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Sample records for preliminary antigenic characterisation

  1. Characterisation of Sarcoptes scabiei antigens.

    PubMed

    Hejduk, Gloria; Hofstätter, Katja; Löwenstein, Michael; Peschke, Roman; Miller, Ingrid; Joachim, Anja

    2011-02-01

    In pig herds, the status of Sarcoptes scabiei infections is routinely monitored by serodiagnosis. Crude antigen for ELISA is usually prepared from S. scabiei var. canis or other variations and may lead to variations in the outcome of different tests, making assay standardisation difficult. This study was performed to investigate the antigen profiles of S. scabiei, including differences between hydrophilic and more hydrophobic protein fractions, by Western blotting with sera from pigs with defined infection status. Potential cross-reactivity among S. scabiei (var. canis, suis and bovis), Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae was also analysed. Hydrophobic S. scabiei antigens were detectable in the range of 40-50 kDa, whilst the hydrophilic fraction showed no specific antigenicity. In the hydrophobic fractions of D. farinae and T. putrescentiae, two major protein fractions in a similar size range could be identified, but no cross-reactivity with Sarcoptes-positive sera was detectable. However, examination of the hydrophilic fractions revealed cross-reactivity between Sarcoptes-positive sera and both the house dust mite and the storage mite in the range of 115 and 28/38 kDa. Specific bands in the same range (42 and 48 kDa) could be detected in blots from hydrophobic fractions of all three tested variations of S. scabiei (var. canis, bovis and suis). These results show that there are considerable differences in mange antibody reactivity, including reactions with proteins from free-living mites, which may interfere with tests based on hydrophilic antigens. Further refinement of antigen and the use of specific hydrophobic proteins could improve ELISA performance and standardisation. PMID:20865427

  2. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ngoepe, Ernest; Fehlner-Gardiner, Christine; Wandeler, Alex; Sabeta, Claude

    2014-01-01

    There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5%) and Mokola virus (0.5%). Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones. PMID:25685866

  3. Purification of Piscirickettsia salmonis and partial characterisation of antigens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, M.N.; Landolt, M.L.; Powell, D.B.; Winton, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the etiological agent of salmonid rickettsial septicemia, an economically significant disease affecting the salmon aquaculture industry. As with other rickettsial pathogens, antigenic analysis of P. salmonis has been limited by the inherent difficulties of purifying an intracellular organism away from host cell material. In this report, we describe the use of diatrizoate meglumine and diatrizoate sodium (DMDS) density gradient centrifugation to purify P. salmonis grown in chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cells. Plaque assay titers and total protein assays confirmed that viable P. salmonis was consistently concentrated in a visible band within the DMDS density gradient at a density of 1.15 to 1.16 g ml-1. Recovery of purified, viable organisms from DMDS density gradients varied from 0.6 to 3%. Preparations of uninfected CHSE-214 cells, CHSE-214 cells infected with P. salmonis, and gradient-purified P. salmonis were compared using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to assess the degree of purification and to identify P. salmonis-specific proteins. Although gradient-purified P. salmonis preparations were not completely free of host cell material, 8 bacterial proteins were identified. Polyclonal rabbit antiserum was used in an immunoblot of proteins from purified P. salmonis to identify 3 major and 5 minor antigens. The major antigens of 56, 30 and 20 kDa were potential candidates for experimental vaccines and development of novel diagnostic assays.

  4. Antigenic characterisation of yeast-expressed lyssavirus nucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kucinskaite, Indre; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Serva, Andrius; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Johnson, Nicholas; Staniulis, Juozas; Fooks, Anthony R; Müller, Thomas; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2007-12-01

    In Europe, three genotypes of the genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae, are present, classical rabies virus (RABV, genotype 1), European bat lyssavirus type 1 (EBLV-1, genotype 5) and European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2, genotype 6). The entire authentic nucleoprotein (N protein) encoding sequences of RABV (challenge virus standard, CVS, strain), EBLV-1 and EBLV-2 were expressed in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae at high level. Purification of recombinant N proteins by caesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in yields between 14-17, 25-29 and 18-20 mg/l of induced yeast culture for RABV-CVS, EBLV-1 and EBLV-2, respectively. The purified N proteins were evaluated by negative staining electron microscopy, which revealed the formation of nucleocapsid-like structures. The antigenic conformation of the N proteins was investigated for their reactivity with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against different lyssaviruses. The reactivity pattern of each mAb was virtually identical between immunofluorescence assay with virus-infected cells, and ELISA and dot blot assay using the corresponding recombinant N proteins. These observations lead us to conclude that yeast-expressed lyssavirus N proteins share antigenic properties with naturally expressed virus protein. These recombinant proteins have the potential for use as components of serological assays for lyssaviruses. PMID:17619134

  5. Characterisation of recombinant immunoreactive antigens of the scab mite Sarcoptes scabiei.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, C; Lucius, R; Matthes, H F; Meusel, G; Reich, B; Kalinna, B H

    2008-05-31

    Sarcoptic mange (or scabies) is an important skin disease which can affect a variety of species including humans, cattle, goats, sheep, horses, pigs, rabbits, and dogs. Approximately 300 million people are affected worldwide and in lifestock animals the infestation may lead to substantial economic losses caused by depression in growth and feed conversion rates. Diagnosis of Sarcoptes infestation is difficult and only a few serological tests have been developed using whole mite antigen for diagnosis of mange in animals. Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of cDNAs of several immunoreactive clones and their recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Three of the proteins contain repetitive sequences which suggests that they might be involved in immune evasion. The application of these antigens in serodiagnosis and the suitability for diagnosis is discussed. PMID:18359167

  6. Antigenic and molecular characterisation of Border disease virus associated with high mortality in lambs in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Vega, S.; Rosell, R.; Orden, J. A.; Pérez, T.; Marín, C.; González, S.; Marco, I.; Cabezón, O.; de la Fuente, R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Border disease virus (BDV) causes congenital disorders in sheep and results in severe, but underestimated, economic losses worldwide. However, information about BDV strains affecting several ruminants worldwide is scarce. Therefore, antigenic and genetic classification of isolates from different geographical regions is important to enhance the knowledge of the epidemiology of BDV. Materials and methods Five pestiviruses isolated from lambs in an epidemic outbreak with an unusually high mortality in Spain in 1997 were characterised antigenically with a panel of monoclonal antibodies and genetically by sequencing within the 50 untranslated (50UTR) region of the genome. Results All the isolates were classified as BDV and showed a high homology with the Aveyron strain (Av), which was associated with an epidemic reported in sheep from the Aveyron region of France in 1984. Conclusions Classification of the isolates from this study provides valuable information on the molecular epidemiology of BDV. PMID:26392884

  7. Antigenic characterisation of virus isolates from vaccinated dogs dying of rabies.

    PubMed

    Aghomo, H O; Rupprecht, C E

    1990-11-01

    Four rabies virus isolates from dogs that succumbed to rabies infection in Nigeria within one year of anti-rabies vaccination were characterised by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The samples were screened for rabies and rabies-related viral antigens by the indirect fluorescent antibody test, performed with MAb 502-2, which recognises the nucleocapsid (NC) protein of all known Lyssaviruses and with MAb 422-5 which identifies African rabies-related viruses. All four canine virus isolates displayed positive fluorescence with MAb 502-2 and were negative with MAb 422-5. In the anti-NC MAb characterisation with a panel of 34 additional MAbs, all isolates displayed positive staining with 32 of the MAbs, were negative with MAb 102-27 and all displayed poor immunofluorescence with MAb 377-7. On the basis of reactivity with a panel of 40 anti-glycoprotein (G) MAbs the isolates were separated into four distinct viral subtypes. None of these canine isolates was identified as the common attenuated Flury LEP rabies strain used for domestic animal vaccination and none resembled other previously characterised rabies viruses from Nigeria. PMID:2288013

  8. The production and characterisation of dinitrocarbanilide antibodies raised using antigen mimics.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Lisa; Fodey, Terence L; Crooks, Steven R H; Delahaut, Philippe; Elliott, Christopher T

    2002-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies were produced to detect the coccidiostat nicarbazin. Due to structural constraints of the active component of nicarbazin, dinitrocarbanilide (DNC), three different compounds that shared a common substructure with DNC were used as antigen mimics. The compounds (N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine 4-nitroanilide (SAN), L-glutamic acid gamma-(p-nitroanilide) (GAN) and p-nitrosuccinanilic acid (NSA)) were conjugated to a carrier protein and used in the immunisation of rabbits. Five different polyclonal sera were produced and consequently characterised. The antibodies exhibited an IC(50) range of 2.3-7.6 ng/ml using a competitive ELISA procedure. Serum from one rabbit, R555, exhibited an IC(50) of 2.9 ng/ml for DNC and cross-reactivity studies showed that this serum was specific for DNC and did not cross-react with other coccidiostats such as halofuginone, toltrazuril or ronidazole. PMID:12191508

  9. Characterisation of the Native Lipid Moiety of Echinococcus granulosus Antigen B

    PubMed Central

    Obal, Gonzalo; Ramos, Ana Lía; Silva, Valeria; Lima, Analía; Batthyany, Carlos; Bessio, María Inés; Ferreira, Fernando; Salinas, Gustavo; Ferreira, Ana María

    2012-01-01

    Antigen B (EgAgB) is the most abundant and immunogenic antigen produced by the larval stage (metacestode) of Echinococcus granulosus. It is a lipoprotein, the structure and function of which have not been completely elucidated. EgAgB apolipoprotein components have been well characterised; they share homology with a group of hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) present exclusively in cestode organisms, and consist of different isoforms of 8-kDa proteins encoded by a polymorphic multigene family comprising five subfamilies (EgAgB1 to EgAgB5). In vitro studies have shown that EgAgB apolipoproteins are capable of binding fatty acids. However, the identity of the native lipid components of EgAgB remains unknown. The present work was aimed at characterising the lipid ligands bound to EgAgB in vivo. EgAgB was purified to homogeneity from hydatid cyst fluid and its lipid fraction was extracted using chloroform∶methanol mixtures. This fraction constituted approximately 40–50% of EgAgB total mass. High-performance thin layer chromatography revealed that the native lipid moiety of EgAgB consists of a variety of neutral (mainly triacylglycerides, sterols and sterol esters) and polar (mainly phosphatidylcholine) lipids. Gas-liquid chromatography analysis showed that 16∶0, 18∶0 and 18∶1(n-9) are the most abundant fatty acids in EgAgB. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography coupled to light scattering demonstrated that EgAgB comprises a population of particles heterogeneous in size, with an average molecular mass of 229 kDa. Our results provide the first direct evidence of the nature of the hydrophobic ligands bound to EgAgB in vivo and indicate that the structure and composition of EgAgB lipoprotein particles are more complex than previously thought, resembling high density plasma lipoproteins. Results are discussed considering what is known on lipid metabolism in cestodes, and taken into account the Echinococcus spp. genomic information regarding both lipid

  10. Characterisation of a Babesia orientalis apical membrane antigen, and comparison of its orthologues among selected apicomplexans.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Fan, Lizhe; Hu, Jinfang; Miao, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yuan; Zhou, Yanqin; Hu, Min; Zhao, Junlong

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, we identified and characterised the complete coding sequence of Babesia orientalis apical membrane antigen 1 (designated Bo-ama1); it is 1803bp in length and encodes a polypeptide of 601 amino acids (aa). The Bo-ama-1 gene product (Bo-AMA1) is predicted to be 67kDa in size and contains a signal peptide. Mature Bo-AMA1 is predicted to have one transmembrane region and a short cytoplasmic tail (C-terminal domain). The extracellular part of Bo-AMA1 has three functional domains (DI, DII and DIII) with 14 conserved cysteine residues. A Bo-AMA1 fragment containing all three of these domains (designated Bo-AMA1-DI/II/III) was cloned into the plasmid vector pET-28a and expressed as a recombinant (His-fusion) protein of 53kDa. Antibodies in the serum from a B. orientalis-infected water buffalo specifically recognised this protein in immunoblotting analysis. Rabbit antibodies raised against the recombinant protein were able to detect native Bo-AMA1 (67kDa) from erythrocytes of B. orientalis-infected water buffalo. Bo-AMA1 is a new member of the AMA1 family and might be a good antigen for the specific detection of antibodies produced in B. orientalis infected cattle. This protein is likely to play critical roles during host cell adherence and invasion by B. orientalis, as the AMA1s reported in other organisms such as Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Further research is required to explore the biological functions of this protein and to determine whether its immunisation can induce protective effects in water buffalo against B. orientalis infection. PMID:25732411

  11. Synthesis and preliminary characterisation of new esters of the bacterial polysaccharide gellan.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, V; Dentini, M; Segatori, M; Tiblandi, C; Callegaro, L; Benedetti, L

    1992-07-01

    Under the appropriate experimental conditions, ethyl, propyl, and methylprednisolon-21-yl esters of gellan can be obtained without significant degradation. At low degrees of esterification (de), depending on the ester moiety, the products are water-soluble, which allows the influence of hydrophilicity and charge density on their ability to assume an ordered conformation in dilute aqueous solution to be studied. With high de, the products were soluble only in organic solvents (e.g., methyl sulphoxide) with good film-forming capacity. The methylprednisolon-21-yl esters have been characterised in a preliminary manner in terms of drug-release kinetics. PMID:1394330

  12. Characterisation of the rat oesophagus epithelium antigens defined by the so-called 'antikeratin antibodies', specific for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Girbal, E; Sebbag, M; Gomès-Daudrix, V; Simon, M; Vincent, C; Serre, G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--An attempt was made to characterise the antigens recognised by serum IgG antibodies directed to the stratum corneum of rat oesophagus epithelium, the so-called 'antikeratin antibodies', which were shown to be highly specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and thus to have an actual diagnostic value. METHODS--Immunoblotting was performed with RA serum samples on different extracts of rat oesophagus epithelium separated by various monodimensional and two dimensional electrophoreses. RESULTS--Three low-salt-soluble antigens sensitive to proteinase K and, therefore, of protein nature were identified. Two proteins, with apparent molecular masses of 210 and 120-90 kilodaltons, shared isoelectric points ranging from 5.8 to 8.5; the third protein exhibited isoelectric points from 4.5 to 7.2 while its molecular mass ranged from 130 to 60 kilodaltons. Immunoadsorption of RA serum samples onto cytokeratins extracted from the stratum corneum of rat oesophagus epithelium did not change their immunoreactivity towards the three antigenic proteins. Widely used deglycosylation and dephosphorylation methods failed to modify either the electrophoretic migration of the proteins or their immunoreactivity with RA serum samples. CONCLUSION--The so-called 'antikeratin antibodies' do not react with cytokeratins. They specifically recognise three late epithelial differentiation proteins which had not been previously described. These proteins may be related to (pro)filaggrin. Images PMID:7504913

  13. NMR spectroscopy applied to the Cultural Heritage: a preliminary study on ancient wood characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, S.; Capitani, D.; Proietti, N.; Ziarelli, F.; Segre, A. L.

    High and low resolution solid state NMR methods have been applied to characterise a few samples of ancient wood. In an ancient larch wood sample, by applying 1H low resolution NMR methods as a function of the temperature, the average pore size and its distribution have been determined. In addition, high resolution NMR techniques have allowed addressing of the question of the proximity of water pools to cellulose and lignin. In particular, a model can be hypothesized in which water pools are surrounded by thin layers of amorphous cellulose and/or lignin while the crystalline domains of cellulose surround the layers of amorphous cellulose. Preliminary results obtained using a fully non invasive and portable NMR unilateral relaxometer, the Eureka-Mouse10 (EM10), are reported. This instrumentation is shown to be perfectly suitable for characterizing degradation in ancient wood samples.

  14. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  15. Lithospheric-scale geoelectrical characterisation of a continental collision zone in Pyrenees: preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, J.; Ledo, J.; Queralt, P.; Marcuello, A.; Liesa, M.; Muñoz, J. A.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    deepen our understanding of the continental collisions and the physical properties associated. Apparent resistivities, phases and induction arrows are used to image the geoelectrical structures at lithospheric scale. The main structures are related with a partial melting region associated with the Iberian Subducted Lower Crust, the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and the electrical resistivity of the asthenosphere. Moreover, major crustal structures associated with the presence of fluids, sediments and graphite have been also characterised. Definitive results from the two central profiles, and preliminary results from the two lateral profiles, will be shown and discussed. Comparison between them constrains the lateral changes of the geoelectrical structures showing a main variation associated with the Iberian subducted lower crust.

  16. Characterising Developmental Language Impairment in Serbian-Speaking Children: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukovic, Mile; Stojanovik, Vesna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the article is to provide preliminary data on the use of auxiliaries and clitics in Serbian-speaking children with developmental language impairment. Two groups of children (a group of 30 children with developmental language impairment and a group of 30 typically developing children) aged between 48 and 83 months and matched on IQ took…

  17. Preliminary characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Zimbabwe, with stage-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hove, T; Lind, P; Mukaratirwa, S

    2005-06-01

    Cell-culture-derived clones of eight Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Zimbabwe were characterised in IFAT with a panel of five monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Each clone had been established from a single murine brain cyst. The antibodies were bradyzoite-specific (4.3), tachyzoite-specific (4.25, 5.1 and anti-P(30)), or tachyzoite- and bradyzoite-specific (5.15). Their strong reactivity with the bradyzoite-specific mAb 4.3 and their weaker reactivity with the tachyzoite-specific 4.25, 5.1 and anti-P(30) indicated that all the isolates are probably of genetic type II. Each of the isolates reacted in the IFAT in a similar way to the Danish reference strain of T. gondii, SSI-119. PMID:15949185

  18. Preliminary Characterisation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin-10 Responses to Chlamydia pecorum Infection in the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Marina; Beagley, Kenneth W.; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Debilitating infectious diseases caused by Chlamydia are major contributors to the decline of Australia's iconic native marsupial species, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). An understanding of koala chlamydial disease pathogenesis and the development of effective strategies to control infections continue to be hindered by an almost complete lack of species-specific immunological reagents. The cell-mediated immune response has been shown to play an influential role in the response to chlamydial infection in other hosts. The objective of this study, hence, was to provide preliminary data on the role of two key cytokines, pro-inflammatory tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and anti-inflammatory interleukin 10 (IL10), in the koala Chlamydia pecorum response. Utilising sequence homology between the cytokine sequences obtained from several recently sequenced marsupial genomes, this report describes the first mRNA sequences of any koala cytokine and the development of koala specific TNFα and IL10 real-time PCR assays to measure the expression of these genes from koala samples. In preliminary studies comparing wild koalas with overt chlamydial disease, previous evidence of C. pecorum infection or no signs of C. pecorum infection, we revealed strong but variable expression of TNFα and IL10 in wild koalas with current signs of chlamydiosis. The description of these assays and the preliminary data on the cell-mediated immune response of koalas to chlamydial infection paves the way for future studies characterising the koala immune response to a range of its pathogens while providing reagents to assist with measuring the efficacy of ongoing attempts to develop a koala chlamydial vaccine. PMID:23527290

  19. Determination of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen (CA 15-3) in bitches with tumours on mammary gland: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Valencakova-Agyagosova, A; Frischova, Z; Sevcikova, Z; Hajurka, J; Lepej, J; Szakallova, I; Kredatusova, G; Nagy, V; Ledecky, V

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to determine levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen (CA 15-3) in the blood serum of 45 bitches. A modified procedure was used to determine the CEA and CA 15-3 markers with the human kits using the radioimmunoassay method. Samples collected from extirpated tumour of mammary glands were histologically processed and classified as per WHO guidelines. The average age of animals with tumour was 10.00 ± 2.2 years; for healthy bitches average age was 4.2 ± 3.2 years. Values of CEA and CA 15-3 were considered positive, if they exceeded 0.23 ng mL(-1) and 7 IU mL(-1) , respectively. Average levels of CEA in the tumour group were 0.25 ± 0.06 versus 0.20 ± 0.03 in healthy bitches (P = 0.0001). The average CA 15-3 value in bitches with tumour was 8.58 ± 1.27 versus 5.14 ± 1.34 in healthy animals (P < 0.0001). PMID:22947252

  20. Laser vibrometry characterisation of a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip device: a preliminary investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fury, C.; Gélat, P. N.; Jones, P. H.; Memoli, G.

    2014-04-01

    Since their original inception as ultrasound contrast agents, potential applications of microbubbles have evolved to encompass molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery. As these areas develop, so does the need to understand the mechanisms behind the interaction of microbubbles both with biological tissue and with other microbubbles. There is therefore a metrological requirement to develop a controlled environment in which to study these processes. Presented here is the design and characterisation of such a system, which consists of a microfluidic chip, specifically developed for manipulating microbubbles using both optical and acoustic trapping. A laser vibrometer is used to observe the coupling of acoustic energy into the chip from a piezoelectric transducer bonded to the surface. Measurement of the velocity of surface waves on the chip is investigated as a potential method for inferring the nature of the acoustic fields excited within the liquid medium of the device. Comparison of measured surface wavelengths with wave types suggests the observation of anti-symmetric Lamb or Love-Kirchhoff waves. Further visual confirmation of the acoustic fields through bubble aggregation highlights differences between the model and experimental results in predicting the position of acoustic pressure nodes in relation to excitation frequency.

  1. Channel characterisation for future Ka-band Mobile Satellite Systems and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforza, Mario; Buonomo, Sergio; Arbesser-Rastburg, Bertram

    1994-01-01

    Mobile satellite systems (MSS) are presently designed or planned to operate, with the exception of OMNITRACKS, in the lower part of the frequency spectrum (UHF to S-bands). The decisions taken at the last World Administrative Radio Conference in 1992 to increase the allocated L- and S-bands for MSS services will only partly alleviate the problem of system capacity. In addition the use of L-and S-band frequencies generally requires large antenna apertures on board the satellite terminal side. The idea of exploiting the large spectrum resources available at higher frequencies (20-30 GHz) and the perspective of reducing user terminal size (and possibly price too) have spurred the interest of systems designers and planners. On the other hand, Ka-band frequencies suffer from increased slant path losses due to atmospheric attenuation phenomena. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently embarked on a number of activities aimed at studying the effect of the typical mobile propagation impairments at Ka-band. This paper briefly summarizes ESA efforts in this field of research and presents preliminary experimental results.

  2. Catalogue of the main gas manifestation of Greece: Geochemical characterisation and preliminary gas hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Calabrese, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    Like other geodynamically active areas, the Hellenic territory is also affected by a large number of geogenic gas manifestations. These occur either in form of point sources (fumaroles, mofettes, bubbling gases) or as diffuse soil gas emanations. The present work produced a first catalogue of the geogenic gas manifestations of the whole Hellenic territory also considering a few literature data. All collected samples were analysed for their chemical composition (He, Ne, Ar, O2, N2, H2, H2S, CO, CH4 and CO2) and isotopic composition (He, CO2-C, CH4-C, N2-N). Geogenic sources release huge amounts of gases, which, apart from having important influences on the global climate, could have strong impact on human health. Gases have both acute and chronic effects. Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulphide are the main gases responsible for acute mortality due to their asphyxiating and/or toxic properties. Methane instead represents a risk for its explosive properties. Gas hazard is often disregarded because in fatal episodes connected to geogenic gases the death cause is often not correctly attributed. Due to the fact that geodynamic active areas can release geogenic gases for million years over wide areas, it is important not to underestimate potential risks. A preliminary estimation of the gas hazard has been made for the time period of the last 20 years considering the whole population of Greece. In this period at least two fatal episodes with a total of three victims could be certainly attributed to geogenic gases (specifically CO2). This would give a risk of 1.3×10-8 fatality from geogenic gas manifestations per annum. Such value, although probably underestimated, is much lower than most other natural or anthropogenic risks. Nevertheless this risk, being unevenly distributed along the whole territory, should not be overlooked especially in areas with high density of gas manifestations and high soil gas fluxes.

  3. Production, characterisation and immunogenicity of a plant-made Plasmodium antigen--the 19 kDa C-terminal fragment of Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein 1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Charles; Wang, Lina; Webster, Diane E; Campbell, Alison E; Coppel, Ross L

    2012-04-01

    Development of a safe, effective and affordable malaria vaccine is central to global disease control efforts. One of the most highly regarded proteins for inclusion in an asexual blood stage subunit vaccine is the 19-kDa C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1(19)). As production of vaccine antigens in plants can potentially overcome cost and delivery hurdles, we set out to produce MSP1(19) in plants, characterise the protein and test its immunogenicity using a mouse model. Plasmodium yoelii MSP1(19) (PyMSP1(19)) was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana using the MagnICON® deconstructed TMV-based viral vector. PyMSP1(19) yield of at least 23% total soluble protein (TSP;3-4 mg/g Fwt) were achieved using a codon-optimised construct that was targeted to the apoplast. Freeze-dried leaf powder contained at least 20 mg PyMSP1(19) per gram dry weight and the protein retained immunogenicity in this form for more than 2 years. Characterisation studies, including SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry and circular dichroism, indicated that the plant-expressed PyMSP1(19) was similar to its Escherichia coli- and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-expressed counterparts. Purified plant-made PyMSP1(19) induced strong immune responses following intraperitoneal immunisation, although titres were lower than those induced by an equivalent dose of purified E. coli-expressed PyMSP1(19). The reason for this is uncertain but may be due to differences in the oligomerisation profile of the vaccines. The plant-made PyMSP1(19) vaccine was also found to be orally immunogenic when delivered alone or following immunisation with a PyMSP1(19) DNA vaccine. This study adds to an increasing body of research supporting the feasibility of plants as both a factory for the production of malaria antigens, and as a safe and affordable platform for oral delivery of a temperature-stable malaria vaccine. PMID:22170105

  4. Characterisation and analysis of thioredoxin peroxidase as a potential antigen for the serodiagnosis of sarcoptic mange in rabbits by dot-ELISA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Scabies caused by Sarcoptes scabiei is a widespread but a neglected tropical zoonosis. In this study, we characterised a S. scabiei thioredoxin peroxidase (SsTPx) and evaluated a recombinant SsTPx as a diagnostic antigen in rabbits. Methods The open reading frame of the gene encoding SsTPx-2 was amplified and the recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and purified. SsTPx was localized in mite tissue by immunolocalisation using the purified recombinant protein. Serodiagnosis assays were carried out in 203 New Zealand White rabbit serum samples by dot-ELISA. Result The open reading frame (489 bp) of the gene encodes an 18.11 kDa protein, which showed highly homology to that of Psoroptes cuniculi (98.77% identity) and belongs to the 2-Cys family of peroxiredoxins. SsTPx was mainly distributed in muscle tissues of mites, integument of the epidermis and the anterior end of S. scabiei. Although SsTPx cross-reactivity with psoroptic mites was observed, the SsTPx dot-ELISA showed excellent diagnostic ability, with 95.3% sensitivity and 93.8% specificity in mange-infected and uninfected groups. Conclusions This study showed that the purified SsTPx is a highly sensitive antigen for the diagnosis of mange infection by dot-ELISA. This technique is a rapid and convenient method that can be used worldwide for the clinical diagnosis of sarcoptic mange in rabbits, and is especially useful in developing regions. PMID:23875925

  5. Expression, characterisation and antigenicity of a truncated Hendra virus attachment protein expressed in the protozoan host Leishmania tarentolae.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kerstin; dos Reis, Vinicius Pinho; Finke, Stefan; Sauerhering, Lucie; Stroh, Eileen; Karger, Axel; Maisner, Andrea; Groschup, Martin H; Diederich, Sandra; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is an emerging zoonotic paramyxovirus within the genus Henipavirus that has caused severe morbidity and mortality in humans and horses in Australia since 1994. HeV infection of host cells is mediated by the membrane bound attachment (G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins, that are essential for receptor binding and fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The eukaryotic unicellular parasite Leishmania tarentolae has recently been established as a powerful tool to express recombinant proteins with mammalian-like glycosylation patterns, but only few viral proteins have been expressed in this system so far. Here, we describe the purification of a truncated, Strep-tag labelled and soluble version of the HeV attachment protein (sHeV G) expressed in stably transfected L. tarentolae cells. After Strep-tag purification the identity of sHeV G was confirmed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. The functional binding of sHeV G to the HeV cell entry receptor ephrin-B2 was confirmed in several binding assays. Generated polyclonal rabbit antiserum against sHeV G reacted with both HeV and Nipah virus (NiV) G proteins in immunofluorescence assay and efficiently neutralised NiV infection, thus further supporting the preserved antigenicity of the purified protein. PMID:26585033

  6. Preliminary selection and evaluation of the binding of aptamers against a Hantavirus antigen using fluorescence spectroscopy and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missailidis, Sotiris; de Oliveira, Renata Carvalho; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Célia Martins; Guterres, Alexandro; Vicente, Luciana Helena Bassan; de Godoy, Daniela Tupy; Lemos, Elba

    2015-12-01

    In this study we have aimed to develop novel aptamers against the Hantavirus nucleoprotein N, a valid antigen already used in the Hantavirus reference laboratory of the Institute Oswaldo Cruz in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Such aptamers, if they are found to bind with high affinity and specificity for the selected hantavirus antigen, they could be translated into novel diagnostic assays with the ability to provide early detection for hantaviroses and their related disease syndromes. In a preliminary screening, we have managed to identify three aptamer species. We have analyzed a short and a long version of these aptamer using fluorescence spectroscopy and modelled their binding. We have identified Stern-Volmer constants for the selected aptamers, which have shown affinity for their target, with a different binding between the short and the long versions of them. Short aptamers have shown to have a higher Stern-Volmer constant and the ability to potentially bind to more than one binding site on the antigen. The information provided by the spectroscopic screening has been invaluable in allowing us to define candidates for further development into diagnostic assays.

  7. Microencapsulation of Streptococcus equi antigens in biodegradable microspheres and preliminary immunisation studies.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana F; Galhardas, Jorge; Cunha, António; Cruz, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Lídia M D; Almeida, António J

    2006-10-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi is the causative agent of strangles, a bacterial infection of the respiratory tract of equidae. Current strategies to prevent strangles rely on antimicrobial therapy or immunisation with inactivated bacteria, S. equi bacterin, or M-like protein (SeM) extract. The aim of this work was to investigate whether immunisation with whole killed S. equi or a bacterial lysate entrapped in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres might induce protective immunity to mice. Animals were treated with a dose of antigen equivalent to 25 microg of SeM. For intranasal route animals were primed on days 1, 2 and 3 and were boosted on day 29. For intramuscular route, primary immunisation was carried out with a single injection on day 1 and animals were boosted on day 29. On day 43 animals were submitted to a challenge with a virulent strain of S. equi. Vaccination with antigen-containing microspheres induced higher serum antibody levels in mice treated by the intranasal route, whereas intramuscular immunisation did not reveal any difference between control and treatment groups. Microencapsulated antigens achieved to fully protect mice against experimental infection irrespective of the route of administration used. Following intranasal or intramuscular administration soluble antigen failed to protect mice against challenge. These studies indicate that PLGA microspheres are a potential carrier system for the delivery of S. equi antigens. PMID:16846728

  8. Measurement of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, cytokeratin-19 fragment and matrix metalloproteinase-7 for detecting cholangiocarcinoma: a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Lo Re, Giovanni; Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Facomer, Flavio; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2014-11-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the liver arising from the bile duct epithelium, accounting for 10-25% of all primary hepatic cancers. The clinical presentation of this tumor is not specific and the diagnosis of early cholangiocarcinoma is difficult, especially in patients with other biliary diseases. Measurement of serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) are commonly used to monitor response to therapy, but are also useful for confirming the presence of a cholangiocarcinoma. In this setting, other biomarkers have been previously tested, including cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) and the matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7). The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical usefulness of the assay of serum CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1 and MMP7, individually and together, as tumor markers for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Twenty-four patients (14 men, 10 women, 62.6±8.2 years of age) with histologically-confirmed cholangiocarcinoma (cases) and 25 age- and sex-matched patients with benign liver disease (controls) underwent measurement of these biomarkers. The mean values of all serum markers of patients with cholangiocarcinoma were significantly higher (p<0.01) than that of the controls. No correlation was found between serum tumor markers and total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were: CEA: 52%, 55%, and 58%; CA 19-9: 74%, 82% and 78%; CYFRA 21-1: 76%, 79% and 78%; MMP7: 78%, 77% and 80%, respectively. The combination of all serum markers afforded 92.0% sensitivity and 96% specificity in detecting cholangiocarcinoma, showing the highest diagnostic accuracy (94%). In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest that the measurement of all four biomarkers together can help in the early detection of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25368272

  9. Identification and preliminary characterization of Treponema pallidum protein antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stamm, L V; Kerner, T C; Bankaitis, V A; Bassford, P J

    1983-08-01

    We have previously described the construction in Escherichia coli K-12 of a hybrid plasmid colony bank of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) genomic DNA. By screening a portion of this bank with an in situ immunoassay, we identified six E. coli clones that express T. pallidum antigens. In this study, the recombinant plasmids from each of these clones have been analyzed in E. coli maxicells and have been found to encode a number of proteins that are not of vector pBR322 origin and are, therefore, of treponemal origin. In each case, several of these proteins can be specifically precipitated from solubilized maxicell extracts by high-titer experimental rabbit syphilitic serum. Certain of these proteins are also precipitated by high-titer latent human syphilitic sera (HSS). The T. pallidum DNA inserts in these plasmids range in size from 6.2 to 14 kilobase pairs, and from the restriction patterns of the inserts and the protein profiles generated by each plasmid in maxicells, it is apparent that we have recovered a total of four unique clones from our colony bank. Recombinant plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 were of particular interest. Plasmid pLVS3 encodes three major protein antigens with molecular weights of 39,000, 35,000, and 25,000. These three proteins, which were not recognized by pooled normal human sera, were efficiently precipitated by most secondary HSS, latent HSS, and late HSS tested. These proteins were also precipitated, although somewhat inefficiently, by most primary HSS tested. Plasmid pLVS5 encodes a major protein antigen with a molecular weight of 32,000 and several minor protein antigens that, although efficiently precipitated by experimental rabbit syphilitic serum, were generally not recognized by the various HSS tested. Evidence is presented indicating that the protein antigens encoded by plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 are specific for pathogenic treponemal species. We have also demonstrated that immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against these protein

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of antigen--antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Chitarra-Guillon, V; Souchon, H; Boulot, G; Riottot, M M; Mariuzza, R; Tello, D; Poljak, R J

    1988-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity have been purified and crystallized as single components or complexed with their specific antigens. The intersegmental flexibility of antibody molecules has imposed the strategy of attempting to crystallize their Fab fragments separately. Intrasegmental mobility in Fabs has rarely been an obstacle to their crystallization. The immune system, however, provides a large functional and structural diversity of antibody molecules suitable for crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:3147699

  11. Enhanced detection of bladder cancer using the epithelial surface marker epithelial membrane antigen: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ring, K S; Karp, F; Benson, M C

    1990-09-01

    The flow cytometry (FCM) technique allows for the rapid quantitative analysis of the DNA content of individual cells. In a variety of genitourinary tumors, DNA ploidy has a significant impact upon prognosis and ultimate patient survival. In patients having transitional cell cancer (TCC) of the bladder, FCM of voided urine and bladder barbotage specimens is highly correlated with cytologic analysis in the detection of malignant cells. One problem with this technique has been decreased sensitivity in samples containing large numbers of inflammatory cells. To improve FCM detection of TCC in bladder wash specimens, we developed a technique using a monoclonal antibody (Mab) specific to human, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The EMA cell-surface marker enabled us to differentiate bladder epithelial cells from lymphocytes and cellular debris. In combination with DNA analysis using propidium iodide, the EMA Mab increased the sensitivity and specificity of FCM compared to conventional analysis using propidium iodide alone. We conclude that epithelial cell-surface antigen staining using both EMA Mab and DNA staining can increase the FCM detection of TCC in bladder wash specimens. PMID:2074517

  12. Purification and immunochemical properties of Escherichia coli B polysaccharide cross-reacting with Salmonella typhi Vi antigen: preliminary evidence for cross-reaction of the polysaccharide with Escherichia coli K1 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Szewczyk, B; Taylor, A

    1983-01-01

    An acidic polysaccharide of Escherichia coli B was isolated by a mild procedure and purified to homogeneity. The polysaccharide was found to react in Salmonella typhi Vi antisera and E. coli K1 antisera. Serological analysis and preliminary chemical characterization of the polysaccharide indicated that it is an aminouronic acid polymer which, although not structurally identical to either Vi or K1, appears more like the Vi antigen, both immunochemically and chemically. Images PMID:6345392

  13. The Functional Response of B Cells to Antigenic Stimulation: A Preliminary Report of Latent Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Willem J; Kleynhans, Léanie; du Plessis, Nelita; Stanley, Kim; Malherbe, Stephanus T; Maasdorp, Elizna; Ronacher, Katharina; Chegou, Novel N; Walzl, Gerhard; Loxton, Andre G

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) remains a successful pathogen, causing tuberculosis disease numbers to constantly increase. Although great progress has been made in delineating the disease, the host-pathogen interaction is incompletely described. B cells have shown to function as both effectors and regulators of immunity via non-humoral methods in both innate and adaptive immune settings. Here we assessed specific B cell functional interaction following stimulation with a broad range of antigens within the LTBI milieu. Our results indicate that B cells readily produce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17, IL-21 and TNF-α) in response to stimulation. TLR4 and TLR9 based stimulations achieved the greatest secreted cytokine-production response and BCG stimulation displayed a clear preference for inducing IL-1β production. We also show that the cytokines produced by B cells are implicated strongly in cell-mediated communication and that plasma (memory) B cells (CD19+CD27+CD138+) is the subset with the greatest contribution to cytokine production. Collectively our data provides insight into B cell responses, where they are implicated in and quantifies responses from specific B cell phenotypes. These findings warrant further functional B cell research with a focus on specific B cell phenotypes under conditions of active TB disease to further our knowledge about the contribution of various cell subsets which could have implications for future vaccine development or refined B cell orientated treatment in the health setting. PMID:27050308

  14. The Functional Response of B Cells to Antigenic Stimulation: A Preliminary Report of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Willem J.; Kleynhans, Léanie; du Plessis, Nelita; Stanley, Kim; Malherbe, Stephanus T.; Maasdorp, Elizna; Ronacher, Katharina; Chegou, Novel N.; Walzl, Gerhard; Loxton, Andre G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) remains a successful pathogen, causing tuberculosis disease numbers to constantly increase. Although great progress has been made in delineating the disease, the host-pathogen interaction is incompletely described. B cells have shown to function as both effectors and regulators of immunity via non-humoral methods in both innate and adaptive immune settings. Here we assessed specific B cell functional interaction following stimulation with a broad range of antigens within the LTBI milieu. Our results indicate that B cells readily produce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17, IL-21 and TNF-α) in response to stimulation. TLR4 and TLR9 based stimulations achieved the greatest secreted cytokine-production response and BCG stimulation displayed a clear preference for inducing IL-1β production. We also show that the cytokines produced by B cells are implicated strongly in cell-mediated communication and that plasma (memory) B cells (CD19+CD27+CD138+) is the subset with the greatest contribution to cytokine production. Collectively our data provides insight into B cell responses, where they are implicated in and quantifies responses from specific B cell phenotypes. These findings warrant further functional B cell research with a focus on specific B cell phenotypes under conditions of active TB disease to further our knowledge about the contribution of various cell subsets which could have implications for future vaccine development or refined B cell orientated treatment in the health setting. PMID:27050308

  15. Characterisation of medical-waste sterilisation-plant wastewater and a preliminary study of coagulation-flocculation treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, O; Mihçiokur, H; Azgin, S T; Ozdemir, O

    2010-01-01

    Wastewater from a medical-waste sterilisation plant (MWSP) contains unique pollutants and requires on-site treatment to prevent contamination of the municipal sewage system and receiving water bodies. Therefore, to meet the prescribed discharge standards and comply with the legal regulations, pre-treatment must be applied to MWSP wastewater. In this study, the capabilities of coagulation-flocculation processes were investigated for MWSP wastewater treatment. Processes using ferric chloride, ferrous sulfate and aluminium sulfate as coagulants were characterised. During the coagulation experiments, seven different coagulant dosages and four different pH values were evaluated to determine the optimum coagulant dosage and pH value. The highest removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was obtained using 300 mg/L of ferric chloride at pH 10. A COD removal of about 60% as well as considerable reductions in the amounts of suspended solids, nitrogen and phosphorus were realised. PMID:20651429

  16. Maine Coon renal screening: ultrasonographical characterisation and preliminary genetic analysis for common genes in cats with renal cysts.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Karine; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Lang, Johann; Leeb, Tosso

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of renal cysts and other renal abnormalities in purebred Maine Coon cats, and to characterise these through genetic typing. Voluntary pre-breeding screening programmes for polycystic kidney disease (PKD) are offered for this breed throughout Switzerland, Germany and other northern European countries. We performed a retrospective evaluation of Maine Coon screening for renal disease at one institution over an 8-year period. Renal ultrasonography was performed in 187 healthy Maine Coon cats. Renal changes were observed in 27 of these cats. Renal cysts were found in seven cats, and were mostly single and unilateral (6/7, 85.7%), small (mean 3.6 mm) and located at the corticomedullary junction (4/6, 66.7%). Sonographical changes indicating chronic kidney disease (CKD) were observed in 10/187 (5.3%) cats and changes of unknown significance were documented in 11/187 (5.9%) cats. All six cats genetically tested for PKD1 were negative for the mutation, and gene sequencing of these cats did not demonstrate any common genetic sequences. Cystic renal disease occurs with a low prevalence in Maine Coons and is unrelated to the PKD observed in Persians and related breeds. Ultrasonographical findings compatible with CKD are not uncommon in juvenile Maine Coons. PMID:23735675

  17. Bovine cysticercosis: Preliminary observations on the immunohistochemical detection of Taenia saginata antigens in lymph nodes of an experimentally infected calf

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract A newly developed immunohistochemical test was used for the first time to demonstrate the presence of Taenia saginata (Cysticercus bovis) antigens in the lymph nodes of a heifer calf experimentally inoculated with Taenia saginata eggs. The new test should aid in the differential diagnosis of eosinophilic lymphadenitis in cattle. PMID:15532887

  18. Preliminary crystallographic studies of a Schistosoma mansoni antigen (Sm21.7) dynein light-chain (DLC) domain

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M. A. F.; Rodrigues, F. T. G.; Chagas, B. C. A.; Rezende, C. M. F.; Goes, A. M.; Nagem, R. A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an inflammatory chronic disease that represents a major health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. The drug of choice for treatment, praziquantel, is effective in killing adult worms but fails to kill immature forms and prevent reinfection. One prominent antigen candidate for an anti-schistosomiasis vaccine is the protein Sm21.7 (184 amino-acid residues) from Schistosoma mansoni, a tegumental protein capable of reducing the worm burden in a murine immunization model. In the present work, the Sm21.7 gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the full-length protein was purified to homogeneity. Crystals of recombinant Sm21.7 suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained using PEG monomethyl ether 2000 as a precipitant. X-ray diffraction images of a native crystal (at 2.05 Å resolution) and a quick-cryosoaked NaI derivative (at 1.95 Å resolution) were collected on the W01B-MX2 beamline at the Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS, Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory/MCT). Both crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P6122, with similar unit-cell parameters a = b = 108.5, c = 55.8 Å. SIRAS-derived phases were used to generate the first electron-density map, from which a partial three-dimensional model of Sm21.7 (from Gln89 to Asn184) was automatically constructed. Anaysis of dissolved crystals by SDS–PAGE confirmed that the protein was cleaved in the crystallization drop and only the Sm21.7 C-terminal domain was crystallized. The structure of the Sm21.7 C-terminal domain will help in the localization of the epitopes responsible for its protective immune responses, constituting important progress in the development of an anti-schistosomiasis vaccine. PMID:24915098

  19. 'Attached cell' antigen 28.3.7 mapping to human chromosome 15 characterises TPA-induced differentiation of the promyelocytic HL-60 cell line to give macrophage/monocyte populations.

    PubMed Central

    Blaineau, C; Avner, P; Tunnacliffe, A; Goodfellow, P

    1983-01-01

    Human cells growing in vitro attached to the substratum express a cell antigen called 28.3.7 identified by a species-specific monoclonal antibody. This antigen is not expressed on human cells growing in suspension. The antigen has a mol. wt. in reduced SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels of 95 000 and in human-mouse somatic cell hybrids, expression of the antigen is controlled by a gene, MIC7, mapping to human chromosome 15. The antigen functions as a marker for macrophage differentiation. In vitro differentiation of the 28.3.7 antigen-negative human promyelocytic leukaemia line HL-60 induced by phorbol ester, results in the formation of a macrophage/monocyte population and the concomitant expression of the 28.3.7 antigen on this adherent cell population. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6641710

  20. Synthesis, characterisation, and preliminary anti-cancer photodynamic therapeutic in vitro studies of mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Patrick; Magnusen, Anthony R.; Moffett, Erick T.; Meyer, Kyle; Hong, Yiling; Ramsdale, Stuart E.; Gordon, Michelle; Stubbs, Javelyn; Seymour, Luke A.; Acharya, Dhiraj; Weber, Ralph T.; Smith, Paul F.; Dismukes, G. Charles; Ji, Ping; Menocal, Laura; Bai, Fengwei; Williams, Jennie L.; Cropek, Donald M.; Jarrett, William L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterisation of mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes, which were used as potential photodynamic therapeutic agents for melanoma cell growth inhibition. The novel complexes, [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)](PF6)2•1.5H2O 1 (where phen2DTT = 1,4-bis(1,10-phenanthrolin-5-ylsulfanyl)butane-2,3-diol and pbt = 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzothiazole) and [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)](PF6)2•3H2O 2 (where tpphz = tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c:3″,2″-h:2‴,3‴-j]phenazine) were synthesised and characterised. Compound 1 was reacted with [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] (where sal-L-tryp = N-salicylidene-L-tryptophanate) to produce [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2•5H2O 4; while [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] was reacted with compound 2 to produce [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2•6H2O 3. All complexes were characterised by elemental analysis, HRMS, ESI MS, UV-visible absorption, ESR spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry, where appropriate. In vitro cell toxicity studies (with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay) via dark and light reaction conditions were carried out with sodium diaqua-4,4',4”,4”'tetrasulfophthalocyaninecobaltate(II) (Na4[Co(tspc)(H2O)2]), [VO(sal-L-tryp)(phen)]•H2O, and the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4. Such studies involved A431, human epidermoid carcinoma cells; human amelanotic malignant melanoma cells; and HFF, non-cancerous human skin fibroblast cells. Both chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 were found to be more toxic to melanoma cells than to non-cancerous fibroblast cells, and preferentially led to apoptosis of the melanoma cells over non-cancerous skin cells. The anti-cancer property of the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 was further enhanced when treated cells were exposed to light, while no such effect was observed on non-cancerous skin fibroblast cells. ESR and 51V NMR spectroscopic studies were also used to assess the stability of the chloride salts of

  1. Chemical Characterisation of the Coarse and Fine Particulate Matter in the Environment of an Underground Railway System: Cytotoxic Effects and Oxidative Stress—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Ottria, Gianluca; Perdelli, Fernanda; Cristina, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exposure to the particulate matter produced in underground railway systems is arousing increasing scientific interest because of its health effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the airborne concentrations of PM10 and three sub-fractions of PM2.5 in an underground railway system environment in proximity to platforms and in underground commercial areas within the system, and to compare these with the outdoor airborne concentrations. We also evaluated the metal components, the cytotoxic properties of the various fractions of particulate matter (PM) and their capacity to induce oxidative stress. Method: We collected the coarse fraction (5–10 µm) and the fine fractions (1–2.5 µm; 0.5–1 µm; 0.25–0.5 µm). Chemical characterisation was determined by means of spectrometry. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) assessment. Results: The concentrations of both PM10 and PM2.5 proved to be similar at the three sampling sites. Iron and other transition metals displayed a greater concentration at the subway platform than at the other two sites. The 2.5–10 µm and 1–2.5 µm fractions of PM from all three sampling sites determined a greater increase in ROS; the intensity of oxidative stress progressively declined as particle diameter diminished. Moreover, ROS concentrations were correlated with the concentrations of some transition metals, namely Mn, Cr, Ti, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni and Mo. All particulate matter fractions displayed lower or similar ROS values between platform level and the outdoor air. Conclusions: The present study revealed that the underground railway environment at platform level, although containing higher concentrations of some particularly reactive metallic species, did not display higher cytotoxicity and oxidative stress levels than the outdoor air. PMID:25872016

  2. Chemical Synthesis, Characterisation, and Biocompatibility of Nanometre Scale Porous Anodic Aluminium Oxide Membranes for Use as a Cell Culture Substrate for the Vero Cell Line: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Le, Xuan Thi; Becker, Thomas; Fawcett, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In this preliminary study we investigate for the first time the biomedical potential of using porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes as a cell substrate for culturing the Cercopithecus aethiops (African green monkey) Kidney (Vero) epithelial cell line. One advantage of using the inorganic AAO membrane is the presence of nanometre scale pore channels that allow the exchange of molecules and nutrients across the membrane. The size of the pore channels can be preselected by adjusting the controlling parameters of a temperature controlled two-step anodization process. The cellular interaction and response of the Vero cell line with an in-house synthesised AAO membrane, a commercially available membrane, and a glass control were assessed by investigating cell adhesion, morphology, and proliferation over a 72 h period. The number of viable cells proliferating over the respective membrane surfaces revealed that the locally produced in-house AAO membrane had cells numbers similar to the glass control. The study revealed evidence of focal adhesion sites over the surface of the nanoporous membranes and the penetration of cellular extensions into the pore structure as well. The outcome of the study has revealed that nanometre scale porous AAO membranes have the potential to become practical cell culture scaffold substrates with the capability to enhance adhesion and proliferation of Vero cells. PMID:24579077

  3. Chemical synthesis, characterisation, and biocompatibility of nanometre scale porous anodic aluminium oxide membranes for use as a cell culture substrate for the vero cell line: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Le, Xuan Thi; O'Dea, Mark; Becker, Thomas; Fawcett, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In this preliminary study we investigate for the first time the biomedical potential of using porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes as a cell substrate for culturing the Cercopithecus aethiops (African green monkey) Kidney (Vero) epithelial cell line. One advantage of using the inorganic AAO membrane is the presence of nanometre scale pore channels that allow the exchange of molecules and nutrients across the membrane. The size of the pore channels can be preselected by adjusting the controlling parameters of a temperature controlled two-step anodization process. The cellular interaction and response of the Vero cell line with an in-house synthesised AAO membrane, a commercially available membrane, and a glass control were assessed by investigating cell adhesion, morphology, and proliferation over a 72 h period. The number of viable cells proliferating over the respective membrane surfaces revealed that the locally produced in-house AAO membrane had cells numbers similar to the glass control. The study revealed evidence of focal adhesion sites over the surface of the nanoporous membranes and the penetration of cellular extensions into the pore structure as well. The outcome of the study has revealed that nanometre scale porous AAO membranes have the potential to become practical cell culture scaffold substrates with the capability to enhance adhesion and proliferation of Vero cells. PMID:24579077

  4. Emergence of antigenic variants of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus serotype O in Ecuador and preliminary evaluation of a field strain as a vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Maradei, Eduardo; Malirat, Viviana; Beascoechea, Claudia Perez; Espinoza, Ana María; Novo, Sabrina Galdo; Smitsaart, Eliana; Salgado, Gustavo; Mattion, Nora; Toledo, Jorge Rodriguez; Bergmann, Ingrid E

    2014-05-01

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus serotype O has been circulating regularly throughout most provinces of Ecuador, one of the two South American countries that still remain endemic, although satisfactory vaccination coverage was reported. This study concentrates in the characterization of isolates collected during 2008-2011, focusing particularly on the antigenic and immunogenic relationships of the field viruses with the O1/Campos vaccine strain in use in the region and with an experimental vaccine formulated with a representative strain of the 2010 epidemic. The results established that antigenically divergent variants poorly protected by the vaccine in use emerged and co-circulated in a limited period of time. A monovalent vaccine formulated with the representative 2010 strain elicited high antibody titers and protected against challenge with homologous virus. In addition, cross-reactive antibodies to predominant viruses in the region were established. In overall this study indicates the ability of the virus to diversify under field conditions in which a vaccine strain with poor match is applied, and the potential of the selected 2010 field virus as a vaccine candidate for incorporation into strategic antigen banks and/or for addition to current formulations for systematic vaccination, in order to prevent the emergence of even more divergent isolates in the future. PMID:24625343

  5. Ticlopidine-induced hepatotoxicity is associated with specific human leukocyte antigen genomic subtypes in Japanese patients: a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hirata, K; Takagi, H; Yamamoto, M; Matsumoto, T; Nishiya, T; Mori, K; Shimizu, S; Masumoto, H; Okutani, Y

    2008-02-01

    Genetic risk factors for ticlopidine-induced hepatotoxicity were determined in 22 Japanese patients with ticlopidine-induced hepatotoxicity and 85 Japanese patients who tolerated ticlopidine therapy without experiencing adverse reactions. There was a significant correlation between ticlopidine-induced hepatotoxicity and five human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles: HLA-A*3303, HLA-B*4403, HLA-Cw*1403, HLA-DRB1*1302 and HLA-DQB1*0604 (corrected probability (P)-value (Pc)<0.01). In particular HLA-A*3303 was present in 15 (68%) of the 22 patients with ticlopidine-induced hepatotoxicity and in 12 (14%) of the 85 ticlopidine-tolerant patients (odds ratio, 13.04; 95% confidence interval (CI), 4.40-38.59; the corrected P-value (Pc)=1.24 x 10(-5)). HLA-A*3303 was present in 12 (86%) of the 14 patients with ticlopidine-induced cholestatic hepatotoxicity (odds ratio, 36.50; 95% CI, 7.25-183.82, Pc=7.32 x 10(-7)). Ticlopidine-induced severe cholestatic hepatotoxicity occurred more frequently in subjects with HLA-A*3303 and its haplotype in Japanese patients. These findings may explain the high incidence of ticlopidine-induced hepatotoxicity in Japanese patients mediated via an immune-mediated mechanism. PMID:17339877

  6. Antigenic sites in carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Hammarstrom, S; Shively, J E; Paxton, R J; Beatty, B G; Larsson, A; Ghosh, R; Bormer, O; Buchegger, F; Mach, J P; Burtin, P

    1989-09-01

    The epitope reactivities of 52 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against carcinoembryonic antigen from 11 different research groups were studied using competitive solid-phase immunoassays. About 60% of all possible combinations of Mabs as inhibitors and as the primary binding antibody were investigated. The inhibition data were analyzed by a specially developed computer program "EPITOPES" which measures concordance and discordance in inhibition patterns between Mabs. The analysis showed that 43 of the 52 Mabs (83%) could be classified into one of five essentially noninteracting epitope groups (GOLD 1-5) containing between four and 15 Mabs each. The epitopes recognized by the Mabs belonging to groups 1 to 5 were peptide in nature. With one or two possible exceptions non-classifiable Mabs were either directed against carbohydrate epitopes (4 Mabs) or were inactive in the tests used. Within epitope groups GOLD 1, 4, and 5 two partially overlapping subgroups were distinguished. Mabs with a high degree of carcinoembryonic antigen specificity generally belonged to epitope groups GOLD 1 and 3. PMID:2474375

  7. Preliminary characterisation of new glass reference materials (GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G) by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm wavelengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillong, M.; Hametner, K.; Reusser, E.; Wilson, S.A.; Gunther, D.

    2005-01-01

    New glass reference materials GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G have been characterised using a prototype solid state laser ablation system capable of producing wavelengths of 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm. This system allowed comparison of the effects of different laser wavelengths under nearly identical ablation and ICP operating conditions. The wavelengths 213 nm and 266 nm were also used at higher energy densities to evaluate the influence of energy density on quantitative analysis. In addition, the glass reference materials were analysed using commercially available 266 nm Nd:YAG and 193 nm ArF excimer lasers. Laser ablation analysis was carried out using both single spot and scanning mode ablation. Using laser ablation ICP-MS, concentrations of fifty-eight elements were determined with external calibration to the NIST SRM 610 glass reference material. Instead of applying the more common internal standardisation procedure, the total concentration of all element oxide concentrations was normalised to 100%. Major element concentrations were compared with those determined by electron microprobe. In addition to NIST SRM 610 for external calibration, USGS BCR-2G was used as a more closely matrix-matched reference material in order to compare the effect of matrix-matched and non matrix-matched calibration on quantitative analysis. The results show that the various laser wavelengths and energy densities applied produced similar results, with the exception of scanning mode ablation at 266 nm without matrix-matched calibration where deviations up to 60% from the average were found. However, results acquired using a scanning mode with a matrix-matched calibration agreed with results obtained by spot analysis. The increased abundance of large particles produced when using a scanning ablation mode with NIST SRM 610, is responsible for elemental fractionation effects caused by incomplete vaporisation of large particles in the ICP.

  8. Rotavirus antigen test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003349.htm Rotavirus antigen test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The rotavirus antigen test detects rotavirus in the feces. This ...

  9. Characterisation of chicken viperin.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Kate E; Karpala, Adam J; Rohringer, Andreas; Ward, Alistair; Bean, Andrew G D

    2015-02-01

    The identification of immune pathways that protect against pathogens may lead to novel molecular therapies for both livestock and human health. Interferon (IFN) is a major response pathway that stimulates multiple genes targeted towards reducing virus. Viperin is one such interferon stimulated gene (ISG) that helps protect mammals from virus and may be critical to protecting chickens in the same way. In chickens, ISGs are not generally well characterised and viperin, in concert with other ISGs, may be important in protecting against virus. Here we identify chicken viperin (ch-viperin) and show that ch-viperin is upregulated in response to viral signature molecules. We further show that viperin is upregulated in response to virus infection in vivo. This data will benefit investigators targeting the antiviral pathways in the chicken. PMID:25311379

  10. An outbreak of a possibly new Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar with the antigenic formula 11:z41:e,n,z15, Greece, March to May 2016: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Mandilara, Georgia; Mellou, Kassiani; Karadimas, Kleon; Georgalis, Leonidas; Polemis, Michalis; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Vatopoulos, Alkiviades

    2016-06-23

    Eleven Salmonella spp. isolates with the antigenic type 11:z41:e,n,z15 - not referred to in the 9th edition of the White-Kauffman-Le Minor Scheme - were identified at the National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella in Greece. Their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles were indistinguishable. No apparent epidemiological link has yet been identified; the results of a case-case study are pending. PMID:27363973

  11. Characterisation of a track structure imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, M; Bashkirov, V A; Hurley, R F; Schulte, R W

    2015-09-01

    The spatial distribution of radiation-induced ionisations in sub-cellular structures plays an important role in the initial formation of radiation damage to biological tissues. Using the nanodosimetry approach, physical characteristics of the track structure can be measured and correlated to DNA damage. In this work, a novel nanodosimeter is presented, which detects positive ions produced by radiation interacting with a gas-sensitive volume in order to obtain a high resolution image of the radiation track structure. The characterisation of the detector prototype was performed and different configurations of the device were tested by varying the detector cathode material and the working gas. Preliminary results show that the ionisation cluster size distribution can be obtained with this approach. Further work is planned to improve the detector efficiency in order to register the complete three-dimensional track structure of ionising radiation. PMID:25877534

  12. Discovery of novel Schistosoma japonicum antigens using a targeted protein microarray approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel vaccine candidates against Schistosoma japonicum are required, and antigens present in the vulnerable larval developmental stage are attractive targets. Post-genomic technologies are now available which can contribute to such antigen discovery. Methods A schistosome-specific protein microarray was probed using the local antibody response against migrating larvae. Antigens were assessed for their novelty and predicted larval expression and host-exposed features. One antigen was further characterised and its sequence and structure were analysed in silico. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyse transcript expression throughout development, and immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays employed to determine antigen recognition by antibody samples. Results Several known and novel antigens were discovered, two of which showed up-regulated transcription in schistosomula. One novel antigen, termed S. japonicum Ly-6-like protein 1 (Sj-L6L-1), was further characterised and shown to share structural and sequence features with the Ly-6 protein family. It was found to be present in the worm tegument and expressed in both the larval and adult worms, but was found to be antigenic only in the lungs that the larvae migrate to and traverse. Conclusions This study represents a novel approach to vaccine antigen discovery and may contribute to schistosome vaccine development against this important group of human and veterinary pathogens. PMID:24964958

  13. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  14. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  15. The antigenic composition of Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, A; Fuchs, N; Sonda, S; Hehl, A

    1999-08-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite which causes neosporosis, namely stillbirth and abortion in cattle, and neuromuscular disease in dogs. Although N. caninum is phylogenetically and biologically closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, it is antigenically clearly distinct. In analogy to T. gondii, three stages have been identified. These are: (i) asexually proliferating tachyzoites; (ii) tissue cysts harbouring slowly dividing bradyzoites; and (iii) oocysts containing sporozoites. The sexually produced stage of this parasite has only recently been identified, and has been shown to be shed with the faeces from dogs orally infected with N. caninum tissue cysts. Thus dogs are definitive hosts of N. caninum. Tachyzoites can be cultivated in vitro using similar techniques as previously described for T. gondii. Methods for generating tissue cysts containing N. caninum bradyzoites in mice, and purification of these cysts, have been developed. A number of studies have been undertaken to identify and characterise at the molecular level specific antigenic components of N. caninum in order to improve serological diagnosis and to enhance the current view on the many open questions concerning the cell biology of this parasite and its interactions with the host on the immunological and cellular level. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview on the approaches used for detection of antigens in N. caninum. The studies discussed here have had a great impact in the elucidation of the immunological and pathogenetic events during infection, as well as the development of potential new immunotherapeutic tools for future vaccination against N. caninum infection. PMID:10576569

  16. Database characterisation of HEP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piorkowski, Mariusz; Grancher, Eric; Topurov, Anton

    2012-12-01

    Oracle-based database applications underpin many key aspects of operations for both the LHC accelerator and the LHC experiments. In addition to the overall performance, the predictability of the response is a key requirement to ensure smooth operations and delivering predictability requires understanding the applications from the ground up. Fortunately, database management systems provide several tools to check, measure, analyse and gather useful information. We present our experiences characterising the performance of several typical HEP database applications performance characterisations that were used to deliver improved predictability and scalability as well as for optimising the hardware platform choice as we migrated to new hardware and Oracle 11g.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PsaA, the adhesive pilin subunit that forms the pH 6 antigen on the surface of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Sadhukhan, Annapurna; Nair, Manoj K M; Schifferli, Dieter M; Xia, Di

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia pestis has been responsible for a number of high-mortality epidemics throughout human history. Like all other bacterial infections, the pathogenesis of Y. pestis begins with the attachment of bacteria to the surface of host cells. At least five surface proteins from Y. pestis have been shown to interact with host cells. Psa, the pH 6 antigen, is one of them and is deployed on the surface of bacteria as thin flexible fibrils that are the result of the polymerization of a single PsaA pilin subunit. Here, the crystallization of recombinant donor-strand complemented PsaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 1.9 Å resolution from a native crystal and to 1.5 Å resolution from a bromide-derivatized crystal. These crystals displayed the symmetry of the orthorhombic space group P222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 26.3, b = 54.6, c = 102.1 Å. Initial phases were derived from single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments, resulting in an electron-density map that showed a single molecule in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Sequence assignment was aided by residues binding to bromide ions of the heavy-atom derivative. PMID:23027758

  18. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*1402 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pravin; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Volz, Armin; Ziegler, Andreas; Saenger, Wolfram

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*1402 in complex with two peptides is reported. The product of the human major histocompatibility (HLA) class I allele HLA-B*1402 only differs from that of allele HLA-B*1403 at amino-acid position 156 of the heavy chain (Leu in HLA-B*1402 and Arg in HLA-B*1403). However, both subtypes are known to be differentially associated with the inflammatory rheumatic disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in black populations in Cameroon and Togo. HLA-B*1402 is not associated with AS, in contrast to HLA-B*1403, which is associated with this disease in the Togolese population. The products of these alleles can present peptides with Arg at position 2, a feature shared by a small group of other HLA-B antigens, including HLA-B*2705, the prototypical AS-associated subtype. Complexes of HLA-B*1402 with a viral peptide (RRRWRRLTV, termed pLMP2) and a self-peptide (IRAAPPPLF, termed pCatA) were prepared and were crystallized using polyethylene glycol as precipitant. The complexes crystallized in space groups P2{sub 1} (pLMP2) and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pCatA) and diffracted synchrotron radiation to 2.55 and 1.86 Å resolution, respectively. Unambiguous solutions for both data sets were obtained by molecular replacement using a peptide-complexed HLA-B*2705 molecule (PDB code) as a search model.

  19. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  20. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  1. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  2. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  3. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  4. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. PMID:24922567

  5. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  6. Aspergillus antigen skin test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The aspergillus antigen skin test determines whether or not a person has been exposed to the mold aspergillus. It is performed by injecting an aspergillus antigen under the skin with a needle. After 48 ...

  7. Phenolic characterisation of selected Salacia species using LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, C T; Thushar, K V; Satheesh, George; Balachandran, Indira

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic characterisation was carried out on the leaf of three Salacia species such as Salacia chinensis, Salacia fruticosa and Salacia oblonga using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry equipped with electrospray ionisation interface. The estimation of total phenolics was carried out spectrophotometrically using Folin-Ciocalteu method. HPLC diode-array detection has been used for the preliminary identification of phenolic compounds, and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses were employed for their characterisation. The fragmentation patterns of the compounds during collision-induced dissociation led to the structural elucidation of the separated compounds. PMID:24730982

  8. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Krishnadas, Deepa Kolaseri; Bai, Fanqi; Lucas, Kenneth G

    2013-01-01

    The identification of cancer testis (CT) antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1), melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3), and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1) in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy.

  9. Analysis of human tumor associated Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, J.; Noujaim, A.A.; MacLean, G.D.; Suresh, M.R.; Longenecker, B.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The Thomsen-Friedenrich (TF) antigen is a precursor structure of MN blood group antigens and is also expressed by about 90% of human carcinomas. The immunodominant group of TF antigen (beta-galactosyl(1-3)-alpha-N-acetylglactosamine) is present in cryptic form in normal RBC and is revealed by neuraminidase treatment. A murine monoclonal antibody (Mab 49H.8) developed against neuraminidase treated human RBC was reactive against a variety of human tumors. We have characterized the human tumor associated TF antigen detected by this antibody from a human transitional bladder carcinoma cell line (647V), a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (LS174T), and a pleural effusion fluid of a breast adenocarcinoma patient (PE 89). A heterologous sandwich radioimmunoassay for TF antigen was developed using Mab 49H.8 as the catcher and 125I-peanut agglutinin as the probe. Detergent extracts of 647V and LS174T cells, media conditioned by culturing these cells, and PE 89 were shown to contain the antigen by this assay. The specificity of the antigen capture by Mab 49H.8 in this assay was demonstrated by its selective inhibition by nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside, phenyl-beta-D-galactoside, and a TF hapten. Preliminary studies on TF antigen in serum samples using this assay showed that about 53.7% of the carcinoma samples contained an antigen concentration greater than 200 units/ml whereas for 90.9% of the normal samples the antigen concentration was below 200 units/ml. These studies demonstrated that the TF antigen is shed by the tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The TF antigen was sensitive to treatment with alkali (0.1 M NaOH for 5 h at 37 degrees C) and periodate (10 mM sodium periodate for 1 h at room temperature), was resistant to acidic pH (50 mM acetate buffer, pH 4.5, for 5 h at 37 degrees C), and could be extracted with perchloric acid.

  10. Proteomic identification of sperm antigens using serum samples from individuals with and without antisperm antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Bauer, K; Kamieniczna, M; Cibulka, J; Ulcova-Gallova, Z; Kurpisz, M

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to identify human sperm antigens reacting with polyclonal antisperm antibodies. Protein sperm extracts were subjected to electrofocusing, and next immune reactions (immunoblotting) were carried out with positive for antisperm antibodies and control (not containing antisperm antibodies) serum samples. Proteomic analysis of human sperm proteins resulted in identification of 80 sperm antigens that could be divided into three groups: antigens specific for patients with antisperm antibodies (32), antigens recognised by both infertile patients and control sera (35) and antigens detected by control serum samples only (13). Among antigens specific for infertile patients, there were 12 sperm entities known to be involved in fertilisation process. We have also characterised three protein entities identified only by sera of infertile women. Altogether, the proteomic analysis resulted in identification of 27 sperm entities not reported previously in human sperm proteome. Identified proteins are sperm antigens that could be potentially responsible for immunological infertility. The study also sheds new light on the sperm antigens in aspect of gender specificity. The investigation of human sperm proteome by the use of antisperm antibodies-containing sera of infertile individuals not only may indicate new proteins but also can draft their immunological nature. PMID:26659478

  11. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  12. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    PubMed

    Dönertaş, Handan Melike; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  13. Human leucocyte antigens in tympanosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dursun, G; Acar, A; Turgay, M; Calgüner, M

    1997-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the association between certain HLA antigens and tympanosclerosis. The serum concentrations of HLA antigens were measured by a microlymphocytotoxicity technique in patients with tympanosclerosis and compared with a healthy control group. The serum levels of HLA-B35 and -DR3 were significantly higher in the patients with tympanosclerosis. This result suggests that certain types of HLA antigens may play an important role as an indicator or mediator in the pathogenesis of tympanosclerosis. PMID:9088683

  14. Novel antigen delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Maria; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2015-08-12

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the "E2 scaffold" of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  15. Synthesis, characterisation and microbial utilisation of amorphous polysugars from lactose.

    PubMed

    Daines, Alison M; Smart, Zlatka; Sims, Ian M; Tannock, Gerald W; Hinkley, Simon F R

    2015-03-01

    The melt polymerisations of glucose, galactose, xylose and fucose with citric acid, and mixtures of sugars therein are reported. Characterisation of the citric-acid catalysed reaction products indicated similar degrees of branched polymerisation but differences in the overall molecular weight of the polymers produced. The dairy by-product lactose could not be polymerised in a similar fashion but was shown to be readily hydrolysed using microwave radiation and a polymer generated from the melt condensation of the resultant glucose and galactose monosaccharides. A preliminary assessment of the bifido-bacterial utilisation of the lactose-derived polymerised products demonstrated a significantly different growth profile compared to commercially utilised galactooligosaccharides (GOS). PMID:25498629

  16. Bed Surface Characterisation in Coarse-Grained Alluvial Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Powell, M.; Tate, N.; Wood, J.; Rice, S. P.; Reid, I.; Ockelford, A.; Chorus

    2011-12-01

    Rivers are active agents of erosion and deposition, and the movement of sediment represents a logistic and sometimes strategic nuisance that affects road and rail communications, channel stability and river ecosystems. The processes of sediment transport are, however, still unclear to the extent that sediment transport rates are often greatly under- or over-predicted by existing predictive equations. Much of the uncertainty derives from the fact that the river bed is a complex arrangement of grains that is difficult to characterise. Quantifying the structural properties, or fabric, of water worked gravels and their topographic signatures in ways that can interface with quantitative analyses of flow and sediment transport is a particular problem. It remains a difficult modelling challenge that has yet to be fully solved. This paper presents some preliminary results from a flume study investigating the dynamics of bed surface structuring in gravel-bed rivers. The evolution of the bed during the experiments was characterised using measurements of surface microtopography extracted from high resolution bed elevation data collected using a Faro measuring arm laser scanner. The objective of the paper is to discuss the utility of a variety of aspatial and scale-based spatial and morphometric metrics which are used to quantify the developing microtopography and structure of the water-worked gravel surfaces.

  17. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) ...

  18. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  19. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  20. Isolation and characterisation of equine influenza viruses (H3N8) from Europe and North America from 2008 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Neil A; Rash, Adam S; Woodward, Alana L; Medcalf, Elizabeth; Helwegen, Maud; Wohlfender, Franziska; Cruz, Fatima; Herrmann, Claudia; Borchers, Kerstin; Tiwari, Ashish; Chambers, Thomas M; Newton, J Richard; Mumford, Jennifer A; Elton, Debra M

    2011-01-10

    Like other influenza A viruses, equine influenza virus undergoes antigenic drift. It is therefore essential that surveillance is carried out to ensure that recommended strains for inclusion in vaccines are kept up to date. Here we report antigenic and genetic characterisation carried out on equine influenza virus strains isolated in North America and Europe over a 2-year period from 2008 to 2009. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken from equines showing acute clinical signs and submitted to diagnostic laboratories for testing and virus isolation in eggs. The sequence of the HA1 portion of the viral haemagglutinin was determined for each strain. Where possible, sequence was determined directly from swab material as well as from virus isolated in eggs. In Europe, 20 viruses were isolated from 15 sporadic outbreaks and 5 viruses were isolated from North America. All of the European and North American viruses were characterised as members of the Florida sublineage, with similarity to A/eq/Lincolnshire/1/07 (clade 1) or A/eq/Richmond/1/07 (clade 2). Antigenic characterisation by haemagglutination inhibition assay indicated that the two clades could be readily distinguished and there were also at least seven amino acid differences between them. The selection of vaccine strains for 2010 by the expert surveillance panel have taken these differences into account and it is now recommended that representatives of both Florida clade 1 and clade 2 are included in vaccines. PMID:20580170

  1. Optimisation of immuno-gold nanoparticle complexes for antigen detection.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Susan; Russell, David A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to define the optimum method of binding antibodies to the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then to apply the optimised antibody-functionalised AuNPs for the detection of a target antigen. A detailed investigation of three different techniques for the functionalisation of AuNPs with anti-cocaine antibody and methods for the subsequent characterisation of the antibody-functionalised AuNP are reported. The addition of anti-cocaine antibody onto the AuNP surface was facilitated by either: a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker with a COOH terminal functional group; an aminated PEG ligand; or an N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate (SPDP)-Protein A/G intermediate. Characterisation of the functionalised particles was performed using transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometry and by agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, the cocaine binding efficacy of the resultant AuNPs and their cocaine-binding capacity was determined using a cocaine-horseradish peroxidase conjugate, and by the application of a microtiter plate-based immunoassay. The results showed that the number of antibody per particle was the highest when the AuNP were functionalised with the Protein A/G intermediate. As compared to free antibody, the cocaine binding efficacy was significantly enhanced using the AuNP-Protein A/G-antibody complex. This optimal antibody-antigen binding efficacy is thought to be the result of the large number of antibody per particle and the oriented binding of the antibody to the Protein A/G on the AuNP surface. These results highlight the ideal immuno-gold nanoparticle characteristics for the detection of target antigens such as cocaine. PMID:26994353

  2. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    PubMed

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  3. Altering the antigenicity of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, H; Alexander, S; Getzoff, E D; Tainer, J A; Geysen, H M; Lerner, R A

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the binding interaction between antigen and antibody we need to distinguish protein residues critical to the binding energy and mechanism from residues merely localized in the interface. By analyzing the binding of monoclonal antibodies to recombinant wild-type and mutant myohemerythrin (MHr) proteins, we were able to test the role of individual critical residues at the highly antigenic site MHr-(79-84), within the context of the folded protein. The results directly show the existence of antigenically critical residues, whose mutations significantly reduce antibody binding to the folded protein, thus verifying peptide-based assignments of these critical residues and demonstrating the ability of buried side chains to influence antigenicity. Taken together, these results (i) distinguish the antigenic surface from the solvent-exposed protein surface before binding, (ii) support a two-stage interaction mechanism allowing inducible changes in protein antigens by antibody binding, and (iii) show that protein antigenicity can be significantly reduced by alteration of single critical residues without destroying biological activity. Images PMID:1373498

  4. Antigen Retrieval Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Shi, Yan; Taylor, Clive R.

    2011-01-01

    As a review for the 20th anniversary of publishing the antigen retrieval (AR) technique in this journal, the authors intend briefly to summarize developments in AR-immunohistochemistry (IHC)–based research and diagnostics, with particular emphasis on current challenges and future research directions. Over the past 20 years, the efforts of many different investigators have coalesced in extending the AR approach to all areas of anatomic pathology diagnosis and research and further have led to AR-based protein extraction techniques and tissue-based proteomics. As a result, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival tissue collections are now seen as a literal treasure of materials for clinical and translational research to an extent unimaginable just two decades ago. Further research in AR-IHC is likely to focus on tissue proteomics, developing a more efficient protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue based on the AR principle, and combining the proteomics approach with AR-IHC to establish a practical, sophisticated platform for identifying and using biomarkers in personalized medicine. PMID:21339172

  5. Genetic and antigenic characterisation of Bungowannah virus, a novel pestivirus causing myocarditis in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June 2003 a syndrome of sudden death in sucker pigs, an elevation in the proportion of stillborn foetuses, increased preweaning losses and to a lesser extent increased mummification rates was recognised on a property in NSW, Australia [1]. This disease has been described as the porcine myocarditi...

  6. Characterisation of the Gaia photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Jordi, C.; Fabricius, C.; Voss, H.; Weiler, M.

    2014-07-01

    Our team at the University of Barcelona has contributed since the early phases of the mission to the definition, evaluation and calibration modelling of the Gaia photometry. To maximise the Gaia scientific exploitation, we have frequently shared many different tools and data with the astronomical community. Among this information we have defined several relationships among colours involving Gaia magnitudes and colours from other commonly used photometric systems (Johnson-Cousins, SDSS, Hipparcos, Tycho and 2MASS) for several types of stars (including white dwarfs). These relationships can be used for planning scientific exploitation of Gaia data, performing simulations of the Gaia-like sky, planning ground-based complementary observations and for building catalogues with auxiliary validation data. During the commissioning phase our team (as part of the Payload Experts group) has been intensively checking the first photometric data to analyse the health and properties of the real instrument. These preliminary analyses allowed us to monitor the throughput variations with time, assess the spectral resolution and re-evaluate the performances of the end-of-mission photometry. The Payload Experts group activities continue beyond the commissioning phase aiming to optimize the operations onboard for maximizing the scientific return. Some example of first spectra and photometry are shown.

  7. Antigenic and structural features of goblet-cell mucin of human small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Forstner, G G; Forstner, J F

    1984-01-01

    With the use of a newly developed solid-phase radioimmunoassay method, the major antigenic determinants of human small-intestinal goblet-cell mucin were investigated and related to the overall tertiary structure of the mucin. Preliminary hapten inhibition studies with various oligosaccharides of known sequence and structure suggested that the determinants did not reside in carbohydrate. Exhaustive thiol reduction, however, almost abolished antigenicity, caused breakdown of the mucin into small heterogeneous glycopeptides, and liberated a 'link' peptide of Mr 118000. Western 'blots' of reduced mucin from polyacrylamide gels on to nitrocellulose sheets showed that a small amount of residual antigenicity remained in large-Mr glycopeptides (Mr greater than 200000). The 'link' peptide was not antigenic. Timed Pronase digestion of native mucin resulted in a progressive loss of antigenic determinants. Gel electrophoresis revealed that after 8h of digestion the 118000-Mr peptide had disappeared, whereas antigenicity, which was confined to large-Mr glycopeptides, was destroyed much more slowly with time (70% by 24h, 100% by 72h). Despite the loss of antigenicity, 72h-Pronase-digested glycopeptides retained all of the carbohydrate of the native mucin. Therefore the antibody to human small-intestinal mucin appears to recognize a 'naked' (non-glycosylated and Pronase-susceptible) peptide region(s) of mucin glycopeptides. For full antigenicity, however, disulphide bonds are required to stabilize a specific three-dimensional configuration of the 'naked' region. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:6199017

  8. HLA incompatible combined liver-kidney transplantation: dynamics of antibody modulation revealed by a novel approach to HLA antibody characterisation.

    PubMed

    Lowe, David; Shabir, Shazia; Buckels, John; Muiesan, Paolo; Hayden, Geoffrey; Holt, Andrew; Hamsho, Ahmed; Skordilis, Kassi; Lipkin, Graham; Borrows, Richard; Briggs, David

    2014-01-01

    This case report confirms the utility of simultaneous liver transplantation in allowing successful kidney transplantation in the face of preformed, high levels of DSA, which would under normal circumstances be associated with hyperacute rejection and kidney graft failure. Antibody characterisation in terms of epitope specificity is more accurate and informative than antibodies described as "antigen-specific" and we suggest a method for identifying and tracking these antibodies; i.e. follow the epitope reaction not the antigen reactions. We consider that this will give a better insight into the behaviour and pathogenicity of HLA-specific sera. In the case presented here this approach has revealed some novel features of the post transplant antibody response in a sensitised recipient. These illustrate three phenomena which challenge current dogmas; an early resynthesis of DSA does not necessarily cause AMR, high levels of DSA can spontaneously modulate, and measurement of antibodies in terms of antigen specificity can give misleading results. PMID:24239533

  9. Natural Selection Promotes Antigenic Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Christopher J.; Ros, Vera I. D.; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed ‘cassettes’ that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections

  10. Aptamer-targeted Antigen Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wengerter, Brian C; Katakowski, Joseph A; Rosenberg, Jacob M; Park, Chae Gyu; Almo, Steven C; Palliser, Deborah; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Effective therapeutic vaccines often require activation of T cell-mediated immunity. Robust T cell activation, including CD8 T cell responses, can be achieved using antibodies or antibody fragments to direct antigens of interest to professional antigen presenting cells. This approach represents an important advance in enhancing vaccine efficacy. Nucleic acid aptamers present a promising alternative to protein-based targeting approaches. We have selected aptamers that specifically bind the murine receptor, DEC205, a C-type lectin expressed predominantly on the surface of CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs) that has been shown to be efficient at facilitating antigen crosspresentation and subsequent CD8+ T cell activation. Using a minimized aptamer conjugated to the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), DEC205-targeted antigen crosspresentation was verified in vitro and in vivo by proliferation and cytokine production by primary murine CD8+ T cells expressing a T cell receptor specific for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-restricted OVA257–264 peptide SIINFEKL. Compared with a nonspecific ribonucleic acid (RNA) of similar length, DEC205 aptamer-OVA-mediated antigen delivery stimulated strong proliferation and production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2. The immune responses elicited by aptamer-OVA conjugates were sufficient to inhibit the growth of established OVA-expressing B16 tumor cells. Our results demonstrate a new application of aptamer technology for the development of effective T cell-mediated vaccines. PMID:24682172

  11. Viral hepatitis and hepatitis B antigen: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Krugman, Saul

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances in hepatitis research have shed new light on the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention of type B hepatitis infection. The so-called ‘Dane’ particle is probably the complete hepatitis B virion; its outer coat is the hepatitis B (Australia) antigen (HB Ag) and its inner core is an immunologically distinct particle. Subtypes of HB Ag (a, d, y, w and r) are useful indices for epidemiological surveys. Concepts of epidemiology have changed: type B hepatitis is transmissible by contact as well as by inoculation. The presence of HB Ag in blood is indicative of the presence of hepatitis B virus. Tests to detect antigen and use of voluntary blood donors have played a major role in the decreased incidence of post transfusion hepatitis. A special hepatitis B gammaglobulin preparation and a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine have proved to be effective in preliminary studies. PMID:4219230

  12. Characterisation of circulating chromogranin A in human cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Corti, A.; Gasparri, A.; Chen, F. X.; Pelagi, M.; Brandazza, A.; Sidoli, A.; Siccardi, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    The structure of circulating chromogranin A (CgA) of phaeochromocytoma patients was characterised and compared with that of CgA extracted from tumours. Size exclusion chromatography experiments provided evidence that CgA is present in the blood of different patients, as well as in tumour extracts, as multiple forms having different hydrodynamic sizes of 600 kDa (CgA-I), 100 kDa (CgA-II) and 55 kDA (CgA-III). The amount of each CgA form as a proportion of the total antigenic material was different in different patients. Western blot analysis of chromatographic fractions indicated that these forms are made up by polypeptides of similar molecular weight (about 60-70 kDa). All CgA forms express the epitopes recognised by two monoclonal antibodies (A11 and B4E11), directed against residues 68-70 and 81-90 of human CgA. However, their relative immunoreactivity was markedly different. No evidence for the presence of multimeric complexes in the CgA-I fraction was obtained by various immunological and biochemical methods. These results suggest that circulating CgA in phaeochromocytoma patients consists of at least three forms that appear to be made up by polypeptides with similar molecular weight and different hydrodynamic properties and immunoreactivity. We hypothesise that different conformations and shapes contribute to the heterogeneity of circulating CgA. Images Figure 4 PMID:8611427

  13. Synthesis and characterisation of chromium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and the characterisation of various chromium carbide compounds. Thin Cr 23C 6 films were deposited by reactive sputtering while Cr 7C 3 films were formed by the carburisation of chromium films in a CH 4/H 2 atmosphere. Cr xC y powders were synthesised from various precursors (Cr, CrN, Cr 2O 3) by reaction with CH 4/H 2 at high temperature. The samples were characterised by AES, XRD and electron diffraction. The effects of the experimental parameters (gas composition, temperature, reaction time) on the purity, the phase formed and the composition of the product of reaction are examined and discussed.

  14. Diagnostics for characterisation of plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsonis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    The popularity of plasma actuators as flow control devices has sparked a flurry of diagnostic efforts towards their characterisation. This review article presents an overview of experimental investigations employing diagnostic techniques specifically aimed at AC dielectric barrier discharge, DC corona and nanosecond pulse plasma actuators. Mechanical, thermal and electrical characterisation techniques are treated. Various techniques for the measurement of induced velocity, body force, heating effects, voltage, current, power and discharge morphology are presented and common issues and challenges are described. The final part of this report addresses the effect of ambient conditions on the performance of plasma actuators.

  15. Agronomic, metabolomic and lipidomic characterisation of Sicilian Origanum vulgare (L.) ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Teresa; Martinelli, Federico; Mariotti, Lorenzo; Leto, Claudio; Maggio, Antonella; La Bella, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Although Origanum vulgare (L.) has been deeply analysed at phytochemical level, poor knowledge is available regarding non-volatile compounds such as lipids. The aim of this work was to characterise five wild Sicilian Origanum ecotypes from an agronomic, metabolomic and lipidomic perspective. Serradifalco presented higher dry weight and inflorescences/plant than the others while Favara had a significantly higher number of branches per plant and more extensive flowered stratum. Metabolomic analysis, performed with LC-MS-TOF, allowed a preliminary characterisation of the non-volatile metabolome of the five oregano ecotypes Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum. Twenty-five metabolites were identified belonging to organic acids, amino acids, lysophosphatidylcholines, carnithines, nucleic bases and lysophosphatidylethanolamines. Lipidomic analysis identified 115 polar plant membrane glycerolipid species. Thirteen of them were differentially present in the two chosen ecotypes. The role of these metabolites in plant physiology from a qualitative and pharmacological point of view was discussed. PMID:26540480

  16. Attribution and Characterisation of Sclerophyll Forested Landscapes Over Large Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Simon; Soto-Berelov, Mariela; Suarez, Lola; Wilkes, Phil; Woodgate, Will; Haywood, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    conducted a total of 67 ground-based method-to-method pairwise comparisons across 11 plots in five sites, incorporating the previously mentioned LAI methods. Out of the 67 comparisons, 29 had an RMSE ≥ 0.5 LAIe. This has important implications for the validation of remotely sensed products since ground based techniques themselves exhibit LAI variations greater than internationally recommended guidelines for satellite product accuracies. 2. Two methods of canopy height derivation are proposed and tested over a large area (4 Million Ha). 99th percentile maximum height achieved a RMSE of 6.6%, whilst 95th percentile dominant height a RMSE = 10.3%. Vertical canopy complexity (i.e. the number of forest layers of strata) was calculated as the local maxima of vegetation density within the LiDAR canopy profile and determined using a cubic spline smoothing of Pgap. This was then validated against in-situ and LiDAR observations of canopy strata with an RMSE 0.39 canopy layers. 3. Preliminary results are presented of landcover characterisation using LandTrendr analysis of Landsat LEDAPS data. kNN is then used to link these features to a dense network of 800 field plots sites.

  17. Candidate vaccine antigens and genes in Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Adler, B; Bulach, D; Chung, J; Doughty, S; Hunt, M; Rajakumar, K; Serrano, M; van Zanden, A; Zhang, Y; Ruffolo, C

    1999-08-20

    Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of fowl cholera and other diseases of production animals. Isolates are classified into five groups based on capsular antigens and into 16 serotypes based on LPS antigens. Strains causing fowl cholera are most frequently designated A:1, A:3 or A:4. Whole cell bacterins can provide some degree of protection, but only against the homologous LPS serotype. There is good evidence that cross-protective antigens are expressed only under in vivo conditions. Empirically derived, live, attenuated vaccines can protect against heterologous serotypes, but because the basis for attenuation is undefined, reversion to virulence is not uncommon. Work in our laboratory is aimed at using a variety of approaches to identify potential protective antigens or virulence genes to be used as candidates for attenuating mutations or as the basis for vaccine antigen delivery systems. The gene encoding an outer membrane protein, Oma87, which is a homologue of the D15 protective antigen of Haemophilus influenzae, was cloned and sequenced. Rabbit antiserum prepared against recombinant Oma87 could passively protect mice against infection. Type 4 fimbriae form the basis of vaccines against ovine footrot and bovine keratoconjunctivitis. We have identified type 4 fimbriae on the surface of P. multocida, purified the fimbrial subunit protein, PtfA, and determined its N-terminal amino acid sequence. Subsequent cloning of the ptfA gene and its inactivation will now be used to assess the importance of type 4 fimbriae in virulence. There has long been anecdotal evidence for the importance of capsule in virulence, but unequivocal genetic evidence for such a role is lacking. We have cloned and characterised the capsule biosynthetic locus in P. multocida A:1 and identified four bex genes involved in capsule transport and genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and transfer of the N-acetyl glucosamine and glucuronic acid components of the capsule. It has

  18. Surface antigens of smooth brucellae.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R; Jones, L M; Leong, D; Wilson, J B

    1968-10-01

    Surface antigens of smooth brucellae were extracted by ether-water, phenol-water, trichloroacetic acid, and saline and examined by immunoelectrophoresis and gel diffusion with antisera from infected and immunized rabbits. Ether-water extracts of Brucella melitensis contained a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was specific for the surface of smooth brucellae and was correlated with the M agglutinogen of Wilson and Miles, a polysaccharide protein component devoid of lipid which was not restricted to the surface of smooth brucellae and was not correlated with the smooth agglutinogen (component 1), and several protein components which were associated with internal antigens of rough and smooth brucellae. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis of ether-water extracts of B. abortus revealed only two components, a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was correlated with the A agglutinogen, and component 1. Component 1 from B. melitensis and B. abortus showed identity in gel diffusion tests, whereas component M from B. melitensis and component A from B. abortus showed partial identity with unabsorbed antisera and no cross-reactions with monospecific sera. Attempts to prepare monospecific sera directly by immunization of rabbits with cell walls or ether-water extracts were unsuccessful. Absorption of antisera with heavy fraction of ether-water extracts did not always result in monospecific sera. It was concluded (as has been described before) that the A and M antigens are present on a single antigenic complex, in different proportions depending upon the species and biotype, and that this component is a lipopolysaccharide protein complex of high molecular weight that diffuses poorly through agar gel. Components 1, A, and M were also demonstrated in trichloroacetic acid and phenol-water extracts. With all extracts, B. melitensis antigen showed greater diffusibility in agar than B. abortus antigens. After mild acid hydrolysis, B. abortus ether-water extract was able

  19. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    PubMed

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. PMID:22477566

  20. The capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella Typhi is a B1b antigen

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Kingsley, Robert A.; Hitchcock, Jessica R.; Ross, Ewan A.; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Lakey, Jeremy; Martin, Laura B.; Toellner, Kai-Michael; MacLennan, Calman A.; MacLennan, Ian C; Henderson, Ian R.; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination with purified capsular polysaccharide Vi antigen from Salmonella Typhi can protect against typhoid fever, although the mechanism for its efficacy is not clearly established. Here, we have characterised the B cell response to this vaccine in wild-type and T cell-deficient mice. We show that immunization with Typhim Vi rapidly induces proliferation in B1b peritoneal cells, but not in B1a cells or marginal zone (MZ) B cells. This induction of B1b proliferation is concomitant with the detection of splenic Vi-specific antibody secreting cells and protective antibody and Rag1-deficient B1b cell chimeras generated by adoptive transfer induced specific antibody after Vi immunization. Furthermore, antibody derived from peritoneal B cells is sufficient to confer protection against Salmonella that express Vi antigen. Expression of Vi by Salmonella during infection did not inhibit the development of early antibody responses to non-Vi antigens. Despite this, the protection conferred by immunization of mice with porin proteins from Salmonella, which induce antibody-mediated protection, was reduced after infection with Vi-expressing Salmonella, although protection was not totally abrogated. This work therefore suggests that in mice, B1b cells contribute to the protection induced by Vi antigen and targeting non-Vi antigens as sub-unit vaccines may offer an attractive strategy to augment current Vi-based vaccine strategies. PMID:23162127

  1. Proteolysis, proteasomes and antigen presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, A. L.; Rock, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins presented to the immune system must first be cleaved to small peptides by intracellular proteinases. Proteasomes are proteolytic complexes that degrade cytosolic and nuclear proteins. These particles have been implicated in ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and in the processing of intracellular antigens for cytolytic immune responses.

  2. Characterisation of protein stability in rod-insert vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Pattani, Aditya; Lowry, Deborah; Curran, Rhonda M; McGrath, Stephanie; Kett, Vicky L; Andrews, Gavin P; Malcolm, R Karl

    2012-07-01

    A major goal in vaccine development is elimination of the 'cold chain', the transport and storage system for maintenance and distribution of the vaccine product. This is particularly pertinent to liquid formulation of vaccines. We have previously described the rod-insert vaginal ring (RiR) device, comprising an elastomeric body into which are inserted lyophilised, rod-shaped, solid drug dosage forms, and having potential for sustained mucosal delivery of biomacromolecules, such as HIV envelope protein-based vaccine candidates. Given the solid, lyophilised nature of these insert dosage forms, we hypothesised that antigen stability may be significantly increased compared with more conventional solubilised vaginal gel format. In this study, we prepared and tested vaginal ring devices fitted with lyophilised rod inserts containing the model antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA). Both the RiRs and the gels that were freeze-dried to prepare the inserts were evaluated for BSA stability using PAGE, turbidimetry, microbial load, MALDI-TOF and qualitative precipitate solubility measurements. When stored at 4 °C, but not when stored at 40 °C/75% RH, the RiR formulation offered protection against structural and conformational changes to BSA. The insert also retained matrix integrity and release characteristics. The results demonstrate that lypophilised gels can provide relative protection against degradation at lower temperatures compared to semi-solid gels. The major mechanism of degradation at 40 °C/75% RH was shown to be protein aggregation. Finally, in a preliminary study, we found that addition of trehalose to the formulation significantly reduces the rate of BSA degradation compared to the original formulation when stored at 40 °C/75% RH. Establishing the mechanism of degradation, and finding that degradation is decelerated in the presence of trehalose, will help inform further development of RiRs specifically and polymer based freeze-dried systems in general. PMID

  3. Seafloor Characterisation and Imaging Using Multibeam Sonar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łubniewski, Zbigniew; Bruniecki, Krzysztof

    The approach to seafloor characterisation and imaging is presented. It relies on the combined, concurrent use of several techniques of multibeam sonar data processing. The first one is based on constructing the grey-level sonar images of seabed using the backscattering strength calculated for the echoes received in the consecutive beams. Then, the set of parameters describing the local region of sonar image is calculated. The second technique utilises the 3D model of the seabed surface, which is constructed as a set of (x, y, z) points using the detected bottom range for each beam in the multibeam system seafloor imaging procedure. For the local region of seabed surface, the descriptors like rms height and autocorrelation slope are calculated. The third technique assumes the use of a set of parameters of the multibeam echo envelope. Then, for selected parameters, the characteristic features quantitatively describing their dependence on seafloor incident angle, like slope, or range, are calculated. Finally, the features obtained by these three techniques are combined together. The proposed method has been tested using multibeam data records acquired from several bottom types in the Gulf of Gdańsk region. The obtained preliminary results show that application of the proposed combined approach improves the classification performance in comparison with those of using only the one scheme of seafloor multibeam data processing.

  4. [Preparation of monoclonal antibodies to gp51 antigen and their use for early diagnosis of bovine leukemia].

    PubMed

    Mikalauskene, G I; Vaĭchiunene, V V; Peshkus, Iu K; Tamoshiunas, V I

    1996-01-01

    A strain BLV-gp51-V7 of hybrid cells has been obtained that is characterised by high specificity as to antigen (glycoprotein gp51). Ascitic tumour appear in syngenic mice inoculated with hybrid cells of strain BLV-gp51-V7. Monoclonal antibodies were isolated from the ascitic fluid of mice. These antibodies were used with the purpose of early diagnosis of cattle leucosis. PMID:9273735

  5. Characterisation of neutron fields at Cernavoda NPP.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Dumitrescu, Dorin; Chirosca, Alecsandru; Hager, Luke; Million, Marc; Bartz, James

    2013-04-01

    Near a nuclear reactor or a fuel container, mixed neutron/gamma fields are very common, necessitating routine neutron dosimetry. Accurate neutron dosimetry is complicated by the fact that the neutron effective dose is strongly dependent on the neutron energy and the direction distribution of the neutron fluence. Neutron field characterisation is indispensable if one wants to obtain a reliable estimate for the neutron dose. A measurement campaign at CANDU nuclear power plant located in Cernavoda, Romania, was set up to characterise the neutron fields in four different locations and to investigate the behaviour of different neutron personal dosemeters. This investigation intends to assist in choosing a suitable neutron dosimetry system at this nuclear power plant. PMID:22874895

  6. Preparation and Characterisation of Nevirapine Oral Nanosuspensions

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Anju; Reddy, A. Jagdeesh; Satheesh, J.; Jithan, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare and characterise nevirapine nanosuspensions so as to improve the dissolution rate of nevirapine. Nevirapine is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of immunodeficiency virus type-1 and it is poorly water-soluble antiretroviral drug. The low solubility of nevirapine can lead to decreased and variable oral bioavailability. Nanosuspension can overcome the oral bioavailability problem of nevirapine. Nevirapine nanosuspensions were prepared using nanoedge method. The suspensions were stabilised using surfactants Lutrol F 127 or Poloxamer 407 and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose. The nanosuspension was characterised for particle size, polydispersibility index, crystalline state, particle morphology, in vitro drug release and pharmacokinetics in rats after oral administration. The results support the claim for the preparation of nanosuspensions with enhanced solubility and bioavailability. PMID:24799740

  7. SCREENING OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC O2 -EVOLVING PROKARYOTES FOR AN INSULIN-LIKE ANTIGEN(1).

    PubMed

    Khursheed, Saima; Anwer, Razique; Zutshi, Sunaina; Fatma, Tasneem

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a metabolic disorder, is becoming a major health problem worldwide. Insulin is the single hope for management of type 1 diabetes, but it is not always available or suitable. For finding additional bioresources, the present study was performed. ELISA-based preliminary screening of cyanobacterial biomass using antihuman insulin antibody have detected an insulin-like antigen in Spirulina platensis S-5, Spirulina NCCU-482, and Spirulina NCCU-483. Their similarity with insulin-like antigen was further confirmed by electrophoretic mobility using bovine insulin as marker. PMID:27009668

  8. Detection of O antigens in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharide on the surface of Escherichia coli constitute the O antigens, which are important virulence factors that are targets of both the innate and adaptive immune system and play a major role in host-pathogen interactions. O antigens that are responsible for antigenic specificity of the ...

  9. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Salfeld, J.; Pfaff, E.; Noah, M.; Schaller, H.

    1989-02-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen (HBcAg)) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen (HBeAg)). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis virus nucleocapsid.

  10. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  11. [Polyagglutinability due to Hempas antigen].

    PubMed

    Rochant, H; Gerbal, A

    1976-03-01

    A new antigen has been recently discoverd in patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II. The acronyme Hempas was proposed for this disease as a remind of the main morphological feature of erythroblasts (hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity) and the characteristic serological findings (positive acidified serum test). The patients red cells are agglutinated and lysed by an IgM cold reacting antibody present in the serum of most normal subjects and not previously recognized. This behaviour is thus reminding of cells carrying antigens such as T, Tn, Cad or acquired B. As for T and Tn cells, sialic acid and electrophoretic mobility are reduced, but in contrast, agglutinability of Hempas cells is enhanced by enzyme treatment. Agglutination by anti H and anti Pr specific reagents is reduced. I and mainly i activity are strongly increased. The relationship between the membrane abnormalities of Hempas red cells and the failure of normoblasts to divide their cytoplasm i still largely unknown. PMID:788106

  12. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  13. Characterisation of an urban bus network for environmental purposes.

    PubMed

    André, Michel; Villanova, André

    2004-12-01

    Since pollutant emissions are closely related to the operating conditions of vehicles, their evaluation usually involves studying these operating conditions (through bus instrumentation and monitoring under actual operation), the design of representative driving or engine test cycles and the measurement of pollutant emissions. A preliminary characterisation of the routes on a bus network should make it possible to identify typical routes, the driving conditions and pollutant emissions of which are then studied. Two approaches are envisaged and applied to the Paris area, for which a wealth of information is available, which should be transferable to other bus networks. Both approaches are based on factorial analysis and automatic clustering, to allow optimum description and the identification of a pertinent typology of the bus routes in several classes. The first attempt at characterisation is based on statistics relating to bus operations: route characteristics (length, dedicated bus lanes, number of stops, location of stops: schools, tourist sites, hospitals, railways or underground stations), travel time, commercial speed, annual statistics (number of passengers, number of vehicles per hour, total kilometres), the irregularity of travel (variation of travel times, injuries, congestion.), as well as information on the problems encountered (congestion, distribution of the passenger load, junctions, bends). A second approach is based on the analysis of the "urban context" in which buses are driven. Population, employment, housing, road network, traffic and places that generate or disturb traffic (schools, railway stations, shopping areas, etc.) are calculated for the Ile de France region, by cells of 100 x 100 m, and collected in a geographical information system (GIS). Statistical analyses enable a typology of these urban cells to be established, the main parameters being density, type of housing, road types and traffic levels. The bus routes are then analysed

  14. Production and proteomic characterisation of purified protein derivative from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Effective diagnosis of Johne's disease (JD), particularly at the stage of early subclinical infection, remains one of the greatest challenges for the control of JD worldwide. The IFN-γ test of cell mediated immunity is currently one of the most suitable diagnostics for subclinical infections, however a major limitation of this test is the lack of a standardised purified protein derivative (PPD) antigen (also referred to as Johnin PPD or PPDj). While attempting to replace PPDj with more specific individual antigens is an attractive proposition, bacterial culture derived PPDj remains the most effective antigen preparation for the diagnosis of subclinical JD. It may be possible to increase the reproducibility and specificity of PPDj preparations by further characterising and standardising the PPDj production. Results Using a standardised protocol, five in-house preparations of PPDj were prepared from cultures of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Compared to PPDs obtained from other institutes/laboratories, these preparations appeared to perform similarly well in the IFN-γ test. Although the broad proteomic composition of all PPDj preparations was remarkably similar, the absolute abundance of individual proteins varied markedly between preparations. All PPDj preparations contained common immunogenic proteins which were also observed in PPD preparations from Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (PPDa) and Mycobacterium bovis (PPDb). Temporal difference in protein secretion of in vitro cultured MAP was observed between 20 and 34 weeks suggesting that the age of MAP culture used for PPDj preparations may markedly influence PPDj composition. Conclusions This study describes a protocol for the production of PPDj and its subsequent proteomic characterisation. The broad proteomic composition of different preparations of PPDj was, for the most part, highly similar. Compositional differences between PPDj preparations were found to be a direct

  15. Characterising the SCUBA-2 superconducting bolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bintley, Dan; MacIntosh, Michael J.; Holland, Wayne S.; Friberg, Per; Walther, Craig; Atkinson, David; Kelly, Dennis; Gao, Xiaofeng; Ade, Peter A. R.; Grainger, William; House, Julian; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Hollister, Matthew I.; Woodcraft, Adam; Dunare, Camelia; Parkes, William; Walton, Anthony J.; Irwin, Kent D.; Hilton, Gene C.; Niemack, Michael; Reintsema, Carl D.; Amiri, Mandana; Burger, Bryce; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hill, Jeff; Kycia, J. B.; Mugford, C. G. A.; Persaud, Lauren

    2010-07-01

    SCUBA-2 is a state of the art 10,000 pixel submillimeter camera installed and being commissioned at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) providing wide-field simultaneous imaging at wavelengths of 450 and 850 microns. At each wavelength there are four 32 by 40 sub-arrays of superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers, each packaged with inline SQUID multiplexed readout and amplifier. In this paper we present the results of characterising individual 1280 bolometer science grade sub-arrays, both in a dedicated 50mk dilution refrigerator test facility and in the instrument installed at the JCMT.

  16. Geophysical characterisation of a rockslide in an alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godio, A.; de Bacco, G.; Strobbia, C.

    2003-04-01

    The rock slope stability analysis requires the geomechanical characterisation of the different geological units that may be affected by the instability, and hence the required investigation depth depends on the mechanism of the movement and on its scale. A joint application of laboratory test and in situ extensive geophysical investigation has been used for the geological and geotechnical characterisation of a site with heavy slope and interested by recent events of landslide in the overburden and rockslide. An existing road is going to be substituted by a tunnel, and so both the shallow detritical overburden and the rock mass has to be investigated. The geophysical survey has been planned taking into account the difficult logistical condition of the area; the accessibility also conditioned the positioning of the boreholes. Two horizontal boreholes, each 50 m long, were drilled along the designed tunnel line, and two vertical boreholes, 30m of depth, were realised in order to take samples to test for the estimate of the mechanical properties of the rock mass. They also provided direct punctual information on the thickness of the overburden and allowed to calibrate the geophysical results. The horizontal ones have been used for borehole seismic and for ultrasonic logging; in the vertical ones inclinometers have been installed to monitor the movements. The stratigraphic evidence showed the presence of shallow layer of low-consolidated materials and a hard gneissic bedrock around 20 m deep. Laboratory measurements on samples allowed the determination of the high-strain mechanical behaviour and the dynamic low-strain elastic moduli (P and S wave ultrasonic pulse test). These data are compared with the results of the in situ characterisation: the geophysical investigation had to answer a series of questions about the geometry and the properties of the detritical overburden, the inhomogeneities and the fracture distribution of the rock mass, the eventual presence of

  17. Surface anisotropy characterisation with meteosat observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, A.; Govaerts, Y. M.; Pinty, B.

    Surface albedo, or more precisely Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR), is the integral the Bi-directional Reflectance Factor (BRF) of the surface over all angles of the upward hemisphere. The retrieval of the DHR trough space observations requires accounting for the scattering and absorption processes in the atmosphere as well as for the angular anisotropy of the surface, the two systems being radiatively coupled. The accuracy achieved in the albedo estimation depends thus on the density of the angular sampling and the reliability of the atmospheric correction. Pinty et al. demonstrated the possibility to derive reliable surface albedo from observations acquired by Meteosat, the European meteorological geostationary satellite. The purpose of this presentation is to analyse the accuracy of this new Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) product, including the effects due to instrument changes and associated calibration uncertainties. In particular, the consistency of the surface anisotropy characterisation is examined in detail. To this end, observations acquired by two adjacent geostationary spacecrafts, i.e., Meteosat-7 and Meteosat-5 have been processed with the MSA algorithm. These satellites are located respectively at 0 and 63 degrees East. Data acquired by these two instruments overlap over a large area encompassing most of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The consistency of the surface anisotropy retrieval is evaluated through a reconstruction of the Meteosat-5 (-7) observations with the Meteosat-7 (-5) surface anisotropy characterisation. No differences larger than the calibration uncertainties have been found, which indicates that the MSA algorithm accounts correctly for the surface anisotropy and instrument differences.

  18. Viruses, cytokines, antigens, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Gianani, R; Sarvetnick, N

    1996-01-01

    To explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, we hypothesize that following an infection the immune response spreads to tissue-specific autoantigens in genetically predisposed individuals eventually determining progression to disease. Molecular mimicry between viral and self antigens could, in some instances, initiate autoimmunity. Local elicitation of inflammatory cytokines following infection probably plays a pivotal role in determining loss of functional tolerance to self autoantigens and the destructive activation of autoreactive cells. We also describe the potential role of interleukin 10, a powerful B-cell activator, in increasing the efficiency of epitope recognition, that could well be crucial to the progression toward disease. PMID:8637859

  19. Recombinant hepatitis B triple antigen vaccine: Hepacare.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Zuckerman, Arie J

    2002-08-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus is a public health problem throughout the world. Hepatitis B vaccines are now included in national immunization programmes of infants and/or adolescents in 129 countries. Current single antigen vaccines, that are plasma-derived or produced by recombinant DNA technology are highly effective, but between 5-10% or more of healthy immunocompetent subjects do not mount an antihepatitis B surface antibody protective response and others respond poorly (hyporesponders). The inclusion of pre-S1 and -S2 components of hepatitis B surface antigen in addition to the single antigen (triple antigen) in a novel vaccine, Hepacare, Medeva Pharma Plc, Speke, UK, overcomes nonresponsiveness and hyporesponsiveness in a significant number of individuals. The triple antigen is indicated for vaccination of nonresponders (and hyporesponders) to the current single antigen vaccines and for persons who require rapid protection against hepatitis B infection. PMID:12901552

  20. Antigen Recognition By Variable Lymphocyte Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.W.; Herrin, B.R.; Cooper, M.D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-18

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) rather than antibodies play the primary role in recognition of antigens in the adaptive immune system of jawless vertebrates. Combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments achieves the required repertoire for antigen recognition. We have determined a crystal structure for a VLR-antigen complex, VLR RBC36 in complex with the H-antigen trisaccharide from human blood type O erythrocytes, at 1.67 angstrom resolution. RBC36 binds the H-trisaccharide on the concave surface of the LRR modules of the solenoid structure where three key hydrophilic residues, multiple van der Waals interactions, and the highly variable insert of the carboxyl-terminal LRR module determine antigen recognition and specificity. The concave surface assembled from the most highly variable regions of the LRRs, along with diversity in the sequence and length of the highly variable insert, can account for the recognition of diverse antigens by VLRs.

  1. Design and characterisation of a highly miniaturised radiation monitor HMRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrini, N.; Turchetta, R.; Griffin, D.; Morse, T.; Morse, A.; Poyntz-Wright, O.; Woodward, S.; Daly, E.; Menicucci, A.; Araujo, H.; Mitchell, E.

    2013-12-01

    Reliable data on the ionising radiation environment is regarded as very important to ensure an efficient design and operation of spacecraft. Here we present a novel Highly Miniaturised Radiation Monitor (HMRM) that aims to greatly reduce costs and complexity of radiation detectors. At the core of the current design is a CMOS Image Sensor. Size and mass are considerably reduced thanks to this approach and there is also scope for a reduction in power consumption. This makes the HMRM much easier to integrate on a spacecraft. The innovative architecture of the proposed radiation monitor will also make particle identification possible. The image sensor is based on a 50 by 51 pixel array. The selected pixel is a 4T, to reduce the noise. The array is read out in snapshot mode at a frame-rate of 10,000 fps. Biasing currents and voltages are generated on-chip to reduce the number of signals required to control the sensor. The sensor is designed to work on a large range of temperatures, from -40 °C to +80 °C; hence a temperature sensor has been integrated. The digital output data is obtained with a three-bit column parallel ADC with programmable thresholds. An analogue readout has been also designed to characterise and debug the ASIC. In this following paper we also want to present the results obtained from the measurements on the prototype. Preliminary PTC plots show a gain of 60 μV/e- with CDS and a noise of 17 e- rms, which includes the noise from the external board.

  2. Persistence of antigen in nonarthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Glynn, L E

    1975-01-01

    The presence of antigen, IgG and C3 was shown by radioautography and immunofluorescence in the collagenous tissues of the joints of animals injected intra-articularly with antigen after having been previously immunized with that antigen in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Since these joints were shown to be virtually free of inflammatory reactions, we suggest that the persistence of immune complexes activating complement cannot fully explain the chronicity of experimental allergic arthritis. Images PMID:769709

  3. HLA antigens in cardiomyopathic Chilean chagasics.

    PubMed Central

    Llop, E; Rothhammer, F; Acuña, M; Apt, W

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of HLA antigens in a sample of 124 Chagas serologically positive Chilean individuals was studied. The sample was subdivided according to the presence or absence of chagasic cardiomyopathy, in order to search for genetic differences associated with this pathological condition. The frequency of antigen B40 in the presence of antigen Cw3 was found to be significantly lower in subjects with cardiomyopathy. We tentatively suggest that the presence of these antigens among noncardiomyopathics is associated with a decreased susceptibility to develop chagasic cardiomyopathy in the Chilean population. PMID:3189340

  4. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  5. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  6. Synthesis and characterisation of self-assembled and self-adjuvanting asymmetric multi-epitope lipopeptides of ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Sharareh; Stephenson, Rachel J; Fuaad, Abdullah Ahmad; Apte, Simon H; Doolan, Denise L; Toth, Istvan

    2015-01-12

    Designing a lipopeptide (LP) vaccine with a specific asymmetric arrangement of epitopes may result in an improved display of antigens, increasing host-cell recognition and immunogenicity. This study aimed to synthesise and characterise the physicochemical properties of a library of asymmetric LP-based vaccine candidates that contained multiple CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes from the model protein antigen, ovalbumin. These fully synthetic vaccine candidates were prepared by microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis. The C12 or C16 lipoamino acids were coupled to the N or C terminus of the OVA CD4 peptide epitope. The OVA CD4 LPs and OVA CD8 peptide constructs were then conjugated using azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition to give multivalent synthetic vaccines. Physiochemical characterisation of these vaccines showed a tendency to self-assemble in aqueous media. Changes in lipid length and position induced self-assembly with significant changes to their morphology and secondary structure as shown by transmission electron microscopy and circular dichroism. PMID:25399845

  7. ESTDAB: a collection of immunologically characterised melanoma cell lines and searchable databank.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, Graham; Marsh, Steven G

    2006-06-01

    Cancer immunologists working in humans often require panels of tumour cell lines expressing different combinations of HLA alleles and other characteristics. Sources of cell lines are usually large cell banks carrying little immunologically relevant information on the available cells and limited numbers of different lines from the same type of tumour. Access to cells with desired combinations of characteristics is, therefore, difficult. Here, we describe an interactive database of a large collection of melanoma cell lines which have been extensively characterised for HLA genotype and surface expression, oncogene and tumour antigen expression, cytokine secretion, surface molecule expression, adhesion to extracellular matrix components, cytokine gene polymorphisms and other factors of interest to immunologists. This enables investigators to search for cells with particular constellations of HLA alleles, tumour antigens, etc., and then request these from the cell bank. This European Searchable Tumour Cell Line and Data Bank (ESTDAB) was established as a Research Infrastructure of the European Commission. For access to the databank and further details, please go to http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/estdab/ . PMID:16421722

  8. SvSXP: a Strongylus vulgaris antigen with potential for prepatent diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Strongyle parasites are ubiquitous in grazing horses. Strongylus vulgaris, the most pathogenic of the large strongyles, is known for its extensive migration in the mesenteric arterial system. The lifecycle of S. vulgaris is characterised by a long prepatent period where the migrating larvae are virtually undetectable as there currently is no test available for diagnosing prepatent S. vulgaris infection. Presence of S. vulgaris larvae in the arterial system causes endarteritis and thrombosis with a risk of non-strangulating intestinal infarctions. Emergence of anthelmintic resistance among cyathostomins has led to recommendations of reduced treatment intensity by targeting horses that exceed a predetermined strongyle faecal egg count threshold. One study suggests an apparent increase in prevalence of S. vulgaris on farms where reduced anthelmintic treatment intensity has been implemented. These issues highlight the need for an accurate and reliable assay for diagnosing prepatent S. vulgaris infection. Methods Immunoscreening of a larval S. vulgaris cDNA library using hyperimmune serum raised against S. vulgaris excretory/secretory antigens was performed to identify potential diagnostic antigens. Immunoreactive clones were sequenced, one potential antigen was characterised, expressed as a recombinant protein, initially evaluated by western blot (WB) analysis, the diagnostic potential of the IgG subclasses was evaluated by ELISA, and the diagnostic accuracy evaluated using serum from 102 horses with known S. vulgaris infection status. Results The clone expressing the potential antigen encoded a S. vulgaris SXP/RAL2 homologue. The recombinant protein, rSvSXP, was shown to be a potential diagnostic antigen by WB analysis, and a target of serum IgGa, IgG(T) and total IgG in naturally infected horses, with IgG(T) antibodies being the most reliable indicator of S. vulgaris infection in horses. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of the ELISA resulted in a

  9. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  10. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of two antigenically distinct O antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigenic variation is one mechanism pathogens use to avoid immune-mediated competition between closely related strains. Here, we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2 respectively). When 18 additional B. b...

  11. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan (5FW). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that 5FW incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when 5FW was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. 19F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each 5FW in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody–antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody–antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques. PMID:22769726

  12. Comparative assessment of vaccine vectors encoding ten malaria antigens identifies two protective liver-stage candidates

    PubMed Central

    Longley, Rhea J.; Salman, Ahmed M.; Cottingham, Matthew G.; Ewer, Katie; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Spencer, Alexandra J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2015-01-01

    The development of an efficacious Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccine remains a top priority for global health. Vaccination with irradiated sporozoites is able to provide complete sterile protection through the action of CD8+ T cells at the liver-stage of infection. However, this method is currently unsuitable for large-scale deployment and focus has instead turned to the development of sub-unit vaccines. Sub-unit vaccine efforts have traditionally focused on two well-known pre-erythrocytic antigens, CSP and TRAP, yet thousands of genes are expressed in the liver-stage. We sought to assess the ability of eight alternative P. falciparum pre-erythrocytic antigens to induce a high proportion of CD8+ T cells. We show that all antigens, when expressed individually in the non-replicating viral vectors ChAd63 and MVA, are capable of inducing an immune response in mice. Furthermore, we also developed chimeric P. berghei parasites expressing the cognate P. falciparum antigen to enable assessment of efficacy in mice. Our preliminary results indicate that vectors encoding either PfLSA1 or PfLSAP2 are capable of inducing sterile protection dependent on the presence of CD8+ T cells. This work has identified two promising P. falciparum liver-stage candidate antigens that will now undergo further testing in humans. PMID:26139288

  13. Proton transfer reactions for improved peptide characterisation.

    PubMed

    Rožman, Marko; Schneider, Andrea; Gaskell, Simon J

    2011-06-01

    The combination of deprotonation (via ion/molecule and ion/ion reactions) and low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) has been explored for the enhanced characterisation of tryptic peptides via access to different precursor charge states. This approach allows instant access to fragmentation properties of singly and doubly protonated precursors (arising from the availability of mobile protons) in a single experiment. Considering both charge states extended our base of structurally informative data (in comparison with considering just a single charge state) due to generation of additional sequence ions and by obtaining supplementary structural information derived from selective cleavages. Roughly 37% of combined data sets (CID spectra of doubly and singly charged precursor) showed a greater database identification confidence than each set alone. Moreover, comparison between a number of sequence ions of the singly charged precursor and the doubly charged precursor provided a mean of distinguishing the two classes of tryptic peptides (arginine or lysine containing). PMID:21630380

  14. Analytical characterisation of homoeopathic mother tinctures.

    PubMed

    Biber, A; Franck-Karl, G; Waimer, F; Riegert, U; Wiget, R

    2009-03-01

    Quality of homoeopathic mother tinctures is assured by the definition of the starting material, the manufacturing process and the analytical characteristics described in the monograph. Traditionally analytical characterisation of the mother tincture comprises appearance, odour, identity, density and dry residue. According to annex I of directive 2001/83/EC an assay is only performed in case of a health hazard due to toxic compounds. The concept of marker substances as usually used in phytotherapy cannot be transferred to mother tinctures without research effort. For example the marker substances echinacoside, apigenin-7-glucoside and rosmarinic acid found in dried underground parts of Echinacea pallida Nutt., dried flower heads of Matricaria recutita L. and dried herb of Pulmonaria officinalis L. cannot be found in homoeopathic mother tinctures prepared from fresh material thereof. PMID:19275866

  15. Extraction Methods in Soil Phosphorus Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soinne, Helena

    2010-05-01

    Extraction methods are widely used to assess the bioavailability of P and to characterise soil P reserves. Even though new and more sophisticated methods to characterise soil P are constantly developed the use of extraction methods is not likely to be replaced because of the relatively simple analytical equipment needed for the analysis. However, the large variety of extractants, pre-treatments and sample preparation procedures complicate the comparison of published results. In order to improve our understanding of the behaviour and cycling of P in soil, it is important to know the role of extracted P in the soil P cycle. The knowledge of the factors affecting the analytical outcome is a prerequisite for justified interpretation of the results. In this study, the effect of sample pre-treatment and properties of the used extractant on extractable molybdate-reactive phosphorus (MRP) and molybdate-unreactive phosphorus (MUP) was studied. Furthermore, the effect of sample preparation procedures prior the analysis on measured MRP and MUP was studied. Two widely used sequential extraction procedures were compared on their ability to show management induced differences on soil P. These results revealed that pre-treatments changed soil properties and air-drying was found to affect soil P, particularly extractable MUP, thought to represent organic P, by disrupting organic matter. This was evidenced by an increase in the water-extractable small-sized (<0.2 µm) P that, at least partly, took place at the expense of the large-sized (>0.2 µm) P. In addition to the effects of sample pre-treatment, the results showed that extractable organic P was sensitive to the chemical nature of the used extractant and to the sample preparation procedures employed prior to P analysis, including centrifugation and filtering of soil suspensions. Filtering may remove a major proportion of extractable MUP; therefore filtering cannot be recommended in the characterisation of solubilised MUP

  16. Characterisation of Magnetic FeRh Epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, M. J.; de Vries, M. A.; Brydson, R. M. D.; Marrows, C.

    2012-07-01

    The lattice structure of roughly equiatomic iron-rhodium epilayers was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Thin films were grown on magnesium oxide substrates using molecular beam epitaxy with thicknesses of 50 nm and capped with a 2-3 nm thick MgO or Al cap. The samples were prepared into cross-sections for characterisation by TEM. Observation of the interfaces FeRh makes with the cap and the substrate are of interest, due to the potential for strain and interfacial diffusion, which will affect the magnetic properties. TEM imaging combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling data give an insight into how strain and diffusion at the interface can affect the magnetic transition.

  17. Sonochemical characterisation of ultrasonic dental descalers.

    PubMed

    Price, Gareth J; Tiong, T Joyce; King, David C

    2014-11-01

    An ultrasonic dental descaling instrument has been characterised using sonochemical techniques. Mapping the emission from luminol solution revealed the distribution of cavitation produced in water around the tips. Hydroxyl radical production rates arising from water sonolysis were measured using terephthalate dosimetry and found to be in the range of μmolmin(-1), comparable with those from a sonochemical horn. Removal of an ink coating from a glass slide showed that cleaning occurred primarily where the tip contacted the surface but was also observed in regions where cavitation occurred even when the tip did not contact the surface. Differences in behaviour were noted between different tip designs and computer simulation of the acoustic pressure distributions using COMSOL showed the reasons behind the different behaviour of the tip designs. PMID:24444490

  18. Characterisation of the TAPIRO BNCT epithermal facility.

    PubMed

    Burn, K W; Colli, V; Curzio, G; d'Errico, F; Gambarini, G; Rosi, G; Scolari, L

    2004-01-01

    A collimated epithermal beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) research has been designed and built at the TAPIRO fast research reactor. A complete experimental characterisation of the radiation field in the irradiation chamber has been performed, to verify agreement with IAEA requirements. Slow neutron fluxes have been measured by means of an activation technique and with thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). The fast neutron dose has been determined with gel dosemeters, while the fast neutron spectrum has been acquired by means of a neutron spectrometer based on superheated drop detectors. The gamma-dose has been measured with gel dosemeters and TLDs. For an independent verification of the experimental results, fluxes, doses and neutron spectra have been calculated with Monte Carlo simulations using the codes MCNP4B and MCNPX_2.1.5 with the direct statistical approach (DSA). The results obtained confirm that the epithermal beams achievable at TAPIRO are of suitable quality for BNCT purposes. PMID:15353724

  19. Preparation and characterisation of hexamidine salts.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Nicola; Matts, Paul J; Lever, Rebecca; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2015-09-30

    Hexamidine diisethionate (HEX D) has been used in the personal care industry and in a number of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products as an antimicrobial agent since the 1950's. Recently, the compound has also been investigated for its beneficial effects on skin health. Surprisingly, there is only limited information describing the physicochemical properties of this compound in the literature. The objective of this work was therefore to conduct a comprehensive programme of characterisation of HEX D as well as its dihydrochloride salt (HEX H). HEX H was prepared from HEX D by a simple acid addition reaction. Both salts were characterised using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). A new high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for both compounds. The pH in aqueous solution as well as respective distribution coefficients between octanol and pH 7.4 buffer were also determined. Finally, solubility and short term stability studies were conducted in a range of solvents. NMR analysis confirmed the preparation of HEX H from HEX D. Thermal analysis indicated the melting points of HEX D and HEX H were 225°C and 266°C respectively. HPLC analysis confirmed the purity of both salts. LogD values at pH 7.4 were -0.74 for HEX D and -0.70 for HEX H respectively. The physicochemical properties of two HEX salts have been established using a range of analytical approaches. Detailed solubility and stability data have also been collated. This information will be useful in the design of novel formulations for targeted delivery of these compounds to the skin. PMID:26235920

  20. Exoplanetary Characterisation Observatory (EChO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Ingo; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2013-04-01

    The science of extrasolar planets is one of the most rapidly changing areas of astrophysics and since 1995 the number of planets known has increased by almost two orders of magnitude. A combination of ground-based surveys and dedicated space missions has resulted in 800-plus planets being detected, and over 2000 that await confirmation. NASA's Kepler mission has opened up the possibility of discovering Earth-like planets in the habitable zone around some of the 100,000 stars it is surveying during its 3 to 4-year lifetime. The new ESA's Gaia mission is expected to discover thousands of new planets around stars within 200 parsecs of the Sun. The key challenge now is moving on from discovery, important though that remains, to characterisation: what are these planets actually like, and why are they as they are? The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is a space mission dedicated to undertaking spectroscopy of transiting exoplanets over the widest range possible and is currently being studied by ESA in the context of a medium class mission within the Cosmic Vision programme for launch post 2020. The mission is based around a highly stable space platform with a 1.2 m class telescope at L2, hosting a suit of spectrographs providing continuous spectral coverage from 0.5 to 16 microns. Such a broad and simultaneous wavelength coverage allows the unique insight into the atmospheric make up of these foreign worlds and allows us to study their planetary and atmospheric compositions and evolutions.

  1. Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni antigens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kosunen, T U; Bång, B E; Hurme, M

    1984-01-01

    To develop monoclonal reagents for antigenic analysis and serotyping of Campylobacter spp., hybridoma cell lines were produced by fusion of mouse myeloma cells and spleen cells from mice immunized with Formalin-treated Campylobacter jejuni organisms. An enzyme immunoassay was used for preliminary screening of the cell culture supernatants and ascites. Twenty-nine clones which reacted with the immunogen were obtained. Seven of these clones were positive in passive hemagglutination tests with sheep erythrocytes coated with boiled saline extract of whole bacteria; four of these reacted with the purified polysaccharide preparation and with the autoclaved saline extract, but not with lipopolysaccharide prepared from the immunogen strain. Two of the antipolysaccharide clones agglutinated live bacteria in slide tests. Four additional clones gave positive slide agglutination tests with live bacteria, but in tube testing no clones agglutinated Formalin-treated bacteria. No cross-reactions with unrelated bacteria were seen, but several clones reacted in the enzyme immunoassay with many of the 24 Campylobacter strains studied. The clone which gave the highest mean enzyme immunoassay values with Campylobacter coli and C. jejuni strains also reacted with Campylobacter fetus subsp. veneralis and C. fetus subsp. fetus strains. This clone also gave the highest enzyme immunoassay value with an acid glycine extract of the immunogen, which indicates the presence of common antigens in the extract. The results suggest that monoclonal antibodies may be used to devise serotyping schemes for Campylobacter spp. PMID:6365954

  2. Experience with guidelines for wastewater characterisation in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Roeleveld, P J; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2002-01-01

    In this paper experiences and results are presented with guidelines for wastewater characterisation that are standardised in The Netherlands for modelling purposes with ASM. The wastewater characterisation is based on a physical-chemical method to characterise the soluble and particulate fractions, combined with a BOD-analysis for characterising the biodegradable fraction of the influent COD. By following the guidelines, a sufficiently detailed and practical characterisation is obtained, and the results can be used for simulation studies on treatment plants for process optimisation, trouble-shooting and design assistance. At present, five years of experience is gained with the guidelines and they were used for the simulation of circa 100 treatment plants. The guidelines are evaluated as simple and easy to implement in routine analysis programs. PMID:11989880

  3. Diagnotic value of some Fasciola gigantica antigens.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Said; El-Bahy, Mohammad; Hassan, Ali; Shalaby, Hatem; Gupta, Neelima

    2015-09-01

    The present study was aimed to select the specificity of antigens for Fasciola gigantica depending on its diagnostic utility and field applications. The tested antigens were coproantigen, excretory-secretory (ES) antigen and egg antigen. Coproantigen and Copro Hyperimmune serum were able to reflect the lowest level of cross-reaction with other tested F. gigantica antigens. By using SDS-PAGE, a structural homology was observed in F. gigantica ES and egg antigens. Intense cross reaction was observed between ES and egg antigens by ELISA technique even when there was no cross-reaction with coproantigen. The 27.6 kDa band proved to be the most specific in F. gigantica coproantigen and was different from the band at the same molecular weight by ES antigen. The results conclude that coproantigens show specific diagnostic ability for Fasciola and have low numbers of cross-reaction proteins reflecting its high specificity. Moreover, detection of coproantigen in faeces offers a new potential for diagnostics as compared to serum samples. This fact holds promise for a more accurate diagnostic technique in the near future for suspected Fasciola infection. PMID:26345056

  4. Antigenic composition of Litomosoides carini.

    PubMed

    Enayat, M S

    1976-07-01

    Three different phosphate buffered saline extracts of Litomosoides carini were prepared and examined by gel diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis and disc polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using sera from infected cotton rats and antisera from hyperimmunized rabbits. Using disc polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, up to 22 protein, 6 lipoprotein and 4 glycoprotein bands were identified. A minimum of 8 precipitin lines were detected by gel diffusion and a maximum of 11 precipitin arcs by immunoelectrophoresis when pooled rabbit antiserum was used. Using infected cotton rat sera, fewer number of precipitin lines and arcs were detected. Two precipitin arcs did not have a counterpart on examination against pooled rabbit antiserum. The importance of these two specific antigenic components for use in immunodiagnosis of human filariasis has been discussed. PMID:823514

  5. Meteorite nanoparticles as models for interstellar grains: synthesis and preliminary characterisation.

    PubMed

    Mautner, M N; Abdelsayed, V; El-Shall, M S; Thrower, J D; Green, S D; Collings, M P; McCoustra, M R S

    2006-01-01

    Dust particles and their interaction with gases play important roles in star formation and in solar nebulae. Appropriate model dust grains are needed for the laboratory simulation of gas-grain interactions. Nanoparticles formed from carbonaceous meteorites may be particularly suitable, as these particles are formed from materials that were formed originally from interstellar/nebula dust. Extending our previous studies with grounded meteorite powders, we demonstrate here the production of nanoparticles formed from meteorites using the laser desorption/controlled condensation method developed in our laboratory. The product nanoparticle aggregates have porous, web-like morphologies similar to interstellar dust grains, indicating that they can present large specific surface areas for gas/grain interactions. In this paper, we present polarisation modulation reflection-absorption infrared spectra (PM-RAIRS) of supported thin films and compare these spectra with the known silicate bands in the spectra of interstellar dust recorded during the ISO mission. We also report an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) temperature programmed desorption (TPD) study of the adsorption of CO on the supported nanoparticle films. The latter allow us to estimate the CO binding energy on the meteorite nanoparticles as 13.5 +/- 3.0 kJ mol(-1), cf. a value of 9.8 +/- 0.2 kJ mol(-1) for CO binding to a water ice substrate. Such thermochemical data can be useful for computational modelling of gas-grain interactions under the diverse conditions in interstellar clouds and solar nebulae. PMID:17191444

  6. A preliminary proteomic characterisation of extracellular vesicles released by the ovine parasitic nematode, Teladorsagia circumcincta

    PubMed Central

    Tzelos, Thomas; Matthews, Jacqueline B.; Buck, Amy H.; Simbari, Fabio; Frew, David; Inglis, Neil F.; McLean, Kevin; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.; Knox, David P.; McNeilly, Tom N.

    2016-01-01

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is a major cause of ovine parasitic gastroenteritis in temperate climatic regions. The development of high levels of anthelmintic resistance in this nematode species challenges its future control. Recent research indicates that many parasite species release extracellular vesicles into their environment, many of which have been classified as endocytic in origin, termed exosomes. These vesicles are considered to play important roles in the intercellular communication between parasites and their hosts, and thus represent potentially useful targets for novel control strategies. Here, we demonstrate that exosome-like extracellular vesicles can be isolated from excretory-secretory (ES) products released by T. circumcincta fourth stage larvae (Tci-L4ES). Furthermore, we perform a comparative proteomic analysis of vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free Tci-L4ES. Approximately 73% of the proteins identified in the vesicle-enriched fraction were unique to this fraction, whilst the remaining 27% were present in both vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free fraction. These unique proteins included structural proteins, nuclear proteins, metabolic proteins, proteolytic enzymes and activation-associated secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that molecules present within the vesicles-enriched material are targets of the IgA and IgG response in T. circumcincta infected sheep, and could potentially represent useful targets for future vaccine intervention studies. PMID:27084478

  7. A preliminary proteomic characterisation of extracellular vesicles released by the ovine parasitic nematode, Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    PubMed

    Tzelos, Thomas; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Buck, Amy H; Simbari, Fabio; Frew, David; Inglis, Neil F; McLean, Kevin; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Knox, David P; McNeilly, Tom N

    2016-05-15

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is a major cause of ovine parasitic gastroenteritis in temperate climatic regions. The development of high levels of anthelmintic resistance in this nematode species challenges its future control. Recent research indicates that many parasite species release extracellular vesicles into their environment, many of which have been classified as endocytic in origin, termed exosomes. These vesicles are considered to play important roles in the intercellular communication between parasites and their hosts, and thus represent potentially useful targets for novel control strategies. Here, we demonstrate that exosome-like extracellular vesicles can be isolated from excretory-secretory (ES) products released by T. circumcincta fourth stage larvae (Tci-L4ES). Furthermore, we perform a comparative proteomic analysis of vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free Tci-L4ES. Approximately 73% of the proteins identified in the vesicle-enriched fraction were unique to this fraction, whilst the remaining 27% were present in both vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free fraction. These unique proteins included structural proteins, nuclear proteins, metabolic proteins, proteolytic enzymes and activation-associated secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that molecules present within the vesicles-enriched material are targets of the IgA and IgG response in T. circumcincta infected sheep, and could potentially represent useful targets for future vaccine intervention studies. PMID:27084478

  8. Isotopic and elemental characterisation of Slovenian apple juice according to geographical origin: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Bizjak Bat, Karmen; Eler, Klemen; Mazej, Darja; Mozetič Vodopivec, Branka; Mulič, Ines; Kump, Peter; Ogrinc, Nives

    2016-07-15

    This study examined the applicability of stable isotope and multi-element data for determining the geographical origin of fresh apple juices. Samples included three apple cultivars (Idared, Golden Delicious and Topaz) harvested in 2011 and 2012 from five different geographical regions of Slovenia. Regional discrimination of the juice samples was most successful when using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and taking into account the following parameters: δ(2)H and δ(18)O content of juice water; δ(15)N and δ(13)C content of the pulp, (D/H)I and (D/H)II in ethanol and the concentration of S, Cl, Fe, Cu, Zn and Sr. Overall prediction ability was 83.9%. The factors that best distinguished the different types of cultivar were the δ(2)H and δ(18)O content of fruit juice water; the δ(13)C and (D/H)I content of ethanol; and the concentration of S, Mg, K, Cu, and Ti. Prediction ability, taking into account all ten parameters, was 75.8%. PMID:26948593

  9. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody. PMID:26496237

  10. Antigen-induced suppression of the in vitro lymphocyte response to different antigens and mitogens

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Göran; Kashiwagi, Noboru

    1972-01-01

    Certain concentrations of antigen stimulated DNA synthesis in sensitized human lymphocytes cultivated in vitro, higher and lower concentrations being less stimulatory. The simultaneous addition of two antigens in low concentrations to the same cells caused an additive response. The decreased response to a high antigen dose did not affect the capacity of the cells to respond to the simultaneous addition of another antigen, as determined at the population level as well as at the cellular level by autoradiography. Presumably specific immunological paralysis was induced by high antigen doses. Addition of low antigen doses for 1–3 days to human sensitized lymphocytes cultivated in vitro resulted in decreased DNA synthesis as a response to the same antigen added in an optimal dose. Suppression of DNA synthesis was not caused by induction of tolerance or antibody suppression, because the cells also failed to respond to an unrelated antigen and to non-specific mitogens, such as PHA and ALS. Most likely the suppressed response after antigen pretreatment represents a phenomenon analogous to antigenic competition, although this term is not appropriate, since there need not be competition between antigens for a detectable effect. No soluble mediators of suppression could be demonstrated in the supernatant of suppressed cultures. PMID:5026855

  11. Testing new methodologies and assessing their potential for reservoir characterisation: Geoelectrical studies in the Northwest Carboniferous Basin (Ireland).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaya, Xènia; Campanyà, Joan; Rath, Volker; Jones, Alan G.; Reay, Derek; Raine, Rob; McConnell, Brian; Ledo, Juanjo

    2016-04-01

    The overarching objective of this study is to improve our methods of characterising saline aquifers by integrating newly acquired electromagnetic data with existing geophysical and geological data. The work presented here is part of an ongoing project to evaluate Ireland's potential for onshore carbon sequestration (IRECCSEM; funded by Science Foundation Ireland). The methodology presented in this characterisation work is not only relevant for studying the potential for onshore carbon sequestration, but is generally applicable for aquifer characterisation, particularly for the evaluation of geothermal resources in appropriate geological settings. We present first results of the three-dimensional (3D) modelling and inversion of the magnetotelluric (MT) data acquired in the Northwest Carboniferous Basin (Ireland) in summer 2015. The electrical resistivity distribution beneath the survey area is constrained using a joint inversion of three different types of electromagnetic data: MT impedance tensor responses (Z), geomagnetic transfer functions (GTF) and inter-station horizontal magnetic transfer-functions (HMT). The preliminary 3D resistivity model obtained reveals the geoelectrical structure of the subsurface, which is translated into parameters relevant to fluid flow. The electromagnetic data were acquired along profiles linking four wells drilled in the area and the available well log data from those wells are used to evaluate some of the existing petrophysical relationships and calibrate them for the study area. This allows us to interpolate the rock physical properties from one well to another well, using the computed geoelectrical model as a reference. The obtained results are compared to available independent geological and geophysical data in order to analyse the validity of this technique, to characterise the uncertainties inherent to our approach, and to assess the potential of this methodology for reservoir characterisation.

  12. Tiny T antigen: an autonomous polyomavirus T antigen amino-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M I; Yoo, W; Mda, N Y; Folk, W R

    1997-01-01

    Three mRNAs from the murine polyomavirus early region encode the three well-characterized tumor antigens. We report the existence of a fourth alternatively spliced mRNA which encodes a fourth tumor antigen, tiny T antigen, which comprises the amino-terminal domain common to all of the T antigens but is extended by six unique amino acid residues. The amount of tiny T antigen in infected cells is small because of its short half-life. Tiny T antigen stimulates the ATPase activity of Hsc70, most likely because of its DnaJ-like motif. The common amino-terminal domain may interface with chaperone complexes to assist the T antigens in carrying out their diverse functions of replication, transcription, and transformation in the appropriate cellular compartments. PMID:9223500

  13. Is rheumatoid arthritis in Indians associated with HLA antigens sharing a DR beta 1 epitope?

    PubMed Central

    Ollier, W E; Stephens, C; Awad, J; Carthy, D; Gupta, A; Perry, D; Jawad, A; Festenstein, H

    1991-01-01

    HLA class II antigens were identified in a group of 44 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) originating largely from the north or northeast of the Indian subcontinent and resident now in east London. Compared with 67 locally typed east London Asian controls, the prevalence of three HLA-DR antigens was raised in the patients: DR1 18.2% v 6.0% chi 2 = 3.99, DR4 20.5% v 11.9% chi 2 = 1.48, and DRw10 27.3% v 8.9% chi 2 = 6.56. These differences were also found when the patients with RA were compared with a larger control group of 110 northern Indians: DR1 18.2% v 7.2% chi 2 = 4.02, DR4 20.5% v 7.2% chi 2 = 5.56, and DRw10 27.3% v 8.1% chi 2 = 9.7. Twenty five (57%) of the patients expressed at least one of these antigens. All patients were also characterised for HLA-Dw types by mixed lymphocyte culture typing. The prevalence of the HLA-DR4 associated Dw types in the patients was: Dw4 2.3%, Dw10 0%, Dw14 11.4%, and Dw15 6.8%. The DR beta 1 chains of DR1 and DRw10 together with the Dw types of DR4 other than Dw10 share amino acid residues in a region of the third hypervariable region considered to be critical in antigen presentation. It is concluded that RA in Indians is associated with these HLA antigens, and data from this study support the hypothesis of a cross reactive epitope common to HLA specificities associated with RA. PMID:1710441

  14. [Comparative characterisation of lipopolysaccharides of Rahnella aquatills].

    PubMed

    Skokliuk, L B; Varbanets', L D; Pokhyl, S I

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of eight strains of R. aquatilis isolated from different sources have been studied. The studies of neutral monosaccharide composition evidence that all of LPS contain galactose (13.4-68.5%), glucose (5.7-29.8%) and heptose (2.6-8.3%) (depending on strains). Some monosaccharides, such as ribose (95U007), rhamnose (95U011, 95U012, 96U036), fucose (95U003, 95U004, 95U007) and mannose (95U012, 96U035, 96U036, 96U037) were absent in LPS. Arabinose was present in two strains--95U003 and 95U007. On the basis of monosaccharide composition all investigated LPS can be divided into six groups. It was shown by double immunodiffusion in agar that all R. aquatilis LPS displayed antigenic activity in homological systems. The results of serological cross reactions indicate the immunochemical heterogeneity of R. aquatilis species. PMID:20455427

  15. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  16. Development of a surveillance scheme for equine influenza in the UK and characterisation of viruses isolated in Europe, Dubai and the USA from 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Alana L; Rash, Adam S; Blinman, Donna; Bowman, Samantha; Chambers, Thomas M; Daly, Janet M; Damiani, Armando; Joseph, Sunitha; Lewis, Nicola; McCauley, John W; Medcalf, Liz; Mumford, Jenny; Newton, J Richard; Tiwari, Ashish; Bryant, Neil A; Elton, Debra M

    2014-03-14

    Equine influenza viruses are a major cause of respiratory disease in horses worldwide and undergo antigenic drift. Several outbreaks of equine influenza occurred worldwide during 2010-2012, including in vaccinated animals, highlighting the importance of surveillance and virus characterisation. Virus isolates were characterised from more than 20 outbreaks over a 3-year period, including strains from the UK, Dubai, Germany and the USA. The haemagglutinin-1 (HA1) sequence of all isolates was determined and compared with OIE-recommended vaccine strains. Viruses from Florida clades 1 and 2 showed continued divergence from each other compared with 2009 isolates. The antigenic inter-relationships among viruses were determined using a haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay with ferret antisera and visualised using antigenic cartography. All European isolates belonged to Florida clade 2, all those from the USA belonged to Florida clade 1. Two subpopulations of clade 2 viruses were isolated, with either substitution A144V or I179V. Isolates from Dubai, obtained from horses shipped from Uruguay, belonged to Florida clade 1 and were similar to viruses isolated in the USA the previous year. The neuraminidase (NA) sequence of representative strains from 2007 and 2009 to 2012 was also determined and compared with that of earlier isolates dating back to 1963. Multiple changes were observed at the amino acid level and clear distinctions could be made between viruses belonging to Florida clade 1 and clade 2. PMID:24480583

  17. Non-antigenic and antigenic interventions in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rydén, Anna KE; Wesley, Johnna D; Coppieters, Ken T; Von Herrath, Matthias G

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells. Current T1D therapies are exclusively focused on regulating glycemia rather than the underlying immune response. A handful of trials have sought to alter the clinical course of T1D using various broad immune-suppressors, e.g., cyclosporine A and azathioprine.1–3 The effect on β-cell preservation was significant, however, these therapies were associated with unacceptable side-effects. In contrast, more recent immunomodulators, such as anti-CD3 and antigenic therapies such as DiaPep277, provide a more targeted immunomodulation and have been generally well-tolerated and safe; however, as a monotherapy there appear to be limitations in terms of therapeutic benefit. Therefore, we argue that this new generation of immune-modifying agents will likely work best as part of a combination therapy. This review will summarize current immune-modulating therapies under investigation and discuss how to move the field of immunotherapy in T1D forward. PMID:24165565

  18. Further characterization of filarial antigens by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, S.; Galahitiyawa, S. C.; Ismail, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of an antigen isolated from sera of Wuchereria bancrofti-infected patients and Setaria digitata antigen SD2-4 is reported. Both antigens showed carbohydrate (glycoprotein) staining. The W. bancrofti antigen had an apparent relative molecular mass of 35 000 while the S. digitata antigen SD2-4 migrated at the marker dye position on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. SDS treatment of these antigens did not abolish the precipitation reaction with antibody. In the case of W. bancrofti antigen, SDS treatment probably exposed hitherto hidden antigen epitopes. PMID:6354508

  19. Characterisation of medieval yellow silver stained glass from Convento de Cristo in Tomar, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, J.; Vilarigues, M.; Ruivo, A.; Corregidor, V.; Silva, R. C. da; Alves, L. C.

    2011-10-01

    Yellow decoration effects in stained glasses using silver staining were first applied in the beginning of the 14th century. The glass piece being decorated was usually painted on its side intended to be facing the exterior environment, and then fired to temperatures between 500 and 650 °C, resulting in colours ranging from pale lemon to deep orange. Stained glass fragments painted by this process and belonging to the Convento de Cristo, in Tomar, Portugal, were characterised using micro-PIXE, and complemented with other analytical techniques, namely UV-Vis spectroscopy and XRF. Preliminary analysis showed that a mixture of Ag and Cu was used for the production of the yellow staining. In order to understand this staining process and the influence of the firing temperature on the resulting colours, several soda and potash glasses with compositions similar to those of medieval glasses were produced and characterised. The role played by the addition of Cu in the final colours was also investigated.

  20. Molecular mobility of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) films characterised by thermally stimulated currents (TSC) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Owusu-Ware, Samuel K; Boateng, Joshua; Jordan, Daniel; Portefaix, Sara; Tasseto, Renata; Ramano, Camila D; Antonijević, Milan D

    2016-01-30

    Molecular mobility has long been established to relate to textural properties and stability of polymer films and is therefore an important property to characterise to better understand pharmaceutical film formulations. The molecular mobility of solvent cast hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) films has been investigated by means of thermally stimulated current (TSC) below the temperature at which the film was formed. Preliminary physical characterisation of the films was performed using XRPD, TGA, DSC and texture analysis (tensile properties). XRPD results showed the films to be completely amorphous with Tg determined by DSC to be 127 ± 1°C. TGA analysis showed the films to contain 8 ± 1% water and film was dried to only 0.06 ± 0.01% water content when heated to 160°C. Application of TSC detected molecular mobility in HEC films at sub-zero temperatures. Two motional transitions with average relaxation time of 50 ± 3s were identified; a β-relaxation at -57 ± 2°C, attributed to localised non-cooperative orientation of HEC polymer chain ends and the hydroxyethyl side groups and an α-relaxation, originating from cooperative segmental mobility, at -20 ± 2°C. The tensile properties i.e., elongation, tensile strength and elastic modulus of the HEC film have been related to the molecular relaxation processes detected by TSC. PMID:26656303

  1. Characterisation of bacteria in ascites--reporting the potential of culture-independent, molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G B; Russell, L E; Preston, P G; Marsh, P; Collins, J E; Saunders, J; Sutton, J; Fine, D; Bruce, K D; Wright, M

    2010-05-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a severe complication of liver disease. A significant proportion of patients have culture-negative ascites, despite having similar signs, symptoms and mortality to those with SBP. Therefore, empirical antibiotic treatment for infection is often started without knowledge of the causative organisms. Here, we investigated the potential of molecular techniques to provide rapid and accurate characterisation of the bacteria present in ascitic fluid. Ascites samples were obtained from 29 cirrhotic patients undergoing clinically indicated therapeutic paracentesis. Bacterial content was determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 16S ribosomal clone sequence analysis. Bacterial signal was detected in all samples, compared to three out of ten using standard methods. Bacterial loads ranged from 5.5 x 10(2) to 5.4 x 10(7) cfu/ml, with a mean value of 1.9 x 10(6) cfu/ml (standard deviation +/- 9.6 x 10(6) cfu/ml). In all but one instance, bacterial species identified by culture were also confirmed by molecular analyses. Preliminary data presented here suggests that culture-independent, molecular analyses could provide rapid characterisation of the bacterial content of ascites fluid, providing a basis for the investigation of SBP development and allowing early and targeted antibiotic intervention. PMID:20238135

  2. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  3. Meningococcal vaccine antigen diversity in global databases

    PubMed Central

    Brehony, C; Hill, DM; Lucidarme, J; Borrow, R; Maiden, MC

    2016-01-01

    The lack of an anti-capsular vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease has necessitated the exploration of alternative vaccine candidates, mostly proteins exhibiting varying degrees of antigenic variation. Analysis of variants of antigen-encoding genes is facilitated by publicly accessible online sequence repositories, such as the Neisseria PubMLST database and the associated Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL). We investigated six proposed meningococcal vaccine formulations by deducing the prevalence of their components in the isolates represented in these repositories. Despite high diversity, a limited number of antigenic variants of each of the vaccine antigens were prevalent, with strong associations of particular variant combinations with given serogroups and genotypes. In the MRF-MGL and globally, the highest levels of identical sequences were observed with multicomponent/multivariant vaccines. Our analyses further demonstrated that certain combinations of antigen variants were prevalent over periods of decades in widely differing locations, indicating that vaccine formulations containing a judicious choice of antigen variants have potential for long-term protection across geographic regions. The data further indicated that formulations with multiple variants would be especially relevant at times of low disease incidence, as relative diversity was higher. Continued surveillance is required to monitor the changing prevalence of these vaccine antigens. PMID:26676305

  4. Characterisation of porous materials for bioseparation.

    PubMed

    Barrande, M; Beurroies, I; Denoyel, R; Tatárová, I; Gramblicka, M; Polakovic, M; Joehnck, M; Schulte, M

    2009-10-01

    A set of chromatographic materials for bioseparation were characterised by various methods. Both commercial materials and new supports presenting various levels of rigidity were analysed. The methods included size-exclusion and capillary phenomena based techniques. Both batch exclusion and inverse size-exclusion chromatography were used. Gas adsorption, mercury porosimetry and thermoporometry were applied as well as a new method based on water desorption starting from the saturated state. When the rigidity of adsorbents is high enough, the agreement is reasonable between the values of the structural parameters that were determined (surface area, porosity, and pore size) by various methods. Nevertheless, a part of macroporosity may not be evidenced by inverse size-exclusion chromatography whereas it is visible by batch exclusion and the other methods. When the rigidity decreases, for example with soft swelling gels, where standard nitrogen adsorption or mercury porosimetry are no more reliable, two main situations are encountered: either the methods based on capillary phenomena (thermoporometry or water desorption) overestimate the pore size with an amplitude that depends on the method, or in some cases it is possible to distinguish water involved in the swelling of pore walls from that involved in pore filling by capillary condensation. PMID:19740472

  5. Fracture characterisation using geoelectric null-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Pierik; Negro, François; Szalai, Sándor; Milnes, Ellen

    2013-06-01

    The term "geoelectric null-array" is used for direct current electrode configurations yielding a potential difference of zero above a homogeneous half-space. This paper presents a comparative study of the behaviour of three null-arrays, midpoint null-array (MAN), Wenner-γ null-array and Schlumberger null-array in response to a fracture, both in profiling and in azimuthal mode. The main objective is to determine which array(s) best localise fractures or best identify their orientation. Forward modelling of the three null-arrays revealed that the Wenner-γ and Schlumberger null-arrays localise vertical fractures the most accurately, whilst the midpoint null-array combined with the Schlumberger null-array allows accurate orientation of a fracture. Numerical analysis then served as a basis to interpret the field results. Field test measurements were carried out above a quarry in Les Breuleux (Switzerland) with the three null-arrays and classical arrays. The results were cross-validated with quarry-wall geological mapping. In real field circumstances, the Wenner-γ null-array proved to be the most efficient and accurate in localising fractures. The orientations of the fractures according to the numerical results were most efficiently determined with the midpoint null-array, whilst the Schlumberger null-array adds accuracy to the results. This study shows that geoelectrical null-arrays are more suitable than classical arrays for the characterisation of fracture geometry.

  6. CHEOPS: CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, K. G.

    2015-10-01

    CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) is the first exoplanet mission dedicated to the search for transits of exoplanets by means of ultrahigh precision photometry of bright stars already known to host planets. CHEOPS will provide the unique capability of determining radii to ~10% accuracy for a subset of those planets in the super-Earth to Neptune mass range. The high photometric precision of CHEOPS will be achieved using a photometer covering the 0.4 - 1.1um waveband and designed around a single frame-transfer CCD which is mounted in the focal plane of a 30 cm equivalent aperture diameter, f/5 on-axis Ritchey-Chretien telescope. Key to reaching the required performance is rejection of straylight from the Earth that is achieved using a specially designed optical baffle. CHEOPS is the first S-class mission in ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025, and is currently planned to be launch-ready by the end of 2017. The mission is a partnership between Switzerland and ESA's science programme, with important contributions from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. In this presentation I will give a scientific and technical overview of the mission, as well as an update on the status of the project.

  7. Characterising Cold Weather for the UK mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradley, Kate; Dacre, Helen; Ambaum, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Excess Winter Mortality is a peak in the population's mortality rate during winter months and is correlated with low outdoor temperatures. Excess Winter Mortality has adverse impacts, including increased demand on health services. The management of resources for such increased demands maybe improved through incorporation of weather forecasting information to advanced warnings. For the UK, prolonged cold periods are associated with easterly advection, and high pressure systems. Characterisation of the synoptic conditions associated with cold periods is important to understand forecast performance. Principal Component Analysis has been used with mean sea level pressure from 35 years of ERA interim reanalysis to capture synoptic variability on a continuous scale. Cold events in the North and South of the UK mainland have been identified as having different synoptic variability using this method. Furthermore extending the Principal Component Analysis to investigate the skill of forecasts has identified systematic under prediction of some cold weather synoptic conditions. Ensemble forecasts are used to quantify the uncertainty associated with these cold weather synoptic conditions. This information maybe be used to improve the value of existing weather warnings.

  8. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  9. Human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Wallis, R S; Boom, W H; Daniel, T M; Chervenak, K; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the immunodominant or protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans. Cell-mediated immunity is necessary for protection, and healthy tuberculin-positive individuals are relatively resistant to exogenous reinfection. We compared the targets of the cell-mediated immune response in healthy tuberculin-positive individuals to those of tuberculosis patients and tuberculin-negative persons. By using T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) of nitrocellulose-bound M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, peaks of T-cell blastogenic activity were identified in the healthy tuberculin reactors at 30, 37, 44, 57, 64, 71 and 88 kDa. Three of these fractions (30, 64, and 71 kDa) coincided with previously characterized proteins: antigen 6/alpha antigen, HSP60, and HSP70, respectively. The blastogenic responses to purified M. tuberculosis antigen 6/alpha antigen and BCG HSP60 were assessed. When cultured with purified antigen 6/alpha antigen, lymphocytes of healthy tuberculin reactors demonstrated greater [3H]thymidine incorporation than either healthy tuberculin-negative controls or tuberculous patients (8,113 +/- 1,939 delta cpm versus 645 +/- 425 delta cpm and 1,019 +/- 710 delta cpm, respectively; P less than 0.01). Healthy reactors also responded to HSP60, although to a lesser degree than antigen 6/alpha antigen (4,276 +/- 1,095 delta cpm; P less than 0.05). Partially purified HSP70 bound to nitrocellulose paper elicited a significant lymphocyte blastogenic response in two of six of the tuberculous patients but in none of the eight healthy tuberculin reactors. Lymphocytes of none of five tuberculin-negative controls responded to recombinant antigens at 14 or 19 kDa or to HSP70. Antibody reactivity generally was inversely correlated with blastogenic response: tuberculous sera had high titer antibody to M. tuberculosis culture filtrate in a range from 35 to 180 kDa. This is the first systematic evaluation of the human response to a panel of native

  10. Characterisation and distribution of heavy metals at Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, M.; Rymer, H.; Gillman, M.; Blake, S.

    2011-12-01

    Activity at Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, is characterised by periodic cycles of intense gas emission that last years to decades. The volcano entered its current phase of degassing in 1993, which resulted in a low-level persistent gas plume. As a result of this continuous emission, the substantial deposition of heavy metals onto the surrounding soils (andosols) is thought to be occurring (Delfosse et al., 2003). The deposition of these heavy metal plume components, and their incorporation into soil, is of key interest because once discharged to the environment they accumulate throughout the food chain and may pose a serious ecological threat (Alloway, 1995). Although many studies have focused on the impacts of volcanic gases on the environment, few have addressed the fate of the metals released by persistent gas plumes. This study therefore investigates the patterns of heavy metal transport, deposition and distribution at Masaya in order to provide additional information on the processes that govern the behaviour of volcanic heavy metals. A number of agricultural and non-agricultural soils at two horizons (A: 0-10 cm and B: 20-30 cm) were collected and their trace metal content analysed. Twenty sites were sampled from the active vent to ~5 km downwind, as well as two control sites upwind of the volcano. Preliminary data suggest that a rapid deposition of metals occurs close to the source, with metal concentrations in the soil generally decreasing with distance away from the active vent. Cr and As clearly follow this trend, with maximum concentrations of 20.71 and 7.61 mg/kg respectively occurring closest to the vent. Concentration peaks for Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn (959.30, 21.57, 13.44, 152.85, and 72.73 mg/kg respectively) occur slightly further away from the vent, implying that these metals are transported further. The concentration of Cr, Co, Al, Ni and Mn was found to increase from soil horizon A to B, whereas the abundance of Zn decreases with depth. Heavy metal

  11. Differential recognition of the multiple banded antigen isoforms across Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum species by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aboklaish, Ali F; Ahmed, Shatha; McAllister, Douglas; Cassell, Gail; Zheng, Xiaotian T; Spiller, Owen B

    2016-08-01

    Two separate species of Ureaplasma have been identified that infect humans: Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum. Most notably, these bacteria lack a cell wall and are the leading infectious organism associated with infection-related induction of preterm birth. Fourteen separate representative prototype bacterial strains, called serovars, are largely differentiated by the sequence of repeating units in the C-terminus of the major surface protein: multiple-banded antigen (MBA). Monoclonal antibodies that recognise single or small groups of serovars have been previously reported, but these reagents remain sequestered in individual research laboratories. Here we characterise a panel of commercially available monoclonal antibodies raised against the MBA and describe the first monoclonal antibody that cross-reacts by immunoblot with all serovars of U. parvum and U. urealyticum species. We also describe a recombinant MBA expressed by Escherichia coli which facilitated further characterisation by immunoblot and demonstrate immunohistochemistry of paraffin-embedded antigens. Immunoblot reactivity was validated against well characterised previously published monoclonal antibodies and individual commercial antibodies were found to recognise all U. parvum strains, only serovars 3 and 14 or only serovars 1 and 6, or all strains belonging to U. parvum and U. urealyticum. MBA mass was highly variable between strains, consistent with variation in the number of C-terminal repeats between strains. Antibody characterisation will enable future investigations to correlate severity of pathogenicity to MBA isoform number or mass, in addition to development of antibody-based diagnostics that will detect infection by all Ureaplasma species or alternately be able to differentiate between U. parvum, U. urealyticum or mixed infections. PMID:27208664

  12. Overexpressed oncogenic tumor-self antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Robert K; Bright, Jennifer D; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Overexpressed tumor-self antigens represent the largest group of candidate vaccine targets. Those exhibiting a role in oncogenesis may be some of the least studied but perhaps most promising. This review considers this subset of self antigens by highlighting vaccine efforts for some of the better known members and focusing on TPD52, a new promising vaccine target. We shed light on the importance of both preclinical and clinical vaccine studies demonstrating that tolerance and autoimmunity (presumed to preclude this class of antigens from vaccine development) can be overcome and do not present the obstacle that might have been expected. The potential of this class of antigens for broad application is considered, possibly in the context of low tumor burden or adjuvant therapy, as is the need to understand mechanisms of tolerance that are relatively understudied. PMID:25483660

  13. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  14. Electronic cigarettes: product characterisation and design considerations

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher J; Cheng, James M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence regarding electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) product characterisation and design features in order to understand their potential impact on individual users and on public health. Methods Systematic literature searches in 10 reference databases were conducted through October 2013. A total of 14 articles and documents and 16 patents were included in this analysis. Results Numerous disposable and reusable e-cigarette product options exist, representing wide variation in product configuration and component functionality. Common e-cigarette components include an aerosol generator, a flow sensor, a battery and a nicotine-containing solution storage area. e-cigarettes currently include many interchangeable parts, enabling users to modify the character of the delivered aerosol and, therefore, the product's ‘effectiveness’ as a nicotine delivery product. Materials in e-cigarettes may include metals, rubber and ceramics. Some materials may be aerosolised and have adverse health effects. Several studies have described significant performance variability across and within e-cigarette brands. Patent applications include novel product features designed to influence aerosol properties and e-cigarette efficiency at delivering nicotine. Conclusions Although e-cigarettes share a basic design, engineering variations and user modifications result in differences in nicotine delivery and potential product risks. e-cigarette aerosols may include harmful and potentially harmful constituents. Battery explosions and the risks of exposure to the e-liquid (especially for children) are also concerns. Additional research will enhance the current understanding of basic e-cigarette design and operation, aerosol production and processing, and functionality. A standardised e-cigarette testing regime should be developed to allow product comparisons. PMID:24732162

  15. Characterising superclusters with the galaxy cluster distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Böhringer, Hans; Collins, Chris A.; Krause, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Superclusters are the largest observed matter density structures in the Universe. Recently, we presented the first supercluster catalogue constructed with a well-defined selection function based on the X-ray flux-limited cluster survey, REFLEX II. To construct the sample we proposed a concept to find large objects with a minimum overdensity such that it can be expected that most of their mass will collapse in the future. The main goal is to provide support for our concept here by using simulation that we can, on the basis of our observational sample of X-ray clusters, construct a supercluster sample defined by a certain minimum overdensity. On this sample we also test how superclusters trace the underlying dark matter distribution. Our results confirm that an overdensity in the number of clusters is tightly correlated with an overdensity of the dark matter distribution. This enables us to define superclusters within which most of the mass will collapse in the future. We also obtain first-order mass estimates of superclusters on the basis of the properties of the member clusters. We also show that in this context the ratio of the cluster number density and dark matter mass density is consistent with the theoretically expected cluster bias. Our previous work provided evidence that superclusters are a special environment in which the density structures of the dark matter grow differently from those in the field, as characterised by the X-ray luminosity function. Here we confirm for the first time that this originates from a top-heavy mass function at high statistical significance that is provided by a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We also find in close agreement with observations that the superclusters only occupy a small volume of a few per cent, but contain more than half of the clusters in the present-day Universe.

  16. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds. PMID:24942699

  17. GOMOS data characterisation and error estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamminen, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Sofieva, V. F.; Laine, M.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; Fussen, D.; Vanhellemont, F.; Fanton-D'Andon, O.; Barrot, G.; Mangin, A.; Guirlet, M.; Blanot, L.; Fehr, T.; Saavedra de Miguel, L.; Fraisse, R.

    2010-10-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument uses stellar occultation technique for monitoring ozone, other trace gases and aerosols in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The self-calibrating measurement principle of GOMOS together with a relatively simple data retrieval where only minimal use of a priori data is required provides excellent possibilities for long-term monitoring of atmospheric composition. GOMOS uses about 180 of the brightest stars as its light source. Depending on the individual spectral characteristics of the stars, the signal-to-noise ratio of GOMOS varies from star to star, resulting also in varying accuracy of retrieved profiles. We present here an overview of the GOMOS data characterisation and error estimation, including modeling errors, for O3, NO2, NO3, and aerosol profiles. The retrieval error (precision) of night-time measurements in the stratosphere is typically 0.5-4% for ozone, about 10-20% for NO2, 20-40% for NO3 and 2-50% for aerosols. Mesospheric O3, up to 100 km, can be measured with 2-10% precision. The main sources of the modeling error are incompletely corrected scintillation, inaccurate aerosol modeling, uncertainties in cross sections of trace gases and in atmospheric temperature. The sampling resolution of GOMOS varies depending on the measurement geometry. In the data inversion a Tikhonov-type regularization with pre-defined target resolution requirement is applied leading to 2-3 km vertical resolution for ozone and 4 km resolution for other trace gases and aerosols.

  18. Tales of Antigen Evasion from CAR Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Both T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors and tumor-specific antibodies can successfully target some malignancies, but antigen escape can lead to relapse. Two articles in this issue of Cancer Immunology Research explore what effective countermeasures may prevent it. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 473-473. ©2016 AACRSee articles by Zah et al., p. 498, and Rufener et al., p. 509. PMID:27252092

  19. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  20. Preliminary Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Preliminary locations for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or resource confirmation wells based on compilation of geological, geophysical and geochemical data prior to carrying out the DOE-funded reflection seismic survey.

  1. Safety of targeting tumor endothelial cell antigens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Samuel C; Riordan, Neil H; Ichim, Thomas E; Szymanski, Julia; Ma, Hong; Perez, Jesus A; Lopez, Javier; Plata-Munoz, Juan J; Silva, Francisco; Patel, Amit N; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying discrimination between "self" and "non-self", a central immunological principle, require careful consideration in immune oncology therapeutics where eliciting anti-cancer immunity must be weighed against the risk of autoimmunity due to the self origin of tumors. Whole cell vaccines are one promising immunotherapeutic avenue whereby a myriad of tumor antigens are introduced in an immunogenic context with the aim of eliciting tumor rejection. Despite the possibility collateral damage to healthy tissues, cancer immunotherapy can be designed such that off target autoimmunity remains limited in scope and severity or completely non-existent. Here we provide an immunological basis for reconciling the safety of cancer vaccines, focusing on tumor endothelial cell vaccines, by discussing the following topics: (a) Antigenic differences between neoplastic and healthy tissues that can be leveraged in cancer vaccine design; (b) The layers of tolerance that control T cell responses directed against antigens expressed in healthy tissues and tumors; and, (c) The hierarchy of antigenic epitope selection and display in response to whole cell vaccines, and how antigen processing and presentation can afford a degree of selectivity against tumors. We conclude with an example of early clinical data utilizing ValloVax™, an immunogenic placental endothelial cell vaccine that is being advanced to target the tumor endothelium of diverse cancers, and we report on the safety and efficacy of ValloVax™ for inducing immunity against tumor endothelial antigens. PMID:27071457

  2. The 65-kilodalton antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shinnick, T M

    1987-01-01

    The immune response of the host to the antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays the key role in determining immunity from infection with as well as the pathogenicity of this organism. A 65-kilodalton (kDa) protein has been identified as one of the medically important antigens of M. tuberculosis. The gene encoding this antigen was isolated from a lambda gt11-M. tuberculosis recombinant DNA library using monoclonal antibodies directed against the 65-kDa antigen as the specific probes. The nucleotide sequence of this gene was determined, and a 540-amino-acid sequence was deduced. This sequence was shown to correspond to that of the 65-kDa antigen by constructing a plasmid in which this open reading frame was fused to the lacZ gene. The resulting fusion protein reacted specifically with the anti-65-kDa protein antibodies. A second long open reading frame was found downstream of the 65-kDa antigen gene which could encode a protein of 517 amino acids. This putative protein contained 29 tandemly arranged partial or complete matches to a pentapeptide sequence. Images PMID:3029018

  3. Unique glycoprotein antigen defined by monoclonal antibody on human neurobiastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mujoo, K.; Spiro, R.C.; Reisfeld, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have characterized a new target antigen on the surface of human neuroblastoma cells and defined it with a monoclonal antibody (Mab) 5G3. This antibody is of IgG2a type and has an association constant of 8 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/. In ELISA assays, Mab 5G3 reacted with human neuroblastoma as well as melanoma, squamous lung, skin carcinoma, and osteogenic sarcoma. Immunocytochemical analysis of frozen tissue sections revealed strong reactivity with all neuroblastoma tissues and marginal reactivity with melanoma and glioma tissues. There was no reactivity with fetal or normal tissues with the exception of cerebellum. The antigen recognized by Mab 5G3 is a glycoprotein of 200 and 215 kDa expressed on the SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. The antigen appears to contain N-linked carbohydrates based on treatment of human neuroblastoma cells with tunicamycin before and after intrinsic radiolabeling followed by indirect immunoprecipitation. The pulse-chase biosynthetic studies followed by indirect immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE indicated the precursor/product relationship between 200 and 215 kDa molecules. The 200 kDa component is endoglycosidase H-sensitive, whereas 215 kDa molecule is Endo-H resistant. The 215 kDa component is also sulfated, sialylated, and phosphorylated at serine residues. Preliminary data suggests that Mab, aside from identifying a unique target antigen on human neuroblastoma cells, may be suited as a targeting device for chemotherapeutic drugs.

  4. Immunological control of ticks through vaccination with Boophilus microplus gut antigens.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, J; Rodríguez, M; García-García, J C

    2000-01-01

    The control of tick infestations and the transmission of tick-borne diseases remain a challenge for the scientific community. Traditional control methods have been only partially successful. Recently, vaccination with recombinant Boophilus microplus gut antigens has been shown to control tick infestations. Our Bm86-containing vaccine formulation (Gavac) has been effective for the control of artificial infestations of B. annulatus, B. decoloratus, and chemically sensitive and resistant B. microplus strains from Australia, Africa, America, and Iran. Preliminary results with Hyalomma spp. and Rhipicephalus spp. suggest partial cross protection. In field trials, vaccination with Gavac controlled B. microplus and B. annulatus infestations and reduced the transmission of babesiosis, resulting in important savings for the cattle industry. Different degrees of susceptibility to the vaccination with Bm86 and sequence variations in the Bm86 locus have been reported. The Bm95 antigen was isolated from the Argentinean Bm86-resistant B. microplus strain A. A Bm95-based vaccine was used to protect cattle against tick infestations under production conditions with similar results to that obtained with Gavac. The Bm95 antigen from strain A was able to protect against infestations with Bm86-sensitive and Bm86-resistant tick strains, thus suggesting that Bm95 could be a more universal antigen in protecting cattle against infestations by B. microplus strains from different geographical areas. These results clearly demonstrate the advantage and possibilities for the immunological control of ticks. PMID:11193686

  5. Genetic and physical evidence for plasmid control of Shigella sonnei form I cell surface antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Kopecko, D J; Washington, O; Formal, S B

    1980-01-01

    Virulent Shigella sonnei synthesize a surface antigen (form I) which appears to be one of several requirements needed for this host to invade epithelial cells. Upon restreaking on agar media, form I cells readily and irreversibly generate form II cells that lack the form I antigen. All form II cells are avirulent. Plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid of form I and II cells of four different S. sonnei isolates, obtained from different areas of the world, was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. A large plasmid (approximately 120 megadaltons in three of the strains) that is present in form I cells was always absent from form II derivatives. Attempts to transfer conjugally only this large plasmid from form I to genetically marked form II cells were unsuccessful. However, a composite molecule, apparently formed by recombination between the large form I plasmid and a self-transmissible plasmid, was found to transfer the form I trait. Transconjugant S. sonnei strains acquiring the form I antigen could retransfer this trait to S. sonnei, Shigella flexneri, or Salmonella typhi. These preliminary findings demonstrate that S. sonnei form I antigen synthesis is mediated by a large plasmid which is lost spontaneously at a relatively high frequency from S. sonnei strains. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6249756

  6. Coccidia of turkey: from isolation, characterisation and comparison to molecular phylogeny and molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Vrba, Vladimir; Pakandl, Michal

    2014-11-01

    Coccidiosis is a disease caused by apicomplexan parasites of the genus Eimeria, which has a significant economic impact on poultry production. Multiple species infecting the turkey have been described; however, due to the general lack of unambiguous description, their identification and taxonomy is debatable. In this work, a systematic approach was taken to isolate, characterise and compare coccidian species in the turkey. Individual species were tracked according to their unique 18S ribosomal DNA sequence. The single-oocyst isolation technique and passaging of mixed species field isolates in selectively immunised birds enabled the derivation of pure species. Six distinct strains representing five eimerian species that infect the turkey were obtained. It appears highly probable that these species represent all species described in the past with the exception of Eimeria subrotunda. The species were analysed using both traditional methods and DNA sequencing. For each strain the oocyst morphology, prepatent period, gross pathology, pathogenicity, host specificity and endogenous cycle were studied. Antigenic similarity was investigated in multiple cross-immunity experiments. For identification and quantification of each individual species or strain, quantitative real-time PCR markers were also developed. Parallel characterisation of pure strains allowed comprehensive comparison with the original descriptions and assignment of correct species names. The species Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, Eimeria gallopavonis, Eimeria meleagrimitis and Eimeria innocua were identified. Comparison of our data with those of previous studies indicates that Eimeria adenoeides is most probably a synonym for either E. meleagridis or E. gallopavonis, or a description based on a mixture of these species, and thus nomen dubium. The species E. dispersa and E. innocua were also found to infect Bobwhite Quail. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on 18S rDNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit

  7. Characterisation of DEFB107 by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Bryan J.; Eastwood, Hayden; Clark, Dave J.; Polfer, Nick C.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Dorin, Julia A.; Maxwell, Alison; Langley, Ross J.; Govan, John R. W.; Bernstein, Summer L.; Bowers, Michael T.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2006-05-01

    Mammalian defensins are small endogenous cationic proteins which form a class of antimicrobial peptides that is part of the innate immune response of all mammalian species [R. Lehrer, Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2 (9) (2004) 727; T. Ganz, R.I. Lehrer, Curr. Opin. Immunol. 6 (4) (1994) 584] [1] and [2]. We have developed mass spectrometry based strategies for characterising the structure-activity relationship of defensins [D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, N.C. Polfer, P.E. Barran, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, J. Biol. Chem. 279 (47) (2004) 48671; P.E. Barran, N.C. Polfer, D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, P.R.R. Langridge-Smith, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, R.P. Millar, M.T. Bowers, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 240 (2005) 273] [3] and [4], and here we present data obtained from a five cysteine containing [beta]-defensin, DEFB107. The synthetic product of this human defensin exists with a glutathione capping group, its oxidation state and disulphide connectivity have been determined via accurate mass measurements and peptide mass mapping respectively, and despite possessing three disulphide bridges, it does not fit the [beta]-defensin canonical motif. With the use of molecular modelling, we have generated candidate geometries to discern the influence of disulphide bridging on the overall tertiary structure of DEFB107. These are compared with experimental results from ion mobility measurements. Defensins display activity against a wide variety of pathogens including both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Their mechanism of mode of action is unknown, but is believed to involve defensin aggregation at cell surfaces, followed by cell permeabilisation and hence deathE To probe this mechanism, the localisation of DEFB107 in synthetic vesicles was studied using H/D exchange and mass spectrometry. The results obtained are used to analyse the antimicrobial activity of DEFB107.

  8. Do lymphocytes from Chagasic patients respond to heart antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Todd, C W; Todd, N R; Guimaraes, A C

    1983-01-01

    Lymphocyte transformation studies of nonadherent lymphocytes from chronic Chagasic and uninfected persons demonstrated that responses of all individuals to a mouse heart homogenate showed a correlation with responses to streptococcal antigens. Considering the known cross-reactions between streptococcal and cardiac antigens and the high reactivity of Chagasic patients to streptococcal antigens, it is possible that positive lymphocyte transformation to unfractionated heart antigen preparations may not represent specific reactivity to heart antigens. PMID:6404836

  9. Serological response to in vitro-shed antigen(s) of Tritrichomonas foetus in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Bondurant, R H; van Hoosear, K A; Corbeil, L B; Bernoco, D

    1996-01-01

    We developed a serological assay for detection of (l) an erythrocyte-adhering molecule(s) shed by the bovine venereal pathogen Tritrichomonas foetus and (II) serum antibodies to this antigen(s) in exposed cattle. Sera from exposed and unexposed cattle were tested for their ability to induce complement-mediated lysis of bovine erythrocytes that had been previously incubated overnight at room temperature in pH-adjusted supernatants of T. foetus culture media. Eight of 180 serum specimens from six groups of presumably unexposed cows or heifers showed a positive (> or = 1:2) hemolytic titer (specificity = 95.6%). Thirteen of 14 females in two experimentally infected groups showed a positive hemolytic titer following infection (sensitivity = 94%). In experimentally infected heifers, there was little correlation (r2 = 0.33) between serum hemolytic titers with respect to shed antigen and titers obtained in serum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in which whole T. foetus served as the antigen. Serum hemolytic titers rose 3 to 4 weeks sooner than did previously described vaginal mucus immunoglobulin G1 or immunoglobulin A titers with respect to whole-cell antigen or TF1.17 subunit antigen, respectively. Among 14 chronically infected bulls, only 6 (43%) showed a positive hemolytic titer. This study is the first, to our knowledge, to show a specific serological response in the host to an in vitro-shed antigen(s) of T. foetus and suggests a useful diagnostic test for potentially exposed herds. PMID:8807209

  10. Tresyl-Based Conjugation of Protein Antigen to Lipid Nanoparticles Increases Antigen Immunogencity

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R.; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G.; Mumper, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  11. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines. PMID:26928033

  12. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  13. Antigen-specific vaccines for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tagliamonte, Maria; Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines targeting pathogens are generally effective and protective because based on foreign non-self antigens which are extremely potent in eliciting an immune response. On the contrary, efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still disappointing. One of the major reasons for such poor outcome, among others, is the difficulty of identifying tumor-specific target antigens which should be unique to the tumors or, at least, overexpressed on the tumors as compared to normal cells. Indeed, this is the only option to overcome the peripheral immune tolerance and elicit a non toxic immune response. New and more potent strategies are now available to identify specific tumor-associated antigens for development of cancer vaccine approaches aiming at eliciting targeted anti-tumor cellular responses. In the last years this aspect has been addressed and many therapeutic vaccination strategies based on either whole tumor cells or specific antigens have been and are being currently evaluated in clinical trials. This review summarizes the current state of cancer vaccines, mainly focusing on antigen-specific approaches. PMID:25483639

  14. Antigenic Properties of N Protein of Hantavirus

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus causes two important rodent-borne viral zoonoses, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North and South America. Twenty-four species that represent sero- and genotypes have been registered within the genus Hantavirus by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Among the viral proteins, nucleocapsid (N) protein possesses an immunodominant antigen. The antigenicitiy of N protein is conserved compared with that of envelope glycoproteins. Therefore, N protein has been used for serological diagnoses and seroepidemiological studies. An understanding of the antigenic properties of N protein is important for the interpretation of results from serological tests using N antigen. N protein consists of about 430 amino acids and possesses various epitopes. The N-terminal quarter of N protein bears linear and immunodominant epitopes. However, a serotype-specific and multimerization-dependent antigenic site was found in the C-terminal half of N protein. In this paper, the structure, function, and antigenicity of N protein are reviewed. PMID:25123683

  15. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  16. A time-dependent model for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation.

    PubMed

    Chandler, J H; Culmer, P R; Jayne, D G; Neville, A

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of the passive electrical resistance of biological tissues through biogalvanic characterisation has been proposed as a simple means of distinguishing healthy from diseased tissue. This method has the potential to provide valuable real-time information when integrated into surgical tools. Characterised tissue resistance values have been shown to be particularly sensitive to external load switching direction and rate, bringing into question the stability and efficacy of the technique. These errors are due to transient variations observed in measurement data that are not accounted for in current electrical models. The presented research proposes the addition of a time-dependent element to the characterisation model to account for losses associated with this transient behaviour. Influence of switching rate has been examined, with the inclusion of transient elements improving the repeatability of the characterised tissue resistance. Application of this model to repeat biogalvanic measurements on a single ex vivo human colon tissue sample with healthy and cancerous (adenocarcinoma) regions showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between tissue types. In contrast, an insignificant difference (p > 0.05) between tissue types was found when measurements were subjected to the current model, suggesting that the proposed model may allow for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation. PMID:26298197

  17. EChO. Exoplanet characterisation observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, G.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Henning, T.; Meyer, M.; Micela, G.; Ribas, I.; Stam, D.; Swain, M.; Krause, O.; Ollivier, M.; Pace, E.; Swinyard, B.; Aylward, A.; van Boekel, R.; Coradini, A.; Encrenaz, T.; Snellen, I.; Zapatero-Osorio, M. R.; Bouwman, J.; Cho, J. Y.-K.; Coudé de Foresto, V.; Guillot, T.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Mueller-Wodarg, I.; Palle, E.; Selsis, F.; Sozzetti, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Achilleos, N.; Adriani, A.; Agnor, C. B.; Afonso, C.; Allende Prieto, C.; Bakos, G.; Barber, R. J.; Barlow, M.; Batista, V.; Bernath, P.; Bézard, B.; Bordé, P.; Brown, L. R.; Cassan, A.; Cavarroc, C.; Ciaravella, A.; Cockell, C.; Coustenis, A.; Danielski, C.; Decin, L.; De Kok, R.; Demangeon, O.; Deroo, P.; Doel, P.; Drossart, P.; Fletcher, L. N.; Focardi, M.; Forget, F.; Fossey, S.; Fouqué, P.; Frith, J.; Galand, M.; Gaulme, P.; Hernández, J. I. González; Grasset, O.; Grassi, D.; Grenfell, J. L.; Griffin, M. J.; Griffith, C. A.; Grözinger, U.; Guedel, M.; Guio, P.; Hainaut, O.; Hargreaves, R.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Heng, K.; Heyrovsky, D.; Hueso, R.; Irwin, P.; Kaltenegger, L.; Kervella, P.; Kipping, D.; Koskinen, T. T.; Kovács, G.; La Barbera, A.; Lammer, H.; Lellouch, E.; Leto, G.; Lopez Morales, M.; Lopez Valverde, M. A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Lovis, C.; Maggio, A.; Maillard, J. P.; Maldonado Prado, J.; Marquette, J. B.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Maxted, P.; Miller, S.; Molinari, S.; Montes, D.; Moro-Martin, A.; Moses, J. I.; Mousis, O.; Nguyen Tuong, N.; Nelson, R.; Orton, G. S.; Pantin, E.; Pascale, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Pinfield, D.; Poretti, E.; Prinja, R.; Prisinzano, L.; Rees, J. M.; Reiners, A.; Samuel, B.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Forcada, J. Sanz; Sasselov, D.; Savini, G.; Sicardy, B.; Smith, A.; Stixrude, L.; Strazzulla, G.; Tennyson, J.; Tessenyi, M.; Vasisht, G.; Vinatier, S.; Viti, S.; Waldmann, I.; White, G. J.; Widemann, T.; Wordsworth, R.; Yelle, R.; Yung, Y.; Yurchenko, S. N.

    2012-10-01

    A dedicated mission to investigate exoplanetary atmospheres represents a major milestone in our quest to understand our place in the universe by placing our Solar System in context and by addressing the suitability of planets for the presence of life. EChO—the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory—is a mission concept specifically geared for this purpose. EChO will provide simultaneous, multi-wavelength spectroscopic observations on a stable platform that will allow very long exposures. The use of passive cooling, few moving parts and well established technology gives a low-risk and potentially long-lived mission. EChO will build on observations by Hubble, Spitzer and ground-based telescopes, which discovered the first molecules and atoms in exoplanetary atmospheres. However, EChO's configuration and specifications are designed to study a number of systems in a consistent manner that will eliminate the ambiguities affecting prior observations. EChO will simultaneously observe a broad enough spectral region—from the visible to the mid-infrared—to constrain from one single spectrum the temperature structure of the atmosphere, the abundances of the major carbon and oxygen bearing species, the expected photochemically-produced species and magnetospheric signatures. The spectral range and resolution are tailored to separate bands belonging to up to 30 molecules and retrieve the composition and temperature structure of planetary atmospheres. The target list for EChO includes planets ranging from Jupiter-sized with equilibrium temperatures T eq up to 2,000 K, to those of a few Earth masses, with T eq u223c 300 K. The list will include planets with no Solar System analog, such as the recently discovered planets GJ1214b, whose density lies between that of terrestrial and gaseous planets, or the rocky-iron planet 55 Cnc e, with day-side temperature close to 3,000 K. As the number of detected exoplanets is growing rapidly each year, and the mass and radius of those

  18. Myosin-cross-reactive antigens from four different lactic acid bacteria are fatty acid hydratases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Haiqin; Song, Yuanda; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The 67 kDa myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) is a member of the MCRA family of proteins present in a wide range of bacteria and was predicted to have fatty acid isomerase function. We have now characterised the catalytic activity of MCRAs from four LAB stains, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG, L. plantarum ST-III, L. acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12. MCRA genes from these strains were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein function was analysed with lipid profiles by GC-MS. The four MCRAs catalysed the conversion of linoleic acid and oleic acid to their respective 10-hydroxy derivatives, which suggests that MCRA proteins catalyse the first step in conjugated linoleic acid production. This is the first report of MCRA from L. rhamnosus with such catalytic function. PMID:22955678

  19. Association of Wegener's granulomatosis with HLA antigens and other genetic markers.

    PubMed Central

    Papiha, S S; Murty, G E; Ad'Hia, A; Mains, B T; Venning, M

    1992-01-01

    The frequencies of the HLA-A, B, C, DR, DQ antigens and of several other genetic markers in biopsy proved and well characterised patients with Wegener's granulomatosis were compared with control frequencies of the region. A highly significant increase in HLA-DR1 was found. The percentage combined frequency of DR1-DQw1 was significantly higher in patients than in the controls. Interestingly, association with the red cell enzyme GLOI and complement locus C4B was also seen. As both of these markers are either linked or within the major histocompatibility complex region (MHC) this is further evidence for the involvement of chromosome 6 in the pathogenesis of Wegener's granulomatosis. To understand the pathology of the disease fully molecular genetic studies of the MHC region are warranted. PMID:1550412

  20. Separation of soluble Brucella antigens by gel-filtration chromatography.

    PubMed

    McGhee, J R; Freeman, B A

    1970-07-01

    Soluble precipitating antigens of Brucella suis have been, in various degrees, purified by filtration on Sephadex gels. The most useful gels employed were Sephadex G-150, Sephadex G-200, and Sepharose 4B. Although not all fractions proved to be immunologically pure, some crude molecular-size estimates of most of the 13 soluble antigens of the Brucella cell could be given. In addition, monospecific antisera to three purified Brucella antigens have been prepared. By using purified preparations, physical and chemical data were obtained on two major antigens, E and 1, and a minor antigen, f. Antigen E is not an agglutinogen and may be toxic. Antigen 1 is of low molecular weight and is neither toxic nor agglutinogenic. The minor antigen f is an agglutinogen as well as a precipitinogen and is found on the cell surface. Both major antigens, when purified, were immunogenic in rabbits. PMID:16557798

  1. Immunochemical characterization of Ancylostoma caninum antigens.

    PubMed

    Schnieder, T; Kohlmetz, C; Epe, C; Stoye, M

    1996-06-01

    Adult worms of Ancylostoma caninum were dissected and manually separated into cephalic glands, cervical glands, intestine, esophagus and cuticula. These fractions as well as third stage larvae were fractionated with Triton X-114 into water soluble (hydrophilic), Triton soluble (hydrophobic) and unsoluble proteins. These fractions were characterized by immunoblotting with serum from rabbits immunized either with a pool of cervical, cephalic glands and intestine, or the esophagus fraction as well as with sera from percutaneously infected dogs and rabbits. Immunodominant antigens were found that reacted with dog or rabbit post infection sera and could be suited as antigens in serodiagnostic tests. Hidden antigens were found in the several fractions. Those from esophagus and intestine could be vaccine candidates that will be tested in immunization trials. PMID:8688863

  2. Antigen sampling in the fish intestine.

    PubMed

    Løkka, Guro; Koppang, Erling Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Antigen uptake in the gastrointestinal tract may induce tolerance, lead to an immune response and also to infection. In mammals, most pathogens gain access to the host though the gastrointestinal tract, and in fish as well, this route seems to be of significant importance. The epithelial surface faces a considerable challenge, functioning both as a barrier towards the external milieu but simultaneously being the site of absorption of nutrients and fluids. The mechanisms allowing antigen uptake over the epithelial barrier play a central role for maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and regulate appropriate immune responses. Such uptake has been widely studied in mammals, but also in fish, a number of experiments have been reported, seeking to reveal cells and mechanisms involved in antigen sampling. In this paper, we review these studies in addition to addressing our current knowledge of the intestinal barrier in fish and its anatomical construction. PMID:26872546

  3. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for podosomes of dendritic cells. PMID:24424029

  4. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  5. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  6. Bovine vaginal antibody responses to immunoaffinity-purified surface antigen of Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, J S; BonDurant, R H; Corbeil, L B

    1995-01-01

    Bovine trichomoniasis is a prevalent sexually transmitted disease of cattle caused by the protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus. Currently, diagnosis is most often made by culture. In order to provide a faster immunodiagnostic approach, a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was investigated. A protective surface antigen (TF1.17 antigen) of T. foetus was immunoaffinity purified and used in an ELISA to detect antibodies in vaginal mucus from heifers inoculated with T. foetus. In preliminary studies, antibodies of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype were detected in mucus from all experimentally infected heifers which were tested at 6 weeks postinoculation, whereas IgG1 and IgG2 were not. In addition, IgA responses detected in postinoculation samples were all greater than those detected in preinoculation samples, unlike those detected by a whole-cell antigen ELISA. For these two reasons, IgA antibodies appeared to be useful diagnostically. Further investigation of IgA antibodies used vaginal mucus collected weekly from heifers inoculated intravaginally with 10(2), 10(4), or 10(6) T. foetus organisms. Heifers with positive cultures for T. foetus had similar IgA responses to TF1.17 antigen over the 10 weeks of infection regardless of the initial inoculum dose. This indicates that if the dose is sufficient to establish infection, the magnitude and duration of the immune response are no longer dependent on dose. All of the infected animals receiving all dosages responded with high absorbance values in the IgA anti-TF1.17 antigen ELISA by 6 weeks postinoculation, and all absorbance values remained high at 10 weeks. To determine the duration of the IgA response, four other heifers inoculated with 7 x 10(6) T. foetus organisms were studied through 24 weeks postinoculation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7615722

  7. Microbially synthesized modular virus-like particles and capsomeres displaying group A streptococcus hypervariable antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Chuan, Yap P; Wibowo, Nani; Connors, Natalie K; Wu, Yang; Hughes, Fiona K; Batzloff, Michael R; Lua, Linda H L; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-06-01

    Effective and low-cost vaccines are essential to control severe group A streptococcus (GAS) infections prevalent in low-income nations and the Australian aboriginal communities. Highly diverse and endemic circulating GAS strains mandate broad-coverage and customized vaccines. This study describes an approach to deliver cross-reactive antigens from endemic GAS strains using modular virus-like particle (VLP) and capsomere systems. The antigens studied were three heterologous N-terminal peptides (GAS1, GAS2, and GAS3) from the GAS surface M-protein that are specific to endemic strains in Australia Northern Territory Aboriginal communities. In vivo data presented here demonstrated salient characteristics of the modular delivery systems in the context of GAS vaccine design. First, the antigenic peptides, when delivered by unadjuvanted modular VLPs or adjuvanted capsomeres, induced high titers of peptide-specific IgG antibodies (over 1 × 10(4) ). Second, delivery by capsomere was superior to VLP for one of the peptides investigated (GAS3), demonstrating that the delivery system relative effectiveness was antigen-dependant. Third, significant cross-reactivity of GAS2-induced IgG with GAS1 was observed using either VLP or capsomere, showing the possibility of broad-coverage vaccine design using these delivery systems and cross-reactive antigens. Fourth, a formulation containing three pre-mixed modular VLPs, each at a low dose of 5 μg (corresponding to <600 ng of each GAS peptide), induced significant titers of IgGs specific to each peptide, demonstrating that a multivalent, broad-coverage VLP vaccine formulation was possible. In summary, the modular VLPs and capsomeres reported here demonstrate, with promising preliminary data, innovative ways to design GAS vaccines using VLP and capsomere delivery systems amenable to microbial synthesis, potentially adoptable by developing countries. PMID:24338691

  8. Distribution of Bexsero® Antigen Sequence Types (BASTs) in invasive meningococcal disease isolates: Implications for immunisation.

    PubMed

    Brehony, Carina; Rodrigues, Charlene M C; Borrow, Ray; Smith, Andrew; Cunney, Robert; Moxon, E Richard; Maiden, Martin C J

    2016-09-01

    Serogroup B is the only major disease-associated capsular group of Neisseria meningitidis for which no protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccine is available. This has led to the development of multi-component protein-based vaccines that target serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease (IMD), including Bexsero®, which was implemented for UK infants in 2015, and Trumenba®. Given the diversity of meningococcal protein antigens, post-implementation surveillance of IMD isolates, including characterisation of vaccine antigens, is essential for assessing the effectiveness of such vaccines. Whole genome sequencing (WGS), as realised in the Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL), provides a rapid, comprehensive, and cost-effective approach to this. To facilitate the surveillance of the antigen targets included in Bexsero® (fHbp, PorA, NHBA and NadA) for protective immunity, a Bexsero® Antigen Sequence Type (BAST) scheme, based on deduced peptide sequence variants, was implemented in the PubMLST.org/neisseria database, which includes the MRF-MGL and other isolate collections. This scheme enabled the characterisation of vaccine antigen variants and here the invasive meningococci isolated in Great Britain and Ireland in the epidemiological years 2010/11 to 2013/14 are analysed. Many unique BASTs (647) were present, but nine of these accounted for 39% (775/1966) of isolates, with some temporal and geographic differences in BAST distribution. BASTs were strongly associated with other characteristics, such as serogroup and clonal complex (cc), and a significant increase in BAST-2 was associated with increased prevalence of serogroup W clonal complex 11 meningococci. Potential coverage was assessed by the examination of the antigen peptide sequences present in the vaccine and epidemiological dataset. There were 22.8-30.8% exact peptide matches to Bexsero® components and predicted coverage of 66.1%, based on genotype-phenotype modelling for 63

  9. Different Approach to the Aluminium Oxide Topography Characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Poljacek, Sanja Mahovic; Gojo, Miroslav; Raos, Pero; Stoic, Antun

    2007-04-07

    Different surface topographic techniques are being widely used for quantitative measurements of typical industrial aluminium oxide surfaces. In this research, specific surface of aluminium oxide layer on the offset printing plate has been investigated by using measuring methods which have previously not been used for characterisation of such surfaces. By using two contact instruments and non-contact laser profilometer (LPM) 2D and 3D roughness parameters have been defined. SEM micrographs of the samples were made. Results have shown that aluminium oxide surfaces with the same average roughness value (Ra) and mean roughness depth (Rz) typically used in the printing plate surface characterisation, have dramatically different surface topographies. According to the type of instrument specific roughness parameters should be used for defining the printing plate surfaces. New surface roughness parameters were defined in order to insure detailed characterisation of the printing plates in graphic reproduction process.

  10. Human Tumor Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    With the recent developments of adoptive T cell therapies and the use of new monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoints, immunotherapy is at a turning point. Key players for the success of these therapies are the cytolytic T lymphocytes, which are a subset of T cells able to recognize and kill tumor cells. Here, I review the nature of the antigenic peptides recognized by these T cells and the processes involved in their presentation. I discuss the importance of understanding how each antigenic peptide is processed in the context of immunotherapy and vaccine delivery. PMID:26161423

  11. Quantitative non-invasive cell characterisation and discrimination based on multispectral autofluorescence features.

    PubMed

    Gosnell, Martin E; Anwer, Ayad G; Mahbub, Saabah B; Menon Perinchery, Sandeep; Inglis, David W; Adhikary, Partho P; Jazayeri, Jalal A; Cahill, Michael A; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol A; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Thompson, Jeremy G; Goldys, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous autofluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from autofluorescence imaging has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent. Label-free classifications are validated by the analysis of Classification Determinant (CD) antigen expression. The versatility of our method is illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. PMID:27029742

  12. Quantitative non-invasive cell characterisation and discrimination based on multispectral autofluorescence features

    PubMed Central

    Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Mahbub, Saabah B.; Menon Perinchery, Sandeep; Inglis, David W.; Adhikary, Partho P.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Cahill, Michael A.; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol A.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous autofluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from autofluorescence imaging has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent. Label-free classifications are validated by the analysis of Classification Determinant (CD) antigen expression. The versatility of our method is illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. PMID:27029742

  13. The production and characterisation of an antibody to detect the coccidiostat toltrazuril and its metabolite ponazuril.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Lisa; Fodey, Terence L; Crooks, Steven R H; Elliott, Christopher T

    2003-05-01

    The production of an antibody to detect toltrazuril or its metabolite ponazuril is complicated due to structural constraints of conjugating these coccidiostats to a carrier protein. Therefore a search was carried out for a compound that shared a common substructure to use as an antigen mimic. The chosen compound, trifluoraminoether, was conjugated to two carrier proteins (HSA and BTG) and used in the immunisation of six rabbits. Two immunogen doses (1 mg and 0.1 mg) were also used. All six rabbits produced an immunological response to the hapten regardless of the carrier protein or immunogen dose used. The most sensitive polyclonal antibody produced, designated R609, was subsequently characterised. This antiserum exhibited an IC50 of 18 ng ml(-1) using a competitive ELISA format. Cross reactivity studies show that this serum is specific for toltrazuril and its metabolites (toltrazuril sulfoxide and toltrazuril sulfone) but does not cross-react with other coccidiostats such as halofuginone, nitroimidazoles or nicarbazin. This is the first reported production of an antibody capable of specifically binding toltrazuril and ponazuril. PMID:12790197

  14. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  15. Antigenic liposomes displaying CD22 ligands induce antigen-specific B cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Macauley, Matthew S.; Pfrengle, Fabian; Rademacher, Christoph; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Gale, Andrew J.; von Drygalski, Annette; Paulson, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies confer humoral immunity but can also be harmful when they target an autoantigen, alloantigen, allergen, or biotherapeutic. New strategies are needed for antigen-specific suppression of undesired antibody responses, particularly to T cell–dependent protein antigens, because they elicit T cell help. Here we show that liposomal nanoparticles, displaying both antigen and glycan ligands of the inhibitory coreceptor CD22, induce a tolerogenic program that selectively causes apoptosis in mouse and human B cells. These SIGLEC-engaging tolerance-inducing antigenic liposomes (STALs, where SIGLEC is defined as sialic acid–binding Ig-like lectin) induced robust antigen-specific tolerance to protein antigens in mice, preventing subsequent immune response to challenge with the same antigen. Since development of inhibitory antibodies to FVIII is a serious problem in treatment of hemophilia A patients, we investigated the potential of this approach for inducing tolerance to FVIII in a hemophilia mouse model. STALs prevented formation of inhibitory FVIII antibodies, allowing for effective administration of FVIII to hemophilia mice to prevent bleeding. These findings suggest that STALs could be used to eliminate or prevent harmful B cell–mediated immune responses. PMID:23722906

  16. Cytostructural Localization of a Tumor-Associated Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Donald R.; Batsakis, John G.

    1980-10-01

    Tumor cell membrane glycoproteins may be involved in the induction of tumor immunity or in the escape of tumors from immunologic defense mechanisms. Forty-four benign and malignant breast lesions were examined for the presence of a carbohydrate precursor antigen (T antigen) of the human blood group system MN. T antigen was demonstrated by means of an immunohistochemical technique to detect tissue binding of peanut agglutinin, a plant lectin, with affinity for T antigen. Malignant breast lesions showed a pattern of T antigen expression different from that of benign breast tissues. A possible role for T antigen in the modulation of the immune response to breast carcinoma is suggested.

  17. Antigen binding and capping by lymphocytes of genetic nonresponder mice.

    PubMed

    Dunham, E K; Unanue, E R; Benacerraf, B

    1972-08-01

    Radioautographic study of the binding of GAT-(125)I to spleen cells of genetic responder and nonresponder mice demonstrates that among mice not injected with antigen all strains have approximately the same number of antigen-binding cells; after injection with antigen the number of antigen-binding cells increases in responders but not in nonresponders. Nonresponders are shown to make antibody after injection with GAT complexed with an immunogenic carrier, demonstrating the presence of potentially functional B cells in responders and nonresponders alike. When incubated in the warm, antigen-binding cells of both responders and nonresponders concentrate antigen at one pole of the cell, forming caps. PMID:5043419

  18. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  19. Human humoral responses to antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: immunodominance of high-molecular-mass antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Laal, S; Samanich, K M; Sonnenberg, M G; Zolla-Pazner, S; Phadtare, J M; Belisle, J T

    1997-01-01

    The selection of antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for most studies of humoral responses in tuberculosis patients has been restricted to molecules that were either immunodominant in immunized animals or amenable to biochemical purification rather than those that were reactive with the human immune system. Delineation of antigens that elicit humoral responses during the natural course of disease progression in humans has been hindered by the presence of cross-reactive antibodies to conserved regions on ubiquitous prokaryotic antigens in sera from healthy individuals and tuberculosis patients. The levels of cross-reactive antibodies in the sera were reduced by preadsorption with Escherichia coli lysates, prior to studying their reactivity against a large panel of M. tuberculosis antigens to which the human immune system may be exposed during natural infection and disease. Thus, reactivity against pools of secreted, cellular, and cell wall-associated antigens of M. tuberculosis was assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results suggested that the secreted protein preparation contained antigens most frequently recognized by the humoral responses of pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The culture filtrate proteins were subsequently size fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, characterized by reaction with murine monoclonal antibodies to known antigens of M. tuberculosis by an ELISA, and assessed for reactivity with tuberculous and nontuberculous sera. Results show that a secreted antigen of 88 kDa elicits a strong antibody response in a high percentage of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. This and other antigens identified on the basis of their reactivity with patient sera may prove useful for developing serodiagnosis for tuberculosis. PMID:9008280

  20. Killing spinors as a characterisation of rotating black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Michael J.; Valiente Kroon, Juan A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the implications of the existence of Killing spinors in a spacetime. In particular, we show that in vacuum and electrovacuum a Killing spinor, along with some assumptions on the associated Killing vector in an asymptotic region, guarantees that the spacetime is locally isometric to the Kerr or Kerr–Newman solutions. We show that the characterisation of these spacetimes in terms of Killing spinors is an alternative expression of characterisation results of Mars (Kerr) and Wong (Kerr–Newman) involving restrictions on the Weyl curvature and matter content.

  1. Quantitative characterisation of deltaic and subaqueous clinoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patruno, Stefano; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Hampson, Gary J.

    2016-04-01

    Clinoforms are ubiquitous deltaic, shallow-marine and continental-margin depositional morphologies, occurring over a range of spatial scales (1-104 m in height). Up to four types of progressively larger-scale clinoforms may prograde synchronously along shoreline-to-abyssal plain transects, albeit at very different rates. Paired subaerial and subaqueous delta clinoforms (or 'delta-scale compound clinoforms'), in particular, constitute a hitherto overlooked depositional model for ancient shallow-marine sandbodies. The topset-to-foreset rollovers of subaqueous deltas are developed at up to 60 m water depths, such that ancient delta-scale clinoforms should not be assumed to record the position of ancient shorelines, even if they are sandstone-rich. This study analyses a large dataset of modern and ancient delta-scale, shelf-prism- and continental-margin-scale clinoforms, in order to characterise diagnostic features of different clinoform systems, and particularly of delta-scale subaqueous clinoforms. Such diagnostic criteria allow different clinoform types and their dominant grain-size characteristics to be interpreted in seismic reflection and/or sedimentological data, and prove that all clinoforms are subject to similar physical laws. The examined dataset demonstrates that progressively larger scale clinoforms are deposited in increasingly deeper waters, over progressively larger time spans. Consequently, depositional flux, sedimentation and progradation rates of continental-margin clinoforms are up to 4-6 orders of magnitude lower than those of deltas. For all clinoform types, due to strong statistical correlations between these parameters, it is now possible to calculate clinoform paleobathymetries once clinoform heights, age spans or progradation rates have been constrained. Muddy and sandy delta-scale subaqueous clinoforms show many different features, but all share four characteristics. (1) They are formed during relative sea-level stillstands (e.g., Late

  2. Phenotypic changes associated with DYNACTIN-2 (DCTN2) over expression characterise SJSA-1 osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bransfield, Kieran L; Askham, Jon M; Leek, Jack P; Robinson, Philip A; Mighell, Alan J

    2006-03-01

    DYNACTIN-2 (DCTN2) localises to chromosome 12q13-q15, a region prone to stable amplification in several cancers. Transient DCTN2 overexpression has a significant impact on cellular phenotype primarily due to disruption of the DYNEIN-dynactin motor. Changes reported include alterations of microtubule-directed movement of molecular (e.g. TP53) and organelle (e.g. Golgi) cargoes towards the nucleus, centrosome biology, cellular movement and mitosis with a potential predisposition to mitotic block and polyploidy. These changes would be expected to be of relevance to carcinogenesis. To investigate this, we report the first study of DCTN2 genomic amplification and sustained DCTN2 overexpression in cancer cells. QFMPCR was employed to characterise the extent of chromosome 12q13-q15 amplicons in SJSA-1, SJRH30, U373MG and CCF-STTG1 cancer cells. DCTN2 amplification was present in SJSA-1, U373MG and SJRH30 cells, yet was incomplete at the 5'-end in SJRH30 cells. Only SJSA-1 cells were characterised by DCTN2 overexpression on Western blot analyses. Microscopy studies distinguished SJSA-1 cells by greater DCTN2 immunofluorescence and diminished centrosome and 58K protein Golgi-marker focus compared to SJRH30 cells. Indirect evidence derived from the published work of others indicated that TP53 transport into the nucleus was unimpaired. Furthermore, we observed that SJSA-1 cells were easy to propagate. In conclusion, persistent DCTN2 overexpression can be tolerated in SJSA-1 cancer cells despite phenotypic abnormalities predicted from transient overexpression studies. This preliminary study does not support a major role for DCTN2 overexpression in carcinogenesis, although further studies would be necessary to confirm this. PMID:16369996

  3. Radioimmunoassay for hepatitis B core antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnelli, E.; Pereira, C.; Triolo, G.; Vernace, S.; Paronetto, F.

    1982-02-01

    Serum hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is an important marker of hepatitis B virus replication. We describe an easy, sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of HBcAg in detergent-treated serum pellets containing Dane particles. Components of a commercial kit for anticore determination are used, and HBcAG is measured by competitive inhibition of binding of /sub 125/I-labeled antibodies to HBcAg with HBcAg-coated beads. We assayed for HBcAG in the sera of 49 patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive chronic hepatitis, 50 patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis, and 30 healthy volunteers. HBcAg was detected in 41% of patients with HBsAg-positive chronic hepatitis but not in patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis Be antigen (an antigen closely associated with the core of Dane particles) determined in the same sera by radioimmunoassay, was not detected in 50% of HBcAg-positive sera.

  4. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  5. Virion and soluble antigens of japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Eckels, K H; Hetrick, F M; Russell, P K

    1975-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virions contain a 58 X 10-3-molecular-weight envelope glycoprotein antigen that can be solubilized with sodium lauryl sulfate and separated from other virion structural polypeptides and viral ribonucleic acid by gel filtration chromatography. The 58 X 10-3-molecular-weight envelope protein is the major antigen responsible for cross-reactivity of the virion in complement fixation tests with other closely related arboviruses. A naturally occurring soluble complement-fixing antigen is found in Japanese encephalitis mouse brain preparations after removal of particulate antigens. After partial purification by gel filtration and isoelectric focusing, the 53 X 10-3-molecular weight soluble complement-fixing antigen is more type specific than the Japanese encephalitis envelope antigen in complement fixation tests. Further, the Japanese encephalitis soluble complement-fixing antigen is stable to treatment with sodium lauryl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, whereas virion complement-fixing antigens are unstable after this treatment. Images PMID:47312

  6. Identification of genes encoding Schistosoma mansoni antigens using an antigenic sequence tag strategy.

    PubMed

    Zouain, C S; Azevedo, V A; Franco, G R; Pena, S D; Goes, A M

    1998-12-01

    Another approach for the identification of genes that code for antigenic products is described using an antigenic sequence tag (AST) strategy. A Schistosoma mansoni adult worm cDNA library was screened with affinity chromatography-purified immunoglobulins from infected human sera and a mild oxidation treatment with sodium periodate. From 1 or both ends of 30 cDNA clones, 30 ASTs were obtained. Of these, 22 were previously known Sm antigens. One clone had matches with entries for other organisms in the databases and 6 had homology with Sm-expressed sequence tags (EST) entries. These clones, together with another 1 that had no significant database matches, were considered new antigenic genes in S. mansoni. The strategy proved to be efficient for the identification of genes that could be used for immunological studies and evaluation as vaccine candidates. PMID:9920341

  7. Bacterial antigen detection in body fluids: methods for rapid antigen concentration and reduction of nonspecific reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Doskeland, S O; Berdal, B P

    1980-01-01

    We sought procedures which would allow a rapid concentration in high yield of bacterial antigens from tissue fluids of patients and which could be applied also to protein-rich fluids like serum. Ethanol precipitation at a subzero temperature with albumin added as an antigen coprecipitant made it possible to achieve a more than 20-fold concentration of antigen in 15 min and a 200-fold concentration in 45 min. Heat-stable antigens could be concentrated from protein-rich fluids (like serum) after the sample had been deproteinized by boiling. Such heating (100 degrees C, 3 min) also liberated bacterial polysaccharides from antibody complexes and elminated the nonspecific interference of serum in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:7372801

  8. Immunohistological distribution of 5T4 antigen in normal and malignant tissues.

    PubMed

    Southall, P J; Boxer, G M; Bagshawe, K D; Hole, N; Bromley, M; Stern, P L

    1990-01-01

    A trophoblast cell surface antigen has been characterised by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 5T4, raised following immunisation with solubilised wheat germ agglutinin binding glycoproteins from human syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane (StMPM). The expression of the 72 kDa glycoprotein was assessed on cryostat sections of a range of neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues, using an avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase technique. In products of conception, intense reactions were noted with villous syncytiotrophoblast membrane in normal early and term placenta, with weaker positivity of placental site trophoblast. Most normal or non-neoplastic tissues were negative, including liver, kidney, spleen, small intestine, ovary and testis. Faint or moderate positive reactions were present in some specialised epithelia. Of 115 neoplasms examined, 76 showed reactions with tumour cells including carcinomas of the bladder, breast, cervix, endometrium, lung, oesophagus, ovary, pancreas, stomach and testicular non-seminomatous germ cell tumours. Choriocarcinomas and placental site trophoblastic tumours were also positive. Most adenocarcinomas of colon and seminomas were negative as were all malignant melanomas and malignant lymphomas. A radioimmunoassay did not detect the antigen in either normal or pregnancy serum. The relatively low level of expression in normal tissues and reactivity with a wide range of carcinomas suggested that the antibody may be useful in diagnostic or targeting studies. PMID:2404511

  9. Characterising atmospheric optical turbulence using stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, James; Butterley, Tim; Föhring, Dora; Wilson, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Stereo-SCIDAR (SCIntillation Detection and Ranging) is a development to the well known SCIDAR method for characterisation of the Earth's atmospheric optical turbulence. Here we present some interesting capabilities, comparisons and results from a recent campaign on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma.

  10. Characterisation of Balance Capacity in Prader-Willi Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capodaglio, Paolo; Menegoni, Francesco; Vismara, Luca; Cimolin, Veronica; Grugni, Graziano; Galli, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Being severely overweight is a distinctive clinical feature of Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS). This explorative study aims to characterise balance capacity in PWS as compared to non-genetically obese patients (O) and to a group of normal-weight individuals (CG). We enrolled 14 PWS patients: 8 females and 6 males (BMI = 41.3 [plus or minus] 7.3…

  11. Isolation and antigenicity of a 45-kilodalton Paracoccidioides brasiliensis immunodominant antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Cruz, M F; Galvão-Castro, B; Daniel-Ribeiro, C

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed human antibody responses to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cellular antigens by the immunoblot technique to identify specific cellular components and to investigate the existence of antigen profile differences among serological responses of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) patients. Among the 64 PCM serum samples analyzed, a relatively homogeneous immunoglobulin G response to P. brasiliensis antigens was observed. The polypeptide with a mass of 45 kDa was the most clinically important, since antibody to this antigen was detectable in 90.6% of PCM patients studied and the six individuals who did not produce antibody were either at the end of treatment or in the posttherapy period and had shown clinical recovery. These facts suggested that the presence of this antibody may be an indicator of active disease. The 45-kDa antigen was also the most specific antigen of the PCM humoral immune response, since it reacted with only 2 of 79 (2.5%) heterologous serum samples tested: 1 histoplasmosis case and 1 tuberculosis case. This polypeptide was isolated from gels by electroelution and, when tested by an immunoradiometric assay and immunoblotting, maintained its reactivity with PCM sera and also with anti-P. brasiliensis polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits at the same sensitivity levels as those obtained in immunoblotting with a crude antigen. Since in our assays the 45-kDa polypeptide was the major P. brasiliensis antigen and seemed to be specific for PCM, its use in alternative diagnostic methods is promising, especially in patients suspected of having the juvenile clinical form of PCM often associated with negative double-immunodiffusion results. Images PMID:1612736

  12. [Identification of serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuegui; He, Lifang; Yuan, Shishan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To isolate and identify serological antigens in the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by the combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technology. Methods The serum IgG of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Muscle larvaes were isolated from the infected muscle, and then purified and cultured to collect excretory-secretory antigens. Serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens were isolated by co-immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE, and analyzed by Western blotting. Moreover, the protein bands in New Zealand rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis were identified by mass spectrometric technology. Results Indirect ELISA showed that the titer of serum antibody of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was 1:6400. The rabbit serum IgG was effectively isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. A total of four clear protein bands of the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis were obtained by electrophoresis. Among them, three clear protein bands with relative molecular mass (Mr) being 40 kDa, 50 kDa and 83 kDa were recognized by the rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis but not recognized by the normal rabbit sera. The obtained four protein molecules were confirmed as serine protease, specific serine protease of muscle larvae, 43 kDa secreted glycoprotein and 53 kDa excretory-secretory antigen. Conclusion Four proteins were obtained from the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technique analysis, which provided new sources and insights for the diagnosis and vaccine candidates of Trichinellosis. PMID:27126943

  13. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  14. Mapping Antigenic Motifs in the Trypomastigote Small Surface Antigen from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Balouz, Virginia; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Cánepa, Gaspar E.; Carmona, Santiago J.; Volcovich, Romina; Gonzalez, Nicolás; Altcheh, Jaime; Agüero, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The trypomastigote small surface antigen (TSSA) is a mucin-like molecule from Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which displays amino acid polymorphisms in parasite isolates. TSSA expression is restricted to the surface of infective cell-derived trypomastigotes, where it functions as an adhesin and engages surface receptors on the host cell as a prerequisite for parasite internalization. Previous results have established TSSA-CL, the isoform encoded by the CL Brener clone, as an appealing candidate for use in serology-based diagnostics for Chagas disease. Here, we used a combination of peptide- and recombinant protein-based tools to map the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL at maximal resolution. Our results indicate the presence of different partially overlapping B-cell epitopes clustering in the central portion of TSSA-CL, which contains most of the polymorphisms found in parasite isolates. Based on these results, we assessed the serodiagnostic performance of a 21-amino-acid-long peptide that spans TSSA-CL major antigenic determinants, which was similar to the performance of the previously validated glutathione S-transferase (GST)-TSSA-CL fusion molecule. Furthermore, the tools developed for the antigenic characterization of the TSSA antigen were also used to explore other potential diagnostic applications of the anti-TSSA humoral response in Chagasic patients. Overall, our present results provide additional insights into the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL and support this molecule as an excellent target for molecular intervention in Chagas disease. PMID:25589551

  15. Immunoediting and Antigen Loss: Overcoming the Achilles Heel of Immunotherapy with Antigen Non-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Monjazeb, Arta Monir; Zamora, Anthony E.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Mirsoian, Annie; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a mainstream therapy option in the battle against cancer. Pre-clinical data demonstrates the ability of immunotherapy to harness the immune system to fight disseminated malignancy. Clinical translation has failed to recapitulate the promising results of pre-clinical studies although there have been some successes. In this review we explore some of the short-comings of cancer immunotherapy that have limited successful clinical translation. We will give special consideration to what we consider the most formidable hurdle to successful cancer immunotherapy: tumor-induced immune suppression and immune escape. We will discuss the need for antigen-specific immune responses for successful immunotherapy but also consider the need for antigen specificity as an Achilles heel of immunotherapy given tumor heterogeneity, immune editing, and antigen loss. Finally, we will discuss how combinatorial strategies may overcome some of the pitfalls of antigen specificity and highlight recent studies from our lab which suggest that the induction of antigen non-specific immune responses may also produce robust anti-tumor effects and bypass the need for antigen specificity. PMID:23898464

  16. Comparison of Schistosoma mansoni Soluble Cercarial Antigens and Soluble Egg Antigens for Serodiagnosing Schistosome Infections

    PubMed Central

    Doenhoff, Mike; Aitken, Cara; Bailey, Wendi; Ji, Minjun; Dawson, Emily; Gilis, Henk; Spence, Grant; Alexander, Claire; van Gool, Tom

    2012-01-01

    A Schistosoma mansoni cercarial antigen preparation (cercarial transformation fluid – SmCTF) was evaluated for detection of anti-schistosome antibodies in human sera in 4 collaborating laboratories. The performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. mansoni egg antigens (SmSEA) in an indirect enzyme-immunoassay (ELISA) antigen assay, the latter being used routinely in 3 of the 4 participating laboratories to diagnose S. mansoni and S. haematobium infections. In the fourth laboratory the performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. japonicum egg antigens (SjSEA) in ELISA for detection of anti-S. japonicum antibodies. In all 4 laboratories the results given by SmCTF in ELISA were very similar to those given by the antigen preparation routinely used in the respective laboratory to detect anti-schistosome antibodies in human infection sera. In so far as the ELISA results from SmCTF are thus so little different from those given by schistosome egg antigens and also cheaper to produce, the former is a potentially useful new diagnostic aid for schistosomiasis. PMID:23029577

  17. Anisakis antigens detected in fish muscle infested with Anisakis simplex L3.

    PubMed

    Solas, M Teresa; García, Maria Luisa; Rodriguez-Mahillo, Ana I; Gonzalez-Munoz, Miguel; de las Heras, Cristina; Tejada, Margarita

    2008-06-01

    Anisakis simplex is a fish parasite that is a public health risk to those consuming raw or poorly cooked marine fish and cephalopods because of the possibility of becoming infested with live larvae. In humans, penetration of the larvae into the gastrointestinal track can cause acute and chronic symptoms and allergic anisakiasis. Excretion and secretion products released by the larvae are thought to play a role in migration through the tissues and induce an immunoglobulin E-mediated immune response. The aim of this preliminary study was to detect parasite antigens and allergens in fish tissues surrounding the migrating larvae. Hake and anchovy fillets were artificially parasitized with Anisakis larvae and stored in chilled conditions for 5 days. Larvae were evaluated for fluorescence, fish muscle tissue was examined with transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical reactions of two rabbit polyclonal antisera against a parasite crude extract and the allergen Ani s 4 were recorded. Larvae immediately migrated into the fish muscle, and no emission of bluish fluorescence was observed. Fish muscle areas in contact with the parasite showed disruptions in the structure and inclusion of granules within sarcomeres. Both parasite antigens and the Ani s 4 allergen were located in areas close to the larvae and where sarcomere structure was preserved. These findings indicate that parasite antigens and allergens are dispersed into the muscle and might cause allergic symptoms such as dyspnea, vomiting, diarrhea, urticaria, angioedema, or anaphylaxis in some individuals sensitive to A. simplex. PMID:18592760

  18. Modified tumour antigen-encoding mRNA facilitates the analysis of naturally occurring and vaccine-induced CD4 and CD8 T cells in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Knights, Ashley J; Nuber, Natko; Thomson, Christopher W; de la Rosa, Olga; Jäger, Elke; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; van den Broek, Maries; Pascolo, Steve; Knuth, Alexander; Zippelius, Alfred

    2009-03-01

    The development of effective anti-cancer vaccines requires precise assessment of vaccine-induced immunity. This is often hampered by low ex vivo frequencies of antigen-specific T cells and limited defined epitopes. This study investigates the applicability of modified, in vitro-transcribed mRNA encoding a therapeutically relevant tumour antigen to analyse T cell responses in cancer patients. In this study transfection of antigen presenting cells, by mRNA encoding the tumour antigen NY-ESO-1, was optimised and applied to address spontaneous and vaccine-induced T cell responses in cancer patients. Memory CD8+ T cells from lung cancer patients having detectable humoral immune responses directed towards NY-ESO-1 could be efficiently detected in peripheral blood. Specific T cells utilised a range of different T cell receptors, indicating a polyclonal response. Specific killing of a panel of NY-ESO-1 expressing tumour cell lines indicates recognition restricted to several HLA allelic variants, including a novel HLA-B49 epitope. Using a modified mRNA construct targeting the translated antigen to the secretory pathway, detection of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells in patients could be enhanced, which allowed the in-depth characterisation of established T cell clones. Moreover, broad CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses covering multiple epitopes were detected following mRNA stimulation of patients treated with a recombinant vaccinia/fowlpox NY-ESO-1 vaccine. This approach allows for a precise monitoring of responses to tumour antigens in a setting that addresses the breadth and magnitude of antigen-specific T cell responses, and that is not limited to a particular combination of known epitopes and HLA-restrictions. PMID:18663444

  19. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  20. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  1. Immunity to Intracellular Salmonella Depends on Surface-associated Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Claudi, Beatrice; Mazé, Alain; Schemmer, Anne K.; Kirchhoff, Dennis; Schmidt, Alexander; Burton, Neil; Bumann, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Invasive Salmonella infection is an important health problem that is worsening because of rising antimicrobial resistance and changing Salmonella serovar spectrum. Novel vaccines with broad serovar coverage are needed, but suitable protective antigens remain largely unknown. Here, we tested 37 broadly conserved Salmonella antigens in a mouse typhoid fever model, and identified antigen candidates that conferred partial protection against lethal disease. Antigen properties such as high in vivo abundance or immunodominance in convalescent individuals were not required for protectivity, but all promising antigen candidates were associated with the Salmonella surface. Surprisingly, this was not due to superior immunogenicity of surface antigens compared to internal antigens as had been suggested by previous studies and novel findings for CD4 T cell responses to model antigens. Confocal microscopy of infected tissues revealed that many live Salmonella resided alone in infected host macrophages with no damaged Salmonella releasing internal antigens in their vicinity. In the absence of accessible internal antigens, detection of these infected cells might require CD4 T cell recognition of Salmonella surface-associated antigens that could be processed and presented even from intact Salmonella. In conclusion, our findings might pave the way for development of an efficacious Salmonella vaccine with broad serovar coverage, and suggest a similar crucial role of surface antigens for immunity to both extracellular and intracellular pathogens. PMID:23093937

  2. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  3. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  4. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  5. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-06-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to -lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with -lactamase in Freund's adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund's adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. backbone flexibility | Freund's adjuvant | conformational epitope | antisera

  6. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in Seibert fractions by immunoblotting.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, S R; Hansen, D; Schecter, G; Slutkin, G; Hopewell, P; Affronti, L; Echenberg, D F

    1986-01-01

    Seibert fractions prepared from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrates were evaluated by immunoblotting with a serum pool from patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Antibody activity was observed primarily with antigens in the polysaccharide II and A protein fractions; these fractions were further evaluated by immunoblotting with sera from individual patients with tuberculosis, from individuals without tuberculosis and positive for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test, and from individuals negative for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test. The antigens identified in the protein A fraction, a 32,000-molecular-weight antigen and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen, reacted with antibody found in sera from all patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from over 25% of the control individuals. A 10,000-molecular-weight antigen, a 30,000- to 44,000-molecular-weight antigen, and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen were observed in the polysaccharide II fraction; these antigens reacted with serum antibody from 70% or more of the patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from 20 to 70% of the control individuals. One of the antigens, with a molecular weight ranging from 17,000 to 28,000 in the polysaccharide II fraction, reacted with antibody in 64% of the sera from patients with tuberculosis but with only 1 of 15 control normal sera. This antigen may elicit an antibody response specifically associated with tuberculosis. Images PMID:3088029

  7. The intracellular pathway for the presentation of vitamin B-related antigens by the antigen-presenting molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Eckle, Sidonia B G; Theodossis, Alex; Liu, Ligong; Chen, Zhenjun; Wubben, Jacinta M; Fairlie, David P; Strugnell, Richard A; Mintern, Justine D; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Villadangos, Jose A

    2016-05-01

    The antigen-presenting molecule MR1 presents vitamin B-related antigens (VitB antigens) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells through an uncharacterized pathway. We show that MR1, unlike other antigen-presenting molecules, does not constitutively present self-ligands. In the steady state it accumulates in a ligand-receptive conformation within the endoplasmic reticulum. VitB antigens reach this location and form a Schiff base with MR1, triggering a 'molecular switch' that allows MR1-VitB antigen complexes to traffic to the plasma membrane. These complexes are endocytosed with kinetics independent of the affinity of the MR1-ligand interaction and are degraded intracellularly, although some MR1 molecules acquire new ligands during passage through endosomes and recycle back to the surface. MR1 antigen presentation is characterized by a rapid 'off-on-off' mechanism that is strictly dependent on antigen availability. PMID:27043408

  8. Genesis Preliminary Examination Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, K. M.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of preliminary examination of the Genesis sample collectors is to provide information on the condition and availability of collector materials to the science community as a basis for allocation requests. Similarly, the information will be used by the Genesis Sample Allocation sub-committee of CAPTEM to determine the optimum allocation scheme, and by the Genesis Curator to determine the processing sequence for allocation production. The plan includes a decision process and detailed examination and documentation protocol for whole arrays and individual collectors (wafers, concentrator targets, bulk metallic glass, gold foil, and polished aluminum). It also includes a plan for communicating the information obtained to the scientific community. The plan does not include a detailed plan for preliminary examination of the SRC lid foil collectors, the process for removal of individual collectors from their frames, or for the subsequent subdivision of collector materials for allocation.

  9. Molecular and immunological characterisation of Theileria parva stocks which are components of the 'Muguga cocktail' used for vaccination against East Coast fever in cattle.

    PubMed

    Bishop, R; Geysen, D; Spooner, P; Skilton, R; Nene, V; Dolan, T; Morzaria, S

    2001-01-20

    The 'Muguga cocktail' which is composed of three Theileria parva stocks Muguga, Kiambu 5 and Serengeti-transformed has been used extensively for live vaccination against East Coast fever in cattle in eastern, central and southern Africa. Herein we describe the molecular characterisation of the T. parva vaccine stocks using three techniques, an indirect fluorescent antibody test with a panel of anti-schizont monoclonal antibodies (MAb), Southern blotting with four T. parva repetitive DNA probes and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays detecting polymorphism within four single copy loci encoding antigen genes. The Muguga and Serengeti-transformed stocks exhibited no obvious differences in their reactivity with the panel of MAbs, whereas Kiambu 5 differed with several MAbs. Kiambu 5 DNA was very distinct from the Muguga and Serengeti-transformed isolates in the hybridisation pattern with all four nucleic acid probes, whereas Muguga and Serengeti-transformed isolates exhibited minor differences and could not be discriminated with one of the probes. PCR amplification in combination with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis indicated that Kiambu 5 was also markedly divergent from the Muguga and Serengeti-transformed stocks within two of the four antigen coding genes. The T. parva Serengeti-transformed stock did not contain a 130 base pair insert within the p67 sporozoite antigen gene, which has been observed previously in most T. parva parasites isolated from buffalo, and could not be discriminated from T. parva Muguga at any of the four single copy loci. Collectively the data indicate that two of the cocktail components T. parva Serengeti-transformed and Muguga are genetically closely related, while the third component Kiambu 5 is quite distinct. Based on the findings, there may be a need to include only one of the T. parva Muguga and Serengeti-transformed components in the immunising cocktail. The study demonstrates the value of molecular

  10. On Preliminary Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, W. H.; Petersen, D.

    2013-12-01

    The preliminary breakdown phase of a negative cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed in detail. Observations were made with a Photron SA1.1 high-speed video camera operating at 9,000 frames per second, fast optical sensors, a flat-plate electric field antenna covering the SLF to MF band, and VHF and UHF radio receivers with bandwidths of 20 MHz. Bright stepwise extensions of a negative leader were observed at an altitude of 8 km during the first few milliseconds of the flash, and were coincident with bipolar electric field pulses called 'characteristic pulses'. The 2-D step lengths of the preliminary processes were in excess of 100 meters, with some 2-D step lengths in excess of 200 meters. Smaller and shorter unipolar electric field pulses were superposed onto the bipolar electric field pulses, and were coincident with VHF and UHF radio pulses. After a few milliseconds, the emerging negative stepped leader system showed a marked decrease in luminosity, step length, and propagation velocity. Details of these events will be discussed, including the possibility that the preliminary breakdown phase consists not of a single developing lightning leader system, but of multiple smaller lightning leader systems that eventually join together into a single system.