describe the frequency, timing, or indications for endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients with status epilepticus. A better understanding of the characteristics of patients with status epilepticus requiring airway interventions could inform clinical care. We sought to characterize ETI use in patients with prehospital status epilepticus. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing intravenous lorazepam to intramuscular midazolam for prehospital status epilepticus treatment. Subjects received ETI in the prehospital, Emergency Department (ED), or inpatient setting at the discretion of caregivers. Results Of 1023 enrollments, 218 (21 %) received ETI. 204 (93.6 %) of the ETIs were performed in the hospital and 14 (6.4 %) in the prehospital setting. Intubated patients were older (52 vs 41 years, p < 0.001), and men underwent ETI more than women (26 vs 21 %, p = 0.047). Patients with ongoing seizures on ED arrival had a higher rate of ETI (32 vs 16 %, p < 0.001), as did those who received rescue anti-seizure medication (29 vs 20 %, p = 0.004). Mortality was higher for intubated patients (7 vs 0.4 %, p < 0.001). Most ETI (n = 133, 62 %) occurred early (prior to or within 30 min after ED arrival), and late ETI was associated with higher mortality (14 vs 3 %, p = 0.002) than early ETI. Conclusions ETI is common in patients with status epilepticus, particularly among the elderly or those with refractory seizures. Any ETI and late ETI are both associated with higher mortality. PMID:25623785

  10. Prenatal and mental health care among trauma-exposed, HIV-infected, pregnant women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Villar-Loubet, Olga M; Illa, Lourdes; Echenique, Marisa; Cook, Ryan; Messick, Barbara; Duthely, Lunthita M; Gazabon, Shirley; Glemaud, Myriam; Bustamante-Avellaneda, Victoria; Potter, JoNell

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive prenatal care for HIV-infected women in the United States involves addressing mental health needs. Retrospective quantitative data are presented from HIV-infected pregnant women (n = 45) who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse (66%), abuse in adulthood by a sexual partner (25%), and abuse during pregnancy (10%). Depression and anxiety were the most commonly reported psychological symptoms; more than half of the sample reported symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), including HIV-related PTSD (PTSD-HIV). There was a strong association between depression and PTSD as well as between anxiety and PTSD-HIV. The majority of infants received zidovudine at birth and continued the recommended regimen. All but one infant were determined to be noninfected. Women improved their CD4(+) T cell counts and HIV RNA viral loads while in prenatal care. Results support the need for targeted prenatal programs to address depression, anxiety, substance use, and trauma in HIV-infected women. PMID:24274993

  11. [Prehospital thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Carlsson, J; Schuster, H P; Tebbe, U

    1997-10-01

    The extent of myocardial damage occurring during acute myocardial infarction is time dependent, and there is abundant evidence from most clinical trials that mortality reduction is greatest in patients treated early with thrombolytic agents, although beneficial effects have been shown with treatment initiated up to 12 h after onset of symptoms. All studies on prehospital thrombolysis have conclusively shown the practicability and safety of patient selection and administration of the thrombolytic agent. The accuracy of diagnosis in the prehospital setting was comparable to trials of in-hospital thrombolysis, e.g., in the Myocardial Infarction Triage and Intervention Project (MITI) 98% of the patients enrolled had subsequent evidence of acute myocardial infarction. With regard to time savings, all randomized studies showed positive results. The smallest time gain was observed in the MITI trial: prehospital-treated patients received thrombolytic therapy an average of 33 min earlier than those treated in hospital. In the European Myocardial Infarction Project (EMIP) the difference in time between prehospital and hospital treatment was a median of 55 min. However, none of these trials was able to show a significant short-term mortality difference between the two groups. Only a meta analysis of five randomized studies with a combined median time gain of about 60 min showed a significant 17% reduction in short-term mortality for patients who received thrombolytic therapy in the prehospital phase. In the Grampian Region Early Anistreplase Trial (GREAT), a study performed in a more rural area than other studies, the time gain by prehospital initiation of thrombolysis was a median of 130 min. GREAT was the only study to date reporting a significant mortality benefit for prehospital-treated patients after 3 months and 1 year. In conclusion, prehospital thrombolysis is feasible and safe. Patients with acute myocardial infarction can be correctly identified and treated with

  12. A Cost-effectiveness Analysis Comparing a Clinical Decision Rule Versus Usual Care to Risk Stratify Children for Intraabdominal Injury After Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Yang, Zhuo; Clark, John A.; Kuppermann, Nathan; Holmes, James F.; Melnikow, Joy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recently a clinical decision rule (CDR) to identify children at very low risk for intraabdominal injury needing acute intervention (IAI) following blunt torso trauma was developed. Potential benefits of a CDR include more appropriate abdominal computed tomography (CT) use and decreased hospital costs. The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of implementing the CDR compared to usual care for the evaluation of children with blunt torso trauma. The hypothesis was that compared to usual care, implementation of the CDR would result in lower CT use and hospital costs. Methods A cost-effectiveness decision analytic model was constructed comparing the costs and outcomes of implementation of the CDR to usual care in the evaluation of children with blunt torso trauma. Probabilities from a multicenter cohort study of children with blunt torso trauma were derived; estimated costs were based on those at the study coordinating site. Outcome measures included missed IAI, number of abdominal CT scans, total costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Sensitivity analyses varying imputed probabilities, costs, and scenarios were conducted. Results Using a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 children with blunt torso trauma, the base case model projected that the implementation of the CDR would result in 0.50 additional missed IAIs, a total cost savings of $54,527, and 104 fewer abdominal CT scans compared to usual care. The usual care strategy would cost $108,110 to prevent missing one additional IAI. Findings were robust under multiple sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Compared to usual care, implementation of the CDR in the evaluation of children with blunt torso trauma would reduce hospital costs and abdominal CT imaging, with a slight increase in the risk of missed intraabdominal IAI. PMID:24238315

  13. Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Quell, Robin; Sørlie, Venke

    2008-10-01

    The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation. PMID:18929341

  14. National Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines Strategy: A Summary for EMS Stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Gaither, Joshua B; Bigham, Blair L; Myers, J Brent; Kupas, Douglas F; Spaite, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Multiple national organizations have recommended and supported a national investment to increase the scientific evidence available to guide patient care delivered by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and incorporate that evidence directly into EMS systems. Ongoing efforts seek to develop, implement, and evaluate prehospital evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) using the National Model Process created by a multidisciplinary panel of experts convened by the Federal Interagency Committee on EMS (FICEMS) and the National EMS Advisory Council (NEMSAC). Yet, these and other EBG efforts have occurred in relative isolation, with limited direct collaboration between national projects, and have experienced challenges in implementation of individual guidelines. There is a need to develop sustainable relationships among stakeholders that facilitate a common vision that facilitates EBG efforts. Herein, we summarize a National Strategy on EBGs developed by the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) with involvement of 57 stakeholder organizations, and with the financial support of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the EMS for Children program. The Strategy proposes seven action items that support collaborative efforts in advancing prehospital EBGs. The first proposed action is creation of a Prehospital Guidelines Consortium (PGC) representing national medical and EMS organizations that have an interest in prehospital EBGs and their benefits to patient outcomes. Other action items include promoting research that supports creation and evaluates the impact of EBGs, promoting the development of new EBGs through improved stakeholder collaboration, and improving education on evidence-based medicine for all prehospital providers. The Strategy intends to facilitate implementation of EBGs by improving guideline dissemination and incorporation into protocols, and seeks to establish standardized evaluation methods for prehospital EBGs. Finally, the Strategy

  15. Adverse Childhood Experiences in the Lives of Male Sex Offenders: Implications for Trauma-Informed Care.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Jill S; Willis, Gwenda M; Prescott, David S

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the prevalence of childhood trauma in a sample of male sexual offenders (N = 679) using the Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) scale. Compared with males in the general population, sex offenders had more than 3 times the odds of child sexual abuse (CSA), nearly twice the odds of physical abuse, 13 times the odds of verbal abuse, and more than 4 times the odds of emotional neglect and coming from a broken home. Less than 16% endorsed zero ACEs and nearly half endorsed four or more. Multiple maltreatments often co-occurred with other types of household dysfunction, suggesting that many sex offenders were raised within a disordered social environment. Higher ACE scores were associated with higher risk scores. By enhancing our understanding of the frequency and correlates of early adverse experiences, we can better devise trauma-informed interventions that respond to the clinical needs of sex offender clients. PMID:24872347

  16. Monitoring of hemostasis in combat trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Carr, Marcus E

    2004-12-01

    Bleeding is clearly a major cause of morbidity and death after trauma. When bleeding is attributable to transection of major vessels, surgical repair is appropriate. Posttraumatic microvascular bleeding attributable to coagulopathy secondary to metabolic derangements, hypothermia, and depletion or dysfunction of cellular and protein components requires a different approach. Although transfusion of blood products may be necessary to replace the blood loss, it does not always correct the problem of microvascular bleeding. The type of injury, mode of care, and treatment objectives differ significantly for combat-wounded soldiers versus civilian trauma patients. Although hemorrhage is responsible for 50% of combat deaths, published information about coagulation monitoring among combat patients is very limited. These articles summarize the appropriate monitoring of hemostasis among combat trauma patients, review the unique nature of combat casualties and the medical system used to treat them, and discuss information available from civilian studies. Because the development of coagulopathy is relatively infrequent in the young, otherwise healthy, military population, the routine screening measures currently used are adequate to guide initial blood product administration. However, as new intravenous hemostatic agents are used for these patients, better laboratory measures will be required. Although hemorrhage is the leading cause of death for combat casualties, catastrophic hemorrhage is rarely a prehospital combat medical management problem because, when it occurs, it tends to cause death before medical care can be provided. In civilian environments, most seriously injured victims can be reached and transported by emergency medical services personnel within minutes; in combat, it often takes hours simply to transport casualties off the battlefield. In combat situations, even if the transport distances are small, the hazardous nature of the forward combat areas frequently

  17. The impact of shorter prehospital transport times on outcomes in patients with abdominal vascular injuries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most deaths in patients with abdominal vascular injuries (ABVI) are caused by exsanguination and irreversible shock. Therefore, time to definitive hemorrhage control is an important factor affecting survival. The study goals were: (1) document current outcomes in patients with ABVI, and (2) compare outcomes to those from the era preceding improvements in an urban prehospital system. Methods A retrospective review of all patients with ABVI at an urban level 1 trauma center was completed. Patients injured prior to prehospital transport improvements (1991–1994) were compared to those following a reduction in transport times (1995–2004). Results Of 388 patients, 70 (18%) arrived prior to prehospital improvements (1991–1994). Patient/injury demographics were similar in both groups (age, sex, penetrating mechanism; p > 0.05). The number of patients presenting with ABVI increased (23 vs. 35 per year; p < 0.05) concurrent to a reduction in transport times (27 vs. 20 minutes; p < 0.05). Patients were more frequently unstable (63% vs. 91%; p < 0.05). Regardless of the specific vessel, mortality increased (37% vs. 67%; p < 0.05) following prehospital improvements. Conclusions A reduction in urban transport times resulted in an increase in (1) the number of patients arriving with abdominal vascular injuries, (2) the proportion presenting in physiologic extremis, and (3) overall mortality. PMID:24360286

  18. The 2014 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group (JWG) White Paper on “Developing Trauma Sciences and Injury Care in India”

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Ranabir; Agarwal, Amit; Galwankar, Sagar; Swaroop, Mamta; Stawicki, Stanislaw P; Rajaram, Laxminarayan; Paladino, Lorenzo; Aggarwal, Praveen; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Dwivedi, Sankalp; Menon, Geetha; Misra, MC; Kalra, OP; Singh, Ajai; Radjou, Angeline Neetha; Joshi, Anuja

    2014-01-01

    It is encouraging to see the much needed shift in the understanding and recognition of the concept of “burden of disease” in the context of traumatic injury. Equally important is understanding that the impact of trauma burden rivals that of nontraumatic morbidities. Subsequently, this paradigm shift reinstates the appeal for timely interventions as the standard for management of traumatic emergencies. Emergency trauma care in India has been disorganized due to inadequate sensitivity toward patients affected by trauma as well as the haphazard, nonuniform acceptance of standardization as the norm. Some of the major hospitals across various regions in the country do have trauma care units, but even those lack protocols to ensure that all trauma cases are handled by those units, largely owing to lack of structured referral system. As a first step to reform the state of trauma care in the country, a detailed overview is needed to gain insight into the prevailing reality. The objectives of this paper are to thus weave a foundation based on the statistical and qualitative burden of trauma in the country; the available infrastructure of trauma care centers equipped to deal with trauma; the need and scope of standardized protocols for intervention; and most importantly, the application of these in shaping educational initiatives in advancing emergency trauma care in the country. PMID:25024939

  19. Early Acute Kidney Injury based on Serum Creatinine or Cystatin C in Intensive Care Unit after Major Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Farid; Sabetian, Golnar; Abbasi, Ghasem; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Salehi, Alireza; Khosravi, Abbas; Geramizadeh, Bita; Taregh, Shuja Ulhaq; Javadpour, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem in critically ill patients and is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recently, serum cystatin C has been shown to be superior to creatinine in early detection of renal function impairment. We compared estimated GFR based on serum cystatin C with estimated GFR based on serum creatinine for early detection of renal dysfunction according to the RIFLE criteria. Methods: During 9 months, three hundred post trauma patients that were referred to the intensive care unit of a referral trauma hospital were recruited. Serum creatinine and serum cystatin C were measured and the estimated GFR within 24 hours of ICU admission was calculated. The primary outcome was the incidence of AKI according to the RIFLE criteria within 2nd to 7th day of admission. Results: During the first week of ICU admission, 21% of patients experienced AKI. After adjusting for major confounders, only the patients with first day’s serum cystatin level higher than 0.78 mg/l were at higher risk of first week AKI (OR=6.14, 95% CI: 2.5-14.7, P<0.001). First day’s serum cystatin C and injury severity score were the major risk factors for ICU mortality (OR=3.54, 95% CI: 1.7-7.4, P=0.001) and (OR=4.6, 95% CI: 1.5-14, P=0.007), respectively. Conclusion: Within 24 hours after admission in ICU due to multiple trauma, high serum cystatin C level may have prognostic value in predicting early AKI and mortality during ICU admission. However, such correlation was not seen neither with creatinine nor cystatin C based GFR. PMID:26538776

  20. Helicopter Evacuation Following a Rural Trauma: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario Using Innovative Simulation Technology.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Desmond; Harty, Chris; Ravalia, Mohamed; Renouf, Tia; Alani, Sabrina; Brown, Robert; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of simulation as a teaching tool for medical professionals working in rural and remote contexts is apparent when low-frequency, high-risk situations are considered. Simulation training has been shown to enhance learning and improve patient outcomes in urban settings. However, there are few simulation scenarios designed to teach rural trauma management during complex medical transportation. In this technical report, we present a scenario using a medevac helicopter (Replica of Sikorsky S-92 designed by Virtual Marine Technology, St. John's, NL) at a rural community. This case can be used for training primary care physicians who are working in a rural or remote setting, or as an innovative addition to emergency medicine and pre-hospital care training programs. PMID:27081585

  1. Helicopter Evacuation Following a Rural Trauma: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario Using Innovative Simulation Technology

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Desmond; Harty, Chris; Ravalia, Mohamed; Renouf, Tia; Alani, Sabrina; Brown, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of simulation as a teaching tool for medical professionals working in rural and remote contexts is apparent when low-frequency, high-risk situations are considered. Simulation training has been shown to enhance learning and improve patient outcomes in urban settings. However, there are few simulation scenarios designed to teach rural trauma management during complex medical transportation. In this technical report, we present a scenario using a medevac helicopter (Replica of Sikorsky S-92 designed by Virtual Marine Technology, St. John's, NL) at a rural community. This case can be used for training primary care physicians who are working in a rural or remote setting, or as an innovative addition to emergency medicine and pre-hospital care training programs. PMID:27081585

  2. Penetrating trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  3. Penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  4. Cost Analysis of Operation Theatre Services at an Apex Tertiary Care Trauma Centre of India.

    PubMed

    Siddharth, Vijaydeep; Kumar, Subodh; Vij, Aarti; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Operating room services are one of the major cost and revenue-generating centres of a hospital. The cost associated with the provisioning of operating department services depends on the resources consumed and the unit costs of those resources. The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of operation theatre services at Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi. The study was carried out at the operation theatre department of Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC), AIIMS from April 2010 to March 2011 after obtaining approval from concerned authorities. This study was observational and descriptive in nature. Traditional (average or gross) costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of operation theatre (OT) services. Cost was calculated under two heads; as capital and operating cost. Annualised cost of capital assets was calculated according to the methodology prescribed by the World Health Organization and operating costs were taken on actual basis; thereafter, per day cost of OT services was obtained. The average number of surgeries performed in the trauma centre per day is 13. The annual cost of providing operating room services at JPNATC, New Delhi was calculated to be 197,298,704 Indian rupees (INR) (US$ 3,653,679), while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 22,626.92 (US$ 419). Majority of the expenditures were for human resource (33.63 %) followed by OT capital cost (31.90 %), consumables (29.97 %), engineering maintenance cost (2.55 %), support services operating cost (1.22 %) and support services capital cost (0.73 %). Of the total cost towards the provisioning of OT services, 32.63 % was capital cost while 67.37 % is operating cost. The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 54). PMID:26730059

  5. A Critical Look At Trauma-Informed Care Among Agencies and Systems Serving Maltreated Youth and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Rochelle F; Lang, Jason

    2016-05-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an increase in programs targeting children and youth impacted by traumatic events, with a heightened focus on ensuring that all such programs and relevant service systems are trauma informed. While such efforts are laudable, trauma-informed care (TIC) is defined in a number of ways, limiting evaluation of these initiatives, specifically as they relate to the potential for improved outcomes or reduced costs often used to advocate for TIC. Widespread interest in TIC, despite an apparent dearth of empirical research, served as the impetus for this special section. Our goal was to identify the most rigorous empirical studies available. These six papers were selected based on their inclusion of a definition of TIC, focus on at least one component of TIC in a child-serving system, and availability of empirical data demonstrating the effectiveness of their efforts. In addition to introducing these papers, we share preliminary data from a brief, anonymous survey of child-serving professionals across various systems and roles to obtain feedback about definitional and conceptual issues related to TIC. While this special section provides a representation of available empirical work, significant gaps between research and practice of TIC remain, with important implications for future work. PMID:26951344

  6. Utility of Repeat Head Computed Tomography for Intracranial Hemorrhage After Trauma and Importance of Direct Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Mary Ellen; Brown, Zachary; Matemavi, Praise; Melnic, Gloria; Sample, Jason

    2016-01-01

    At many institutions, it is common practice for trauma patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) to receive routine repeat head computed tomographic (CT) scans after the initial CT scan, regardless of symptoms, to evaluate progression of the injury. The purpose of this study was to assess quantifiable risk factors (age, anticoagulation, gender) that could place patients at greater risk for progression of injury, thus requiring surgical intervention (craniotomy, craniectomy) for which serial CT scanning would be useful. From January 2014 to June 2015, a total of 211 patients presented with traumatic ICH and 198 were eligible for inclusion. Twenty-six patients required operative intervention for ICH. One of 26 patients went to the operating room as a result of repeat head CT scans without associated mental status change, change in neurological examination, or associated symptoms such as nausea or vomiting. Significant changes in patient management due to routine repeat CT scans were not observed. There were no statistically significant risk factors identified to place patients at higher risk for progression of disease. The data from this analysis emphasized the importance of nursing care in identifying and relaying changes in patient condition to the trauma team. PMID:27618379

  7. [Pre-hospital management of acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lefort, Hugues; Fradin, Jordan; Blgnand, Michel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The medical management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) follows the recommendations of international medical societies. The call to the emergency services by the patient triggers a race against the clock in pre-hospital care. It is essential to reduce the duration of the inadequate perfusion of the heart in order to limit its consequences. An effective reperfusion strategy must be planned in advance taking into account the logistical constraints. It is crucial that the general public is educated to recognise the signs of ACS and to call the emergency services immediately (such as 15, 112 or 991). PMID:26040140

  8. Longitudinal spiritual coping with trauma in people with HIV: implications for health care.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Heidemarie; Ironson, Gail

    2014-03-01

    This 10-year study (N=177) examines how people with HIV use spirituality to cope with life's trauma on top of HIV-related stress (e.g., facing death, stigma, poverty, limited healthcare) usual events. Spirituality, defined as a connection to a higher presence, is independent from religion (institutionalized spirituality). As a dynamic adaptive process, coping requires longitudinal studying. Qualitative content-analysis of interviews/essays yielded a coding of specific aspects and a longitudinal rating of overall spiritual coping. Most participants were rated as spiritual, using spiritual practices, about half experienced comfort, empowerment, growth/transformation, gratitude, less than one-third meaning, community, and positive reframing. Up to one-fifth perceived spiritual conflict, struggle, or anger, triggering post-traumatic stress, which sometimes converted into positive growth/transformation later. Over time, 65% used spiritual coping positively, 7% negatively, and 28% had no significant use. Spirituality was mainly beneficial for women, heterosexuals, and African Americans (p<0.05). Results suggest that spirituality is a major source of positive and occasionally negative coping (e.g., viewing HIV as sin). We discuss how clinicians can recognize and prevent when spirituality is creating distress and barriers to HIV treatment, adding a literature review on ways of effective spiritual assessment. Spirituality may be a beneficial component of coping with trauma, considering socio-cultural contexts. PMID:24601735

  9. Longitudinal Spiritual Coping with Trauma in People with HIV: Implications for Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Ironson, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This 10-year study (N=177) examines how people with HIV use spirituality to cope with life's trauma on top of HIV-related stress (e.g., facing death, stigma, poverty, limited healthcare) usual events. Spirituality, defined as a connection to a higher presence, is independent from religion (institutionalized spirituality). As a dynamic adaptive process, coping requires longitudinal studying. Qualitative content-analysis of interviews/essays yielded a coding of specific aspects and a longitudinal rating of overall spiritual coping. Most participants were rated as spiritual, using spiritual practices, about half experienced comfort, empowerment, growth/transformation, gratitude, less than one-third meaning, community, and positive reframing. Up to one-fifth perceived spiritual conflict, struggle, or anger, triggering post-traumatic stress, which sometimes converted into positive growth/transformation later. Over time, 65% used spiritual coping positively, 7% negatively, and 28% had no significant use. Spirituality was mainly beneficial for women, heterosexuals, and African Americans (p<0.05). Results suggest that spirituality is a major source of positive and occasionally negative coping (e.g., viewing HIV as sin). We discuss how clinicians can recognize and prevent when spirituality is creating distress and barriers to HIV treatment, adding a literature review on ways of effective spiritual assessment. Spirituality may be a beneficial component of coping with trauma, considering socio-cultural contexts. PMID:24601735

  10. Children’s Mental Health Care following Hurricane Katrina: A Field Trial of Trauma-Focused Psychotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Jaycox, Lisa H.; Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Walker, Douglas W.; Langley, Audra K.; Gegenheimer, Kate L.; Scott, Molly; Schonlau, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    New Orleans school children participated in an assessment and field trial of two interventions 15 months after Hurricane Katrina. Children (N = 195) reported on hurricane exposure, lifetime trauma exposure, peer and parent support, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depressive symptoms. Teachers reported on behavior. At baseline, 60.5% screened positive for PTSD symptoms and were offered a group intervention at school or individual treatment at a mental health clinic. Uptake of the mental health care was uneven across intervention groups, with 98% beginning the school intervention, compared to 37% beginning at the clinic. Both treatments led to significant symptom reduction of PTSD symptoms but many still had elevated PTSD symptoms at post treatment. Implications for future postdisaster mental health work are discussed. PMID:20419730

  11. Trauma in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Cathy A

    2015-06-01

    Injury in older adults is a looming public health crisis. This article provides a broad overview of geriatric trauma across the continuum of care. After a review of the epidemiology of geriatric trauma, optimal approaches to patient care are presented for triage and transport, trauma team activation and initial assessment, inpatient management, and injury prevention. Special emphasis is given to assessment of frailty, advanced care planning, and transitions of care. PMID:25981722

  12. A consensus-based template for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physician-staffed pre-hospital units are employed in many Western emergency medical services (EMS) systems. Although these services usually integrate well within their EMS, little is known about the quality of care delivered, the precision of dispatch, and whether the services deliver a higher quality of care to pre-hospital patients. There is no common data set collected to document the activity of physician pre-hospital activity which makes shared research efforts difficult. The aim of this study was to develop a core data set for routine documentation and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services in Europe. Methods Using predefined criteria, we recruited sixteen European experts in the field of pre-hospital care. These experts were guided through a four-step modified nominal group technique. The process was carried out using both e-mail-based communication and a plenary meeting in Stavanger, Norway. Results The core data set was divided into 5 sections: "fixed system variables", "event operational descriptors", " patient descriptors", "process mapping", and "outcome measures and quality indicators". After the initial round, a total of 361 variables were proposed by the experts. Subsequent rounds reduced the number of core variables to 45. These constituted the final core data set. Emphasis was placed on the standardisation of reporting time variables, chief complaints and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions Using a modified nominal group technique, we have established a core data set for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services. We believe that this template could facilitate future studies within the field and facilitate standardised reporting and future shared research efforts in advanced pre-hospital care. PMID:22107787

  13. Promising Practices and Strategies for Using Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Practice to Improve Foster Care Placement Stability: A Breakthrough Series Collaborative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conradi, Lisa; Agosti, Jen; Tullberg, Erika; Richardson, Lisa; Langan, Heather; Ko, Susan; Wilson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This paper will provide information on a recent Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) conducted by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network on Using Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Practice to Improve Foster Care Placement Stability. Information on this particular BSC will be provided, followed by initial findings gathered from an evaluation of…

  14. Role of external cardiac compression in truncal trauma.

    PubMed

    Mattox, K L; Feliciano, D V

    1982-11-01

    External cardiac compression (ECC) was originally developed for patients with nontraumatic cardiac conditions, but it is now used for a wide variety of emergency conditions. As an integral part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), ECC coupled with forced pulmonary ventilation may NOT be applicable to cases of cardiac arrest following penetrating and blunt thoracic and abdominal trauma. Review of 100 patients with penetrating or blunt truncal trauma who received CPR and ECC more than 3 minutes prehospital revealed NO survivors despite continued aggressive resuscitative efforts in 49 of the patients upon arrival at a trauma center. Major cardiovascular disruption was found at thoracotomy or autopsy in all patients. In another 12 patients receiving forced ventilation and prehospital ECC, air embolism to the coronary arteries was the cause of death. CPR by paramedics, physicians, nurses, or lay persons does not appear to be of value in patients who have sustained cardiac arrest from truncal trauma. PMID:7143499

  15. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  16. Prehospital stroke diagnostics based on neurological examination and transcranial ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCS) has proved to be a fast and reliable tool for the detection of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusions in a hospital setting. In this feasibility study on prehospital sonography, our aim was to investigate the accuracy of TCCS for neurovascular emergency diagnostics when performed in a prehospital setting using mobile ultrasound equipment as part of a neurological examination. Methods Following a ‘911 stroke code’ call, stroke neurologists experienced in TCCS rendezvoused with the paramedic team. In patients with suspected stroke, TCCS examination including ultrasound contrast agents was performed. Results were compared with neurovascular imaging (CTA, MRA) and the final discharge diagnosis from standard patient-centered stroke care. Results We enrolled ‘232 stroke code’ patients with follow-up data available in 102 patients with complete TCCS examination. A diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made in 73 cases; 29 patients were identified as ‘stroke mimics’. MCA occlusion was diagnosed in ten patients, while internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion/high-grade stenosis leading to reversal of anterior cerebral artery flow was diagnosed in four patients. The initial working diagnosis ‘any stroke’ showed a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 48%. ‘Major MCA or ICA stroke’ diagnosed by mobile ultrasound showed an overall sensitivity of 78% and specificity of 98%. Conclusions The study demonstrates the feasibility and high diagnostic accuracy of emergency transcranial ultrasound assessment combined with neurological examinations for major ischemic stroke. Future combination with telemedical support, point-of-care analysis of blood serum markers, and probability algorithms of prehospital stroke diagnosis including ultrasound may help to speed up stroke treatment. PMID:24572006

  17. A qualitative study of patient and family perceptions of chaplain presence during post-trauma care.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Steven C; Hildebrand, Alice A

    2015-01-01

    Improving the provision of spiritual care to hospitalized patients requires understanding what patients look for from a hospital chaplain, and why. This qualitative study uses grounded theory methodology to analyze data from 25 interviews with adult patients and/or adult family members who received spiritual care in a large tertiary care hospital. Analysis reveals three key themes in chaplaincy care: the attributes valued in the chaplain's presence, the elements necessary to form relationship with the chaplain, and the role of the chaplain in helping patients to discover and express meaning in their experiences. The authors weave these three themes together into a grounded theory and propose an assessment model that incorporates psychological theory about human motivation, faith development, and the development of autonomy. An understanding of the proposed assessment model can guide chaplain interventions and benefit all members of the clinical care team. PMID:25793422

  18. [Anesthesiological care in orthogeriatric co-management. Perioperative treatment of geriatric trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Luger, Thomas J; Luger, Markus F

    2016-04-01

    Elderly patients increasingly need to undergo surgery under anesthesia, especially following trauma. A timely interdisciplinary approach to the perioperative management of these patients is decisive for the long-term outcome. Orthogeriatric co-management, which includes geriatricians and anesthesiologists from an early stage, is of great benefit for geriatric patients. Patient age, comorbidities and self-sufficiency in activities of daily life are decisive for an anesthesiological assessment of the state of health and preoperative risk stratification. If necessary additional investigations, such as echocardiography must be carried out, in order to guarantee optimal perioperative anesthesiological management. Certain medical factors can delay the initiation of anesthesia and it is absolutely necessary that these are taken into consideration for surgical management. Not every form of anesthesia is equally suitable for every geriatric patient. PMID:27090913

  19. [Treatment of severely injured patients : Impact of the German Trauma Registry DGU®].

    PubMed

    Bouillon, B; Lefering, R; Paffrath, T; Sturm, J; Hoffmann, R

    2016-06-01

    The German Trauma Registry DGU® started in 1993 as an initiative of five dedicated trauma centers and has evolved significantly since then. Data were obtained at four points of time from the site of the accident until discharge from hospital. In the first year (1993), the registry collected data of 260 patients from 5 hospitals. In 2015 more than 38.000 were included from 640 hospitals.This paper focusses on the impact of the trauma registry on the treatment of severely injured patients. Several authors could show that the data can be used by hospitals for benchmarking. This can help to detect problems in individual hospitals and to find solutions that can be implemented into the process of care and its subsequent reevaluation. Due to structural and process-related changes, the time necessary for the management in the emergency room could be reduced significantly. Various scientific analyses of the Trauma Registry DGU® data were implemented in the treatment of severely injured patients. In the prehospital treatment, this changed the criteria for intubation and led to a reduction of volume replacement. In the hospital setting, the analysis influenced the radiologic work-up and the treatment of coagulopathy of severely injured patients. Moreover, the risk-adjusted mortality of severely injured patients in Germany could be continuously reduced over the past 20 years. PMID:27240850

  20. Innovations in Implementation of Trauma-Informed Care Practices in Youth Residential Treatment: A Curriculum for Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummer, Victoria Latham; Dollard, Norin; Robst, John; Armstrong, Mary I.

    2010-01-01

    Children in the child welfare system frequently experience trauma within the caregiving relationship. These traumatic experiences may be compounded by system trauma and place these children at high risk of emotional disorders and placement in out-of-home (OOH) mental health treatment programs. This article reviews the literature on trauma and…

  1. Trauma-related amputations in war and at a civilian major trauma centre-comparison of care, outcome and the challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D S; Guthrie, H C; Yousaf, S; Cranley, M; Rogers, B A; Clasper, J C

    2016-08-01

    The Afghanistan conflict has resulted in a large number of service personnel sustaining amputations. Whilst obvious differences exist between military and civilian trauma-related amputations both settings result in life changing injuries. Comparisons offer the potential of advancement and protection of the knowledge gained during the last 12 years. This paper compares the military and civilian trauma-related amputee cohorts' demographics, management and rehabilitation outcomes measures. The UK military Joint Theatre Trauma Registry and a civilian major trauma centre database of trauma-related amputees were analysed. 255 military and 24 civilian amputees were identified. A significant difference (p>0.05) was seen in median age (24, range 18-43, vs. 48, range 24-87 years), mean number of amputations per casualty (1.6±SD 0.678 vs. 1±SD 0.0), mean ISS (22±SD 12.8 vs. 14.7±SD 15.7) and gender (99% males vs. 78%). Rehabilitation outcome measures recorded included the Special Interest Group in Amputee Medicine score where the military group demonstrated significantly better scores (91% Grade E+ compared to 19%). Differences in patients underlying physiology and psychology, the military trauma system and a huge sustained investment in rehabilitation are all contributing factors for these differing outcomes. However the authors also believe that the use of a consultant-led MDT and central rehabilitation have benefited the military cohort in the acute rehabilitation stage and is reflected in the good short-term outcomes. PMID:27287739

  2. Making health care decisions without a prognosis: life in a brain trauma unit.

    PubMed

    Martone, M

    2000-01-01

    When the author's daughter was hit by a car and remained unconscious for seven months, she found that there were certain factors where traditional ethical theory was not sufficiently nuanced to guide her practical decision making in regard to her daughter's health care. This article concentrates on three of those factors. They are: (1) no reliable prognosis can be offered for many brain-injured individuals; (2) a patient's age and the relationship between the patient and the caregiver affect the context of caring; and (3) there are severe difficulties in obtaining and sustaining chronic care and accessing scarce resources. PMID:12528705

  3. Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital - a descriptive study from northern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital. Methods This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009. Results The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1–57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT < 60 min after emergency room arrival. Penetrating trauma caused injuries in seven patients. Solid organ injuries constituted 78% of abdominal injuries. Non-operative management succeeded in 82 patients. Surgery was performed for 28 patients, either immediately (n = 17) as result of operative management or later (n = 11), due to non-operative management failure; the latter mainly occurred with hollow viscus injuries. Patients with multiple abdominal injuries, whether associated with multiple trauma or an isolated abdominal trauma, had significantly more non-operative failures than patients with a single abdominal injury. One death occurred within 30 days. Conclusions Non-operative management of patients with abdominal injuries, except for hollow viscus injuries, was highly

  4. Use of prehospital ultrasound in North America: a survey of emergency medical services medical directors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in ultrasound imaging technology have made it more accessible to prehospital providers. Little is known about how ultrasound is being used in the prehospital environment and we suspect that it is not widely used in North America at this time. We believe that EMS system characteristics such as provider training, system size, population served, and type of transport will be associated with use or non-use of ultrasound. Our study objective was to describe the current use of prehospital ultrasound in North America. Methods This study was a cross-sectional survey distributed to EMS directors on the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) mailing list. Respondents had the option to complete a paper or electronic survey. Results Of the 755 deliverable surveys we received 255 responses from across Canada and the United states for an overall response rate of 30%. Of respondents, 4.1% of EMS systems (95% CI 1.9, 6.3) reported currently using ultrasound and an additional 21.7% (95% CI 17, 26.4) are considering implementing ultrasound. EMS services using ultrasound have a higher proportion of physicians (p < 0.001) as their highest trained prehospital providers when compared to the survey group as a whole. The most commonly cited current and projected applications are Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma (FAST) and assessment of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) arrest. The cost of equipment and training are the most significant barriers to implementation of ultrasound. Most medical directors want evidence that prehospital ultrasound improves patient outcomes prior to implementation. Conclusions Prehospital ultrasound is infrequently used in North America and there are a number of barriers to its implementation, including costs of equipment and training and limited evidence demonstrating improved outcomes. A research agenda for prehospital ultrasound should focus on patient-important outcomes such as morbidity and mortality. Two commonly

  5. Discontinuation of cervical spine immobilisation in unconscious patients with trauma in intensive care units--telephone survey of practice in south and west region.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, K. J.; Clancy, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study how the cervical spine is assessed before discontinuation of cervical spine immobilisation in unconscious trauma patients in intensive care units. DESIGN: Telephone interview of consultants responsible for adult intensive care units. SETTING: All 25 intensive care units in the South and West region that admit victims of major trauma. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The clinical and radiological basis on which the decision is made to stop cervical spine immobilisation in unconscious patients with trauma. RESULTS: In 19 units cervical spine immobilisation was stopped in unconscious patients on the basis of radiology alone, and six units combined radiology with clinical examination after the patient had regained consciousness. Sixteen units relied on a normal lateral radiological view of the cervical spine alone, five required a normal lateral and anteroposterior view, and four required a normal lateral, anteroposterior, and open mouth peg view. CONCLUSIONS: There are inconsistencies in the clinical and radiological approach to assessing the cervical spine in unconscious patients with trauma before the removal of immobilisation precautions. There is an overreliance on the lateral cervical spine view alone, which has been shown to be insensitive in this setting. PMID:9180066

  6. Use of the medical Ethics Consultation Service in a busy Level I trauma center: impact on decision-making and patient care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura S; Lesandrini, Jason; Rozycki, Grace S

    2012-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess reasons for consultation of the Ethics Consultation Service for trauma patients and how consultations impacted care. We conducted a review of ethics consultations at a Level I trauma center from 2001 to 2010. Data included patient demographics, etiology of injury, and timing/type of the consult, categorized as: shared decision-making, end-of-life, privacy and confidentiality, resource allocation, and professionalism. Consultations were requested on 108 patients (age mean, 46.5 ± 20 years; Injury Severity Score mean, 23 ± 14; length of stay [LOS] mean, 44 ± 44 days), 0.50 per cent of all trauma admissions. Seventy-seven per cent of consultations occurred in the intensive care unit. End of life was the most common consultation (44%) followed by shared decision-making (41%). Average time to consultation was 25 days. Shared decision-making consults occurred much earlier than end-of-life consults as evidenced by a lower consult day/LOS ratio (consult day/LOS = 0.36 ± 0.3 vs 0.77 ± 0.3, P = 0.0001). Conclusions consisted of: 1) ethics consultation on trauma patients are most commonly for end-of-life and shared decision-making issues; 2) most ethics consultations occur while patients are in the intensive care unit; and 3) earlier ethics consultations are likely to be for shared decision-making issues. PMID:22748529

  7. Health Care Workers and Standard Precautions: Perceptions and Determinants of Compliance in the Emergency and Trauma Triage of a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Sangini; Nair, Suma; Shetty, Ranjitha S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Careful adherence to standard precautions can protect both health care workers (HCWs) and patients from infections. The present study identified the perceptions and compliance with the use of standard precautions and assessed the determinants of noncompliance among the HCWs in an emergency and trauma triage centre. Methods. A cross-sectional study using a semistructured questionnaire was carried out to collect the relevant information from the study participants. Results. A total of 162 HCWs were recruited into the study, who reported varying degrees of compliance with standard precautions. While most of them declared the use of hand rub (95%) and gloves (77%), reported use of protective eye gear and outer protective clothing was very low (22 and 28%, resp.). Despite a perceived risk of exposure to blood-borne infections, 8% of the HCWs had not completed the hepatitis B vaccination schedule. About 17% reported at least one needle stick injury in the past year but only 5.6% received medical attention. Conclusion. Inadequate adherence to standard precautions among health care providers warrants new training and monitoring strategies. Establishment of an effective occupational health cell incorporating these elements including periodic surveillance could be the way forward.

  8. Healthcare professionals' intentions to use wiki-based reminders to promote best practices in trauma care: a survey protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Healthcare professionals are increasingly using wikis as collaborative tools to create, synthesize, share, and disseminate knowledge in healthcare. Because wikis depend on collaborators to keep content up-to-date, healthcare professionals who use wikis must adopt behaviors that foster this collaboration. This protocol describes the methods we will use to develop and test the metrological qualities of a questionnaire that will assess healthcare professionals' intentions and the determinants of those intentions to use wiki-based reminders that promote best practices in trauma care. Methods Using the Theory of Planned Behavior, we will conduct semi-structured interviews of healthcare professionals to identify salient beliefs that may affect their future use of wikis. These beliefs will inform our questionnaire on intended behavior. A test-retest of the survey will verify the questionnaire's stability over time. We will interview 50 healthcare professionals (25 physicians and 25 allied health professionals) working in the emergency departments of three trauma centers in Quebec, Canada. We will analyze the content of the interviews and construct and pilot a questionnaire. We will then test the revised questionnaire with 30 healthcare professionals (15 physicians and 15 allied health professionals) and retest it two weeks later. We will assess the internal consistency of the questionnaire constructs using Cronbach's alpha coefficients and determine their stability with the intra-class correlation (ICC). Discussion To our knowledge, this study will be the first to develop and test a theory-based survey that measures healthcare professionals' intentions to use a wiki-based intervention. This study will identify professionals' salient beliefs qualitatively and will quantify the psychometric capacities of the questionnaire based on those beliefs. PMID:20540775

  9. Prehospital tidal volume influences hospital tidal volume: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stoltze, Andrew J.; Wong, Terrence S.; Harland, Karisa K.; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Fuller, Brian M.; Mohr, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe current practice of ventilation in a modern air medical system, and to measure the association of ventilation strategy with subsequent ventilator care and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Materials and Methods Retrospective observational cohort study of intubated adult patients (n=235) transported by a university-affiliated air medical transport service to a 711-bed tertiary academic center between July 2011 and May 2013. Low tidal volume ventilation was defined as tidal volumes ≤ 8 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW). Multivariable regression was used to measure the association between prehospital tidal volume, hospital ventilation strategy, and ARDS. Results Most patients (57%) were ventilated solely with bag-valve ventilation during transport. Mean tidal volume of mechanically ventilated patients was 8.6 mL/kg PBW (SD 0.2 mL/kg). Low tidal volume ventilation was used in 13% of patients. Patients receiving low tidal volume ventilation during air medical transport were more likely to receive low tidal volume ventilation in the emergency department (p < 0.001) and intensive care unit (p = 0.015). ARDS was not associated with pre-hospital tidal volume (p = 0.840). Conclusions Low tidal volume ventilation was rare during air medical transport. Air transport ventilation strategy influenced subsequent ventilation, but was not associated with ARDS. PMID:25813548

  10. The use of urinary bladder matrix in the treatment of trauma and combat casualty wound care.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Ian L; Campbell, Paul; Sabino, Jennifer; Dearth, Christopher L; Fleming, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of combat injuries and resulting wounds can be difficult to treat due to compromised and evolving tissue necrosis, environmental contaminants, multidrug resistant microbacterial and/or fungal infections, coupled with microvascular damage and/or hypovascularized exposed vital structures. Our group has developed surgical care algorithms with identifiable salvage techniques to achieve stable, definitive wound coverage often with the aid of certain regenerative medicine biologic scaffold materials and advanced wound care to facilitate tissue coverage and healing. This case series reports on the role of urinary bladder matrix scaffolds in the wound care and reconstruction of traumatic and combat wounds. Urinary bladder matrix was found to facilitate definitive soft tissue reconstruction by establishing a neovascularized soft tissue base acceptable for second stage wound and skin coverage options within traumatic and combat-related wounds. PMID:26237704

  11. Prehospital activated charcoal: the way forward

    PubMed Central

    Greene, S; Kerins, M; O'Connor, N

    2005-01-01

    Methods: A postal questionnaire was used to determine the current level of use of prehospital activated charcoal by ambulance NHS trusts, the incidence of associated complications, and barriers preventing the routine use of prehospital SDAC. Results: A completed questionnaire was returned by 36 of the 39 ambulance NHS trusts in the UK (response rate 92%). Currently none of the trusts that responded to the questionnaire provides prehospital SDAC as an intervention. The most common barriers to the provision of prehospital SDAC are the current lack of evidence in the medical literature proving it is effective in improving patient outcome and the lack of a recognised protocol for its administration. Other issues included concerns regarding potential complications, ambulance turnaround times, lack of availability of SDAC, and lack of funding. Conclusions: A lack of published evidence proving efficacy remains the most important factor in preventing the routine administration of SDAC to appropriate patients in the prehospital environment. Further research in this setting is required to determine the usefulness of this therapy. PMID:16189043

  12. Parental Perceptions of Hospital Care in Children with Accidental or Alleged Non-Accidental Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ince, Elif E.; Rubin, David; Christian, Cindy W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether a suspicion or diagnosis of child abuse during hospitalization influences parental perceptions of hospital care in families of children admitted with traumatic injuries. Method: Parents of children younger than 6 years of age admitted with traumatic injuries to a large urban children's hospital were recruited to…

  13. How regional trauma systems improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elaine

    2015-10-01

    Management of severely injured patients is complex and requires organised, expert care. Regionalised trauma systems are relatively new in the UK and aim to deliver optimal, timely care to injured patients at the most appropriate location. This article discusses the drivers, organisation, processes and outcomes of regionalised trauma care. It also describes the challenges and benefits of working within a trauma system to enable emergency practitioners to reflect on their roles in contemporary trauma care. PMID:26451941

  14. Major abdominal vascular trauma--a unified approach.

    PubMed

    Kashuk, J L; Moore, E E; Millikan, J S; Moore, J B

    1982-08-01

    Advances in prehospital emergency care have increased the numbers of patients arriving at the hospital with immediate life-threatening trauma. This is a review of our recent 6-year experience with 161 major abdominal vascular injuries in 123 patients. The distribution by injury site and respective mortality were: 18, aortic (56%); 39, aortic branch (37%); 51, inferior vena cava (39%); 30, inferior vena cava branch (45%); and 23, portal venous system (39%). The overall death rate was 37%. Forty-six patients presented with unobtainable blood pressure and 19 (41%) survived. Left thoracotomy and temporary aortic occlusion were required in the resuscitation of 45 patients; when applied in the emergency department the salvage rate was 7%, and in the operating room, 35%. Forty-four patients had more than one major vascular injury and 17 (39% recovered, compared to a survival rate of 76% with single vascular trauma. Others have emphasized that most deaths from major abdominal vascular injury are a result of hemorrhage. In our study although 89% of mortality was due to bleeding, half occurred after control of the major bleeding sites. These findings suggest that coagulopathy, hypothermia, and acidosis are complicating factors which demand as much attention by the surgeon as the initial resuscitation and operative control classically emphasized. PMID:6980992

  15. Cardiovascular consequences of weightlessness promote advances in clinical and trauma care.

    PubMed

    Cooke, William H; Convertino, Victor A

    2005-08-01

    Cardiovascular adaptations driven by exposure to weightlessness cause some astronauts to experience orthostatic intolerance upon return to Earth. Maladaptations of spaceflight that lead to hemodynamic instability are temporary, and therefore astronauts provide for researchers a powerful model to study cardiovascular dysfunction in terrestrial patients. Orthostatic intolerance in astronauts is linked to changes in the autonomic control of cardiovascular function, and so patients that suffer neurocardiogenic syncope may benefit from a greater understanding of the effects of spaceflight on the autonomic nervous system. In addition, appropriate autonomic compensation is fundamental to the maintenance of stable arterial pressures and brain blood flow in patients suffering traumatic bleeding injuries. The application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP), an experimental procedure used widely in aerospace physiology, induces autonomic and hemodynamic responses that are similar to actual hemorrhage and therefore may emerge as a useful experimental tool to simulate hemorrhage in humans. Observations that standing astronauts and severely injured patients are challenged to maintain venous return has contributed to the development of an inspiratory impedance threshold device that serves as a controlled "Mueller maneuver" and has the potential to reduce orthostatic intolerance in returning astronauts and slow the progression to hemorrhagic shock in bleeding patients. In this review, we focus on describing new concepts that have arisen from studies of astronauts, patients, and victims of trauma, and highlight the necessity of developing the capability of monitoring medical information continuously and remotely. Remote medical monitoring will be essential for long-duration space missions and has the potential to save lives on the battlefield and in the civilian sector. PMID:16101467

  16. Maxillofacial Trauma Trends at a Tertiary Care Hospital: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Eun-Gyu; Jung, Dong-Young; Lee, Jong-Sung; Seol, Guk-Jin; Choi, So-Young; Paeng, Jung-Young; Kim, Jin-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Maxillofacial fractures are rapidly increasing from car accidents, industrial accidents, teenaged criminal activity, and sports injuries. Accurate assessment, appropriate diagnosis, and preparing individual treatment plans are necessary to reduce surgical complications. We investigated recent trends of facial bone fracture by period, cause, and type, with the objective of reducing surgical complications. Methods: To investigate time trends of maxillofacial fractures, we reviewed medical records from 2,196 patients with maxillofacial fractures in 1981∼1987 (Group A), 1995∼1999 (Group B), and 2008∼2012 (Group C). We analyzed each group, comparing the number of patients, sex ratio, age, fracture site, and etiology. Results: The number of patients in each period was 418, 516, and 1,262 in Groups A to C. Of note is the increase in the number of patients from Group A to C. The sex ratios were 5.6:1, 3.5:1, and 3.8:1 in Groups A, B, and C. The most affected age group for fracture is 20∼29 in all three groups. Traffic accidents are the most common cause in Groups A and B, while there were somewhat different causes of fracture in Group C. Sports-induced facial trauma was twice as high in Group C compared with Group A and B. Mandible fracture accounts for a large portion of facial bone fractures overall. Conclusion: We observed an increase in facial bone fracture patients at Kyungpook National University Dental Hospital over the years. Although facial injury caused by traffic accidents was still a major cause of facial bone fracture in all periods, the percentage decreased. In recent years, isolated mandible fracture increased but mandible and mid-facial complex fracture decreased, possibly because of a reduction in traffic accidents. PMID:27489843

  17. Prehospital Lactate Measurement by Emergency Medical Services in Patients Meeting Sepsis Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Lori L.; Hokanson, Jonathan S.; Fernstrom, Karl M.; Kinzy, Tyler G.; Lick, Charles J.; Satterlee, Paul A.; LaCroix, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to pilot test the delivery of sepsis education to emergency medical services (EMS) providers and the feasibility of equipping them with temporal artery thermometers (TATs) and handheld lactate meters to aid in the prehospital recognition of sepsis. Methods This study used a convenience sample of prehospital patients meeting established criteria for sepsis. Paramedics received education on systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, were trained in the use of TATs and hand-held lactate meters, and enrolled patients who had a recent history of infection, met ≥ 2 SIRS criteria, and were being transported to a participating hospital. Blood lactate was measured by paramedics in the prehospital setting and again in the emergency department (ED) via usual care. Paramedics entered data using an online database accessible at the point of care. Results Prehospital lactate values obtained by paramedics ranged from 0.8 to 9.8 mmol/L, and an elevated lactate (i.e. ≥ 4.0) was documented in 13 of 112 enrolled patients (12%). The unadjusted correlation of prehospital and ED lactate values was 0.57 (p< 0.001). The median interval between paramedic assessment of blood lactate and the electronic posting of the ED-measured lactate value in the hospital record was 111 minutes. Overall, 91 patients (81%) were hospitalized after ED evaluation, 27 (24%) were ultimately diagnosed with sepsis, and 3 (3%) died during hospitalization. Subjects with elevated prehospital lactate were somewhat more likely to have been admitted to the intensive care unit (23% vs 15%) and to have been diagnosed with sepsis (38% vs 22%) than those with normal lactate levels, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion In this pilot, EMS use of a combination of objective SIRS criteria, subjective assessment of infection, and blood lactate measurements did not achieve a level of diagnostic accuracy for sepsis that would warrant hospital prenotification

  18. Management of the open abdomen: clinical recommendations for the trauma/acute care surgeon and general surgeon.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Luis G

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, the surgical approach to managing abdominal injuries was to assess the extent of trauma, repair any damage and close the abdomen in one definitive procedure rather than leave the abdomen open. With advances in medicine, damage control surgery using temporary abdominal closure methods is being used to manage the open abdomen (OA) when closure is not possible. Although OA management is often observed in traumatic injuries, the extension of damage control surgery concepts, in conjunction with OA, for the management of the septic patient requires that the general surgeon who is faced with these challenges has a comprehensive knowledge of this complex subject. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance to the acute care and general surgeon on the use of OA negative pressure therapy (OA-NPT; ABTHERA™ Open Abdomen Negative Pressure Therapy System, KCI, an ACELITY Company, San Antonio, TX) for OA management. A literature review of published evidence, clinical recommendations on managing the OA and a case study demonstrating OA management using OA-NPT have been included. PMID:27547961

  19. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Matthew M.; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S.; Mains, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  20. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Matthew M; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S; Mains, Charles W; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  1. Pediatric Anaphylaxis Management in the Prehospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Linda; Cone, David C.; Langhan, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening systemic allergic reaction that occurs after contact with an allergy-causing substance. Timely administration of intramuscular epinephrine is the treatment of choice for controlling symptoms and decreasing fatalities. Our purpose was to investigate the prehospital management of anaphylaxis among patients receiving care in an urban tertiary care pediatric emergency department (PED). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review from May, 2008 to January, 2010 of patients 18 years or younger who received care in the PED for anaphylaxis. Data were extracted by one investigator and included demographic information, patient symptoms, past medical history, medications administered (including route and provider), and final disposition. Results We reviewed 218 cases of anaphylaxis in 202 children. Mean age of patients was 7.4 years; 56% of patients were male. Two hundred and fourteen (98%) manifested symptoms in the skin/mucosal system, 68% had respiratory symptoms, 44% had gastrointestinal symptoms, and 2% had hypotension. Sixty-seven percent had a previous history of allergic reaction and 38% had a history of asthma. Seventy-six percent of the patients presented with anaphylaxis to food products, 8% to medications, 1% to stings, and 16% to unknown allergens. Reactions occurred at home or with family members 87% of the time, and at school 12% of the time. Only 36% of the patients who met criteria for anaphylaxis had epinephrine administered by emergency medical services (EMS). Among 26 patients with anaphylactic reactions at school, 69% received epinephrine by the school nurse. Of the 117 patients with known allergies who were with their parents at the time of anaphylactic reaction, 41% received epinephrine. Thirteen patients were seen by a physician prior to coming to the PED; all received epinephrine at the physician’s office. In total, epinephrine was given to 41% (89) of the 218 cases prior to coming to the PED

  2. In an idealized world: can discrepancies across self-reported parental care and high betrayal trauma during childhood predict infant attachment avoidance in the next generation?

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Rosemary E; Laurent, Heidemarie K; Musser, Erica D; Measelle, Jeffery R; Ablow, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    Adult caregivers' idealization of their parents as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview is a risk factor for the intergenerational transmission of the insecure-avoidant attachment style. This study evaluated a briefer screening approach for identifying parental idealization, testing the utility of prenatal maternal self-report measures of recalled betrayal trauma and parental care in childhood to predict observationally assessed infant attachment avoidance with 58 mother-infant dyads 18 months postpartum. In a logistic regression that controlled for maternal demographics, prenatal psychopathology, and postnatal sensitivity, the interaction between women's self-reported childhood high betrayal trauma and the level of care provided to them by their parents was the only significant predictor of 18-month infant security versus avoidance. Results suggest that betrayal trauma and recalled parental care in childhood can provide a means of identifying caregivers whose infant children are at risk for avoidant attachment, potentially providing an efficient means for scientific studies and clinical intervention aimed at preventing the intergenerational transmission of attachment problems. PMID:24060035

  3. The evolution of trauma surgery at a high-volume Canadian centre: implications for public health, prevention, clinical care, education and recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Das, Debanjana; Roberts, Derek J.; Vis, Christine; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Kortbeek, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trauma centres continue to evolve with respect to clinical care and their impact on public health. Despite improvements in patient outcomes, operative volumes, and therefore maintenance of surgical skills, has become a challenging issue. We sought to determine whether injury demographics and treatments at a high- volume centre changed over time. Methods We used the Alberta Trauma Registry to analyze all severely injured (injury severity score [ISS] ≥ 12) patient admissions over a 16-year period (1995–2011). Results Of the 12 879 severely injured patients requiring admission, there was a 1.5-fold increase in the annual admission rate despite population normalization (p = 0.001). Over the 16-year interval, patients were older with a subsequent lower mortality (p = 0.001) and length of hospital stay (p = 0.007). In patients with the most severe ISS (≥ 48), there was no change in mortality (27%, p = 0.26). In 2011, falls were the most common mechanism compared with motor vehicle crashes (41% v. 23%; p < 0.001); this was a complete reversal compared with 1995 (25% v. 41%). Motorized recreational vehicle and motorcycle injuries also increased (p < 0.001). The mean number of operations performed by trauma surgeons decreased (laparotomies: 67 [17%] in 1995 v. 47 [5%] in 2011, p < 0.001). Thoracotomies and tracheostomies remained unchanged (p = 0.19). Conclusion Clinical care has improved despite an increasing overall volume of severely injured patient admissions. The number of operative interventions performed by trauma surgeons continues to decrease concurrent to a change in injury mechanisms. Despite these improvements, maintenance of technical skills among trauma surgeons has become an important issue. PMID:25427332

  4. Taking the trauma out of wound care: the importance of undisturbed healing.

    PubMed

    Rippon, M; Davies, P; White, R

    2012-08-01

    Significant advances in wound dressing technology have resulted in a myriad of dressing choices for wound-care clinicians, providing more than just an inert wound cover. The establishment of a moist wound environment under modern wound dressings and the optimisation of the healing response are now the goals expected of these dressings. However, the use of wound dressings, particularly traditional dressings such as gauze, frequently results in wound and peri-wound tissue damage that impairs the wound healing response, counteracting any of the dressings' healing benefits. Therefore, in order to maximise the healing benefits wounds covered by today's wound dressings must minimise tissue disturbance (physical as well as chemical). This review aims to consider the ways traditional, as well as modern, wound dressings may disturb wounds, summarising the potential areas of wound disturbance, and suggesting how best to address this aspect of the use of wound dressings to treat acute as well as chronic wounds. PMID:22885308

  5. Trauma program development.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    The development of a strong trauma program is clearly one of the most important facets of successful business development. Several recent publications have demonstrated that well run trauma services can generate significant profits for both the hospital and the surgeons involved. There are many aspects to this task that require constant attention and insight. Top notch patient care, efficiency, and cost-effective resource utilization are all important components that must be addressed while providing adequate physician compensation within the bounds of hospital financial constraints and the encompassing legal issues. Each situation is different but many of the components are universal. This chapter addresses all aspects of trauma program development to provide the graduating fellow with the tools to create a new trauma program or improve an existing program in order to provide the best patient care while optimizing financial reward and improving care efficiency. PMID:24918830

  6. Development and Implementation of a Child Welfare Workforce Strategy to Build a Trauma-Informed System of Support for Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Suzanne E U; Pullmann, Michael D; Negrete, Andrea; Uomoto, Jacqueline A; Berliner, Lucy; Shogren, Dae; Silverman, Ellen; Putnam, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Effective strategies that increase the extent to which child welfare professionals engage in trauma-informed case planning are needed. This study evaluated two approaches to increase trauma symptom identification and use of screening results to inform case planning. The first study evaluated the impact of training on trauma-informed screening tools for 44 child welfare professionals who screen all children upon placement into foster care. The second study evaluated a two-stage approach to training child welfare workers on case planning for children's mental health. Participants included (a) 71 newly hired child welfare professionals who received a 3-hr training and (b) 55 child welfare professionals who participated in a full-day training. Results from the first study indicate that training effectively increased knowledge and skills in administering screening tools, though there was variability in comfort with screening. In the second study, participants self-reported significant gains in their competency in identifying mental health needs (including traumatic stress) and linking children with evidence-based services. These findings provide preliminary evidence for the viability of this approach to increase the extent to which child welfare professionals are trauma informed, aware of symptoms, and able to link children and youth with effective services designed to meet their specific needs. PMID:26928411

  7. Child-Adult Relationship Enhancement (CARE): An evidence-informed program for children with a history of trauma and other behavioral challenges.

    PubMed

    Gurwitch, Robin H; Messer, Erica Pearl; Masse, Joshua; Olafson, Erna; Boat, Barbara W; Putnam, Frank W

    2016-03-01

    Child maltreatment impacts approximately two million children each year, with physical abuse and neglect the most common form of maltreatment. These children are at risk for mental and physical health concerns and the ability to form positive social relationships is also adversely affected. Child Adult Relationship Enhancement (CARE) is a set of skills designed to improve interactions of any adult and child or adolescent. Based on parent training programs, including the strong evidence-based treatment, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), CARE was initially developed to fill an important gap in mental health services for children of any age who are considered at-risk for maltreatment or other problems. CARE subsequently has been extended for use by adults who interact with children and youth outside of existing mental health therapeutic services as well as to compliment other services the child or adolescent may be receiving. Developed through discussions with Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) therapists and requests for a training similar to PCIT for the non-mental health professional, CARE is not therapy, but is comprised of a set of skills that can support other services provided to families. Since 2006, over 2000 caregivers, mental health, child welfare, educators, and other professionals have received CARE training with a focus on children who are exposed to trauma and maltreatment. This article presents implementation successes and challenges of a trauma-informed training designed to help adults connect and enhance their relationships with children considered at-risk. PMID:26613674

  8. Immediate prehospital hypothermia protocol in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Laure; Vitrat, François; Savary, Dominique; Debaty, Guillaume; Santre, Charles; Durand, Michel; Dessertaine, Geraldine; Timsit, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves the outcomes of cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of an immediate prehospital cooling procedure implemented just after the return of spontaneous circulation with a prehospital setting. During 30 months, the case records of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital CA presumably due to a cardiac disease were studied. A routine protocol of immediate postresuscitation cooling had been tested by an emergency team, which consisted of an infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline. We decided to assess the efficacy and tolerance of this procedure. A total of 99 patients were studied; 22 were treated with prehospital TH, and 77 consecutive patients treated with prehospital standard resuscitation served as controls. For all patients, TH was maintained for 12 to 24 hours. The demographic, clinical, and biological characteristics of the patients were similar in the 2 groups. The rate of patients with a body temperature of less than 35 degrees C upon admission was 41% in the cooling group and 18% in the control group. Rapid infusion of fluid was not associated with pulmonary edema. After 1 year of follow-up, 6 (27%) of 22 patients in the cooling group and 30 (39%) of 77 patients in the control group had a good outcome. Our preliminary observation suggests that in comatose survivors of CA, prehospital TH with infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline is feasible and can be used safely by mobile emergency and intensive care units. PMID:19497463

  9. Prehospital system delay in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Pek, Pin Pin; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Timely reperfusion in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) improves outcomes. System delay is that between first medical contact and reperfusion therapy, comprising prehospital and hospital components. This study aimed to characterize prehospital system delay in Singapore. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed for 462 consecutive STEMI patients presenting to a tertiary hospital from December 2006 to April 2008. Patients with cardiac arrest secondarily presented were excluded. For those who received emergency medical services (EMS), ambulance records were reviewed. Time intervals in the hospital were collected prospectively. The patients were divided into two equal groups of high/low prehospital system delay using visual binning technique. RESULTS: Of 462 patients, 76 received EMS and 52 of the 76 patients were analyzed. The median system delay was 125.5 minutes and the median prehospital system delay was 33.5 minutes (interquartile range [IQR]=27.0, 42.0). Delay between call-received-by-ambulance and ambulance-dispatched was 2.48 minutes (IQR=1.47, 16.55); between ambulance-dispatch and arrival-at-patient-location was 8.07 minutes (IQR=1.30, 22.13); between arrival-at- and departure-from-patient-location was 13.12 minutes (IQR=3.12, 32.2); and between leaving-patient-location to ED-registration was 9.90 minutes (IQR=1.62, 32.92). Comparing patients with prehospital system delay of less than 35.5 minutes versus more showed that the median delay between ambulance-dispatch and arrival-at-patient-location was shorter (5.75 vs. 9.37 minutes, P<0.01). The median delay between arrival-at-patient-location and leaving-patient-location was also shorter (10.78 vs. 14.37 minutes, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Prehospital system delay in our patients was suboptimal. This is the first attempt at characterizing prehospital system delay in Singapore and forms the basis for improving efficiency of STEMI care. PMID:26693262

  10. The cost of injury and trauma care in low- and middle-income countries: a review of economic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wesson, Hadley K H; Boikhutso, Nonkululeko; Bachani, Abdulgafoor M; Hofman, Karen J; Hyder, Adnan A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Injuries are a significant cause of mortality and morbidity, of which more than 90% occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Given the extent of this burden being confronted by LMICs, there is need to place injury prevention at the forefront of public health initiatives and to understand the costs associated with injury. The aim of this article is to describe the extent to which injury-related costing studies have been conducted in LMICs. Methods A review of literature was performed to explore costing data available for injury and/or trauma care in LMICs. Study quality was described using recommendations from the Community Guide’s quality assessment tool for economic evaluations. Results The review identified 68 studies, of which 13 were full economic evaluations. Cost of injury varied widely with mean costs ranging from US$14 to US$17 400. In terms of injury-prevention interventions, cost per disability adjusted life year averted for injury-prevention interventions ranged from US$10.90 for speed bump installation to US$17 000 for drunk driving and breath testing campaigns in Africa. The studies varied in quality, ranging from very good to unsatisfactory. Discussion There is a lack of injury-related economic evidence from LMICs. Current costing research has considerable variability in the costs and cost descriptions of injury and associated prevention interventions. The generalizability of these studies is limited. Yet the economic burden of injury is high, suggesting significant potential for cost savings through injury prevention. A standardized approach to economic evaluation of injury in LMICs is needed to further prioritize investing in injury prevention. PMID:24097794

  11. Fat embolism syndrome in long bone trauma following vehicular accidents: Experience from a tertiary care hospital in north India

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Parvaiz A.; Ahmad, Feroze; Gurcoo, Showkat A.; Khan, Umar H.; Naqash, Imtiyaz A.; Sidiq, Suhail; Jan, Rafi Ahmad; Koul, Ajaz N.; Ashraf, Mohammad; Bhat, Mubasher Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a clinical problem arising mainly due to fractures particularly of long bones and pelvis. Not much literature is available about FES from the Indian subcontinent. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients referred/admitted prospectively over a 3-year period for suspected FES to a north Indian tertiary care center and satisfying the clinical criteria proposed by Gurd and Wilson, and Schonfeld were included in the study. Clinical features, risk factors, complications, response to treatment and any sequelae were recorded. Results: The patients (all male) presented with acute onset breathlessness, 36-120 hours following major bone trauma due to vehicular accidents. Associated features included features of cerebral dysfunction (n = 24, 69%), petechial rash (14%), tachycardia (94%) and fever (46%). Hypoxemia was demonstrable in 80% cases, thrombocytopenia in 91%, anemia in 94% and hypoalbuminemia in 59%. Bilateral alveolar infiltrates were seen on chest radiography in 28 patients and there was evidence of bilateral ground glass appearance in 5 patients on CT. Eleven patients required ventilatory assistance whereas others were treated with supportive management. Three patients expired due to associated sepsis and respiratory failure, whereas others recovered with a mean hospital stay of 9 days. No long term sequelae were observed. Conclusion: FES remains a clinical challenge and is a diagnosis of exclusion based only on clinical grounds because of the absence of any specific laboratory test. A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis and initiating supportive management in patients with traumatic fractures, especially in those having undergone an invasive orthopedic procedure. PMID:23741088

  12. Organizational characteristics of the austere intensive care unit: the evolution of military trauma and critical care medicine; applications for civilian medical care systems.

    PubMed

    Grathwohl, Kurt W; Venticinque, Steven G

    2008-07-01

    Critical care in the U.S. military has significantly evolved in the last decade. More recently, the U.S. military has implemented organizational changes, including the use of multidisciplinary teams in austere environments to improve outcomes in severely injured polytrauma combat patients. Specifically, organizational changes in combat support hospitals located in combat zones during Operation Iraqi Freedom have led to decreased intensive care unit mortality and length of stay as well as resource use. These changes were implemented without increases in logistic support or the addition of highly technologic equipment. The mechanism for improvement in mortality is likely attributable to the adherence of basic critical care medicine fundamentals. This intensivist-directed team model provides sophisticated critical care even in the most austere environments. To optimize critically injured patients' outcomes, intensive care organizational models similar to the U.S. military, described in this article, can possibly be adapted to those of civilian care during disaster management to meet the challenges of emergency mass critical care. PMID:18594253

  13. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  14. Tourniquet use in the civilian prehospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C; Porter, K M

    2007-01-01

    Tourniquets are an effective means of arresting life‐threatening external haemorrhage from limb injury. Their use has not previously been accepted practice for pre‐hospital civilian trauma care because of significant concerns regarding the potential complications. However, in a few rare situations tourniquet application will be necessary and life‐saving. This review explores the potential problems and mistrust of tourniquet use; explains the reasons why civilian pre‐hospital tourniquet use may be necessary; defines the clear indications for tourniquet use in external haemorrhage control; and provides practical information on tourniquet application and removal. Practitioners need to familiarise themselves with commercial pre‐hospital tourniquets and be prepared to use one without irrational fear of complications in the appropriate cases. PMID:17652690

  15. Prehospital Use of IM Ketamine for Sedation of Violent and Agitated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scheppke, Kenneth A.; Braghiroli, Joao; Shalaby, Mostafa; Chait, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Violent and agitated patients pose a serious challenge for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. Rapid control of these patients is paramount to successful prehospital evaluation and also for the safety of both the patient and crew. Sedation is often required for these patients, but the ideal choice of medication is not clear. The objective is to demonstrate that ketamine, given as a single intramuscular injection for violent and agitated patients, including those with suspected excited delirium syndrome (ExDS), is both safe and effective during the prehospital phase of care, and allows for the rapid sedation and control of this difficult patient population. Methods We reviewed paramedic run sheets from five different catchment areas in suburban Florida communities. We identified 52 patients as having been given intramuscular ketamine 4mg/kg IM, following a specific protocol devised by the EMS medical director of these jurisdictions, to treat agitated and violent patients, including a subset of which would be expected to suffer from ExDS. Twenty-six of 52 patients were also given parenteral midazolam after medical control was obtained to prevent emergence reactions associated with ketamine. Results Review of records demonstrated that almost all patients (50/52) were rapidly sedated and in all but three patients no negative side effects were noted during the prehospital care. All patients were subsequently transported to the hospital before ketamine effects wore off. Conclusion Ketamine may be safely and effectively used by trained paramedics following a specific protocol. The drug provides excellent efficacy and few clinically significant side effects in the prehospital phase of care, making it an attractive choice in those situations requiring rapid and safe sedation especially without intravenous access. PMID:25493111

  16. Management of ocular, orbital, and adnexal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Spoor, T.C.; Nesi, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 20 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Ruptured Globe: Primary Care; Corneal Trauma, Endophthalmitis; Antibiotic Usage; Radiology of Orbital Trauma; Maxillofacial Fractures; Orbital Infections; and Basic Management of Soft Tissue Injury.

  17. A case of unrecognized prehospital anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Ryan C; Gratton, Matthew C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A case of prehospital anaphylactic shock that presented atypically, without a known exposure, is discussed. Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction that requires prompt recognition and aggressive treatment. While there is little diagnostic dilemma (specifically used in the conclusion section of this paper) in the recognition and management of "classic" presentations of anaphylaxis there is likely a need for further education of prehospital providers, as well as emergency physicians, on how to recognize atypical cases of anaphylaxis. These cases can be equally severe, with potentially fatal consequences if missed. The diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis are reviewed, as well as barriers that providers encounter in diagnosing uncommon presentations. PMID:20954971

  18. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  19. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 23. Mayersak RJ. Facial trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, ...

  20. Utilization profile of the trauma intensive care unit at the Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit at Kandahar Airfield between May 1 and Oct. 15, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kalpa; Pirie, Steven; Compton, Lisa; McAlister, Vivian; Church, Brian; Kao, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Background In the war against the Taliban, Canada was the lead North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) nation to provide medical and surgical care to NATO soldiers, Afghanistan National Army soldiers, Afghanistan Nation Police, civilians working in and outside Kandahar Airfield and Afghanistan civilians at the Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit (R3MMU) from February 2006 to October 2009. Methods We obtained data from the Joint Theatre Trauma Registry between May 1 and Oct. 15, 2009; 188 patients were admitted to the R3MMU intensive care unit (ICU). We analyzed the ICU data according to types and causes of trauma, mechanical ventilation prevalence, ICU medical and surgical complications, blood products utilization, length of stay in the ICU and mortality. Results The admitting services were general surgery (35%), neurosurgery (29%), orthopedic surgery (18%) and internal medicine (3%). Improvised explosive devices (46%) and gunshot wounds (26%) were the main causes of ICU admissions. The mean injury severity score for all patients admitted to the ICU was 37, and 81% of ICU patients required mechanical ventilation for a mean duration of 3 days. The main ICU complications were coagulopathy (6.4%), aspiration pneumonia (4.3%), pneumothorax (3.7%) and wound infection (2.7%). The following blood products were most used: packed red blood cells (55%), fresh frozen plasma (54%), platelets (29%) and cryoprecipitate (23%). The average length of stay in the ICU was 4.3 days, and the survival rate was 93%. Conclusion The high survival rate suggests that ICU care is a necessary and vital resource for a trauma hospital in a war zone. PMID:22099326

  1. Integrating palliative care in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit: A report from the Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit (IPAL-ICU) Project Advisory Board and the Center to Advance Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Mosenthal, Anne C.; Weissman, David E.; Curtis, J. Randall; Hays, Ross M.; Lustbader, Dana R.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Brasel, Karen J.; Campbell, Margaret; Nelson, Judith E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although successful models for palliative care delivery and quality improvement in the intensive care unit have been described, their applicability in surgical intensive care unit settings has not been fully addressed. We undertook to define specific challenges, strategies, and solutions for integration of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit. Data Sources We searched the MEDLINE database from inception to May 2011 for all English language articles using the term “surgical palliative care” or the terms “surgical critical care,” “surgical ICU,” “surgeon,” “trauma” or “transplant,” and “palliative care” or “end-of- life care” and hand-searched our personal files for additional articles. Based on review of these articles and the experiences of our interdisciplinary expert Advisory Board, we prepared this report. Data Extraction and Synthesis We critically reviewed the existing literature on delivery of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit setting focusing on challenges, strategies, models, and interventions to promote effective integration of palliative care for patients receiving surgical critical care and their families. Conclusions Characteristics of patients with surgical disease and practices, attitudes, and interactions of different disciplines on the surgical critical care team present distinctive issues for intensive care unit palliative care integration and improvement. Physicians, nurses, and other team members in surgery, critical care and palliative care (if available) should be engaged collaboratively to identify challenges and develop strategies. “Consultative,” “integrative,” and combined models can be used to improve intensive care unit palliative care, although optimal use of trigger criteria for palliative care consultation has not yet been demonstrated. Important components of an improvement effort include attention to efficient work systems and practical tools and to

  2. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes. PMID:27414143

  3. Replacement of Promethazine With Ondansetron for Treatment of Opioid- and Trauma-Related Nausea and Vomiting in Tactical Combat Casualty Care.

    PubMed

    Onifer, Dana J; Butler, Frank K; Gross, Kirby R; Otten, Edward J; Patton, Robert; Russell, Robert J; Stockinger, Zsolt; Burrell, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The current Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) Guidelines recommend parenteral promethazine as the single agent for the treatment of opioid-induced nausea and/or vomiting and give a secondary indication of "synergistic analgesic effect." Promethazine, however, has a well-documented history of undesired side effects relating to impairment and dysregulation of the central and autonomic nervous systems, such as sedation, extrapyramidal symptoms, dystonia, impairment of psychomotor function, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and hypotension. These may be particularly worrisome in the combat casualty. Additionally, since 16 September 2009, there has been a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) black box warning for the injectable form of promethazine, due to "the risk of serious tissue injury when this drug is administered incorrectly." Conversely, ondansetron, which is now available in generic form, has a well-established favorable safety profile and demonstrated efficacy in undifferentiated nausea and vomiting in the emergency department and prehospital settings. It has none of the central and autonomic nervous system side effects noted with promethazine and carries no FDA black box warning. Ondansetron is available in parenteral form and an orally disintegrating tablet, providing multiple safe and effective routes of administration. Despite the fact that it is an off-label use, ondansetron is being increasingly given for acute, undifferentiated nausea and vomiting and is presently being used in the field on combat casualties by some US and Allied Forces. Considering the risks involved with promethazine use, and the efficacy and safety of ondansetron and ondansetron?s availability in a generic form, we recommend removing promethazine from the TCCC Guidelines and replacing it with ondansetron. PMID:26125161

  4. [Prehospital thrombolysis. Evaluation of preliminary experiences at Val-de-Marne].

    PubMed

    Dubois-Randé, J L; Herve, C; Duval-Moulin, A M; Gaillard, M; Boesch, C; Louvard, Y; Wolf, M; Jan, F; Castaigne, A

    1989-12-01

    Benefits of thrombolysis have been shown to be greater when therapy is administered early, and this led us to consider the value of starting thrombolytic treatment in the patient's home. However, this implies the transfer of responsibility of patient management from the cardiologist to the physician in charge of the mobile emergency care team. A study was undertaken in the Val-de-Marne department to assess the benefits and risks of this therapeutic approach. The first phase was designed to evaluate the reliability of the emergency care team's diagnosis and the second phase of the study was a randomised double blind prehospital therapeutic trial of a thrombolytic agent, acylated streptokinase (intravenous bolus of 30 units in 4 minutes) against placebo. The nature of prehospital treatment was revealed on hospital admission and thrombolytic therapy was immediately given to those patients allocated to placebo at home providing the admitting cardiologist confirmed the indication. A total of 100 patients were included; 57 were allocated to thrombolytic therapy and 43 to placebo in the prehospital phase. The diagnosis of acute coronary insufficiency was confirmed in all cases and 97 p. 100 of patients had signs of acute myocardial infarction. No complications were attributable to prehospital administration of the thrombolytic. The average time gain in instituting treatment was 60 minutes. At control coronary angiography, 72 p. 100 of the coronary arteries thought to the responsible for the infarct were shown to be patent. The global left ventricular ejection fraction of patients treated with thrombolysis at home was 56.7 p. 100 compared with 53.4 p. 100 in the placebo group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2515822

  5. Prehospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsens Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Rizoli, Sandro B; Rhind, Shawn G; Cuschieri, Joseph; Junger, Wolfgang; Baker, Andrew J; Dubick, Michael A; Hoyt, David B; Bulger, Eileen M

    2015-07-01

    Impaired hemostasis frequently occurs after traumatic shock and resuscitation. The prehospital fluid administered can exacerbate subsequent bleeding and coagulopathy. Hypertonic solutions are recommended as first-line treatment of traumatic shock; however, their effects on coagulation are unclear. This study explores the impact of resuscitation with various hypertonic solutions on early coagulopathy after trauma. We conducted a prospective observational subgroup analysis of large clinical trial on out-of-hospital single-bolus (250 mL) hypertonic fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock trauma patients (systolic blood pressure, ≤70 mmHg). Patients received 7.5% NaCl (HS), 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 (HSD), or 0.9% NaCl (normal saline [NS]) in the prehospital setting. Thirty-four patients were included: 9 HS, 8 HSD, 17 NS. Treatment with HS/HSD led to higher admission systolic blood pressure, sodium, chloride, and osmolarity, whereas lactate, base deficit, fluid requirement, and hemoglobin levels were similar in all groups. The HSD-resuscitated patients had higher admission international normalized ratio values and more hypocoagulable patients, 62% (vs. 55% HS, 47% NS; P < 0.05). Prothrombotic tissue factor was elevated in shock treated with NS but depressed in both HS and HSD groups. Fibrinolytic tissue plasminogen activator and anti-fibrinolytic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 were increased by shock but not thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. The HSD patients had the worst imbalance between procoagulation/anticoagulation and profibrinolysis/antifibrinolysis, resulting in more hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis. We concluded that resuscitation with hypertonic solutions, particularly HSD, worsens hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis after hemorrhagic shock in trauma through imbalances in both procoagulants and anticoagulants and both profibrinolytic and antifibrinolytic activities. PMID:25784523

  6. Prehospital Emergency Nursing students' experiences of learning during prehospital clinical placements.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Kim; Fridlund, Bengt; Thorén, Ann-Britt

    2013-07-01

    Clinical placements play an important role in learning a new profession, but students report about poor placement experiences. Standards have been laid down for improvements within clinical training in Prehospital Emergency Nursing programmes in Sweden, but no studies have been carried out in this field in a Swedish context. The purpose of this study was thus to describe the experiences of Prehospital Emergency Nursing (PEN) students of their clinical placement and the effect on their learning process. Data were collected in 28 individual interviews and analyzed in accordance with Flanagan's Critical Incident Technique. Three main areas emerged: the professional clinical supervisor, the clinical placement setting and the learning strategy. All these areas played a significant role in the PEN students' learning progress and development into a new professional role. The choice of clinical supervisor (CS) and clinical placement is important if PEN students' learning is to be an effective and positive experience. The prehospital environment is unique and can have positive and negative effects on student learning depending on the support and structure given during their clinical placement. A learning strategy based on reflective dialogue, CS continuity and a learning structure based on the prehospital environment is presented. PMID:23140791

  7. Rethinking Child Welfare to Keep Families Safe and Together: Effective Housing-Based Supports to Reduce Child Trauma, Maltreatment Recidivism, and Re-Entry to Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Marny; Sullivan, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of children who are placed in child protective custody have parents with a substance use disorder. This placement occurs despite evidence that the trauma of removal is associated with poor long-term child outcomes. This article describes a collaborative model of a continuum of housing-based clinical and support services for the whole family that has safely reduced foster care placement. An external evaluation of this pilot in Jackson County, Oregon, found significant differences in subsequent maltreatment, foster care re-entry, and family permanency outcomes favoring the treatment group. After initial external grant funds, this program is continuing and expanding across Oregon due to state legislation, and funding and can be a model for other states. PMID:26827482

  8. A Review of Traumatic Brain Injury Trauma Center Visits Meeting Physiologic Criteria from the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Field Triage Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, William S.; Ovalle, Fernando; Faul, Mark; Sasser, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a serious subset of injuries among persons in the United States, and prehospital care of these injuries can mitigate both the morbidity and the mortality in patients who suffer from these injuries. Guidelines for triage of injured patients have been set forth by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT) in cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These guidelines include physiologic criteria, such as the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate, which should be used in determining triage of an injured patient. Objectives This study examined the numbers of visits at level I and II trauma centers by patients with a diagnosed TBI to determine the prevalence of those meeting physiologic criteria from the ACS-COT/CDC guidelines and to determine the extent of mortality among this patient population. Methods The data for this study were taken from the 2007 National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) National Sample Program (NSP). This data set is a nationally representative sample of visits to level I and II trauma centers across the United States and is funded by the American College of Surgeons. Estimates of demographic characteristics, physiologic measures, and death were made for this study population using both chi-square analyses and adjusted logistic regression modeling. Results The analyses demonstrated that although many people who sustain a TBI and were taken to a level I or II trauma center did not meet the physiologic criteria, those who did meet the physiologic criteria had significantly higher odds of death than those who did not meet the criteria. After controlling for age, gender, race, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and length of stay in the hospital, persons who had a GCS score ≤13 were 17 times more likely to die than TBI patients who had a higher GCS score (odds ratio [OR] 17.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 10.7–28.3). Other

  9. The Need for More Prehospital Research on Language Barriers: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Ramsey C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite evidence from other healthcare settings that language barriers negatively impact patient outcomes, the literature on language barriers in emergency medical services (EMS) has not been previously summarized. The objective of this study is to systematically review existing studies of the impact of language barriers on prehospital emergency care and identify opportunities for future research. Methods A systematic review with narrative synthesis of publications with populations specific to the prehospital setting and outcome measures specific to language barriers was conducted. A four-prong search strategy of academic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, and Clinical Key) through March 2015, web-based search for gray literature, search of citation lists, and review of key conference proceedings using pre-defined eligibility criteria was used. Language-related outcomes were categorized and reported as community-specific outcomes, EMS provider-specific outcomes, patient-specific outcomes, or health system-specific outcomes. Results Twenty-two studies met eligibility criteria for review. Ten publications (45%) focused on community-specific outcomes. Language barriers are perceived as a barrier by minority language speaking communities to activating EMS. Eleven publications (50%) reported outcomes specific to EMS providers, with six of these studies focused on EMS dispatch. EMS dispatchers describe less accurate and delayed dispatch of resources when confronted with language discordant callers, as well as limitations in the ability to provide medical direction to callers. There is a paucity of research on EMS treatment and transport decisions, and no studies provided patient-specific or health system-specific outcomes. Key research gaps include identifying the mechanisms by which language barriers impact care, the effect of language barriers on EMS utilization and clinically significant outcomes, and the cost implications of addressing language

  10. An effective prehospital emergency system.

    PubMed

    McManus, W F; Tresch, D D; Darin, J C

    1977-04-01

    An Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system with the capabilities of rapid response, patient extrication, basic life support, advanced life support, radio communication, and transportation provides appropriate care for a wide spectrum of injured and acutely ill patients. The validity of the selective dual response system in demonstrated by: 1) rapid provision of basic life support, 2) appropriate availability of advanced life support, 3) conservation of educational and fiscal resources, and 4) the enchancement of knowledge and manipulative skill expertise of relatively few, but busy, EMT-paramedics who are provided close medical supervision and support. PMID:857049

  11. Development and evaluation of a novel, real time mobile telesonography system in management of patients with abdominal trauma: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the use of e-FAST in management of patients with abdominal trauma, its utility in prehospital setting is not widely adopted. The goal of this study is to develop a novel portable telesonography (TS) system and evaluate the comparability of the quality of images obtained via this system among healthy volunteers who undergo e-FAST abdominal examination in a moving ambulance and at the ED. We hypothesize that: (1) real-time ultrasound images of acute trauma patients in the pre-hospital setting can be obtained and transmitted to the ED via the novel TS system; and (2) Ultrasound images transmitted to the hospital from the real-time TS system will be comparable in quality to those obtained in the ED. Methods Study participants are three healthy volunteers (one each with normal, overweight and obese BMI category). The ultrasound images will be obtained by two ultrasound-trained physicians The TS is a portable sonogram (by Sonosite) interfaced with a portable broadcast unit (by Live-U). Two UTPs will conduct e-FAST examinations on healthy volunteers in moving ambulances and transmit the images via cellular network to the hospital server, where they are stored. Upon arrival in the ED, the same UTPs will obtain another set of images from the volunteers, which are then compared to those obtained in the moving ambulances by another set of blinded UTPs (evaluators) using a validated image quality scale, the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction (QUIS). Discussion Findings from this study will provide needed data on the validity of the novel TS in transmitting live images from moving ambulances to images obtained in the ED thus providing opportunity to facilitate medical care of a patient located in a remote or austere setting. PMID:23249290

  12. Determinants of survival after inferior vena cava trauma.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, J; Frankhouse, J; Modrall, G; Golshani, S; Aziz, I; Demetriades, D; Yellin, A E

    1999-10-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) injuries continue to be associated with mortality rates of 21 to 66 per cent despite advances in prehospital, surgical, and critical care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcome of patients with IVC injury after treatment at a major urban trauma center and to identify factors predictive of survival. Between 1989 and 1995, 158 patients presented to the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center with IVC injuries. One hundred thirty-six patient records were available for review, and 69 data points were collected and analyzed. Mean age was 26 years (range, 6-54), and 122 (90%) patients were male. Mechanism of injury included gunshot in 88 (65%) patients, stab in 23 (17%) patients, shotgun in 7 (5%) patients, and blunt trauma in 18 (13%) patients. The mean Injury Severity Score was 25. Seventy (52%) patients were hypotensive. Eleven (8%) patients died before surgical intervention, and 25 (18%) patients died before operative repair. Repair (79), ligation (20), or observation (1) was accomplished in 100 (74%) patients. Overall survival was 48 per cent and 65 per cent in the 100 patients surviving to operative repair, including 5 of 20 patients requiring IVC ligation. Significant differences (P<0.001) between survivors and nonsurvivors included Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Score, hematocrit, hypotension, emergent thoracotomy, blood loss, level of injury, tamponade, and associated aortic injury. Logistic regression analysis identified hypotension, anatomic level of injury, and associated aortic injury as significant predictors of outcome (P = 0.001). Survival is predominantly determined by severity and anatomic accessibility of the IVC injury and by the absence of associated major vascular injuries. Ligation may control otherwise exsanguinating injuries and should be considered early in the management of complex injuries. PMID:10515547

  13. Pitfalls in penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, A B

    2003-08-01

    In Western Europe the most frequent cause of multiple injuries is blunt trauma. Only few of us have experience with penetrating trauma, without exception far less than in the USA or South-Africa. In Rotterdam, the Erasmus Medical Centre is a level I trauma centre, situated directly in the town centre. All penetrating traumas are directly presented to our emergency department by a well organized ambulance service supported by a mobile medical team if necessary. The delay with scoop and run principles is very short for these cases, resulting in severely injured reaching the hospital alive in increasing frequency. Although the basic principles of trauma care according to the guidelines of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) (1-2) are the same for blunt and penetrating trauma with regard to priorities, diagnostics and primary therapy, there are some pitfalls in the strategy of management in penetrating trauma one should be aware of. Simple algorithms can be helpful, especially in case of limited experience (3). In case of life-saving procedures, the principles of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) must be followed (4-5). This approach is somewhat different from "traditional" surgical treatment. In the Ist phase prompt interventions by emergency thoracotomy and laparotomy are carried out, with only two goals to achieve: surgical control of haemorrhage and contamination. After temporary life-saving procedures, the 2nd phase is characterized by intensive care treatment, dealing with hypothermia, metabolic acidosis and clotting disturbances. Finally in the 3rd phase, within 6-24 hours, definitive surgical care takes place. In this overview, penetrating injuries of neck, thorax, abdomen and extremities will be outlined. Penetrating cranial injuries, as a neurosurgical emergency with poor prognosis, are not discussed. History and physical examination remain the corner stones of good medical praxis. In a work-up according to ATLS principles airway, breathing and circulation

  14. Video recording of emergency department trauma resuscitations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Debra M

    2003-01-01

    Although hospitals are faced with the challenges of appropriately informing the public regarding health care and protecting the privacy of patients, a comprehensive policy concerning videotaping of trauma resuscitations can be developed to comply with regulatory bodies. Video recording of trauma team resuscitations can be utilized as an effective quality improvement tool to evaluate trauma team performance, psychomotor skills and techniques, and to identify educational needs related to specific trauma populations. Video recording of Trauma resuscitations is an effective tool for improving trauma team performance by educating clinical staff regarding roles and responsibilities. PMID:16265920

  15. Barriers of Pre-Hospital Services in Road Traffic Injuries in Tehran: The Viewpoint of Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    Alinia, Shahrokh; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Maddah, Sadat Seyed Bagher; Negarandeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran is one of the countries with considerable road traffic injuries. Pre-hospital interventions have an important role in preventing mortalities and disabilities caused by traffic accidents. The present study aimed to explore the barriers of pre-hospital care in traffic injuries in Tehran, Iran. Methods: A qualitative content analysis approach was conducted based on 21 semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and then data condensing, labeling, coding and defining categories were performed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Four main barriers including 4 main categories and 13 subcategories emerged; they included Barriers related to people, Barriers related to metropolitan infrastructure, Barriers related to the profession and Barriers related to managerial issues. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, pre-hospital service barriers in traffic accidents have many dimensions including cultural, structural and managerial domains. Policy makers in health system can use these findings to promote the quality of pre-hospital services, especially in the field of traffic injuries. PMID:26448954

  16. Do pre-hospital anaesthesiologists reliably predict mortality using the NACA severity score? A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    RAATINIEMI, L; MIKKELSEN, K; FREDRIKSEN, K; WISBORG, T

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics' (NACA) severity score is widely used in pre-hospital emergency medicine to grade the severity of illness or trauma in patient groups but is scarcely validated. The aim of this study was to assess the score's ability to predict mortality and need for advanced in-hospital interventions in a cohort from one anaesthesiologist-manned helicopter service in Northern Norway. Methods All missions completed by one helicopter service during January 1999 to December 2009 were reviewed. One thousand eight hundred forty-one patients were assessed by the NACA score. Pre-hospital and in-hospital interventions were collected from patient records. The relationship between NACA score and the outcome measures was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results A total of 1533 patients were included in the analysis; uninjured and dead victims were excluded per protocol. Overall mortality rate of the patients with NACA score 1–6 was 5.2%. Trauma patients with NACA score 1–6 had overall mortality rate of 1.9% (12/625) and non-trauma patients 7.4% (67/908). The NACA score's ability to predict mortality was assessed by using ROC area under curve (AUC) and was 0.86 for all, 0.82 for non-trauma and 0.98 for trauma patients. The NACA score's ability to predict a need for respiratory therapy within 24 h revealed an AUC of 0.90 for all patients combined. Conclusion The NACA score had good discrimination for predicting mortality and need for respiratory therapy. It is thus useful as a tool to measure overall severity of the patient population in this kind of emergency medicine system. PMID:24134443

  17. The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the Evolution of Neuro-Trauma Care: Would the 16th President Have Survived in the Modern Era?

    PubMed

    Yan, Sandra C; Smith, Timothy R; Bi, Wenya Linda; Brewster, Ryan; Gormley, William B; Dunn, Ian F; Laws, Edward R

    2015-11-01

    Abraham Lincoln was the 16(th) President of the United States of America. On April 14, 1865, shortly after his re-election and the conclusion of the Civil War, Lincoln was shot and killed by John Wilkes Booth. Although numerous physicians tended to the President shortly after his injury, he passed away the next morning. Today, we recognize Lincoln as one of the greatest Presidents in American history. His assassination profoundly influenced the future of the United States, especially as the country was coming back together again following the Civil War. Testaments to his lasting legacy can be seen in many places, from the stone carving of him on Mount Rushmore to his image gracing the $5 bill. What if the President had survived his injury? Would he have had a different outcome utilizing current critical care treatment? Neurotrauma care in 1865 was not yet developed, and head wounds such as the one Lincoln sustained were almost always fatal. The medical attention he received is considered by historians and physicians today to be excellent for that time. We look at the evolution of neurotrauma care during the last 150 years in the US. Particular focus is paid to the advancement of care for penetrating brain injuries in modern trauma centers. PMID:26092530

  18. The National Trauma Research Repository: Ushering in a New ERA of trauma research (Commentary).

    PubMed

    Smith, Sharon L; Price, Michelle A; Fabian, Timothy C; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Pruitt, Basil A; Stewart, Ronald M; Jenkins, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Despite being the leading cause of death in the United States for individuals 46 years and younger and the primary cause of death among military service members, trauma care research has been underfunded for the last 50 years. Sustained federal funding for a coordinated national trauma clinical research program is required to advance the science of caring for the injured. The Department of Defense is committed to funding studies with military relevance; therefore, it cannot fund pediatric or geriatric trauma clinical trials. Currently, trauma clinical trials are often performed within a single site or a small group of trauma hospitals, and research data are not available for secondary analysis or sharing across studies. Data-sharing platforms encourage transfer of research data and knowledge between civilian and military researchers, reduce redundancy, and maximize limited research funding. In collaboration with the Department of Defense, trauma researchers formed the Coalition for National Trauma Research (CNTR) in 2014 to advance trauma research in a coordinated effort. CNTR's member organizations are the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST), the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACS COT), the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST), the Western Trauma Association (WTA), and the National Trauma Institute (NTI). CNTR advocates for sustained federal funding for a multidisciplinary national trauma research program to be conducted through a large clinical trials network and a national trauma research repository. The initial advocacy and research activities underway to accomplish these goals are presented. PMID:27496599

  19. The Impact of Pre-Hospital Administration of Lactated Ringer's Solution versus Normal Saline in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rowell, Susan E; Fair, Kelly A; Barbosa, Ronald R; Watters, Jennifer M; Bulger, Eileen M; Holcomb, John B; Cohen, Mitchell J; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Fox, Erin E; Schreiber, Martin A

    2016-06-01

    Lactated Ringer's (LR) and normal saline (NS) are both used for resuscitation of injured patients. NS has been associated with increased resuscitation volume, blood loss, acidosis, and coagulopathy compared with LR. We sought to determine if pre-hospital LR is associated with improved outcome compared with NS in patients with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI). We included patients receiving pre-hospital LR or NS from the PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study. Patients with TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] head ≥3) and without TBI (AIS head ≤2) were compared. Cox proportional hazards models including Injury Severity Score (ISS), AIS head, AIS extremity, age, fluids, intubation status, and hospital site were generated for prediction of mortality. Linear regression models were generated for prediction of red blood cell (RBC) and crystalloid requirement, and admission biochemical/physiological parameters. Seven hundred ninety-one patients received either LR (n = 117) or NS (n = 674). Median ISS, AIS head, AIS extremity, and pre-hospital fluid volume were higher in TBI and non-TBI patients receiving LR compared with NS (p < 0.01). In patients with TBI (n = 308), LR was associated with higher adjusted mortality compared with NS (hazard rate [HR] = 1.78, confidence interval [CI] 1.04-3.04, p = 0.035). In patients without TBI (n = 483), no difference in mortality was demonstrated (HR = 1.49, CI 0.757-2.95, p = 0.247). Fluid type had no effect on admission biochemical or physiological parameters, 6-hour RBC, or crystalloid requirement in either group. LR was associated with increased mortality compared with NS in patients with TBI. These results underscore the need for a prospective randomized trial comparing pre-hospital LR with NS in patients with TBI. PMID:26914721

  20. Blunt cardiac rupture with prehospital pulseless electrical activity: a rare successful experience.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Hua; Choi, Wai-Mau; Wu, Hsueh-Ru; Liu, Hung-Chang; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Tsai, Shin-Han

    2005-12-01

    Blunt cardiac rupture is highly associated with mortality. In the recent literature, the reported mortality rates of cardiac rupture ranged from 59.7% to 100%. The probability of survival for those with prehospital pulseless electrical activity was extremely low. This case report describes a rare example of survival of a female patient with life-threatening cardiac rupture and cardiac tamponade after a major car accident. The victim developed pulseless electrical activity at admission. She recovered from the accident, however, without developing any signs of neurologic deficits. This case study emphasizes the value of the primary survey of patients and prompt and accurate interventions, including focused abdominal sonography for trauma, pericardiocentesis, and an urgent thoracotomy in the operating room for primary repair of cardiac rupture without applying a cardiopulmonary bypass system. The study showed that early diagnosis and aggressive interventions are crucial factors to the successful outcome of patient's survival. PMID:16394928

  1. NATO Blood Panel perspectives on changes to military prehospital resuscitation policies: current and future practice.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Tom; Badloe, John; Bohonek, Milos; Taylor, Audra L; Erik Heier, Hans; Doughty, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Blood Panel exists to promote interoperability of transfusion practice between NATO partners. However, it has served as an important forum for the development of prehospital transfusion and transfusion in the austere environment. There are synergies with the trauma hemostasis and oxygen research community especially in the areas of innovation and research. Four presentations are summarized together with a review of some scientific principles. The past decade has already seen significant changes in early transfusion support. Sometimes practice has preceded the evidence and has stretched regulatory and logistic constraints. Ethical and philosophical issues are also important and require us to question "should we" and not just "could we." The challenge for the combined communities is to continue to optimize transfusion support underpinned by evidence-based excellence. PMID:27100759

  2. Staphylococcal Blood Stream Infections: Epidemiology, Resistance Pattern and Outcome at a Level 1 Indian Trauma Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Vibhor; Mathur, Purva; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Misra, Mahesh Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Blood stream infection (BSI)/bacteremia is a potentially life threatening infection and are associated with a high crude mortality. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus (CONS) and Staphylococcus aureus are the most commonly isolated gram positive bacteria from blood culture samples. While S. aureus is a known pathogen causing BSIs, CONS are considered to be common contaminants of blood culture. Of late many studies have challenged this traditional viewpoint. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology and significance of Staphylococcus aureus and CONS bacteremia, their resistance patterns and associated mortality in critically ill trauma patients admitted to a level 1 trauma center. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted from January 2009 to June 2011. All patients from whose blood samples yielded a S. aureus or CONS on culture were included in this study. A detailed history was obtained and follow-up of the patients was done. The isolates of Staphylococci were identified to species level. Antibiotic susceptibility was performed by the disc diffusion method and VITEK-2 system. Results: During this 30 month period, total of 10,509 blood samples were received from 2,938 patients. A total of 1,961 samples taken from 905 patients were positive for one or more pathogens. S. aureus/CONS were isolated from 469 samples from 374 patients. Crude mortality amongst the patients having Staphylococcal BSI was 25% (94/374). Conclusion: Staphylococcal blood stream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. PMID:24014969

  3. Reduction of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal infections by limitation of broad-spectrum cephalosporin use in a trauma and burn intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    May, A K; Melton, S M; McGwin, G; Cross, J M; Moser, S A; Rue, L W

    2000-09-01

    Both vancomycin and third-generation cephalosporin use are believed to contribute to a rise in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections. In 1998, the largest number of VRE infections in our hospital occurred in the trauma/burn intensive care unit (TBICU), accounting for nearly 20% of hospital infections. In an attempt to control the VRE infection rate, antibiotic protocols for prophylaxis, empiric, and definitive therapy were initiated during the final quarter of 1998 to minimize cephalosporin use by the introduction of piperacillin/tazobactam. Therefore, we undertook a study of the VRE infection rate for the TBICU in relation to vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, piperacillin, third-generation cephalosporin, and total cephalosporin use before and after efforts to limit cephalosporins. These data were compared to those in the medical and surgical intensive care units. During 1998, seven VRE infections occurred in the TBICU. Following initiation of antibiotic protocols, one case of VRE infection occurred in the subsequent month and no cases in the 17 months since. The decrease in the VRE infection rate corresponded with a significant increase in the use of piperacillin/tazobactam and a reduction in third-generation and total cephalosporin use. In contrast, cephalosporin use in the medical and surgical intensive care units remains significantly higher than in the TBICU, and neither unit has had a reduction in their VRE infection rates. PMID:11028540

  4. [The Trauma Network of the German Society for Trauma 2009].

    PubMed

    Kühne, C A; Mand, C; Sturm, J; Lackner, C K; Künzel, A; Siebert, H; Ruchholtz, S

    2009-10-01

    In 2009, 3 years after the foundation of the Trauma Network of the German Society for Trauma (TraumaNetzwerkD DGU), the majority of German hospitals participating in the treatment of seriously injured patients is registered in regional trauma networks (TNW). Currently there are 41 trauma networks with more than 660 hospitals in existence, 18 more are registered but are still in the planning phase. Each Federal State has an average of 39 trauma centres of different levels taking part in the treatment of seriously injured patients and every trauma network has an average catchment area of 8708 km(2). The most favourable geographical infrastructure conditions exist in Nordrhein-Westfalen, the least favourable in Sachsen-Anhalt and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. A total of 95 hospitals have already fulfilled the first audit of the structural, personnel and qualitative requirements by the certification bodies. Examination of the check lists of 26 hospitals showed shortcomings in the clinical structure so that these hospitals must be rechecked after correction of the shortcomings. A total of 59 hospitals throughout Germany were successfully audited and only one failed to fulfil the requirements. Because of the varying sizes of the trauma networks there are differences in the areas covered by each trauma network and trauma centre. Concerning the process of certification and auditing (together with the company DIOcert) it could be seen that by careful examination of the check lists of each hospital unforeseen problems during the audit could be avoided. The following article will present the current state of development of the Trauma Network of the German Society for Trauma and describe the certification and auditing process. PMID:19756455

  5. Communicative Management in Ambulatory Services: Prehospital Management Communication--Limits and Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Poor management communication in healthcare services affects employees' motivation, commitment, and, in the final instance, organizational performance and the quality of patient care. In any area of health management, good communication is, therefore, key to successful management. This article discusses how managers of ambulance stations should secure communication with their paramedic crews. The first part uses ethical concepts to analyze communicative disagreement in interactive dialogue between managers and paramedics. The second part outlines basic communication principles that can serve as conceptual tools for avoiding misinterpretation in prehospital manager-employee interaction. PMID:26182699

  6. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. PMID:21640287

  7. Prehospital heart rate and blood pressure increase the positive predictive value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for high-mortality traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Andrew; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Kumar, Kamal; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-05-15

    We hypothesized that vital signs could be used to improve the association between a trauma patient's prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and his or her clinical condition. Previously, abnormally low and high blood pressures have both been associated with higher mortality for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1384 adult prehospital trauma patients. Vital-sign data were electronically archived and analyzed. We examined the relative risk of severe head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 5-6 as a function of the GCS, systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR). We created multi-variate logistic regression models and, using DeLong's test, compared their area under receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC AUCs) for three outcomes: head AIS 5-6, all-cause mortality, and either head AIS 5-6 or neurosurgical procedure. We found significant bimodal relationships between head AIS 5-6 versus SBP and HR, but not RR. When the GCS was <15, ROC AUCs were significantly higher for a multi-variate regression model (GCS, SBP, and HR) versus GCS alone. In particular, patients with abnormalities in all parameters (GCS, SBP, and HR) were significantly more likely to have high-mortality TBI versus those with abnormalities in GCS alone. This could be useful for mobilizing resources (e.g., neurosurgeons and operating rooms at the receiving hospital) and might enable new prehospital management protocols where therapies are selected based on TBI mortality risk. PMID:24372334

  8. Coronary artery dissection: an unusual cause of hypoxia in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Burns, Brian J; Healy, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    A 41-year-old motocross rider sustained blunt trauma to the chest following a collision with another rider. He was initially hypoxic and was given oxygen with a non-rebreather mask. He complained of chest pain. A prehospital extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma (eFAST) scan was negative for pneumothorax, but demonstrated a hypokinetic left ventricle. An electrocardiogram (ECG) in the emergency department confirmed anterior myocardial infarction, found to be due to a traumatic left anterior descending coronary artery dissection. This case highlights a rare but life-threatening cause of hypoxia in blunt chest trauma. PMID:21495831

  9. Tailbone trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Choi SB, Cwinn AA. Pelvic trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 55. Vora ...

  10. Recent advances in TeleStroke: a systematic review on applications in prehospital management and Stroke Unit treatment or TeleStroke networking in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Gordian J; Müller-Barna, Peter; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2014-12-01

    TeleStroke has become an increasing means to overcome shortage of stroke expertise in underserved areas. This rapidly growing field has triggered a large amount of publications in recent years. We aimed to analyze recent advances in the field of telemedicine for acute stroke, with main focus on prehospital management, Stroke Unit treatment and network implementations in developing countries. Out of 260 articles, 25 were selected for this systematic review: 9 regarding prehospital management, 14 regarding Stroke Unit treatment and 2 describing a network in developing countries. Prehospital management showed that stroke recognition can start at the dispatch emergency call, important clinical information can be electronically transmitted to hospitals before admission and even acute treatment such as thrombolysis can be initiated in the prehospital field if ambulances are equipped with CT scan and point-of-care laboratory. Articles on remote clinical examination, telemedical imaging interpretation, trial recruitment and cost-effectiveness described various aspects of Stroke Unit treatment within TeleStroke networks, underlining reliability, safety and cost savings of these systems of care. Only one network was described to have been implemented in a developing/emerging nation. TeleStroke is a growing field expanding its focus to a broader spectrum of stroke care. It still seems to be underused, particularly in developing countries. PMID:25381687

  11. [Effect of logistic and medical emergency resources on fatal outcome of severe trauma].

    PubMed

    Biewener, A; Holch, M; Müller, U; Veitinger, A; Erfurt, C; Zwipp, H

    2000-02-01

    122 cases of patients who died in sequel of an accident (recruitment period 1993/94, mean ISS 40 +/- 19) in reach of air rescue base Dresden, Germany, were examined. Data were assessed from autopsy protocol and the protocol of the physician who treated on scene. We analyzed the time course of the emergency, the scheduled emergency medical service and the quality of prehospital diagnosis and therapy by the emergency team. The mean response time was 8.1 +/- 5.9 min, the mean distance between EMS bases und incident location 5.9 +/- 5.7 km. In 94.4% of all cases a mobile intensive care unit--with an emergency physician as crew member--was on scene, in 5.6% a paramedic car. Air rescue by helicopter, including an emergency physician, was performed only in 8.7% of all cases although a helicopter was available in 54% of all accidents. Mechanisms of injury were traffic accident (71.4%), fall (14.3), 5.9% accident on building site, shot and stab injuries (5.9%) and burns (1.7%). 82 patients reached the emergency room alive (67.2% mean ISS 37 +/- 18). Only 26% of all patients were transported directly to a level I trauma center. Mean survival time of all 122 patients was 146 +/- 30.4 h. Severe head injury described by autopsy protocol was diagnosed on scene in 82%. Preclinical treatment was:intubation and ventilation (63%), O2 insufflation (17.4%), no specific treatment (19.6%). Severe thoracic trauma was diagnosed in 54%. Preclinical treatment was:intubation and ventilation (64.8%), O2 application (18.8%), no specific treatment (16.2%). Severe thoracic trauma with hemato-pneumothorax (n = 26) was recognized by the emergency physician in 65.6%, specific therapy (application of chest drain) was performed in 7.1%. Preclinical diagnosis rates concerning abdominal trauma were 29% and 27.8% in case of unstable pelvis fracture. Hemorrhagic shock related to these injuries was found in 44.2%, mean resuscitation volume applicated in these cases was 960 +/- 610 ml. Typical faults in

  12. Intramuscular midazolam versus intravenous lorazepam for the prehospital treatment of status epilepticus in the pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Robert D.; Nicholas, Katherine; Durkalski-Mauldin, Valerie L.; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Conwit, Robin; Mahajan, Prashant V.; Lewandowski, Christopher; Silbergleit, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine the effectiveness of intramuscular (IM) midazolam versus intravenous (IV) lorazepam for the treatment of pediatric patients with status epilepticus (SE) in the prehospital care setting. Methods This multicenter clinical trial randomized patients diagnosed with SE to receive either IM midazolam or IV lorazepam administered by paramedics in the prehospital care setting. Included in this secondary analysis were only patients younger than 18 years of age. Evaluated were the associations of the treatment group (IM vs. IV) with the primary outcome, defined as seizure cessation prior to emergency department (ED) arrival, and with patient characteristics, time to important events, and adverse events. Descriptive statistics and 99% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for the analysis. Results Of 893 primary study subjects, 120 met criteria for this study (60 in each treatment group). There were no differences in important baseline characteristics or seizure etiologies between groups. The primary outcome was met in 41 (68.3%) and 43 (71.7%) of subjects in the IM and IV groups, respectively (risk difference [RD] −3.3%, 99% CI −24.9% to 18.2%). Similar results were noted for those younger than 11 years (RD −1.3%, 99% CI −25.7% to 23.1%). Time from initiating the treatment protocol was shorter for children who received IM midazolam, mainly due to the shorter time to administer the active treatment. Safety profiles were similar. Significance IM midazolam can be rapidly administered and appears to be safe and effective for the management of children with SE treated in the prehospital setting. The results must be interpreted in the context of the secondary analysis design and sample size of the study. PMID:25597369

  13. Impact of Injury Severity on Dynamic Inflammation Networks Following Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Almahmoud, Khalid; Namas, Rami A.; Abdul-Malak, Othman; Zaaqoq, Akram M.; Zamora, Ruben; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Sperry, Jason; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical outcomes following trauma depend on the extent of injury and the host’s response to injury, along with medical care. We hypothesized that dynamic networks of systemic inflammation manifest differently as a function of injury severity in human blunt trauma. Study Design From a cohort of 472 blunt trauma survivors studied following IRB approval, three Injury Severity Score (ISS) sub-cohorts were derived after matching for age and gender: Mild ISS (49 patients [33 males, 16 females; age 42±1.9; ISS 9.5±0.4]); Moderate ISS: (49 patients [33 males, 16 females; age 42±1.9; ISS 19.9±0.4]) and Severe ISS: (49 patients [33 males, 16 females; age 42±2.5; ISS 33±1.1]). Multiple inflammatory mediators were assessed in serial blood samples. Dynamic Bayesian Network (DyBN) inference was utilized to infer causal relationships based on probabilistic measures. Results ICU length of stay [LOS], total LOS, days on mechanical ventilation, Marshall Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score, prevalence of pre-hospital hypotension and nosocomial infection, as well admission lactate and base deficit were elevated as a function of ISS. Multiple circulating inflammatory mediators were significantly elevated in Severe ISS vs. Moderate or Mild ISS over both the first 24 h and out to 7 days post-injury. Moderate and Mild ISS. DyBN suggested that IL-6 production in Severe ISS was affected by MCP-1/CCL2, MIG/CXCL9, and IP-10/CXCL10; by MCP-1/CCL2 and MIG/CXCL9 in Moderate ISS; and by MIG/CXCL9 alone in Mild ISS over 7 d post-injury. Conclusion ISS correlates linearly with morbidity, prevalence of infection, and early systemic inflammatory connectivity of chemokines to IL-6. PMID:26009819

  14. [Experience of surgical care administration to patients with closed abdominal trauma, serving on the ships of the Navy].

    PubMed

    Pleskach, V V; Mosyagin, I G

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of surgical care administration to personnel, serving on ships of the Navy of Russia and performing different tasks in off-shore maritime and ocean zones in 2012-2013 showed that there is a requirement to create seven additional ship groups of specialized medical care: on the Northern Fleet--2, on the Pacific Fleet--2, on the Baltic Fleet--1, on the Black Sea Fleet--1, on the Caspian Flotilla--1. There is also a reasonable requirement to include anaesthesiologist and nurse anaesthetist into these groups. PMID:27263212

  15. Operative treatment of hepatic trauma in Vachira Phuket Hospital.

    PubMed

    Vatanaprasan, Thanong

    2005-03-01

    28%) and 53 patients in the present study died (mortality 25.1%). Thirty one patients (14.7%) died of hepatic cause, whereas 22 patients (10.4%) died of non hepatic causes. Exsanguination and associated head injuries were the major cause of death (83%). Nonsurvivors had a significantly higher shock, blunt injury, associated injury and high grade hepatic injury than survivors (p < 0.005). The high mortality and morbidity can be achieved by well regulated motorcycle accident prevention measures and well prehospital care. PMID:15962638

  16. "Do you expect me to receive PTSD care in a setting where most of the other patients remind me of the perpetrator?": Home-based telemedicine to address barriers to care unique to military sexual trauma and veterans affairs hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Amanda K; Davis, Margaret T; Grubaugh, Anouk; Resnick, Heidi; Birks, Anna; Denier, Carol; Muzzy, Wendy; Tuerk, Peter; Acierno, Ron

    2016-05-01

    Home-based telemedicine (HBT) is a validated method of evidence-based treatment delivery for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and justification for its use has centered on closing gaps related to provider availability and distance to treatment centers. However, another potential use of HBT may be to overcome barriers to care that are inherent to the treatment environment, such as with female veterans who have experienced military sexual trauma (MST) and who must present to VA Medical Centers where the majority of patients share features with perpetrator (e.g. gender, clothing) and may function as reminders of the trauma. Delivering evidence-based therapies to female veterans with MST-related PTSD via HBT can provide needed treatment to this population. This manuscript describes an ongoing federally funded randomized controlled trial comparing Prolonged Exposure (PE) delivered in-person to PE delivered via HBT. Outcomes include session attendance, satisfaction with services, and clinical and quality of life indices. It is hypothesized that based on intent-to-treat analyses, HBT delivery of PE will be more effective than SD at improving both clinical and quality of life outcomes at post, 3-, and 6-month follow-up. This is because 'dose received', that is fewer sessions missed, and lower attrition, will be observed in the HBT group. Although the current manuscript focuses on female veterans with MST-related PTSD, implications for other populations facing systemic barriers are discussed. PMID:26992740

  17. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  18. Trauma Care Doesn't Discriminate: The Association of Race and Health Insurance with Mortality Following Traumatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Osler, Turner; Glance, Laurent G.; Li, Wenjun; Buzas, Jeffery S.; Wetzel, Megan L.; Hosmer, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported that black race and lack of health insurance coverage are associated with increased mortality following traumatic injury. However the association of race and insurance status with trauma outcomes has not been examined using contemporary, national, population-based data. Methods We used data from the National Inpatient Sample on 215,615 patients admitted to one of 836 hospitals following traumatic injury in 2010. We examined the effects of race and insurance coverage on mortality using two logistic regression models, one for patients aged <65 years and the other for older patients. Results Unadjusted mortality was low for white (2.71%), black (2.54%) and Hispanic (2.03%) patients. We found no difference in adjusted survival for non-elderly black patients compared to white patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.90-1.19, P=0.550). Elderly black patients had a 25% lower odds of mortality compared to elderly white patients (AOR 0.75; 95% CI 0.63-0.90; P=0.002). After accounting for survivor bias insurance coverage was not associated with improved survival in younger patients (AOR 0.91; 95% CI: 0.77-1.07; P=0.233). Conclusions Black race is not associated with higher mortality following injury. Health insurance coverage is associated with lower mortality but this may be the result of hospitals’ inability to quickly obtain insurance coverage for uninsured patients who die early in their hospital stay. Increasing insurance coverage may not improve survival for patients hospitalized following injury. Level of Evidence III, Prognostic. PMID:25909426

  19. Lightweight Trauma Module - LTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Current patient movement items (PMI) supporting the military's Critical Care Air Transport Team (CCATT) mission as well as the Crew Health Care System for space (CHeCS) have significant limitations: size, weight, battery duration, and dated clinical technology. The LTM is a small, 20 lb., system integrating diagnostic and therapeutic clinical capabilities along with onboard data management, communication services and automated care algorithms to meet new Aeromedical Evacuation requirements. The Lightweight Trauma Module is an Impact Instrumentation, Inc. project with strong Industry, DoD, NASA, and Academia partnerships aimed at developing the next generation of smart and rugged critical care tools for hazardous environments ranging from the battlefield to space exploration. The LTM is a combination ventilator/critical care monitor/therapeutic system with integrated automatic control systems. Additional capabilities are provided with small external modules.

  20. Imaging in spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Johan W M; Maes, Menno; Ozsarlak, Ozkan; van den Hauwe, Luc; Parizel, Paul M

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  1. A consensus based template for reporting of pre-hospital major incident medical management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Structured reporting of major incidents has been advocated to improve the care provided at future incidents. A systematic review identified ten existing templates for reporting major incident medical management, but these templates are not in widespread use. We aimed to address this challenge by designing an open access template for uniform reporting of data from pre-hospital major incident medical management that will be tested for feasibility. Methods An expert group of thirteen European major incident practitioners, planners or academics participated in a four stage modified nominal group technique consensus process to design a novel reporting template. Initially, each expert proposed 30 variables. Secondly, these proposals were combined and each expert prioritized 45 variables from the total of 270. Thirdly, the expert group met in Norway to develop the template. Lastly, revisions to the final template were agreed via e-mail. Results The consensus process resulted in a template consisting of 48 variables divided into six categories; pre-incident data, Emergency Medical Service (EMS) background, incident characteristics, EMS response, patient characteristics and key lessons. Conclusions The expert group reached consensus on a set of key variables to report the medical management of pre-hospital major incidents and developed a novel reporting template. The template will be freely available for downloading and reporting on http://www.majorincidentreporting.org. This is the first global open access database for pre-hospital major incident reporting. The use of a uniform dataset will allow comparative analysis and has potential to identify areas of improvement for future responses. PMID:24517242

  2. Potential cardiac arrest – an observational study of pre-hospital medical response

    PubMed Central

    Zakariassen, Erik; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A previous study showed that Norwegian GPs on call attended around 40% of out-of-hospital medical emergencies. We wanted to investigate the alarms of prehospital medical resources and the doctors' responses in situations of potential cardiac arrests. Design and setting A three-month prospective data collection was undertaken from three emergency medical communication centres, covering a population of 816,000 residents. From all emergency medical events, a sub-group of patients who received resuscitation, or who were later pronounced dead at site, was selected for further analysis. Results 5,105 medical emergencies involving 5,180 patients were included, of which 193 met the inclusion criteria. The GP on call was alarmed in 59 %, and an anaesthesiologist in 43 % of the cases. When alarmed, a GP attended in 84 % and an anaesthesiologist in 87 % of the cases. Among the patients who died, the GP on call was alarmed most frequently. Conclusion Events involving patients in need of resuscitation are rare, but medical response in the form of the attendance of prehospital personnel is significant. Norwegian GPs have a higher call-out rate for patients in severe situations where resuscitation was an option of treatment, compared with other “red-response” situations. Key pointsThis study investigates alarms of and call-outs among GPs and anaesthesiologists on call, in the most acute clinical situations:Medical emergencies involving patients in need of resuscitation were rare.The health care contribution by pre-hospital personnel being called out was significant.Compared with other acute situations, the GP had a higher attendance rate to patients in life-threatening situations. PMID:27092724

  3. Elderly trauma.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Renee Semonin

    2015-01-01

    Across the world, the population is aging. Adults 65 years and older make up one of the fastest growing segments of the US population. Trauma is a disease process that affects all age groups. The mortality and morbidity that result from an injury can be influenced by many factors including age, physical condition, and comorbidities. The management of the elderly trauma patient can present some unique challenges. This paper addresses the differences that occur in the management of elderly patient who has been injured. This paper also includes a discussion of how to prevent injury in the elderly. PMID:26039652

  4. Implementing and preserving the advances in combat casualty care from Iraq and Afghanistan throughout the US Military.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Smith, David J; Carmona, Richard H

    2015-08-01

    Thirteen years of continuous combat operations have enabled the US Military and its coalition partners to make a number of major advances in casualty care. The coalition nations have developed a superb combat trauma system and achieved unprecedented casualty survival rates. There remains, however, a need to accelerate the translation of new battlefield trauma care information, training, and equipment to units and individuals deploying in support of combat operations. In addition, the US Military needs to ensure that these advances are sustained during peace intervals and that we continue to build upon our successes as we prepare for future conflicts. This article contains recommendations designed to accomplish those goals. For the proposed actions to benefit all branches of our armed services, the direction will need to come from the Office of the Secretary of Defense in partnership with the Joint Staff. Effective translation of military advances in prehospital trauma care may also increase survival for law enforcement officers wounded in the line of duty and for civilian victims of Active Shooter or terrorist-related mass-casualty incidents. PMID:26218704

  5. Management of Pediatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Injury is still the number 1 killer of children ages 1 to 18 years in the United States (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/children.htm). Children who sustain injuries with resulting disabilities incur significant costs not only for their health care but also for productivity lost to the economy. The families of children who survive childhood injury with disability face years of emotional and financial hardship, along with a significant societal burden. The entire process of managing childhood injury is enormously complex and varies by region. Only the comprehensive cooperation of a broadly diverse trauma team will have a significant effect on improving the care of injured children. PMID:27456509

  6. Transfer Times to Definitive Care Facilities Are Too Long

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, David T.; Connolly, Michael; Biffl, Walter L.; Majercik, Sarah D.; Cioffi, William G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review our experience with interfacility transfers to identify problems that could be addressed in the development of a statewide trauma system. Background: The fundamental tenet of a trauma system is to get the right patient to the right hospital at the right time. This hinges on well-defined prehospital destination criteria, interfacility transfer protocols, and education of caregivers. Patients arriving at local community hospitals (LOCs) benefit from stabilization and transfer to trauma centers (TCs) for definitive care. However, in the absence of a formalized trauma system, patients may not reach the TC in a timely fashion and may not be appropriately treated or stabilized at LOCs prior to transfer. Methods: Our facility is a level I TC and regional referral center for a compact geographic area without a formal trauma system. The Trauma Registry was queried for adult patients admitted to the trauma service between January 1, 2001 and March 30, 2003. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those received directly from the scene (DIR) and those transferred from another institution (TRAN). Medical records were reviewed to elucidate details of the early care. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. Continuous data were compared using Student t test, and categorical data using χ2. Transfer times were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: A total of 3507 patients were analyzed. The TRAN group had a higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) (17.5 versus 11.0, P < 0.05), lower Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) (13.3 versus 14.1, P < 0.05), lower initial systolic blood pressure (SBP) (130 versus 140, P< 0.05), and higher mortality (10% versus 79%, P < 0.05) than the DIR group. The average time spent at the LOC was 162 ± 8 minutes. The subgroup of patients with hypotension spent an average of 134 minutes at the LOC, often receiving numerous diagnostic tests despite unavailability of surgeons to provide definitive care. Severe head injury (GCS = 3

  7. Theater Blood Support in the Prehospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Audra L; Corley, Jason B

    2016-01-01

    The Army Blood Program (ABP) is charged with the responsibility of supporting the Warfighter on the battlefield, in addition to meeting garrison hospital blood requirements on a daily basis. Blood support concepts developed in response to Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom combat operations are the cornerstone to maintaining current capabilities and shaping future endeavors.. The ABP is actively engaged with research, advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy for both our conventional and operational forces. The feasibility of frozen/deglycerolized red blood cell use in theater has been demonstrated. The use of Blood Group A plasma in the place of Blood Group AB plasma has been successful. Placement of cryoprecipitate at Role 2 medical facilities and the placement of blood products on MEDEVAC (Vampire Program missions) have proven invaluable in moving transfusion therapy closer to the point of Injury. The improved patient outcomes from earlier transfusion of blood products has driven the requirement for far-forward blood support. Now (more than ever), there are products and processes in place to meet the requirements for blood use in the prehospital setting. PMID:27215865

  8. Epidemiology of pneumonia in a burn care unit: the influence of inhalation trauma on pneumonia and of pneumonia on burn mortality

    PubMed Central

    Liodaki, E.; Kalousis, K.; Mauss, K.L.; Kisch, T.; Mailaender, P.; Stang, F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study is to determine the epidemiological characteristics of burn patients developing pneumonia, as well as the predisposing factors and the mortality of these patients. Infectious complications present serious problems in severely burned patients. Pneumonia, in particular, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients. Patients with inhalation injuries are exposed to a greater risk due to the possible development of infectious complications in the lower respiratory tract. During their stay in our Burn Care Unit, 22.9% of our burn patients developed pneumonia and 10.9 % of these patients died. Risk factors for the development of pneumonia in burn patients were found to be inhalation trauma, high ABSI score, the Baux and modified Baux index, and high ASA score (p<0.01). Age and gender showed no significant correlation to the incidence of pneumonia. In this study we were able to determine the incidence of pneumonia in burn patients, their mortality and the strong correlation of the presence of inhalation injury with the development of pneumonia.

  9. Efficacy of MRI in primary care for patients with knee complaints due to trauma: protocol of a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (TACKLE trial)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with traumatic knee complaints regularly consult their general practitioner (GP). MRI might be a valuable diagnostic tool to assist GPs in making appropriate treatment decisions and reducing costs. Therefore, this study will assess the cost-effectiveness of referral to MRI by GPs compared with usual care, in patients with persistent traumatic knee complaints. Design and methods This is a multi-centre, open-labelled randomised controlled non-inferiority trial in combination with a concurrent observational cohort study. Eligible patients (aged 18–45 years) have knee complaints due to trauma (or sudden onset) occurring in the preceding 6 months and consulting their GP. Participants are randomised to: 1) an MRI group, i.e. GP referral to MRI, or 2) a usual care group, i.e. no MRI. Primary outcomes are knee-related daily function, medical costs (healthcare use and productivity loss), and quality of life. Secondary outcomes are disability due to knee complaints, severity of knee pain, and patients’ perceived recovery and satisfaction. Outcomes are measured at baseline and at 1.5, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up. Also collected are data on patient demographics, GPs’ initial working diagnosis, GPs’ preferred management at baseline, and MRI findings. Discussion In the Netherlands, the additional diagnostic value and cost-effectiveness of direct access to knee MRI for patients presenting with traumatic knee complaints in general practice is unknown. Although GPs increasingly refer patients to MRI, the Dutch clinical guideline ‘Traumatic knee complaints’ for GPs does not recommend referral to MRI, mainly because the cost-effectiveness is still unknown. Trial registration Dutch Trial Registration: NTR3689. PMID:24588860

  10. Effect of extreme temperatures on drugs for prehospital ACLS.

    PubMed

    Johansen, R B; Schafer, N C; Brown, P I

    1993-09-01

    Advanced cardiac life support drugs undergo a wide range of temperature exposures in the prehospital setting. Although manufacturers place temperature restrictions for drug stability on their products, it has been shown that these limits are often exceeded in the prehospital environment. We exposed four different drugs to temperatures of -20 degrees C (-6 degrees F) and 70 degrees C (150 degrees F) and subsequently performed assays to determine their respective chemical stability compared with that of control samples. We determined that no significant difference in chemical structure occurred between the standard sample and the four drugs exposed to extreme temperatures (P > .05). This information has obvious implications in making further recommendations for drug storage. More work to determine bioactivity of temperature-exposed drugs may show results with implications for success in prehospital cardiac resuscitation. PMID:8363680

  11. Cardiopulmonary arrest on arrival due to penetrating trauma

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Mitsugi; Toyoda, Hiroshi; Kosuge, Takayuki; Tahara, Yoshio; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to clarify the outcome of patients with cardiopulmonary arrest on arrival due to penetrating trauma (PT-CPA) and to establish the treatment strategy. PATIENTS AND METHODS The clinical course of 29 patients with PT-CPA over the past 10 years was examined. We have taken three approaches to these patients: (i) an aggressive treatment strategy; (ii) an in-hospital system supporting this aggressive resuscitation; and (iii) the pre-hospital emergency medical service (EMS) system in our city. RESULTS Although the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was established in 59% of patients, only 17% survived for 7 days, 14% were discharged, and 7% were neurologically intact. Of 10 patients showing pulseless electrical activity (PEA) on the scene, ROSC was established in 100% and 30% were discharged; however, of 12 patients showing asystole, ROSC was established in 33% and no patient could be discharged. There was no difference in the time interval from the arrival at the emergency department to ROSC between discharged patients and patients who died. The time interval from collapse to arrival at the emergency department in discharged patients and patients who went to the intensive care unit was shorter than that of patients who died in the emergency department with and without ROSC. CONCLUSIONS We cannot decide to give up and terminate resuscitation in any PT-CPA patients and cannot define salvageable patients. However, our data show that 30-min resuscitation is thought to be relevant and that we should not give up on resuscitation because of the time interval without ROSC after arrival at the hospital. PMID:20353643

  12. Complex Trauma and Mental Health in Children and Adolescents Placed in Foster Care: Findings from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeson, Johanna K. P.; Briggs, Ernestine C.; Kisiel, Cassandra L.; Layne, Christopher M.; Ake, George S., III; Ko, Susan J.; Gerrity, Ellen T.; Steinberg, Alan M.; Howard, Michael L.; Pynoos, Robert S.; Fairbank, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Many children in the child welfare system (CWS) have histories of recurrent interpersonal trauma perpetrated by caregivers early in life often referred to as "complex trauma". Children in the CWS also experience a diverse range of reactions across multiple areas of functioning that are associated with such exposure. Nevertheless, few CWSs…

  13. Does paramedic-base hospital contact result in beneficial deviations from standard prehospital protocols?

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, J. R.; Luo, J.; Schriger, D. L.; Silver, L.

    1990-01-01

    We reviewed written and audio records of paramedic-base hospital radio contact to determine whether care differed from that suggested in standard prehospital care protocols. Records of all 659 contacts for seizure, syncope, abdominal pain, or altered mental state during 1987 (28.4% of all contacts) were scored for the use of standard therapies (such as intravenous access, oxygen, naloxone hydrochloride) and unanticipated therapies (intubation, nitroglycerin). Cases that involved unanticipated treatments were reviewed to determine whether they could have been prospectively identified by simple clinical findings. Standard therapies were used in the majority of patients. Unanticipated therapies were administered to 13 patients, all of whom had abnormal vital signs, diaphoresis, respiratory distress, or a second prominent symptom. Data suggest that protocols could replace radio contact for most patients and that the few who might benefit from radio contact can be easily identified. A 90% reduction in radio contacts in Los Angeles county could save $3 million each year. PMID:2219893

  14. Prehospital stroke diagnosis and treatment in ambulances and helicopters-a concept paper.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Thilo; Dunford, James V; Schlachetzki, Felix; Boy, Sandra; Hemmen, Thomas; Meyer, Brett C; Serra, John; Powers, Jeff; Voie, Arne

    2013-04-01

    Stroke is the second common cause of death and the primary cause of early invalidity worldwide. Different from other diseases is the time sensitivity related to stroke. In case of an ischemic event occluding a brain artery, 2000000 neurons die every minute. Stroke diagnosis and treatment should be initiated at the earliest time point possible, preferably at the site or during patient transport. Portable ultrasound has been used for prehospital diagnosis for applications other than stroke, and its acceptance as a valuable diagnostic tool "in the field" is growing. The intrahospital use of transcranial ultrasound for stroke diagnosis has been described extensively in the literature. Beyond its diagnostic use, first clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical work demonstrate that ultrasound can be used to accelerate clot lysis (sonothrombolysis) in presence as well as in absence of tissue plasminogen activator. Hence, the use of transcranial ultrasound for diagnosis and possibly treatment of stroke bares the potential to add to current stroke care paradigms significantly. The purpose of this concept article is to describe the opportunities presented by recent advances in transcranial ultrasound to diagnose and potentially treat large vessel embolic stroke in the prehospital environment. PMID:23415600

  15. Paramedic Recognition of Sepsis in the Prehospital Setting: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Andrew H.; Cain, Edward; Campbell, Samuel G.; Jensen, Jan L.; Petrie, David A.; Erdogan, Mete; Patrick, Gredi; Patrick, Ward

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with sepsis benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Accurate paramedic recognition of sepsis is important to initiate care promptly for patients who arrive by Emergency Medical Services. Methods. Prospective observational study of adult patients (age ≥ 16 years) transported by paramedics to the emergency department (ED) of a Canadian tertiary hospital. Paramedic identification of sepsis was assessed using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool developed by the study team and compared to blind, independent documentation of ED diagnoses by attending emergency physicians (EPs). Specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value, and likelihood ratios were calculated with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Overall, 629 patients were included in the analysis. Sepsis was identified by paramedics in 170 (27.0%) patients and by EPs in 71 (11.3%) patients. Sensitivity of paramedic sepsis identification compared to EP diagnosis was 73.2% (95% CI 61.4–83.0), while specificity was 78.8% (95% CI 75.2–82.2). The accuracy of paramedic identification of sepsis was 78.2% (492/629, 52 true positive, 440 true negative). Positive and negative predictive values were 30.6% (95% CI 23.8–38.1) and 95.9% (95% CI 93.6–97.5), respectively. Conclusion. Using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool, paramedic recognition of sepsis had greater specificity than sensitivity with reasonable accuracy. PMID:27051533

  16. Prehospital delay in patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Choon Chiet; Sultana, Papia; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Chan, Kim Poh; Pek, Pin Pin; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2011-10-01

    To characterize prehospital delays in patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital in Asia. A retrospective review of 273 patients with diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction; symptom to door (S2D) time was described in two ways, time from first onset of symptoms; and time from the onset of the worst episode to presentation at emergency department. The median first onset S2D time was 173 min (interquartile range 80-350 min); and median worst episode S2D time was 131 min (interquartile range 70-261 min). Patients with prehospital delay tended to use their own transport compared with the no delay group (P=0.026, 95% confidence interval=0.02-0.24). There was no difference in S2D times for typical compared with atypical symptoms. A large proportion of patients experienced delay in seeking medical care after the onset of acute coronary symptoms. Self-transport was associated with delay. PMID:21317785

  17. Pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; Ru, Xiaojuan; Sun, Haixin; Liu, Hongmei; Sun, Dongling; Liu, Yunhai; Huang, Jiuyi; He, Li; Wang, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China. The rates of delay greater than or equal to 2 hours were calculated and factors associated with delays were determined by non-conditional binary logistic regression, after adjusting for different explanatory factors. Among the 403 cases of stroke with an accurate documented time of prehospital delay, the median time (interquartile range) was 4.00 (1.50–14.00) hours. Among the 544 cases of stroke with an estimated time range of prehospital delay, 24.8% of patients were transferred to the emergency department or hospital within 2 hours, only 16.9% of patients with stroke were aware that the initial symptom represented a stroke, only 18.8% used the emergency medical service and one-third of the stroke cases were not identified by ambulance doctors. In the multivariate analyses, 8 variables or sub-variables were identified. In conclusion, prehospital delay of stroke was common in communities. Thus, intervention measures in communities should focus on education about the early identification of stroke and appropriate emergency medical service (EMS) use, as well as the development of organized stroke care. PMID:27411494

  18. Pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Ru, Xiaojuan; Sun, Haixin; Liu, Hongmei; Sun, Dongling; Liu, Yunhai; Huang, Jiuyi; He, Li; Wang, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China. The rates of delay greater than or equal to 2 hours were calculated and factors associated with delays were determined by non-conditional binary logistic regression, after adjusting for different explanatory factors. Among the 403 cases of stroke with an accurate documented time of prehospital delay, the median time (interquartile range) was 4.00 (1.50-14.00) hours. Among the 544 cases of stroke with an estimated time range of prehospital delay, 24.8% of patients were transferred to the emergency department or hospital within 2 hours, only 16.9% of patients with stroke were aware that the initial symptom represented a stroke, only 18.8% used the emergency medical service and one-third of the stroke cases were not identified by ambulance doctors. In the multivariate analyses, 8 variables or sub-variables were identified. In conclusion, prehospital delay of stroke was common in communities. Thus, intervention measures in communities should focus on education about the early identification of stroke and appropriate emergency medical service (EMS) use, as well as the development of organized stroke care. PMID:27411494

  19. Trauma Ultrasound in Civilian Tactical Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Lori; Justice, William; Goodloe, Jeffrey M.; Dixon, Jeff D.; Thomas, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    The term “tactical medicine” can be defined in more than one way, but in the nonmilitary setting the term tactical emergency medical services (TEMS) is often used to denote medical support operations for law enforcement. In supporting operations involving groups such as special weapons and tactics (SWAT) teams, TEMS entail executing triage, diagnosis, stabilization, and evacuation decision-making in challenging settings. Ultrasound, now well entrenched as a part of trauma evaluation in the hospital setting, has been investigated in the prehospital arena and may have utility in TEMS. This paper addresses potential use of US in the tactical environment, with emphasis on the lessons of recent years' literature. Possible uses of US are discussed, in terms of both specific clinical applications and also with respect to informing triage and related decision making. PMID:23243509

  20. Emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting: an assessment of health facilities in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Thomas F; Hines, Rosemary; Ahn, Roy; Walters, Michelle; Young, David; Anderson, Rachel Eleanor; Tom, Sabrina M; Clark, Rachel; Obita, Walter; Nelson, Brett D

    2014-01-01

    Objective Injuries, trauma and non-communicable diseases are responsible for a rising proportion of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries. Delivering effective emergency and urgent healthcare for these and other conditions in resource-limited settings is challenging. In this study, we sought to examine and characterise emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting. Methods We conducted an assessment within all 30 primary and secondary hospitals and within a stratified random sampling of 30 dispensaries and health centres in western Kenya. The key informants were the most senior facility healthcare provider and manager available. Emergency physician researchers utilised a semistructured assessment tool, and data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic coding. Results No lower level facilities and 30% of higher level facilities reported having a defined, organised approach to trauma. 43% of higher level facilities had access to an anaesthetist. The majority of lower level facilities had suture and wound care supplies and gloves but typically lacked other basic trauma supplies. For cardiac care, 50% of higher level facilities had morphine, but a minority had functioning ECG, sublingual nitroglycerine or a defibrillator. Only 20% of lower level facilities had glucometers, and only 33% of higher level facilities could care for diabetic emergencies. No facilities had sepsis clinical guidelines. Conclusions Large gaps in essential emergency care capabilities were identified at all facility levels in western Kenya. There are great opportunities for a universally deployed basic emergency care package, an advanced emergency care package and facility designation scheme, and a reliable prehospital care transportation and communications system in resource-limited settings. PMID:25260371

  1. Regional Anesthesia in Trauma Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Janice J.; Lollo, Loreto; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is an established method to provide analgesia for patients in the operating room and during the postoperative phase. While regional anesthesia offers unique advantages, as shown by the recent military experience, it is not commonly utilized in the prehospital or emergency department setting. Most often, regional anesthesia techniques for traumatized patients are first utilized in the operating room for procedural anesthesia or for postoperative pain control. While infiltration or single nerve block procedures are often used by surgeons or emergency medicine physicians in the preoperative phase, more advanced techniques such as plexus block procedures or regional catheter placements are more commonly performed by anesthesiologists for surgery or postoperative pain control. These regional techniques offer advantages over intravenous anesthesia, not just in the perioperative phase but also in the acute phase of traumatized patients and during the initial transport of injured patients. Anesthesiologists have extensive experience with regional techniques and are able to introduce regional anesthesia into settings outside the operating room and in the early treatment phases of trauma patients. PMID:22162684

  2. Hazardous materials events: evaluation of transport to health care facility and evacuation decisions.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J L; Kovalchick, D F; Harter, L; Kyes, K B; Lymp, J F; Brodkin, C A

    2001-03-01

    The study objective was to analyze hazardous materials event and victim factors associated with transportation of victims to a health care facility, and evacuation or shelter-in-place of nearby populations. A retrospective review was conducted on hazardous materials events in Washington State from 1993 to 1997. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for transportation, evacuation, and shelter-in-place. Over five years, 2,654 victims from 457 events were reported, with 1,859 (70%) transported to a health care facility. Evacuation occurred in 279 (61%) events and shelter-in-place in 14 (3%) events. After excluding 14 deaths, regression analysis indicated that victims with trauma (OR 5.87, 95% CI 1.41-24.5), thermal burns (6.90, 1.15-41.3), dizziness/other CNS symptoms (1.59, 1.00-2.54), and headache (1.54, 1.01-2.35) were most likely to be transported. Chemical releases inside buildings (2.09, 1.06-4.10, compared with transportation events), and involving 3-5 victims (2.86, 1.54-5.31, compared to 1 victim) or > or =6 victims (8.74, 4.01-19.0), were most likely to involve evacuation or shelter-in-place. Events involving sulfuric acid (0.15, 0.05-0.49) and sodium hydroxide (0.19, 0.04-0.94) were least likely to involve evacuation or shelter-in-place. Prehospital decisions to transport victims to a health care facility and evacuate or shelter-in-place nearby populations are associated with event and victim factors. Further research is needed to determine if these factors also predict need for medical care or removal from exposure, and to develop evidence-based prehospital care protocols for hazardous materials exposure victims. PMID:11239250

  3. Subcutaneous Fluid Administration: A Potentially Useful Tool in Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Annette O.; Goodloe, Jeffrey M.; Thomas, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Mass casualty incidents (MCIs) and disaster medical situations are ideal settings in which there is need for a novel approach to infusing fluids and medications into a patient's intravascular space. An attractive new approach would avoid the potentially time-consuming needlestick and venous cannulation requiring a trained practitioner. In multiple-patient situations, trained practitioners are not always available in sufficient numbers to enable timely placement of intravenous catheters. The novel approach for intravascular space infusion, described in this paper involves the preadministration of the enzyme, human recombinant hyaluronidase (HRH), into the subcutaneous (SC) space, via an indwelling catheter. The enzyme “loosens” the SC space effectively enhancing the absorption of fluids and medication. PMID:22649733

  4. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  5. A strategy to implement and support pre-hospital emergency medical systems in developing, resource-constrained areas of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jared H; Shing, Rachel; Twomey, Michele; Wallis, Lee A

    2014-01-01

    Resource-constrained countries are in extreme need of pre-hospital emergency care systems. However, current popular strategies to provide pre-hospital emergency care are inappropriate for and beyond the means of a resource-constrained country, and so new ones are needed-ones that can both function in an under-developed area's particular context and be done with the area's limited resources. In this study, we used a two-location pilot and consensus approach to develop a strategy to implement and support pre-hospital emergency care in one such developing, resource-constrained area: the Western Cape province of South Africa. Local community members are trained to be emergency first aid responders who can provide immediate, on-scene care until a Transporter can take the patient to the hospital. Management of the system is done through local Community Based Organizations, which can adapt the model to their communities as needed to ensure local appropriateness and feasibility. Within a community, the system is implemented in a graduated manner based on available resources, and is designed to not rely on the whole system being implemented first to provide partial function. The University of Cape Town's Division of Emergency Medicine and the Western Cape's provincial METRO EMS intend to follow this model, along with sharing it with other South African provinces. PMID:22917929

  6. Protocol for a systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components compared to other resuscitative fluids in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the use of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation of patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. It has been speculated that early resuscitation with blood components may have benefits in terms of treating trauma-induced coagulopathy, which in turn may influence survival. The proposed systematic review will evaluate the evidence on the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components (red blood cells and/or plasma or whole blood), in both civilian and military settings, compared with other resuscitation strategies in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. Methods/design Standard systematic review methods aimed at minimising bias will be employed for study identification, selection and data extraction. General medical and specialist databases will be searched; the search strategy will combine terms for the population, intervention and setting. Studies will be selected for review if the population includes adult patients with major traumatic haemorrhage who receive blood components in a pre-hospital setting (civilian or military). Systematic reviews, randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and controlled observational studies will be included. Uncontrolled studies will be considered depending on the volume of controlled evidence. Quality assessment will be tailored to different study designs. Both patient related and surrogate outcomes will be considered. Synthesis is likely to be primarily narrative, but meta-analyses and subgroup analyses will be undertaken where clinical and methodological homogeneity exists. Discussion Given the increasing use by emergency services of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation, this is a timely systematic review, which will attempt to clarify the evidence base for this practice. As far as the authors are aware, the proposed systematic review will be the first to address this topic. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014013794 PMID:25344301

  7. [Fat embolism syndrome in skeletal trauma: particularities of the diagnosis, economic aspects and the role of non-invasive ventilation in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Davydova, N S; Shen', N P; Boltaev, P G; Vasilenko, P B; Skorokhodova, L A

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with a multicenter study that demonstrates the possibility and feasibility of noninvasive ventilation in patients with skeletal trauma complicated wiith fat embolism syndrome. The authors found additional criteria for the severity of the condition of patients with trauma. Important criteria for the choose a type of ventilation (non-invasive and invasive) is the lack of consciousness, desynchronization of a patient with ventilator and the need for a specialized regimes or miorelaxation to synchronize with the respirator. PMID:25549488

  8. Are pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, L. M.; Redmond, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine what proportion of pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury--deaths at the scene of the accident and those that occur before the person has reached hospital--are preventable. DESIGN--Retrospective study of all deaths from accidental injury that occurred between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1990 and were reported to the coroner. SETTING--North Staffordshire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Injury severity score, probability of survival (probit analysis), and airway obstruction. RESULTS--There were 152 pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury (110 males and 42 females). In the same period there were 257 deaths in hospital from accidental injury (136 males and 121 females). The average age at death was 41.9 years for those who died before reaching hospital, and their average injury severity score was 29.3. In contrast, those who died in hospital were older and equally likely to be males or females. Important neurological injury occurred in 113 pre-hospital deaths, and evidence of airway obstruction in 59. Eighty six pre-hospital deaths were due to road traffic accidents, and 37 of these were occupants in cars. On the basis of the injury severity score and age, death was found to have been inevitable or highly likely in 92 cases. In the remaining 60 cases death had not been inevitable and airway obstruction was present in up to 51 patients with injuries that they might have survived. CONCLUSION--Death was potentially preventable in at least 39% of those who died from accidental injury before they reached hospital. Training in first aid should be available more widely, and particularly to motorists as many pre-hospital deaths that could be prevented are due to road accidents. PMID:8173428

  9. The impact of parental accompaniment in paediatric trauma: a helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Major trauma remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in young people and adolescents throughout the western world. Both the physical and psychological consequences of trauma are well documented and it is shown that peri-traumatic factors play a large part in the emotional recovery of children involved in trauma. Indeed, parental anxiety levels may play one of the biggest roles. There are no publically available guidelines on pre-hospital accompaniment, and where research has been done on parental presence it often focuses primarily on the parents or staff, rather than the child themselves. Whilst acknowledging the impact on parents and staff, the importance of the emotional wellbeing of the child should be reinforced, to reduce the likelihood of developing symptoms in keeping with post-traumatic stress disorder. This non-systematic literature review, aims to examine the impact of parental accompaniment to hospital, following paediatric trauma, and to help pre-hospital clinicians decide whether accompaniment would be of benefit to their patient population. The lack of published data does not enable a formal recommendation of parental accompaniment in the helicopter to be mandated, though it should be the preference in land based conveyance. Future research is needed into the emotional recovery of children after trauma, as well as the experiences of patient, parent and staff during conveyance. PMID:24887082

  10. Transforming Cultural Trauma into Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokenleg, Martin

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges facing Aboriginal populations increasingly is being called "intergenerational trauma." Restoring the cultural heritage is a central theme in the book, "Reclaiming Youth at Risk." That work describes the Circle of Courage model for positive development which blends Native child and youth care philosophy with research…

  11. Scoring systems of severity in patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Rapsang, Amy Grace; Shyam, Devajit Chowlek

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; hence severity scales are important adjuncts to trauma care in order to characterize the nature and extent of injury. Trauma scoring models can assist with triage and help in evaluation and prediction of prognosis in order to organise and improve trauma systems. Given the wide variety of scoring instruments available to assess the injured patient, it is imperative that the choice of the severity score accurately match the application. Even though trauma scores are not the key elements of trauma treatment, they are however, an essential part of improvement in triage decisions and in identifying patients with unexpected outcomes. This article provides the reader with a compendium of trauma severity scales along with their predicted death rate calculation, which can be adopted in order to improve decision making, trauma care, research and in comparative analyses in quality assessment. PMID:25015031

  12. Management of Open Pneumothorax in Tactical Combat Casualty Care: TCCC Guidelines Change 13-02.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Dubose, Joseph J; Otten, Edward J; Bennett, Donald R; Gerhardt, Robert T; Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Gross, Kriby R; Cap, Andrew P; Littlejohn, Lanny F; Edgar, Erin P; Shackelford, Stacy A; Blackbourne, Lorne H; Kotwal, Russ S; Holcomb, John B; Bailey, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    During the recent United States Central Command (USCENTCOM) and Joint Trauma System (JTS) assessment of prehospital trauma care in Afghanistan, the deployed director of the Joint Theater Trauma System (JTTS), CAPT Donald R. Bennett, questioned why TCCC recommends treating a nonlethal injury (open pneumothorax) with an intervention (a nonvented chest seal) that could produce a lethal condition (tension pneumothorax). New research from the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research (USAISR) has found that, in a model of open pneumothorax treated with a chest seal in which increments of air were added to the pleural space to simulate an air leak from an injured lung, use of a vented chest seal prevented the subsequent development of a tension pneumothorax, whereas use of a nonvented chest seal did not. The updated TCCC Guideline for the battlefield management of open pneumothorax is: ?All open and/ or sucking chest wounds should be treated by immediately applying a vented chest seal to cover the defect. If a vente chest seal is not available, use a non-vented chest seal. Monitor the casualty for the potential development of a subsequent tension pneumothorax. If the casualty develops increasing hypoxia, respiratory distress, or hypotension and a tension pneumothorax is suspected, treat by burping or removing the dressing or by needle decompression.? This recommendation was approved by the required two-thirds majority of the Committee on TCCC in June 2013. PMID:24048995

  13. Penetrating pediatric trauma owing to improper child safety seat use.

    PubMed

    Riggle, Andrew; Bollins, John; Konda, Subbarredy; Aggarwal, Rahul; Beiswenger, Ashlei

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a 15-month-old child with a history of thoracic impalement after improper safety seat restraint. The foreign body was stabilized with bulky dressings in the field before transport. Imaging revealed possible pulmonary artery involvement; and consequently, a thoracotomy was done to obtain vascular control before removal. We use this case to highlight prehospital care and operative management of a patient with foreign body impalement. PMID:20105612

  14. The public hospital mission at Seattle's Harborview Medical Center: high-quality care for the underserved and excellence in medical education.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, John V L; Young, Audrey; Goldstein, Erika A; Logerfo, James P

    2006-10-01

    United States public hospitals and medical schools commonly enter into partnerships that serve the patient care, education, and research missions of both institutions. Harborview Medical Center, the county hospital in Seattle, Washington, and the University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSOM) have enjoyed a long affiliation that began at the medical school's founding 60 years ago. A formal agreement in 1967 turned over responsibility for all Harborview operations to UWSOM at a time when Harborview's facilities had fallen into serious disrepair and public hospitals were closing across the United States. All faculty and staff based at Harborview are employed by the University of Washington. By the mid-1970s a revitalization was underway at Harborview. The Medic One paramedic program drew national acclaim for pioneering prehospital emergency cardiac care, and the trauma and burn centers grew rapidly to meet specialized intensive care needs of the Pacific Northwest. Today, the success of the trauma, specialty surgery, and rehabilitation services have allowed Harborview to consistently maintain a positive operating margin while caring for the county's uninsured and indigent patients ($98 million in charity care in 2005). The hospital also offers nationally recognized residency programs and supports nationally and internationally acclaimed research. Harborview faces significant challenges for the future, including rapid growth of the indigent patient load, continually changing expectations for physician training, and growing cost pressures. PMID:16985348

  15. Use of point-of-care ultrasound by a critical care retrieval team.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Stefan M; Pearce, Andrew; Alfred, Sam; Sharley, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound in the prehospital and retrieval environments has now become possible owing to decreased size and weight, and increasing robustness of some ultrasound machines. This report describes the initial experience of point-of-care ultrasound by an Australian critical care retrieval service using a portable ultrasound machine. PMID:18021108

  16. Changes in the patterns, presentation and management of penetrating chest trauma patients at a level II trauma centre in southern Pakistan over the last two decades.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Umer Muhammad; Faruque, Ahmad; Ansari, Hamza; Ahmad, Mansoor; Rashid, Umar; Perveen, Shazia; Sharif, Hasanat

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating chest trauma can be used as an indicator of violence in the country. We aimed to look at the changes in its incidence and management at a major trauma centre in the country. We also wanted to look at any effect of prehospital time on surgical intervention and outcome of the victim. In this retrospective descriptive study, we observed the presentation and management of 191 penetrating chest injury patients at a level II trauma hospital in Pakistan in the last 20 years. The study sample was divided into two groups: Group 1, 1988-1998 and Group 2, 1999-2009. No significant change in incidence of trauma was observed between the two groups. The delay in the time between event and arrival showed an increase in the number of surgical procedures performed. Also the number of thoracotomies performed went up significantly in the second decade from 5.7 to 16.5% with a P<0.05. Six (3.1%) mortality cases were observed in 20 years. It was seen that the greater the prehospital time, the greater the chances of surgery. Also seen was the increase in mortality as critical cases could make it to the hospital alive in recent times due to improved transportation services. PMID:20923826

  17. Termination of resuscitative efforts: medical futility for the trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, M

    2001-12-01

    Despite years of research on the resuscitation of the patient with critical traumatic injuries, controversy remains surrounding the criteria to waive initiation of resuscitation in the pre-hospital setting or to terminate such efforts in the emergency department. The decision to initiate or continue resuscitation on moribund trauma patients is associated with considerable costs. Ambulance transport using lights and sirens carries potential risk. Emergency department thoracotomy, with exposure to high risk bodily fluids, involvement of numerous staff, and usage precious blood products, is a procedure that has fewer and fewer indications. This review presents guidelines to help determine when to initiate resuscitation for the critically injured trauma patient and when to cease these efforts in the emergency department. Since there are economic, societal, and ethical implications, each system should establish their own criteria, using these guidelines as a basis. PMID:11805549

  18. How we provide thawed plasma for trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, James R; Zielinski, Martin D; Berns, Kathleen S; Badjie, Karafa S; Tauscher, Craig D; Hammel, Scott A; Zietlow, Scott P; Jenkins, Donald

    2015-08-01

    Almost 50% of trauma-related fatalities within the first 24 hours of injury are related to hemorrhage. Improved survival in severely injured patients has been demonstrated when massive transfusion protocols are rapidly invoked as part of a therapeutic approach known as damage control resuscitation (DCR). DCR incorporates the early use of plasma to prevent or correct trauma-induced coagulopathy. DCR often requires the transfusion of plasma before determination of the recipient's ABO group. Historically, group AB plasma has been considered the "universal donor" plasma product. At our facility, the number of AB plasma products produced on an annual basis was found to be inadequate to support the trauma service's DCR program. A joint decision was made by the transfusion medicine and trauma services to provide group A thawed plasma (TP) for in-hospital and prehospital DCR protocols. A description of the implementation of group A TP into the DCR program is provided as well as outcome data pertaining to the use of TP in trauma patients. PMID:26013588

  19. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  20. Demystifying damage c