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Sample records for premature mortality due

  1. Premature mortality in India due to PM2.5 and ozone exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghude, Sachin D.; Chate, D. M.; Jena, C.; Beig, G.; Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Pfister, G. G.; Fadnavis, S.; Pithani, Prakash

    2016-05-01

    This bottom-up modeling study, supported by new population census 2011 data, simulates ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure on local to regional scales. It quantifies, present-day premature mortalities associated with the exposure to near-surface PM2.5 and O3 concentrations in India using a regional chemistry model. We estimate that PM2.5 exposure leads to about 570,000 (CI95: 320,000-730,000) premature mortalities in 2011. On a national scale, our estimate of mortality by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to O3 exposure is about 12,000 people. The Indo-Gangetic region accounts for a large part (~42%) of the estimated mortalities. The associated lost life expectancy is calculated as 3.4 ± 1.1 years for all of India with highest values found for Delhi (6.3 ± 2.2 years). The economic cost of estimated premature mortalities associated with PM2.5 and O3 exposure is about 640 (350-800) billion USD in 2011, which is a factor of 10 higher than total expenditure on health by public and private expenditure.

  2. Sex and Racial/Ethnic Differences in Premature Mortality Due to HIV: Florida, 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Niyonsenga, Theophile; Fennie, Kristopher P.; McKelvey, Karma; Lieb, Spencer; Maddox, Lorene M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to characterize premature mortality among people diagnosed with HIV infection from 2000 to 2009 in Florida, by sex and race/ethnicity, to estimate differences in premature mortality that could be prevented by linkage to HIV care and treatment. Methods Florida surveillance data for HIV diagnoses (excluding concurrent AIDS diagnoses) were linked with vital records data to ascertain deaths through 2011. Years of potential life lost (YPLL) were obtained from the expected number of remaining years of life at a given age from the U.S. sex-specific period life tables. Results Among 41,565 people diagnosed with HIV infection during the study period, 5,249 died, and 2,563 (48.8%) deaths were due to HIV/AIDS. Age-standardized YPLL (aYPLL) due to HIV/AIDS per 1,000 person-years was significantly higher for females than males (372.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 349.8, 396.2 vs. 295.2, 95% CI 278.4, 312.5); for non-Hispanic black (NHB) females than non-Hispanic white (NHW) and Hispanic females (388.2, 95% CI 360.7, 416.9; 294.3, 95% CI 239.8, 354.9; and 295.0, 95% CI 242.9, 352.5, respectively); and for NHB males compared with NHW and Hispanic males (378.7, 95% CI 353.7, 404.7; 210.6, 95% CI 174.3, 250.8; and 240.9, 95% CI 204.8, 280.2, respectively). In multilevel modeling controlling for individual factors, NHB race was associated with YPLL due to HIV/AIDS for women (p=0.04) and men (p<0.001). Conclusion Among people diagnosed with HIV infection, females and NHB people had a disproportionately high premature mortality from HIV/AIDS, suggesting the need for enhanced efforts to improve linkage to and retention in care and medication adherence for these groups. PMID:26327728

  3. Multimodel estimates of premature human mortality due to intercontinental transport of air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Silva, R.; West, J. J.; Sudo, K.; Lund, M. T.; Emmons, L. K.; Takemura, T.; Bian, H.

    2015-12-01

    Numerous modeling studies indicate that emissions from one continent influence air quality over others. Reducing air pollutant emissions from one continent can therefore benefit air quality and health on multiple continents. Here, we estimate the impacts of the intercontinental transport of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on premature human mortality by using an ensemble of global chemical transport models coordinated by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP). We use simulations of 20% reductions of all anthropogenic emissions from 13 regions (North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Northern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Former Soviet Union, Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, and Australia) to calculate their impact on premature mortality within each region and elsewhere in the world. To better understand the impact of potential control strategies, we also analyze premature mortality for global 20% perturbations from five sectors individually: power and industry, ground transport, forest and savannah fires, residential, and others (shipping, aviation, and agriculture). Following previous studies, premature human mortality resulting from each perturbation scenario is calculated using a health impact function based on a log-linear model for O3 and an integrated exposure response model for PM2.5 to estimate relative risk. The spatial distribution of the exposed population (adults aged 25 and over) is obtained from the LandScan 2011 Global Population Dataset. Baseline mortality rates for chronic respiratory disease, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer are estimated from the GBD 2010 country-level mortality dataset for the exposed population. Model results are regridded from each model's original grid to a common 0.5°x0.5° grid used to estimate mortality. We perform uncertainty analysis and evaluate the sensitivity

  4. Model calculated global, regional and megacity premature mortality due to air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Barlas, C.; Giannadaki, D.; Pozzer, A.

    2013-07-01

    Air pollution by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) has increased strongly with industrialization and urbanization. We estimate the premature mortality rates and the years of human life lost (YLL) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 and O3 in 2005 for epidemiological regions defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). This is based upon high-resolution global model calculations that resolve urban and industrial regions in greater detail compared to previous work. Results indicate that 69% of the global population is exposed to an annual mean anthropogenic PM2.5 concentration of >10 μg m-3 (WHO guideline) and 33% to > 25 μg m-3 (EU directive). We applied an epidemiological health impact function and find that especially in large countries with extensive suburban and rural populations, air pollution-induced mortality rates have been underestimated given that previous studies largely focused on the urban environment. We calculate a global respiratory mortality of about 773 thousand/year (YLL ≈ 5.2 million/year), 186 thousand/year by lung cancer (YLL ≈ 1.7 million/year) and 2.0 million/year by cardiovascular disease (YLL ≈ 14.3 million/year). The global mean per capita mortality caused by air pollution is about 0.1% yr-1. The highest premature mortality rates are found in the Southeast Asia and Western Pacific regions (about 25% and 46% of the global rate, respectively) where more than a dozen of the most highly polluted megacities are located.

  5. Exploring the uncertainty associated with satellite-based estimates of premature mortality due to exposure to fine particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, B.; Heald, C. L.

    2015-09-01

    The negative impacts of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure on human health are a primary motivator for air quality research. However, estimates of the air pollution health burden vary considerably and strongly depend on the datasets and methodology. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been widely used to overcome limited coverage from surface monitoring and to assess the global population exposure to PM2.5 and the associated premature mortality. Here we quantify the uncertainty in determining the burden of disease using this approach, discuss different methods and datasets, and explain sources of discrepancies among values in the literature. For this purpose we primarily use the MODIS satellite observations in concert with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. We contrast results in the United States and China for the years 2004-2011. We estimate that in the United States, exposure to PM2.5 accounts for approximately 4 % of total deaths compared to 22 % in China (using satellite-based exposure), which falls within the range of previous estimates. The difference in estimated mortality burden based solely on a global model vs. that derived from satellite is approximately 9 % for the US and 4 % for China on a nationwide basis, although regionally the differences can be much greater. This difference is overshadowed by the uncertainty in the methodology for deriving PM2.5 burden from satellite observations, which we quantify to be on order of 20 % due to uncertainties in the AOD-to-surface-PM2.5 relationship, 10 % due to the satellite observational uncertainty, and 30 % or greater uncertainty associated with the application of concentration response functions to estimated exposure.

  6. Exploring the uncertainty associated with satellite-based estimates of premature mortality due to exposure to fine particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Bonne; Heald, Colette L.

    2016-03-01

    The negative impacts of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure on human health are a primary motivator for air quality research. However, estimates of the air pollution health burden vary considerably and strongly depend on the data sets and methodology. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been widely used to overcome limited coverage from surface monitoring and to assess the global population exposure to PM2.5 and the associated premature mortality. Here we quantify the uncertainty in determining the burden of disease using this approach, discuss different methods and data sets, and explain sources of discrepancies among values in the literature. For this purpose we primarily use the MODIS satellite observations in concert with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. We contrast results in the United States and China for the years 2004-2011. Using the Burnett et al. (2014) integrated exposure response function, we estimate that in the United States, exposure to PM2.5 accounts for approximately 2 % of total deaths compared to 14 % in China (using satellite-based exposure), which falls within the range of previous estimates. The difference in estimated mortality burden based solely on a global model vs. that derived from satellite is approximately 14 % for the US and 2 % for China on a nationwide basis, although regionally the differences can be much greater. This difference is overshadowed by the uncertainty in the methodology for deriving PM2.5 burden from satellite observations, which we quantify to be on the order of 20 % due to uncertainties in the AOD-to-surface-PM2.5 relationship, 10 % due to the satellite observational uncertainty, and 30 % or greater uncertainty associated with the application of concentration response functions to estimated exposure.

  7. Potential Years of Life Lost Due to Premature Mortality Among Treatment-Seeking Illicit Drug Users in Finland.

    PubMed

    Onyeka, Ifeoma N; Beynon, Caryl M; Vohlonen, Ilkka; Tiihonen, Jari; Föhr, Jaana; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Kauhanen, Jussi

    2015-12-01

    Premature death is a serious public health concern. The primary objective of this study was to examine premature deaths in terms of potential years of life lost (PYLL) in a cohort of 4817 treatment-seeking illicit drug users. Clients' data were linked to the Finnish national cause-of-death register and the follow-up period ranged from 31 January 1997 to 31 December 2010. PYLL before 70 years was calculated for all deaths and cause-specific deaths by gender. We observed 496 deaths (417 males and 79 females) at the end of 2010. The mean age at death was 33.8 years, 34.3 years for males (range 18-68) and 31.4 years for females (range 16-53). Overall, 17,951 life years were lost; 14,898 among males and 3053 among females. The overall PYLL rate for males was more than twice that of females (513.0/1000 vs. 243.7/1000 person-years) but the mean PYLL was higher in females than males (38.6 vs. 35.7 years). Of the total PYLL, 34.8 % was due to accidental overdose, and 24.0 % to suicide. In both genders, accidental overdose and suicide were the two top-ranking causes of PYLL. Premature deaths among drug users are a potential loss to the society. Our findings suggest that measures targeting accidental overdose and suicide are top priorities for reducing preventable loss of life. PMID:25967278

  8. Development of a Deprivation Index and its relation to premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system in Hungary, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Attila; Nagy, Csilla; Páldy, Anna; Beale, Linda

    2010-05-01

    An association between health and socio-economic status is well known. Based on international and national studies, the aims of this study were to develop a multi-dimensional index at the municipality level, to provide information about socio-economic deprivation in Hungary and to investigate the association between socio-economic status and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system. Seven municipality level socio-economic indicators were used from the National Information System of Spatial Development (income, low qualification, unemployment, one-parent families, large families, density of housing and car ownership). After normalisation and standardisation, indicator weights were evaluated using factor analysis. A risk analysis study was conducted using the Rapid Inquiry Facility software to evaluate the association between deprivation and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system for the years 1998-2004. Areas of significantly high deprivation were identified in the northeastern, eastern and southwestern parts of Hungary. A statistically significant association was found between premature cardiovascular mortality and deprivation status in both genders. The Deprivation Index is the first composite index at the municipality level in Hungary and includes key factors that affect socio-economic status. The identified association highlighted the fact that inequalities in socio-economic status may reflect the spatial distribution of health status in a population. The results can be used to inform prevention strategies and help plan local health promotion programs aimed at reducing health inequalities. PMID:20199838

  9. Future Premature Mortality Due to O3, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and Primary PM in Europe — Sensitivity to Changes in Climate, Anthropogenic Emissions, Population and Building Stock

    PubMed Central

    Geels, Camilla; Andersson, Camilla; Hänninen, Otto; Lansø, Anne Sofie; Schwarze, Per E.; Ambelas Skjøth, Carsten; Brandt, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is an important environmental factor associated with health impacts in Europe and considerable resources are used to reduce exposure to air pollution through emission reductions. These reductions will have non-linear effects on exposure due, e.g., to interactions between climate and atmospheric chemistry. By using an integrated assessment model, we quantify the effect of changes in climate, emissions and population demography on exposure and health impacts in Europe. The sensitivity to the changes is assessed by investigating the differences between the decades 2000–2009, 2050–2059 and 2080–2089. We focus on the number of premature deaths related to atmospheric ozone, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and primary PM. For the Nordic region we furthermore include a projection on how population exposure might develop due to changes in building stock with increased energy efficiency. Reductions in emissions cause a large significant decrease in mortality, while climate effects on chemistry and emissions only affects premature mortality by a few percent. Changes in population demography lead to a larger relative increase in chronic mortality than the relative increase in population. Finally, the projected changes in building stock and infiltration rates in the Nordic indicate that this factor may be very important for assessments of population exposure in the future. PMID:25749320

  10. Future premature mortality due to O3, secondary inorganic aerosols and primary PM in Europe--sensitivity to changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions, population and building stock.

    PubMed

    Geels, Camilla; Andersson, Camilla; Hänninen, Otto; Lansø, Anne Sofie; Schwarze, Per E; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Brandt, Jørgen

    2015-03-01

    Air pollution is an important environmental factor associated with health impacts in Europe and considerable resources are used to reduce exposure to air pollution through emission reductions. These reductions will have non-linear effects on exposure due, e.g., to interactions between climate and atmospheric chemistry. By using an integrated assessment model, we quantify the effect of changes in climate, emissions and population demography on exposure and health impacts in Europe. The sensitivity to the changes is assessed by investigating the differences between the decades 2000-2009, 2050-2059 and 2080-2089. We focus on the number of premature deaths related to atmospheric ozone, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and primary PM. For the Nordic region we furthermore include a projection on how population exposure might develop due to changes in building stock with increased energy efficiency. Reductions in emissions cause a large significant decrease in mortality, while climate effects on chemistry and emissions only affects premature mortality by a few percent. Changes in population demography lead to a larger relative increase in chronic mortality than the relative increase in population. Finally, the projected changes in building stock and infiltration rates in the Nordic indicate that this factor may be very important for assessments of population exposure in the future. PMID:25749320

  11. Serbia within the European context: An analysis of premature mortality

    PubMed Central

    Santric Milicevic, Milena; Bjegovic, Vesna; Terzic, Zorica; Vukovic, Dejana; Kocev, Nikola; Marinkovic, Jelena; Vasic, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Background Based on the global predictions majority of deaths will be collectively caused by cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and traffic accidents over the coming 25 years. In planning future national health policy actions, inter – regional assessments play an important role. The purpose of the study was to analyze similarities and differences in premature mortality between Serbia, EURO A, EURO B, and EURO C regions in 2000. Methods Mortality and premature mortality patterns were analysed according to cause of death, by gender and seven age intervals. The study results are presented in relative (%) and absolute terms (age-specific and age-standardized death rates per 100,000 population, and age-standardized rates of years of life lost – YLL per 1,000). Direct standardization of rates was undertaken using the standard population of Europe. The inter-regional comparison was based on a calculation of differences in YLL structures and with a ratio of age-standardized YLL rates per 1,000. A multivariate generalized linear model was used to explore mortality of Serbia and Europe sub-regions with ln age-specific death rates. The dissimilarity was achieved with a p ≤ 0.05. Results According to the mortality pattern, Serbia was similar to EURO B, but with a lower average YLL per death case. YLL patterns indicated similarities between Serbia and EURO A, while SRR YLL had similarities between Serbia and EURO B. Compared to all Europe sub-regions, Serbia had a major excess of premature mortality in neoplasms and diabetes mellitus. Serbia had lost more years of life than EURO A due to cardiovascular, genitourinary diseases, and intentional injuries. Yet, Serbia was not as burdened with communicable diseases and injuries as were EURO B and EURO C. Conclusion With a premature mortality pattern, Serbia is placed in the middle position of the Europe triangle. The main excess of YLL in Serbia was due to cardiovascular, malignant diseases, and diabetes mellitus. The results

  12. The impact of pharmaceutical innovation on premature cancer mortality in Switzerland, 1995-2012.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Frank R

    2016-09-01

    The premature cancer mortality rate has been declining in Switzerland, but there has been considerable variation in the rate of decline across cancer sites (e.g., breast or digestive organs). I analyze the effect that pharmaceutical innovation had on premature cancer mortality in Switzerland during the period 1995-2012 by investigating whether the cancer sites that experienced more pharmaceutical innovation had larger declines in premature mortality, controlling for the number of people diagnosed and mean age at diagnosis. Premature cancer mortality before ages 75 and 65 is significantly inversely related to the cumulative number of drugs registered 5, 10, and 15 years earlier. The number of drugs registered during 1980-1997 explains 63 % of the variation across cancer sites in the 1995-2012 log change in the premature (before age 75) mortality rate. Controlling for the cumulative number of drugs, the cumulative number of chemical subgroups does not have a statistically significant effect on premature mortality. This suggests that drugs (chemical substances) within the same class (chemical subgroup) are not "therapeutically equivalent". Over 17,000 life-years before age 75 were gained in 2012 due to drugs registered during 1990-2007. The number of life-years before age 75 gained in 2012 from drugs registered during two earlier periods (1985-2002 and 1980-1997) were more than twice as great. Since mean utilization of new drugs is much lower than mean utilization of older drugs, more recent drug registrations may have a smaller effect on premature mortality than earlier drug registrations even if the average quality of newer drugs is higher. Estimates of the cost per life-year gained before ages 75 and 65 in 2012 from drugs registered during 1990-2007 are $21,228 and $28,673, respectively. These figures are below even the lowest estimates from the value-of-life literature of the value of a quality-adjusted life-year. The estimates indicate that the cost per life

  13. Adverse childhood experiences and premature all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Irving, Michelle; Lepage, Benoit; Dedieu, Dominique; Bartley, Mel; Blane, David; Grosclaude, Pascale; Lang, Thierry; Delpierre, Cyrille

    2013-09-01

    Events causing stress responses during sensitive periods of rapid neurological development in childhood may be early determinants of all-cause premature mortality. Using a British birth cohort study of individuals born in 1958, the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and mortality≤50 year was examined for men (n=7,816) and women (n=7,405) separately. ACE were measured using prospectively collected reports from parents and the school: no adversities (70%); one adversity (22%), two or more adversities (8%). A Cox regression model was carried out controlling for early life variables and for characteristics at 23 years. In men the risk of death was 57% higher among those who had experienced 2+ ACE compared to those with none (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.13, 2.18, p=0.007). In women, a graded relationship was observed between ACE and mortality, the risk increasing as ACE accumulated. Women with one ACE had a 66% increased risk of death (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.19, 2.33, p=0.003) and those with ≥2 ACE had an 80% increased risk (HR 1.80, 95% CI 1.10, 2.95, p=0.020) versus those with no ACE. Given the small impact of adult life style factors on the association between ACE and premature mortality, biological embedding during sensitive periods in early development is a plausible explanatory mechanism. PMID:23887883

  14. Skewed birth sex ratio and premature mortality in elephants.

    PubMed

    Saragusty, Joseph; Hermes, Robert; Göritz, Frank; Schmitt, Dennis L; Hildebrandt, Thomas B

    2009-10-01

    Sex allocation theories predict equal offspring number of both sexes unless differential investment is required or some competition exists. Left undisturbed, elephants reproduce well and in approximately even numbers in the wild. We report an excess of males are born and substantial juvenile mortality occurs, perinatally, in captivity. Studbook data on captive births (CB, n=487) and premature deaths (PD, <5 years of age; n=164) in Asian and African elephants in Europe and North America were compared with data on Myanmar timber (Asian) elephants (CB, n=3070; PD, n=738). Growth in CB was found in three of the captive populations. A significant excess of male births occurred in European Asian elephants (ratio: 0.61, P=0.044) and in births following artificial insemination (0.83, P=0.003), and a numerical inclination in North American African elephants (0.6). While juvenile mortality in European African and Myanmar populations was 21-23%, it was almost double (40-45%) in all other captive populations. In zoo populations, 68-91% of PD were within 1 month of birth with stillbirth and infanticide being major causes. In Myanmar, 62% of juvenile deaths were at >6 months with maternal insufficient milk production, natural hazards and accidents being the main causes. European Asian and Myanmar elephants PD was biased towards males (0.71, P=0.024 and 0.56, P<0.001, respectively). The skewed birth sex ratio and high juvenile mortality hinder efforts to help captive populations become self-sustaining. Efforts should be invested to identify the mechanism behind these trends and seek solutions for them. PMID:19058933

  15. The Effect of Clozapine on Premature Mortality: An Assessment of Clinical Monitoring and Other Potential Confounders

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Richard D.; Downs, Johnny; Chang, Chin-Kuo; Jackson, Richard G.; Shetty, Hitesh; Broadbent, Matthew; Hotopf, Matthew; Stewart, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine can cause severe adverse effects yet it is associated with reduced mortality risk. We test the hypothesis this association is due to increased clinical monitoring and investigate risk of premature mortality from natural causes. We identified 14 754 individuals (879 deaths) with serious mental illness (SMI) including schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders aged ≥ 15 years in a large specialist mental healthcare case register linked to national mortality tracing. In this cohort study we modeled the effect of clozapine on mortality over a 5-year period (2007–2011) using Cox regression. Individuals prescribed clozapine had more severe psychopathology and poorer functional status. Many of the exposures associated with clozapine use were themselves risk factors for increased mortality. However, we identified a strong association between being prescribed clozapine and lower mortality which persisted after controlling for a broad range of potential confounders including clinical monitoring and markers of disease severity (adjusted hazard ratio 0.4; 95% CI 0.2–0.7; p = .001). This association remained after restricting the sample to those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or those taking antipsychotics and after using propensity scores to reduce the impact of confounding by indication. Among individuals with SMI, those prescribed clozapine had a reduced risk of mortality due to both natural and unnatural causes. We found no evidence to indicate that lower mortality associated with clozapine in SMI was due to increased clinical monitoring or confounding factors. This is the first study to report an association between clozapine and reduced risk of mortality from natural causes. PMID:25154620

  16. The effect of future ambient air pollution on human premature mortality to 2100 using output from the ACCMIP model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Raquel A.; West, J. Jason; Lamarque, Jean-François; Shindell, Drew T.; Collins, William J.; Dalsoren, Stig; Faluvegi, Greg; Folberth, Gerd; Horowitz, Larry W.; Nagashima, Tatsuya; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, Steven T.; Sudo, Kengo; Takemura, Toshihiko; Bergmann, Daniel; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Cionni, Irene; Doherty, Ruth M.; Eyring, Veronika; Josse, Beatrice; MacKenzie, Ian A.; Plummer, David; Righi, Mattia; Stevenson, David S.; Strode, Sarah; Szopa, Sophie; Zengast, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Ambient air pollution from ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with premature mortality. Future concentrations of these air pollutants will be driven by natural and anthropogenic emissions and by climate change. Using anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions projected in the four Representative Concentration Pathway scenarios (RCPs), the ACCMIP ensemble of chemistry-climate models simulated future concentrations of ozone and PM2.5 at selected decades between 2000 and 2100. We use output from the ACCMIP ensemble, together with projections of future population and baseline mortality rates, to quantify the human premature mortality impacts of future ambient air pollution. Future air-pollution-related premature mortality in 2030, 2050 and 2100 is estimated for each scenario and for each model using a health impact function based on changes in concentrations of ozone and PM2.5 relative to 2000 and projected future population and baseline mortality rates. Additionally, the global mortality burden of ozone and PM2.5 in 2000 and each future period is estimated relative to 1850 concentrations, using present-day and future population and baseline mortality rates. The change in future ozone concentrations relative to 2000 is associated with excess global premature mortality in some scenarios/periods, particularly in RCP8.5 in 2100 (316 thousand deaths year-1), likely driven by the large increase in methane emissions and by the net effect of climate change projected in this scenario, but it leads to considerable avoided premature mortality for the three other RCPs. However, the global mortality burden of ozone markedly increases from 382 000 (121 000 to 728 000) deaths year-1 in 2000 to between 1.09 and 2.36 million deaths year-1 in 2100, across RCPs, mostly due to the effect of increases in population and baseline mortality rates. PM2.5 concentrations decrease relative to 2000 in all scenarios, due to projected reductions in emissions, and

  17. Population characteristics, mechanisms of primary care and premature mortality in England: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Richard; Honeyford, Kate; Levene, Louis S; Mainous, Arch G; Jones, David R; Bankart, M John; Stokes, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Health systems with strong primary care tend to have better population outcomes, but in many countries demand for care is growing. We sought to identify mechanisms of primary care that influence premature mortality. Design We developed a conceptual model of the mechanisms by which primary care influences premature mortality, and undertook a cross-sectional study in which population and primary care variables reflecting the model were used to explain variations in mortality of those aged under 75 years. The premature standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for each practice, available from the Department of Health, had been calculated from numbers of deaths in the 5 years from 2006 to 2010. A regression model was undertaken with explanatory variables for the year 2009/2010, and repeated to check stability using data for 2008/2009 and 2010/2011. Setting All general practices in England were eligible for inclusion and, of the total of 8290, complete data were available for 7858. Results Population variables, particularly deprivation, were the most powerful predictors of premature mortality, but the mechanisms of primary care depicted in our model also affected mortality. The number of GPs/1000 population and detection of hypertension were negatively associated with mortality. In less deprived practices, continuity of care was also negatively associated with mortality. Conclusions Greater supply of primary care is associated with lower premature mortality even in a health system that has strong primary care (England). Health systems need to sustain the capacity of primary care to deliver effective care, and should assist primary care providers in identifying and meeting the needs of socioeconomically deprived groups. PMID:26868945

  18. Modelling small-area inequality in premature mortality using years of life lost rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congdon, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of premature mortality variations via standardized expected years of life lost (SEYLL) measures raises questions about suitable modelling for mortality data, especially when developing SEYLL profiles for areas with small populations. Existing fixed effects estimation methods take no account of correlations in mortality levels over ages, causes, socio-ethnic groups or areas. They also do not specify an underlying data generating process, or a likelihood model that can include trends or correlations, and are likely to produce unstable estimates for small-areas. An alternative strategy involves a fully specified data generation process, and a random effects model which "borrows strength" to produce stable SEYLL estimates, allowing for correlations between ages, areas and socio-ethnic groups. The resulting modelling strategy is applied to gender-specific differences in SEYLL rates in small-areas in NE London, and to cause-specific mortality for leading causes of premature mortality in these areas.

  19. The contribution of outdoor air pollution sources to premature mortality on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Evans, J. S.; Fnais, M.; Giannadaki, D.; Pozzer, A.

    2015-09-01

    Assessment of the global burden of disease is based on epidemiological cohort studies that connect premature mortality to a wide range of causes, including the long-term health impacts of ozone and fine particulate matter with a diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometres (PM2.5). It has proved difficult to quantify premature mortality related to air pollution, notably in regions where air quality is not monitored, and also because the toxicity of particles from various sources may vary. Here we use a global atmospheric chemistry model to investigate the link between premature mortality and seven emission source categories in urban and rural environments. In accord with the global burden of disease for 2010 (ref. 5), we calculate that outdoor air pollution, mostly by PM2.5, leads to 3.3 (95 per cent confidence interval 1.61-4.81) million premature deaths per year worldwide, predominantly in Asia. We primarily assume that all particles are equally toxic, but also include a sensitivity study that accounts for differential toxicity. We find that emissions from residential energy use such as heating and cooking, prevalent in India and China, have the largest impact on premature mortality globally, being even more dominant if carbonaceous particles are assumed to be most toxic. Whereas in much of the USA and in a few other countries emissions from traffic and power generation are important, in eastern USA, Europe, Russia and East Asia agricultural emissions make the largest relative contribution to PM2.5, with the estimate of overall health impact depending on assumptions regarding particle toxicity. Model projections based on a business-as-usual emission scenario indicate that the contribution of outdoor air pollution to premature mortality could double by 2050.

  20. The contribution of outdoor air pollution sources to premature mortality on a global scale.

    PubMed

    Lelieveld, J; Evans, J S; Fnais, M; Giannadaki, D; Pozzer, A

    2015-09-17

    Assessment of the global burden of disease is based on epidemiological cohort studies that connect premature mortality to a wide range of causes, including the long-term health impacts of ozone and fine particulate matter with a diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometres (PM2.5). It has proved difficult to quantify premature mortality related to air pollution, notably in regions where air quality is not monitored, and also because the toxicity of particles from various sources may vary. Here we use a global atmospheric chemistry model to investigate the link between premature mortality and seven emission source categories in urban and rural environments. In accord with the global burden of disease for 2010 (ref. 5), we calculate that outdoor air pollution, mostly by PM2.5, leads to 3.3 (95 per cent confidence interval 1.61-4.81) million premature deaths per year worldwide, predominantly in Asia. We primarily assume that all particles are equally toxic, but also include a sensitivity study that accounts for differential toxicity. We find that emissions from residential energy use such as heating and cooking, prevalent in India and China, have the largest impact on premature mortality globally, being even more dominant if carbonaceous particles are assumed to be most toxic. Whereas in much of the USA and in a few other countries emissions from traffic and power generation are important, in eastern USA, Europe, Russia and East Asia agricultural emissions make the largest relative contribution to PM2.5, with the estimate of overall health impact depending on assumptions regarding particle toxicity. Model projections based on a business-as-usual emission scenario indicate that the contribution of outdoor air pollution to premature mortality could double by 2050. PMID:26381985

  1. Premature Mortality from Cardiovascular Disease in the Americas – Will the Goal of a Decline of “25% by 2025” be Met?

    PubMed Central

    Ordunez, Pedro; Prieto-Lara, Elisa; Pinheiro Gawryszewski, Vilma; Hennis, Anselm J. M.; Cooper, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the underlying cause 1.6 million deaths per year in the Americas, accounting for 30% of total mortality and 38% of by non-communicable deaths diseases (NCDs). A 25% reduction in premature mortality due four main NCDs was targeted by the 2011 High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of NCDs. While overall CVD mortality fell in the Americas during the past decade, trends in premature CVD mortality during the same period have not been described, particularly in the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. Methods This is a population-based trend-series study based on a total of 6,133,666 deaths to describe the trends and characteristics of premature mortality due to CVD and to estimates of the average annual percentage of change during the period 2000–2010 in the Americas. Findings Premature mortality due to CVD in the Americas fell by 21% in the period 2000–2010 with a -2.5% average annual rate of change in the last 5 year—a statistically significant reduction of mortality—. Mortality from ischemic diseases, declined by 25% - 24% among men and 26% among women. Cerebrovascular diseases declined by 27% -26% among men and 28% among women. Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, the Dominican Republic, Bahamas, and Brazil had CVD premature mortality rates over 200 per 100,000 population, while the average for the Region was 132.7. US and Canada will meet the 25% reduction target before 2025. Mexico, Costa Rica, Venezuela, Dominican Republic, Panama, Guyana, and El Salvador did not significantly reduce premature mortality among men and Guyana, the Dominican Republic, and Panama did not achieve the required annual reduction in women. Conclusions Trends in premature mortality due to CVD observed in last decade in the Americas would indicate that if these trends continue, the Region as a whole and a majority of its countries will be able to reach the goal of a 25% relative reduction in premature

  2. Reduction in maternal mortality due to sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S; Kaipa, A; Kakani, A

    2005-02-01

    The present study was undertaken at a rural medical institute in India to analyse the trends in maternal mortality due to sepsis and the factors associated with change, if any. During the study period of 20 years, a total of 37,155 women delivered, 192 deaths occurred and forty deaths (20.83%) were due to sepsis and it's sequlae. It was revealed that there is a definite decrease in the proportion of deaths due to sepsis, to 10% in the last five years from 35% in earlier years. The change seems to be due to the advocacy of clean deliveries and reduction in case fatality because of alterations in medication and earlier surgical intervention. However the percentage contribution of septic abortion has remained the same. Septic abortion continues to exist inspite of all the current laws and discussion about the availability of a liberal law, which permits abortion almost on request. Most of the women who had died due to septic abortion were married (65%). Deaths due to septic abortion, are persisting even in married women and it is a matter of concern for health providers, policy makers and governments. PMID:15814392

  3. Re-examining premature mortality in anorexia nervosa: a meta-analysis redux.

    PubMed

    Keshaviah, Aparna; Edkins, Katherine; Hastings, Elizabeth R; Krishna, Meera; Franko, Debra L; Herzog, David B; Thomas, Jennifer J; Murray, Helen B; Eddy, Kamryn T

    2014-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is reported to have the highest premature mortality of any psychiatric disorder, but recent meta-analyses may have inflated estimates. We sought to re-estimate mortality after methodological corrections and to identify predictors of mortality. We included 41 cohorts from 40 peer-reviewed studies published between 1966 and 2010. Methods included double data extraction, log-linear regression with an over-dispersed Poisson model, and all-cause and suicide-specific standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), with 95% Poisson confidence intervals. Participants with AN were 5.2 [3.7-7.5] times more likely to die prematurely from any cause, and 18.1 [11.5-28.7] times more likely to die by suicide than 15-34 year old females in the general population. Our estimates were 10% and 49% lower, respectively, than previously reported SMRs. Risk of premature mortality was highest in studies with older participants, although confounding by treatment was present. Gender, ascertainment, and diagnostic criteria also impacted risk. PMID:25214371

  4. Social class and premature mortality among men: a method for state-based surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, E; Armstrong, D L; Casper, M L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined trends in mortality by social class for Black and White men aged 35 through 54 years in North Carolina, for 1984 through 1993, using an inexpensive, newly developed state-based surveillance method. METHODS: Data from death certificates and census files permitted examination of four social classes, defined on the basis of occupation. RESULTS: Premature mortality was inversely associated with social class for both Blacks and Whites. Blacks were at least twice as likely to die as Whites within each social class. CONCLUSIONS: Adoption of state-specific surveillance of social class and premature mortality would provide data crucial for developing and evaluating public health programs to reduce social inequalities in health. PMID:9314808

  5. Jim Crow and Premature Mortality Among the US Black and White Population, 1960–2009

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T.; Coull, Brent A.; Beckfield, Jason; Kiang, Mathew V.; Waterman, Pamela D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scant research has analyzed the health impact of abolition of Jim Crow (ie, legal racial discrimination overturned by the US 1964 Civil Rights Act). Methods We used hierarchical age–period–cohort models to analyze US national black and white premature mortality rates (death before 65 years of age) in 1960–2009. Results Within a context of declining US black and white premature mortality rates and a persistent 2-fold excess black risk of premature mortality in both the Jim Crow and non-Jim Crow states, analyses including random period, cohort, state, and county effects and fixed county income effects found that, within the black population, the largest Jim Crow-by-period interaction occurred in 1960–1964 (mortality rate ratio [MRR] = 1.15 [95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.22), yielding the largest overall period-specific Jim Crow effect MRR of 1.27, with no such interactions subsequently observed. Furthermore, the most elevated Jim Crow-by-cohort effects occurred for birth cohorts from 1901 through 1945 (MRR range = 1.05–1.11), translating to the largest overall cohort-specific Jim Crow effect MRRs for the 1921–1945 birth cohorts (MRR ~ 1.2), with no such interactions subsequently observed. No such interactions between Jim Crow and either period or cohort occurred among the white population. Conclusion Together, the study results offer compelling evidence of the enduring impact of both Jim Crow and its abolition on premature mortality among the US black population, although insufficient to eliminate the persistent 2-fold black excess risk evident in both the Jim Crow and non-Jim Crow states from 1960 to 2009. PMID:24825344

  6. Premature adult mortality in urban Zambia: a repeated population-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Timæus, Ian M; Banda, Richard; Thankian, Kusanthan; Banda, Andrew; Lemba, Musonda; Stringer, Jeffrey S A; Chi, Benjamin H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To measure the sex-specific and community-specific mortality rates for adults in Lusaka, Zambia, and to identify potential individual-level, household-level and community-level correlates of premature mortality. We conducted 12 survey rounds of a population-based cross-sectional study between 2004 and 2011, and collected data via a structured interview with a household head. Setting Households in Lusaka District, Zambia, 2004–2011. Participants 43 064 household heads (88% female) who enumerated 123 807 adult household members aged between 15 and 60 years. Primary outcome Premature adult mortality. Results The overall mortality rate was 16.2/1000 person-years for men and 12.3/1000 person-years for women. The conditional probability of dying between age 15 and 60 (45q15) was 0.626 for men and 0.537 for women. The top three causes of death for men and women were infectious in origin (ie, tuberculosis, HIV and malaria). We observed an over twofold variation of mortality rates between communities. The mortality rate was 1.98 times higher (95% CI 1.57 to 2.51) in households where a family member required nursing care, 1.44 times higher (95% CI 1.22 to 1.71) during the cool dry season, and 1.28 times higher (95% CI 1.06 to 1.54) in communities with low-cost housing. Conclusions To meet Zambia's development goals, further investigation is needed into the factors associated with adult mortality. Mortality can potentially be reduced through focus on high-need households and communities, and improved infectious disease prevention and treatment services. PMID:26940113

  7. Hyena disease (premature physeal closure) in calves due to overdose of vitamins A, D3, E.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenichi; Sadahito, Kobayashi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Nobuyuki, Onizuka; Mikami, Osamu; Yamada, Manabu; Nakamura, Kikuyasu; Yasuyuki, Nakajima

    2003-03-01

    Holstein suckling calves on a farm manifested severe emaciation, generalized alopecia, dome-like cranial deformation, and high mortality (Case 1). Metaphyseal growth plates of the femur were achondroplastic; segmented, partially resorped, and replaced with immature bony trabeculae containing degenerated chondrocytes. The skull was thin and partially replaced with connective tissue. Diffuse and severe fatty degeneration was observed in the hepatic stellate (Ito') cells. After 6 mo, surviving calves manifested unthrifty with short and irregular hindquarters (Case 2). The metaphyseal growth plates were poorly formed, irregular, partially disappeared centrally, and often sealed with thin bony trabeculae. The cartilage matrix was not homogeneous but was finely fibrous, and chondrocytes were flat and degenerated. The bone lesion was diagnosed as chondrodysplasia due to premature physeal closure. These calves had been administered excessive amounts of vitamins A, D3 and E, and blood chemistry of acute case showed hypervitaminosis A and E. Case I demonstrated acute disease, while Case 2 demonstrated chronic sequelae. Hypervitaminosis A was the suspected cause. PMID:12678294

  8. Twenty years of socioeconomic inequalities in premature mortality in Barcelona: The influence of population and neighbourhood changes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Gotsens, Mercè; Marí-Dell'Olmo, Marc; Mehdipanah, Roshanak; Borrell, Carme

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse trends in socioeconomic inequalities in premature mortality in Barcelona from 1992 to 2011, accounting for population changes. We conducted a repeated cross-sectional study of the Barcelona population (25-64 years) using generalized linear mixed models for trend analysis, and found that socioeconomic inequalities in premature mortality persisted between neighbourhoods, but tended to diminish. However, the reduction in inequality was related to an increase in the number of foreign-born individuals mainly in socioeconomic disadvantaged neighbourhoods, in which the decrease in premature mortality was more marked. To study trends in geographical inequalities in mortality, it is essential to understand demographic changes occurred in different places related to local levels of deprivation. PMID:27105035

  9. Socioeconomic inequalities in premature mortality in Colombia, 1998-2007: The double burden of non-communicable diseases and injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arroyave, Ivan; Burdorf, Alex; Cardona, Doris; Avendano, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Non-communicable diseases have become the leading cause of death in middle-income countries, but mortality from injuries and infections remains high. We examined the contribution of specific causes to disparities in adult premature mortality (ages 25-64) by educational level from 1998 to 2007 in Colombia. Methods Data from mortality registries were linked to population censuses to obtain mortality rates by educational attainment. We used Poisson regression to model trends in mortality by educational attainment and estimated the contribution of specific causes to the Slope Index of Inequality. Results Men and women with only primary education had higher premature mortality than men and women with post-secondary education (RRmen=2·60, 95% confidence interval [CI]:2·56, 2·64; RRwomen=2·36, CI:2·31, 2·42). Mortality declined in all educational groups, but declines were significantly larger for higher-educated men and women. Homicide explained 55·1% of male inequalities while non-communicable diseases explained 62·5% of female inequalities and 27·1% of male inequalities. Infections explained a small proportion of inequalities in mortality. Conclusion Injuries and non-communicable diseases contribute considerably to disparities in premature mortality in Colombia. Multi-sector policies to reduce both interpersonal violence and non-communicable disease risk factors are required to curb mortality disparities. PMID:24674854

  10. Joint Consideration of Distal and Proximal Predictors of Premature Mortality among Serious Juvenile Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, Laurie; Piquero, Alex R.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Mansion, Andre D.; Schubert, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Juvenile offenders are at heightened risk of death in adolescence and young adulthood compared to adolescents in the general population. The current study extends previous research by testing the joint contributions of distal (historical and demographic characteristics) and proximal (closer to the time of the death) predictors of mortality. We also tested and whether proximal variables were potential mediators of the effects of distal variables on mortality. Methods Participants were 1,354 serious juvenile offenders, 45 (3.32%) of whom were deceased by the completion of the study. Data were collected through self-reports and official records. Results Significant distal predictors of mortality were being African-American and having a history of substance use disorder. Proximal predictors that added significantly to prediction included gun carrying, gang membership, and substance use problems. Potential mediators of the effects of substance use disorder history were continuing substance use problems and gang membership. However, proximal variables could not explain the heightened risk for African-Americans. Conclusions Gang membership, gun carrying, and substance use problems are risk factors for early mortality among juvenile offenders, but they do not explain the elevated risk for death among African Americans. Thus, further research is needed to understand the mechanisms underlying risk for premature death among African-American adolescent offenders. Implications and contributions Findings suggest that interventions to reduce substance use problems, gang membership, and gun carrying have the potential to reduce risk of mortality for serious juvenile offenders. However, these factors cannot explain the heightened risk for death among African-American participants. PMID:23415755

  11. UK asbestos imports and mortality due to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wiggans, R. E.; Young, C.; Fishwick, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that the rising mortality due to mesothelioma and asbestosis can be predicted from historic asbestos usage. Mortality due to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is also rising, without any apparent explanation. Aims To compare mortality due to these conditions and examine the relationship between mortality and national asbestos imports. Methods Mortality data for IPF and asbestosis in England and Wales were available from the Office for National Statistics. Data for mesothelioma deaths in England and Wales and historic UK asbestos import data were available from the Health & Safety Executive. The numbers of annual deaths due to each condition were plotted separately by gender, against UK asbestos imports 48 years earlier. Linear regression models were constructed. Results For mesothelioma and IPF, there was a significant linear relationship between the number of male and female deaths each year and historic UK asbestos imports. For asbestosis mortality, a similar relationship was found for male but not female deaths. The annual numbers of deaths due to asbestosis in both sexes were lower than for IPF and mesothelioma. Conclusions The strength of the association between IPF mortality and historic asbestos imports was similar to that seen in an established asbestos-related disease, i.e. mesothelioma. This finding could in part be explained by diagnostic difficulties in separating asbestosis from IPF and highlights the need for a more accurate method of assessing lifetime occupational asbestos exposure. PMID:26511746

  12. Comparative analysis of premature mortality among urban immigrants in Bremen, Germany: a retrospective register-based linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Nataliya; Brand, Tilman; Brünings-Kuppe, Claudia; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Luttmann, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The main objective of this study was to explore differences in mortality patterns among two large immigrant groups in Germany: one from Turkey and the other from the former Soviet Union (FSU). To this end, we investigated indicators of premature mortality. Design This study was conducted as a retrospective population-based study based on mortality register linkage. Using mortality data for the period 2004–2010, we calculated age-standardised death rates (SDR) and standardised mortality ratios (SMR) for premature deaths (premature mortality. Setting and participants In this study, we made use of the unique possibilities of register-based research in relation to migration and health. Analyses were performed in three population groups in the federal state of Bremen, Germany: immigrants from Turkey, those from the FSU and the general population. Results The SDRs for premature deaths of the two immigrant groups were lower compared to those of the general population. The SMRs remained under 1. Using the indicator of YPLL, we observed higher age-standardised YPLL rates among immigrant populations, particularly among males from the FSU compared to females and population groups 4238/100 000, 95% CI (4119 to 4358). Regarding main causes of premature death, we found larger contributions of infant mortality and diseases of the respiratory system among Turkish immigrants, and of injuries and poisonings, and mental and behavioural disorders among immigrants from the FSU. Conclusions While the overall trends favour the immigrant populations, the indicator of YPLL and cause-specific results indicate areas where the healthcare systems responsiveness may need to be improved, including preventive services. Further work with broader databases providing a similar level of differentiation is necessary to substantiate these findings. PMID:27000782

  13. Effect of fluconazole prophylaxis on candidiasis and mortality in premature infants: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Daniel K.; Hudak, Mark L.; Duara, Shahnaz; Randolph, David A.; Bidegain, Margarita; Mundakel, Gratias T.; Natarajan, Girija; Burchfield, David J.; White, Robert D.; Shattuck, Karen E.; Neu, Natalie; Bendel, Catherine M.; Kim, M. Roger; Finer, Neil N.; Stewart, Dan L.; Arrieta, Antonio C.; Wade, Kelly C.; Kaufman, David A.; Manzoni, Paolo; Prather, Kristi O.; Testoni, Daniela; Berezny, Katherine Y.; Smith, P. Brian

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Invasive candidiasis in premature infants causes mortality and neurodevelopmental impairment. Fluconazole prophylaxis reduces candidiasis, but its effect on mortality and the safety of fluconazole is unknown. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficacy and safety of fluconazole in preventing death or invasive candidiasis in extremely low-birth-weight infants. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS This study was a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial of fluconazole in premature infants. Infants weighing less than 750 g at birth (N = 361) from 32 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the United States were randomly assigned to receive either fluconazole or placebo twice weekly for 42 days. Surviving infants were evaluated at 18 to 22 months corrected age for neurodevelopmental outcomes. The study was conducted between November 2008 and February 2013. INTERVENTIONS Fluconazole (6 mg/kg of body weight) or placebo. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary end point was a composite of death or definite or probable invasive candidiasis prior to study day 49 (1 week after completion of study drug). Secondary and safety outcomes included invasive candidiasis, liver function, bacterial infection, length of stay, intracranial hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, chronic lung disease, patent ductus arteriosus requiring surgery, retinopathy of prematurity requiring surgery, necrotizing enterocolitis, spontaneous intestinal perforation, and neurodevelopmental outcomes—defined as a Bayley-III cognition composite score of less than 70, blindness, deafness, or cerebral palsy at 18–22-months corrected age. RESULTS Among infants receiving fluconazole, the composite primary end point of death or invasive candidiasis was 16% (95% CI, 11%–22%) vs 21% in the placebo group (95% CI, 15%–28%; odds ratio 0.73 [95% CI 0.43–1.23]; P=.24; treatment difference −5% [95% CI, −13%–3%]). Invasive candidiasis occurred less frequently in the fluconazole group (3% [95% CI, 1%

  14. Socioeconomic inequalities in premature mortality in France: have they widened in recent decades?

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Annette; Chastang, Jean-François; Menvielle, Gwenn; Luce, Danièle

    2006-04-01

    An increase in social inequalities in premature mortality has been observed in the last decades in various European countries. In France, large inequalities have been reported for several years, but the changes over time have been only partially examined. The study was based on the analysis of a large longitudinal data set. Four periods of 7 years following a census were compared. Deaths in the period (21,003 deaths for men, 9,418 for women) were recorded and studied according to socioeconomic status (SES) at the census. Relative Index of Inequality (RII) was calculated in order to quantify the magnitude of inequalities among those employed, and also in the entire population, with specific categories for those inactive. The results showed that the magnitude of inequalities remained mainly stable over time for men and women working at the time of the census. However, for the entire population, a strong increase in the magnitude of social inequalities was observed. For men the RIIs increased from 3.53 in the first period to 6.54 in the most recent period. For women, the corresponding figures were 1.94 and 3.88. The increase was observed also for specific causes of deaths: cancer and cardiovascular diseases for both sexes, and external causes for men. In spite of a global decrease in the mortality over the period, the absolute differences between the top and the bottom of the socioeconomic scale did not change. The results highlight the importance of temporal changes in mortality associated with an increase of unemployment, changes in the labour market, and the consequences of selective exclusion from work. The classification of those not working is an important point to consider in the study of social inequalities. PMID:16162384

  15. Estimating Potential Reductions in Premature Mortality in New York City From Raising the Minimum Wage to $15

    PubMed Central

    Konty, Kevin J.; Van Wye, Gretchen; Barbot, Oxiris; Hadler, James L.; Linos, Natalia; Bassett, Mary T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess potential reductions in premature mortality that could have been achieved in 2008 to 2012 if the minimum wage had been $15 per hour in New York City. Methods. Using the 2008 to 2012 American Community Survey, we performed simulations to assess how the proportion of low-income residents in each neighborhood might change with a hypothetical $15 minimum wage under alternative assumptions of labor market dynamics. We developed an ecological model of premature death to determine the differences between the levels of premature mortality as predicted by the actual proportions of low-income residents in 2008 to 2012 and the levels predicted by the proportions of low-income residents under a hypothetical $15 minimum wage. Results. A $15 minimum wage could have averted 2800 to 5500 premature deaths between 2008 and 2012 in New York City, representing 4% to 8% of total premature deaths in that period. Most of these avertable deaths would be realized in lower-income communities, in which residents are predominantly people of color. Conclusions. A higher minimum wage may have substantial positive effects on health and should be considered as an instrument to address health disparities. PMID:27077350

  16. Cause-specific premature death from ambient PM2.5 exposure in India: Estimate adjusted for baseline mortality.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sourangsu; Dey, Sagnik

    2016-05-01

    In India, more than a billion population is at risk of exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration exceeding World Health Organization air quality guideline, posing a serious threat to health. Cause-specific premature death from ambient PM2.5 exposure is poorly known for India. Here we develop a non-linear power law (NLP) function to estimate the relative risk associated with ambient PM2.5 exposure using satellite-based PM2.5 concentration (2001-2010) that is bias-corrected against coincident direct measurements. We show that estimate of annual premature death in India is lower by 14.7% (19.2%) using NLP (integrated exposure risk function, IER) for assumption of uniform baseline mortality across India (as considered in the global burden of disease study) relative to the estimate obtained by adjusting for state-specific baseline mortality using GDP as a proxy. 486,100 (811,000) annual premature death in India is estimated using NLP (IER) risk functions after baseline mortality adjustment. 54.5% of premature death estimated using NLP risk function is attributed to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 24.0% to ischemic heart disease (IHD), 18.5% to stroke and the remaining 3.0% to lung cancer (LC). 44,900 (5900-173,300) less premature death is expected annually, if India achieves its present annual air quality target of 40μgm(-3). Our results identify the worst affected districts in terms of ambient PM2.5 exposure and resulting annual premature death and call for initiation of long-term measures through a systematic framework of pollution and health data archive. PMID:27063285

  17. Reducing Premature Mortality in the Mentally Ill Through Health Promotion Programs.

    PubMed

    Price, James H; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, Joy A; Whaley, Cathy; Bowman, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Nearly half of the U.S. adult population will have a major mental illness during their lifetimes. At any point in time, almost a fifth of all American adults have a serious mental illness (SMI). Too many in our society do not understand mental illnesses, placing the blame for the illness on those with the illness, resulting in isolation, marginalization, or incarceration of individuals with SMIs. They may experience stigma, inadequate and delayed health and mental health care, and major socioeconomic disadvantages. They may struggle with activities of daily living, lose many of their resources, and spiral down into poverty. The disadvantages and decreased ability to function experienced by individuals with SMIs lead to increased unhealthy behaviors, reduced participation in wellness-related activities, and premature morbidity and mortality. The general and physical health of individuals with SMIs poses greater challenges from both practice and research standpoints. However, health educators are poised uniquely to provide health promotion programs, conduct research, and advocate for the health and well-being of individuals with SMIs. In this review, we summarize the challenges and opportunities for health promotion in individuals with SMIs. PMID:27307394

  18. Selection due to nonretention mortality in gillnet fisheries for salmon.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew R; Kendall, Neala W; Branch, Trevor A; Schindler, Daniel E; Quinn, Thomas P

    2011-05-01

    Fisheries often exert selective pressures through elevated mortality on a nonrandom component of exploited stocks. Selective removal of individuals will alter the composition of a given population, with potential consequences for its size structure, stability and evolution. Gillnets are known to harvest fish according to size. It is not known, however, whether delayed mortality due to disentanglement from gillnets exerts selective pressures that reinforce or counteract harvest selection. We examined gillnet disentanglement in exploited populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, to characterize the length distribution of fish that disentangle from gillnets and determine whether nonretention mortality reinforces harvest selection and exerts common pressures according to sex and age. We also evaluated discrete spawning populations to determine whether nonretention affects populations with different morphologies in distinct ways. In aggregate, nonretention mortality in fish that disentangle from gillnets counters harvest selection but with different effects by sex and age. At the level of individual spawning populations, nonretention mortality may exert stabilizing, disruptive, or directional selection depending on the size distribution of a given population. Our analyses suggest nonretention mortality exerts significant selective pressures and should be explicitly included in analyses of fishery-induced selection. PMID:25567993

  19. Selection due to nonretention mortality in gillnet fisheries for salmon

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew R; Kendall, Neala W; Branch, Trevor A; Schindler, Daniel E; Quinn, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    Fisheries often exert selective pressures through elevated mortality on a nonrandom component of exploited stocks. Selective removal of individuals will alter the composition of a given population, with potential consequences for its size structure, stability and evolution. Gillnets are known to harvest fish according to size. It is not known, however, whether delayed mortality due to disentanglement from gillnets exerts selective pressures that reinforce or counteract harvest selection. We examined gillnet disentanglement in exploited populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, to characterize the length distribution of fish that disentangle from gillnets and determine whether nonretention mortality reinforces harvest selection and exerts common pressures according to sex and age. We also evaluated discrete spawning populations to determine whether nonretention affects populations with different morphologies in distinct ways. In aggregate, nonretention mortality in fish that disentangle from gillnets counters harvest selection but with different effects by sex and age. At the level of individual spawning populations, nonretention mortality may exert stabilizing, disruptive, or directional selection depending on the size distribution of a given population. Our analyses suggest nonretention mortality exerts significant selective pressures and should be explicitly included in analyses of fishery-induced selection. PMID:25567993

  20. Disparities in Infant Mortality Due to Congenital Anomalies on Guam

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Sara; Haddock, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    In the 1970's and 1980's, there were large inter-village disparities in infant mortality due to congenital anomalies on Guam. A village-level analysis was conducted to determine if these disparities can be explained by behavioral (ie, median age of village females, village fertility ratio), structural (ie, population density, persons per household, single mother households per village, married females per village), and environmental (ie, living in a village where Agent Orange (AO) spraying was conducted) factors. Village-level data for live births and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies (1970–1989) was collected from Guam's Office of Vital Statistics. Data on median age of village females, village fertility ratio, population density, persons per household, single mother households, and married females were obtained from the 1980 US Census. Estimates of village-level AO use were provided through personal communications, and villages were dichotomized into AO and non-AO spray areas. Village location was classified by usual residence of the mother. Linear regression was used to determine associations between infant mortality due to congenital anomalies and the behavioral, structural, and environmental factors. The association between AO spray area and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies was statistically significant under univariable (B [95%CI] = 1.88 [0.64,3.11], P = .005) and multivariable conditions (B [95%CI] = 2.02 [0.08,3.96], P = .042). These results suggest that infants born to mothers whose usual residence was in an AO spray area on Guam are at an increased risk of mortality due to congenital anomalies. Further studies using individual-level data are needed to validate these results. PMID:26668770

  1. Disparities in Infant Mortality Due to Congenital Anomalies on Guam.

    PubMed

    Noel, Jonathan K; Namazi, Sara; Haddock, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    In the 1970's and 1980's, there were large inter-village disparities in infant mortality due to congenital anomalies on Guam. A village-level analysis was conducted to determine if these disparities can be explained by behavioral (ie, median age of village females, village fertility ratio), structural (ie, population density, persons per household, single mother households per village, married females per village), and environmental (ie, living in a village where Agent Orange (AO) spraying was conducted) factors. Village-level data for live births and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies (1970-1989) was collected from Guam's Office of Vital Statistics. Data on median age of village females, village fertility ratio, population density, persons per household, single mother households, and married females were obtained from the 1980 US Census. Estimates of village-level AO use were provided through personal communications, and villages were dichotomized into AO and non-AO spray areas. Village location was classified by usual residence of the mother. Linear regression was used to determine associations between infant mortality due to congenital anomalies and the behavioral, structural, and environmental factors. The association between AO spray area and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies was statistically significant under univariable (B [95%CI] = 1.88 [0.64,3.11], P = .005) and multivariable conditions (B [95%CI] = 2.02 [0.08,3.96], P = .042). These results suggest that infants born to mothers whose usual residence was in an AO spray area on Guam are at an increased risk of mortality due to congenital anomalies. Further studies using individual-level data are needed to validate these results. PMID:26668770

  2. MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY DUE TO AIDS: A STUDY OF BURDEN OF DISEASE AT A MUNICIPAL LEVEL

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Jane DA; RAMOS, Victoria; SILVA, Helena Caetano Gonçalves DA; TRAEBERT, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of measuring the burden of disease involves aggregating morbidity and mortality components into a single indicator, the disability-adjusted life year (DALY), to measure how much and how people live and suffer the impact of a disease. Objective: To estimate the global burden of disease due to AIDS in a municipality of southern Brazil. Methods: An ecological study was conducted in 2009 to examine the incidence and AIDS-related deaths among the population residing in the city of Tubarao, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. Data from the Mortality Information System in the National Health System was used to calculate the years of life lost (YLL) due to premature mortality. The calculation was based on the difference between a standardized life expectancy and age at death, with a discount rate of 3% per year. Data from the Information System for Notifiable Diseases were used to calculate the years lived with disability (YLD). The DALY was estimated by the sum of YLL and YLD. Indicator rates were estimated per 100,000 inhabitants, distributed by age and gender. Results: A total of 131 records were examined, and a 572.5 DALYs were estimated, which generated a rate of 593.1 DALYs/100,000 inhabitants. The rate among men amounted to 780.7 DALYs/100,000, whereas among women the rate was 417.1 DALYs/100,000. The most affected age groups were 30-44 years for men and 60-69 years for women. Conclusion: The burden of disease due to AIDS in the city of Tubarao was relatively high when considering the global trend. The mortality component accounted for more than 90% of the burden of disease. PMID:26603227

  3. Investigating the relationship between quality of primary care and premature mortality in England: a spatial whole-population study

    PubMed Central

    Springate, David A; Ashworth, Mark; Webb, Roger T; Buchan, Iain E; Doran, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the relationship between a national primary care pay-for-performance programme, the UK’s Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), and all-cause and cause-specific premature mortality linked closely with conditions included in the framework. Design Longitudinal spatial study, at the level of the “lower layer super output area” (LSOA). Setting 32482 LSOAs (neighbourhoods of 1500 people on average), covering the whole population of England (approximately 53.5 million), from 2007 to 2012. Participants 8647 English general practices participating in the QOF for at least one year of the study period, including over 99% of patients registered with primary care. Intervention National pay-for-performance programme incentivising performance on over 100 quality-of-care indicators. Main outcome measures All-cause and cause-specific mortality rates for six chronic conditions: diabetes, heart failure, hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and chronic kidney disease. We used multiple linear regressions to investigate the relationship between spatially estimated recorded quality of care and mortality. Results All-cause and cause-specific mortality rates declined over the study period. Higher mortality was associated with greater area deprivation, urban location, and higher proportion of a non-white population. In general, there was no significant relationship between practice performance on quality indicators included in the QOF and all-cause or cause-specific mortality rates in the practice locality. Conclusions Higher reported achievement of activities incentivised under a major, nationwide pay-for-performance programme did not seem to result in reduced incidence of premature death in the population. PMID:25733592

  4. Premature labour

    PubMed Central

    Koh, K.S.

    1976-01-01

    Prematurity is by far the commonest cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The management of premature labour is empirical because little is understood about the mechanism of labour. Effective uterine relaxant drugs have an important, albeit minor role. Phototherapy has reduced the complications of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, and the beneficial effect of antepartum corticosteroid therapy in minimizing the risk of respiratory distress syndrome is now convincing. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in premature rupture of the membranes does not alter perinatal mortality, although postpartum maternal morbidity is reduced. The introduction of neonatal intensive care units has improved the survival rate of premature infants. Sound clinical judgement remains the mainstay in the management of premature labour. PMID:4217

  5. A population-based study of premature mortality in relation to neighbourhood density of alcohol sales and cheque cashing outlets in Toronto, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, Flora I; Creatore, Maria Isabella; Gozdyra, Piotr; Park, Alison L; Ray, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    Objective Alcohol overuse and poverty, each associated with premature death, often exist within disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Cheque cashing places (CCPs) may be opportunistically placed in disadvantaged neighbourhoods, where customers abound. We explored whether neighbourhood density of CCPs and alcohol outlets are each related to premature mortality among adults. Design Retrospective population-based study. Setting 140 neighbourhoods in Toronto, Ontario, 2005–2009. Participants Adults aged 20–59 years. Measures Our primary outcome was premature all-cause mortality among adults aged 20–59 years. Across neighbourhoods we explored neighbourhood density, in km2, of CCPs and alcohol outlets, and the relation of each to premature mortality. Poisson regression provided adjusted relative risks (aRRs) and 95% CIs, adjusting for material deprivation quintile (Q), crime Q and number of banks. Results Intentional self-harm, accidental poisoning and liver disease were among the top five causes of premature death among males aged 20–59 years. The overall premature mortality rate was 96.3/10 000 males and 55.9/10 000 females. Comparing the highest versus lowest CCP density Q, the aRR for death was 1.25 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.36) among males and 1.11 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.24) among females. The corresponding aRR comparing the highest Q versus lowest Q alcohol outlet density in relation to premature mortality was 1.36 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.48) for males and 1.11 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.24) for females. The pattern of the relation between either CCPs or alcohol outlet density and premature mortality was typically J shaped. Conclusions There is a J-shaped relation between CCP or alcohol outlet density and premature mortality, even on controlling for conventional measures of poverty. Formal banking and alcohol reduction strategies might be added to health promotion policies aimed at reducing premature mortality in highly affected neighbourhoods. PMID:25518874

  6. Trends in inequalities in premature cancer mortality by educational level in Colombia, 1998–2007

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Esther; Arroyave, Ivan; Pardo, Constanza; Wiesner, Carolina; Murillo, Raul; Forman, David; Burdorf, Alex; Avendaño, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Background There is paucity of studies on socioeconomic inequalities in cancer mortality in developing countries. We examined trends in inequalities in cancer mortality by educational attainment in Colombia during a period of epidemiological transition and a rapid expansion of health insurance coverage. Methods Population mortality data (1998–2007) were linked to census data to obtain age-standardised cancer mortality rates by educational attainment at ages 25–64 years for stomach, cervical, prostate, lung, colorectal, breast and other cancers. We used Poisson regression to model mortality by educational attainment and estimated the contribution of specific cancers to the Slope Index of Inequality in cancer mortality. Results We observed large educational inequalities in cancer mortality, particularly for cancer of the cervix (RR primary versus tertiary groups=5.75, contributing 51% of cancer inequalities), stomach (RR=2.56 for males, contributing 49% of total cancer inequalities, and RR=1.98 for females, contributing 14% to total cancer inequalities), and lung (RR=1.64 for males contributing 17% of total cancer inequalities, and 1.32 for females contributing 5% to total cancer inequalities). Total cancer mortality rates declined faster among those with higher education, with the exception of mortality from cervical cancer, which declined more rapidly in the lower educational groups. Conclusion There are large socioeconomic inequalities in preventable cancer mortality in Colombia, which underscore the need for intensifying prevention efforts. Reducing cervical cancer through reducing HPV infection, early detection and improved access to treatment of preneoplasic lesions. Reinforcing anti-tobacco measures may be particularly important to curb inequalities in cancer mortality. PMID:25492898

  7. Economic impact of reduced mortality due to increased cycling.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Harry; Cavill, Nick; Racioppi, Francesca; Dinsdale, Hywell; Oja, Pekka; Kahlmeier, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Increasing regular physical activity is a key public health goal. One strategy is to change the physical environment to encourage walking and cycling, requiring partnerships with the transport and urban planning sectors. Economic evaluation is an important factor in the decision to fund any new transport scheme, but techniques for assessing the economic value of the health benefits of cycling and walking have tended to be less sophisticated than the approaches used for assessing other benefits. This study aimed to produce a practical tool for estimating the economic impact of reduced mortality due to increased cycling. The tool was intended to be transparent, easy to use, reliable, and based on conservative assumptions and default values, which can be used in the absence of local data. It addressed the question: For a given volume of cycling within a defined population, what is the economic value of the health benefits? The authors used published estimates of relative risk of all-cause mortality among regular cyclists and applied these to levels of cycling defined by the user to produce an estimate of the number of deaths potentially averted because of regular cycling. The tool then calculates the economic value of the deaths averted using the "value of a statistical life." The outputs of the tool support decision making on cycle infrastructure or policies, or can be used as part of an integrated economic appraisal. The tool's unique contribution is that it takes a public health approach to a transport problem, addresses it in epidemiologic terms, and places the results back into the transport context. Examples of its use include its adoption by the English and Swedish departments of transport as the recommended methodologic approach for estimating the health impact of walking and cycling. PMID:23253656

  8. A systematic review and meta-analysis of premature mortality in bipolar affective disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, J. F.; Miles, J.; Walters, K.; King, M.; Osborn, D. P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review and complete meta-analysis of studies estimating standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) in bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) for all-cause and cause-specific mortalities. Method Cause-specific mortality was grouped into natural and unnatural causes. These subgroups were further divided into circulatory, respiratory, neoplastic and infectious causes, and suicide and other violent deaths. Summary SMRs were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was examined via subgroup analysis and meta-regression. Results Systematic searching found 31 studies meeting inclusion criteria. Summary SMR for all-cause mortality = 2.05 (95% CI 1.89– 2.23), but heterogeneity was high (I2 = 96.2%). This heterogeneity could not be accounted for by date of publication, cohort size, mid-decade of data collection, population type or geographical region. Unnatural death summary SMR = 7.42 (95% CI 6.43–8.55) and natural death = 1.64 (95% CI 1.47–1.83). Specifically, suicide SMR = 14.44 (95% CI 12.43–16.78), other violent death SMR = 3.68 (95% CI 2.77–4.90), deaths from circulatory disease = 1.73 (95% CI 1.54–1.94), respiratory disease = 2.92 (95% CI 2.00–4.23), infection = 2.25 (95% CI 1.70–3.00) and neoplasm = 1.14 (95% CI 1.10–1.21). Conclusion Despite considerable heterogeneity, all summary SMR estimates and a large majority of individual studies showed elevated mortality in BPAD compared to the general population. This was true for all causes of mortality studied. PMID:25735195

  9. Consequences of high temperatures and premature mortality on the transcriptome and blood physiology of wild adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka).

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Ken M; Hinch, Scott G; Sierocinski, Thomas; Clark, Timothy D; Eliason, Erika J; Donaldson, Michael R; Li, Shaorong; Pavlidis, Paul; Miller, Kristi M

    2012-07-01

    Elevated river water temperature in the Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada, has been associated with enhanced mortality of adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) during their upriver migration to spawning grounds. We undertook a study to assess the effects of elevated water temperatures on the gill transcriptome and blood plasma variables in wild-caught sockeye salmon. Naturally migrating sockeye salmon returning to the Fraser River were collected and held at ecologically relevant temperatures of 14°C and 19°C for seven days, a period representing a significant portion of their upstream migration. After seven days, sockeye salmon held at 19°C stimulated heat shock response genes as well as many genes associated with an immune response when compared with fish held at 14°C. Additionally, fish at 19°C had elevated plasma chloride and lactate, suggestive of a disturbance in osmoregulatory homeostasis and a stress response detectable in the blood plasma. Fish that died prematurely over the course of the holding study were compared with time-matched surviving fish; the former fish were characterized by an upregulation of several transcription factors associated with apoptosis and downregulation of genes involved in immune function and antioxidant activity. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC1) was the most significantly upregulated gene in dying salmon, which suggests an association with cellular apoptosis. We hypothesize that the observed decrease in plasma ions and increases in plasma cortisol that occur in dying fish may be linked to the increase in ODC1. By highlighting these underlying physiological mechanisms, this study enhances our understanding of the processes involved in premature mortality and temperature stress in Pacific salmon during migration to spawning grounds. PMID:22957178

  10. Present and potential future contributions of sulfate, black and organic carbon aerosols from China to global air quality, premature mortality and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikawa, E.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Liu, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols are harmful to human health and have both direct and indirect effects on climate. China is a major contributor to global emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a sulfate (SO42-) precursor, organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) aerosols. Although increasingly examined, the effect of present and potential future levels of these emissions on global premature mortality and climate change has not been well quantified. Through both direct and indirect effects, SO42- and OC exert negative radiative forcing (cooling) while BC exerts positive forcing (warming). We analyze the effect of China's emissions of SO2, SO42-, OC and BC in 2000 and for three emission scenarios in 2030 on global surface aerosol concentrations, premature mortality, and radiative forcing. Using global models of chemical transport (MOZART-2) and radiative transfer (GFDL RTM), and combining simulation results with gridded population data, mortality rates, and concentration-response relationships from the epidemiological literature, we estimate the contribution of Chinese aerosols to global annual premature mortality and to radiative forcing in 2000 and 2030. In 2000, we estimate these aerosols cause 385,320 premature deaths in China and an additional 18 240 globally. In 2030, aggressive emission controls lead to a reduction in premature deaths to 200,370 in China and 7,740 elsewhere, while under a high emissions scenario premature deaths would increase to 602,950 in China and to 29,750 elsewhere. Because the negative radiative forcing from SO42- and OC is larger than the positive forcing from BC, the Chinese aerosols lead to global net direct radiative forcing of -74 mW m-2 in 2000 and between -15 and -97 mW m-2 in 2030 based on the emissions scenario. Our analysis suggests that environmental policies that simultaneously improve public health and mitigate climate change would be highly beneficial (eg. reductions in BC emissions).

  11. Municipal mortality due to thyroid cancer in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lope, Virginia; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; Ramis, Rebeca; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2006-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is a tumor with a low but growing incidence in Spain. This study sought to depict its spatial municipal mortality pattern, using the classic model proposed by Besag, York and Mollié. Methods It was possible to compile and ascertain the posterior distribution of relative risk on the basis of a single Bayesian spatial model covering all of Spain's 8077 municipal areas. Maps were plotted depicting standardized mortality ratios, smoothed relative risk (RR) estimates, and the posterior probability that RR > 1. Results From 1989 to 1998 a total of 2,538 thyroid cancer deaths were registered in 1,041 municipalities. The highest relative risks were mostly situated in the Canary Islands, the province of Lugo, the east of La Coruña (Corunna) and western areas of Asturias and Orense. Conclusion The observed mortality pattern coincides with areas in Spain where goiter has been declared endemic. The higher frequency in these same areas of undifferentiated, more aggressive carcinomas could be reflected in the mortality figures. Other unknown genetic or environmental factors could also play a role in the etiology of this tumor. PMID:17173668

  12. Obesity or obesities? Controversies on the association between body mass index and premature mortality.

    PubMed

    Bosello, Ottavio; Donataccio, Maria Pia; Cuzzolaro, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is still defined on the basis of body mass index (BMI) and BMI in itself is generally accepted as a strong predictor of overall early mortality. However, an inverse association between BMI and mortality has been reported in patients with many disease states and in several clinical settings: hemodialysis, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, stroke, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, surgery, etc. This unexpected phenomenon is usually called obesity-survival paradox (OP). The contiguous concepts of metabolically healthy obesity (MHO, a phenotype having BMI ≥ 30 but not having any metabolic syndrome component and having a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, HOMA, <2.5) and metabolically obese normal weight (MONW, normal-weight individuals displaying obesity-related phenotypic characteristics) have received a great deal of attention in recent years. The interactions that link MHO, MONW and OP with body composition, fat distribution, aging and cardiorespiratory fitness are other crucial areas of research. The article is an introductory narrative overview of the origin and current use of the concepts of MHO, MONW and OP. These phenomena are very controversial and appear as a consequence of the frail current diagnostic definition of obesity based only on BMI. A new commonly established characterization and classification of obesities based on a number of variables is needed urgently. PMID:27043948

  13. Geographic and Racial Variation in Premature Mortality in the U.S.: Analyzing the Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Mark R.; Cummins, Clint; Fuchs, Victor R.

    2012-01-01

    Life expectancy at birth, estimated from United States period life tables, has been shown to vary systematically and widely by region and race. We use the same tables to estimate the probability of survival from birth to age 70 (S70), a measure of mortality more sensitive to disparities and more reliably calculated for small populations, to describe the variation and identify its sources in greater detail to assess the patterns of this variation. Examination of the unadjusted probability of S70 for each US county with a sufficient population of whites and blacks reveals large geographic differences for each race-sex group. For example, white males born in the ten percent healthiest counties have a 77 percent probability of survival to age 70, but only a 61 percent chance if born in the ten percent least healthy counties. Similar geographical disparities face white women and blacks of each sex. Moreover, within each county, large differences in S70 prevail between blacks and whites, on average 17 percentage points for men and 12 percentage points for women. In linear regressions for each race-sex group, nearly all of the geographic variation is accounted for by a common set of 22 socio-economic and environmental variables, selected for previously suspected impact on mortality; R2 ranges from 0.86 for white males to 0.72 for black females. Analysis of black-white survival chances within each county reveals that the same variables account for most of the race gap in S70 as well. When actual white male values for each explanatory variable are substituted for black in the black male prediction equation to assess the role explanatory variables play in the black-white survival difference, residual black-white differences at the county level shrink markedly to a mean of −2.4% (+/−2.4); for women the mean difference is −3.7% (+/−2.3). PMID:22529892

  14. [Mortality due to bronchopulmonary cancers in workers of 2 foundries].

    PubMed

    Moulin, J J; Lafontaine, M; Mantout, B; Belanger, A; Michel, M; Wild, P; Clavel, T; Fournier, M; Fontana, J M

    1995-01-01

    A mortality study was carried out in two factories producing stainless steel in order to assess lung cancer risk among workers employed in coke oven, blast and open hearth furnaces, foundry, electric furnace, hot and cold rolling mills and pickling areas. Occupational exposures of interest were chromium compounds, nickel compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), silica and asbestos. All male workers having at least one year of employment between 01.01.1960 and 31.12.1990 were followed up for mortality. The vital status was assessed from birth place registries. Complete job histories since date of first employment were abstracted from the company files. The smoking habits of 50% of the cohort members were known from medical records. The observed number of deaths (obs) were compared with the expected ones based on regional rates with adjustment for age, sex and calendar time (Standardized Mortality Ratio, SMR). The cohorts included 6324 (factory 1) and 5270 (factory 2) workers. The overall mortality did not differ markedly from that expected in both factories: SMR = 0.95 (obs = 1540, p = 0.05) in factory 1 and SMR = 1.06 (obs = 916, non-significant) in factory 2. SMRs for lung cancer did not differ from unity, respectively 0.99 (obs = 105) and 1.00 (obs = 54), in whole cohorts. Non-significant lung cancer excesses were observed among workers of some workshops where exposures of interest might have occurred: coke oven (SMR = 2.04), blast furnace (SMR = 1.36), open hearth furnace (SMR = 1.75), hot rolling mills (SMR = 1.29). These processes, however, are no longer involved in the study factories. Furthermore, no lung cancer excess was observed among workers employed in current workshops: electric furnaces and cold rolling mills. PMID:7732197

  15. Prospective study of healthcare utilisation and respiratory morbidity due to RSV infection in prematurely born infants

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, S; Roberts, A; Fox, G; Pollina, E; Zuckerman, M; Chaudhry, S; Greenough, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to determine the impact of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, both in hospital and the community, on healthcare utilisation and respiratory morbidity in prematurely born infants and to identify risk factors for symptomatic RSV infection. Methods: A hospital and community follow up study was undertaken of 126 infants born before 32 weeks of gestational age. Healthcare utilisation (hospital admissions and general practitioner attendances) in the first year, respiratory morbidity at follow up (wheeze and cough documented by parent completed diary cards), and RSV positive lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) were documented. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained for immunofluorescence and culture for RSV whenever the infants had an LRTI, either in the community or in hospital. Results: Forty two infants had an RSV positive LRTI (RSV group), 50 had an RSV negative LRTI (RSV negative LRTI group), and 32 infants had no LRTI (no LRTI group). Compared with the RSV negative LRTI and the no LRTI groups, the RSV group required more admissions (p = 0.392, p<0.001) and days in hospital (p = 0.049, p = 0.006) and had more cough (p = 0.05, p = 0.038) and wheeze (p = 0.003, p = 0.003) at follow up. Significant risk factors for symptomatic RSV LRTI were number of siblings (p = 0.035) and maternal smoking in pregnancy (p = 0.005), for cough were number of siblings (p = 0.002) and RSV LRTI (p = 0.02), and for wheeze was RSV LRTI (p = 0.019). Conclusion: RSV infection, even if hospital admission is not required, is associated with increased subsequent respiratory morbidity in prematurely born infants. PMID:16227330

  16. High mortality due to accidental salinomycin intoxication in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Eisapour, Hamed; Erfani, Amir Mehdi; Kalantary, Amir Ali; Amoli, Jamileh Salar; Mozafari, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    In February 2012, 100% mortality was reported in a herd with 79 local sheep that were kept around of Abhar, Northwest of Iran. The ration for adult sheep was daily mixed (40 kg straw, 25 kg wheat and 2 kg Vit-C premix) and accidentally 1 500 g of salinomycin (Salinomycin 12% Premix; Aras Bazar Laboratories, Iran) had been added to the ration (22388 mg/kg = 22388 ppm) and overnight was fed to herd. At the morning, 78 sheep were founded dead and one of them showed convulsive seizures. Postmortem examination revealed pulmonary congestion and edema, hemorrhages in abomasum, large pale kidney and white streak lines in myocardium. Main histopathologic lesions were extensive subepicardial and intercardiomyofibers hemorrhages, extensive cardiomyolysis and myocarditis in heart, severe hyperemia and extensive acute tubular necrosis (ATN) in kidneys and focal necrosis and retention of bile cholangitis in the liver. In this study, on the basis of the history, observation of the ionophore remnant in the ration, clinical signs, gross and histopathological findings, acute salinomycin intoxication is definitely diagnosed. PMID:26109896

  17. Birth weight-specific infant mortality due to congenital anomalies, 1960 and 1980.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, R J; Buehler, J W; Strauss, L T; Hogue, C J; Smith, J C

    1987-01-01

    The impact of mortality due to congenital anomalies in single-delivery births was compared in 1960 and 1980 birth cohorts; data were used from the 1960 National Center for Health Statistics national linkage of birth and death certificates and the 1980 National Infant Mortality Surveillance project. In 1960 there were 14,714 deaths due to congenital anomalies, compared with 8,674 in 1980, a 41 percent reduction. The infant mortality risk (IMR) due to congenital anomalies fell 31 percent. This is in contrast with the observed 54 percent decline in IMR due to all causes. This reduction in mortality due to congenital anomalies occurred for both whites and blacks in the postneonatal period and for whites only in the neonatal period. Changes ranged from a 1.8 percent increase for the black neonatal mortality risk to a 46.6 percent decrease for the white postneonatal mortality risk. In spite of these relative reductions, the absolute percentage of all infant deaths due to congenital anomalies had increased from 15.8 percent in 1960 to 24.1 percent in 1980. Two categories, cardiovascular and central nervous system anomalies, accounted for 72 percent of infant deaths due to congenital anomalies in 1960 and for 59 percent in 1980; cardiovascular anomalies accounted for 48 percent of all deaths due to congenital anomalies in 1960 and 40 percent in 1980. Infant mortality risks in the United States showed a 2:1 black to white ratio in both 1960 and 1980. However, for infant mortality due to congenital anomalies, the black and white mortality risks were approximately equal in both 1960 and 1980. For infants with birth weights of 500-2,499 g, the risk of neonatal mortality for blacks was less than half the risk for whites. PMID:3104974

  18. Premature termination codons in PRPF31 cause retinitis pigmentosa via haploinsufficiency due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Rio Frio, Thomas; Wade, Nicholas M.; Ransijn, Adriana; Berson, Eliot L.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Rivolta, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the gene encoding the mRNA splicing factor PRPF31 cause retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary form of retinal degeneration. Most of these mutations are characterized by DNA changes that lead to premature termination codons. We investigated 6 different PRPF31 mutations, represented by single-base substitutions or microdeletions, in cell lines derived from 9 patients with dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Five of these mutations lead to premature termination codons, and 1 leads to the skipping of exon 2. Allele-specific measurement of PRPF31 transcripts revealed a strong reduction in the expression of mutant alleles. As a consequence, total PRPF31 protein abundance was decreased, and no truncated proteins were detected. Subnuclear localization of the full-length PRPF31 that was present remained unaffected. Blocking nonsense-mediated mRNA decay significantly restored the amount of mutant PRPF31 mRNA but did not restore the synthesis of mutant proteins, even in conjunction with inhibitors of protein degradation pathways. Our results indicate that most PRPF31 mutations ultimately result in null alleles through the activation of surveillance mechanisms that inactivate mutant mRNA and, possibly, proteins. Furthermore, these data provide compelling evidence that the pathogenic effect of PRPF31 mutations is likely due to haploinsufficiency rather than to gain of function. PMID:18317597

  19. Spectrum of excess mortality due to carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections.

    PubMed

    Hauck, C; Cober, E; Richter, S S; Perez, F; Salata, R A; Kalayjian, R C; Watkins, R R; Scalera, N M; Doi, Y; Kaye, K S; Evans, S; Fowler, V G; Bonomo, R A; van Duin, D

    2016-06-01

    Patients infected or colonized with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKp) are often chronically and acutely ill, which results in substantial mortality unrelated to infection. Therefore, estimating excess mortality due to CRKp infections is challenging. The Consortium on Resistance against Carbapenems in K. pneumoniae (CRACKLE) is a prospective multicenter study. Here, patients in CRACKLE were evaluated at the time of their first CRKp bloodstream infection (BSI), pneumonia or urinary tract infection (UTI). A control cohort of patients with CRKp urinary colonization without CRKp infection was constructed. Excess hospital mortality was defined as mortality in cases after subtracting mortality in controls. In addition, the adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) for time-to-hospital-mortality at 30 days associated with infection compared with colonization were calculated in Cox proportional hazard models. In the study period, 260 patients with CRKp infections were included in the BSI (90 patients), pneumonia (49 patients) and UTI (121 patients) groups, who were compared with 223 controls. All-cause hospital mortality in controls was 12%. Excess hospital mortality was 27% in both patients with BSI and those with pneumonia. Excess hospital mortality was not observed in patients with UTI. In multivariable analyses, BSI and pneumonia compared with controls were associated with aHR of 2.59 (95% CI 1.52-4.50, p <0.001) and 3.44 (95% CI 1.80-6.48, p <0.001), respectively. In conclusion, in patients with CRKp infection, pneumonia is associated with the highest excess hospital mortality. Patients with BSI have slightly lower excess hospital mortality rates, whereas excess hospital mortality was not observed in hospitalized patients with UTI. PMID:26850824

  20. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI. PMID:26730342

  1. Increased mortality in amateur radio operators due to lymphatic and hematopoietic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Milham, S. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    To search for potentially carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic field exposures, the author conducted a population-based study of mortality in US amateur radio operators. Ascertainment of Washington State and California amateur radio operators (67,829 persons) was done through the 1984 US Federal Communications Commission Amateur Radio Station and/or Operator License file. A total of 2485 deaths were located for the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1984, in a population of amateur radio operators which accumulated 232,499 person-years at risk. The all-cause standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 71, but a statistically significant increased mortality was seen for cancers of the other lymphatic tissues (SMR = 162), a rubric which includes multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The all-leukemia standardized mortality ratio was slightly, but nonsignificantly, elevated (SMR = 124). However, mortality due to acute myeloid leukemia was significantly elevated (SMR = 176).

  2. [Analysis of the impact of mortality due to suicides in Mexico, 2000-2012].

    PubMed

    Dávila Cervantes, Claudio Alberto; Ochoa Torres, María del Pilar; Casique Rodríguez, Irene

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the burden of disease due to suicide in Mexico using years of life lost (YLL) between 2000 and 2012 by sex, age group (for those under 85 years of age) and jurisdiction. Vital statistics on mortality and population estimates were used to calculate standardized mortality rates and years of life lost due to suicide. Between 2000 and 2012 a sustained increase in the suicide mortality rate was observed in Mexico. The age group with the highest rate was 85 years of age or older for men, and 15-19 years of age for women. The highest impact in life expectancy due to suicide occurred at 20 to 24 years of age in men and 15 to 19 years of age in women. The states with the highest mortality due to suicide were located in the Yucatan Peninsula (Yucatan, Quintana Roo and Campeche). Mortality due to suicide in Mexico has increased continually. As suicides are preventable, the implementation of health public policies through timely identification, integral prevention strategies and the detailed study of associated risk factors is imperative. PMID:26676591

  3. Mortality Due to Malignant and Non-Malignant Diseases in Korean Professional Emergency Responders

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Jeong, Kyoung Sook

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to estimate the cause-specific mortality in male emergency responders (ER), compare with that of Korean men. Mortality was also compared between more experienced firefighters (i.e., firefighters employed ≥20 years and firefighters employed ≥10 to <20 years) and less experienced firefighters and non-firefighters (i.e., firefighters employed <10 years and non-firefighters) to investigate associations between mortality and exposure to occupational hazards. Methods The cohort was comprised of 33,442 males who were employed as ERs between 1980 and 2007 and not deceased as of 1991. Work history was merged with the death registry from the National Statistical Office of Korea to follow-up on mortality between 1992 and 2007. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) for ERs were calculated in reference to the Korean male population. Adjusted relative risks (ARRs) of mortalities for firefighters employed ≥20 years and ≥10 years to <20 years were calculated in reference to non-firefighters and firefighters employed < 10 years. Results Overall (SMR=0.43, 95%CI=0.39–0.47) and some kinds of cause-specific mortalities were significantly lower among ERs compared with the Korean male population. No significant increase in mortality was observed across the major ICD-10 classifications among ERs. Mortality due to exposure to smoke, fire, and flames (SMR=3.11, 95% CI=1.87–4.85), however, was significantly increased among ERs. All-cause mortality (ARR=1.46, 95% CI=1.13–1.89), overall cancer mortality (ARR=1.54, 95% CI=1.02–2.31) and mortality of external injury, poisoning and external causes (ARR=3.13, 95% CI=1.80–5.46) were significantly increased among firefighters employed ≥20 years compared to those of non-firefighters and firefighters employed < 10 years. Conclusions An increase in mortality due to all cancer and external injury, poisoning, and external causes in firefighters employed ≥20 years compared with non-firefighters and

  4. 15-epi-lipoxin A4 reduces the mortality of prematurely born pups in a mouse model of infection-induced preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, S F; Catalano, R D; Wade, J; Rossi, A G; Norman, J E

    2015-04-01

    Preterm birth remains the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. There are currently few effective therapies and therefore an urgent need for novel treatments. Although there is much focus on trying to alter gestation of delivery, the primary aim of preterm birth prevention therapies should be to reduce prematurity related mortality and morbidity. Given the link between intrauterine infection and inflammation and preterm labour (PTL), we hypothesized that administration of lipoxins, key anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution mediators, could be a useful novel treatment for PTL. Using a mouse model of infection-induced PTL, we investigated whether 15-epi-lipoxin A4 could delay lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PTL and reduce pup mortality. On D17 of gestation mice (n = 9-12) were pretreated with vehicle or 15-epi-lipoxin A4 prior to intrauterine administration of LPS or PBS. Although pretreatment with 15-epi-lipoxin A4 did not delay LPS-induced PTL, there was a significant reduction in the mortality amongst prematurely delivered pups (defined as delivery within 36 h of surgery) in mice treated with 15-epi-lipoxin A4 prior to LPS treatment, compared with those receiving LPS alone (P < 0.05). Quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR analysis of utero-placental tissues harvested 6 h post-treatment demonstrated that 15-epi-lipoxin A4 treatment increased Ptgs2 expression in the uterus, placenta and fetal membranes (P < 0.05) and decreased 15-Hpgd expression (P < 0.05) in the placenta and uterus, suggesting that 15-epi-lipoxin A4 may regulate the local production and activity of prostaglandins. These data suggest that augmenting lipoxin levels could be a useful novel therapeutic option in the treatment of PTL, protecting the fetus from the adverse effects of infection-induced preterm birth. PMID:25567326

  5. Substance abuse and psychiatric co-morbidity as predictors of premature mortality in Swedish drug abusers a prospective longitudinal study 1970 - 2006

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few longitudinal cohort studies have focused on the impact of substances abused and psychiatric disorders on premature mortality. The aim of the present study was to identify predictors of increased risk of drug related death and non drug related death in substance abusers of opiates, stimulants, cannabis, sedatives/hypnotics, hallucinogens and alcohol over several decades. Methods Follow-up study of a consecutive cohort of 561 substance abusers, admitted to a detoxification unit January 1970 to February 1978 in southern Sweden, and followed up in 2006. Demographic and clinical data, substance diagnoses and three groups of psychiatric diagnoses were identified at first admission. Causes of death were coded according to ICD-10 and classified as drug related deaths or non drug related deaths. To identify the incidence of some probable risk factors of drug related premature death, the data were subjected to a competing risks Cox regression analysis. Results Of 561 patients in the cohort, 11 individuals had either emigrated or could not be located, and 204/561 patients (36.4%) were deceased by 2006. The cumulative risk of drug related death increased more in the first 15 years and leveled out later on when non drug related causes of death had a similar incidence. In the final model, male gender, regular use of opiates or barbiturates at first admission, and neurosis were associated with an increased risk of drug related premature death, while cannabis use and psychosis were associated with a decreased risk. Neurosis, mainly depression and/or anxiety disorders, predicted drug related premature death while chronic psychosis and personality disorders did not. Chronic alcohol addiction was associated with increased risk of non drug related death. Conclusions The cohort of drug abusers had an increased risk of premature death to the age of 69. Drug related premature death was predicted by male gender, the use of opiates or barbiturates and depression and anxiety

  6. Premature termination of tubulin gene transcription in Xenopus oocytes is due to promoter-dependent disruption of elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Hair, A; Morgan, G T

    1993-01-01

    We have shown previously that the Xenopus alpha-tubulin gene, X alpha T14, exhibits premature termination of transcription when injected into oocyte nuclei. The 3' ends of prematurely terminated transcripts are formed immediately downstream of a stem-loop sequence found in the first 41 bp of the 5' leader. We show here, using deleted constructs, that premature termination requires the presence only of sequences from -200 to +19 relative to the initiation site. Deletion of the stem-loop does not increase the production of extended transcripts, and premature termination apparently continues at nonspecific sites. This finding indicates that disruption of the elongation phase of transcription rather than abrogation of a specific antitermination mechanism is the cause of premature termination in X alpha T14. We also found that disruption of elongation on a reporter gene could be induced specifically by competition with X alpha T14 promoters. To identify which elements of the promoter might interact with elongation determinants to cause this competition, we constructed a series of internal promoter mutants. Most mutations in the -200 to -60 region of the promoter had some effect on initiation frequency but did not cause any significant change in levels of premature termination. However, mutations in the core promoter that removed the TATA box consensus causes major change in initiation and resulted in a marked decrease in the production of prematurely terminated transcripts relative to extended transcripts. We discuss why such promoters can apparently escape the disruption of elongation that leads to premature termination. Images PMID:8247007

  7. Cause-Specific Mortality Due to Malignant and Non-Malignant Disease in Korean Foundry Workers

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Ahn, Yeon-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Background Foundry work is associated with serious occupational hazards. Although several studies have investigated the health risks associated with foundry work, the results of these studies have been inconsistent with the exception of an increased lung cancer risk. The current study evaluated the mortality of Korean foundry workers due to malignant and non-malignant diseases. Methods This study is part of an ongoing investigation of Korean foundry workers. To date, we have observed more than 150,000 person-years in male foundry production workers. In the current study, we stratified mortality ratios by the following job categories: melting-pouring, molding-coremaking, fettling, and uncategorized production work. We calculated standard mortality ratios (SMR) of foundry workers compare to general Korean men and relative risk (RR) of mortality of foundry production workers reference to non-production worker, respectively. Results Korean foundry production workers had a significantly higher risk of mortality due to malignant disease, including stomach (RR: 3.96; 95% CI: 1.41–11.06) and lung cancer (RR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.01–4.30), compared with non-production workers. High mortality ratios were also observed for non-malignant diseases, including diseases of the circulatory (RR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.18–3.14), respiratory (RR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.52–21.42 for uncategorized production worker), and digestive (RR: 2.27; 95% CI: 1.22–4.24) systems, as well as for injuries (RR: 2.36; 95% CI: 1.52–3.66) including suicide (RR: 3.64; 95% CI: 1.32–10.01). Conclusion This study suggests that foundry production work significantly increases the risk of mortality due to some kinds of malignant and non-malignant diseases compared with non-production work. PMID:24505454

  8. Projection of future temperature-related mortality due to climate and demographic changes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Ho

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the effects of global climate change from both environmental and human health perspectives has gained great importance. Particularly, studies on the direct effect of temperature increase on future mortality have been conducted. However, few of those studies considered population changes, and although the world population is rapidly aging, no previous study considered the effect of society aging. Here we present a projection of future temperature-related mortality due to both climate and demographic changes in seven major cities of South Korea, a fast aging country, until 2100; we used the HadGEM3-RA model under four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5) and the United Nations world population prospects under three fertility scenarios (high, medium, and low). The results showed markedly increased mortality in the elderly group, significantly increasing the overall future mortality. In 2090s, South Korea could experience a four- to six-time increase in temperature-related mortality compared to that during 1992-2010 under four different RCP scenarios and three different fertility variants, while the mortality is estimated to increase only by 0.5 to 1.5 times assuming no population aging. Therefore, not considering population aging may significantly underestimate temperature risks. PMID:27316627

  9. Epidemiological Aspects of Neonatal Mortality Due To Intrauterine Infection in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    MAMYRBAYEVA, Marzya; IGISSINOV, Nurbek; ZHUMAGALIYEVA, Galina; SHILMANOVA, Akmanat

    2015-01-01

    Background: In this study, we examined the epidemiological aspects of neonatal mortality due to intrauterine infections with regard to regional characteristics. Methods: Consolidated report of the Ministry of Health and Social Development of the Republic of Kazakhstan on children deceased during their first 28 days of life due to intrauterine infections (P23 – congenital pneumonia, P35–39 – infectious diseases specific to the perinatal period) in the country and its regions for 2010 – 2014 was used in this investigation. Descriptive and analytical methods of medical statistics and epidemiology were used as the main method of this 5-year (2010–2014) retrospective study. Results: Overall, 3,298 neonatal deaths from intrauterine infections were recorded in Kazakhstan during the period of 2010–2014, 1,925 of which were early and 1,373 were late neonatal deaths. The average annual rate of neonatal mortality rate from intrauterine infection in the country amounted to 1.73±0.23‰ (95% CI=1.27–2.19‰), whereas trends during the study period decreased (T=−15.3%). Regional characteristics of neonatal mortality were established. Different levels for cartograms of neonatal mortality from intrauterine infections were defined: low (up to 1.28‰), average (from 1.28‰ to 2.12‰) and high (by 2.12‰ and above). Neonatal mortality in the early and late periods was also analyzed. Conclusion: This is the first epidemiological study of neonatal mortality from intrauterine infection, which contains a detailed space-time evaluation. The results of this investigation can be used to improve the state program to combat infant mortality. PMID:26576344

  10. Association of Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy with Infant Hospitalization and Mortality Due to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Michael J.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal smoking is associated with infant respiratory infections and with increased risk of low birthweight (LBW) infants and preterm birth. This study assesses the association of maternal smoking during pregnancy with both respiratory and non-respiratory infectious disease (ID) morbidity and mortality in infants. Methods We conducted two retrospective case-control analyses of infants born in Washington State from 1987–2004 using linked birth certificate, death certificate, and hospital discharge records. One assessed morbidity—infants hospitalized due to ID within one year of birth (47,404 cases/48,233 controls). The second assessed mortality—infants who died within one year due to ID (627 cases/2,730 controls). Results Maternal smoking was associated with both hospitalization (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.52; 95%CI: 1.46, 1.58) and mortality (AOR=1.51; 95%CI: 1.17, 1.96) due to any ID. In subgroup analyses, maternal smoking was associated with hospitalization due to a broad range of ID including both respiratory (AOR=1.69; 95%CI: 1.63, 1.76) and non-respiratory ID (AOR=1.27; 95%CI: 1.20, 1.34). Further stratification by birthweight and gestational age did not appreciably change these estimates. In contrast, there was no association of maternal smoking with ID infant mortality when only LBW infants were considered. Conclusions Maternal smoking was associated with a broad range of both respiratory and non-respiratory ID outcomes. Despite attenuation of the mortality association among LBW infants, ID hospitalization was found to be independent of both birthweight and gestational age. These findings suggest that full-term infants of normal weight whose mothers smoked may suffer an increased risk of serious ID morbidity and mortality. PMID:22929173

  11. Mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions

    PubMed Central

    Oguro, Michio; Imahiro, Sawako; Saito, Shoichi; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Japanese oak wilt (Raffaelea quercivora) is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the flying ambrosia beetle, Platypus quercivorus, and causes mass mortality in the fagaceous species of Japan. The data described in this article are available in Mendeley Data, DOI: 10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1 [1] and include the mortality status of 1089 Quercus crispula and 846 Quercus serrata trees and surrounding forest conditions. The findings using this dataset were published in M. Oguro, S. Imahiro, S. Saito, T. Nakashizuka, Relative importance of multiple scale factors to oak tree mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease, For. Ecol. Manag. (2015) doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2015.07.016 [2]. PMID:26543883

  12. Mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Michio; Imahiro, Sawako; Saito, Shoichi; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2015-12-01

    Japanese oak wilt (Raffaelea quercivora) is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the flying ambrosia beetle, Platypus quercivorus, and causes mass mortality in the fagaceous species of Japan. The data described in this article are available in Mendeley Data, DOI: 10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1 [1] and include the mortality status of 1089 Quercus crispula and 846 Quercus serrata trees and surrounding forest conditions. The findings using this dataset were published in M. Oguro, S. Imahiro, S. Saito, T. Nakashizuka, Relative importance of multiple scale factors to oak tree mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease, For. Ecol. Manag. (2015) doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2015.07.016 [2]. PMID:26543883

  13. Mortality of rocky mountain elk in Michigan due to meningeal worm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Schmitt, S.M.; Carlson, E.; Haufler, J.B.; Beyer, D.E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Mortality from cerebrospinal parelaphostrongylosis caused by the meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) has been hypothesized to limit elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) populations in areas where elk are conspecific with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Elk were reintroduced into Michigan (USA) in the early 1900s and subsequently greatly increased population size and distribution despite sympatric high-density (???12/km2) white-tailed deer populations. We monitored 100 radio-collared elk of all age and sex classes from 1981-94, during which time we documented 76 mortalities. Meningeal worm was a minor mortality factor for elk in Michigan and accounted for only 3% of mortalities, fewer than legal harvest (58%), illegal kills (22%), other diseases (7%), and malnutrition (4%). Across years, annual cause-specific mortality rates due to cerebrospinal parelaphostrongylosis were 0.033 (SE=0.006), 0.029 (SE=0.005), 0.000 (SE=0.001), and 0.000 (SE=0.000) for calves, 1-yr-old, 2-yr-old, and ???3-yr-old, respectively. The overall population-level mortality rate due to cerebrospinal parelaphostrongylosis was 0.009 (SE=0.001). Thus, meningeal worm had little impact on elk in Michigan during our study despite greater than normal precipitation (favoring gastropods) and record (???14 km2) deer densities. Further, elk in Michigan have shown sustained population rates-of-increase of ???18%/yr and among the highest levels of juvenile production and survival recorded for elk in North America, indicating that elk can persist in areas with meningeal worm at high levels of population productivity. it is likely that local ecologic characteristics among elk, white-tailed deer, and gastropods, and degree of exposure, age of elk, individual and population experience with meningeal worm, overall population vigor, and moisture determine the effects of meningeal worm on elk populations. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2005.

  14. Premature Contractions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Premature Contractions - PACs and PVCs Updated:Apr 6,2016 Premature contraction = early beat ... chambers of the heart (atria). Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) start in the lower chambers of the heart ( ...

  15. Mortality due to snakebite envenomation in Costa Rica (1993-2006).

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Gutiérrez, José María

    2008-09-01

    The mortality due to snakebite envenomation in Costa Rica for the period 1993-2006 was investigated by a retrospective analysis. There were 48 fatalities due to snakebites during this period. Mortality rates ranged from 0.02 per 100,000 population in 2006 to 0.19 per 100,000 population in 1993. Case fatality rates in the period 1993-2000 ranged between 0.18% (2000) and 1.15% (1993). The highest numbers of fatal cases occurred in the provinces of Puntarenas and Limón, in low-land humid regions where the species Bothrops asper ('terciopelo') is distributed and agricultural activities predominate. The most affected age groups were those of 20-29, 40-49 and 50-59 years, and fatal cases predominated in males over females by a ratio of 5:1. PMID:18625261

  16. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, Nathan G.; Williams, A.P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.J.; Mackay, D.S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Allen, Craig D.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J.D.; Breshears, D.D.; Rauscher, Sara A.; Koven, C.

    2015-01-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests and their associated climatic feedbacks. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April–August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted ≥50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  17. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.; Williams, A. P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.; Mackay, D. S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, J. C.; Allen, C. D.; Fisher, R. A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J. D.; Breshears, D. D.; Rauscher, S. A.; Koven, C.

    2016-03-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests and their associated climatic feedbacks. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April-August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted >=50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  18. Effect of vitamin B supplementation on cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sui-Liang; Chen, Ting-Song; Ma, Chen-Yun; Meng, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Zhou, Yu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Observational studies have suggested that vitamin B supplementation is associated with cancer risk, but this association remains controversial. A pooled data-based meta-analysis was conducted to summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of vitamin B supplementation on cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality. Methods: PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched to identify trials to fit our analysis through August 2015. Relative risk (RR) was used to measure the effect of vitamin B supplementation on the risk of cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality using a random-effect model. Cumulative meta-analysis, sensitivity analysis, subgroup analysis, heterogeneity tests, and tests for publication bias were also conducted. Results: Eighteen RCTs reporting the data on 74,498 individuals were included in the meta-analysis. Sixteen of these trials included 4103 cases of cancer; in 6 trials, 731 cancer-related deaths occurred; and in 15 trials, 7046 deaths occurred. Vitamin B supplementation had little or no effect on the incidence of cancer (RR: 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98–1.10; P = 0.216), death due to cancer (RR, 1.05; 95% CI: 0.90–1.22; P = 0.521), and total mortality (RR, 1.00; 95% CI: 0.94–1.06; P = 0.952). Upon performing a cumulative meta-analysis for cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality, the nonsignificance of the effect of vitamin B persisted. With respect to specific types of cancer, vitamin B supplementation significantly reduced the risk of skin melanoma (RR, 0.47; 95% CI: 0.23–0.94; P = 0.032). Conclusion: Vitamin B supplementation does not have an effect on cancer incidence, death due to cancer, or total mortality. It is associated with a lower risk of skin melanoma, but has no effect on other cancers. PMID:27495015

  19. Dose-Response Relationship of Physical Activity to Premature and Total All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Walkers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the dose-response relationships between cause-specific mortality and exercise energy expenditure in a prospective epidemiological cohort of walkers. Methods The sample consisted of the 8,436 male and 33,586 female participants of the National Walkers' Health Study. Walking energy expenditure was calculated in metabolic equivalents (METs, 1 MET = 3.5 ml O2/kg/min), which were used to divide the cohort into four exercise categories: category 1 (≤1.07 MET-hours/d), category 2 (1.07 to 1.8 MET-hours/d), category 3 (1.8 to 3.6 MET-hours/d), and category 4 (≥3.6 MET-hours/d). Competing risk regression analyses were use to calculate the risk of mortality for categories 2, 3 and 4 relative to category 1. Results 22.9% of the subjects were in category 1, 16.1% in category 2, 33.3% in category 3, and 27.7% in category 4. There were 2,448 deaths during the 9.6 average years of follow-up. Total mortality was 11.2% lower in category 2 (P = 0.04), 32.4% lower in category 3 (P<10−12) and 32.9% lower in category 4 (P = 10−11) than in category 1. For underlying causes of death, the respective risk reductions for categories 2, 3 and 4 were 23.6% (P = 0.008), 35.2% (P<10−5), and 34.9% (P = 0.0001) for cardiovascular disease mortality; 27.8% (P = 0.18), 20.6% (P = 0.07), and 31.4% (P = 0.009) for ischemic heart disease mortality; and 39.4% (P = 0.18), 63.8% (P = 0.005), and 90.6% (P = 0.002) for diabetes mortality when compared to category 1. For all related mortality (i.e., underlying and contributing causes of death combined), the respective risk reductions for categories 2, 3 and 4 were 18.7% (P = 0.22), 42.5% (P = 0.001), and 57.5% (P = 0.0001) for heart failure; 9.4% (P = 0.56), 44.3% (P = 0.0004), and 33.5% (P = 0.02) for hypertensive diseases; 11.5% (P = 0.38), 41.0% (P<10−4), and 35.5% (P = 0.001) for dysrhythmias: and 23.2% (P = 0.13), 45.8% (P = 0.0002), and 41

  20. Childhood Mortality Due to Unintentional Injuries in Japan, 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Sekii, Hideaki; Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Shirasawa, Takako; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shimizu, Takaya; Kokaze, Akatsuki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined deaths due to unintentional injuries among children in Japan to identify the age groups and sexes at most risk, and the types of injuries, so that effective forms of targeted intervention can be devised. Among children aged 0–14 years, deaths whose underlying causes had been classified under code V01-X59 of the ICD-10 were defined as deaths of children caused by unintentional injuries. Using data from the Vital Statistics 2000–2009 for analysis, we examined the changes in mortality and trends in terms of sex, age, and cause of death. Mortality decreased by 46.2%, from 933 in 2000 to 502 in 2009. The mortality rate among children aged 1–4 years decreased by almost half. The total number of deaths during this decade was 7,362 (boys: 4,690, girls: 2,672). Among the causes of death, the majority were due to “transport accidents”, followed by “other accidental threats to breathing”, and “accidental drowning and submersion”. The characteristics observed in terms of sex, age, and cause of death—that is, deaths from suffocation among infants aged less than 1 year, drowning deaths among boys, and transport accidents involving pedestrians and cyclists—must be addressed as targets for future intervention. PMID:23364538

  1. Association of physical job demands, smoking and alcohol abuse with subsequent premature mortality: a 9-year follow-up population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bourgkard, Eve; Wild, Pascal; Massin, Nicole; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Otero Sierra, Carmen; Fontana, Jean-Marc; Benamghar, Lahoucine; Mur, Jean-Marie; Ravaud, Jean-François; Guillemin, Francis; Chau, Nearkasen

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of physical job demands (PJD), smoking, and alcohol abuse, with premature mortality before age 70 (PM-70) among the working or inactive population. The sample included 4,268 subjects aged 15 or more randomly selected in north-eastern France. They completed a mailed questionnaire (birth date, sex, weight, height, job, PJD, smoking habit, alcohol abuse (Deta questionnaire)) in 1996 and were followed for mortality until 2004 (9 yr). PJD score was defined by the cumulative number of the following high job demands at work: hammer, vibrating platform, pneumatic tools, other vibrating hand tools, screwdriver, handling objects, awkward posture, tasks at heights, machine tools, pace, working on a production line, standing about and walking. The data were analyzed using the Poisson regression model. Those with PM-70 were 126 (3.81 per 1,000 person-years). The leading causes of death were cancers (46.4% in men, 57.1% in women), cardiovascular diseases (20.2% and 11.9%), suicide (9.5% and 7.1%), respiratory diseases (6.0% and 4.8%), and digestive diseases (2.4% and 4.8%). PJD3, smoker, and alcohol abuse had adjusted risk ratios of 1.71 (95% CI 1.02-2.88), 1.76 (1.08-2.88), and 2.07 (1.31-3.26) respectively for all-cause mortality. Manual workers had a risk ratio of 1.84 (1.00-3.37) compared to the higher socio-economic classes. The men had a two-fold higher mortality rate than the women; this difference became non-significant when controlling for job, PJD, smoker and alcohol abuse. For cancer mortality the factors PJD3, smoker, and alcohol abuse had adjusted risk ratios of 2.00 (1.00-3.99), 2.34 (1.19-4.63), and 2.22 (1.17-4.20), respectively. Health promotion efforts should be directed at structural measures of task redesign and they should also concern lifestyle. PMID:18285642

  2. A review of methods for estimating mortality due to parasites in wild fish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, R. J. G.

    1984-03-01

    Six methods are described for detecting mortality due to parasitic infections in natural fish populations. They are: (a) through autopsies; (b) by determining the frequency of infections known to be eventually lethal; (c) by observing a decrease in the prevalence of a long-lived parasite (or permanent scar from a parasite) with host age; (d) by observing a decrease in the variance/mean ratio for the parasites with host age; (e) by comparing the observed frequency of a combination of two independent events with the calculated probability of their occurrence; and finally (f) by comparing the observed frequency distribution of the parasite, with a projected frequency based on data from lightly infected fish. In this technique, negative binomials are fitted to the data and truncated at various points. Some advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are given, together with examples. The methods do not necessarily provide definitive answers, but they are indicative of whether or not significant parasite-related mortality may be occurring, and in some cases provide an estimate of its probable magnitude in terms of the total host mortality rate.

  3. Trends in maternal mortality due to haemorrhage: two decades of Indian rural observations.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S; Sirohi, Ritu

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric haemorrhage continues to be a major cause of maternal mortality. Our analysis of records of over a period of 20 years from April 1982 to March 2002 reveals that it was a contributory cause of maternal mortality in 19.9% of cases. The majority of deaths, (65%) had occurred within 24 hours of admission and in 47.5% of cases there was severe anaemia on admission; 17.5% had died due to an atonic PPH, which was the largest category, followed by ruptured uterus (15%), abruptio placenta (15%) and retained placenta (12.5%). Deaths due to obstetric haemorrhage because of a ruptured uterus, retained placenta and abortion have decreased from 22.22% between 1982 and 1987 to zero in the last 5 years and an increase was seen in deaths due to haemorrhage because of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia and ectopic pregnancy, from 1.69% to 4.87%, unclassified haemorrhage 1.96% to 7.31% and placenta praevia from zero between 1982 and 1987 to 4.87% between 1997 and 2002. PMID:14675979

  4. Abrupt increases in Amazonian tree mortality due to drought-fire interactions.

    PubMed

    Brando, Paulo Monteiro; Balch, Jennifer K; Nepstad, Daniel C; Morton, Douglas C; Putz, Francis E; Coe, Michael T; Silvério, Divino; Macedo, Marcia N; Davidson, Eric A; Nóbrega, Caroline C; Alencar, Ane; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S

    2014-04-29

    Interactions between climate and land-use change may drive widespread degradation of Amazonian forests. High-intensity fires associated with extreme weather events could accelerate this degradation by abruptly increasing tree mortality, but this process remains poorly understood. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first field-based evidence of a tipping point in Amazon forests due to altered fire regimes. Based on results of a large-scale, long-term experiment with annual and triennial burn regimes (B1yr and B3yr, respectively) in the Amazon, we found abrupt increases in fire-induced tree mortality (226 and 462%) during a severe drought event, when fuel loads and air temperatures were substantially higher and relative humidity was lower than long-term averages. This threshold mortality response had a cascading effect, causing sharp declines in canopy cover (23 and 31%) and aboveground live biomass (12 and 30%) and favoring widespread invasion by flammable grasses across the forest edge area (80 and 63%), where fires were most intense (e.g., 220 and 820 kW ⋅ m(-1)). During the droughts of 2007 and 2010, regional forest fires burned 12 and 5% of southeastern Amazon forests, respectively, compared with <1% in nondrought years. These results show that a few extreme drought events, coupled with forest fragmentation and anthropogenic ignition sources, are already causing widespread fire-induced tree mortality and forest degradation across southeastern Amazon forests. Future projections of vegetation responses to climate change across drier portions of the Amazon require more than simulation of global climate forcing alone and must also include interactions of extreme weather events, fire, and land-use change. PMID:24733937

  5. Abrupt increases in Amazonian tree mortality due to drought–fire interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brando, Paulo Monteiro; Balch, Jennifer K.; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Morton, Douglas C.; Putz, Francis E.; Coe, Michael T.; Silvério, Divino; Macedo, Marcia N.; Davidson, Eric A.; Nóbrega, Caroline C.; Alencar, Ane; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between climate and land-use change may drive widespread degradation of Amazonian forests. High-intensity fires associated with extreme weather events could accelerate this degradation by abruptly increasing tree mortality, but this process remains poorly understood. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first field-based evidence of a tipping point in Amazon forests due to altered fire regimes. Based on results of a large-scale, long-term experiment with annual and triennial burn regimes (B1yr and B3yr, respectively) in the Amazon, we found abrupt increases in fire-induced tree mortality (226 and 462%) during a severe drought event, when fuel loads and air temperatures were substantially higher and relative humidity was lower than long-term averages. This threshold mortality response had a cascading effect, causing sharp declines in canopy cover (23 and 31%) and aboveground live biomass (12 and 30%) and favoring widespread invasion by flammable grasses across the forest edge area (80 and 63%), where fires were most intense (e.g., 220 and 820 kW⋅m−1). During the droughts of 2007 and 2010, regional forest fires burned 12 and 5% of southeastern Amazon forests, respectively, compared with <1% in nondrought years. These results show that a few extreme drought events, coupled with forest fragmentation and anthropogenic ignition sources, are already causing widespread fire-induced tree mortality and forest degradation across southeastern Amazon forests. Future projections of vegetation responses to climate change across drier portions of the Amazon require more than simulation of global climate forcing alone and must also include interactions of extreme weather events, fire, and land-use change. PMID:24733937

  6. Assessment of short-term PM2.5-related mortality due to different emission sources in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiandong; Wang, Shuxiao; Voorhees, A. Scott; Zhao, Bin; Jang, Carey; Jiang, Jingkun; Fu, Joshua S.; Ding, Dian; Zhu, Yun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution is a major environmental risk to health. In this study, short-term premature mortality due to particulate matter equal to or less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) is estimated by using a PC-based human health benefits software. The economic loss is assessed by using the willingness to pay (WTP) method. The contributions of each region, sector and gaseous precursor are also determined by employing brute-force method. The results show that, in the YRD in 2010, the short-term premature deaths caused by PM2.5 are estimated to be 13,162 (95% confidence interval (CI): 10,761-15,554), while the economic loss is 22.1 (95% CI: 18.1-26.1) billion Chinese Yuan. The industrial and residential sectors contributed the most, accounting for more than 50% of the total economic loss. Emissions of primary PM2.5 and NH3 are major contributors to the health-related loss in winter, while the contribution of gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NOx is higher than primary PM2.5 in summer.

  7. Years of life lost due to malignant neoplasms characterized by the highest mortality rate

    PubMed Central

    Pikala, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The analysis of premature deaths measured with years of life lost between the studied and referential populations helps to emphasize the social and economic aspect of a loss caused by deaths due to malignant neoplasms. The aim of the study was to analyze years of life lost by inhabitants of the Lodz province due to malignant neoplasms. Material and methods The study material included a database which contained information gathered from 313,144 death certificates (including 66,899 people who died of malignant neoplasms) of inhabitants of the Lodz province who died between 1999 and 2008. The SEYLLp (Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per living person) method was used to determine years of life lost. Jointpoint models were used to analyze time trends. Results In males the diseases which mostly contributed to death were tracheal, bronchial and lung malignant neoplasms (SEYLLp = 170.7) and cancer of the large intestine, rectum and anus (SEYLLp = 47.5). In females the principal diseases were tracheal, bronchial and lung malignant neoplasms (SEYLLp = 61.6), breast cancer (SEYLLp = 60.4) and cancer of the large intestine, rectum and anus (SEYLLp = 42.3). The years of life lost were growing in the period under study. Conclusions The number of years lost due to malignant neoplasms in the Lodz province between 1999 and 2008 was growing. The main reasons for deaths in females were tracheal, bronchial and lung malignant neoplasms as well as breast cancer and in males – cancer of the large intestine, rectum and anus as well as prostate cancer. PMID:25395953

  8. Premature Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, TC; Anyaehie, UB; Ezenyeaku, CC

    2013-01-01

    Premature menopause affects 1% of women under the age of 40 years. The women are at risk of premature death, neurological diseases, psychosexual dysfunction, mood disorders, osteoporosis, ischemic heart disease and infertility. There is need to use simplified protocols and improved techniques in oocyte donation to achieve pregnancy and mother a baby in those women at risk. Review of the pertinent literature on premature menopause, selected references, internet services using the PubMed and Medline databases were included in this review. In the past, pregnancy in women with premature menopause was rare but with recent advancement in oocyte donation, women with premature menopause now have hoped to mother a child. Hormone replacement therapy is beneficial to adverse consequences of premature menopause. Women with premature menopause are at risk of premature death, neurological diseases, psychosexual dysfunction, mood disorders, osteoporosis, ischemic heart disease and infertility. Public enlightenment and education is important tool to save those at risk. PMID:23634337

  9. Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trief, E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has increased due to a high incidence of premature, low birthweight infants. Stages of severity range from no visual damage to total blindness, and educational problems of ROP children parallel those of other visually impaired children, early intervention being crucial. Treatments are either pharmacological or…

  10. Climate and mortality changes due to reductions in household cooking emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Tommi; Mielonen, Tero; Arola, Antti; Kokkola, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Household cooking is a significant cause for health and environmental problems in the developing countries. There are more than 3 billion people who use biomass for fuel in cooking stoves in their daily life. These cooking stoves use inadequate ventilation and expose especially women and children to indoor smoke. To reduce problems of the biomass burning, India launched an initiative to provide affordable and clean energy solutions for the poorest households by providing clean next-generation cooking stoves. The improved cooking stoves are expected to improve outdoor air quality and to reduce the climate-active pollutants, thus simultaneously slowing the climate change. Previous research has shown that the emissions of black carbon can be decreased substantially, as much as 90 % by applying better technology in cooking stoves. We have implemented reasonable (50% decrease) and best case (90% decrease) scenarios of the reductions in black and organic carbon due to improved cooking stoves in India into ECHAM-HAMMOZ aerosol-climate model. The global simulations of the scenarios will be used to study how the reductions of emissions in India affect the pollutant concentrations and radiation. The simulated reductions in particulate concentrations will also be used to estimate the decrease in mortality rates. Furthermore, we will study how the emission reductions would affect the global climate and mortality if a similar initiative would be applied in other developing countries.

  11. Airway Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prevents Acute Mortality Due to Lethal Sulfur Mustard Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Veress, Livia A.; Anderson, Dana R.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Houin, Paul R.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; Loader, Joan E.; Paradiso, Danielle C.; Smith, Russell W.; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Holmes, Wesley W.; White, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical weapon stockpiled today in volatile regions of the world. SM inhalation causes a life-threatening airway injury characterized by airway obstruction from fibrin casts, which can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is more than 80%. No therapy exists to prevent mortality after SM exposure. Our previous work using the less toxic analog of SM, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, identified tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) an effective rescue therapy for airway cast obstruction (Veress, L. A., Hendry-Hofer, T. B., Loader, J. E., Rioux, J. S., Garlick, R. B., and White, C. W. (2013). Tissue plasminogen activator prevents mortality from sulfur mustard analog-induced airway obstruction. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 48, 439–447). It is not known if exposure to neat SM vapor, the primary agent used in chemical warfare, will also cause death due to airway casts, and if tPA could be used to improve outcome. Methods: Adult rats were exposed to SM, and when oxygen saturation reached less than 85% (median: 6.5 h), intratracheal tPA or placebo was given under isoflurane anesthesia every 4 h for 48 h. Oxygen saturation, clinical distress, and arterial blood gases were assessed. Microdissection was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Results: Intratracheal tPA treatment eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h) and greatly improved morbidity after lethal SM inhalation (100% death in controls). tPA normalized SM-associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress. Moreover, tPA treatment resulted in greatly diminished airway casts, preventing respiratory failure from airway obstruction. Conclusions: tPA given via airway more than 6 h after exposure prevented death from lethal SM inhalation, and normalized oxygenation and ventilation defects, thereby rescuing from respiratory distress and failure. Intra-airway tPA should be considered as a life

  12. The effect of grid resolution on estimates of the burden of ozone and fine particulate matter on premature mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Punger, Elizabeth M.; West, J. Jason

    2013-01-01

    Assessments of human health impacts associated with outdoor air pollution often use air quality models to represent exposure, but involve uncertainties due to coarse model resolution. Here we quantify how estimates of mortality in the United States attributable to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) at coarse resolution differ from those at finer resolution. Using the finest modeled concentrations (12 km), we estimate that 66,000 (95% CI, 39,300 – 84,500) all-cause and 21,400 (5,600 – 34,200) respiratory deaths per year are attributable to PM2.5 and O3 concentrations above low-concentration thresholds, respectively. Using model results at 36 km resolution gives mortality burdens that are 11% higher for PM2.5 and 12% higher for O3 than the 12 km estimates, suggesting a modest positive bias. We also scale modeled concentrations at 12 km to coarser resolutions by simple averaging, and repeat the mortality assessment at multiple resolutions from 24 to 408 km, including the resolutions of global models; in doing so, we account for the effect of resolution on population exposure. Coarse grid resolutions produce mortality estimates that are substantially biased low for PM2.5 (30–40% lower than the 12 km estimate at >250 km resolution), but less than 6% higher for O3 at any resolution. Mortality estimates for primary PM2.5 species show greater bias at coarse resolution than secondary species. These results suggest that coarse resolution global models (>100 km) are likely biased low for PM2.5 health effects. For ozone, biases due to coarse resolution may be much smaller, and the effect on modeled chemistry likely dominates. PMID:24348882

  13. Avian wildlife mortality events due to salmonellosis in the United States, 1985-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, A.J.; Saito, E.K.

    2008-01-01

    Infection with Salmonella spp. has long been recognized in avian wildlife, although its significance in causing avian mortality, and its zoonotic risk, is not well understood. This study evaluates the role of Salmonella spp. in wild bird mortality events in the United States from 1985 through 2004. Analyses were performed to calculate the frequency of these events and the proportional mortality by species, year, month, state, and region. Salmonellosis was a significant contributor to mortality in many species of birds; particularly in passerines, for which 21.5% of all mortality events involved salmonellosis. The proportional mortality averaged a 12% annual increase over the 20-yr period, with seasonal peaks in January and April. Increased salmonellosis-related mortality in New England, Southeastern, and Mountain-Prairie states was identified. Based on the results of this study, salmonellosis can be considered an important zoonotic disease of wild birds. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  14. Huntingtons Disease Mice Infected with Toxoplasma gondii Demonstrate Early Kynurenine Pathway Activation, Altered CD8+ T-Cell Responses, and Premature Mortality.

    PubMed

    Donley, David W; Olson, Andrew R; Raisbeck, Merl F; Fox, Jonathan H; Gigley, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine-repeat expansion in the huntingtin protein. Activation of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation is implicated in the pathogenesis of HD. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyzes the oxidation of tryptophan to kynurenine, the first step in this pathway. The prevalent, neuroinvasive protozoal pathogen Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) results in clinically silent life-long infection in immune-competent individuals. T. gondii infection results in activation of IDO which provides some protection against the parasite by depleting tryptophan which the parasite cannot synthesize. The kynurenine pathway may therefore represent a point of synergism between HD and T. gondii infection. We show here that IDO activity is elevated at least four-fold in frontal cortex and striata of non-infected N171-82Q HD mice at 14-weeks corresponding to early-advanced HD. T. gondii infection at 5 weeks resulted in elevation of cortical IDO activity in HD mice. HD-infected mice died significantly earlier than wild-type infected and HD control mice. Prior to death, infected HD mice demonstrated decreased CD8+ T-lymphocyte proliferation in brain and spleen compared to wild-type infected mice. We demonstrate for the first time that HD mice have an altered response to an infectious agent that is characterized by premature mortality, altered immune responses and early activation of IDO. Findings are relevant to understanding how T. gondii infection may interact with pathways mediating neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:27611938

  15. Oocyte cryopreservation for fertility preservation in post-pubertal female children at risk for premature ovarian failure due to accelerated follicle loss in Turner Syndrome or cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, K; Bedoschi, G

    2014-01-01

    Objective To preliminarily study the feasibility of oocyte cryopreservation in post-pubertal girls aged between 13 and 15 years who were at risk for premature ovarian failure due to the accelerated follicle loss associated with Turner’s Syndrome or cancer treatments. Design Retrospective cohort and review of literature. Setting Academic fertility preservation unit. Participants Three girls diagnosed with Turner syndrome, one girl diagnosed with germ-cell tumor and one girl diagnosed with lymphoblastic leukemia. Interventions Assessment of ovarian reserve, ovarian stimulation, oocyte retrieval, in vitro maturation, and mature oocyte cryopreservation. Main Outcome Measure Response to ovarian stimulation, number of mature oocytes cryopreserved and complications, if any. Results Mean AMH, baseline FSH, Estradiol and antral follicle counts were 1.30 ± 0.39, 6.08 ± 2.63, 41.39 ± 24.68, 8.0 ± 3.2; respectively. In Turner girls the ovarian reserve assessment indicated already diminished ovarian reserve. Ovarian stimulation and oocyte cryopreservation was successfully performed in all female children referred for fertility preservation. A range of 4–11 mature oocytes (mean 8.1 ± 3.4) was cryopreserved without any complications. All girls tolerated the procedure well. Conclusions Oocyte cryopreservation is a feasible technique in selected female children at risk for premature ovarian failure. Further studies would be beneficial to test the success of oocyte cryopreservation in young girls. PMID:25214440

  16. Risk assessment for cardiovascular and respiratory mortality due to air pollution and synoptic meteorology in 10 Canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Vanos, Jennifer K; Hebbern, Christopher; Cakmak, Sabit

    2014-02-01

    Synoptic weather and ambient air quality synergistically influence human health. We report the relative risk of mortality from all non-accidental, respiratory-, and cardiovascular-related causes, associated with exposure to four air pollutants, by weather type and season, in 10 major Canadian cities for 1981 through 1999. We conducted this multi-city time-series study using Poisson generalized linear models stratified by season and each of six distinctive synoptic weather types. Statistically significant relationships of mortality due to short-term exposure to carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and ozone were found, with significant modifications of risk by weather type, season, and mortality cause. In total, 61% of the respiratory-related mortality relative risk estimates were significantly higher than for cardiovascular-related mortality. The combined effect of weather and air pollution is greatest when tropical-type weather is present in the spring or summer. PMID:24355413

  17. Preventive zinc supplementation in developing countries: impact on mortality and morbidity due to diarrhea, pneumonia and malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Zinc deficiency is commonly prevalent in children in developing countries and plays a role in decreased immunity and increased risk of infection. Preventive zinc supplementation in healthy children can reduce mortality due to common causes like diarrhea, pneumonia and malaria. The main objective was to determine all-cause mortality and cause-specific mortality and morbidity in children under five in developing countries for preventive zinc supplementation. Data sources/ review methods A literature search was carried out on PubMed, the Cochrane Library and the WHO regional databases to identify RCTs on zinc supplementation for greater than 3 months in children less than 5 years of age in developing countries and its effect on mortality was analyzed. Results The effect of preventive zinc supplementation on mortality was given in eight trials, while cause specific mortality data was given in five of these eight trials. Zinc supplementation alone was associated with a statistically insignificant 9% (RR = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.82, 1.01) reduction in all cause mortality in the intervention group as compared to controls using a random effect model. The impact on diarrhea-specific mortality of zinc alone was a non-significant 18% reduction (RR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.64, 1.05) and 15% for pneumonia-specific mortality (RR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.11). The incidence of diarrhea showed a 13% reduction with preventive zinc supplementation (RR = 0.87; 95% CI: 0.81, 0.94) and a 19% reduction in pneumonia morbidity (RR = 0.81; 95% CI: 0.73, 0.90). Keeping in mind the direction of effect of zinc supplementation in reducing diarrhea and pneumonia related morbidity and mortality; we considered all the outcomes for selection of effectiveness estimate for inclusion in the LiST model. After application of the CHERG rules with consideration to quality of evidence and rule # 6, we used the most conservative estimates as a surrogate for mortality. We, therefore, conclude that zinc

  18. Dirty air, dirty power. Mortality and health damage due to air pollution from power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Conrad G.; Padian, M.

    2004-06-15

    The Clean Air Task Force commissioned Abt Associates, the consulting firm relied upon by US EPA to assess the health benefits of many of the agency's air regulatory programs. The report documents the asthma attacks, hospitalisations, lost work and school days, and premature deaths linked to pollution from power plants. A first report was released in 2000. The 2004 report documents for the first time the number of heart attacks and lung cancer deaths that would be caused by power plants in 2010 and 2020. It compares the premature deaths that would result under the Bush administration's air pollution plan, the existing US Clean Air Act, and a proposal sponsored by Senator Jim Jeffords to strengthen the Clean Air Act. In general it was found that the administration's plan would produce the fewest benefits. The full study is available from the EPA, abstracted separately on the Coal Abstracts database. 65 refs., 2 apps.

  19. Raptor mortality due to West Nile virus in the United States, 2002.

    PubMed

    Saito, Emi K; Sileo, Louis; Green, D Earl; Meteyer, Carol U; McLaughlin, Grace S; Converse, Kathryn A; Docherty, Douglas E

    2007-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has affected many thousands of birds since it was first detected in North America in 1999, but the overall impact on wild bird populations is unknown. In mid-August 2002, wildlife rehabilitators and local wildlife officials from multiple states began reporting increasing numbers of sick and dying raptors, mostly red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus). Commonly reported clinical signs were nonspecific and included emaciation, lethargy, weakness, inability to perch, fly or stand, and nonresponse to danger. Raptor carcasses from 12 states were received, and diagnostic evaluation of 56 raptors implicated WNV infection in 40 (71%) of these cases. Histologically, nonsuppurative encephalitis and myocarditis were the salient lesions (79% and 61%, respectively). Other causes of death included lead poisoning, trauma, aspergillosis, and Salmonella spp. and Clostridium spp. infections. The reason(s) for the reported increase in raptor mortality due to WNV in 2002 compared with the previous WNV seasons is unclear, and a better understanding of the epizootiology and pathogenesis of the virus in raptor populations is needed. PMID:17495304

  20. Raptor mortality due to West Nile virus in the United States, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saito, E.K.; Sileo, L.; Green, D.E.; Meteyer, C.U.; McLaughlin, G.S.; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has affected many thousands of birds since it was first detected in North America in 1999, but the overall impact on wild bird populations is unknown. In mid-August 2002, wildlife rehabilitators and local wildlife officials from multiple states began reporting increasing numbers of sick and dying raptors, mostly red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus. Commonly reported clinical signs were nonspecific and included emaciation, lethargy, weakness, inability to perch, fly or stand, and nonresponse to danger. Raptor carcasses from 12 states were received, and diagnostic evaluation of 56 raptors implicated WNV infection in 40 (71%) of these cases. Histologically, nonsuppurative encephalitis and myocarditis were the salient lesions (79% and 61%, respectively). Other causes of death included lead poisoning, trauma, aspergillosis, and Salmonella spp. and Clostridium spp. infections. The reason(s) for the reported increase in raptor mortality due to WNV in 2002 compared with the previous WNV seasons is unclear, and a better understanding of the epizootiology and pathogenesis of the virus in raptor populations is needed. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  1. Impact of Biofuel Poplar Cultivation on Ground-Level Ozone and Premature Human Mortality Depends on Cultivar Selection and Planting Location.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Kirsti; Wild, Oliver; Eller, Allyson S D; Hewitt, C Nick

    2015-07-21

    Isoprene and other volatile organic compounds emitted from vegetation play a key role in governing the formation of ground-level ozone. Emission rates of such compounds depend critically on the plant species. The cultivation of biofuel feedstocks will contribute to future land use change, altering the distribution of plant species and hence the magnitude and distribution of emissions. Here we use relationships between biomass yield and isoprene emissions derived from experimental data for 29 commercially available poplar hybrids to assess the impact that the large-scale cultivation of poplar for use as a biofuel feedstock will have on air quality, specifically ground-level ozone concentrations, in Europe. We show that the increases in ground-level ozone across Europe will increase the number of premature deaths attributable to ozone pollution each year by up to 6%. Substantial crop losses (up to ∼9 Mt y(-1) of wheat and maize) are also projected. We further demonstrate that these impacts are strongly dependent on the location of the poplar plantations, due to the prevailing meteorology, the population density, and the dominant crop type of the region. Our findings indicate the need for a concerted and centralized decision-making process that considers all aspects of future land use change in Europe, and not just the effect on greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:26098452

  2. The burden of COPD mortality due to ambient air pollution in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yang, Jun; Song, Yun-Feng; Chen, Ping-Yan; Ou, Chun-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality fraction attributable to air pollution and modification by individual characteristics of air pollution effects. We applied distributed lag non-linear models to assess the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality in 2007-2011 in Guangzhou, China, and the total COPD mortality fraction attributable to air pollution was calculated as well. We found that an increase of 10 μg/m(3) in particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was associated with a 1.58% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12-3.06%), 3.45% (95% CI: 1.30-5.66%) and 2.35% (95% CI: 0.42-4.32%) increase of COPD mortality over a lag of 0-15 days, respectively. Greater air pollution effects were observed in the elderly, males and residents with low educational attainment. The results showed 10.91% (95% CI: 1.02-9.58%), 12.71% (95% CI: 5.03-19.85%) and 13.38% (95% CI: 2.67-22.84%) COPD mortality was attributable to current PM10, SO2 and NO2 exposure, respectively. In conclusion, the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality differed by individual characteristics. There were remarkable COPD mortality burdens attributable to air pollution in Guangzhou. PMID:27195597

  3. The burden of COPD mortality due to ambient air pollution in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Yang, Jun; Song, Yun-Feng; Chen, Ping-Yan; Ou, Chun-Quan

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have investigated the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality fraction attributable to air pollution and modification by individual characteristics of air pollution effects. We applied distributed lag non-linear models to assess the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality in 2007–2011 in Guangzhou, China, and the total COPD mortality fraction attributable to air pollution was calculated as well. We found that an increase of 10 μg/m3 in particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was associated with a 1.58% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12–3.06%), 3.45% (95% CI: 1.30–5.66%) and 2.35% (95% CI: 0.42–4.32%) increase of COPD mortality over a lag of 0–15 days, respectively. Greater air pollution effects were observed in the elderly, males and residents with low educational attainment. The results showed 10.91% (95% CI: 1.02–9.58%), 12.71% (95% CI: 5.03–19.85%) and 13.38% (95% CI: 2.67–22.84%) COPD mortality was attributable to current PM10, SO2 and NO2 exposure, respectively. In conclusion, the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality differed by individual characteristics. There were remarkable COPD mortality burdens attributable to air pollution in Guangzhou.

  4. Reduction of maternal mortality due to preeclampsia in Colombia-an interrupted time-series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Medina, Rodolfo; Herrera-Escobar, Juan Pablo; Nieto-Díaz, Aníbal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Preeclampsia is the most important cause of maternal mortality in developing countries. A comprehensive prenatal care program including bio-psychosocial components was developed and introduced at a national level in Colombia. We report on the trends in maternal mortality rates and their related causes before and after implementation of this program. Methods: General and specific maternal mortality rates were monitored for nine years (1998-2006). An interrupted time-series analysis was performed with monthly data on cases of maternal mortality that compared trends and changes in national mortality rates and the impact of these changes attributable to the introduction of a bio-psychosocial model. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate correlations between the interventions. Results: Five years after (2002 - 2006) its introduction the general maternal mortality rate was significantly reduced to 23% (OR=0.77, CI 95% 0.71-0.82).The implementation of BPSM also reduced the incidence of preeclampsia in 22% (OR= 0.78, CI 95% 0.67-0.88), as also the labor complications by hemorrhage in 25% (OR=0.75, CI 95% 0.59-0.90) associated with the implementation of red code. The other causes of maternal mortality did not reveal significant changes. Biomedical, nutritional, psychosocial assessments, and other individual interventions in prenatal care were not correlated to maternal mortality (p= 0.112); however, together as a model we observed a significant association (p= 0.042). Conclusions: General maternal mortality was reduced after the implementation of a comprehensive national prenatal care program. Is important the evaluation of this program in others populations. PMID:24970956

  5. Loss of genetic diversity in the endemic Hector's dolphin due to fisheries-related mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, F B; Baker, C S

    2000-01-01

    The endemic New Zealand Hector's dolphin is considered the rarest species of marine dolphin with a total abundance of less than 4000. The species is listed as vulnerable because of fisheries-related mortality due to entanglement in set nets. The vulnerability of this species is further increased by its fidelity to local natal ranges and the genetic isolation of regional populations. Here we present evidence, based on 108 contemporary samples and 55 historical samples dating back to 1870, of a significant loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity in two regional populations of Hector's dolphin. The haplotype diversity (h) was calculated from sequences of a 206 bp fragment in the mtDNA control region, designed to identify 13 out of the 14 known maternal lineages. Over the last 20 years, the North Island population has been reduced from at least three lineages (h = 0.41) to a single lineage (h = 0; p < 0.05). Given its small size, reproductive isolation and reduced genetic diversity, this population is likely to become extinct. The diversity of the East Coast South Island population has declined significantly from h = 0.65 to h = 0.35 (p < 0.05). Based on trend analysis of the mtDNA diversity, we predict that the East Coast population will lose all mtDNA diversity within the next 20 years. This time-series of reduction in genetic variation provides independent evidence of the severity of population decline and habitat contraction resulting from fisheries and perhaps other human activities. PMID:10670959

  6. Possible bias in tree-ring time series due to mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Lucier, A A; Warnick, W L; Hyink, D M

    1989-07-01

    This article discusses the possible bias in tree-ring time series studies extending from the year of sample collection to a prepollution period. The authors hypothesizes that normal mortality (i.e., mortality not associated with sudden disturbance) can cause reduced tree ring widths in years preceding actual tree death and produce a bias toward smaller and more variable ring widths at the end of the tree-ring time series.

  7. Severe mortality in mesocosm-reared sharpsnout sea bream Diplodus puntazzo larvae due to epitheliocystis infection.

    PubMed

    Katharios, Pantelis; Papadaki, Maria; Papandroulakis, Nikos; Divanach, Pascal

    2008-10-16

    This paper describes severe mortalities recorded in sharpsnout sea bream Diplodus puntazzo larvae reared in mesocosms. The mortalities were attributed to epitheliocystis infection. The pathology associated with the disease is described using histological techniques. Microscopical examination showed a massive infection of the skin, fins, and oral cavity, with impaired feeding, respiration, and osmoregulation being the most likely cause of death. This is the first report of epitheliocystis disease in sharpsnout sea bream and in fish at such an early developmental stage. PMID:19062753

  8. The burden of COPD mortality due to ambient air pollution in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Yang, Jun; Song, Yun-Feng; Chen, Ping-Yan; Ou, Chun-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality fraction attributable to air pollution and modification by individual characteristics of air pollution effects. We applied distributed lag non-linear models to assess the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality in 2007–2011 in Guangzhou, China, and the total COPD mortality fraction attributable to air pollution was calculated as well. We found that an increase of 10 μg/m3 in particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was associated with a 1.58% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12–3.06%), 3.45% (95% CI: 1.30–5.66%) and 2.35% (95% CI: 0.42–4.32%) increase of COPD mortality over a lag of 0–15 days, respectively. Greater air pollution effects were observed in the elderly, males and residents with low educational attainment. The results showed 10.91% (95% CI: 1.02–9.58%), 12.71% (95% CI: 5.03–19.85%) and 13.38% (95% CI: 2.67–22.84%) COPD mortality was attributable to current PM10, SO2 and NO2 exposure, respectively. In conclusion, the associations between air pollution and COPD mortality differed by individual characteristics. There were remarkable COPD mortality burdens attributable to air pollution in Guangzhou. PMID:27195597

  9. Relevance of Candida and other mycoses for morbidity and mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock due to peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstern, Christoph; Herold, Christina; Mieth, Markus; Brenner, Thorsten; Decker, Sebastian; Busch, Cornelius J; Hofer, Stefan; Zimmermann, Stefan; Weigand, Markus A; Bernhard, Michael

    2015-07-01

    This single-centre retrospective cohort study evaluated the incidence and outcome of mycoses in critical ill patients (n = 283) with sepsis due to peritonitis. Overall mortality was 41.3%, and the 28-day mortality was 29.3%. Fungal pathogens were found in 51.9%. The common first location was the respiratory tract (66.6%), followed by the abdominal site (19.7%). Candida colonisation was found in 64.6%, and invasive Candida infection in 34.0%. Identified fungi were Candida spp. in 98.6% and Aspergillus spp. in 6.1%. Patients with fungal pathogens showed a higher rate of postoperative peritonitis, APACHE II and tracheotomy. In comparison to patients without fungal pathogens, these patients showed a longer duration on mechanical ventilation, and a higher overall mortality. Patients with Candida-positive swabs from abdominal sites had more fascia dehiscence and anastomosis leakage. Seventy-two patients (48.9%) received antifungal therapy, 26 patients were treated empirically. Antifungal therapy was not associated with a decrease in mortality. Age and renal replacement therapy were associated with mortality. In conclusion, fungi are common pathogens in critically ill patients with peritonitis, and detection of fungi is associated with an increase in overall mortality. Particularly, Candida-positive abdominal swabs are associated with an increase in morbidity. However, we were not able to demonstrate a survival benefit for antifungal therapy in peritonitis patients. PMID:26010584

  10. Premature infant

    MedlinePlus

    ... infant. Common signs of prematurity include: Abnormal breathing patterns (shallow, irregular pauses in breathing called apnea) Body hair (lanugo) Enlarged clitoris (in female infants) Less body fat Lower muscle tone and ...

  11. Premature infant

    MedlinePlus

    Preterm infant; Preemie; Premie ... The infant may have trouble breathing and keeping a constant body temperature. ... A premature infant may have signs of the following problems: Anemia Bleeding into the brain or damage to the brain's white ...

  12. Premature Ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    ... orgasm before he wants to, he loses his erection and can’t continue with intercourse. Premature ejaculation ... seconds so that you begin to lose your erection. You repeat this process several times before you ...

  13. Mortality Due to Chagas Disease in Brazil According to a Specific Cause

    PubMed Central

    da Nóbrega, Aglaêr Alves; de Araújo, Wildo Navegantes; Vasconcelos, Ana Maria Nogales

    2014-01-01

    A century after its discovery, Chagas disease (CD) is still considered a public health problem. Mortality caused by CD between 2000 and 2010 was described according to the specific underlying cause, year of occurrence, gender, age range, and region of Brazil. The standardized mortality rate decreased 32.4%, from 3.4% in 2000 to 2.3% in 2010. Most of the deaths (85.9%) occurred in male patients who were > 60 years of age caused by cardiac involvement. The mortality rate caused by cardiac involvement decreased in all regions of Brazil, except in the North region, where it increased by 1.6%. The Northeast had the smallest and the Central-West had the largest decrease. The mortality rate caused by a compromised digestive tract increased in all regions. Despite the control of transmission by vector and blood transfusions, CD should remain on the list of priority diseases for the public health service in Brazil, and surveillance actions cannot be interrupted. PMID:25002301

  14. Multiple Brain Abscesses due to Streptococcus anginosus: Prediction of Mortality by an Imaging Severity Index Score

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient with altered mental status, brain abscesses, ventriculitis, and empyemas died of septic shock and brain abscesses secondary to Streptococcus anginosus despite aggressive treatment. An imaging severity index score with a better prognostic value than the Glasgow coma scale predicted mortality in this patient. PMID:27034878

  15. High Mortality from Blood Stream Infection in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Is Due to Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Seboxa, Teshale; Amogne, Wondwossen; Abebe, Workeabeba; Tsegaye, Tewodros; Azazh, Aklilu; Hailu, Workagegnehu; Fufa, Kebede; Grude, Nils; Henriksen, Thor-Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background Managing blood stream infection in Africa is hampered by lack of bacteriological support needed for antimicrobial stewardship, and background data needed for empirical treatment. A combined pro- and retrospective approach was used to overcome thresholds in clinical research in Africa. Methods Outcome and characteristics including age, HIV infection, pancytopenia and bacteriological results were studied in 292 adult patients with two or more SIRS criteria using univariate and confirming multivariate logistic regression models. Expected randomly distributed resistance covariation was compared with observed co-resistance among gram-negative enteric bacteria in 92 paediatric blood culture isolates that had been harvested in the same hospital during the same period of time. Results Mortality was fivefold increased among patients with positive blood culture results [50.0% vs. 9.8%; OR 11.24 (4.38–25.88), p < 0.0001], and for this group of patients mortality was significantly associated with antimicrobial resistance [OR 23.28 (3.3–164.4), p = 0.002]. All 11 patients with Enterobacteriaceae resistant to 3rd. generation cephalosporins died. Eighty-nine patients had pancytopenia grade 3–4. Among patients with negative blood culture results, mortality was significantly associated with pancytopenia [OR 3.12 (1.32–7.39), p = 0.01]. HIV positivity was not associated with increased mortality. Antimicrobial resistance that concerned gram-negative enteric bacteria, regardless of species, was characterized by co-resistance between third generation cephalosporins, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, and co-trimoxazole. Conclusion Mortality was strongly associated with growth of bacteria resistant to empirical treatment, and these patients were dead or dying when bacteriological reports arrived. Because of co-resistance, alternative efficient antibiotics would not have been available in Ethiopia for 8/11 Enterobacteriaceae-infected patients with isolates resistant to third

  16. Mortality due to infectious hematopoietic necrosis of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) fry in streamside egg incubation boxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.; Jenes, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus caused mortality of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in streamside egg incubation boxes. Virus was not detectable in eggs or alevins; its first isolation coincided with the appearance of dead fish in a trap on the outflow from the box. Mortality due to the virus did not occur in every egg box studied. However, when fry from the boxes were held in the laboratory, epizootics began as much as 3 wk later, with total mortality exceeding 90%. More than 96% of the dead fry had titers exceeding 105 plaque-forming units per gram. The peak incidence of virus in fry migrating in the river coincided with the arrival of hatchery-produced fry, although some fry believed to have been produced by natural spawning were also infected.Englis

  17. Transgenic mice overexpressing glia maturation factor-β, an oxidative stress inducible gene, show premature aging due to Zmpste24 down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, Jun-ichi; Takenaka, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Glia Maturation Factor-β (GMF), a brain specific protein, is induced by proteinuria in renal tubules. Ectopic GMF overexpression causes apoptosis in vitro via cellular vulnerability to oxidative stress. In order to examine the roles of GMF in non-brain tissue, we constructed transgenic mice overexpressing GMF (GMF-TG). The GMF-TG mice exhibited appearance phenotypes associated with premature aging. The GMF-TG mice also demonstrated short lifespans and reduced hair regrowth, suggesting an accelerated aging process. The production of an abnormal lamin A, a nuclear envelope protein, plays a causal role in both normal aging and accelerated aging diseases, known as laminopathies. Importantly, we identified the abnormal lamin A (prelamin A), accompanied by a down-regulation of a lamin A processing enzyme (Zmpste24) in the kidney of the GMF-TG mice. The GMF-TG mice showed accelerated aging in the kidney, compared with wild-type mice, showing increased TGF-β1, CTGF gene and serum creatinine. The gene expression of p21/waf1 was increased at an earlier stage of life, at 10 weeks, which was in turn down-regulated at a later stage, at 60 weeks. In conclusion, we propose that GMF-TG mice might be a novel mouse model of accelerated aging, due to the abnormal lamin A. PMID:26232943

  18. Transgenic mice overexpressing glia maturation factor-β, an oxidative stress inducible gene, show premature aging due to Zmpste24 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Rika; Asai, Kanae; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Takenaka, Masaru

    2015-07-01

    Glia Maturation Factor-β (GMF), a brain specific protein, is induced by proteinuria in renal tubules. Ectopic GMF overexpression causes apoptosisin vitro via cellular vulnerability to oxidative stress. In order to examine the roles of GMF in non-brain tissue, we constructed transgenic mice overexpressing GMF (GMF-TG). The GMF-TG mice exhibited appearance phenotypes associated with premature aging. The GMF-TG mice also demonstrated short lifespans and reduced hair regrowth, suggesting an accelerated aging process. The production of an abnormal lamin A, a nuclear envelope protein, plays a causal role in both normal aging and accelerated aging diseases, known as laminopathies. Importantly, we identified the abnormal lamin A (prelamin A), accompanied by a down-regulation of a lamin A processing enzyme (Zmpste24) in the kidney of the GMF-TG mice. The GMF-TG mice showed accelerated aging in the kidney, compared with wild-type mice, showing increased TGF-β1, CTGF gene and serum creatinine. The gene expression of p21/waf1 was increased at an earlier stage of life, at 10 weeks, which was in turn down-regulated at a later stage, at 60 weeks. In conclusion, we propose that GMF-TG mice might be a novel mouse model of accelerated aging, due to the abnormal lamin A. PMID:26232943

  19. Estimating mortality, morbidity and disability due to malaria among Africa's non-pregnant population.

    PubMed Central

    Snow, R. W.; Craig, M.; Deichmann, U.; Marsh, K.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of malaria to morbidity and mortality among people in Africa has been a subject of academic interest, political advocacy, and speculation. National statistics for much of sub-Saharan Africa have proved to be an unreliable source of disease-specific morbidity and mortality data. Credible estimates of disease-specific burdens are required for setting global and national priorities for health in order to rationalize the use of limited resources and lobby for financial support. We have taken an empirical approach to defining the limits of Plasmodium falciparum transmission across the continent and interpolated the distributions of projected populations in 1995. By combining a review of the literature on malaria in Africa and models of acquired functional immunity, we have estimated the age-structured rates of the fatal, morbid and disabling sequelae following exposure to malaria infection under different epidemiological conditions. PMID:10516785

  20. Mortality due to respiratory diseases in the elderly after influenza vaccination campaigns in the Federal District, Brazil, 1996-2009 *

    PubMed Central

    Scoralick, Francisca Magalhães; Piazzolla, Luciana Paganini; Pires, Liana Laura; Neri, Cleudsom; de Paula, Wladimir Kummer

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare mortality rates due to respiratory diseases among elderly individuals residing in the Federal District of Brasília, Brazil, prior to and after the implementation of a national influenza vaccination campaign. METHODS: This was an ecological time series analysis. Data regarding the population of individuals who were over 60 years of age between 1996 and 2009 were obtained from official databases. The variables of interest were the crude mortality rate (CMR), the mortality rate due to the respiratory disease (MRRD), and the proportional mortality ratio (PMR) for respiratory diseases. We performed a qualitative analysis of the data for the period prior to and after the implementation of the vaccination campaign (1996-1999 and 2000-2009, respectively). RESULTS: The CMR increased with advancing age. Over the course of the study period, we observed reductions in the CMR in all of the age brackets studied, particularly among those aged 80 years or older. Reductions in the MRRD were also found in all of the age groups, especially in those aged 80 years or older. In addition, there was a decrease in the PMR for respiratory diseases in all age groups throughout the study period. The most pronounced decrease in the PMR for respiratory diseases in the ≥ 70 year age bracket occurred in 2000 (immediately following the implementation of the national vaccination campaign); in 2001, that rate increased in all age groups, despite the greater adherence to the vaccination campaign in comparison with that recorded for 2000. CONCLUSIONS: Influenza vaccination appears to have a positive impact on the prevention of mortality due to respiratory diseases, particularly in the population aged 70 or over. PMID:23670505

  1. Towns with extremely low mortality due to ischemic heart disease in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cause of coronary disease inframortality in Spain is unknown. The aim of this study is to identify Spanish towns with very low ischemic heart disease mortality, describe their health and social characteristics, and analyze the relationship with a series of contextual factors. Methods We obtained the number of deaths registered for each of 8,122 Spanish towns in the periods 1989-1998 and 1999-2003. Expected deaths, standardized mortality ratio (SMR), smoothed Relative Risk (RR), and Posterior Probability (PP) of RR > 1 were calculated using Bayesian hierarchical models. Inframortality was defined as any town that displayed an RR below the 10th percentile, an SMR of under 1 for both sexes, and a PP of RR > 1 less than or equal to 0.002 for male and 0.005 for female mortality, during the two periods covered. All the remaining towns, except for those with high mortality classified as "tourist towns", were selected as controls. The association among socioeconomic, health, dietary, lifestyle and vascular risk factors was analyzed using sequential mixed logistic regression models, with province as the random-effects variable. Results We identified 32 towns in which ischemic heart disease mortality was half the national rate and four times lower than the European Union rate, situated in lightly populated provinces spread across the northern half of Spain, and revealed a surprising pattern of geographic aggegation for 23 of the 32 towns. Variables related with inframortality were: a less aged population (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89-0.99); a contextual dietary pattern marked by a high fish content (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.38-3.28) and wine consumption (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.08-2.07); and a low prevalence of obesity (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.22-1.01); and, in the case of towns of over 1000 inhabitants, a higher physician-population ratio (OR 3.80, 95% CI 1.17-12.3). Conclusions Results indicate that dietary and health care factors have an influence on inframortality. The geographical

  2. Evaluating the Long-Term Health and Economic Impacts of Central Residential Air Filtration for Reducing Premature Mortality Associated with Indoor Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) of Outdoor Origin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Azimi, Parham; Stephens, Brent

    2015-07-01

    Much of human exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) of outdoor origin occurs in residences. High-efficiency particle air filtration in central heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is increasingly being used to reduce concentrations of particulate matter inside homes. However, questions remain about the effectiveness of filtration for reducing exposures to PM2.5 of outdoor origin and adverse health outcomes. Here we integrate epidemiology functions and mass balance modeling to estimate the long-term health and economic impacts of HVAC filtration for reducing premature mortality associated with indoor PM2.5 of outdoor origin in residences. We evaluate 11 classifications of filters (MERV 5 through HEPA) using six case studies of single-family home vintages and ventilation system combinations located in 22 U.S. cities. We estimate that widespread use of higher efficiency filters would reduce premature mortality by 0.002-2.5% and increase life expectancy by 0.02-1.6 months, yielding annual monetary benefits ranging from $1 to $1348 per person in the homes and locations modeled herein. Large differences in the magnitude of health and economic impacts are driven largely by differences in rated filter efficiency and building and ventilation system characteristics that govern particle infiltration and persistence, with smaller influences attributable to geographic location. PMID:26197328

  3. Evaluating the Long-Term Health and Economic Impacts of Central Residential Air Filtration for Reducing Premature Mortality Associated with Indoor Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) of Outdoor Origin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Azimi, Parham; Stephens, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Much of human exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) of outdoor origin occurs in residences. High-efficiency particle air filtration in central heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is increasingly being used to reduce concentrations of particulate matter inside homes. However, questions remain about the effectiveness of filtration for reducing exposures to PM2.5 of outdoor origin and adverse health outcomes. Here we integrate epidemiology functions and mass balance modeling to estimate the long-term health and economic impacts of HVAC filtration for reducing premature mortality associated with indoor PM2.5 of outdoor origin in residences. We evaluate 11 classifications of filters (MERV 5 through HEPA) using six case studies of single-family home vintages and ventilation system combinations located in 22 U.S. cities. We estimate that widespread use of higher efficiency filters would reduce premature mortality by 0.002–2.5% and increase life expectancy by 0.02–1.6 months, yielding annual monetary benefits ranging from $1 to $1348 per person in the homes and locations modeled herein. Large differences in the magnitude of health and economic impacts are driven largely by differences in rated filter efficiency and building and ventilation system characteristics that govern particle infiltration and persistence, with smaller influences attributable to geographic location. PMID:26197328

  4. Differential Mortality of Dog Tick Vectors Due to Infection by Diverse Francisella tularensis tularensis Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Goethert, Heidi K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The factors involved in the long-term perpetuation of Francisella tularensis tularensis in nature are poorly understood. Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, has become a site of sustained transmission of Type A tularemia, with nearly 100 human cases reported from 2000 to 2010. We have identified a stable focus of F. tularensis transmission there, where the annual prevalence in host-seeking Dermacentor variabilis is about 3%, suggesting that this tick perpetuates the agent. However, laboratory studies have shown that infection with F. tularensis has a profound negative effect on dog tick mortality, presenting a paradox: how can a vector perpetuate an agent that negatively affects its fitness? It may be that experimental infection does not mimic that of natural transmission. Accordingly, we examined the effects that F. tularensis has on the longevity of field-derived ticks. Of 63 PCR-positive ticks collected in early summer, 89% were dead by December compared to 48% of 214 uninfected ticks collected at the same time and site. However, the quantum of F. tularensis DNA within each tick was not correlated with increased mortality. Instead, ticks with an uncommon genotype were more likely to die early than those with the common genotype. We conclude that the interaction between F. tularensis and its vector is complex and certain bacterial genotypes appear to be better adapted to their arthropod host. PMID:21612530

  5. Desert bighorn sheep mortality due to presumptive type C botulism in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swift, P.K.; Wehausen, J.D.; Ernest, H.B.; Singer, R.S.; Pauli, A.M.; Kinde, H.; Rocke, T.E.; Bleich, V.C.

    2000-01-01

    During a routine telemetry flight of the Mojave Desert (California, USA) in August 1995, mortality signals were detected from two of 12 radio-collared female desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) in the vicinity of Old Dad Peak in San Bernardino County (California). A series of field investigations determined that at least 45 bighorn sheep had died near two artificial water catchments (guzzlers), including 13 bighorn sheep which had presumably drowned in a guzzler tank. Samples from water contaminated by decomposing bighorn sheep carcasses and hemolyzed blood from a fresh bighorn sheep carcass were tested for the presence of pesticides, heavy metals, strychnine, blue-green algae, Clostridium botulinum toxin, ethylene glycol, nitrates, nitrites, sodium, and salts. Mouse bioassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detected type C botulinum toxin in the hemolyzed blood and in fly larvae and pupae. This, coupled with negative results from other analyses, led us to conclude that type C botulinum poisoning was most likely responsible for the mortality of bighorn sheep outside the guzzler tank.

  6. Non-linear increases in Amazonian tree mortality due to drought-fire interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brando, P. M.; Balch, J.; Nepstad, D.; Morton, D. C.; Putz, F.; Coe, M. T.; Silvério, D.; Macedo, M.; Davidson, E. A.; Nóbrega, C.; Alencar, A.; Soares-Filho, B.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change may drive a late-century replacement of Amazon forests by fire-prone scrub vegetation. These model-based predictions do not consider the positive feedbacks between fire disturbance and extreme weather events, which could accelerate forest replacement. Here we present the first field-based evidence of a near-term tipping point in Amazon forest fire regimes. We found a two to four-fould increase in fire-induced tree mortality during an extreme drought. This threshold mortality response had a cascading effect, causing sharp declines in canopy cover and aboveground live biomass relative to an unburned control, while favoring widespread invasion by flammable grasses across 32-37% of the forest edge. Regional forest fires burned up to 12% of southeast Amazon forests during recent droughts, but less than 1% in non-drought years. The process of severe climate-induced forest degradation predicted by models for the later part of this century could be triggered sooner by widespread and high-intensity fires.

  7. [Premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Sapetti, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is the more frequent sexological consultation in men along with the Erectile Dysfunction. In this article a revision will become of its definitions, its clinical manifestations that allow to an effective diagnosis and its therapeutic boarding with Sexual Therapies and, in certain cases, with drugs like PDE-5 Inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, IRSS, or dapoxetine. PMID:24260751

  8. Causes of mortality due to rheumatic diseases in Jerez de los Caballeros (Badajoz) during the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Peral Pacheco, Diego; Suárez-Guzmán, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    A total of 26,203 of the deaths in Jerez de los Caballeros (Badajoz) during the 19th century were collected and grouped according to the Bertillon's Classification, in order to study the causes of death from rheumatic diseases. An analysis was made using the Death Registers, those located in the Parish Archives, and files of the Municipal Archives. There were a total of 31 deaths due to rheumatic diseases, with the 65-74 years age group being most frequent. The lack of records may be due to the inaccuracy of the diagnoses. September was the month of increased mortality. PMID:26139377

  9. Quantifying and Adjusting for Disease Misclassification Due to Loss to Follow-Up in Historical Cohort Mortality Studies

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Laura L. F.; Maldonado, George

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to quantify and adjust for disease misclassification from loss to follow-up in a historical cohort mortality study of workers where exposure was categorized as a multi-level variable. Disease classification parameters were defined using 2008 mortality data for the New Zealand population and the proportions of known deaths observed for the cohort. The probability distributions for each classification parameter were constructed to account for potential differences in mortality due to exposure status, gender, and ethnicity. Probabilistic uncertainty analysis (bias analysis), which uses Monte Carlo techniques, was then used to sample each parameter distribution 50,000 times, calculating adjusted odds ratios (ORDM-LTF) that compared the mortality of workers with the highest cumulative exposure to those that were considered never-exposed. The geometric mean ORDM-LTF ranged between 1.65 (certainty interval (CI): 0.50–3.88) and 3.33 (CI: 1.21–10.48), and the geometric mean of the disease-misclassification error factor (εDM-LTF), which is the ratio of the observed odds ratio to the adjusted odds ratio, had a range of 0.91 (CI: 0.29–2.52) to 1.85 (CI: 0.78–6.07). Only when workers in the highest exposure category were more likely than those never-exposed to be misclassified as non-cases did the ORDM-LTF frequency distributions shift further away from the null. The application of uncertainty analysis to historical cohort mortality studies with multi-level exposures can provide valuable insight into the magnitude and direction of study error resulting from losses to follow-up. PMID:26501295

  10. Osteopenia - premature infants

    MedlinePlus

    Neonatal rickets; Brittle bones - premature infants; Weak bones - premature infants; Osteopenia of prematurity ... baby. This helps the baby grow. A premature infant may not receive the proper amount of calcium ...

  11. [Incidence and mortality due to cancer in Navarre, 1998-2002. Trends in the last 30 years].

    PubMed

    Ardanaz, E; Moreno-Iribas, C; Pérez de Rada, M E; Ezponda, C; Floristán, Y; Navaridas, N; Martínez-Peñuela, J M; Puras, A; Santamaría, M; Ezpeleta, I; Valerdi, J J; Pardo, F J; Monzón, F J; Lizarraga, J; Ortigosa, C; Resano, J; Barricarte, A

    2007-01-01

    Between 1998-2002, 16,952 new cases of cancer were registered in Navarre. In men, the most frequently diagnosed cancers were in the following order: prostate, lung, colon and rectum, bladder and stomach, which accounted for 63.2%. In women, the sites were breast, colon and rectum, corpus uteri, stomach and ovary, which accounted for 57.6% of the cases. In the same period, 1998-2002, 4,127 men and 2,470 women died from cancer. Sixty percent of all deaths due to malign tumours in men were due to cancer of the lung, prostate, colon and rectum, stomach and bladder. In women this was due to cancers of colon and rectum, breast, stomach, pancreas and lung, which accounted for 49% of the cases. In men in Navarre there has been an increase in the incidence rates of cancer of the prostate, kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Avoidable cancers such as those related to smoking (lung, oral cavity and pharynx or pancreas) continue to rise, and represent a greater global risk of dying from cancer in the latest period studied than in the decades of the 1970s and 1980s. From 1995 up to the present, mortality due to cancer has moved from occupying the second place to become the first cause of death among men in Navarre. The global risk of death due to cancer in men is now equal to the first period studied, 1975-1977. Amongst women the global risk of death due to cancer fell by 25% between 1975 and 2002, basically at the cost of breast and stomach cancer. Tumours related to smoking increased both in mortality and in incidence and appear as a significant health problem amongst women in Navarre. Breast cancer has increased in incidence, with lower mortality figures than those of the first period 1975-1977. Invasive cancer of the cervix remains at very low rates in comparison with many European countries, including Spain. In both sexes colorectal and skin cancer has increased, while the incidence and mortality of stomach cancer continues to fall. PMID:17898820

  12. Cancer incidence and mortality due to alcohol: an analysis of 10-year data.

    PubMed

    Laffoy, M; McCarthy, T; Mullen, L; Byrne, D; Martin, J

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is causally related to cancer of the upper aero-digestive tract, liver, colon, rectum, female breast and pancreas. The dose response relationship varies for each site. We calculated Ireland's cancer incidence and mortality attributable to alcohol over a 10-year period. Between 2001 and 2010, 4,585 (4.7%) male and 4,593 (4.2%) female invasive cancer diagnoses were attributable to alcohol. The greatest risk was for the upper aero-digestive tract where 2,961 (52.9%) of these cancers in males and 866 (35.2%) in females were attributable to alcohol. Between 2001 and 2010, 2,823 (6.7%) of male cancer deaths and 1,700 (4.6%) of female cancer deaths were attributable to alcohol. Every year approximately 900 new cancers and 500 cancer deaths are attributable to alcohol. Alcohol is a major cause of cancer after smoking, obesity and physical inactivity. Public awareness of risk must improve. Over half of alcohol related cancers are preventable by adhering to Department of Health alcohol consumption guidelines. PMID:24579406

  13. Mortality due to acute adverse drug reactions in Galicia: 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Arias, Domingo; Pereiro Gómez, César; Bermejo Barrera, Ana M; López de Abajo Rodríguez, Benito; Sobrido Prieto, María

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study all people who died in the Autonomous Community of Galicia from acute death after drugconsumption (ADR) in which there was judicial intervention during the period from 1997 to 2011, according to inclusion and exclusión criteria established by the National Drug Plan for the entire national territory. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of deceased subjects were studied, in order to identify key risk factors and/or vulnerable populations.A total of 805 deaths were recorded. The distribution by provinces and municipalities corresponds to the areas of greatest population, incidence of consumption and proximity to the coast. The average age of these patients was 34.34 years, with a gradual increase over years. Most of them were male (91.2%) and single (47.7). 43.5% of the deceased habitually used the parenteral route of administration and 36.4% had positive HIV serology. The most frequently-detected substances corresponded to opiates (heroin: 61.3%, methadone: 35.6%), followed by cocaine (53.7%), although the most common pattern was that of poly-consumption. ADR mortality figures remain relatively stable throughout the study period. The predominant pattern is that of males, opiates and a long history of consumption. PMID:26990265

  14. Mortality due to cutaneous melanoma in south region of Brazil: a spatial approach*

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Flávia Regina; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando Costa

    2016-01-01

    Background Cutaneous melanoma is a skin cancer with low incidence but high mortality rates. The South region of Brazil has the highest death rates by melanoma per 100,000 inhabitants of the country. Little is known about the spatial distribution of this malignancy in southern Brazil. Objectives Identify the spatial patterns of deaths from cutaneous melanoma in South region of Brazil, using geoprocessing tools. Methods This is an ecological and exploratory study of death information by cutaneous melanoma obtained from portal Datasus, for Brazil's southern region, from January 2008 to December 2012. Deaths were separated by gender and rates per 100,000 inhabitants were calculated and used to compile thematic maps, Moran maps and Kernel maps, using TerraView software. It was adopted an alpha = 5%. Results There were data on 2378 deaths from cutaneous melanoma in the study period. High rates were identified in the northern and littoral regions of Rio Grande do Sul; the northeast of Santa Catarina; and west of Paraná - for the total population, with minor differences detected and indicated regarding gender. The global Moran index presented p-values of 0.03, 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, for male, female and overall deaths. All the micro-regions that showed high priority for intervention were detected in the Rio Grande do Sul. Conclusion Spatial clusters of micro-regions with high death rates from cutaneous melanoma in South region of Brazil were identified, serving as an important tool for health managers. PMID:27579737

  15. Neonatal mortality due to preterm birth at 28-36 weeks' gestation in China, 2003-2008.

    PubMed

    Liang, Juan; Mao, Meng; Dai, Li; Li, Xiaohong; Miao, Lei; Li, Qi; He, Chunhua; Li, Mingrong; Wang, He; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yanping

    2011-11-01

    Almost all (99%) neonatal deaths occur in developing countries, where the progress in reducing neonatal mortality rates (NMR) has been small; the Millennium Development Goal for child survival cannot be met if this situation continues. China is among the 10 countries that have the largest numbers of neonatal deaths. In order to provide effective interventions to reduce the national NMR for government policy makers, we analyse the trends, causes and characteristics of the neonatal deaths of preterm babies in different regions of China during the period 2003-2008. The data for this retrospective study were retrieved from the population-based Maternal and Child Health Surveillance System of China. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to analyse the trend of NMRs due to immaturity. The national NMR due to immaturity has decreased by 38.7% in 6 years. However, the proportion of preterm births among the causes of neonatal death has increased significantly from 33.6% in 2003 to 40.9% in 2008. The relative risk of neonatal death among preterm babies has shown significant regional disparity. In 2008, the adjusted relative risk was 1.30 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95, 1.78] in the inland regions and 2.37 [95% CI 1.56, 3.60] in the remote regions, both compared with the coastal regions. The proportion of neonatal deaths with a gestational age <32 weeks or a birthweight <1500 g was highest among the coastal regions. Most neonatal deaths of preterm babies in remote areas were born at home and were not treated before death. Our study suggests that preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal death in China and neonatal mortality due to immaturity displayed regional differences. The Chinese government should implement major effective strategies for reducing the mortality of preterm infants to further decrease the total NMR. Priority interventions should be region-specific, depending on the availability of economic and health care resources. PMID:21980948

  16. Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution and mortality due to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Torén, Kjell; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Nilsson, Tohr; Järvholm, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    Objectives A growing number of epidemiological studies are showing that ambient exposure to particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, whether occupational exposure increases this risk is not clear. The aim of the present study was to examine whether occupational exposure to particulate air pollution increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Methods The study population was a cohort of 176 309 occupationally exposed Swedish male construction workers and 71 778 unexposed male construction workers. The definition of exposure to inorganic dust (asbestos, man‐made mineral fibres, dust from cement, concrete and quartz), wood dust, fumes (metal fumes, asphalt fumes and diesel exhaust) and gases and irritants (organic solvents and reactive chemicals) was based on a job‐exposure matrix with focus on exposure in the mid‐1970s. The cohort was followed from 1971 to 2002 with regard to mortality to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Relative risks (RR) were obtained by the person‐years method and from Poisson regression models adjusting for baseline values of blood pressure, body mass index, age and smoking habits. Results Any occupational particulate air pollution was associated with an increased risk for ischemic heart disease (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.19), but there was no increased risk for cerebrovascular disease (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.07). There was an increased risk for ischaemic heart disease and exposure to inorganic dust (RR 1.07, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and exposure to fumes (RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.10), especially diesel exhaust (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.24). There was no significantly increased risk for cerebrovascular disease and exposure to inorganic dust, fumes or wood dust. Conclusions Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution, especially diesel exhaust, among construction workers increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease. PMID

  17. Increased Mortality in Schizophrenia Due to Cardiovascular Disease – A Non-Systematic Review of Epidemiology, Possible Causes, and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ringen, Petter Andreas; Engh, John A.; Birkenaes, Astrid B.; Dieset, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is among the major causes of disability worldwide and the mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is significantly elevated. There is a growing concern that this health challenge is not fully understood and efficiently addressed. Methods: Non-systematic review using searches in PubMed on relevant topics as well as selection of references based on the authors’ experience from clinical work and research in the field. Results: In most countries, the standardized mortality rate in schizophrenia is about 2.5, leading to a reduction in life expectancy between 15 and 20 years. A major contributor of the increased mortality is due to CVD, with CVD mortality ranging from 40 to 50% in most studies. Important causal factors are related to lifestyle, including poor diet, lack of physical activity, smoking, and substance abuse. Recent findings suggest that there are overlapping pathophysiology and genetics between schizophrenia and CVD-risk factors, further increasing the liability to CVD in schizophrenia. Many pharmacological agents used for treating psychotic disorders have side effects augmenting CVD risk. Although several CVD-risk factors can be effectively prevented and treated, the provision of somatic health services to people with schizophrenia seems inadequate. Further, there is a sparseness of studies investigating the effects of lifestyle interventions in schizophrenia, and there is little knowledge about effective programs targeting physical health in this population. Discussion: The risk for CVD and CVD-related deaths in people with schizophrenia is increased, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully known. Coordinated interventions in different health care settings could probably reduce the risk. There is an urgent need to develop and implement effective programs to increase life expectancy in schizophrenia, and we argue that mental health workers should be more involved in this important task. PMID:25309466

  18. Estimating source-attributable health impacts of ambient fine particulate matter exposure: global premature mortality from surface transportation emissions in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambliss, S. E.; Silva, R.; West, J. J.; Zeinali, M.; Minjares, R.

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to ambient fine particular matter (PM2.5) was responsible for 3.2 million premature deaths in 2010 and is among the top ten leading risk factors for early death. Surface transportation is a significant global source of PM2.5 emissions and a target for new actions. The objective of this study is to estimate the global and national health burden of ambient PM2.5 exposure attributable to surface transportation emissions. This share of health burden is called the transportation attributable fraction (TAF), and is assumed equal to the proportional decrease in modeled ambient particulate matter concentrations when surface transportation emissions are removed. National population-weighted TAFs for 190 countries are modeled for 2005 using the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model. Changes in annual average concentration of PM2.5 at 0.5 × 0.67 degree horizontal resolution are based on a global emissions inventory and removal of all surface transportation emissions. Global population-weighted average TAF was 8.5 percent or 1.75 μg m-3 in 2005. Approximately 242 000 annual premature deaths were attributable to surface transportation emissions, dominated by China, the United States, the European Union and India. This application of TAF allows future Global Burden of Disease studies to estimate the sector-specific burden of ambient PM2.5 exposure. Additional research is needed to capture intraurban variations in emissions and exposure, and to broaden the range of health effects considered, including the effects of other pollutants.

  19. Your Premature Baby: Low Birthweight

    MedlinePlus

    ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar 39 weeks is best Order bereavement materials News Moms Need ... birthweight: Premature birth . This is birth before 37 weeks of pregnancy. About 7 of 10 low-birthweight ...

  20. Insulation workers in Belfast. A further study of mortality due to asbestos exposure (1940-75).

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, P C; Simpson, M J

    1977-01-01

    A follow-up study of 162 men already working as insulators (laggers) in 1940 has been extended from 1965 to 1975. By the end of 1975 there were 40 survivors when 108 had been expected. Until 1965 there had been an overall excess of deaths; these were due to asbestosis with or without tuberculosis and to alimentary cancer, as well as to bronchial carcinoma and mesothelioma. From 1965 onwards the overall death rate among survivors is not so excessive but there is still a marked excess of deaths from bronchial cancer and mesothelioma. The continued risk of death attributable to malignancy after asbestosis had ceased to contribute directly, does not appear to be caused by any changes which occurred before 1940 in the conditions at work. PMID:911687

  1. Mortality due to a retained circle hook in a longfin mako shark Isurus paucus (Guitart-Manday).

    PubMed

    Adams, D H; Borucinska, J D; Maillett, K; Whitburn, K; Sander, T E

    2015-07-01

    A female longfin mako shark Isurus paucus (Guitart-Manday, 1966) was found moribund on the Atlantic Ocean beach near Canaveral National Seashore, Florida; the shark died shortly after stranding. Macroscopic lesions included a partially healed bite mark on the left pectoral fin, a clefted snout, pericardial effusion and a pericardial mass surrounding a 12/0 circle fishing hook. The heart, pericardial mass, gills, ovary, oviduct, shell gland, epigonal organ, liver, kidney and intrarenal and interrenal glands were processed for histopathology and examined by brightfield microscopy. Microscopic examination revealed chronic proliferative and pyogranulomatous pericarditis and myocarditis with rhabdomyolysis, fibrosis and thrombosis; scant bacteria and multifocal granular deposits of iron were found intralesionally. In addition, acute, multifocal infarcts within the epigonal organ and gill filaments were found in association with emboli formed by necrocellular material. The ovary had high numbers of atretic follicles, and the liver had diffuse, severe hepatocellular degeneration, multifocal spongiosis and moderate numbers of melanomacrophage cells. This report provides evidence of direct mortality due to systemic lesions associated with retained fishing gear in a prohibited shark species. Due to the large numbers of sharks released from both recreational and commercial fisheries worldwide, impact of delayed post-release mortality on shark populations is an important consideration. PMID:24974904

  2. Retinopathy of prematurity

    MedlinePlus

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is abnormal blood vessel development in the retina of the eye. It occurs in infants ... Certified Orthoptists. Screening examination of premature infants for retinopathy of prematurity. Pediatrics . 2013;131(1):189-95. PMID: 23277315 ...

  3. Osteopenia - premature infants

    MedlinePlus

    Neonatal rickets; Brittle bones - premature infants; Weak bones - premature infants; Osteopenia of prematurity ... the amount of calcium and phosphorus in the bone. This can cause bones to be weak and ...

  4. Premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Chris G.

    2007-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual disorder. Recent normative data suggests that men with an intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) of less than 1 minute have “definite” PE, while men with IELTs between 1 and 1.5 minutes have “probable” PE. Although there is insufficient empirical evidence to identify the etiology of PE, there is limited correlational evidence to suggest that men with PE have high levels of sexual anxiety and inherited altered sensitivity of central 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin) receptors. Pharmacological modulation of the ejaculatory threshold using off-label daily or on-demand selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors is well tolerated and offers patients a high likelihood of achieving improved ejaculatory control within a few days of initiating treatment, consequential improvements in sexual desire and other sexual domains. Investigational drugs such as the ejaculo-selective serotonin transport inhibitor, dapoxetine represent a major development in sexual medicine. These drugs offer patients the convenience of on-demand dosing, significant improvements in IELT, ejaculatory control and sexual satisfaction with minimal adverse effects. PMID:19675782

  5. Premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Poma, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The management of patients with premature rupture of membranes has changed markedly in the past several years. The basis for this is a combination of a better understanding of newborn physiology, improved neonatal care, refinements in antibiotic therapy, and the widespread use of maternal and fetal monitoring. The best outcome for both mother and infant undoubtedly reflects data based on a combination of factors, among which are gestational age survival, evidence of fetal distress, presence or absence of labor and sepsis, and of course, the cervical condition as it is related to labor-readiness. An important recent advance is the recognition that an active observation management program is associated with less morbidity and mortality than the classic management course of delivery within 12 hours of membrane rupture. The fact that preterm premature rupture of membranes tends to recur in subsequent pregnancies offers an opportunity for prevention. Moreover, advances in perinatal and neonatal care will continue to improve the outcomes of these women and their children. PMID:8583489

  6. Early Menopause (Premature Menopause)

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been called “premature menopause” or “premature ovarian failure.” But a better term is “primary ovarian insufficiency,” ... and what procedures might cause it. Premature Ovarian Failure: Premature Menopause (Copyright © American Pregnancy Association) - This article ...

  7. Outcomes for extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Glass, Hannah C; Costarino, Andrew T; Stayer, Stephen A; Brett, Claire M; Cladis, Franklyn; Davis, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Premature birth is a significant cause of infant and child morbidity and mortality. In the United States, the premature birth rate, which had steadily increased during the 1990s and early 2000s, has decreased annually for 7 years and is now approximately 11.39%. Human viability, defined as gestational age at which the chance of survival is 50%, is currently approximately 23 to 24 weeks in developed countries. Infant girls, on average, have better outcomes than infant boys. A relatively uncomplicated course in the intensive care nursery for an extremely premature infant results in a discharge date close to the prenatal estimated date of confinement. Despite technological advances and efforts of child health experts during the last generation, the extremely premature infant (less than 28 weeks gestation) and extremely low birth weight infant (<1000 g) remain at high risk for death and disability with 30% to 50% mortality and, in survivors, at least 20% to 50% risk of morbidity. The introduction of continuous positive airway pressure, mechanical ventilation, and exogenous surfactant increased survival and spurred the development of neonatal intensive care in the 1970s through the early 1990s. Routine administration of antenatal steroids during premature labor improved neonatal mortality and morbidity in the late 1990s. The recognition that chronic postnatal administration of steroids to infants should be avoided may have improved outcomes in the early 2000s. Evidence from recent trials attempting to define the appropriate target for oxygen saturation in preterm infants suggests arterial oxygen saturation between 91% and 95% (compared with 85%-89%) avoids excess mortality; however, final analyses of data from these trials have not been published, so definitive recommendations are still pending. The development of neonatal neurocritical intensive care units may improve neurocognitive outcomes in this high-risk group. Long-term follow-up to detect and address

  8. Higher mortality due to intracerebral hemorrhage in dialysis patients: a comparison with the general population in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Minako; Matsuo, Koji; Kazama, Junichiro James; Narita, Ichiei

    2015-02-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases, including intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, remain prevalent causes of morbidity and mortality among dialysis patients. Their mortality rate for cerebrovascular diseases is roughly three times higher than that in the general population. However, whether mortality rates for all subtypes of cerebrovascular diseases are equally higher has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate for each stroke subtype, comparing dialysis patients and the general population in Japan. We used mortality data reported by the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy and national Vital Statistics data between 2008 and 2009. We calculated standardized mortality ratios and compared the mortality rates for stroke subtypes including intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. During the 2-year study period, 51 994 and 933 deaths from intracerebral hemorrhage, 79 124 and 511 deaths from cerebral infarction, and 24 957 and 147 deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage were recorded per 252 million person-years and per 546 474 dialysis patient-years, respectively. Standardized mortality ratios among dialysis patients relative to the general population were 3.8 (95% confidence interval, 3.6-4.1), 1.3 (1.2-1.4), and 1.3 (1.1-1.6) for intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, respectively. Intracerebral hemorrhage was the highest cause of mortality in the dialysis population, although cerebral infarction was the highest in the general population. Relative to the general population in Japan, Japanese dialysis patients had higher mortality rates, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:25196294

  9. Modeling of the relationship between the environmental air pollution, clinical risk factors, and hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mehraban; Ahmadi, Ali; Baradaran, Azar; Masoudipoor, Neda; Frouzandeh, Soleiman

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the relationship between the environmental factor, clinical risk factors, and individual variables with mortality due to acute myocardial infarction (MI) in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed between April 2012 and March 2013. The data on the patients’ mortality due to MI in Isfahan were obtained from the MI National Registry. The international classification system (ICD10: I21-I22) was used to diagnose MI. The air quality indicators and environmental variables were used to measure the air pollution. Multilevel logistic regression in the Stata software was used to determine the factors associated with mortality in patients and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. Results: Six hundred eleven patients with MI were studied during 1-year. 444 (72.2%) patients were male and the rest were female. 4.7% of the patients died due to MI. The mean age at MI incidence was 62.2 ± 13 years. Of the air pollution parameters, PM10 had the maximum mean concentration (49.113 ppm), followed by NOX, NO, NO2, CO, SO2, and O3. The adjusted OR of mortality was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5-2.85) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3-1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.84 (95% CI: 1.13-3) for age, 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01-1.20) for CO, 1.1 (95% CI: 1.03-1.30) for O3, and 1.04 (95% CI: 1.01-1.4) for SO2, all of which were considered as the risk factors of mortality. However, OR of mortality was 0.79 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.74-0.84) and 0.52 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4-0.68) were considered as protective factors of mortality. The individual characteristics including age, history of MI in the immediate family, hypertension, and diabetes were significantly associated with mortality from MI. The indices of air pollution including SO2, CO, O3, and environmental factors such as the precipitation and temperature were the determinants of mortality in patients with MI. Conclusion: With regards to the factors

  10. Electrocardiographic Predictors of Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Mozos, Ioana; Caraba, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality. Sudden cardiac death may also appear in athletes, due to underlying congenital or inherited cardiac abnormalities. The electrocardiogram is used in clinical practice and clinical trials, as a valid, reliable, accessible, inexpensive method. The aim of the present paper was to review electrocardiographic (ECG) signs associated with cardiovascular mortality and the mechanisms underlying those associations, providing a brief description of the main studies in this area, and consider their implication for clinical practice in the general population and athletes. The main ECG parameters associated with cardiovascular mortality in the present paper are the P wave (duration, interatrial block, and deep terminal negativity of the P wave in V1), prolonged QT and Tpeak-Tend intervals, QRS duration and fragmentation, bundle branch block, ST segment depression and elevation, T waves (inverted, T wave axes), spatial angles between QRS and T vectors, premature ventricular contractions, and ECG hypertrophy criteria. PMID:26257460

  11. Electrocardiographic Predictors of Cardiovascular Mortality.

    PubMed

    Mozos, Ioana; Caraba, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality. Sudden cardiac death may also appear in athletes, due to underlying congenital or inherited cardiac abnormalities. The electrocardiogram is used in clinical practice and clinical trials, as a valid, reliable, accessible, inexpensive method. The aim of the present paper was to review electrocardiographic (ECG) signs associated with cardiovascular mortality and the mechanisms underlying those associations, providing a brief description of the main studies in this area, and consider their implication for clinical practice in the general population and athletes. The main ECG parameters associated with cardiovascular mortality in the present paper are the P wave (duration, interatrial block, and deep terminal negativity of the P wave in V1), prolonged QT and Tpeak-Tend intervals, QRS duration and fragmentation, bundle branch block, ST segment depression and elevation, T waves (inverted, T wave axes), spatial angles between QRS and T vectors, premature ventricular contractions, and ECG hypertrophy criteria. PMID:26257460

  12. [Evaluation of the quality of drinking water in Senigallia (Italy), including the presence of asbestos fibres, and of morbidity and mortality due to gastrointestinal tumours].

    PubMed

    Fiorenzuolo, Giovanni; Moroni, Vania; Cerrone, Tiziana; Bartolucci, Elena; Rossetti, Siro; Tarsi, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the organoleptic quality of drinking water conducted in asbestos cement piping, in eleven towns in the Marche region (Italy) and the presence of asbestos fibres. A descriptive survey was also conducted to assess possible health effects in the population, in particular morbidity and mortality due to gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Study results show a very low concentration of free asbestos fibres in water samples examined. No differences in mortality and morbidity due to GI cancers were detected compared to the national population. PMID:23903037

  13. Premature rupture of membranes

    MedlinePlus

    ... When the water breaks early, it is called premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Most women will go ... th week of pregnancy, it is called preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). The earlier your water ...

  14. Association between air pollution and daily mortality and hospital admission due to ischaemic heart diseases in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wilson Wai San; Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H. S.

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The effects of air pollution on IHD mortalities have been widely reported. Fewer studies focus on IHD morbidities and PM2.5, especially in Asia. To explore the associations between short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidities and mortalities from IHD, we conducted a time series study using a generalized additive model that regressed the daily numbers of IHD mortalities and hospital admissions on daily mean concentrations of the following air pollutants: nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The relative risks (RR) of IHD deaths and hospital admissions per 10 μg/m3 increase in the concentration of each air pollutant were derived in single pollutant models. Multipollutant models were also constructed to estimate their RRs controlling for other pollutants. Significant RRs were observed for all five air pollutants, ranging from 1.008 to 1.032 per 10 μg/m3 increase in air pollutant concentrations for IHD mortality and from 1.006 to 1.021 per 10 μg/m3 for hospital admissions for IHD. In the multipollutant model, only NO2 remained significant for IHD mortality while SO2 and PM2.5 was significantly associated with hospital admissions. This study provides additional evidence that mortalities and hospital admissions for IHD are significantly associated with air pollution. However, we cannot attribute these health effects to a specific air pollutant, owing to high collinearity between some air pollutants.

  15. Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Mortality Due to Cardiovascular Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease in Shenyang, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baijun; Zhang, Liwen; Chen, Xi; Ma, Nannan; Yu, Fei; Guo, Huimin; Huang, Hui; Lee, Yungling Leo; Tang, Naijun; Chen, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between ambient air pollution exposure and mortality of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in human is controversial, and there is little information about how exposures to ambient air pollution contribution to the mortality of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases among Chinese. The aim of the present study was to examine whether exposure to ambient-air pollution increases the risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective cohort study among humans to examine the association between compound-air pollutants [particulate matter <10 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)] and mortality in Shenyang, China, using 12 years of data (1998–2009). Also, stratified analysis by sex, age, education, and income was conducted for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality. The results showed that an increase of 10 µg/m3 in a year average concentration of PM10 corresponds to 55% increase in the risk of a death cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51 to 1.60) and 49% increase in cerebrovascular disease (HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.45 to 1.53), respectively. The corresponding figures of adjusted HR (95%CI) for a 10 µg/m3 increase in NO2 was 2.46 (2.31 to 2.63) for cardiovascular mortality and 2.44 (2.27 to 2.62) for cerebrovascular mortality, respectively. The effects of air pollution were more evident in female that in male, and nonsmokers and residents with BMI<18.5 were more vulnerable to outdoor air pollution. Conclusion/Significance Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with the death of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases among Chinese populations. PMID:21695220

  16. Retinopathy of Prematurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinweg, Sue Byrd; Griffin, Harold C.; Griffin, Linda W.; Gingras, Happy

    2005-01-01

    The eyes of premature infants are especially vulnerable to injury after birth. A serious complication is called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is abnormal growth of the blood vessels in an infant's eye. Retinopathy of prematurity develops when abnormal blood vessels grow and spread throughout the retina, which is the nerve tissue at the…

  17. Principal sequence pattern analysis of episodes of excess mortality due to heat in the Barcelona metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Juan Carlos; Aran, Montserrat; Raso, José Miguel; Pérez-Zanón, Nuria

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study is to classify the synoptic sequences associated with excess mortality during the warm season in the Barcelona metropolitan area. To achieve this purpose, we undertook a principal sequence pattern analysis that incorporates different atmospheric levels, in an attempt at identifying the main features that account for dynamic and thermodynamic atmospheric processes. The sequence length was determined by the short-term displacement between temperature and mortality. To detect this lag, we applied the cross-correlation function to the residuals obtained from the modelling of the daily temperature and mortality series of summer. These residuals were estimated by means of an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. A 7-day sequence emerged as the basic temporal unit for evaluating the synoptic background that triggers the temperature related to excess mortality in the Barcelona metropolitan area. The principal sequence pattern analysis distinguished three main synoptic patterns: two dynamic configurations produced by southern fluxes related to an Atlantic low, which can be associated with heat waves recorded in southern Europe, and a third pattern identified by a stagnation situation associated with the persistence of a blocking anticyclone over Europe, related to heat waves recorded in northern and central western Europe.

  18. Predicted risks of second malignant neoplasm incidence and mortality due to secondary neutrons in a girl and boy receiving proton craniospinal irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Mahajan, Anita; Mirkovic, Dragan; Zhang, Rui; Giebeler, Annelise; Kornguth, David; Harvey, Mark; Woo, Shiao; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the predicted risks of second malignant neoplasm (SMN) incidence and mortality from secondary neutrons for a 9-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy who received proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI). SMN incidence and mortality from neutrons were predicted from equivalent doses to radiosensitive organs for cranial, spinal and intracranial boost fields. Therapeutic proton absorbed dose and equivalent dose from neutrons were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Risks of SMN incidence and mortality in most organs and tissues were predicted by applying risks models from the National Research Council of the National Academies to the equivalent dose from neutrons; for non-melanoma skin cancer, risk models from the International Commission on Radiological Protection were applied. The lifetime absolute risks of SMN incidence due to neutrons were 14.8% and 8.5%, for the girl and boy, respectively. The risks of a fatal SMN were 5.3% and 3.4% for the girl and boy, respectively. The girl had a greater risk for any SMN except colon and liver cancers, indicating that the girl's higher risks were not attributable solely to greater susceptibility to breast cancer. Lung cancer predominated the risk of SMN mortality for both patients. This study suggests that the risks of SMN incidence and mortality from neutrons may be greater for girls than for boys treated with proton CSI.

  19. Transient Aortic Occlusion Augments Collateral Blood Flow and Reduces Mortality During Severe Ischemia due to Proximal Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Gomathi; Dong, Bin; Todd, Kathryn G; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Winship, Ian R

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral collateral circulation provides alternative vascular routes for blood to reach ischemic tissues during stroke. Collateral therapeutics attempt to augment flow through these collateral channels to reduce ischemia and brain damage during acute ischemic stroke. Transient aortic occlusion (TAO) has pre-clinical data suggesting that it can augment collateral blood flow and clinical data suggesting a benefit for patients with moderate cortical strokes. By diverting blood from the periphery towards the cerebral circulation, TAO has the potential to augment primary collateral flow at the circle of Willis and thereby improve outcome even during large, hemispheric strokes. Using proximal middle and anterior cerebral artery occlusion in rats, we demonstrate that TAO reduces mortality and improves collateral blood flow in severely ischemic animals. As such, TAO may be an effective therapy to reduce early mortality during severe ischemia associated with proximal occlusions. PMID:26706246

  20. IMPACT OF THE PEGYLATED-INTERFERON AND RIBAVIRIN THERAPY ON THE TREATMENT-RELATED MORTALITY OF PATIENTS WITH CIRRHOSIS DUE TO HEPATITIS C VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    DRESCH, Kelly Fernanda Nomura; de MATTOS, Angelo Alves; TOVO, Cristiane Valle; de ONOFRIO, Fernanda Quadros; CASAGRANDE, Leandro; FELTRIN, Alberi Adolfo; de BARROS, Iago Christofoli; de ALMEIDA, Paulo Roberto Lerias

    2016-01-01

    Although the protease inhibitors have revolutionized the therapy of chronic hepatitis C (CHC), the concomitant use of pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) is associated to a high rate of adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the consequences of PEG-IFN and RBV and their relationship with mortality in patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: Medical records of CHC who underwent treatment with PEG-IFN and RBV in a public hospital in Brazil were evaluated. All the patients with cirrhosis were selected, and their clinical and laboratory characteristics, response to treatment, side effects and mortality were evaluated. RESULTS: From the 1,059 patients with CHC, 257 cirrhotic patients were evaluated. Of these, 45 (17.5%) achieved sustained viral response (SVR). Early discontinuation of therapy occurred in 105 (40.8%) patients, of which 39 (15.2%) were due to serious adverse effects. The mortality rate among the 257 cirrhotic patients was 4.3%, occurring in 06/242 (2.4%) of the Child-A, and in 05/15 (33.3%) of the Child-B patients. In conclusion, the treatment of patients with cirrhosis due to HCV with PEG-IFN and RBV shows a low SVR rate and a high mortality, especially in patients with liver dysfunction. PMID:27253739

  1. Retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Catherine O

    2014-06-01

    Premature infants born at 30 weeks' gestational age or younger, or 1500 g or smaller, are screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Guidelines for supplemental oxygen in neonatal intensive care units have decreased but not eliminated the incidence of severe ROP. The underlying cause for ROP is prematurity and low birth weight, and with the survival of smaller and younger babies, ROP continues to be a significant problem facing premature infants. Threshold ROP is treated with retinal photocoagulation, but newer treatments such as intraocular injections of bevacizumab (Avastin) are being used alone or in conjunction with laser. PMID:24852153

  2. Mortality due to respiratory cancers in the coke oven plants of the Lorraine coalmining industry (Houillères du Bassin de Lorraine).

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, J P; Chau, N; Patris, A; Mur, J M; Pham, Q T; Moulin, J J; Morviller, P; Auburtin, G; Figueredo, A; Martin, J

    1987-01-01

    The main activity of the Houillères du Bassin de Lorraine (Lorraine Collieries), employing 23,000 operatives and executives, is coalmining. The coke production is carried out by two coke oven plants with a workforce of respectively 747 and 552 workers. The coal coking process entails the emission of noxious products such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the ovens. The influence of occupational exposure on mortality due to respiratory cancers, and particularly to lung and upper respiratory and alimentary tracts cancer, was investigated among a cohort of 534 male workers from the two coke oven plants who had retired from work between 1963 and 1982. The job history of each subject has been precisely reconstructed by indicating the duration of exposure on the ovens, close to the ovens, and in maintenance occupations. The cohort mortality has been analysed according to the method of indirect standardisation with reference to the French male population and by a case-control study concerning the consumption of tobacco per cohort. The mortality due to lung cancer is 2.51 times higher than expected. This excess of mortality differs, but not significantly, between the two coke oven plants (standardised mortality ratio equals 3.05 and 1.75 respectively). It is not significantly higher among subjects exposed for more than five years, directly exposed on the ovens or working near the ovens or at maintenance occupations on the ovens (SMR = 2.78), than among those exposed for less than five years (SMR = 2.35) or those not exposed at all. Even taking into account the excess of mortality due to lung cancers in the Moselle district (1.6 time that of France), the excess of lung cancers does not seem to be explained by the regional factor, or by tobacco and alcohol consumption. Although no significant relation was offered between lung cancer and the duration of exposure to PAH, even when taking smoking habits into account, the carcinogenic role of occupational nuisances

  3. Beyond Building Better Brains: Bridging the Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) Gap of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Harris, William

    2014-01-01

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are essential for normal vision and neurodevelopment. DHA accretion in utero occurs primarily in the last trimester of pregnancy to support rapid growth and brain development. Premature infants, born before this process is complete, are relatively deficient in this essential fatty acid. Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants remain deficient for a long period of time due to ineffective conversion from precursor fatty acids, lower fat stores, and a limited nutritional provision of DHA after birth. In addition to long- term visual and neurodevelopmental risks, VLBW infants have significant morbidity and mortality from diseases specific to premature birth, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). There is increasing evidence that DHA has protective benefits against these disease states. The aim of this article is to identify the unique needs of premature infants, review the current recommendations for LCPUFA provision in infants, and discuss the caveats and innovative new ways to overcome the DHA deficiency through postnatal supplementation, with the long term goal of improving morbidity and mortality in this at risk population. PMID:25357095

  4. INFUSION RATE OF GLUCOSE IS THE MAJOR PREDICTOR OF HYEPRGLYCEMIA IN VERY PREMATURE INFANTS RECEIVING TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Hyperglycemia is frequently occurring in very premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition. In adult intensive care patients, hyperglycemia has been associated with increased mortality. Although no such data are available in premature infants, it is conceivable that nutritional...

  5. Mortality rate and gross pathology due to tuberculosis in wild brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) following low dose subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Graham; Yockney, Ivor; Whitford, Jackie; Cross, Martin L

    2013-04-01

    Gross pathology due to tuberculosis can be established experimentally in brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) within 7 weeks of injection of virulent Mycobacterium bovis into subcutaneous connective tissues of the peripheral limbs. This pathology involves lymphadenomegaly and development of gross lesions in peripheral lymph nodes, with subsequent gross lesions in the lungs and reticuloendothelial organs. Using this artificial infection model, we here assessed the mortality rate for possums in the wild, to provide new information on the likely survival period for New Zealand's major wildlife host. Possums were trapped and inoculated with <50 CFU of M. bovis, then fitted with mortality signal emitting radio tracking collars, released and re-tracked for 6 months. Possum survival probability was 89% up to 12 weeks post-injection (p.i.), but cumulative mortality was rapid from then on. The median survival period, based on study of 38 possums, was 18 weeks p.i.; this corresponds with a predicted time interval of 11 weeks between first presentation of TB as palpable lymphadenomegaly and death for an average possum, shorter than period values currently used in possum TB epidemiological modelling. We also examined gross pathology in 11 possums by post mortem necropsy, and confirmed lymphadenomegaly and tuberculous lesions at 7 and 12 weeks p.i. Extra-peripheral gross lesions were more frequent among possums at 12 weeks p.i. than at 7 weeks, while the occurrence of lung lesions (the most likely cause of disease-induced mortality) was apparent in animals at 12 weeks but not at 7 weeks p.i. Our results suggest that the time course of TB from development of gross lesions to mortality may be shorter than previously estimated from field studies of naturally tuberculous possums. PMID:23063260

  6. Family Perspectives on Prematurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero to Three (J), 2003

    2003-01-01

    In this article, seven families describe their experiences giving birth to and raising a premature baby. Their perspectives vary, one from another, and shift over time, depending on each family's circumstances and the baby's developmental course. Experiences discussed include premature labor, medical interventions and the NICU, bringing the baby…

  7. [Treatment of premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Targoński, Aleksander; Prajsner, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is the most common sexual dysfunction in men. Its prevalence rate in Europe and in United States is estimated to be between 20% and 30%. The diagnosis of premature ejaculation is based on three main criteria: increased intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT), lack of control over ejaculation and interpersonal psychological disturbances. Premature ejaculation is classified as lifelong (primary) or acquired (secondary) and might be facilitated by chronic prostatitis, diabetes mellitus, hyperthyroidism, obesity. The exact etiology of the disease remains unclear, although 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors are known to have a significant role. The use of SSRIs (selective serotonine reuptake inhibitors) is old and efficient form of therapy for premature ejaculation. Other drugs like tramadol, clomipramine, local anaesthetics and PDE-5 (phosphodiesterase 5) inhibitors also have some efficacy in the treatment of premature ejaculation. To minimize adverse effects the "on demand" therapy is preferred to the daily treatment. Simple questionnaires for patients are used to assess treatment effects. PMID:22827115

  8. Maternal and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Krishna Menon, M K

    1972-01-01

    A brief analysis of data from the records of the Government Hospital for Women and Children in Madras for a 36-year period (1929-1964) is presented. India with a population of over 550 million has only 1 doctor for each 6000 population. For the 80% of the population which is rural, the doctor ratio is only 88/1 million. There is also a shortage of paramedical personnel. During the earlier years of this study period, abortions, puerperal infections; hemorrhage, and toxemia accounted for nearly 75% of all meternal deaths, while in later years deaths from these causes were 40%. Among associated factors in maternal mortality, anemia was the most frequent, it still accounts for 20% and is a contributory factor in another 20%. The mortality from postpartum hemorrhage was 9.3% but has now decreased to 2.8%. Eclampsia is a preventable disease and a marked reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality from this cause has been achieved. Maternal deaths from puerperal infections have dropped from 25% of all maternal deaths to 7%. Uterine rupture has been reduced from 75% to 9.3% due to modern facilities. Operative deliveries still have an incidence of 2.1% and a mortality rate of 1.4% of all deliveries. These rates would be further reduced by more efficient antenatal and intranatal care. Reported perinatal mortality of infants has been reduced from 182/1000 births to an average of 78/1000 in all areas, but is 60.6/1000 in the city of Madras. Socioeconomic standards play an important role in perinatal mortality, 70% of such deaths occurring in the lowest economic groups. Improvement has been noted in the past 25 years but in rural areas little progress has been made. Prematurity and low birth weights are still larger factors in India than in other countries, with acute infectious diseases, anemia, and general malnutrition among mothers the frequent causes. Problems requiring further efforts to reduce maternal and infant mortality are correct vital statistics, improved

  9. Medical complications of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Allen, M C; Jones, M D

    1986-03-01

    The improved survival of extremely premature infants has generated intense interest in the quality of life of the survivors. This review focuses on the major long-term complications of prematurity (developmental disability, retinopathy of prematurity, chronic lung disease) and concludes with an overview of the broader spectrum of morbidity. Severe impairment (cerebral palsy, mental retardation, retrolental fibroplasia, severe chronic lung disease) fortunately occurs in a small proportion of survivors. However, the prevalence of the lesser morbidities (minimal cerebral dysfunction/learning disability, poor growth, postneonatal illnesses, rehospitalization) is less clearly defined. These problems all have an impact on families, and on medical and educational services. PMID:2935764

  10. [Premature orgasm in the male].

    PubMed

    Köhn, F M

    2003-11-13

    To date, we have no uniform definition of ejaculatio praecox. In a qualitative approach, premature ejaculation is ascribed to a failure to control excitement. As causes, organic disorders and erectile dysfunction must be excluded. The majority of cases, however, are due to psychological or partnership problems. The history-taking should aim, in particular, to uncover possible anxiety in conjunction with premature orgasm, and also to establish the reactions of the partner. As therapy, medication (local anesthetics, antidepressive agents, PDE-5 inhibitors) and sexual-therapeutic measures are available. Since few sufferers take the initiative in seeking treatment, particular importance attaches to providing the public with information about the therapeutic options for treating this common disorder. PMID:14699829

  11. Decreased mortality in patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases after installation of an intensive care unit in a secondary hospital in the interior of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Luciano Passamani; Bahlis, Laura Fuchs; Wajner, André; Waldemar, Fernando Starosta

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between the in-hospital mortality of patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases and the availability of intensive care units. Methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated a database from a hospital medicine service involving patients hospitalized due to respiratory non-terminal diseases. Data on clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with mortality, such as Charlson score and length of hospital stay, were collected. The following analyses were performed: univariate analysis with simple stratification using the Mantel Haenszel test, chi squared test, Student’s t test, Mann-Whitney test, and logistic regression. Results Three hundred thirteen patients were selected, including 98 (31.3%) before installation of the intensive care unit and 215 (68.7%) after installation of the intensive care unit. No significant differences in the clinical and anthropometric characteristics or risk factors were observed between the groups. The mortality rate was 18/95 (18.9%) before the installation of the intensive care unit and 21/206 (10.2%) after the installation of the intensive care unit. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the probability of death after the installation of the intensive care unit decreased by 58% (OR: 0.42; 95%CI 0.205 -0.879; p = 0.021). Conclusion Considering the limitations of the study, the results suggest a benefit, with a decrease of one death per every 11 patients treated for respiratory diseases after the installation of an intensive care unit in our hospital. The results corroborate the benefits of the implementation of intensive care units in secondary hospitals. PMID:26465244

  12. Dapoxetine for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Feige, A M; Pinsky, M R; Hellstrom, W J G

    2011-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common form of male sexual dysfunction, with an estimated worldwide prevalence of 20–30%.1 Although PE is not life threatening, it has significant impact on quality of life. The fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR)defines PE as “persistent or recurrent ejaculation with minimal sexual stimulation before, on, or shortly after penetration and before the person wishes it” that “causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty” and “is not due exclusively to the direct effects of a substance.”2 The International Society for Sexual Medicine, which recently modified the definition to include the threshold ejaculatory latency time, defines PEas “male sexual dysfunction characterized by ejaculation which always or nearly always occurs prior to or within 1 min of vaginal penetration; the inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations; and negative personal consequences such as distress, bother, frustration, and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy.”3 The lack of ejaculatory control is consistent among all clinical definitions of PE and is a highly sensitive predictor of the condition. PMID:21085116

  13. Apnea of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Eichenwald, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity is one of the most common diagnoses in the NICU. Despite the frequency of apnea of prematurity, it is unknown whether recurrent apnea, bradycardia, and hypoxemia in preterm infants are harmful. Research into the development of respiratory control in immature animals and preterm infants has facilitated our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of apnea of prematurity. However, the lack of consistent definitions, monitoring practices, and consensus about clinical significance leads to significant variation in practice. The purpose of this clinical report is to review the evidence basis for the definition, epidemiology, and treatment of apnea of prematurity as well as discharge recommendations for preterm infants diagnosed with recurrent apneic events. PMID:26628729

  14. Premature Ovarian Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is when a woman's ovaries stop working before she is 40. POF is different from ... There is no treatment that will restore normal ovarian function. However, many health care providers suggest taking ...

  15. Apnea of prematurity

    MedlinePlus

    Apnea - newborns; AOP; As and Bs; A/B/D; Blue spell - newborns; Dusky spell - newborns; Spell - newborns; Apnea - neonatal ... the airway open are weak Other stresses in a sick or premature baby may worsen apnea, including: ...

  16. Premature ovarian failure: clinical presentation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kovanci, Ertug; Schutt, Amy K

    2015-03-01

    Premature ovarian failure is a devastating diagnosis for reproductive-aged women. The diagnosis is relatively easy. However, it has serious health consequences, including psychological distress, infertility, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, ischemic heart disease, and increased risk for mortality. Management should be initiated immediately to prevent long-term consequences. Estrogen therapy is the mainstay of management. Postmenopausal estrogen therapy studies should not be used to determine the risks of treatment in these young women. PMID:25681846

  17. Estimation of excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 in Japan using a high-resolution model for present and future scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Daisuke; Ueda, Kayo; Ng, Chris Fook Sheng; Takami, Akinori; Ariga, Toshinori; Matsuhashi, Keisuke; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter with a diameter of less than 2.5 μm, known as PM2.5, can affect human health, especially in elderly people. Because of the imminent aging of society in the near future in most developed countries, the human health impacts of PM2.5 must be evaluated. In this study, we used a global-to-regional atmospheric transport model to simulate PM2.5 in Japan with a high-resolution stretched grid system (∼10 km for the high-resolution model, HRM) for the present (the 2000) and the future (the 2030, as proposed by the Representative Concentrations Pathway 4.5, RCP4.5). We also used the same model with a low-resolution uniform grid system (∼100 km for the low-resolution model, LRM). These calculations were conducted by nudging meteorological fields obtained from an atmosphere-ocean coupled model and providing emission inventories used in the coupled model. After correcting for bias, we calculated the excess mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 among the elderly (over 65 years old) based on different minimum PM2.5 concentration (MINPM) levels to account for uncertainty using the simulated PM2.5 distributions to express the health effect as a concentration-response function. As a result, we estimated the excess mortality for all of Japan to be 31,300 (95% confidence intervals: 20,700 to 42,600) people in 2000 and 28,600 (95% confidence intervals: 19,000 to 38,700) people in 2030 using the HRM with a MINPM of 5.8 μg/m3. In contrast, the LRM resulted in underestimates of approximately 30% (for PM2.5 concentrations in the 2000 and 2030), approximately 60% (excess mortality in the 2000) and approximately 90% (excess mortality in 2030) compared to the HRM results. We also found that the uncertainty in the MINPM value, especially for low PM2.5 concentrations in the future (2030) can cause large variability in the estimates, ranging from 0 (MINPM of 15 μg/m3 in both HRM and LRM) to 95,000 (MINPM of 0 μg/m3 in HRM) people.

  18. Dapoxetine: in premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Sheridan M; Scott, Lesley J

    2010-07-30

    Dapoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is the first oral pharmacological agent indicated for the treatment of men aged 18-64 years with premature ejaculation. In four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre studies of 12-24 weeks' duration, oral dapoxetine 30 or 60 mg (administered as needed) was effective in the treatment of men with premature ejaculation, inducing significantly (p < 0.001) greater improvements from baseline than placebo in the primary efficacy endpoint (mean intravaginal ejaculatory latency time [IELT] or mean average IELT [defined as the average of IELT values over the previous 4 weeks], as measured by the female partner utilizing a stopwatch). For the most part, dapoxetine recipients achieved significantly better outcomes than placebo recipients with regard to the secondary endpoints, including the Premature Ejaculation Profile (PEP) domains and the Clinical Global Impression or Patient Global Impression ratings of change in premature ejaculation, across these clinical studies. The beneficial effects of dapoxetine therapy on the perceived control over ejaculation and satisfaction with sexual intercourse PEP domains were sustained in a 9-month noncomparative extension phase of two identical 12-week, double-blind studies. Oral dapoxetine therapy for up to 12 months was generally well tolerated in men with premature ejaculation, with the nature of treatment-emergent adverse events generally similar across the clinical studies and between dapoxetine and placebo. PMID:20614950

  19. Prematurity: present and future

    PubMed Central

    Tsimis, M. E.; Al-Hamayel, N. Abu; Germaine, H.; Burd, I.

    2014-01-01

    The study of preterm labor and prematurity, as with any medical science, has undergone a major transformation in its approach from an inevitable part of obstetrics with few answers to one in which science has led to knowledge and clinical intervention. Despite these advancements, understanding of preterm labor and prevention of prematurity is still limited. In the current review, we begin the discussion with fetal viability, first from a historical perspective and then from the understanding of this issue from a prospective of various professional organizations. We then present the scope of the problem of preterm birth from various countries including the discrepancy between the US and Europe. We continue with updates on extreme prematurity and outcomes with two longitudinal studies from the past 2 years. We further review available interventions for prematurity and discuss the use of antenatal corticosteroids. First, we examine their use in the context of professional recommendations and then examine the trajectory of their continued use in the late preterm period. We focus on a European-based trial with preliminary results and an ongoing American counterpart. The current knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind preterm labor is presented with a focus on the multiple etiologies of preterm labor, both known and presumed, with updates in the basic science realm. Furthermore, up-to-date studies on prediction of preterm birth and prematurity-related morbidity are presented. PMID:25300768

  20. Burden of disease due to cancer in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández de Larrea-Baz, Nerea; Álvarez-Martín, Elena; Morant-Ginestar, Consuelo; Gènova-Maleras, Ricard; Gil, Ángel; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    Background Burden of disease is a joint measure of mortality and morbidity which makes it easier to compare health problems in which these two components enjoy different degrees of relative importance. The objective of this study is ascertaining the burden of disease due to cancer in Spain via the calculation of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods DALYs are the sum of years of life lost due to premature mortality and years lost due to disability. World Health Organization methodology and the following sources of data were used: the Mortality Register and Princeton Model Life Table for Years of life lost due to premature mortality and population, incidence estimates (Spanish tumour registries and fitting of generalized linear mixed models), duration (from data of survival in Spain from the EUROCARE-3 study and fitting of Weibull distribution function) and disability (weights published in the literature) for Years lost due to disability. Results There were 828,997 DALYs due to cancer (20.5 DALYs/1,000 population), 61% in men. Of the total, 51% corresponded to lung, colorectal, breast, stomach and prostate cancers. Mortality (84% of DALYs) predominated over disability. Subjects aged under 20 years accounted for 1.6% and those aged over 70 years accounted for 30.1% of DALYs. Conclusion Lung, colorectal and breast cancers are responsible for the highest number of DALYs in Spain. Even if the burden of disease due to cancer is predominantly caused by mortality, some cancers have a significant weight of disability. Information on 2000 burden of disease due to cancer can be useful to assess how it has evolved over time and the impact of medical advances on it in terms of mortality and disability. PMID:19183440

  1. Dapoxetine for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    Premature ejaculation, also referred to as rapid or early ejaculation, is a poorly understood disorder with no single, widely-recognised, evidence-based definition. Studies based on patient self-reporting indicate that premature ejaculation is a common complaint with estimated prevalence ranging from 4%-39% of men in the general community.(1) However, a lack of an accurate validated definition has made comparison of the results of such studies difficult.(2) In addition, perception of normal ejaculatory latency varies by country and differs when assessed by the patient or their partner.(3) ▾Dapoxetine (Priligy-A. Menarini Farmaceutica Internazionale SRL), a short-acting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is the first drug to be licensed in the UK for on-demand management of diagnosed premature ejaculation.(4) In this article we review the evidence for dapoxetine and discuss some of the challenges associated with its introduction. PMID:24627135

  2. Impacts of intercontinental transport of aerosols on human mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anenberg, S.; West, J. J.; Schulz, M.; Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP) modelers

    2011-12-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with deleterious health impacts, including premature death from cardiopulmonary disease and lung cancer. Although the lifetime of tropospheric PM2.5 is roughly only a week, observations and modeling studies demonstrate that PM2.5 can be transported long distances, impacting air quality and health on regional or global scales. We estimate the mortality impacts of 20% primary PM and PM precursor emission reductions in four major world regions - North America, Europe, East Asia, and South Asia. We use surface concentrations simulated by an ensemble of global chemical transport models convened by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution and epidemiologically-derived concentration-response functions to calculate mortality impacts. We estimate that while >90% of avoided premature deaths resulting from these emission reductions occur within the source region, about 9,600 annual avoided deaths occur in other parts of the world. Reducing emissions in Europe avoids the most extra-regional premature deaths, due to large downwind populations in relatively close proximity. Compared with a previous study of 20% ozone precursor emission reductions, we find that the impacts of intercontinental ozone are greater than or equal to those of PM2.5 for most source-receptor pairs, due to the longer atmospheric lifetime and greater transport efficiency for ozone. However, impacts of intercontinental PM2.5 are greater for source-receptor pairs not separated by an ocean, due to the stronger relationship of PM2.5 with mortality. We examine the sensitivity of estimated premature deaths to the shape and magnitude of the concentration-response function, as well as the inter-model variation in simulated PM2.5 responses to emission reductions.

  3. Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Premature Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mezu-Ndubuisi, Olachi J.; Agarwal, Ghanshyam; Raghavan, Aarti; Pham, Jennifer T.; Ohler, Kirsten H.; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2015-01-01

    Persistent patency of the ductus arteriosus is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. In infants born prior to 28 weeks of gestation, a hemodynamically-significant patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) can cause cardiovascular instability, exacerbate respiratory distress syndrome, prolong the need for assisted ventilation, and increase the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, renal dysfunction, intraventricular hemorrhage, cerebral palsy, and mortality. In this article, we review the pathophysiology, clinical features, and assessment of hemodynamic significance, and provide a rigorous appraisal of the quality of evidence to support current medical and surgical management of PDA of prematurity. Cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors such as indomethacin and ibuprofen remain the mainstay of medical therapy for PDA, and can be used both for prophylaxis as well as rescue therapy to achieve PDA closure. Surgical ligation is also effective and is used in infants who do not respond to medical management. Although both medical and surgical treatment have proven efficacy in closing the ductus, both modalities are associated with significant adverse effects. Because the ductus does undergo spontaneous closure in some premature infants, improved and early identification of infants most likely to develop a symptomatic PDA could help in directing treatment to the at-risk infants and allow others to receive expectant management. PMID:22564132

  4. New Perspectives on Premature Infants and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Joy V.

    2003-01-01

    More than 485,000 low-birth-weight, premature babies are born in the U.S. each year. The increase in preterm births since 1990 may be due to assisted pregnancies and births to older mothers. Although their survival rates are improving, many premature infants experience long-lasting developmental and behavioral problems. The author describes recent…

  5. Widening social inequalities in mortality: the case of Barcelona, a southern European city.

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, C; Plasència, A; Pasarin, I; Ortún, V

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse trends in mortality inequalities in Barcelona between 1983 and 1994 by comparing rates in those electoral wards with a low socioeconomic level and rates in the remaining wards. DESIGN: Mortality trends study. SETTING: The city of Barcelona (Spain). SUBJECTS: The study included all deaths among residents of the two groups of city wards. Details were obtained from death certificates. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age standardised mortality rates, age standardised rates of years of potential life lost, and age specific mortality rates in relation to cause of death, sex, and year were computed as well as the comparative mortality figure and the ratio of standardised rates of years of potential life lost. RESULTS: Rates of premature mortality increased from 5691.2 years of potential life lost per 100,000 inhabitants aged 1 to 70 years in 1983 to 7606.2 in 1994 in the low socioeconomic level wards, and from 3731.2 to 4236.9 in the other wards, showing an increase in inequalities over the 12 years, mostly due to AIDS and drug overdose as causes of death. Conversely, cerebrovascular disease showed a reduction in inequality over the same period. Overall mortality in the 15-44 age group widened the gap between both groups of wards. CONCLUSION: AIDS and drug overdose are emerging as the causes of death that are contributing to a substantial increase in social inequality in terms of premature mortality, an unreported observation in European urban areas. PMID:9519129

  6. Short-term effect of dust storms on the risk of mortality due to respiratory, cardiovascular and all-causes in Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Taiar, Abdullah; Thalib, Lukman

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of dust storms on short-term mortality in Kuwait. We analyzed respiratory and cardiovascular mortality as well as all-cause mortality in relation to dust storm events over a 5-year study period, using data obtained through a population-based retrospective ecological time series study. Dust storm days were identified when the national daily average of PM10 exceeded 200 μg/m3. Generalized additive models with Poisson link were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of age-stratified daily mortality associated with dust events, after adjusting for potential confounders including weather variables and long-term trends. There was no significant association between dust storm events and same-day respiratory mortality (RR = 0.96; 95 %CI 0.88-1.04), cardiovascular mortality (RR = 0.98; 95 %CI 0.96-1.012) or all-cause mortality (RR = 0.99; 95 %CI 0.97-1.00). Overall our findings suggest that local dust, that most likely originates from crustal materials, has little impact on short-term respiratory, cardiovascular or all-cause mortality.

  7. Short-term effect of dust storms on the risk of mortality due to respiratory, cardiovascular and all-causes in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Taiar, Abdullah; Thalib, Lukman

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of dust storms on short-term mortality in Kuwait. We analyzed respiratory and cardiovascular mortality as well as all-cause mortality in relation to dust storm events over a 5-year study period, using data obtained through a population-based retrospective ecological time series study. Dust storm days were identified when the national daily average of PM10 exceeded 200 μg/m(3). Generalized additive models with Poisson link were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of age-stratified daily mortality associated with dust events, after adjusting for potential confounders including weather variables and long-term trends. There was no significant association between dust storm events and same-day respiratory mortality (RR = 0.96; 95%CI 0.88-1.04), cardiovascular mortality (RR = 0.98; 95%CI 0.96-1.012) or all-cause mortality (RR = 0.99; 95%CI 0.97-1.00). Overall our findings suggest that local dust, that most likely originates from crustal materials, has little impact on short-term respiratory, cardiovascular or all-cause mortality. PMID:23329278

  8. [Premature ovarian failure].

    PubMed

    Assumpção, Carmen Regina Leal de

    2014-03-01

    This article is a review on different aspects of premature ovarian failure (POF) defined as the development of hypogonadism in women before 40 years of age. The review will discuss the etiopathogeny, autoimmune and iatrogenic causes, abnormalities of chromosome X, as well as clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. Most of the women with this disorder do not have menstrual history, specific of POF development, but infertility associated with the diagnosis is the most problematic aspect of the disease. PMID:24830590

  9. Prematurely terminated slug tests

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K. )

    1990-07-01

    A solution of the well response to a prematurely terminated slug test (PTST) is presented. The advantages of a PTST over conventional slug tests are discussed. A systematized procedure of a PTST is proposed, where a slug test is terminated in the midpoint of the flow point, and the subsequent shut-in data is recorded and analyzed. This method requires a downhole shut-in device and a pressure transducer, which is no more than the conventional deep-well slug testing. As opposed to slug tests, which are ineffective when a skin is present, more accurate estimate of formation permeability can be made using a PTST. Premature termination also shortens the test duration considerably. Because in most cases no more information is gained by completing a slug test to the end, the author recommends that conventional slug tests be replaced by the premature termination technique. This study is part of an investigation of the feasibility of geologic isolation of nuclear wastes being carried out by the US Department of Energy and the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland.

  10. Relationship between Tap Water Hardness, Magnesium, and Calcium Concentration and Mortality due to Ischemic Heart Disease or Stroke in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Leurs, Lina J.; Schouten, Leo J.; Mons, Margreet N.; Goldbohm, R. Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Conflicting results on the relationship between the hardness of drinking water and mortality related to ischemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke have been reported. Objectives We investigated the possible association between tap water calcium or magnesium concentration and total hardness and IHD mortality or stroke mortality. Methods In 1986, a cohort of 120,852 men and women aged 55–69 years provided detailed information on dietary and other lifestyle habits. Follow-up for mortality until 1996 was established by linking data from the Central Bureau of Genealogy and Statistics Netherlands. We calculated tap water hardness for each postal code using information obtained from all pumping stations in the Netherlands. Tap water hardness was categorized as soft [< 1.5 mmol/L calcium carbonate (CaCO3)], medium hard (1.6–2.0 mmol/L CaCO3), and hard (> 2.0 mmol/L CaCO3). The multivariate case-cohort analysis was based on 1,944 IHD mortality and 779 stroke mortality cases and 4,114 subcohort members. Results For both men and women, we observed no relationship between tap water hardness and IHD mortality [hard vs. soft water: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85–1.28 for men and HR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.71–1.21 for women) and stroke mortality (hard vs. soft water HR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.66–1.21 and HR = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.62–1.20, respectively). For men with the 20% lowest dietary magnesium intake, an inverse association was observed between tap water magnesium intake and stroke mortality (HR per 1 mg/L intake = 0.75; 95% CI, 0.61–0.91), whereas for women with the 20% lowest dietary magnesium intake, the opposite was observed. Conclusions We found no evidence for an overall significant association between tap water hardness, magnesium or calcium concentrations, and IHD mortality or stroke mortality. More research is needed to investigate the effect of tap water magnesium on IHD mortality or stroke mortality in subjects with low dietary

  11. Vestibular Stimulation and Development of the Small Premature Infant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Mary V.

    This study was designed to explore the effects of vestibular stimulation on the developmental behavior, respiratory functioning, weight and length gains, and morbidity and mortality rates of premature infants. A total of 20 infants participated in this study in 4 groups of 5 infants each. Group A infants were placed in a motorized hammock within…

  12. Premature Ventricular Complexes in Apparently Normal Hearts.

    PubMed

    Luebbert, Jeffrey; Auberson, Denise; Marchlinski, Francis

    2016-09-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) are consistently associated with worse prognosis and higher morbidity and mortality. This article reviews PVCs and their presentation in patients with an apparently normal heart. Patients with PVCs may be completely asymptomatic, whereas others may note severely disabling symptoms. Cardiomyopathy may occur with frequent PVCs. Diagnostic work-up is directed at obtaining 12-lead ECG to characterize QRS morphology, Holter monitor to assess frequency, and echo and advanced imaging to assess for early cardiomyopathy and exclude structural heart disease. Options for management include watchful waiting, medical therapy, or catheter ablation. Malignant variants of PVCs may induce ventricular fibrillation even in a normal heart. PMID:27521085

  13. Posttraumatic stress due to an acute coronary syndrome increases risk of 42-month major adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Donald; Rieckmann, Nina; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Schwartz, Joseph E; Burg, Matthew M; Davidson, Karina W; Clemow, Lynn; Shimbo, Daichi; Kronish, Ian M

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 15% of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to their ACS event. We assessed whether ACS-induced PTSD symptoms increase risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and all-cause mortality (ACM) in an observational cohort study of 247 patients (aged 25-93 years; 45% women) hospitalized for an ACS at one of 3 academic medical centers in New York and Connecticut between November 2003 and June 2005. Within 1 week of admission, patient demographics, Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score, Charlson comorbidity index, left ventricular ejection fraction, and depression status were obtained. At 1-month follow-up, ACS-induced PTSD symptoms were assessed with the Impact of Events Scale-Revised. The primary endpoint was combined MACE (hospitalization for myocardial infarction, unstable angina or urgent/emergency coronary revascularization procedures) and ACM, which were actively surveyed for 42 months after index event. Thirty-six (15%) patients had elevated intrusion symptoms, 32 (13%) elevated avoidance symptoms, and 21 (9%) elevated hyperarousal symptoms. Study physicians adjudicated 21 MACEs and 15 deaths during the follow-up period. In unadjusted Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, and analyses adjusted for sex, age, clinical characteristics and depression, high intrusion symptoms were associated with the primary endpoint (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-9.02; p = .015). Avoidance and hyperarousal symptoms were not associated with the primary endpoint. The presence of intrusion symptoms is a strong and independent predictor of elevated risk for MACE and ACM, and should be considered in the risk stratification of ACS patients. PMID:21807378

  14. Recognizing and preventing epilepsy-related mortality

    PubMed Central

    Spruill, Tanya; Thurman, David; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is associated with a high rate of premature mortality from direct and indirect effects of seizures, epilepsy, and antiseizure therapies. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the second leading neurologic cause of total lost potential life-years after stroke, yet SUDEP may account for less than half of all epilepsy-related deaths. Some epilepsy groups are especially vulnerable: individuals from low socioeconomic status groups and those with comorbid psychiatric illness die more often than controls. Despite clear evidence of an important public health problem, efforts to assess and prevent epilepsy-related deaths remain inadequate. We discuss factors contributing to the underestimation of SUDEP and other epilepsy-related causes of death. We suggest the need for a systematic classification of deaths directly due to epilepsy (e.g., SUDEP, drowning), due to acute symptomatic seizures, and indirectly due to epilepsy (e.g., suicide, chronic effects of antiseizure medications). Accurately estimating the frequency of epilepsy-related mortality is essential to support the development and assessment of preventive interventions. We propose that educational interventions and public health campaigns targeting medication adherence, psychiatric comorbidity, and other modifiable risk factors may reduce epilepsy-related mortality. Educational campaigns regarding sudden infant death syndrome and fires, which kill far fewer Americans than epilepsy, have been widely implemented. We have done too little to prevent epilepsy-related deaths. Everyone with epilepsy and everyone who treats people with epilepsy need to know that controlling seizures will save lives. PMID:26674330

  15. (Dr. P. C. Sen Award on rural health practice). Infant and early childhood mortality in some rural ICDS blocks of west Bengal.

    PubMed

    Biswas, A B; Basu, M; Das, K K; Biswas, R

    1993-01-01

    This one year prospective study was carried out to determine the CBR, CDR and different underfive mortality rates in some selected rural ICDS blocks of West Bengal and also to find out the common causes of infant and childhood mortality in these areas. It was revealed that most of the above mentioned indicators in ICDS blocks were considerably lower than that of National figures, but more or less similar to those of rural Bengal as recorded in routine Govt. reports. Compared to the picture of rural West Bengal, both still birth & perinatal mortality rates were found higher in all ICDS blocks. The causes of mortality trends among under fives' were found similar to that of rural India pattern i.e. prematurity, acute respiratory infections and diarrhoea being the leaders. Neonates, who contributed the largest share of infant mortality died mainly due to prematurity. So, observations like high perinatal mortality & still birth rates, huge proportion of neonatal death during infancy, same IMR but low 5MR, and death of neonates due to prematurity etc. claim the necessity of improving maternal component of ICDS services, their nutritional care in particular. PMID:8063374

  16. Trends of potential years of life lost due to main causes of deaths in urban and rural population in Poland, 2002-2011.

    PubMed

    Krzyżak, Michalina; Maślach, Dominik; Szpak, Andrzej; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Florczyk, Katarzyna; Skrodzka, Martyna; Owoc, Alfred; Bojar, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the level and the trends of Potential Years of Life Lost due to main causes of deaths in Poland in 2002-2011, with consideration of place of residence, urban-rural. The material for the study was the number of deaths due to main causes in Poland in years 2002-2011, based on data from the Central Statistical Office. Premature mortality analysis was conducted with the use of PYLL indicator (PYLL - Potential Years of Life Lost). PYLL rate was calculated according to the method proposed by J. Romeder, according to which the premature mortality was defined as death before the age of 70. Time trends of PYLL rate and the annual percent change (APC) were assessed using the Joinpoint Regression Programme. Rural/urban ratio was used to presented the differences in premature mortality between rural and urban areas . In years2002-2011, the PYLL rate for all-cause deaths decreased by 13.2% among men and 16.0% among women in rural areas, whereas in urban decreased it decreased by 15.7% among men and 14.9% among women. In 2011, the main causes of PYLL among men in rural areas were: external causes (32.3%), cardiovascular diseases (23.5%) and cancers (19.4%); in urban areas: cardiovascular diseases (24.7%), external causes (24.3%) and cancers (20.9%). Among women in rural areas, the leading causes were: cancers (39.9%), cardiovascular diseases (20.1%) and external causes (15.1%). The main causes of premature mortality among women in urban areas were: cancers (41.7%), cardiovascular diseases (19.6%) and external causes (11.1%). Premature mortality among men in rural areas was significantly higher than in urban for all analysed causes of death, with the exception of ischaemic heart diseases and colorectal cancer. Premature mortality among women in rural areas was significantly lower than in urban for all analysed cause of deaths, except of cerebrovascular diseases, external causes, suicides and traffic accidents. The presented epidemiological

  17. The clinical and microbiological correlates of premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Karat, C; Madhivanan, P; Krupp, K; Poornima, S; Jayanthi, N V; Suguna, J S; Mathai, E

    2006-10-01

    Prematurity is the cause of 85% of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) is associated with 30-40% of preterm deliveries. A case-control study conducted between July 2002 and 2003 examined the correlates and risk factors for PROM in Mysore, India. WBCs in vaginal fluid, leucocytes in urine, UTI and infection with E. coli, S. aureus, C. albicans and BV were significantly associated with PROM. BV, E. coli and WBCs in vaginal fluid were independent risk factors. Screening and treatment of BV and E. coli infection in pregnancy may reduce the risk of PROM. PMID:17185848

  18. The Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis Among Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Matthew S.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is a leading infectious cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. Improved recognition of modifiable risk factors and antifungal prophylaxis have contributed to the recent decline in the incidence of this infection among infants. Invasive candidiasis typically occurs in the first six weeks of life and presents with non-specific signs of sepsis. Definitive diagnosis relies on growth of Candida in blood culture or cultures from other normally sterile sites, but this may identify fewer than half of cases. Improved diagnostics are needed to guide initiation of antifungal therapy in premature infants. PMID:25677999

  19. Efficacy of a novel prebiotic and a commercial probiotic in reducing mortality and production losses due to cold stress and Escherichia coli challenge of broiler chicks 1.

    PubMed

    Huff, G R; Huff, W E; Rath, N C; El-Gohary, F A; Zhou, Z Y; Shini, S

    2015-05-01

    Prebiotics consisting of resistant starch may alter intestinal ecology, thus modulating inflammation and increasing intestinal health through increased cecal production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). Probiotics may directly alter the intestinal microbiome, resulting in the same effects. We hypothesize that adding prebiotics and probiotics to feed may protect the gut of young chicks under stress. Studies 1, 2, and 3 evaluated treatments in a cold stress (CS) and Escherichia coli (EC) oral challenge to 430 day-old broiler chicks for 3 wk. In study 1, prebiotics were administered as 15% of the diet during the first week only and consisted of the following: Hi-Maize resistant starch (HM), potato starch (PS), or raw potato (RP). In studies 2 and 3, the PS treatment was identical to study 1, and an additional probiotic treatment (PRO) was administered in feed and water. In study 1, PS protected BW during the first week and decreased the mortality of CS/EC-challenged birds during the first week and wk 3, while RP decreased the mortality of warm-brooded birds challenged with EC during the first week. In study 2, PS decreased and PRO increased the main effect mean (MEM) of the first week BW. PS and PRO numerically decreased the feed conversion ratio (FCR) by 23 and 29 points, respectively, in CS/EC-challenged birds with no effects on mortality. In study 3, PS decreased and PRO increased the first week and wk 3 MEM BW. PS numerically increased FCR by 16 points, while PRO decreased FCR by 2 points. Both PS and PRO tended to increase overall mortality, and PRO significantly increased mortality in the CS/EC challenge. These results suggest that the effects of PS may be too variable in this challenge model for further study; however, the PRO treatment improved production values and may have potential as an alternative to antibiotics during the first weeks after hatch. PMID:25743418

  20. Premature ejaculation: A review.

    PubMed

    Gajjala, Sukumar Reddy; Khalidi, Azheel

    2014-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual disorder. It is defined by the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders as "ejaculation occurring, without control, on or shortly after penetration and before the person wishes it, causing marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.([1]) Although the timing of intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) (i.e., time from penetration to ejaculation) is not included in this definition, an IELT of <2 min, or ejaculation occurring before penetration, has been considered consistent with PE.([2]) Management involves both the patient and his partner. Therapeutic options should suit both partners and be appropriate to their habit in planning and frequency of intercourse. Follow-up at appropriate intervals to judge efficacy, titrate dosage of pharmacological treatments and ascertain side effects is mandatory. PMID:26396440

  1. Premature ejaculation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Gajjala, Sukumar Reddy; Khalidi, Azheel

    2014-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual disorder. It is defined by the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders as “ejaculation occurring, without control, on or shortly after penetration and before the person wishes it, causing marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.[1] Although the timing of intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) (i.e., time from penetration to ejaculation) is not included in this definition, an IELT of <2 min, or ejaculation occurring before penetration, has been considered consistent with PE.[2] Management involves both the patient and his partner. Therapeutic options should suit both partners and be appropriate to their habit in planning and frequency of intercourse. Follow-up at appropriate intervals to judge efficacy, titrate dosage of pharmacological treatments and ascertain side effects is mandatory. PMID:26396440

  2. [Premature newborn: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Pastor Rodríguez, Jesús David; Pastor Bravo, María Del Mar; López García, Visitación; Cotes Teruel, María Isabel; Mellado, Jesús Eulogio; Cárceles, José Jara

    2010-01-01

    A case is presented of a premature newborn of 27 weeks gestation and weighing 420 grams who was delivered as a result of a maternal pre-eclampsia and retarded intra-uterine growth. During the 125 days of hospitalisation, an individual care plan based on the Virginia Henderson model was devised and applied to both the child and her parents using NANDA diagnostics, interventions according to the NIC classification, and the expected results according to the NOC classification. The Marjory Gordon functional patterns were used for the initial assessment. By applying the pre-term newborn (PTNB) plan, all their needs were provided and were modified throughout the hospital stay, with new needs that were added to the established ones. These required a continuous assessment with the subsequent adapting of the care plan. Likewise, the care required by the parents varied from the initial grief due to the possible loss of their child to learning the alarm signs and the home care that their child would need. The child was finally discharged weighing 2900 grams and with normal neurological and psychomotor development, although with a lower weight appropriate to her age. Currently, at 2 years old, the child has a normal neurological and psychomotor development, but with weight and size lower than the P(3) percentile. She requires speech therapy treatment due to paralysis of the right vocal cord. PMID:20605104

  3. RiskDiff: a web tool for the analysis of the difference due to risk and demographic factors for incidence or mortality data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Analysing the observed differences for incidence or mortality of a particular disease between two different situations (such as time points, geographical areas, gender or other social characteristics) can be useful both for scientific or administrative purposes. From an epidemiological and public health point of view, it is of great interest to assess the effect of demographic factors in these observed differences in order to elucidate the effect of the risk of developing a disease or dying from it. The method proposed by Bashir and Estève, which splits the observed variation into three components: risk, population structure and population size is a common choice at practice. Results A web-based application, called RiskDiff has been implemented (available at http://rht.iconcologia.net/riskdiff.htm), to perform this kind of statistical analyses, providing text and graphical summaries. Code from the implemented functions in R is also provided. An application to cancer mortality data from Catalonia is used for illustration. Conclusions Combining epidemiological with demographical factors is crucial for analysing incidence or mortality from a disease, especially if the population pyramids show substantial differences. The tool implemented may serve to promote and divulgate the use of this method to give advice for epidemiologic interpretation and decision making in public health. PMID:20021655

  4. Prenatal Stress, Prematurity, and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the United States and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced "premature asthma." Prenatal stress may cause not only abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring TH2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: interleukin 6 (IL-6), which has been associated with premature labor, can promote TH2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing "premature asthma." If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common comorbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (eg, from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health. PMID:26676148

  5. Infant mortality in rural India: a strategy for reduction.

    PubMed

    Pratinidhi, A K; Shrotri, A N; Shah, U; Chavan, H H

    1987-08-01

    A risk-approach-strategy project sponsored by WHO was undertaken in 22 villages of Surur, Pune, by BJ Medical College. All births in the study population of 47,000 were followed, comparing the 3 cohorts born between January 1981 to December 1983. Female village health guides were trained in screening for 11 maternal risk factors, infant risk factors, infant monitoring, and basic health support such as maternal nutrition, rest, breastfeeding and home cleaning, heating, humidifying and infant isolation. There were 123, 97 and 87 infant deaths in the 1981, 1982, and 1983 cohorts, giving infant mortality rats of 91.2, 72.3 and 67.3 respectively. The proportion of neonatal deaths remained at 61 to 62.1% over the period. The most common risk factors seen were illness, low birth weight and growth retardation, often associated with illness. Incidence of low birth weight and prolonged labor both decreased significantly over the duration of the program. Mortality was high among infants with feeding problems and prematurity. 40% of deaths were due to infections, 28% to low birth weight and prematurity, and 9% to birth asphyxia. The lower infant mortality rate achieved here is comparable to urban levels reported in India. These results show that primary health workers are capable of referring and managing risks, and risk management could be applied on a larger scale. PMID:3443502

  6. Advances in treating premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Cayan, Selahittin; Serefoğlu, Ege Can

    2014-01-01

    In spite of its high prevalence and long history, the ambiguity regarding the definition, epidemiology and management of premature ejaculation continues. Topical anesthetic creams and daily or on-demand selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment forms the basis of pharmacotherapy for premature ejaculation today, in spite of low adherence by patients. Psychotherapy may improve the outcomes when combined with these treatment modalities. Tramadol and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have a limited role in the management of premature ejaculation. Further research is required to develop better options for the treatment of this common sexual disorder. PMID:25184045

  7. Advances in treating premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Şerefoğlu, Ege Can

    2014-01-01

    In spite of its high prevalence and long history, the ambiguity regarding the definition, epidemiology and management of premature ejaculation continues. Topical anesthetic creams and daily or on-demand selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment forms the basis of pharmacotherapy for premature ejaculation today, in spite of low adherence by patients. Psychotherapy may improve the outcomes when combined with these treatment modalities. Tramadol and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have a limited role in the management of premature ejaculation. Further research is required to develop better options for the treatment of this common sexual disorder. PMID:25184045

  8. Medical therapy for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Mohee, Amar; Eardley, Ian

    2011-10-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual dysfunction. Advances in PE research have been hampered owing to a nonstandardized definition of PE, until the definition by the International Society of Sexual Medicine (ISSM) in 2009. Once the diagnosis of PE is established through a thorough history, a variety of medical therapies is available, including tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), centrally acting opiates, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors and topical desensitizing creams. Most of these treatments increase the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) and patient satisfaction scores, with the most convincing evidence for SSRIs and topical creams. Daily SSRIs such as paroxetine, although efficacious, do have a substantial and prolonged side effect profile. Dapoxetine, which is a on-demand SSRI, is the only licensed drug for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by a factor of 2.5 to 3 with limited and tolerable side effects. In the near future, the topical aerosol PSD502 is due to be licensed for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by up to a factor of 6 but having minimal local and negligible systemic side effects. PMID:22046199

  9. Medical therapy for premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Mohee, Amar; Eardley, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual dysfunction. Advances in PE research have been hampered owing to a nonstandardized definition of PE, until the definition by the International Society of Sexual Medicine (ISSM) in 2009. Once the diagnosis of PE is established through a thorough history, a variety of medical therapies is available, including tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), centrally acting opiates, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors and topical desensitizing creams. Most of these treatments increase the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) and patient satisfaction scores, with the most convincing evidence for SSRIs and topical creams. Daily SSRIs such as paroxetine, although efficacious, do have a substantial and prolonged side effect profile. Dapoxetine, which is a on-demand SSRI, is the only licensed drug for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by a factor of 2.5 to 3 with limited and tolerable side effects. In the near future, the topical aerosol PSD502 is due to be licensed for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by up to a factor of 6 but having minimal local and negligible systemic side effects. PMID:22046199

  10. [Premature ovarian failures].

    PubMed

    Bricaire, Léopoldine; Laroche, Emmanuelle; Bourcigaux, Nathalie; Donadille, Bruno; Christin-Maitre, Sophie

    2013-11-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is clinically suspected by amenorrhea and confirmed by an elevated FSH serum level above 40 mUI/L (even 20 mUI/L) twice, in a woman before the age of 40. Prevalence of POF is between 1 to 2% in women. In 90% of cases, no aetiology is identified. Obvious causes are chemotherapy, pelvic radiotherapy, ovarian surgery and diethylstilbestrol exposure in utero. A karyotype should be performed as Turner Syndrome is the most frequent genetic cause of POF. Some X abnormalities such as X deletion or X autosome translocation can be found. FMR1 pre-mutation (fragile X syndrome) should be searched for, even though no cases of mental retardation are known, in the family. Other genetic abnormalities can be suggested by associated symptoms (i.e.: FOXL2, SF1 mutations). Auto-immune aetiology can be suspected if other auto-immune features are present, however, there are no reliable auto-antibodies to confirm auto-immunity in POF. Treatment of POF is based on hormonal replacement therapy in order to avoid estrogen deficiency, suppress vasomotor symptoms and avoid bone loss as well as cardiovascular risk. Estrogens should be associated with progesterone or a progestin, at least up to the age of 51. Patients with POF should be informed that spontaneous pregnancies may occur (in 5% of cases). In case of desire of pregnancy, the patient should be oriented to a specialized unit for in vitro fertilization with oocyte donation. Psychological support is essential and should be part of the treatment. POF is associated with an increased risk of emotional distress and depression. No preventive treatment of POF is available so far. PMID:24157186

  11. Mortality in Asia.

    PubMed

    1981-01-01

    Although the general trend in mortality between 1950 and 1975 in South and East Asia has been downward, there is considerable country-to-country variation in the rate of decline. In countries where combined economic, social, and political circumstances resulted in controlling the disease spectrum (e.g., China, Malaysia, Sri Lanka), mortality levels declined to those seen in low-mortality countries. In most of the large countries of the region however, mortality declined at a slower rate, even slowing down considerably in the 1970's while the death rates remained high (e.g., India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Philippines); this slowing down of mortality level is attributed essentially to the poverty-stricken masses of society which were not able to take advantage of social, technological, and health-promoting behavioral changes conducive to mortality decline. Infant mortality levels, although declining since 1950, followed the same dismal pattern of the general mortality level. The rate varies from less than 10/1000 live births (Japan) to more than 140/1000 (Bangladesh, Laos, Nepal). Generally, rural areas exhibited higher infant mortality than urban areas. The level of child mortality declines with increases in the mother's educational level in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The largest decline in child mortality occurs when at least 1 parent has secondary education. The premature retardation of mortality decline is caused by several factors: economic development, nutrition and food supply, provision and adequacy of health services, and demographic trends. The outlook for the year 2000 for most of Asia's countries will depend heavily on significant population increases. In most countries, particularly in South Asia, population is expected to increase by 75%, much of it in rural areas and among poorer socioeconomic groups. In view of this, Asia's health planners and policymakers will have to develop health policies which will strike a balance

  12. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and adult mortality.

    PubMed

    London, Andrew S; Landes, Scott D

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the relationship between self-reported ADHD and adult mortality over a four-year period, and whether ADHD is associated with underlying cause of death (accidents versus all others). If ADHD increases mortality risk through accidents, then interventions may be designed and implemented to reduce risk and prevent premature death. We estimate descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression models using data from the 2007 U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Sample Adult File linked to National Death Index (NDI) data through 2011 (N=23,352). Analyses are weighted and standard errors are adjusted for the complex sampling design. We find that the odds of dying are significantly higher among those with ADHD than among those without ADHD net of exogenous sociodemographic controls (adjusted odds ratio=1.78, 95% confidence interval=1.01, 3.12). Although marginally non-significant, accidental death is more common among those with ADHD than among those without ADHD (13.2% versus 4.3%, p=0.052). Few population-representative studies examine the relationship between ADHD and adult mortality due to data limitations. Using NHIS data linked to the NDI, we are only able to observe a few deaths among adults with ADHD. However, ADHD is associated with significantly higher odds of dying for adults and results suggest that accidents may be an underlying cause of death more often for decedents with ADHD. Future research should further examine the mechanisms linking ADHD to adult mortality and the extent to which mortality among persons with ADHD is preventable. Regular measurement of ADHD among adults in the NHIS is warranted. PMID:27343403

  13. Caregiving Behavior Is Associated With Decreased Mortality Risk

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephanie L.; Smith, Dylan M.; Schulz, Richard; Kabeto, Mohammed U.; Ubel, Peter A.; Poulin, Michael; Yi, Jaehee; Kim, Catherine; Langa, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional investigations of caregiving link it to increased caregiver morbidity and mortality, but do not disentangle the effects of providing care from those of being continuously exposed to an ailing loved one with serious health problems. We explored this possible confound in a national, longitudinal survey of elderly married individuals (N = 3,376). Results showed that spending at least 14 hr per week providing care to a spouse predicted decreased mortality for the caregiver, independently of behavioral and cognitive limitations of the care recipient (spouse), and of other demographic and health variables. These findings suggest that it may be premature to conclude that health risks for caregivers are due to providing active help. Indeed, under some circumstances, caregivers may actually benefit from providing care. PMID:19320860

  14. Cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Isabelle R.; de Souza, Dyego L.B.; Bernal, María M.; Costa, Íris do C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer is currently in the spotlight due to their heavy responsibility as main cause of death in both developed and developing countries. Analysis of the epidemiological situation is required as a support tool for the planning of public health measures for the most vulnerable groups. We analyzed cancer mortality trends in Brazil and geographic regions in the period 1996 to 2010 and calculate mortality predictions for the period 2011 to 2030. This is an epidemiological, demographic-based study that utilized information from the Mortality Information System on all deaths due to cancer in Brazil. Mortality trends were analyzed by the Joinpoint regression, and Nordpred was utilized for the calculation of predictions. Stability was verified for the female (annual percentage change [APC] = 0.4%) and male (APC = 0.5%) sexes. The North and Northeast regions present significant increasing trends for mortality in both sexes. Until 2030, female mortality trends will not present considerable variations, but there will be a decrease in mortality trends for the male sex. There will be increases in mortality rates until 2030 for the North and Northeast regions, whereas reductions will be verified for the remaining geographic regions. This variation will be explained by the demographic structure of regions until 2030. There are pronounced regional and sex differences in cancer mortality in Brazil, and these discrepancies will continue to increase until the year 2030, when the Northeast region will present the highest cancer mortality rates in Brazil. PMID:25906105

  15. Mortality and economic burden of Krasnoyarsk region, Russia, caused by regular tobacco usage

    PubMed Central

    Artyukhov, Ivan P; Arshukova, Irina L; Dobretsova, Elena A; Shulmin, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assesses mortality and economic burden due to the regular tobacco usage among the population of the Krasnoyarsk region of the Russian Federation. This territory was chosen for the analysis because of two factors: high smoking prevalence in the Krasnoyarsk region (46% among the adult population) and premature mortality of the working-age population, which leads to a significant burden to the federal budget of the Russian Federation. Data sources In our work, three main causes of smoking-related deaths were considered: cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, and COPD. The working-age population was investigated (20–72 years old). The databases of mortality and population size of the territorial body of state statistics of the Krasnoyarsk region (data for 2013) were used as the information sources. Methods Joint application of population-attributable risk and disability-adjusted life years method allowed us to estimate medico-demographic and economic burden due to the tobacco-attributable premature mortality in the investigated population. Results We found that tobacco use-related economic burden is at least equal to 2% of the gross regional product of the Krasnoyarsk region in 2013. Conclusion An assessment of economic tobacco use-related burden is important for determining the volume of necessary funding for development of smoking prevention programs, proper estimation of tobacco companies’ taxation, and other measures for controlling tobacco use. Smoking cessation is a priority for prevention of the tobacco-related diseases and reduction of their burden on local economy. PMID:26955267

  16. Avoidable mortality from giving tranexamic acid to bleeding trauma patients: an estimation based on WHO mortality data, a systematic literature review and data from the CRASH-2 trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The CRASH-2 trial showed that early administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) safely reduces mortality in bleeding in trauma patients. Based on data from the CRASH-2 trial, global mortality data and a systematic literature review, we estimated the number of premature deaths that might be averted every year worldwide through the use of TXA. Methods We used CRASH-2 trial data to examine the effect of TXA on death due to bleeding by geographical region. We used WHO mortality data (2008) and data from a systematic review of the literature to estimate the annual number of in-hospital trauma deaths due to bleeding. We then used the relative risk estimates from the CRASH-2 trial to estimate the number of premature deaths that could be averted if all hospitalised bleeding trauma patients received TXA within one hour of injury, and within three hours of injury. Sensitivity analyses were used to explore the effect of uncertainty in the parameter estimates and the assumptions made in the model. Results There is no evidence that the effect of TXA on death due to bleeding varies by geographical region (heterogeneity p = 0.70). Based on WHO data and our systematic literature review, we estimate that each year worldwide there are approximately 400,000 in-hospital trauma deaths due to bleeding. If patients received TXA within one hour of injury then approximately 128,000 (uncertainty range [UR] ≈ 72,000 to 172,000) deaths might be averted. If patients received TXA within three hours of injury then approximately 112,000 (UR ≈ 68,000 to 148,000) deaths might be averted. Country specific estimates show that the largest numbers of deaths averted would be in India and China. Conclusions The use of TXA in the treatment of traumatic bleeding has the potential to prevent many premature deaths every year. A large proportion of the potential health gains are in low and middle income countries. PMID:22380715

  17. A protozoal-associated epizootic impacting marine wildlife: Mass-mortality of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Patricia A.; Harris, Michael; Hatfield, Brian; Langlois, Gregg; Jessup, David A.; Magargal, Spencer L.; Packham, Andrea E.; Toy-Choutka, Sharon; Melli, Ann C.; Murray, Michael A.; Gulland, Frances M.; Grigg, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    During April, 2004, 40 sick and dead southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were recovered over 18 km of coastline near Morro Bay, California. This event represented the single largest monthly spike in mortality ever recorded during 30 years of southern sea otter stranding data collection. Because of the point-source nature of the event and clinical signs consistent with severe, acute neurological disease, exposure to a chemical or marine toxin was initially considered. However, detailed postmortem examinations revealed lesions consistent with an infectious etiology, and further investigation confirmed the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona as the underlying cause. Tissues from 94% of examined otters were PCR-positive for S. neurona, based on DNA amplification and sequencing at the ITS-1 locus, and 100% of tested animals (n = 14) had elevated IgM and IgG titers to S. neurona. Evidence to support the point-source character of this event include the striking spatial and temporal clustering of cases and detection of high concentrations of anti-S. neurona IgM in serum of stranded animals. Concurrent exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid may have enhanced susceptibility of affected otters to S. neurona and exacerbated the neurological signs exhibited by stranded animals. Other factors that may have contributed to the severity of this epizootic include a large rainstorm that preceded the event and an abundance of razor clams near local beaches, attracting numerous otters close to shore within the affected area. This is the first report of a localized epizootic in marine wildlife caused by apicomplexan protozoa. PMID:20615616

  18. A protozoal-associated epizootic impacting marine wildlife: mass-mortality of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa A; Conrad, Patricia A; Harris, Michael; Hatfield, Brian; Langlois, Gregg; Jessup, David A; Magargal, Spencer L; Packham, Andrea E; Toy-Choutka, Sharon; Melli, Ann C; Murray, Michael A; Gulland, Frances M; Grigg, Michael E

    2010-09-20

    During April 2004, 40 sick and dead southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were recovered over 18km of coastline near Morro Bay, California. This event represented the single largest monthly spike in mortality ever recorded during 30 years of southern sea otter stranding data collection. Because of the point-source nature of the event and clinical signs consistent with severe, acute neurological disease, exposure to a chemical or marine toxin was initially considered. However, detailed postmortem examinations revealed lesions consistent with an infectious etiology, and further investigation confirmed the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona as the underlying cause. Tissues from 94% of examined otters were PCR-positive for S. neurona, based on DNA amplification and sequencing at the ITS-1 locus, and 100% of tested animals (n=14) had elevated IgM and IgG titers to S. neurona. Evidence to support the point-source character of this event include the striking spatial and temporal clustering of cases and detection of high concentrations of anti-S. neurona IgM in serum of stranded animals. Concurrent exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid may have enhanced susceptibility of affected otters to S. neurona and exacerbated the neurological signs exhibited by stranded animals. Other factors that may have contributed to the severity of this epizootic include a large rainstorm that preceded the event and an abundance of razor clams near local beaches, attracting numerous otters close to shore within the affected area. This is the first report of a localized epizootic in marine wildlife caused by apicomplexan protozoa. PMID:20615616

  19. A protozoal-associated epizootic impacting marine wildlife: Mass-mortality of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.A.; Conrad, P.A.; Harris, M.; Hatfield, B.; Langlois, G.; Jessup, David A.; Magargal, S.L.; Packham, A.E.; Toy-Choutka, S.; Melli, A.C.; Murray, M.A.; Gulland, F.M.; Grigg, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    During April 2004, 40 sick and dead southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were recovered over 18 km of coastline near Morro Bay, California. This event represented the single largest monthly spike in mortality ever recorded during 30 years of southern sea otter stranding data collection. Because of the point-source nature of the event and clinical signs consistent with severe, acute neurological disease, exposure to a chemical or marine toxin was initially considered. However, detailed postmortem examinations revealed lesions consistent with an infectious etiology, and further investigation confirmed the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona as the underlying cause. Tissues from 94% of examined otters were PCR-positive for S. neurona, based on DNA amplification and sequencing at the ITS-1 locus, and 100% of tested animals (n= 14) had elevated IgM and IgG titers to S. neurona. Evidence to support the point-source character of this event include the striking spatial and temporal clustering of cases and detection of high concentrations of anti- S. neurona IgM in serum of stranded animals. Concurrent exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid may have enhanced susceptibility of affected otters to S. neurona and exacerbated the neurological signs exhibited by stranded animals. Other factors that may have contributed to the severity of this epizootic include a large rainstorm that preceded the event and an abundance of razor clams near local beaches, attracting numerous otters close to shore within the affected area. This is the first report of a localized epizootic in marine wildlife caused by apicomplexan protozoa. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Minimising Mortality in Endangered Raptors Due to Power Lines: The Importance of Spatial Aggregation to Optimize the Application of Mitigation Measures

    PubMed Central

    Guil, Francisco; Fernández-Olalla, Mariana; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Mosqueda, Ignacio; Gómez, María Elena; Aranda, Antonio; Arredondo, Ángel; Guzmán, José; Oria, Javier; González, Luis Mariano; Margalida, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Electrocution by power lines is one of the main causes of non-natural mortality in birds of prey. In an area in central Spain, we surveyed 6304 pylons from 333 power lines to determine electrocution rates, environmental and design factors that may influence electrocution and the efficacy of mitigation measures used to minimise electrocution cases. A total of 952 electrocuted raptors, representing 14 different species, were observed. Electrocuted raptors were concentrated in certain areas and the environmental factors associated with increased electrocution events were: greater numbers of prey animals; greater vegetation cover; and shorter distance to roads. The structural elements associated with electrocutions were shorter strings of insulators, one or more phases over the crossarm, cross-shaped design and pylon function. Of the 952 carcasses found, 148 were eagles, including golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) and Bonelli's eagle (Aquila fasciata). Electrocuted eagles were clustered in smaller areas than other electrocuted raptors. The factors associated with increased eagle electrocution events were: pylons function, shorter strings of insulators, higher slopes surrounding the pylon, and more numerous potential prey animals. Pylons with increased string of insulators had lower raptor electrocution rates than unimproved pylons, although this technique was unsuccessful for eagles. Pylons with cable insulation showed higher electrocution rates than unimproved pylons, both for raptors and eagles, despite this is the most widely used and recommended mitigation measure in several countries. To optimize the application of mitigation measures, our results recommend the substitution of pin-type insulators to suspended ones and elongating the strings of insulators. PMID:22140549

  1. Coyote (Canis latrans) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) mortality and morbidity due to a Karenia brevis red tide in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Castle, Kevin T; Flewelling, Leanne J; Bryan, John; Kramer, Adam; Lindsay, James; Nevada, Cheyenne; Stablein, Wade; Wong, David; Landsberg, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    In October 2009, during a Karenia brevis red tide along the Texas coast, millions of dead fish washed ashore along the 113-km length of Padre Island National Seashore (PAIS). Between November 2009 and January 2010, at least 12 coyotes (Canis latrans) and three domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) died or were euthanized at PAIS or local veterinary clinics because of illness suspected to be related to the red tide. Another red tide event occurred during autumn 2011 and, although fewer dead fish were observed relative to the 2009 event, coyotes again were affected. Staff at PAIS submitted carcasses of four coyotes and one domestic dog from November 2009 to February 2010 and six coyotes from October to November 2011 for necropsy and ancillary testing. High levels of brevetoxins (PbTxs) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in seven of the coyotes and the dog, with concentrations up to 634 ng PbTx-3 eq/g in stomach contents, 545 ng PbTx-3 eq/g in liver, 195 ng PbTx-3 eq/g in kidney, and 106 ng PbTx-3 eq/mL in urine samples. Based on red tide presence, clinical signs, and postmortem findings, brevetoxicosis caused by presumptive ingestion of toxic dead fish was the likely cause of canid deaths at PAIS. These findings represent the first confirmed report of terrestrial mammalian wildlife mortalities related to a K. brevis bloom. The implications for red tide impacts on terrestrial wildlife populations are a potentially significant but relatively undocumented phenomenon. PMID:24502723

  2. Infant Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infant Mortality Infant Mortality: What is CDC Doing? Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Teen Pregnancy Contraception CDC Contraceptive Guidance for ... and low birth weight Maternal complications of pregnancy Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Injuries (e.g., suffocation). The top ...

  3. Epidemiological characteristics and deaths of premature infants in a referral hospital for high-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas; Sant'Ana, Luciana Ferreira da Rocha; Longo, Giana Zarbato; Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Franceschin, Sylvia do Carmo Castro

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the process of care provided to premature infants in a neonatal intensive care unit and the factors associated with their mortality. Methods Cross-sectional retrospective study of premature infants in an intensive care unit between 2008 and 2010. The characteristics of the mothers and premature infants were described, and a bivariate analysis was performed on the following characteristics: the study period and the "death" outcome (hospital, neonatal and early) using Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test or a chi-square test for linear trends. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed using a stepwise backward logistic regression method between the variables with p<0.20 and the "death" outcome. A p value <0.05 was considered to be significant. Results In total, 293 preterm infants were studied. Increased access to complementary tests (transfontanellar ultrasound and Doppler echocardiogram) and breastfeeding rates were indicators of improving care. Mortality was concentrated in the neonatal period, especially in the early neonatal period, and was associated with extreme prematurity, small size for gestational age and an Apgar score <7 at 5 minutes after birth. The late-onset sepsis was also associated with a greater chance of neonatal death, and antenatal corticosteroids were protective against neonatal and early deaths. Conclusions Although these results are comparable to previous findings regarding mortality among premature infants in Brazil, the study emphasizes the need to implement strategies that promote breastfeeding and reduce neonatal mortality and its early component. PMID:23917938

  4. Music Therapy with Premature Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standley, Jayne

    2003-01-01

    Over 20 years of research and clinical practice in music therapy with premature infants has been compiled into this text designed for Board Certified Music Therapists specializing in Neonatal Intensive Care clinical services, for NICU medical staff incorporating research-based music therapy into developmental care plans, and for parents of…

  5. Mothers' Retrospections of Premature Childbirth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmar, Magda; And Others

    This study examined Hungarian mothers' recollections, 8 years after the birth of their premature baby, of their stress at the time of the baby's birth. Interviews were conducted with 30 mothers whose babies had been born between 30 and 37 weeks gestational age. At the time of the follow-up, all children had normal IQs and were attending normal…

  6. [Visuospatial functions and prematurity].

    PubMed

    Miranda-Herrero, M C; Pascual-Pascual, S I; Barredo-Valderrama, E; Vazquez-Lopez, M; de Castro-De Castro, P

    2014-11-01

    Visuospatial functions are very important in learning process and development of abstract thought during childhood. Several studies show that preterm and low birth weight infants obtain lower scores in test that assess cognitive functions, specially in the first year of life. These differences are attenuated over time, but a developmental delay that affects working memory and visuospatial process still persists. It is unclear what factors are involved in development of these functions, and pre- or perinatal factors may interfere with the proper conduct of the same, but have been described anatomical and physiological differences between the preterm and term brain that could explain somewhere in these alterations. The different selective vulnerability to hypoxia between immature brain in which preoligodendrocytes and subplate neurons predominate, and mature brain, determine differences in the pattern of injury from hypoxia with greater involvement of the periventricular white matter in preterm children. This lesional pattern leaves to a dysfunction in attentional and visuospatial process, due to the increased vulnerability of the regions involved in the dorsal pathway of visual processing. PMID:25342055

  7. [Mortality. The behavior of mortality through 1987].

    PubMed

    Jimenez, R

    1988-01-01

    Mexico's crude death rate has declined from 33/1000 in the early 20th century to about 6/1000 in 1985-87. Mortality declined sharply from 1640-60. more slowly from 1960-77, and rapidly again beginning around 1980. The explanation for the mortality decline lies both in advances in medical and health care and in economic growth of the country. The mortality declines in the late 1970s and early 1980s probably resulted primarily from extension of primary health care programs in rural areas. The infant mortality rate has declined from 288.6/1000 live births in 1900 to 73.8 in 1960 and 42 in 1986-87. At present 30% of deaths in Mexico are to children under 5, but little is known of the impact of the country's economic crisis on mortality in this age group. The strong mortality decline between 1950-70 was in the economically active age group of 15-64 years. Excess male mortality in this group reached a maximum in 1980: for each death of woman there were 150 male deaths. Between 1960-80 the rate of deaths due to infection, parasfitism, and respiratory disease declined by 5%, the rate of death from cancer remained almost unchanged, and the rate of death from cardiovascular diseases increased by 9%. Deaths from accidents, homicide, suicide, and other violence increased by 38%. Male general mortality rates were 25% higher than female in 1980. Mexican life expectancy increased from 49.6 years in 195 to 67 in 1987. Life expectancy was 65.6 for males and 71.7 for females. Average life expectancy was 69 for the more privileged social sectors and 56.7 for agricultural workers in 1965-79. The life expectancy of urban women was 3 years longer than that of rural women and 10.4 years longer than that of rural men. PMID:12158030

  8. [Cerebral syndromes in premature children].

    PubMed

    Edel'shteĭn, E A; Bandarenko, E S

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral disturbances observed in premature infants are analyzed. These disturbances are a consequence of developmental slowdown and are associated with the pathological immaturity of the brain structures. On condition an active pathogenetic therapy is given these disturbances may gradually regress. On the basis of long-term observations of 600 prematurely born infants the authors describe the following clinical syndromes: muscular hypotonicity lasting up to 4-5 months and followed with a rise of the tone; the syndrome of "paretic hands" observed during the first two months of life; a hypertensive-hydrocephalic syndrome combined with a rise of the neuro-reflectory excitability; the syndrome of psychomotor development retardation followed at an age of over 1.5 to 2 years by complete recovery or minimal cerebral insufficiency with belated development of motor speech and neurosis-like reactions. PMID:6880498

  9. Neurodevelopmental outcomes of infants born prematurely.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Glen P

    2014-01-01

    Long-term follow-up of infants born prematurely is necessary to determine neurodevelopmental outcomes, particularly with the expansion of interest from major disabilities to high prevalence/low severity dysfunctions. Models of pathogenesis include changes due to developmental disruptions and to injury, the magnitude and type of change influenced by the infant's age, and central nervous system recovery and reorganization. Alterations in neurogenesis, migration, myelination, cell death, and synaptogenesis occur even in the absence of insult. Despite increased knowledge regarding these processes, the functional significance of brain abnormalities is unclear. Because of methodologic problems in follow-up studies, it is difficult to characterize outcome definitively. Nonetheless, an acceptable degree of agreement across studies is found with regard to specific neurodevelopmental outcomes: motor/neurologic function, visuomotor integrative skills, IQ, academic achievement, language, executive function, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder/behavioral issues. In general, children born prematurely have more problems in these areas than do their normal birth weight counterparts. Suggestions for improved analyses and clarification of outcomes include use of cluster analysis, structural equation modeling, growth curve analysis, developmental epidemiologic approaches, and better control of background variables using risk indexes and factor scores. Better assessment techniques measuring functions documented to be at higher risk of problems are discussed. PMID:25007063

  10. Neonatal mortality in Meerut district.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Mishra, V N; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Chopra, H; Singh, R B

    1993-09-01

    A study of neonatal mortality in Meerut district revealed an infant mortality rate of 50.1 per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality accounted for 37.8% of infant mortality with a neonatal mortality rate of 19.0 per 1000 live births. 90.5% of these neonates were delivered at home largely by untrained personnel (57.2%). Only 28.6% of these neonates were treated by qualified doctors and only 30.9% of their mothers were fully immunized against tetanus. At least 2/3rd of neonatal mortality was due to exogenous factors with tetanus neonatorum and septicaemia being the principal causes of mortality each accounting for a mortality rate of 4.7 per 1000 live births. PMID:8112786

  11. Lung consequences in adults born prematurely.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Charlotte E; Bush, Andrew; Hurst, John R; Kotecha, Sailesh; McGarvey, Lorcan

    2015-12-01

    Although survival has improved significantly in recent years, prematurity remains a major cause of infant and childhood mortality and morbidity. Preterm births (<37 weeks of gestation) account for 8% of live births representing >50,000 live births each year in the UK. Preterm birth, irrespective of whether babies require neonatal intensive care, is associated with increased respiratory symptoms, partially reversible airflow obstruction and abnormal thoracic imaging in childhood and in young adulthood compared with those born at term. Having failed to reach their optimal peak lung function in early adulthood, there are as yet unsubstantiated concerns of accelerated lung function decline especially if exposed to noxious substances leading to chronic respiratory illness; even if the rate of decline in lung function is normal, the threshold for respiratory symptoms will be crossed early. Few adult respiratory physicians enquire about the neonatal period in their clinical practice. The management of these subjects in adulthood is largely evidence free. They are often labelled as asthmatic although the underlying mechanisms are likely to be very different. Smoking cessation, maintaining physical fitness, annual influenza immunisation and a general healthy lifestyle should be endorsed irrespective of any symptoms. There are a number of clinical and research priorities to maximise the quality of life and lung health in the longer term not least understanding the underlying mechanisms and optimising treatment, rather than extrapolating from other airway diseases. PMID:26607737

  12. Lung consequences in adults born prematurely.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Charlotte E; Bush, Andrew; Hurst, John R; Kotecha, Sailesh; McGarvey, Lorcan

    2015-06-01

    Although survival has improved significantly in recent years, prematurity remains a major cause of infant and childhood mortality and morbidity. Preterm births (<37 weeks of gestation) account for 8% of live births representing >50 000 live births each year in the UK. Preterm birth, irrespective of whether babies require neonatal intensive care, is associated with increased respiratory symptoms, partially reversible airflow obstruction and abnormal thoracic imaging in childhood and in young adulthood compared with those born at term. Having failed to reach their optimal peak lung function in early adulthood, there are as yet unsubstantiated concerns of accelerated lung function decline especially if exposed to noxious substances leading to chronic respiratory illness; even if the rate of decline in lung function is normal, the threshold for respiratory symptoms will be crossed early. Few adult respiratory physicians enquire about the neonatal period in their clinical practice. The management of these subjects in adulthood is largely evidence free. They are often labelled as asthmatic although the underlying mechanisms are likely to be very different. Smoking cessation, maintaining physical fitness, annual influenza immunisation and a general healthy lifestyle should be endorsed irrespective of any symptoms. There are a number of clinical and research priorities to maximise the quality of life and lung health in the longer term not least understanding the underlying mechanisms and optimising treatment, rather than extrapolating from other airway diseases. PMID:25825005

  13. Reduction in pneumonia mortality and total childhood mortality by means of community-based intervention trial in Gadchiroli, India.

    PubMed

    Bang, A T; Bang, R A; Tale, O; Sontakke, P; Solanki, J; Wargantiwar, R; Kelzarkar, P

    1990-07-28

    In a community-based intervention trial to reduce childhood mortality from pneumonia the intervention area included 58 villages (6176 children aged 0-4 years) and the control area 44 villages (3947 children) in Gadchiroli, India. The interventions included mass education about childhood pneumonia and case-management of pneumonia by paramedics, village health workers, and traditional birth attendants (TBAs) who were trained to recognise childhood pneumonia and treat it with co-trimoxazole. Parents sought treatment, and coverage was 76% without active case-detection efforts. The case-fatality rate among the 612 cases treated by health workers was 0.8%, compared with 13.5% in the control area. After a year of intervention pneumonia-specific childhood mortality was significantly lower in the intervention than in the control area (8.1 vs 17.5 deaths per 1000 children under 5 years); the difference between the areas was greatest in children under 1 year. The differences in infant mortality (89 vs 121 per 1000) and total under-5 mortality (28.5 vs 40.7 per 1000) were highly significant. Mortality from other causes remained similar in the two areas but neonatal mortality due to birth injury and prematurity was significantly lower in the intervention area, presumably owing to the combination of better maternal and neonatal care by the TBAs trained in the project and the availability of treatment for pneumonia. The cost of co-trimoxazole was US $0.025 per child per year ($2.64 per child saved). PMID:1973770

  14. Extended effects of air pollution on cardiopulmonary mortality in Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, Manfred; Rabczenko, Daniel; Moshammer, Hanns

    BackgroundCurrent standards for fine particulates and nitrogen dioxide are under revision. Patients with cardiovascular disease have been identified as the largest group which need to be protected from effects of urban air pollution. MethodsWe sought to estimate associations between indicators of urban air pollution and daily mortality using time series of daily TSP, PM 10, PM 2.5, NO 2, SO 2, O 3 and nontrauma deaths in Vienna (Austria) 2000-2004. We used polynomial distributed lag analysis adjusted for seasonality, daily temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure and incidence of influenza as registered by sentinels. ResultsAll three particulate measures and NO 2 were associated with mortality from all causes and from ischemic heart disease and COPD at all ages and in the elderly. The magnitude of the effect was largest for PM 2.5 and NO 2. Best predictor of mortality increase lagged 0-7 days was PM 2.5 (for ischemic heart disease and COPD) and NO 2 (for other heart disease and all causes). Total mortality increase, lagged 0-14 days, per 10 μg m -3 was 2.6% for PM 2.5 and 2.9% for NO 2, mainly due to cardiopulmonary and cerebrovascular causes. ConclusionAcute and subacute lethal effects of urban air pollution are predicted by PM 2.5 and NO 2 increase even at relatively low levels of these pollutants. This is consistent with results on hospital admissions and the lack of a threshold. While harvesting (reduction of mortality after short increase due to premature deaths of most sensitive persons) seems to be of minor importance, deaths accumulate during 14 days after an increase of air pollutants. The limit values for PM 2.5 and NO 2 proposed for 2010 in the European Union are unable to prevent serious health effects.

  15. Hyperparathyroidism: Cancer and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Soumik; Ghosh, Sujoy

    2012-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a commoner endocrinopathy today with a large number of asymptomatic patients in contrast to the scenario five decades ago. Surgery is indicated for patients fulfilling the NIH criteria who are mostly symptomatic while individuals with mild disease are managed conservatively. Several studies indicate increased risk of malignancy involving several sites and related mortality in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) with the risk persisting for several years after surgery. PHPT is associated with structural & functional cardiac abnormalities and premature death from increased cardiovascular disease with risk normalising only several years after surgery. Mortality risk is associated with pre-operative serum calcium & parathormone and parathyroid adenoma weight. However, the issue of existence of similar risk and surgical benefit in mild PHPT is mired in controversy although some studies have shown an association and beneficial trends with surgery. With current evidence, it would be prudent to follow up PHPT patients for malignancy and cardiovascular disease and possibly adopt a more liberal attitude towards surgery. PMID:23565381

  16. Current therapies for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Gur, Serap; Kadowitz, Philip J; Sikka, Suresh C

    2016-07-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) subjectively affects 20-30% of men globally. Until recently, understanding of PE was hampered by the absence of a widely accepted definition, paucity of evidence-based clinical studies, and the absence of an appropriate animal model. Here, we elaborate on the current definition of PE, its pathogenesis, currently available therapies, and future treatment prospects. Most treatments for PE are 'off-label' and include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), topical anesthetics, tramadol, and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. Such knowledge of the benefit and limitations of each treatment will help to direct future drug design and formulations. PMID:27179987

  17. [Forensic importance of premature craniosynostosis].

    PubMed

    Fehlow, P

    1991-01-01

    In agreement with Canabis craniosynostosis as a little known organic partial factor of sociopathy is demonstrated. A psychic syndrome of the frontal lobe with increased susceptibility in environmental damages is assumed to be basic disorder. In the criminals of the material sexual offenders were preponderating. Associated craniofacial dysplasias are a risk for psychic maldevelopment. The importance of premature craniosynostocis as a biological risk factor, incidence, diagnostic, indication for an operation, also in the meaning of a neurosurgical "Konflikttherapie" (cosmetical indication) are discussed. PMID:1811531

  18. [Skin antisepsis in premature infants].

    PubMed

    Agolini, G; Faldella, G; Janes, E; Raitano, A; Spinelli, M; Vitali, M

    2011-01-01

    In some premature newborns, 7 months old and with less than 1 kg of body wheight, total parenteral nutrition is used for weeks, so that good antiseptics can cooperate to the prevention of nosocomial infections, associating the best biocide effects to the best topical tolerability. Details are reported on the biocide cutaneous properties of some chloro-derivates, as sodium hypochlorite and NaDCC, of ethyl and propyl alcohols, of chlorhexidine, of iodophors and also of triclosan and octenidine (even if these latter biocids are not normally available in Italy as cutaneous antiseptics). PMID:22423476

  19. A premature low-birth-weight infant with congenital complete atrioventricular block and myocarditis successfully treated by staged pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Tao; Nii, Masaki; Tanaka, Yasuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is a known lethal condition. Although antenatal diagnosis and the technical advances of pacemaker treatment have reduced its mortality, treatment of premature babies with significant myocardial damage remains a challenge. In this paper, we report the case of a premature low-birth-weight infant with congenital complete atrioventricular block and extremely low ventricular rate, fetal hydrops, and myocarditis who was successfully treated with staged permanent pacemaker implantation. PMID:27071550

  20. Patterns and causes of neonatal and postneonatal mortality in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S

    1989-01-01

    Community-level research data from a Maternal-Child Health and Family Planning (MCH/FP) program and comparison areas in rural Bangladesh indicate that 60 percent of infant deaths occurred in the neonatal period in both areas. Since the inception of the MCH/FP program, mortality rates declined relative to those in the comparison area. This decline, however, was confined to the neonatal period death rates only, with mortality rates in the postneonatal period remaining similar in the two areas. Prematurity accounted for approximately 40 percent of deaths in the neonatal period. Cause-of-death data indicated that the differences in the neonatal mortality rates between the two areas was mainly due to a marked decline in tetanus neonatorum deaths in the MCH/FP program area, because of the tetanus toxoid immunization of pregnant women there. The interventions in the MCH/FP area, however, did not significantly influence mortality due to any other cause. This study provides an explanation for the limited impact on infant mortality of health interventions that focus on diarrheal diseases and immunizations of children. PMID:2734810

  1. Premature ejaculation: is there an efficient therapy?

    PubMed

    Francischi, Fábio Barros de; Ayres, Daniel Cernach; Itao, Ricardo Eidi; Spessoto, Luis Cesar Fava; Arruda, Jose Germano Ferraz Del; Facio Junior, Fernando Nestor

    2011-12-01

    Premature ejaculation is the most frequent male sexual dysfunction, estimated to affect 20 to 30% of men at some time in their life. A Pubmed search from the year 2000 to the present was performed to retrieve publications related to management or treatment of premature ejaculation. Behavioral techniques have been the mainstay of premature ejaculation management for many years, although evidence of their short-term efficacy is limited. Topical therapies for premature ejaculation act by desensitizing the penis and do not alter the sensation of ejaculation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), commonly used in the treatment of depression, are often used to treat premature ejaculation, based on the observation that delayed ejaculation is a frequent side effect of this drug class. Dapoxetine is a short-acting SSRI formulated to treat premature ejaculation, and results seem very promising. PMID:26761263

  2. [Road accidents morbidity and mortality in district of Vrancea].

    PubMed

    Duma, Odetta

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, road accidents represent an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The present paper is a descriptive study of the most important factors involved in road accidents appearance from the district of Vrancea, in year 2001 and assesses the gravity of premature deaths using potential years of lost life (PYLL). In this district, the level of PYLL due to road accidents in male is significant higher in comparison with female (964 and respectively 408), these data being in concordance with PYLL of the entire country. The most frequent causes involved in road accidents are related to human factor and less to vehicle or road conditions. This category of trauma and deaths may be entirely prevented through educational, law, control or technical measures and using descriptive epidemiological data regarding road traffic. PMID:14974230

  3. Advances in understanding and treating premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Saitz, Theodore R; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2015-11-01

    Over the past several years, many advances have been made in our understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of premature ejaculation. Newly developed definitions of premature ejaculation are now available, and our perception of the classification, prevalence, aetiological factors, and treatment options for premature ejaculation have evolved. Despite ongoing research, there remains much to be learned about all aspects of this common sexual disorder, in particular effective clinical diagnosis and treatment options. PMID:26502991

  4. Maternal mortality in Sirur.

    PubMed

    Shrotri, A; Pratinidhi, A; Shah, U

    1990-01-01

    The research aim was 1) to determine the incidence of maternal mortality in a rural health center area in Sirur, Maharashtra state, India; 2) to determine the relative risk; and 3) to make suggestions about reducing maternal mortality. The data on deliveries was obtained between 1981 and 1984. Medical care at the Rural Training Center was supervised by the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, the B.J. Medical College in Pune. Deliveries numbered 5994 singleton births over the four years; 5919 births were live births. 15 mothers died: 14 after delivery and 1 predelivery. The maternal mortality rate was 2.5/1000 live births. The maternal causes of death included 9 direct obstetric causes, 3 from postpartum hemorrhage of anemic women, and 3 from puerperal sepsis of anemic women with prolonged labor. 2 deaths were due to eclampsia, and 1 death was unexplained. There were 5 (33.3%) maternal deaths due to indirect causes (3 from hepatitis and 2 from thrombosis). One woman died of undetermined causes. Maternal jaundice during pregnancy was associated with the highest relative risk of maternal death: 106.4. Other relative risk factors were edema, anemia, and prolonged labor. Attributable risk was highest for anemia, followed by jaundice, edema, and maternal age of over 30 years. Maternal mortality at 30 years and older was 3.9/1000 live births. Teenage maternal mortality was 3.3/1000. Maternal mortality among women 20-29 years old was lowest at 2.1/1000. Maternal mortality for women with a parity of 5 or higher was 3.6/1000. Prima gravida women had a maternal mortality rate of 2.9/1000. Parities between 1 and 4 had a maternal mortality rate of 2.3/1000. The lowest maternal mortality was at parity of 3. Only 1 woman who died had received more than 3 prenatal visits. 11 out of 13 women medically examined prenatally were identified with the following risk factors: jaundice, edema, anemia, young or old maternal age, parity, or poor obstetric history. The local

  5. Why do premature newborn infants display elevated blood adenosine levels?

    PubMed

    Panfoli, Isabella; Cassanello, Michela; Bruschettini, Matteo; Colella, Marina; Cerone, Roberto; Ravera, Silvia; Calzia, Daniela; Candiano, Giovanni; Ramenghi, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Our preliminary data show high levels of adenosine in the blood of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, positively correlating to their prematurity (i.e. body weight class). This prompted us to look for a mechanism promoting such impressive adenosine increase. We hypothesized a correlation with oxygen challenge. In fact, it is recognized that either oxygen lack or its excess contribute to the pathogenesis of the injuries of prematurity, such as retinopathy (ROP) and periventricular white matter lesions (PWMI). The optimal concentration of oxygen for resuscitation of VLBW infants is currently under revision. We propose that the elevated adenosine blood concentrations of VLBW infants recognizes two sources. The first could be its activity-dependent release from unmyelinated brain axons. Adenosine in this respect would be an end-product of the hypometabolic VLBW newborn unmyelinated axon intensely firing in response to the environmental stimuli consequent to premature birth. Adenosine would be eventually found in the blood due to blood-brain barrier immaturity. In fact, adenosine is the primary activity-dependent signal promoting differentiation of premyelinating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) into myelinating cells in the Central Nervous System, while inhibiting their proliferation and inhibiting synaptic function. The second, would be the ecto-cellular ATP synthesized by the endothelial cell plasmalemma exposed to ambient oxygen concentrations due to premature breathing, especially in lung. ATP would be rapidly transformed into adenosine by the ectonucleotidase activities such as NTPDase I (CD39), and NT5E (CD73). An ectopic extra-mitochondrial aerobic ATP synthetic ability was reported in many cell plasma-membranes, among which endothelial cells. The potential implications of the cited hypotheses for the neonatology area would be great. The amount of oxygen administration for reviving of newborns would find a molecular basis for its assessment. VLBW

  6. Risk Factors and Prevention of Late Onset Sepsis in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Downey, L Corbin; Smith, P Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2010-01-01

    Late-onset sepsis in premature infants is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and increased medical costs. Risk factors include low birth weight, low gestational age, previous antimicrobial exposure, poor hand hygiene, and central venous catheters. Methods studied to prevent late-onset sepsis include early feedings, immune globulin administration, prophylactic antimicrobial administration, and improved hand hygiene. In this review, we will outline the risk factors for development of late-onset sepsis and evidence supporting methods for prevention of late-onset sepsis in premature infants. PMID:20116186

  7. [Sexological intervention on premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    San Martín Blanco, C

    2014-07-01

    Strategies, recommendations and techniques proposed by sex therapy for intervention on premature ejaculation, have represented for nearly four decades the most effective model of intervention in this sexual dysfunction, which currently is complemented by the efficacy of dapoxetine drug treatment. Clinical experience and recent studies support that combined intervention offers the best therapeutic results. In addition in sex therapy, etiologic diagnosis is obtained from the analysis of the interrelationship of the couple. Diagnostic and therapeutic intervention has to be always centered in the relationship, so the techniques and resources must be applied with the expectation of being implemented in the sexual interaction. It will therefore be the relationship that receive treatment, even if medication is used for one of the members of the couple. On the other hand, this model of intervention can be implemented by a professional with training, although not necessarily a specialist. PMID:25953038

  8. [Communicating with premature newborns through touch].

    PubMed

    Berne-Audéoud, Frédérique; Marcus, Leila; Lejeune, Fleur; Gentaz, Edouard; Debillon, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    How does the premature newborn perceive the outside world? The first sense developed by the foetus is touch. Through the physiology of sensoriality and brain maturation, touch can constitute an essential vector in communicating with and caring for the premature child. PMID:20925301

  9. 28 CFR 51.22 - Premature submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Premature submissions. 51.22 Section 51.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF... § 51.22 Premature submissions. The Attorney General will not consider on the merits: (a) Any...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2290 - Premature primings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Premature primings. 29.2290 Section 29.2290 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... 21) § 29.2290 Premature primings. Ground leaves harvested before reaching complete growth...

  11. 7 CFR 29.2290 - Premature primings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Premature primings. 29.2290 Section 29.2290 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... 21) § 29.2290 Premature primings. Ground leaves harvested before reaching complete growth...

  12. A revised classification of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Quinn, G E; Schaffer, D B; Johnson, L

    1982-12-01

    We have developed a classification system for the acute phases of retinopathy of prematurity based on more than 13,000 ophthalmoscopic examinations of more than 3,400 premature infants between 1968 and 1982. Two forms of the active disease exist. Retinopathy of prematurity is a relatively common mild disease and retinopathy of prematurity plus is characterized by rapid progression and posterior pole vascular tortuosity and dilation. The five grades progress from peripheral vascular abnormalities (Grade 1) through a demarcation line (Grade 2) and extraretinal neovascularization (Grade 3) to partial (Grade 4) or total (Grade 5) retinal detachment. The persistence of abnormal retinal vessels during the first year of life is considered "transitional" retinopathy of prematurity unless unequivocal cicatricial changes with macular distortion develop. PMID:6897494

  13. Fighting for the next generation: US Prematurity in 2030.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Edward R B; Carrino, Gerard E; Russell, Rebecca B; Howse, Jennifer L

    2014-12-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a serious problem, with >450 000 neonates born prematurely in the United States every year. Beginning in 1980, the United States experienced a nearly 3-decade rise in the PTB rate, peaking in 2006 at 12.8%. PTB has declined for 7 consecutive years to 11.4% in 2013, but it still accounts for 1 in 9 neonates born every year. In addition to elevated neonatal and infant mortality among those born preterm, many who survive will have lifelong morbidities and disabilities. Because of the burden of morbidity, disability, and mortality for PTB, as well as its impact more broadly on society, including excess annual costs estimated to be at least $26.2 billion by a committee for the Institute of Medicine, the March of Dimes initiated the Prematurity Campaign in 2003. In 2008 the March of Dimes established a goal of reducing the US PTB rate to 9.6% by 2020. However, the United States ranks extremely poorly for PTB rates among Very High Human Development Index (VHHDI) countries, subjecting untold numbers of neonates to unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the March of Dimes proposes an aspirational goal of 5.5% for the 2030 US PTB rate, which would put the United States in the top 4 (10%) of 39 VHHDI countries. This 5.5% PTB rate is being achieved in VHHDI countries and by women from diverse settings receiving optimal care. This goal can be reached and will ensure a better start in life for many more neonates in the next generation. PMID:25367536

  14. Design of wireless multi-parameter monitoring system for oral feeding of premature infants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Lin; Kuo, Hsing-Chien; Wang, Lin-Yu; Ko, Mei-Ju; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2016-07-01

    Premature infants often cannot successfully and coordinately complete their oral feeding. Mature sucking, swallowing, and respiration activities are crucial indicators for the survival of newborn infants. Due to the vulnerability and unobvious muscle activities of premature infants, current clinical care givers mainly depend on the subjective behavioral observation of infants during oral feeding. There is still lack of an integrated oral feeding monitoring system to objectively and quantifiably monitor the related physiological parameters of premature infants. In this study, a wireless multi-parameter monitoring system for oral feeding of premature infants was proposed to monitor the sucking-swallowing-respiratory activities and the heart rate variability to provide quantitative indices of oral feeding. Here, a novel sucking pressure sensing module was also developed to monitor the premature infant's sucking pressure under oral feeding to avoid the immersion influence of milk. The experimental results showed that the proposed system detected the related physiological parameters of premature infants during oral feeding effectively and may provide an objective clinical evaluation tool for oral feeding ability and safety of premature infants in the future. PMID:26429347

  15. Therapeutic targets for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Abdel-Hamid, Ibrahim A

    2011-09-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common male sexual complaint, and may exert a profound negative impact on the man's life and partnership. Using currently available treatment alternatives (e.g., selective serotonin uptake inhibitor, agents acting locally on the penis), PE can be treated in most, but not all patients. However, since long term success rates have been disappointing, and the only approved treatment so far is the short-acting selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor dapoxetine, there is currently an intensive search for new treatment modalities. Selection of the most promising therapeutic targets from a host of current and potential candidates depends heavily on their roles in the pathophysiology of PE. Possible central nervous targets that will be discussed are serotonin transporters, and CNS receptors for 5-HT(IA) and 5-HT(1B), dopamine, oxytocin, opioids, neurokinin-1, and glutamate. Putative peripheral targets include α(1)-adrenoceptors, phosphodiestrase enzymes, Rho kinases, purinergic (P2X) receptors, and penile sensory nerves. It is clear that exploiting the full therapeutic potential of these targets will require additional basic and clinical research. PMID:21816550

  16. Six-year mortality in a street-recruited cohort of homeless youth in San Francisco, California

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jessica S.; Parriott, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The mortality rate of a street-recruited homeless youth cohort in the United States has not yet been reported. We examined the six-year mortality rate for a cohort of street youth recruited from San Francisco street venues in 2004. Methods. Using data collected from a longitudinal, venue-based sample of street youth 15–24 years of age, we calculated age, race, and gender-adjusted mortality rates. Results. Of a sample of 218 participants, 11 died from enrollment in 2004 to December 31, 2010. The majority of deaths were due to suicide and/or substance abuse. The death rate was 9.6 deaths per hundred thousand person-years. The age, race and gender-adjusted standardized mortality ratio was 10.6 (95% CI [5.3–18.9]). Gender specific SMRs were 16.1 (95% CI [3.3–47.1]) for females and 9.4 (95% CI [4.0–18.4]) for males. Conclusions. Street-recruited homeless youth in San Francisco experience a mortality rate in excess of ten times that of the state’s general youth population. Services and programs, particularly housing, mental health and substance abuse interventions, are urgently needed to prevent premature mortality in this vulnerable population. PMID:27114873

  17. Six-year mortality in a street-recruited cohort of homeless youth in San Francisco, California.

    PubMed

    Auerswald, Colette L; Lin, Jessica S; Parriott, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The mortality rate of a street-recruited homeless youth cohort in the United States has not yet been reported. We examined the six-year mortality rate for a cohort of street youth recruited from San Francisco street venues in 2004. Methods. Using data collected from a longitudinal, venue-based sample of street youth 15-24 years of age, we calculated age, race, and gender-adjusted mortality rates. Results. Of a sample of 218 participants, 11 died from enrollment in 2004 to December 31, 2010. The majority of deaths were due to suicide and/or substance abuse. The death rate was 9.6 deaths per hundred thousand person-years. The age, race and gender-adjusted standardized mortality ratio was 10.6 (95% CI [5.3-18.9]). Gender specific SMRs were 16.1 (95% CI [3.3-47.1]) for females and 9.4 (95% CI [4.0-18.4]) for males. Conclusions. Street-recruited homeless youth in San Francisco experience a mortality rate in excess of ten times that of the state's general youth population. Services and programs, particularly housing, mental health and substance abuse interventions, are urgently needed to prevent premature mortality in this vulnerable population. PMID:27114873

  18. [Changes in infant mortality].

    PubMed

    Aguirre, A

    1997-01-01

    Mexico's infant mortality rate is estimated to have declined from 189 in 1930 to 129 in 1950 and 30 in 1995. The infant mortality rate has continued its decline despite the economic crisis of recent years. The use of oral rehydration therapy has reduced mortality from diarrhea, and the spread of family planning has reduced the numbers of births at high risk due to maternal age, parity, or short birth intervals. The types of causes of infant death have changed as the numbers have decreased. They can be grouped in ascending order according to the difficulty of prevention: diseases preventable by immunization, acute diarrhea, acute respiratory infections, perinatal disorders, and congenital anomalies. Over two-thirds of infant deaths recorded since 1950 have been due to these causes. Infectious diseases, including diarrhea, acute respiratory infections, and conditions preventable by immunization predominated as causes of infant mortality before 1930. As the epidemiological transition progresses, diseases preventable by immunization lose importance, and diarrhea and respiratory infections occupy the first two places, with perinatal disorders being third. Between 1980 and 1990, in Mexico, diarrhea and acute respiratory infections dropped to second and third place after perinatal disorders, with congenital anomalies in fourth place. In most developed countries, perinatal disorders and congenital anomalies are the two most frequent causes of death, while diarrhea and respiratory infections no longer appear in the top five. In 1995, the four main causes in Mexico in descending order were perinatal disorders, congenital anomalies, acute respiratory infections, and diarrhea. PMID:12158082

  19. SUPER EARLY PREMATURE BIRTH IN TERMS OF THE NEW STANDARD OF LIVE BIRTH IN THE REPUBLIC OF SAKHA (YAKUTIA).

    PubMed

    Baisheva, N S; Duglas, N I; Pavlova, T Yu; Yakovleva, E B; Rad, Ya G

    2015-01-01

    Premature birth is a serious problem of public health around the world owing to the high frequency of complications and perinatal losses. According to the WHO recommendations by gestation terms the premature birth divides into: super early premature birth (SEPB) in the term of 22-27 weeks, early PB in the term of 28-33 weeks and PB in the term of 34-37 weeks. Preterm born infants make 85%, and in the neonatal mortality structure make more than 55%. It is necessary to consider that in recent years the number of women in the premature birth development risk group has increased, to which patients with a uterus scar, extragenital pathology, supporting reproductive technology treatment pregnancy are related. PMID:26887126

  20. Thinking about Pregnancy After Premature Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Global Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... Zika virus and pregnancy Microcephaly Medicine safety and pregnancy Birth defects prevention Learn how to help reduce ...

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Three Surfactant Preparations in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Trembath, Andrea; Hornik, Christoph P.; Clark, Reese; Smith, P. Brian; Daniels, Julie; Laughon, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare effectiveness of three surfactant preparations (beractant, calfactant, and poractant alpha) in premature infants for preventing three outcomes: (1) air leak syndromes; (2) death; and (3) bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death (composite outcomes). Study design We conducted a comparative effectiveness study of premature infants admitted to 322 neonatal intensive care units in the U.S. from 2005–2010 who were treated with beractant, calfactant, or poractant alfa. We compared the incidence of air leak syndromes, death, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death, adjusting for gestational age, antenatal steroids, discharge year, and small-for-gestational-age status. Results 51,282 infants received surfactant; 40% received beractant, 30% calfactant, and 30% poractant alfa. Median birth weight was 1435 g (interquartile range 966–2065); median gestational age was 30 weeks (27–33). On adjusted analysis, we observed a similar risk of air leak syndromes (calfactant vs. beractant odds ratio [OR]=1.17 [95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.43]; calfactant vs. poractant OR=1.23 [0.98, 1.56]; beractant vs. poractant OR=1.06 [0.87, 1.29]), death (calfactant vs. beractant OR=1.14 [0.93, 1.39]; calfactant vs. poractant OR=0.98 [0.78, 1.23]; beractant vs. poractant OR=0.86 [0.72, 1.04]), and BPD or death (calfactant vs. beractant OR=1.08 [0.93, 1.26]; calfactant vs. poractant OR=1.19 [1.00, 1.41]; beractant vs. poractant OR=1.10 [0.96, 1.27]). Conclusions Beractant, calfactant, and poractant alfa demonstrated similar effectiveness in prevention of air leak syndromes, death, and BPD or death in premature infants when adjusted for site. Previously described differences in mortality between surfactants likely do not represent true differences in effectiveness but may relate to site variation in outcomes. PMID:23769501

  2. Method of testing carbide inserts for premature fracture by face milling of cylindrical workpieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, R.; Akasawa, T.; Okusa, K.

    1984-12-01

    Methods are proposed for face milling solid cylindrical workpieces or half-cut and hollow cylindrical workpieces prepared from rectangular blocks by continuously changing both or either of the angles of engagement and disengagement. Carbide inserts are tested for premature fracture before the onset of steady wear using these face-milling methods. The premature fracture indicates the insufficient toughness of carbides to perform a given machining job. As carbides of higher wear resistance have lower shock resistance in general, they must be tested for premature fracture due to the lack of toughness to select suitable carbides for specific cutting applications. The test results obtained under the present study show that the premature fracture of carbides, whose toughness was classified by static toughness tests, can be evaluated dynamically and easily by the proposed face-milling methods.

  3. Mortal assets

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, John J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2005-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). Whle associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15

  4. Nonlinear pattern analysis of ventricular premature beats by mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yokoshima, T.; Kishida, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of ventricular premature beats (VPBs) has been related to the risk of mortality. However, little is known about the temporal pattern of occurrence of VPBs and its relationship to autonomic activity. Hence, we applied a general correlation measure, mutual information, to quantify how VPBs are generated over time. We also used mutual information to determine the correlation between VPB production and heart rate in order to evaluate effects of autonomic activity on VPB production. We examined twenty subjects with more than 3000 VPBs/day and simulated random time series of VPB occurrence. We found that mutual information values could be used to characterize quantitatively the temporal patterns of VPB generation. Our data suggest that VPB production is not random and VPBs generated with a higher value of mutual information may be more greatly affected by autonomic activity.

  5. Recognizing and preventing epilepsy-related mortality: A call for action.

    PubMed

    Devinsky, Orrin; Spruill, Tanya; Thurman, David; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-02-23

    Epilepsy is associated with a high rate of premature mortality from direct and indirect effects of seizures, epilepsy, and antiseizure therapies. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the second leading neurologic cause of total lost potential life-years after stroke, yet SUDEP may account for less than half of all epilepsy-related deaths. Some epilepsy groups are especially vulnerable: individuals from low socioeconomic status groups and those with comorbid psychiatric illness die more often than controls. Despite clear evidence of an important public health problem, efforts to assess and prevent epilepsy-related deaths remain inadequate. We discuss factors contributing to the underestimation of SUDEP and other epilepsy-related causes of death. We suggest the need for a systematic classification of deaths directly due to epilepsy (e.g., SUDEP, drowning), due to acute symptomatic seizures, and indirectly due to epilepsy (e.g., suicide, chronic effects of antiseizure medications). Accurately estimating the frequency of epilepsy-related mortality is essential to support the development and assessment of preventive interventions. We propose that educational interventions and public health campaigns targeting medication adherence, psychiatric comorbidity, and other modifiable risk factors may reduce epilepsy-related mortality. Educational campaigns regarding sudden infant death syndrome and fires, which kill far fewer Americans than epilepsy, have been widely implemented. We have done too little to prevent epilepsy-related deaths. Everyone with epilepsy and everyone who treats people with epilepsy need to know that controlling seizures will save lives. PMID:26674330

  6. Oral contraceptive use and mortality after 36 years of follow-up in the Nurses’ Health Study: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Brittany M; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Colditz, Graham A; Missmer, Stacey A; Rosner, Bernard A; Hankinson, Susan E; Speizer, Frank E

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of oral contraceptives is associated with all cause and cause specific mortality. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Nurses’ Health Study, data collected between 1976 and 2012. Population 121 701 participants were prospectively followed for 36 years; lifetime oral contraceptive use was recorded biennially from 1976 to 1982. Main outcome measures Overall and cause specific mortality, assessed throughout follow-up until 2012. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the relative risks of all cause and cause specific mortality associated with use of oral contraceptives. Results In our population of 121 577 women with information on oral contraceptive use, 63 626 were never users (52%) and 57 951 were ever users (48%). After 3.6 million person years, we recorded 31 286 deaths. No association was observed between ever use of oral contraceptives and all cause mortality. However, violent or accidental deaths were more common among ever users (hazard ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.37). Longer duration of use was more strongly associated with certain causes of death, including premature mortality due to breast cancer (test for trend P<0.0001) and decreased mortality rates of ovarian cancer (P=0.002). Longer time since last use was also associated with certain outcomes, including a positive association with violent or accidental deaths (P=0.005). Conclusions All cause mortality did not differ significantly between women who had ever used oral contraceptives and never users. Oral contraceptive use was associated with certain causes of death, including increased rates of violent or accidental death and deaths due to breast cancer, whereas deaths due to ovarian cancer were less common among women who used oral contraceptives. These results pertain to earlier oral contraceptive formulations with higher hormone doses rather than the now more commonly used third and fourth generation formulations

  7. Estimating adult mortality attributable to PM2.5 exposure in China with assimilated PM2.5 concentrations based on a ground monitoring network.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Han, Yiqun; Tang, Xiao; Zhu, Jiang; Zhu, Tong

    2016-10-15

    Estimates of mortality attributable to air pollution in China showed large differences among various studies, mainly arising from differences in exposure assessments and choice of the concentration-response function. The Chinese national monitoring network recently has included direct measurements of PM2.5 (particulates with aerodynamic diameter≤2.5μm), providing a potentially more reliable exposure assessment. We estimated adult premature mortalities due to PM2.5 across China in 2013 and mortality benefits for scenarios in which China meets the World Health Organization (WHO) Air Quality Guidelines (AQG) and three interim targets (ITs) for PM2.5. Attributable adult mortalities were estimated with assimilated spatial PM2.5 concentrations across China based on direct PM2.5 measurements from 506 PM2.5 monitoring sites and a regional air quality model, and using the integrated exposure-response model. Our results show that in China, 83% of the population lived in areas where PM2.5 concentrations exceeded the Chinese Ambient Air Quality Standard of 35μgm(-3). Premature mortalities attributed to PM2.5 nationwide were 1.37 million in total, and 0.69, 0.38, 0.13, and 0.17 million for stroke, ischemic heart disease, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respectively. High population density areas exhibited the highest health risks attributed to air pollution. The mortality benefits will be 23%, 39%, 66%, and 83% of the total present premature mortalities (1.37 million mortalities) when PM2.5 concentrations in China meet the WHO IT-1, IT-2, IT-3, and AQG, respectively. Our study shows that integrating PM2.5 concentrations based on the national monitoring network with the regional air quality model provides an advanced exposure estimate method with potentials to further improve the accuracy for mortality estimate; much higher health benefits could be achieved if China adopted more stringent WHO guidelines for PM2.5. PMID:27266521

  8. Cause-Specific Mortality and Death Certificate Reporting in Adults with Moderate to Profound Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrer, F.; McGrother, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The study of premature deaths in people with intellectual disability (ID) has become the focus of recent policy initiatives in England. This is the first UK population-based study to explore cause-specific mortality in adults with ID compared with the general population. Methods: Cause-specific standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and…

  9. Prematures with and without Regressed Retinopathy of Prematurity: Comparison of Long-Term (6-10 Years) Ophthalmological Morbidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cats, Bernard P.; Tan, Karel E. W. P.

    Reporting long-term ophthalmologic sequelae among ex-prematures at 6 to 10 years of age, this study compares 42 ex-premature infants who had had regressed forms of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) during the neonatal period with 42 matched non-ROP ex-premature controls at 6 to 10 years of age. Subjects were subdivided into four groups: (1) ROP…

  10. Impact of retinopathy of prematurity on ocular structures and visual functions.

    PubMed

    Fielder, Alistair; Blencowe, Hannah; O'Connor, Anna; Gilbert, Clare

    2015-03-01

    The preterm baby may develop ophthalmic sequelae which can be due to prematurity per se, due to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) or due to neurological damage. Focusing on the former two, we discuss how in high-income countries the risk of sight-threatening ROP is largely confined to babies <1000 g birth weight (BW), whereas in low-income or middle-income countries babies exceeding 2500 g BW can be blinded. The effects of prematurity and ROP are presented as regional and global estimates of acute-phase ROP and the consequent mild/moderate and severe visual impairment. We discuss sequelae and how they affect the eye and its shape, strabismus and finally consider their impact on visual functions, including visual acuity, the visual field, colour vision and contrast sensitivity. PMID:25336678

  11. Relationship between premature ejaculation and depression

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yue; Li, Juanjuan; Shan, Guang; Qian, Huijun; Wang, Tao; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jun; Liu, Luhao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most prevalent male sexual dysfunction. Epidemiologic findings are inconsistent concerning the risk for depression associated with PE. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between between depression and risk of PE. Data sources: We conducted a literature search of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from these databases’ inception through June 2014 for observational epidemiological studies examining the association between depression on risk of PE. Study eligibility criteria: Studies were selected if they reported the risk estimates for PE associated with depression. Participants: patients>18 years of age suffering from PE. Interventions: a history of depressive disorder. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: These odds ratios (ORs) were pooled using a random or fixed effects model and were tested for heterogeneity. Subgroup analysis was employed to explore heterogeneity. Results: Eight trials involving 18,035 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Depression were statistically significantly associated with the risk of PE (OR = 1.63, 95% CI:1.42–1.87). There was no evidence of between-study heterogeneity (P = 0.623, I2 = 0.0%). The association was similar when stratified by mean age, geographical area, study design, sample size, publication year, and controlling key confounders. Limitations: The severity of depression and PE could not be identified due to unavailable data of trials. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusions: These findings provide evidence that depression is associated with a significantly increased risk of PE. In addition, more prospective studies are necessary to evaluate the association and identify the ideal treatment. Systematic review registration number: CRD42016041272 PMID:27583879

  12. Changes in the pattern of mortality following the eradication of hyperendemic malaria from a highly susceptible community

    PubMed Central

    Giglioli, George

    1972-01-01

    The population of the sugar estates of the Guyana coastlands was 110 000 in 1966; malaria was eradicated between 1945 and 1951. A study has been made of the pattern of mortality before and after malaria eradication, during the 30-year period from 1937 to 1966. The decline in general mortality has greatly exceeded the fall in mortality specifically related to malaria and has continued for almost 10 years after registration of the last death from malaria. In infants, mortality has been reduced, mainly through a decline in the number of deaths from prematurity and congenital debility that were due mainly to malaria and its sequelae in the expectant mother. In children (1-14 years of age) the decline has resulted from the disappearance of malaria and chronic nephritis as causes of death. In adults, mortality has fallen mainly through the progressive decline in the incidence of a number of diseases not overtly related to malaria: acute and chronic respiratory diseases, chronic nephritis, and the anaemias. Cardiovascular diseases, on the contrary, have shown a tendency to increase since malaria was brought under control. PMID:4624339

  13. Skin Disease in Laminopathy-Associated Premature Aging.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Tomás; Sola Carvajal, Agustín; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-11-01

    The nuclear lamina, a protein network located under the nuclear membrane, has during the past decade found increasing interest due to its significant involvement in a range of genetic diseases, including the segmental premature aging syndromes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, restrictive dermopathy, and atypical Werner syndrome. In this review we examine these diseases, some caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, and their skin disease features. Advances within this area might also provide novel insights into the biology of skin aging, as recent data suggest that low levels of progerin are expressed in unaffected individuals and these levels increase with aging. PMID:26290387

  14. The influence of particulate matter on respiratory morbidity and mortality in children and infants.

    PubMed

    Jakubiak-Lasocka, Joanna; Lasocki, Jakub; Badyda, Artur J

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is the most important environmental health risk leading to premature mortality, respiratory and other health problems. The aim of this study was to quantify its impact on infants and children in Warsaw (Poland), following the principles of Health Impact Assessment method. Particulate matter (PM(2.5) and PM(10)) was considered as the indicator of air pollution. Exposure-response functions between air pollution and health impacts were employed based on the literature. According to the calculations, around 5,201 asthma symptoms and 234 hospital respiratory admissions were caused annually due to air pollution. Hospitalizations due to cardiovascular problems related to air pollution amounted to 13. The mortality among infants and children is relatively low and occurs mostly in the postneonatal period. Nonetheless, approx. 5 mortality cases were assessed to be air pollution-attributable. The study demonstrates a significant impact of air pollution on infants and children, which is manifested primarily as a range of respiratory problems. PMID:25381559

  15. One-Stage Repair of an Interrupted Aortic Arch with an Aortopulmonary Window in a Premature Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Bobos, Dimitrios; Kanakis, Meletios A.; Koulouri, Sofia; Giannopoulos, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch with an aortopulmonary window is a rare congenital entity that is associated with high morbidity and mortality, especially in premature low-birth-weight infants, and the proper timing of surgical correction remains a matter of debate. We present the case of a premature infant weighing 1.6 kg who successfully underwent one stage surgical repair to treat interrupted aortic arch with an aortopulmonary window. The therapeutic management of this patient is described below, and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:26665109

  16. Conventional and Advanced Lipid Parameters in Premature Coronary Artery Disease Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sarita; Daga, Mridul Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and has assumed alarming proportions in India with gradual increase in its incidence and prevalence over the last decade. India is in the middle of epidemic of coronary artery disease which is leading cause of hospital admissions, morbidity and mortality. In the Indian population, there is higher tendency to develop CAD at a younger age, which cannot be explained on the basis of conventional lipid parameters. Aim The purpose of this study is to find advanced lipid parameters which correlate better with premature CAD, as compared to the conventional lipid parameters. Materials and Methods Thirty middle aged individuals suffering from premature CAD and 30 age and gender matched healthy individuals without any history of clinical evidence suggestive of CAD were studied. Fasting venous blood samples of all the subjects under study were collected after an overnight fasting and conventional lipid parameters and advanced lipid parameters (i.e. oxidized LDL, Lp (a), ApoA-1, small dense LDL, ApoB) were estimated. Correlation of conventional and advanced lipid parameters with premature CAD and among each other was calculated using Pearson correlation coefficient. Results In our study the values of ox-LDL, sdLDL, Lp (a) and ApoB, total cholesterol, TG, LDL-C were significantly higher while HDL-C and Apo A1 and were significantly lower in cases than in controls. Advanced lipid parameters have higher correlation with premature CAD as compared to conventional lipid parameters. Ox-LDL show the highest correlation coefficient (r=+0.89) among these parameters followed by Lp (a) (r=+0.86) and ApoB (r=+0.79). Conclusion Advanced lipid parameters (i.e. oxidized LDL, Lp (a), ApoA-1, small dense LDL, ApoB) are better discriminator of premature CAD as compared to conventional lipid parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein). Oxidised LDL, small dense

  17. Years of Life Lost Due to External Causes of Death in the Lodz Province, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Pikala, Malgorzata; Bryla, Marek; Bryla, Pawel; Maniecka-Bryla, Irena

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is the analysis of years of life lost due to external causes of death, particularly due to traffic accidents and suicides. Materials and Methods The study material includes a database containing information gathered from 376,281 death certificates of inhabitants of the Lodz province who died between 1999 and 2010. The Lodz province is characterized by the highest mortality rates in Poland. The SEYLLp (Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per living person) and the SEYLLd (per death) indices were used to determine years of life lost. Joinpoint models were used to analyze time trends. Results In 2010, deaths due to external causes constituted 6.0% of the total number of deaths. The standardized death rate (SDR) due to external causes was 110.0 per 100,000 males and was five times higher than for females (22.0 per 100,000 females). In 2010, the SEYLLp due to external causes was 3746 per 100,000 males and 721 per 100,000 females. Among males, suicides and traffic accidents were the most common causes of death (the values of the SEYLLp were: 1098 years and 887 years per 100,000 people, respectively). Among females, the SEYLLp values were 183 years due to traffic accidents and 143 years due to suicides (per 100,000 people). Conclusions A decrease in the number of years of life lost due to external causes is much higher among females. The authors observe that a growing number of suicides contribute to an increase in the value of the SEYLLp index. This directly contributes to over-mortality of males due to external causes. The analysis of the years of life lost focuses on the social and economic aspects of premature mortality due to external causes. PMID:24810942

  18. Effects of Prematurity on the Development of Contrast Sensitivity: Testing the Visual Experience Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Rain G.; Dobkins, Karen R.

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of visual experience on early visual development, the current study compared contrast sensitivity across infants born with different levels of moderate-to-late prematurity. Here the logic is that at any given postterm age, the most premature infants will have the oldest postnatal age. Given that postnatal age is a proxy for visual experience, the visual experience hypothesis predicts that infants who are more premature, yet healthy, should have higher sensitivity. Luminance (light/dark) and chromatic (red/green) contrast sensitivities (CS) were measured in 236 healthy infants (born −10 to +2 weeks relative to due date) between 5 and 32 weeks postterm age from due date and 8 to 38 weeks postnatal from birth date. For chromatic CS, we found clear evidence that infants who were most premature within our sample had the highest sensitivity. Specifically, 4 to 10 additional weeks of visual experience, by virtue of being born early, enhanced chromatic CS. For luminance CS, similar but weaker results were seen. Here, only infants with an additional 6 to 10 weeks of visual experience, and only at later age points in development, showed enhanced sensitivity. However, CS in preterm infants was still below that of fullterm infants with equivalent postnatal age. In sum, these results suggest that chromatic CS is influenced more by prematurity (and possibly visual experience) than is luminance CS, which has implications for differential development of Parvocellular and Magnocellular pathways. PMID:23485427

  19. Laterality in Prematurely-Born Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segalwitz, Sidney J.; Chapman, Jacqueline S.

    The study examined the relationship between perinatal stress and decreased right handedness and decreased left cerebral dominance for speech with 215 children born prematurely, followed from birth, and tested at age 5. Results indicated that neither hand preference nor hand performance correlated with degree of perinatal stress and that eye…

  20. Osteopenia (metabolic bone disease) of prematurity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopenia is defined as postnatal bone mineralization that is inadequate to fully mineralize bones. Osteopenia occurs commonly in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Prior to the use of high-mineral containing diets for premature infants, which is the current practice, significant radiographic ch...

  1. Alone no more: pain in premature children.

    PubMed

    Bellieni, C V; Bagnoli, F; Buonocore, G

    2003-01-01

    It is only recently that newborns have been recognised to feel pain. To avoid the drawbacks of common analgesics, alternative analgesic methods (e.g. sucking and/or oral sugar) have been proposed. We showed that these methods are of little effect without the relaxing, distracting, comforting presence of a person at the cribside who talks to and massages the baby. This is a further demonstration that newborns, including premature babies, look for a reassuring presence when experiencing pain. This is surprising as premature babies are relatively unreactive, often completely isolated in an incubator and considered incapable of social behavior. To the attentive observer, however, they reveal an unsuspected emotional world. Not only do they feel pain, but they are also capable of suffering, distress, anxiety and fear. This needs to be considered in neonatal analgesic treatment, even for extremely premature children. It is mandatory for caregivers to be a reassuring presence during painful procedures: premature babies are exacting patients. They not only feel pain, they even suffer; they request not only drugs, but a human presence nearby. PMID:14700042

  2. 7 CFR 29.1050 - Prematurity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prematurity. 29.1050 Section 29.1050 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official...

  3. Telemedicine for evaluation of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Fierson, Walter M; Capone, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) remains a significant threat to vision for extremely premature infants despite the availability of therapeutic modalities capable, in most cases, of managing this disorder. It has been shown in many controlled trials that application of therapies at the appropriate time is essential to successful outcomes in premature infants affected by ROP. Bedside binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy has been the standard technique for diagnosis and monitoring of ROP in these patients. However, implementation of routine use of this screening method for at-risk premature infants has presented challenges within our existing care systems, including relative local scarcity of qualified ophthalmologist examiners in some locations and the remote location of some NICUs. Modern technology, including the development of wide-angle ocular digital fundus photography, coupled with the ability to send digital images electronically to remote locations, has led to the development of telemedicine-based remote digital fundus imaging (RDFI-TM) evaluation techniques. These techniques have the potential to allow the diagnosis and monitoring of ROP to occur in lieu of the necessity for some repeated on-site examinations in NICUs. This report reviews the currently available literature on RDFI-TM evaluations for ROP and outlines pertinent practical and risk management considerations that should be used when including RDFI-TM in any new or existing ROP care structure. PMID:25548330

  4. Adjusting survival estimates for premature transmitter failure: A case study from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holbrook, Christopher M.; Perry, Russell W.; Brandes, Patricia L.; Adams, Noah S.

    2013-01-01

    In telemetry studies, premature tag failure causes negative bias in fish survival estimates because tag failure is interpreted as fish mortality. We used mark-recapture modeling to adjust estimates of fish survival for a previous study where premature tag failure was documented. High rates of tag failure occurred during the Vernalis Adaptive Management Plan’s (VAMP) 2008 study to estimate survival of fall-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during migration through the San Joaquin River and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. Due to a high rate of tag failure, the observed travel time distribution was likely negatively biased, resulting in an underestimate of tag survival probability in this study. Consequently, the bias-adjustment method resulted in only a small increase in estimated fish survival when the observed travel time distribution was used to estimate the probability of tag survival. Since the bias-adjustment failed to remove bias, we used historical travel time data and conducted a sensitivity analysis to examine how fish survival might have varied across a range of tag survival probabilities. Our analysis suggested that fish survival estimates were low (95% confidence bounds range from 0.052 to 0.227) over a wide range of plausible tag survival probabilities (0.48–1.00), and this finding is consistent with other studies in this system. When tags fail at a high rate, available methods to adjust for the bias may perform poorly. Our example highlights the importance of evaluating the tag life assumption during survival studies, and presents a simple framework for evaluating adjusted survival estimates when auxiliary travel time data are available.

  5. Ethnicity, deprivation and mortality due to 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in England during the 2009/2010 pandemic and the first post-pandemic season.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Harris, R J; Ellis, J; Pebody, R G

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between risk of death following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection and ethnicity and deprivation during the 2009/2010 pandemic period and the first post-pandemic season of 2010/2011 in England was examined. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the mortality risk, adjusted for age, gender, and place of residence. Those of non-White ethnicity experienced an increased mortality risk compared to White populations during the 2009/2010 pandemic [10·5/1000 vs. 6·0/1000 general population; adjusted risk ratio (RR) 1·84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·39-2·54] with the highest risk in those of Pakistani ethnicity. However, no significant difference between ethnicities was observed during the following 2010/2011 season. Persons living in areas with the highest level of deprivation had a significantly higher risk of death (RR 2·08, 95% CI 1·49-2·91) compared to the lowest level for both periods. These results highlight the importance of rapid identification of groups at higher risk of severe disease in the early stages of future pandemics to enable the implementation of optimal prevention and control measures for vulnerable populations. PMID:25850904

  6. A population-based, multifaceted strategy to implement antenatal corticosteroid treatment versus standard care for the reduction of neonatal mortality due to preterm birth in low-income and middle-income countries: the ACT cluster-randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Althabe, Fernando; Belizán, José M; McClure, Elizabeth M; Hemingway-Foday, Jennifer; Berrueta, Mabel; Mazzoni, Agustina; Ciganda, Alvaro; Goudar, Shivaprasad S; Kodkany, Bhalachandra S; Mahantshetti, Niranjana S; Dhaded, Sangappa M; Katageri, Geetanjali M; Metgud, Mrityunjay C; Joshi, Anjali M; Bellad, Mrutyunjaya B; Honnungar, Narayan V; Derman, Richard J; Saleem, Sarah; Pasha, Omrana; Ali, Sumera; Hasnain, Farid; Goldenberg, Robert L; Esamai, Fabian; Nyongesa, Paul; Ayunga, Silas; Liechty, Edward A; Garces, Ana L; Figueroa, Lester; Hambidge, K Michael; Krebs, Nancy F; Patel, Archana; Bhandarkar, Anjali; Waikar, Manjushri; Hibberd, Patricia L; Chomba, Elwyn; Carlo, Waldemar A; Mwiche, Angel; Chiwila, Melody; Manasyan, Albert; Pineda, Sayury; Meleth, Sreelatha; Thorsten, Vanessa; Stolka, Kristen; Wallace, Dennis D; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Jobe, Alan H; Buekens, Pierre M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Antenatal corticosteroids for pregnant women at risk of preterm birth are among the most effective hospital-based interventions to reduce neonatal mortality. We aimed to assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of a multifaceted intervention designed to increase the use of antenatal corticosteroids at all levels of health care in low-income and middle-income countries. Methods In this 18-month, cluster-randomised trial, we randomly assigned (1:1) rural and semi-urban clusters within six countries (Argentina, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Pakistan, and Zambia) to standard care or a multifaceted intervention including components to improve identification of women at risk of preterm birth and to facilitate appropriate use of antenatal corticosteroids. The primary outcome was 28-day neonatal mortality among infants less than the 5th percentile for birthweight (a proxy for preterm birth) across the clusters. Use of antenatal corticosteroids and suspected maternal infection were additional main outcomes. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01084096. Findings The ACT trial took place between October, 2011, and March, 2014 (start dates varied by site). 51 intervention clusters with 47 394 livebirths (2520 [5%] less than 5th percentile for birthweight) and 50 control clusters with 50 743 livebirths (2258 [4%] less than 5th percentile) completed follow-up. 1052 (45%) of 2327 women in intervention clusters who delivered less-than-5th-percentile infants received antenatal corticosteroids, compared with 215 (10%) of 2062 in control clusters (p<0·0001). Among the less-than-5th-percentile infants, 28-day neonatal mortality was 225 per 1000 livebirths for the intervention group and 232 per 1000 livebirths for the control group (relative risk [RR] 0·96, 95% CI 0·87–1·06, p=0·65) and suspected maternal infection was reported in 236 (10%) of 2361 women in the intervention group and 133 (6%) of 2094 in the control group (odds ratio

  7. Impact of rotavirus vaccine on premature infants.

    PubMed

    Roué, Jean-Michel; Nowak, Emmanuel; Le Gal, Grégoire; Lemaitre, Thomas; Oger, Emmanuel; Poulhazan, Elise; Giroux, Jean-Dominique; Garenne, Armelle; Gagneur, Arnaud

    2014-10-01

    Infants born preterm are at a higher risk of complications and hospitalization in cases of rotavirus diarrhea than children born at term. We evaluated the impact of a rotavirus vaccination campaign (May 2007 to May 2010) on hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis in a population of children under 3 years old born prematurely (before 37 weeks of gestation) in the Brest University Hospital birth zone. Active surveillance from 2002 to 2006 and a prospective collection of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea were initiated in the pediatric units of Brest University Hospital until May 2010. Numbers of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea among the population of children born prematurely, before and after the start of the vaccination program, were compared using a Poisson regression model controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation. A total of 217 premature infants were vaccinated from 2007 to 2010. Vaccine coverage for a complete course of three doses was 41.9%. The vaccine safety in premature infants was similar to that in term infants. The vaccination program led to a division by a factor of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 5.2) in the number of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea during the first two epidemic seasons following vaccine introduction and by a factor of 11 (95% CI, 3.5 to 34.8) during the third season. We observed significant effectiveness of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine on the number of hospitalizations in a population of prematurely born infants younger than 3 years of age. A multicenter national study would provide better assessment of this impact. (This study [Impact of Systematic Infants Vaccination Against Rotavirus on Gastroenteritis Hospitalization: a Prospective Study in Brest District, France (IVANHOE)] has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00740935.). PMID:25080553

  8. Birthing and Parenting a Premature Infant in a Cultural Context

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Jada L.; Holdtich-Davis, Diane; Docherty, Sharron L.; Theodorou, Christina S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal qualitative descriptive study was to explore American Indian (AI) mothers’ perceptions of parenting their premature infants over their first year of life in the context of their culture, including the birth and hospitalization experience. A convenience sample of 17 AI mothers and their premature infants were recruited from either a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or pediatric clinic in the southeast. Semistructured interviews were conducted at two time points. Through content analytic methods, three broad categories were revealed: descriptions of having a premature infant in the NICU, descriptions of parenting a premature infant, and the influence of Lumbee culture on parenting a premature infant. Certain aspects of AI culture appear to be important in having a premature infant in the NICU and in parenting a premature infant. We recommend that healthcare providers deliver culturally appropriate care that fully supports AI mothers and their premature infants. PMID:25721716

  9. Birthing and Parenting a Premature Infant in a Cultural Context.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jada L; Holdtich-Davis, Diane; Docherty, Sharron L; Theodorou, Christina S

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal qualitative descriptive study was to explore American Indian mothers' perceptions of parenting their premature infants over their first year of life in the context of their culture, including the birth and hospitalization experience. A convenience sample of 17 American Indian mothers and their premature infants were recruited from either a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or pediatric clinic in the southeast. Semistructured interviews were conducted at two time points. Through content analytic methods, three broad categories were revealed: descriptions of having a premature infant in the NICU, descriptions of parenting a premature infant, and the influence of Lumbee culture on parenting a premature infant. Certain aspects of American Indian culture appear to be important in having a premature infant in the NICU and in parenting a premature infant. We recommend that health care providers deliver culturally appropriate care that fully supports American Indian mothers and their premature infants. PMID:25721716

  10. Retinopathy of Prematurity: Therapeutic Strategies Based on Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Cayabyab, Rowena; Ramanathan, Rangasamy

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) continues to be a major preventable cause of blindness and visual handicaps globally. With improved perinatal care, improved survival of moderately preterm infants, and limited resources for oxygen delivery and monitoring, more mature preterm infants are developing severe ROP in developing countries. The pathophysiology of ROP is characterized by two phases. Phase I ROP is due to vaso-obliteration beginning immediately after birth secondary to a marked decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Phase II begins around 33 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA). During this phase, VEGF levels increase, especially if there is retinal hypoxia with increasing retinal metabolism and demand for oxygen leading to abnormal vasoproliferation. Since the original description of ROP in 1942 by Terry et al. [Am J Ophthalmol 1942;25:203-204], four epidemics of ROP have been observed. Prevention or early treatment of ROP involves careful titration of oxygen saturation by pulse oximeter (SpO2). Optimal SpO2 target remains elusive. Most of the large trials have focused on either a low SpO2 (85-89%) or a high SpO2 (91-95%) from the first day of birth to 36 weeks' PMA. Although the incidence of severe ROP and bronchopulmonary dysplasia decreased significantly, predischarge mortality was higher in these studies. Use of graded SpO2 during the 2 different phases of ROP (early, low SpO2 during phase I vs. late, high SpO2 during phase II) may be the best approach to prevent this disabling condition. Further trials should focus on this strategy. Other biological agents that are currently being studied include IGF-1 with IGF-binding protein-3 (rhIGF-1 + rhIGFBP-3) and propranolol. For advanced stages of ROP, laser ablation of avascular retina, early treatment of ROP (ETROP) protocol, intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF antibodies (e.g. bevacizumab) and vitrectomy are used to protect central vision and prevent

  11. Alterations in Functional Connectivity for Language in Prematurely Born Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Robin J.; Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty; Kesler, Shelli R.; Katz, Karol H.; Schneider, Karen C.; Pugh, Kenneth R.; Makuch, Robert W.; Reiss, Allan L.; Constable, R. Todd; Ment, Laura R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent data suggest recovery of language systems but persistent structural abnormalities in the prematurely born. We tested the hypothesis that subjects who were born prematurely develop alternative networks for processing language. Subjects who were born prematurely (n = 22; 600-1250 g birth weight), without neonatal brain injury on neonatal…

  12. Infant mortality in Rajasthan villages.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S D; Jain, T P; Joshi, S; Mangal, D K

    1981-02-01

    Social, cultural and economic factors, beside medical causes, contribute to the high percentage of infant mortality in India. This study was carried out in 12 villages in the area of the Rural Health Training Centre, Naila, India; all villages were being regularly visited by paramedical staff and doctors. During 1977 62 infants died. Most parents were illiterate and very poor. 50.3% of deaths occurred within the first 28 days of life, and 25.8% within the first 7 days of life; 72.8% of deaths occurred within the first 6 months of life. Infections and malnutrition accounted for 77.3% of all deaths; pneumonia alone claimed 25.8% of lives, malnutrition 19.3%, fever for unknown reasons 16.1%, diarrhea 14.5% and prematurity 12.9%. Deaths for pneumonia were 56.3% in the postneonatal period and 43.7% in the neonatal period, while fever predominated as a cause of death in the neonatal rather than in postneonatal period, with 70% and 30% of deaths respectively. 56.4% of deaths were recorded among children born to mothers aged 21-30, 30.7% among children of mothers over 30, and 12.9% among children of mothers below 20. 51.6% of dead children had a birth order of 5 and over; only 17.8% had first birth order. 50.1% of deaths were observed in infants who were born less than 12 months from the previous conception. Similar studies done in other Indian regions show similar percentages of infant mortality and of causes for mortality. PMID:7263000

  13. Patient characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality in children following tracheotomy

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G; Graham, Robert J; Roberson, David W; Rhein, Lawrence; Graham, Dionne A; Zhou, Jing; O’Brien, Jane; Putney, Heather; Goldmann, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify children at risk for in-hospital mortality following tracheotomy. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 25 746 876 US hospitalisations for children within the Kids’ Inpatient Database 1997, 2000, 2003 and 2006. Participants 18 806 hospitalisations of children ages 0–18 years undergoing tracheotomy, identified from ICD-9-CM tracheotomy procedure codes. Main outcome measure Mortality during the initial hospitalisation when tracheotomy was performed in relation to patient demographic and clinical characteristics (neuromuscular impairment (NI), chronic lung disease, upper airway anomaly, prematurity, congenital heart disease, upper airway infection and trauma) identified with ICD-9-CM codes. Results Between 1997 and 2006, mortality following tracheotomy ranged from 7.7% to 8.5%. In each year, higher mortality was observed in children undergoing tracheotomy who were aged <1 year compared with children aged 1–4 years (mortality range: 10.2–13.1% vs 1.1–4.2%); in children with congenital heart disease, compared with children without congenital heart disease (13.1–18.7% vs 6.2–7.1%) and in children with prematurity, compared with children who were not premature (13.0–19.4% vs 6.8–7.3%). Lower mortality was observed in children with an upper airway anomaly compared with children without an upper airway anomaly (1.5–5.1% vs 9.1–10.3%). In 2006, the highest mortality (40.0%) was observed in premature children with NI and congenital heart disease, who did not have an upper airway anomaly. Conclusions Congenital heart disease, prematurity, the absence of an upper airway anomaly and age <1 year were characteristics associated with higher mortality in children following tracheotomy. These findings may assist provider communication with children and families regarding early prognosis following tracheotomy. PMID:20522454

  14. Jewish mortality reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Staetsky, Laura Daniel; Hinde, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    It is known that mortality of Jews is different from the mortality of the populations that surround them. However, the existence of commonalities in mortality of different Jewish communities across the world has not received scholarly attention. This paper aims to identify common features of the evolution of Jewish mortality among Jews living in Israel and the Diaspora. In the paper the mortality of Jews in Israel is systematically compared with the mortality of the populations of developed countries, and the findings from the earlier studies of mortality of Jews in selected Diaspora communities are re-examined. The outcome is a re-formulation and extension of the notion of the 'Jewish pattern of mortality'. The account of this pattern is based on the consistently low level of behaviourally induced mortality, the migration history of Jewish populations and the enduring influence of early-life conditions on mortality at older ages. PMID:24784140

  15. Filamin A mutation may be associated with diffuse lung disease mimicking bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature newborns.

    PubMed

    Lord, Amanda; Shapiro, Adam J; Saint-Martin, Christine; Claveau, Martine; Melançon, Serge; Wintermark, Pia

    2014-11-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common long-term complication in premature newborns requiring ventilatory support and is the most common cause of chronic diffuse lung disease in this population. We present the clinical course of a premature newborn with a complicated neonatal respiratory course that was initially thought to be related to BPD, but it did not respond to the typical therapies for this condition. Due to the findings of periventricular nodular heterotopia, the diagnosis of a filamin A gene mutation was eventually made, which explained the respiratory pathology of this patient. When time of onset and clinical course do not correlate with typical BPD, one should consider alternative diagnoses in premature infants, including neonatal diffuse lung disease. PMID:25053830

  16. Age and sex-specific mortality of wild and captive populations of a monogamous pair-bonded primate (Aotus azarae).

    PubMed

    Larson, Sam M; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen R; Williams, Lawrence; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    In polygynous primates, a greater reproductive variance in males have been linked to their reduced life expectancy relative to females. The mortality patterns of monogamous pair-bonded primates, however, are less clear. We analyzed the sex differences in mortality within wild (NMales  = 70, NFemales  = 73) and captive (NMales  = 25, NFemales  = 29) populations of Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarae), a socially and genetically monogamous primate exhibiting biparental care. We used Bayesian Survival Trajectory Analysis (BaSTA) to test age-dependent models of mortality. The wild and captive populations were best fit by the logistic and Gompertz models, respectively, implying greater heterogeneity in the wild environment likely due to harsher conditions. We found that age patterns of mortality were similar between the sexes in both populations. We calculated life expectancy and disparity, the latter a measure of the steepness of senescence, for both sexes in each population. Males and females had similar life expectancies in both populations; the wild population overall having a shorter life expectancy than the captive one. Furthermore, captive females had a reduced life disparity relative to captive males and to both sexes in the wild. We interpret this pattern in light of the hazards associated with reproduction. In captivity, where reproduction is intensely managed, the risks associated with gestation and birth are tempered so that there is a reduction in the likelihood of captive females dying prematurely, decreasing their overall life disparity. PMID:25866126

  17. Risk assessment of mortality for all-cause, ischemic heart disease, cardiopulmonary disease, and lung cancer due to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Pei-Hsuan; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Chen, Chien-Jen; Hu, Suh-Woan; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Tsai, Jeng-Lin; Tang, Mei-Ling; Chen, Guan-Jie; Ku, Kai-Chen

    2014-10-01

    Based on recent understanding of PM2.5 health-related problems from fossil-fueled power plants emission inventories collected in Taiwan, we have determined the loss of life expectancy (LLE) and the lifetime (75-year) risks for PM2.5 health-related mortalities as attributed to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant; the Taichung Power Plant (TCP), with an installed nominal electrical capacity of 5780 MW in 2013. Five plausible scenarios (combinations of emission controls, fuel switch, and relocation) and two risk factors were considered. It is estimated that the lifetime (75-y) risk for all-cause mortality was 0.3%-0.6% for males and 0.2%-0.4% for females, and LLE at 84 days in 1997 for the 23 million residents of Taiwan. The risk has been reduced to one-fourth at 0.05%-0.10% for males and 0.03%-0.06% for females, and LLE at 15 days in 2007, which was mainly attributed to the installation of desulfurization and de-NOx equipment. Moreover, additional improvements can be expected if we can relocate the power plant to a downwind site on Taiwan, and convert the fuel source from coal to natural gas. The risk can be significantly reduced further to one-fiftieth at 0.001%-0.002% for males and 0.001% for females, and LLE at 0.3 days. Nonetheless, it is still an order higher than the commonly accepted elevated-cancer risk at 0.0001% (10-6), indicating that the PM2.5 health-related risk for operating such a world-class power plant is not negligible. In addition, this study finds that a better-chosen site (involving moving the plant to the leeward side of Taiwan) can reduce the risk significantly as opposed to solely transitioning the fuel source to natural gas. Note that the fuel cost of using natural gas (0.11 USD/kWh in 2013) in Taiwan is about twice the price of using coal fuel (0.05 USD/kWh in 2013).

  18. Apnea of prematurity: from cause to treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Gonzalez, Fernando; Mu, Dezhi

    2011-09-01

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is a common problem affecting premature infants, likely secondary to a "physiologic" immaturity of respiratory control that may be exacerbated by neonatal disease. These include altered ventilatory responses to hypoxia, hypercapnia, and altered sleep states, while the roles of gastroesophageal reflux and anemia remain controversial. Standard clinical management of the obstructive subtype of AOP includes prone positioning and continuous positive or nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation to prevent pharyngeal collapse and alveolar atelectasis, while methylxanthine therapy is a mainstay of treatment of central apnea by stimulating the central nervous system and respiratory muscle function. Other therapies, including kangaroo care, red blood cell transfusions, and CO(2) inhalation, require further study. The physiology and pathophysiology behind AOP are discussed, including the laryngeal chemoreflex and sensitivity to inhibitory neurotransmitters, as are the mechanisms by which different therapies may work and the potential long-term neurodevelopmental consequences of AOP and its treatment. PMID:21301866

  19. Molecular insights into the premature aging disease progeria.

    PubMed

    Vidak, Sandra; Foisner, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare premature aging disease presenting many features resembling the normal aging process. HGPS patients die before the age of 20 years due to cardiovascular problems and heart failure. HGPS is linked to mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the intermediate filament protein lamin A. Lamin A is a major component of the nuclear lamina, a scaffold structure at the nuclear envelope that defines mechanochemical properties of the nucleus and is involved in chromatin organization and epigenetic regulation. Lamin A is also present in the nuclear interior where it fulfills lamina-independent functions in cell signaling and gene regulation. The most common LMNA mutation linked to HGPS leads to mis-splicing of the LMNA mRNA and produces a mutant lamin A protein called progerin that tightly associates with the inner nuclear membrane and affects the dynamic properties of lamins. Progerin expression impairs many important cellular processes providing insight into potential disease mechanisms. These include changes in mechanosignaling, altered chromatin organization and impaired genome stability, and changes in signaling pathways, leading to impaired regulation of adult stem cells, defective extracellular matrix production and premature cell senescence. In this review, we discuss these pathways and their potential contribution to the disease pathologies as well as therapeutic approaches used in preclinical and clinical tests. PMID:26847180

  20. The Effect of Peribulbar Block with General Anesthesia for Vitreoretinal Surgery in Premature and Ex-Premature Infants with Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Renu; Maitra, Souvik

    2016-01-15

    Safe anesthesia in premature and ex-premature infants remains a challenge for the anesthesiologist. These infants are at risk of postoperative apnea, desaturation, and bradycardia after general anesthesia. We describe our experience of peribulbar block in 24 infants who underwent vitreoretinal surgery for retinopathy of prematurity. None of our patients had postoperative apnea or required neonatal intensive care admission. A possible opioid and muscle relaxant-sparing effect of peribulbar block might have reduced the incidence of postoperative complications. PMID:26556110

  1. A physiologic method for monitoring premature infants.

    PubMed

    Ludington-Hoe, S; Kasper, C E

    1995-01-01

    Instrumentation capable of handling 12 continuous hours of nine-channel real-time physiologic data sampled at 10Hz was needed to test within and between subject variability and preterm infant responses to skin-to-skin contact with the mother. A review of basic electrical components, electrical principles related to physiologic monitoring, and electrophysiology concepts generic to physiologic monitoring is presented. The development, specifications and applications of a new instrument to monitor premature infant cardiorespiratory adaptations are discussed. PMID:7493185

  2. [Premature ejaculation in urological routine practice].

    PubMed

    Mathers, M J; Sommer, F; Degener, S; Brandt, A S; Roth, S

    2013-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is a frequent male sexual complaint or sexual disturbance found in urological practices and outpatient units. The frequency in the individual practices varies considerably. In large studies the prevalence is strongly dependent on the definition and ranges between 3% and 25%. Subjectively, the inability to delay ejaculation and the distress resulting from it, is relevant for the patient and his partner. Intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) is used as an objective parameter. Nevertheless, in the everyday routine practice this objective parameter is not practical. Clinically 2 questionnaires have asserted themselves (Premature Ejaculation Profile and Index of Premature Ejaculation). Studies have shown that the self-assessment of patients correlates relatively well with the objective IELT measured by means of a stopwatch. Beside topical anaesthetics and elective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), especially Dapexetine which has been approved in Germany since 2009, are treatment options. These drugs differ particularly in their use (daily or on-demand) and their effectiveness (measured by x-fold increase of IELT). This article deals with the clinical approach to EP. Beside the definition, prevalence, aetiology and neurophysiology of EP, the different pharmacological therapies as well as the guidelines of the International Society for Sexual Medicine are discussed. PMID:23381878

  3. Maternal and fetal outcomes in term premature rupture of membrane

    PubMed Central

    Endale, Tigist; Fentahun, Netsanet; Gemada, Desta; Hussen, Mamusha Aman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Premature rupture of membrane (PROM) is linked to significant maternal prenatal mortalities and morbidity. In Ethiopia, where maternal mortality is still high, the maternal and fetal outcomes in PROM is very important to decrease maternal and child mortality and for better management and prevention of complications. Thus, this study aimed to detect the maternal and fetal outcomes and associated factors in term PROM at Mizan-Aman General Hospital, south-west Ethiopia. METHODS: A retrospective cross sectional study was conducted using data available at Mizan-Aman General Hospital during a period of 3 years (January 2011 to December 2013). We examined records of 4 525 women who gave birth in the hospital; out of these women, 185 were diagnosed with term PROM and all of them were included in the study. The data of these women were collected using a checklist based on registration books. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 statistical package. The association between independent and dependent variables was assessed by bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. 95%CI and P value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Of the 4 525 women who gave birth in the hospital, 202 were complicated by term PROM. About 22.2% of the women showed unfavorable maternal outcomes. The most common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality was puerperal sepsis. About 33.5% of neonates experienced unfavorable outcomes. The duration of PROM >12 hours (AOR=5.6, 95%CI 1.3–24.1) latency >24 hours (AOR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7–11.8), residing in rural areas (AOR=4.2, 95%CI 3.96–29.4) and birth weight less than 2 500 g were associated with unfavorable outcomes. CONCLUSION: Women residing in rural areas, long latency, and neonates with birth weight less 2 500 g may have unfavorable outcomes. Therefore, optimum obstetric and medical care is essential for the reduction of the devastating complications related to disorders. PMID:27313811

  4. [Maternal and fetal morbidity in patients with premature rupture of the membrane after 27-week gestation. Causes and costs].

    PubMed

    Nava Flores, Jorge; Enríquez Miranda, Ma Cecilia; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2003-07-01

    Premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) occurs in a third of the childbirths preterm, this represents 8% of all pregnancies, with same morbidity and mortality in developing and developed countries, PROM is the more common cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, making this obstetric complication a worldwide problem of health, since it contributes to the economic problem for the cost risen in medical attention for both, mothers and live birth. PROM is considered a mutifactorial entity. This study was carried out in the Hospital de Ginecología y Obstetricia of the Centro Médico "La Raza" in Mexico City, where women entered in serial form with pregnancies from 27 to 34 weeks of gestation and spontaneous PROM, without any other pathology. 120 patients were included, with 26.8 +/- 5.9 year-old age. The gestational age with more frequency of PROM were from 30 to 33 weeks, 22.5% of the patients had 4 days with PROM, 6 of this cases arrived up to 13 days with this complication at delivery. 2.5% of the patients presented deciduitis, with adequated response to the use of antibiotics. When analyzing the hospital stay, a stay was observed from 4 to 7 days (5.26 +/- 1.96 M +/- SD), with a total cost for maternal stay of 2 millions 445,650 pesos. Those babies born had an average of 23 days of hospital stay and the total cot of the days of stay was 4 millions 963,978 pesos. Other costs were the attention of maternal and pediatrics specialty, the obstetric resolution of the pregnancy, obstetric ultrasonography and crystallographies. Thus, the total costs of the attention of this complication in these patients with PROM was of 10 millions 296,988 pesos. The international reference is the American dollar that was in 10 pesos for dollar to the moment of this study. The maternal morbidity is low to that described in previous studies, but in spite of the exhaustive efforts on the prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment, the premature rate due to PROM has not diminished

  5. Mortality table construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  6. Azithromycin, Ureaplasma and chronic lung disease of prematurity: a case study for neonatal drug development.

    PubMed

    Turner, Mark A; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2012-06-01

    Chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Ureaplasma has received intermittent attention over the last two decades as a possible contributory factor. In addition, pulmonary inflammation is associated with the development of CLD. The macrolide azithromycin provides an attractive option to determine if it can decrease the development of CLD as it has both anti-inflammatory and anti-infective properties. In this article, the authors review the evidence for the role of Ureaplasma in the development of CLD and the obstacles faced in the development of a drug before it reaches clinical practice. PMID:21697219

  7. Perinatal mortality attributable to complications of childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiako, T.; Ronsmans, C.; Van der Paal, L.

    2000-01-01

    Very few population-based studies of perinatal mortality in developing countries have examined the role of intrapartum risk factors. In the present study, the proportion of perinatal deaths that are attributable to complications during childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh, was assessed using community-based data from a home-based programme led by professional midwives between 1987 and 1993. Complications during labour and delivery--such as prolonged or obstructed labour, abnormal fetal position, and hypertensive diseases of pregnancy--increased the risk of perinatal mortality fivefold and accounted for 30% of perinatal deaths. Premature labour, which occurred in 20% of pregnancies, accounted for 27% of perinatal mortality. Better care by qualified staff during delivery and improved care of newborns should substantially reduce perinatal mortality in this study population. PMID:10859856

  8. Lamin A/C, laminopathies and premature ageing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohua; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2008-06-01

    Lamin A/C belongs to type V intermediate filaments and constitutes the nuclear lamina and nuclear matrix, where a variety of nuclear activities occur. Lamin A/C protein is firstly synthesized as a precursor and is further proteolytically processed by the zinc metallo-proteinase Ste24 (Zmpste24). Lamin A/C mutations cause a series of human diseases, collectively called laminopathies, the most severe of which is Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and restrictive dermopathy (RD) which arises due to an unsuccessful maturation of prelamin A. Although the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood, genomic instability, defective nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction, have been hypothesized to be responsible for laminopathy-based premature ageing. Removal of unprocessed prelamin A (progerin) or rescue of defective DNA repair could be potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of HGPS in future. PMID:18366013

  9. Aneuploidy causes premature differentiation of neural and intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gogendeau, Delphine; Siudeja, Katarzyna; Gambarotto, Davide; Pennetier, Carole; Bardin, Allison J.; Basto, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy is associated with a variety of diseases such as cancer and microcephaly. Although many studies have addressed the consequences of a non-euploid genome in cells, little is known about their overall consequences in tissue and organism development. Here we use two different mutant conditions to address the consequences of aneuploidy during tissue development and homeostasis in Drosophila. We show that aneuploidy causes brain size reduction due to a decrease in the number of proliferative neural stem cells (NSCs), but not through apoptosis. Instead, aneuploid NSCs present an extended G1 phase, which leads to cell cycle exit and premature differentiation. Moreover, we show that this response to aneuploidy is also present in adult intestinal stem cells but not in the wing disc. Our work highlights a neural and intestine stem cell-specific response to aneuploidy, which prevents their proliferation and expansion. PMID:26573328

  10. Premature menopause linked to CVD and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Claire; Overton, Caroline

    2010-03-01

    Premature menopause affects 1% of women under the age of 40, the usual age of the menopause is 51. Most women will present with irregular periods or no periods at all with or without climacteric symptoms. Around 10% of women present with primary amenorrhoea. A careful history and examination are required. It is important to ask specifically about previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy and to look for signs of androgen excess e.g. polycystic ovarian syndrome, adrenal problems e.g. galactorrhoea and thyroid goitres. Once pregnancy has been excluded, a progestagen challenge test can be performed in primary care. Norethisterone 5 mg tds po for ten days or alternatively medroxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg daily for ten days is prescribed. A withdrawal bleed within a few days of stopping the norethisterone indicates the presence of oestrogen and bleeding more than a few drops is considered a positive withdrawal bleed. The absence of a bleed indicates low levels of oestrogen, putting the woman at risk of CVD and osteoporosis. FSH levels above 30 IU/l are an indicator that the ovaries are failing and the menopause is approaching or has occurred. It should be remembered that FSH levels fluctuate during the month and from one month to the next, so a minimum of two measurements should be made at least four to six weeks apart. The presence of a bleed should not exclude premature menopause as part of the differential diagnosis as there can be varying and unpredictable ovarian function remaining. The progestagen challenge test should not be used alone, but in conjunction with FSH, LH and oestradiol. There is no treatment for premature menopause. Women desiring pregnancy should be referred to a fertility clinic and discussion of egg donation. Women not wishing to become pregnant should be prescribed HRT until the age of 50 to control symptoms of oestrogen deficiency and reduce the risks of osteoporosis and CVD. PMID:20408329

  11. Infant mortality rates declining, but still high.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M

    1992-10-01

    Family planning can improve infant survival. Specifically, use of family planning methods can minimize family size, increase birth spacing, and reduce the likelihood of pregnancy for teenagers and women aged 40 or older. Immunizations and oral rehydration are responsible for the falling infant mortality rats since 1977 in developing countries, especially among 1-12 month old infants. Yet, neonatal mortality in developing countries had not changed. WHO intends to step up efforts to improve newborn survival. Accurate data are needed, however. Even in developed countries which keep good statistics, infant mortality bias exists. For example, in Japan, some infant deaths are called fetal deaths. In developing countries, much of the data come from hospitals, yet most birth do not occur in hospitals. Even in surveys, bias exists, such as problems with recall. Many researchers use traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to follow up on all births in an area which may eliminate some biases. Such a prospective and longitudinal study in Trairi county in northeastern Brazil shows the infant mortality rate to be less than half of the official rate (65 vs. 142). The major causes of infant death in developed countries, which tends to occur in the neonatal period, are low birth weight, prematurity, birth complications, and congenital defects; developing countries; they are vaccine preventable infectious diseases, diarrhea and dehydration, and respiratory illnesses, all complicated by malnutrition. To make further strides in reducing infant mortality, public health workers must concentrate on the neonatal period. Training TBAs in sterile techniques, appropriate technology, resuscitation of infants, and identification of potential problems is a positive step. Yet, unpredictable conditions (e.g., AIDS) exist and/or will arise which erode improvements. For example, in Nicaragua, within 1 year after the new government introduced health budget cuts which resulted in the poor paying for

  12. Treatment options for apnoea of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Morton, Sarah U; Smith, Vincent C

    2016-07-01

    Apnoea of prematurity (AOP) affects almost all infants born at <28 weeks gestation or with birth weight <1000 g. When untreated, AOP may be associated with negative outcomes. Because of these negative outcomes, effective treatment for AOP is an important part of optimising care of preterm infants. Standard treatment usually involves xanthine therapy and respiratory support. Cutting-edge work with stochastic vibrotactile stimulation and new pharmaceutical agents continues to expand therapeutic options. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of AOP, associated conditions and treatment options. PMID:27010019

  13. Premature ovarian failure: morphological and ultrastructural aspects.

    PubMed

    Haidar, M A; Baracat, E C; Simões, M J; Focchi, G R; Evêncio Neto, J; de Lima, G R

    1994-01-01

    The authors documented by means of light and transmission electron microscopy that the ovaries of women with premature ovarian failure (POF) displayed dense connective tissue and rare corpora albicantia. Eight of the ten studied cases did not present ovarian follicles; in two cases, it was verified the presence of ovarian follicles, atypical primordial follicles and in one case, a corpus luteum was identified (after stimulation with exogenous gonadotrophin). Regarding the ultrastructural analysis, it was noted that the fibroblasts were united one to each other by cellular prolongations that formed a woof, constituting a cellular syncicius. PMID:7610321

  14. Premature ejaculation: the scope of the problem.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Tricia; Eardley, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is one of the most common male sexual dysfunctions. Successful treatment of PE has been hampered by the existence of a variety of definitions and diagnostic criteria and the lack of large, long-term studies of treatment efficacy. Numerous, diverse treatment approaches with varying degrees of efficacy have been used; these include behavioral, cognitive, and sex therapy techniques, and pharmacologic management with anti-depressants, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and topical anesthetics. The approach most likely to provide success is a combination of cognitive and sex therapy with a pharmacologic agent of proven efficacy that has an easy-to-follow dosing regimen. PMID:17365515

  15. Premature ejaculation: old story, new insights.

    PubMed

    Jannini, Emmanuele A; Ciocca, Giacomo; Limoncin, Erika; Mollaioli, Daniele; Di Sante, Stefania; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Lombardo, Francesco; Lenzi, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Conventional theories and therapies for premature ejaculation (PE) are based on assumptions not always supported by evidence. This review of the current literature on the physiology of the ejaculatory control, pathogenesis of PE, and available therapies shows that PE is still far from being fully understood. However, several interesting hypotheses have been formulated, and solid, evidence-based clinical data are currently available for dapoxetine, the unique, first-line, officially approved pharmacotherapy for PE. Further growth in the field of PE will occur only when we shift from opinion-based classifications, definitions, and hypotheses to robust, noncontroversial data grounded on evidence. PMID:26409323

  16. Pattern Organization of Premature Ventricular Heartbeats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Ivanov, Plamen; Stanley, H. Eugene; Stanley, Gene; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2000-03-01

    Increased number of premature (abnormal) ventricular beats in a record of heartbeat intervals are known to be associated with an advanced stage of pathology (e.g. congestive heart failure). These abnormal beats usually occur in repeated bursts for relatively short periods of time. Here we ask the question if particular abnormal patterns appear throughout records of heartbeat intervals. We study the temporal organization of specific patterns of ventricular beats in long 24 hour records and their relation to different stages of disease. We analyze the statistical properties of such patterns and combination of patterns by means of crosscorrelation matrices.

  17. Current concepts in premature ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Maclaran, Kate; Panay, Nick

    2015-03-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a life-changing diagnosis, with profound physical and psychological consequences. Unfortunately, there are many deficiencies in our understanding of the condition as the underlying etiology and optimum management strategies are poorly understood. Improved awareness of POI and its long-term implications has led to increased research interest in recent years. Current research has allowed a greater understanding of the changing epidemiology in POI, genetic factors in its etiology and randomized controlled trials of hormone therapy are underway to provide evidence for treatment. This article reviews the latest literature on POI to summarize current understanding and future directions. PMID:25776291

  18. [Ophthalmological screening for retinopathy of prematurity].

    PubMed

    Oberacher-Velten, I; Segerer, H; Helbig, H

    2012-12-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is one of the three leading causes of legal blindness in childhood in developed countries. Adequate screening is one of the most important steps towards successful treatment. During the last decades, international and national guidelines for ROP screening have been continually updated. These guidelines correspond to progress in neonatal care and to a better understanding of the relationship between different neonatal parameters and the risk of developing ROP. The present article surveys ROP classification, the current national and international guidelines and new aspects of ROP screening. PMID:23212355

  19. Global and regional patterns in cardiovascular mortality from 1990 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Roth, Gregory A; Huffman, Mark D; Moran, Andrew E; Feigin, Valery; Mensah, George A; Naghavi, Mohsen; Murray, Christopher J L

    2015-10-27

    There is a global commitment to reduce premature cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) 25% by 2025. CVD mortality rates have declined dramatically over the past 2 decades, yet the number of life years lost to premature CVD deaths is increasing in low- and middle-income regions. Ischemic heart disease and stroke remain the leading causes of premature death in the world; however, there is wide regional variation in these patterns. Some regions, led by Central Asia, face particularly high rates of premature death from ischemic heart disease. Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia suffer disproportionately from death from stroke. The purpose of the present report is to (1) describe global trends and regional variation in premature mortality attributable to CVD, (2) review past and current approaches to the measurement of these trends, and (3) describe the limitations of existing models of epidemiological transitions for explaining the observed distribution and trends of CVD mortality. We describe extensive variation both between and within regions even while CVD remains a dominant cause of death. Policies and health interventions will need to be tailored and scaled for a broad range of local conditions to achieve global goals for the improvement of cardiovascular health. PMID:26503749

  20. Labour complications remain the most important risk factors for perinatal mortality in rural Kenya.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Renay; Ronsmans, Carine; Dorman, Ed; Jilo, Hilton; Muhoro, Anne; Shulman, Caroline

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and quantify risk factors for perinatal mortality in a Kenyan district hospital and to assess the proportion of perinatal deaths attributable to labour complications, maternal undernutrition, malaria, anaemia and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 910 births was conducted between January 1996 and July 1997 and risk factors for perinatal mortality were analysed. FINDINGS: The perinatal mortality rate was 118 per 1000 births. Complications of labour such as haemorrhage, premature rupture of membranes/premature labour, and obstructed labour/ malpresentation increased the risk of death between 8- and 62-fold, and 53% of all perinatal deaths were attributable to labour complications. Placental malaria and maternal HIV, on the other hand, were not associated with perinatal mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Greater attention needs to be given to the quality of obstetric care provided in the rural district-hospital setting. PMID:14576887

  1. Local-level mortality surveillance in resource-limited settings: a case study of Cape Town highlights disparities in health

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Debbie; Daniels, Johann; Zinyakatira, Nesbert; Matzopoulos, Richard; Bourne, David; Shaikh, Najma; Naledi, Tracey

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify the leading causes of mortality and premature mortality in Cape Town, South Africa, and its subdistricts, and to compare levels of mortality between subdistricts. Methods Cape Town mortality data for the period 2001–2006 were analysed by age, cause of death and sex. Cause-of-death codes were aggregated into three main cause groups: (i) pre-transitional causes (e.g. communicable diseases, maternal causes, perinatal conditions and nutritional deficiencies), (ii) noncommunicable diseases and (iii) injuries. Premature mortality was calculated in years of life lost (YLLs). Population estimates for the Cape Town Metro district were used to calculate age-specific rates per 100 000 population, which were then age-standardized and compared across subdistricts. Findings The pattern of mortality in Cape Town reflects the quadruple burden of disease observed in the national cause-of-death profile, with HIV/AIDS, other infectious diseases, injuries and noncommunicable diseases all accounting for a significant proportion of deaths. HIV/AIDS has replaced homicide as the leading cause of death. HIV/AIDS, homicide, tuberculosis and road traffic injuries accounted for 44% of all premature mortality. Khayelitsha, the poorest subdistrict, had the highest levels of mortality for all main cause groups. Conclusion Local mortality surveillance highlights the differential needs of the population of Cape Town and provides a wealth of data to inform planning and implementation of targeted interventions. Multisectoral interventions will be required to reduce the burden of disease. PMID:20539858

  2. Manatee mortality in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mignucci-Giannoni, A. A.; Montoya-Ospina, R. A.; Jimenez-Marrero, N. M.; Rodriguez-Lopez, M.; Williams, E.H., Jr.; Bonde, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    The most pressing problem in the effective management of the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Puerto Rico is mortality due to human activities. We assessed 90 cases of manatee strandings in Puerto Rico based on historical data and a coordinated carcass salvage effort from 1990 through 1995. We determined patterns of mortality, including type of event, condition of carcasses, spatial and temporal distribution, gender, size/age class, and the cause of death. The spatial distribution of stranding events was not uniform, with the north, northeast, and south coasts having the highest numbers. Six clusters representing the highest incidence included the areas of Fajardo and Ceiba, Bahia de Jobos, Toa Baja, Guayanilla, Cabo Rojo, and Rio Grande to Luquillo. The number of reported cases has increased at an average rate of 9.6%/yr since 1990. The seasonality of stranding events showed a bimodal pattern, from February through April and in August and September. Most identified causes of death were due to human interaction, especially captures and watercraft collisions. Natural causes usually involved dependent calves. From 1990 through 1995, most deaths were attributed to watercraft collisions. A reduction in anthropogenic mortality of this endangered species can be accomplished only through education and a proactive management and conservation plan that includes law enforcement, mortality assessment, scientific research, rescue and rehabilitation, and inter- and intraagency cooperation.

  3. Premature discontinuation of contraception in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bracher, M; Santow, G

    1992-01-01

    Life-history data from a nationally representative survey of Australian women were used to examine discontinuation of contraceptive methods because of accidental pregnancy, side effects or dissatisfaction. The pill was the most successfully used method, with a first-year discontinuation rate of 10% for all three reasons. Side effects dominated the reasons for the premature discontinuation of both the pill and the IUD, while the reasons for discontinuing the condom stemmed equally from pregnancy and dissatisfaction with the method. Discontinuation of the diaphragm resulted largely from accidental pregnancy. Hazards models were used to identify the correlates of discontinuation of each method. Predictors of premature discontinuation reflect the availability of methods, physiological reactions to them and the social characteristics of their users. Discontinuation of the pill because of side effects or dissatisfaction was more likely among poorly educated women, non-Protestants and recent users, and less likely among teenagers. Discontinuation of the IUD was related entirely to physiological factors: Nulliparous women and users of unmedicated devices were at a greater risk than other women of accidental pregnancy, and nulliparous women were at greater risk of discontinuation associated with side effects. Nulliparous women were also more likely to discontinue the condom because of pregnancy, as were non-Protestants and the Australian-born. PMID:1612144

  4. Premature ovarian insufficiency: Pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Anna J.

    2015-01-01

    The term premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) describes a continuum of declining ovarian function in a young woman, resulting in an earlier than average menopause. It is a term that reflects the variable nature of the condition and is substantially less emotive than the formerly used “premature ovarian failure” which signaled a single event in time. Contrary to the decline in the age of menarche seen over the last 3-4 decades there has been no similar change in the age of menopause. In developed nations, the average age for cessation of menstrual cycles is 50-52 years. The age is younger among women from developing nations. Much has been written about POI despite a lack of good data on the incidence of this condition. It is believed that 1% of women under the age of 40 years and 0.1% under the age of 30 years will develop POI. Research is increasingly providing information about the pathogenesis and treatments are being developed to better preserve ovarian function during cancer treatment and to improve fertility options. This narrative review summarizes the current literature to provide an approach to best practice management of POI. PMID:26903753

  5. The Neurovascular Retina in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Anne B.; Hansen, Ronald M.; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D.

    2009-01-01

    The continuing worldwide epidemic of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a leading cause of childhood visual impairment, strongly motivates further research into mechanisms of the disease. Although the hallmark of ROP is abnormal retinal vasculature, a growing body of evidence supports a critical role for the neural retina in the ROP disease process. The age of onset of ROP coincides with the rapid developmental increase in rod photoreceptor outer segment length and rhodopsin content of the retina with escalation of energy demands. Using a combination of non-invasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and image analysis procedures, the neural retina and its vasculature have been studied in prematurely born human subjects, both with and without ROP, and in rats that model the key vascular and neural parameters found in human ROP subjects. These data are compared to comprehensive numeric summaries of the neural and vascular features in normally developing human and rat retina. In rats, biochemical, anatomical, and molecular biological investigations are paired with the non-invasive assessments. ROP, even if mild, primarily and persistently alters the structure and function of photoreceptors. Post-receptor neurons and retinal vasculature, which are intimately related, are also affected by ROP; conspicuous neurovascular abnormalities disappear, but subtle structural anomalies and functional deficits may persist years after clinical ROP resolves. The data from human subjects and rat models identify photoreceptor and post-receptor targets for interventions that promise improved outcomes for children at risk for ROP. PMID:19563909

  6. Premature centromere division and other centromeric misbehavior

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, P.H.

    1993-12-31

    Premature centromere division was initially described for the X chromosome. In an otherwise typical metaphase cell, one chromosome showed no primary constriction and appeared to have no centromere. G-banding analysis indicated that this apparent acentric fragment was an entire X chromosome. Because its centromere was divided when the centromeres of all other chromosomes of the metaphase cell were entire, the condition was described as premature centromere division (PCD). The importance of PCD lies in its being a mechanism on non-disjunction, as was indicated by the strong association of X chromosome aneuploidy with PCD,X. We can infer that the affected chromosome failed to take part in the normal distribution of chromosomes at mitoses. The centromere, it its widest sense, is generally believed to have a role in the correct orientation of chromosomes at the metaphase plate and the distribution of chromatids to the spindle poles. The failure of these functions implies a major centromeric dysfunction. What do we know of this complex region of the chromosome that might help us understand its dysfunction?

  7. Premature ovarian insufficiency: Pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Anna J

    2015-01-01

    The term premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) describes a continuum of declining ovarian function in a young woman, resulting in an earlier than average menopause. It is a term that reflects the variable nature of the condition and is substantially less emotive than the formerly used "premature ovarian failure" which signaled a single event in time. Contrary to the decline in the age of menarche seen over the last 3-4 decades there has been no similar change in the age of menopause. In developed nations, the average age for cessation of menstrual cycles is 50-52 years. The age is younger among women from developing nations. Much has been written about POI despite a lack of good data on the incidence of this condition. It is believed that 1% of women under the age of 40 years and 0.1% under the age of 30 years will develop POI. Research is increasingly providing information about the pathogenesis and treatments are being developed to better preserve ovarian function during cancer treatment and to improve fertility options. This narrative review summarizes the current literature to provide an approach to best practice management of POI. PMID:26903753

  8. Respiratory tract mortality in cement workers: a proportionate mortality study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evidence regarding the association between lung cancer and occupational exposure to cement is controversial. This study investigated causes of deaths from cancer of respiratory tract among cement workers. Methods The deaths of the Greek Cement Workers Compensation Scheme were analyzed covering the period 1969-1998. All respiratory, lung, laryngeal and urinary bladder cancer proportionate mortality were calculated for cement production, maintenance, and office workers in the cement industry. Mortality from urinary bladder cancer was used as an indirect indicator of the confounding effect of smoking. Results Mortality from all respiratory cancer was significantly increased in cement production workers (PMR = 1.91; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.33). The proportionate mortality from lung cancer was significantly elevated (PMR = 2.05; 95% CI 1.65 to 2.52). A statistically significant increase in proportionate mortality due to respiratory (PMR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.34). and lung cancer (PMR = 1.67;95% CI = 1.15-2.34) among maintenance workers has been observed. The PMR among the three groups of workers (production, maintenance, office) did differ significantly for lung cancer (p = 0.001), while the PMR for urinary bladder cancer found to be similar among the three groups of cement workers. Conclusion Cement production, and maintenance workers presented increased lung and respiratory cancer proportionate mortality, and this finding probably cannot be explained by the confounding effect of smoking alone. Further research including use of prospective cohort studies is needed in order to establish a causal association between occupational exposure to cement and risk of lung cancer. PMID:22738120

  9. Impacts of Intercontinental Transport of Anthropogenic Fine Particulate Matter on Human Mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anenberg, Susan C.; West, J. Jason; Hongbin, Yu; Chin, Mian; Schulz, Michael; Bergmann, Dan; Bey, Isabelle; Bian, Huisheng; Diehl, Thomas; Fiore, Arlene; Hess, Peter; Marmer, Elina; Montanaro, Veronica; Park, Rokjin; Shindell, Drew; Takemura, Toshihiko; Dentener, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Fine particulate matter with diameter of 2.5 microns or less (PM2.5) is associated with premature mortality and can travel long distances, impacting air quality and health on intercontinental scales. We estimate the mortality impacts of 20 % anthropogenic primary PM2.5 and PM2.5 precursor emission reductions in each of four major industrial regions (North America, Europe, East Asia, and South Asia) using an ensemble of global chemical transport model simulations coordinated by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution and epidemiologically-derived concentration-response functions. We estimate that while 93-97 % of avoided deaths from reducing emissions in all four regions occur within the source region, 3-7 % (11,500; 95 % confidence interval, 8,800-14,200) occur outside the source region from concentrations transported between continents. Approximately 17 and 13 % of global deaths avoided by reducing North America and Europe emissions occur extraregionally, owing to large downwind populations, compared with 4 and 2 % for South and East Asia. The coarse resolution global models used here may underestimate intraregional health benefits occurring on local scales, affecting these relative contributions of extraregional versus intraregional health benefits. Compared with a previous study of 20 % ozone precursor emission reductions, we find that despite greater transport efficiency for ozone, absolute mortality impacts of intercontinental PM2.5 transport are comparable or greater for neighboring source-receptor pairs, due to the stronger effect of PM2.5 on mortality. However, uncertainties in modeling and concentration-response relationships are large for both estimates.

  10. Epidemiological aspects of prematurity in the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qurashi, Faisal O.; Yousef, Abdullah A.; Awary, Bassam H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the epidemiological characteristics of prematurity and survival rate in preterm infants diagnosed at a university hospital in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out of 476 preterm infants who were admitted with the diagnosis of prematurity to King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, between June 2008 and 2013. Demographics, birth weight, and neonatal survival rate were analyzed. Results: Four hundred and seventy-six preterm infants were admitted with a total prevalence of 7.5%. Descriptive analysis revealed 55% were males. Extremely preterm infants (<28 weeks’ gestation) comprised 9% and very preterm infants (28 to <32 weeks’ gestation) comprised 20%. Extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants (<1000 g) comprised 11%. One hundred and fifty-seven (32%) infants were small for gestational age. Out of the total number of ELBW infants, 58% of them were discharged. The overall mortality was 7.6%. The mortality rate of male infants was 53%. The survival to discharge according to gestational age ranged from 30-97.6%. Conclusion: The estimated prevalence of preterm births in a university hospital in eastern province of Saudi Arabia, is consistent with various studies from different parts of the world. PMID:27052284

  11. Response of global particulate-matter-related mortality to changes in local precursor emissions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Colin J; Martin, Randall V; Henze, Daven K; Brauer, Michael; Cohen, Aaron; Donkelaar, Aaron van

    2015-04-01

    Recent Global Burden of Disease (GBD) assessments estimated that outdoor fine-particulate matter (PM2.5) is a causal factor in over 5% of global premature deaths. PM2.5 is produced by a variety of direct and indirect, natural and anthropogenic processes that complicate PM2.5 management. This study develops a proof-of-concept method to quantify the effects on global premature mortality of changes to PM2.5 precursor emissions. Using the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, we calculated sensitivities of global PM2.5-related premature mortality to emissions of precursor gases (SO2, NOx, NH3) and carbonaceous aerosols. We used a satellite-derived ground-level PM2.5 data set at approximately 10 × 10 km(2) resolution to better align the exposure with population density. We used exposure-response functions from the GBD project to relate mortality to exposure in the adjoint calculation. The response of global mortality to changes in local anthropogenic emissions varied spatially by several orders of magnitude. The largest reductions in mortality for a 1 kg km(-2) yr(-1) decrease in emissions were for ammonia and carbonaceous aerosols in Eastern Europe. The greatest reductions in mortality for a 10% decrease in emissions were found for secondary inorganic sources in East Asia. In general, a 10% decrease in SO2 emissions was the most effective source to control, but regional exceptions were found. PMID:25730303

  12. Modified Distal Shoe Appliance for Premature Loss of Multiple Deciduous Molars: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    K., Navin H.; Idris, Mohammed; Christopher, Pradeep; Rai, Niharika

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of the primary dentition until the normal time of exfoliation is one of the most important factor involved in preventive and interceptive dentistry. The premature loss of second primary molar before the eruption of permanent first molar can create a significant arch space/tooth size discrepancy. Distal shoe space maintainer is a valuable part of the Paediatric Dentist’s armamentarium in those cases where the second primary molar is prematurely lost and it helps to guide the first permanent molar into place. Conventional design poses various limitations in cases of premature loss of multiple deciduous molars. Thus, it is required to modify the conventional designs according to the needs of the patient. This case report describes an innovative modification of distal shoe appliance in cases of premature loss of multiple deciduous molars. In the present case, modification of distal shoe space maintainer was advocated because of inadequate abutments caused due to multiple loss of deciduous molars. Bilateral design of distal shoe was planned for unilateral loss of deciduous molars. PMID:25302284

  13. Mortality among US commercial pilots and navigators.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, J S; Lackland, D T; Dosemeci, M; Mohr, L C; Dunbar, J B; Grosche, B; Hoel, D G

    1998-11-01

    The airline industry may be an occupational setting with specific health risks. Two environmental agents to which flight crews are known to be exposed are cosmic radiation and magnetic fields generated by the aircraft's electrical system. Other factors to be considered are circadian disruption and conditions specific to air travel, such as noise, vibration, mild hypoxia, reduced atmospheric pressure, low humidity, and air quality. This study investigated mortality among US commercial pilots and navigators, using proportional mortality ratios for cancer and noncancer end points. Proportional cancer mortality ratios and mortality odds ratios were also calculated for comparison to the proportional mortality ratios for cancer causes of death. Results indicated that US pilots and navigators have experienced significantly increased mortality due to cancer of the kidney and renal pelvis, motor neuron disease, and external causes. In addition, increased mortality due to prostate cancer, brain cancer, colon cancer, and cancer of the lip, buccal cavity, and pharynx was suggested. Mortality was significantly decreased for 11 causes. To determine if these health outcomes are related to occupational exposures, it will be necessary to quantify each exposure separately, to study the potential synergy of effects, and to couple this information with disease data on an individual basis. PMID:9830605

  14. Air pollution and infant mortality from pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Penna, M.L.; Duchiade, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between air pollution, measured as concentration of suspended particulates in the atmosphere, and infant mortality due to pneumonia in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. Multiple linear regression (progressive or stepwise method) was used to analyze infant mortality due to pneumonia, diarrhea, and all causes in 1980, by geographic area, income level, and degree of contamination. While the variable proportion of families with income equivalent to more than two minimum wages was included in the regressions corresponding to the three types of infant mortality, the average contamination index had a statistically significant coefficient (b = 0.2208; t = 2.670; P = 0.0137) only in the case of mortality due to pneumonia. This would suggest a biological association, but, as in any ecological study, such conclusions should be viewed with caution. The authors believe that air quality indicators are essential to consider in studies of acute respiratory infections in developing countries.

  15. Female circumcision and child mortality in urban Somalia.

    PubMed

    Mohamud, O A

    1991-01-01

    In Somalia, a demographer analyzed urban data obtained from the Family Health Survey to examine the effect female circumcision has on child mortality and the mechanism of that effect. Girls undergo female circumcision between 5-12 years old in Somalia. Since sunni circumcision (removal of the clitoral prepuce and tip of the clitoris) and clitoridectomy (removal of the entire clitoris) did not affect child mortality, he used them as the reference group. Infibulation (entire removal of the clitoris and of the labia minora and majora with the remains of the labia majora being sewn together allowing only a small opening for passage of urine) did affect child mortality. Female children who underwent infibulation and whose mothers most likely also underwent infibulation experienced higher mortality (13-72%) than those from other circumcised mothers. Female mortality exceeded male mortality indicating possible son preference. Mothers with clitoridectomy or infibulation had significantly higher infant mortality than those with sunni circumcision with the strongest effects during the neonatal period (95% and 42% higher mortality, respectively; p=.01). The effect of female circumcision on child mortality decreased with increased child's age. This higher than expected mortality among women with clitoridectomy may have been because women with infibulation had more stillbirths which were not counted as births. The exposed vagina of clitoridectomized women is more likely to be infected resulting in high risk of stillbirths and premature births than the closed vagina of infibulated women. The researcher suggested that the policies promoting education and consciousness raising may eventually eradicate female circumcision. This longterm campaign should use mass media, senior women of high status, and respected religious leaders. Legislation prohibiting this practice would only drive it underground under unsanitary conditions. Demographers should no longer ignore female circumcision

  16. Estimation of Future PM2.5- and Ozone-related Mortality over the Continental United States in a Changing Climate: An application of High-resolution Dynamical Downscaling Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Fu, Joshua S.; Huang, Kan; Gao, Yang

    2015-04-14

    This paper evaluates the PM2.5- and ozone-related mortality at present (2000s) and in the future (2050s) over the continental United States by using the Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP-CE). Atmospheric chemical fields are simulated by WRF/CMAQ (horizontal resolution: 12 × 12km), applying the dynamical downscaling technique from global climate-chemistry models under the Representative Concentration Pathways scenario (RCP 8.5). Future air quality results predict that the annual mean PM2.5 concentrations in continental US will decrease nationwide, especially in the eastern US and west coast. However, the ozone concentration is projected to decrease in the Eastern US but increase in the Western US. Future mortality is evaluated under two scenarios (1) holding future population and baseline incidence rate at the present level and (2) decreasing the future baseline incidence rate but increasing the future population. For PM2.5, the entire continental US presents a decreasing trend of PM2.5-related mortality by the 2050s in Scenario (1), primarily resulting from the emissions reduction. While in Scenario (2), almost half of the continental states show a rising tendency of PM2.5-related mortality, due to the dominant influence of population growth. In particular, the highest PM2.5-related deaths and the biggest discrepancy between present and future PM2.5-related deaths will both occur in California in 2050s. For the ozone-related premature mortality, the simulation shows nation-wide rising tendency in 2050s under both two scenarios, mainly due to the increase of ozone concentration and population in the future. Furthermore, the uncertainty analysis shows that the effect of the all causes mortality is much larger than for specific causes. This assessment is the result of the accumulated uncertainty of generating datasets. The uncertainty range of ozone-related all cause premature mortality is narrower than the PM2.5-related all cause mortality

  17. Spatially resolved estimation of ozone-related mortality in the United States under two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent A.; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The spatial pattern of the uncertainty in air pollution-related health impacts due to climate change has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs), the latest greenhouse gas emission pathways. We estimated future tropospheric ozone (O3) and related excess mortality and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States under RCPs. Based on dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 level at 12 km resolution between the future (2057–2059) and base years (2001–2004) under a low-to-medium emission scenario (RCP4.5) and a fossil fuel intensive emission scenario (RCP8.5). We then estimated the excess mortality attributable to changes in O3. Finally, we analyzed the sensitivity of the excess mortality estimates to the input variables and the uncertainty in the excess mortality estimation using Monte Carlo simulations. O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1,312 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 427 to 2,198) and −2,118 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (95% CI: −3,021 to −1,216), when allowing for climate change and emissions reduction. The uncertainty of O3-related excess mortality estimates was mainly caused by RCP emissions pathways. Excess mortality estimates attributable to the combined effect of climate and emission changes on O3 as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space and so do the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective community level mitigation and adaptation policy. PMID:25530644

  18. Spatially resolved estimation of ozone-related mortality in the United States under two representative concentration pathways (RCPs) and their uncertainty

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent A.; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2014-11-16

    We report that the spatial pattern of the uncertainty in air pollution-related health impacts due to climate change has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs), the latest greenhouse gas emission pathways. We estimated future tropospheric ozone (O3) and related excess mortality and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States under RCPs. Based on dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 level at 12 km resolution between the future (2057 and 2059) and base years (2001–2004) under a low-to-medium emission scenario (RCP4.5) and amore » fossil fuel intensive emission scenario (RCP8.5). We then estimated the excess mortality attributable to changes in O3. Finally, we analyzed the sensitivity of the excess mortality estimates to the input variables and the uncertainty in the excess mortality estimation using Monte Carlo simulations. O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1312 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 427 to 2198) and ₋2118 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (95 % CI: ₋3021 to ₋1216), when allowing for climate change and emissions reduction. The uncertainty of O3-related excess mortality estimates was mainly caused by RCP emissions pathways. Finally, excess mortality estimates attributable to the combined effect of climate and emission changes on O3 as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space and so do the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective community level mitigation and adaptation policy.« less

  19. Spatially resolved estimation of ozone-related mortality in the United States under two representative concentration pathways (RCPs) and their uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent A.; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2014-11-16

    We report that the spatial pattern of the uncertainty in air pollution-related health impacts due to climate change has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs), the latest greenhouse gas emission pathways. We estimated future tropospheric ozone (O3) and related excess mortality and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States under RCPs. Based on dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 level at 12 km resolution between the future (2057 and 2059) and base years (2001–2004) under a low-to-medium emission scenario (RCP4.5) and a fossil fuel intensive emission scenario (RCP8.5). We then estimated the excess mortality attributable to changes in O3. Finally, we analyzed the sensitivity of the excess mortality estimates to the input variables and the uncertainty in the excess mortality estimation using Monte Carlo simulations. O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1312 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 427 to 2198) and ₋2118 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (95 % CI: ₋3021 to ₋1216), when allowing for climate change and emissions reduction. The uncertainty of O3-related excess mortality estimates was mainly caused by RCP emissions pathways. Finally, excess mortality estimates attributable to the combined effect of climate and emission changes on O3 as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space and so do the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective community level mitigation and adaptation policy.

  20. Available and future therapies for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Hellstrom, W J G

    2010-07-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE), the most common male sexual dysfunction, impacts the quality of life of not only the affected male but also his partner. Despite its prevalence, there are currently no United States Food and Drug Administration-approved therapies for PE. In 2004, the American Urological Association published treatment guidelines for PE that recommended the serotonergic antidepressants paroxetine, sertraline, clomipramine and fluoxetine, as well as topical lidocaine-prilocaine cream. None of these treatments were developed for PE, and all have limitations associated with their use. Therapies in development may have advantages over the currently available treatments. These include PSD-502, a metered-dose aerosol of lidocaine and prilocaine used as an on-demand local treatment, and dapoxetine, an on-demand short-acting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Together with a recent, evidence-based definition of PE, these novel therapies should improve sexual function and quality of life in men suffering from PE. PMID:20683504

  1. Premature and accelerated aging: HIV or HAART?

    PubMed

    Smith, Reuben L; de Boer, Richard; Brul, Stanley; Budovskaya, Yelena; van Spek, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly increased life expectancy of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive population. Nevertheless, the average lifespan of HIV-patients remains shorter compared to uninfected individuals. Immunosenescence, a current explanation for this difference invokes heavily on viral stimulus despite HAART efficiency in viral suppression. We propose here that the premature and accelerated aging of HIV-patients can also be caused by adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs, specifically those that affect the mitochondria. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) antiretroviral drug class for instance, is known to cause depletion of mitochondrial DNA via inhibition of the mitochondrial specific DNA polymerase-γ. Besides NRTIs, other antiretroviral drug classes such as protease inhibitors also cause severe mitochondrial damage by increasing oxidative stress and diminishing mitochondrial function. We also discuss important areas for future research and argue in favor of the use of Caenorhabditis elegans as a novel model system for studying these effects. PMID:23372574

  2. [Pharmacological treatment of the premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Jurado López, A R

    2014-07-01

    Biomedical approach to premature ejaculation (PE) has permited a better phisiopatologycal knowledge and so the use of pharmacological agents for the treatment of this sexual dysfuncion. Most of the studies to evaluate the eficacy of these drugs were not carried at all the parameters which actually define PE: intravaginal ejaculatory latencie time (IELT) tested with watch, ejaculation control self perception cuantification (questionaries) and cuantification of generated consequences in patient and partner, if it existes. For this reason, it is difficult to analyse the scientific evidence and we use medicines with no approved indication for PE ("off label"). This text is a review of pharmacologycal agents with no approved indication (PDE type 5 inhibitors, α-blockers, tramadol, SSRI, clomipramine), and pharmacologycal agents developed to be used in the treatment of PE and having got indication in this sexual dysfunction or "on label" drugs (topic anesthesics, dapoxetine). PMID:25953037

  3. Premature and accelerated aging: HIV or HAART?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Reuben L.; de Boer, Richard; Brul, Stanley; Budovskaya, Yelena; van Spek, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly increased life expectancy of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive population. Nevertheless, the average lifespan of HIV-patients remains shorter compared to uninfected individuals. Immunosenescence, a current explanation for this difference invokes heavily on viral stimulus despite HAART efficiency in viral suppression. We propose here that the premature and accelerated aging of HIV-patients can also be caused by adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs, specifically those that affect the mitochondria. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) antiretroviral drug class for instance, is known to cause depletion of mitochondrial DNA via inhibition of the mitochondrial specific DNA polymerase-γ. Besides NRTIs, other antiretroviral drug classes such as protease inhibitors also cause severe mitochondrial damage by increasing oxidative stress and diminishing mitochondrial function. We also discuss important areas for future research and argue in favor of the use of Caenorhabditis elegans as a novel model system for studying these effects. PMID:23372574

  4. Socioeconomic Status, Race, and Mortality: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sarah S.; Williams, David R.; Munro, Heather M.; Hargreaves, Margaret K.; Blot, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the independent and joint effects of race, individual socioeconomic status (SES), and neighborhood SES on mortality risk. Methods. We conducted a prospective analysis involving 52 965 non-Hispanic Black and 23 592 non-Hispanic White adults taking part in the Southern Community Cohort Study. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine associations of race and SES with all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Results. In our cohort, wherein Blacks and Whites had similar individual SES, Blacks were less likely than Whites to die during the follow-up period (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.73, 0.84). Low household income was a strong predictor of all-cause mortality among both Blacks and Whites (HR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.45, 2.12). Being in the lowest (vs highest) category with respect to both individual and neighborhood SES was associated with a nearly 3-fold increase in all-cause mortality risk (HR = 2.76; 95% CI = 1.99, 3.84). There was no significant mortality-related interaction between individual SES and neighborhood SES among either Blacks or Whites. Conclusions. SES is a strong predictor of premature mortality, and the independent associations of individual SES and neighborhood SES with mortality risk are similar for Blacks and Whites. PMID:25322291

  5. Premature adrenarche: etiology, clinical findings, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Voutilainen, Raimo; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Adrenarche means the morphological and functional change of the adrenal cortex leading to increasing production of adrenal androgen precursors (AAPs) in mid childhood, typically at around 5-8 years of age in humans. The AAPs dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate conjugate (DHEAS) are the best serum markers of adrenal androgen (AA) secretion and adrenarche. Normal ACTH secretion and action are needed for adrenarche, but additional inherent and exogenous factors regulate AA secretion. Inter-individual variation in the timing of adrenarche and serum concentrations of DHEA(S) in adolescence and adulthood are remarkable. Premature adrenarche (PA) is defined as the appearance of clinical signs of androgen action (pubic/axillary hair, adult type body odor, oily skin or hair, comedones, acne, accelerated statural growth) before the age of 8 years in girls or 9 years in boys associated with AAP concentrations high for the prepubertal chronological age. To accept the diagnosis of PA, central puberty, adrenocortical and gonadal sex hormone secreting tumors, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and exogenous source of androgens need to be excluded. The individually variable peripheral conversion of circulating AAPs to biologically more active androgens (testosterone, dihydrotestosterone) and the androgen receptor activity in the target tissues are as important as the circulating AAP concentrations as determinants of androgen action. PA has gained much attention during the last decades, as it has been associated with small birth size, the metabolic and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), and thus with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in later life. The aim of this review is to describe the known hormonal changes and their possible regulators in on-time and premature adrenarche, and the clinical features and possible later health problems associating with PA. PMID:24923732

  6. Extra tactile stimulation of the premature infant.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M; Chamorro, I; Green, D; Knudtson, F

    1975-01-01

    To ascertain whether touch, in the form of extra tactile stimulation, would result in more rapid physical and social development and a greater degree of social development of the premature infant, 48 minutes of extra tactile stimulation, defines as a gentle, nonrhythmic stroking of the greatest possible area of skin surface of the infant's body by the nurse's hand, was given to eight experimental group premature infants daily for a minimum of two weeks while they were confined to an isolette. Six infants formed a control group. Regain of birth weight was used to assess physical development. Scores on the applicable portions of the Gesell Development Schedule and Bayley Scales of Infant Development and plasma cortisol levels were used to measure rate and degree of social development. Data were analyzed in terms of the total group and for pairs of infants matched for gestational age, birth weight, and Apgar score. No significant difference was found between control and experimental groups in rate of physical development as measured by regain of birth weight. Analysis of the relationship between weight gain and gestational age, sex, and Apgar scores indicated that none was a substantial indicator of the rate at which infants gained weight while in the hospital. There was no significant difference in the degree of social development between experimental and control infants, but, as hypothesized, there was significant difference in rate of social development. Plasma cortisol levels as an indication of the infant's adrenocorticol development as evidenced by his ability to respond to stressful situations, and hence indirectly his social development, revealed no significant difference between the two groups. PMID:1041616

  7. Feeding premature infants banked human milk homogenized by ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Rayol, M R; Martinez, F E; Jorge, S M; Gonçalves, A L; Desai, I D

    1993-12-01

    Premature neonates fed ultrasonically homogenized human milk had better weight gain and triceps skin-fold thickness than did a control group given untreated human milk (p < 0.01) and also had lower fat loss during tube feeding (p < 0.01). Ultrasonic homogenization of human milk appears to minimize loss of fat and thus allows better growth of premature infants. PMID:8229535

  8. Palliative Care for Extremely Premature Infants and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Renee D.

    2010-01-01

    Extremely premature infants face multiple acute and chronic life-threatening conditions. In addition, the treatments to ameliorate or cure these conditions often entail pain and discomfort. Integrating palliative care from the moment that extremely premature labor is diagnosed offers families and clinicians support through the process of defining…

  9. Retinopathy of prematurity: An update on screening and management.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Ann L

    2016-03-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a proliferative disorder of the developing retinal blood vessels in preterm infants. The present practice point reviews new information regarding screening and management for retinopathy of prematurity, including the role of risk factors in screening, optimal scheduling for screening examinations, pain management, digital retinal photography and antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy. PMID:27095887

  10. Psychological and Educational Sequelae of Prematurity. Interim Report No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Rosalyn; And Others

    The longitudinal study assessed the psychological and educational sequelae of premature birth through the early elementary school years, to determine whether children born prematurely constitute a high risk population in terms of regular school progress. Subjects included 78 children with birth weights of 2500 grams or less, 78 children of normal…

  11. [Infant mortality in Peru].

    PubMed

    Ramos Padilla, M A

    1987-01-01

    Bolivia, Haiti, and Peru have infant mortality levels as high as those of the developed countries a century ago. The decline of general and especially infant mortality experienced in Latin America beginning in the 1940s was uneven throughout the continent. Cuba's infant mortality rate declined by 86% between 1940-80, but Peru's declined by only 48% despite its higher initial level. In 1984, 34% of all deaths in Peru were to children under 1 year and about 21% were to children 1-5 years old. Socioeconomic factors are the major explanation of Peru's poor infant mortality levels. Regional and social disparities in access to housing, food, urban infrastructure, and other vital goods and services are reflected in infant mortality statistics. Infant mortality has declined in both rural and urban areas, but the magnitude of the decline was much greater in urban areas. Between 1960-75, the infant mortality rate declined from 133 to 80/1000 live births in urban areas, but only from 180 to 150/1000 in rural areas. Investment in the infrastructure and services of the cities during the 1950s and 60s was not matched by any significant investment in rural infrastructure. Rural-urban mortality differentials are not as profound in countries which distribute public investment more evenly between rural and urban areas. Cuba's rural infant mortality rate is only 16% greater than its urban rate, while Peru's rural rate is 47% higher. The rural-urban differential in Peru hides a steep gap between the metropolitan zone of Lima-Callao, which has an infant mortality rate of 55/1000, and that of all cities, which have a rate 45% higher. Metropolitan Lima has the highest levels of living in Peru, including the highest incomes and best housing and service infrastructure. A majority of Peru's economic and industrial development has been concentrated in Lima. Peru's infant mortality differentials are also striking at the departmental level. The 5 departments with the highest infant mortality

  12. Mortality and morbidity risks and economic behavior.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Avraham; Meltzer, David

    2013-02-01

    There are theoretical reasons to expect that high risk of mortality or morbidity during young adulthood decreases investment in human capital. However, investigation of this hypothesis is complicated by a variety of empirical challenges, including difficulties in inferring causation due to omitted variables and reverse causation. For example, to compare two groups with substantially different mortality rates, one typically has to use samples from different countries or periods, making it difficult to control for other relevant variables. Reverse causation is important because human capital investment can affect mortality and morbidity. To counter these problems, we collected data on human capital investments, fertility decisions, and other economic choices of people at risk for Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a fatal genetic disorder that introduces a large and exogenous risk of early mortality and morbidity. We find a strong negative relation between mortality and morbidity risks and human capital investment. PMID:22308067

  13. Excess mortality associated with alcohol consumption.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P.

    1988-01-01

    To estimate the excess mortality due to alcohol in England and Wales death rates specific to alcohol consumption that had been derived from five longitudinal studies were applied to the current population divided into categories of alcohol consumption. Because of the J shaped relation between alcohol consumption and death the excess mortality used as a baseline was an alcohol consumption of 1-10 units/week and an adjustment was made for the slight excess mortality of abstainers. The number of excess deaths was obtained by subtracting the number of deaths expected if all the population had the consumption of the lowest risk group; correction for the total observed mortality in the population was made. This resulted in an estimate of 28,000 deaths each year in England and Wales as the excess mortality among people aged 15-74 associated with alcohol consumption. PMID:3140936

  14. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial of a new porcine surfactant in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Celso Moura; Precioso, Alexander Roberto; Mascaretti, Renata Suman

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of a new porcine-derived pulmonary surfactant developed by Instituto Butantan with those of animal-derived surfactants commercially available in Brazil, regarding neonatal mortality and the major complications of prematurity in preterm newborns with birth weight up to 1500g and diagnosed with respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Neonates diagnosed with respiratory distress syndrome were randomized to receive either Butantan surfactant (Butantan group) or one of the following surfactants: Survanta® or Curosurf®. Newborns receiving Survanta® or Curosurf® comprised the control group. The main outcome measures were mortality rates at 72 hours and at 28 days of life; the typical complications of prematurity as evaluated on the 28th day of life were defined as secundary outcomes. Results No differences were observed between the Butantan (n=154) and control (n=173) groups in relation to birth weight, gestational age, sex, and prenatal use of corticosteroids, or in mortality rates both at 72 hours (14.19% versus 14.12%; p=0.98) and at 28 days (39.86% versus 33.33%; p=0.24) of life. Higher 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores were observed among control group newborns. No differences were observed as regards the secondary outcomes, except for greater need for supplemental oxygen and a higher incidence of interstitial pulmonary emphysema in the Butantan group. Conclusion The mortality rates at 72 hours and 28 days of life and the incidence of major complications of prematurity were comparable to those found with the animal-derived surfactants commercially available in Brazil, showing the efficacy and safety of the new surfactant in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. PMID:25628188

  15. High Summer Temperatures and Mortality in Estonia

    PubMed Central

    Oudin Åström, Daniel; Åström, Christofer; Rekker, Kaidi; Indermitte, Ene; Orru, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background On-going climate change is predicted to result in a growing number of extreme weather events—such as heat waves—throughout Europe. The effect of high temperatures and heat waves are already having an important impact on public health in terms of increased mortality, but studies from an Estonian setting are almost entirely missing. We investigated mortality in relation to high summer temperatures and the time course of mortality in a coastal and inland region of Estonia. Methods We collected daily mortality data and daily maximum temperature for a coastal and an inland region of Estonia. We applied a distributed lag non-linear model to investigate heat related mortality and the time course of mortality in Estonia. Results We found an immediate increase in mortality associated with temperatures exceeding the 75th percentile of summer maximum temperatures, corresponding to approximately 23°C. This increase lasted for a couple of days in both regions. The total effect of elevated temperatures was not lessened by significant mortality displacement. Discussion We observed significantly increased mortality in Estonia, both on a country level as well as for a coastal region and an inland region with a more continental climate. Heat related mortality was higher in the inland region as compared to the coastal region, however, no statistically significant differences were observed. The lower risks in coastal areas could be due to lower maximum temperatures and cooling effects of the sea, but also better socioeconomic condition. Our results suggest that region specific estimates of the impacts of temperature extremes on mortality are needed. PMID:27167851

  16. War and Children's Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton-Ford, Steve; Houston, Paula; Hamill, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Examines impact of war on young children's mortality in 137 countries. Finds that years recently at war (1990-5) interact with years previously at war (1946-89) to elevate mortality rates. Religious composition interacts with years recently at war to reduce effect. Controlling for women's literacy and access to safe water eliminates effect for…

  17. Avoidable mortality in Lithuania.

    PubMed Central

    Gaizauskiene, A; Gurevicius, R

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The study aimed to analyse avoidable mortality in Lithuania as an index of the quality of health care and to assess trends in avoidable mortality from 1970-90. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS--All deaths of Lithuanian residents aged between 0 and 64 years between 1970 and 1990 were analysed. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Twenty seven per cent of all deaths in this age group were avoidable. Avoidable deaths were grouped into preventable and treatable ones. Treatable causes of death accounted for 54%, and preventable, 46% of avoidable mortality. Time trends showed that general mortality and mortality from avoidable causes of death in this age group were almost stable between 1970 and 1990. Mortality from treatable causes of death fell, while deaths from preventable causes increased. The results in the preventable group were greatly affected by deaths from malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus, and lungs. Differences were noted between the sexes in total mortality as well as in avoidable mortality. CONCLUSIONS--Avoidable causes of death are relatively common and, consequently, they are of practical importance for public health and studies of the health care quality in Lithuania. Reorganisation of health care is to be carried out and considerable emphasis will be placed on health education, promotion, and prevention, as primary prevention measures have not been effective thus far. PMID:7629464

  18. Dioxins and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Olivier; Birnbaum, Linda; Rimm, Eric; Mittleman, Murray A.; Hauser, Russ

    2008-01-01

    Objective In this systematic review we evaluated the evidence on the association between dioxin exposure and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in humans. Data sources and extraction We conducted a PubMed search in December 2007 and considered all English-language epidemiologic studies and their citations regarding dioxin exposure and CVD mortality. To focus on dioxins, we excluded cohorts that were either primarily exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls or from the leather and perfume industries, which include other cardiotoxic coexposures. Data synthesis We included results from 12 cohorts in the review. Ten cohorts were occupationally exposed. We divided analyses according to two well-recognized criteria of epidemiologic study quality: the accuracy of the exposure assessment, and whether the exposed population was compared with an internal or an external (e.g., general population) reference group. Analyses using internal comparisons with accurate exposure assessments are the highest quality because they minimize both exposure misclassification and confounding due to workers being healthier than the general population (“healthy worker effect”). The studies in the highest-quality group found consistent and significant dose-related increases in ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality and more modest associations with all-CVD mortality. Their primary limitation was a lack of adjustment for potential confounding by the major risk factors for CVD. Conclusions The results of this systematic review suggest that dioxin exposure is associated with mortality from both IHD and all CVD, although more strongly with the former. However, it is not possible to determine the potential bias, if any, from confounding by other risk factors for CVD. PMID:19057694

  19. Using the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34 (CCAPS-34) to Predict Premature Termination in a College Counseling Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sean B.

    2012-01-01

    Swift and Greenberg (2012) observed that variables influencing the decision to drop out fluctuate according to the primary presenting problem, the amount of structure in therapy, the length of treatment, and the clinical setting. Due to these reports, researchers may focus on predictors of premature termination (PT) in treatment settings where the…

  20. Association of maternal lithium exposure and premature delivery.

    PubMed

    Troyer, W A; Pereira, G R; Lannon, R A; Belik, J; Yoder, M C

    1993-01-01

    Lithium is widely used and the treatment of choice for patients with manic-depressive illness. For pregnant patients with manic-depressive illness, however, the use of lithium during the first trimester of pregnancy may present an increased risk for fetal maldevelopment. We have recently cared for several large-for-gestational-age, prematurely born infants whose mothers were treated with lithium throughout pregnancy. To determine whether maternal lithium use during pregnancy may predispose to the onset of premature labor and fetal macrosomia, we reviewed records from the International Register of Lithium Babies and from a cohort of manic-depressive pregnant women. More than one third (36%) of infants reported to the International Register were born prematurely, and 37% of the premature infants were large for gestational age; 15% of the term infants were born large for gestational age. In the cohort group, manic-depressive mothers who received lithium during pregnancy had a 2.5-fold higher incidence of premature births than manic-depressive pregnant patients who did not receive lithium treatment. The incidence of large-for-gestational-age births in lithium-treated women in the cohort was not different from that of the general population or from manic-depressive women not treated with lithium. In summary, an association between maternal lithium therapy and premature delivery is reported. We recommend that women receiving lithium therapy during pregnancy be closely monitored for the onset of premature labor. PMID:8515304

  1. [Mortality of myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Bonnefoy, E; Kirkorian, G

    2011-12-01

    Coronary disease is a major cause of death and disability. From 1975 to 2000, coronary mortality was reduced by half. Better treatments and reduction of risk factors are the main causes. This phenomenon is observed in most developed countries, but mortality from coronary heart disease continues to increase in developing countries. In-hospital mortality of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is in the range of 7 to 10% in registries. In infarction without ST segment elevation (NSTEMI), in-hospital mortality is around 5%. More recent studies found a similar in-hospital mortality for STEMI and NSTEMI. Because of patient selection and monitoring, mortality in clinical trials is much lower. After adjustment for the extent of coronary disease, age, risk factors, history of myocardial infarction, the excess mortality observed in women is fading. Many clinical, biological and laboratory parameters are associated with mortality in myocardial infarction. They refer to the immediate risk of death (ventricular rhythm disturbances, shock…), the extent of infarction (number of leads with ST elevation on the ECG, release of biomarkers, ejection fraction…), the presence of heart failure, the failure of reperfusion and the patient's baseline risk (age, renal function…). Risk scores, and more specifically the GRACE risk score, synthesize these different markers to predict the risk of death in a given patient. However, their use for the treatment of myocardial only concerns NSTEMI. Only a limited number of mechanical or pharmacological interventions reduces mortality of heart attack. The main benefits are observed with reperfusion by thrombolysis or primary angioplasty in STEMI, aspirin, heparin, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. Some medications such as bivalirudin and fondaparinux reduce mortality by decreasing the incidence of hemorrhagic complications. The guidelines classify interventions according to their benefit and especially their ability

  2. The Ets protein Pointed prevents both premature differentiation and dedifferentiation of Drosophila intermediate neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yonggang; Li, Xiaosu; Deng, Xiaobing; Hou, Yanjun; O'Hara, Krysten; Urso, Andreacarola; Peng, Ying; Chen, Li; Zhu, Sijun

    2016-09-01

    Intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) need to avoid both dedifferentiation and differentiation during neurogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In Drosophila, the Ets protein Pointed P1 (PntP1) is required to generate INPs from type II neuroblasts. Here, we investigated how PntP1 promotes INP generation. By generating pntP1-specific mutants and using RNAi knockdown, we show that the loss of PntP1 leads to both an increase in type II neuroblast number and the elimination of INPs. The elimination of INPs results from the premature differentiation of INPs due to ectopic Prospero expression in newly generated immature INPs (imINPs), whereas the increase in type II neuroblasts results from the dedifferentiation of imINPs due to loss of Earmuff at later stages of imINP development. Furthermore, reducing Buttonhead enhances the loss of INPs in pntP1 mutants, suggesting that PntP1 and Buttonhead act cooperatively to prevent premature INP differentiation. Our results demonstrate that PntP1 prevents both the premature differentiation and the dedifferentiation of INPs by regulating the expression of distinct target genes at different stages of imINP development. PMID:27510969

  3. Symbolic transfer entropy-based premature signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Yu, Zheng-Feng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use symbolic transfer entropy to study the coupling strength between premature signals. Numerical experiments show that three types of signal couplings are in the same direction. Among them, normal signal coupling is the strongest, followed by that of premature ventricular contractions, and that of atrial premature beats is the weakest. The T test shows that the entropies of the three signals are distinct. Symbolic transfer entropy requires less data, can distinguish the three types of signals and has very good computational efficiency.

  4. Premature Saturation in Backpropagation Networks: Mechanism and Necessary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reifman, Jaques; Vitela, Javier E.

    1997-06-01

    The mechanism that gives rise to the phenomenon of premature saturation of the output units of feedforward multilayer neural networks during training with the standard backpropagation algorithm is described. The entire process of premature saturation is characterized by three distinct stages, and it is concluded that the momentum term plays the leading role in the occurrence of the phenomenon. The necessary conditions for the occurrence of premature saturation are presented, and a method is proposed, based on these conditions, that eliminates the occurrence of the phenomenon. The validity of the conditions and the proposed method are illustrated through simulation results. Copyright 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. PMID:12662866

  5. Associations between number of sick-leave days and future all-cause and cause-specific mortality: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As the number of studies on the future situation of sickness absentees still is very limited, we aimed to investigate the association between number of sick-leave days and future all-cause and cause-specific mortality among women and men. Methods A cohort of 2 275 987 women and 2 393 248 men, aged 20–64 years in 1995 was followed 1996–2006 with regard to mortality. Data were obtained from linked authority-administered registers. The relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of mortality with and without a 2-year wash-out period were estimated by multivariate Poisson regression analyses. All analyses were stratified by sex, adjusting for socio demographics and inpatient care. Results A gradually higher all-cause mortality risk occurred with increasing number of sick-leave days in 1995, among both women (RR 1.11; CI 1.07-1.15 for those with 1–15 sick-leave days to RR 2.45; CI 2.36-2.53 among those with 166–365 days) and men (RR 1.20; CI 1.17-1.24 to RR 1.91; CI 1.85-1.97). Multivariate risk estimates were comparable for the different causes of death (circulatory disease, cancer, and suicide). The two-year washout period had only a minor effect on the risk estimates. Conclusion Even a low number of sick-leave days was associated with a higher risk for premature death in the following 11 years, also when adjusting for morbidity. This was the case for both women and men and also for cause-specific mortality. More knowledge is warranted on the mechanisms leading to higher mortality risks among sickness absentees, as sickness certification is a common measure in health care, and most sick leave is due to diagnoses you do not die from. PMID:25037232

  6. Preventing the premature death of relationship marketing.

    PubMed

    Fournier, S; Dobscha, S; Mick, D G

    1998-01-01

    Relationship marketing is in vogue. And why not? The new, increasingly efficient ways that companies have of understanding and responding to customers' needs and preferences seemingly allow them to build more meaningful connections with consumers than ever before. These connections promise to benefit the bottom line by reducing costs and increasing revenue. Unfortunately, a close look suggests that the relationships between companies and customers are troubled ones, at best. Companies may delight in learning more about their customers and in being able to provide features and services to please every possible palate. But customers delight in neither. In fact, customer satisfaction rates in the United States are at an all-time low, while complaints, boycotts, and other expressions of consumer discontent are on the rise. This mounting wave of unhappiness has yet to reach the bottom line. Sooner or later, however, corporate performance will suffer unless relationship marketing becomes what it is supposed to be--the epitome of customer orientation. Ironically, the very things that marketers are doing to build relationships with customers are often the things that are destroying those relationships. Relationship marketing is powerful in theory but troubled in practice. To prevent its premature death, marketers need to take the time to figure out how and why they are undermining their own best efforts, as well as how they can get things back on track. PMID:10176918

  7. Telemedicine for Retinopathy of Prematurity Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Grace M.; Williams, Steven L.; Starren, Justin; Flynn, John T.; Chiang, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vasoproliferative disorder affecting low birth weight infants. Although timely diagnosis and treatment can significantly reduce the risk of severe complications, ROP remains a leading cause of childhood blindness worldwide. Limitations of current disease management strategies include extensive travel and logistical coordination requirements for ophthalmologists and neonatologists, decreasing availability of adequately-trained ophthalmologists at the point of care, variability in how retinal findings are diagnosed and documented, and a growing need for ROP care worldwide. Store-and-forward telemedicine is an emerging technology by which medical data are captured for subsequent interpretation by a remote expert. This has potential to improve accessibility, quality, and cost of ROP management. In this paper, we summarize the current evaluation data on applications of telemedicine for ROP, particularly involving the diagnostic accuracy and reliability of remote image interpretation by experts. We also address challenges such as the cost-effectiveness of telemedicine, and highlight potential barriers to implementation of these systems. Understanding these principles is essential to determine future directions in research and development of telemedicine systems for ROP, as well as for other ophthalmic diseases. PMID:19665742

  8. Update on treatments for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Hellstrom, W J G

    2011-01-01

    Current and upcoming treatment options for premature ejaculation (PE) are of global clinical interest. In 2008, the International Society for Sexual Medicine published an evidence-based definition for PE. While there are no US Food and Drug Administration-approved therapies for PE, the American Urological Association 2004 guidelines state the serotonergic antidepressants paroxetine, sertraline, fluoxetine and clomipramine and the topical lidocaine-prilocaine cream are effective treatment options. However, there are limitations associated with their use, which may be overcome by PE-specific therapies currently in development. Two agents that are in advanced stages of clinical development include: (i) dapoxetine, an on-demand short-acting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, and (ii) PSD502, a metered-dose aerosol containing lidocaine and prilocaine, also for on-demand treatment. Another on-demand agent in development is tramadol, a weak opioid that is currently approved for treating pain. Coupled with efficient diagnosis, it is hoped that these newer agents will improve the quality of life for patients who suffer from PE. PMID:21155940

  9. Features of premature ejaculation in infertile men.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, K; Yavari-kia, P; Ahmadi-Asrbadr, Y; Nematzadeh-Pakdel, A; Alikhah, H

    2010-09-15

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common form of sexual dysfunction and is one of the causes of male factor infertility. The aim of this study was assay of frequency and features of PE in a group of infertile men. This cross-sectional study was carried out since December 2006 to January 2008 on a sequential sample of 300 male patients complaining of infertility referring to the only infertility research center of Tabriz al-Zahra hospital. Data were collected by a designed questionnaire in which there were questions about age, age of marriage, history of sexual transmitted disease, drug use, previous sexual contacts, systemic diseases, masturbation, erectile dysfunction and frequency of intercourse. The mean age of studied patients was 30.39 +/- 5.76 and 43% of patients had PE, that in 74.4% primary PE and in 25.6% secondary PE seen. The most common form of ejaculation latency time was about less than 1 min that was seen in 51.2% of patients with PE. Mean of masturbation times was 5.13 +/- 3.19 times per month, and there is significant relation between the age of patients and type of PE, (p = 0.001) and ejaculation latency time and type of PE (p = 0.035). The high frequency rate of PE in Iranian men with complaint of infertility and also relatively lower age of these patients reflects the necessity of attention and management of this imperative psycho-organic disorder. PMID:23350165

  10. Clomiphene Effects on Idiopathic Premature Ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Ketabchi, Ali Asghar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Premature ejaculation (PE) is the inability to delay ejaculation, occurring sooner than they or their partner would like during sexual activities. PE is a challenging problem that can affect sexual enjoyment and may harm relationships of couples and affect their quality of life. In idiopathic PE, several helpful techniques and medicines are recommended, but none of them has yielded satisfactory results. Objectives: Our objective in this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clomiphene as a selective estrogen receptor modulator on the treatment of idiopathic PE. Patients and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 178 married men with idiopathic PE defined according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Third Revised Version (DSM-III-R) who referred to urology clinics over a 10-month period in 2012 were randomized into two groups, namely the study (clomiphene) and control (placebo) groups. They completed self-administered questionnaires that included intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT), erectile dysfunction indexes, quality of life (QOL), sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, and medical illness. After 6 months of intervention, all data were compared with the baseline data and between the groups. Results: Within the 10-month study course, 126 patients (70.8%) completed this study. After intervention and comparison of the results between the two groups, IELT, sexual indexes, and QOL improved in the study group, but significant differences were observed only in the IELT and QOL findings. Conclusions: Clomiphene seems to be useful in the pharmacological treatment of PE compared to the placebo. PMID:26543830

  11. Dapoxetine. Premature ejaculation: not worth the risk.

    PubMed

    2010-02-01

    Time until ejaculation during sexual intercourse is highly variable. Some men and their partners find sex unsatisfactory because they feel ejaculation occurs too quickly. Psychobehavioural therapy is the first option. Dapoxetine, a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is the first drug to be authorised for use in premature ejaculation in some EU member states. Four double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trials in a total of 4414 men are available. At best, only one in three men and one in five women perceived at least a moderate improvement in sexual satisfaction through a specific effect of dapoxetine. A substantial placebo effect was observed in one-third of participants of both sexes. Dapoxetine exposes men to the numerous adverse effects of all serotonin reuptake inhibitors, some of which can be severe, such as self-harm, aggressive behaviour, and serotonin syndrome. Postural hypotension and syncope can also occur. Dapoxetine is strongly metabolised by the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes CYP 3A4 and CYP 2D6, and thus carries a risk of numerous pharmacokinetic interactions. In practice, there is no justification for exposing men to potentially serious adverse effects for only a moderate symptomatic improvement in a poorly defined disorder. Behavioural approaches should remain the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:20455331

  12. Premature termination codons in modern human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    The considerable range of genetic variation in human populations may partly reflect distinctive processes of adaptation to variable environmental conditions. However, the adaptive genomic signatures remain to be completely elucidated. This research explores candidate loci under selection at the population level by characterizing recently arisen premature termination codons (PTCs), some of which indicate a human knockout. From a total of 7595 participants from two population exome projects, 246 PTCs were found where natural selection has resulted in new alleles with a high frequency (from 1% to 96%) of derived alleles and various levels of population differentiation (FST = 0.00139–0.626). The PTC genes formed protein and regulatory networks limited to 15 biological processes or gene families, of which seven categories were previously unreported. PTC mutations have a strong tendency to be introduced into members of the same gene family, even during modern human evolution, although the exact nature of the selection is not fully known. The findings here suggest the ongoing evolutionary plasticity of modern humans at the genetic level and also partly provide insights into common human knockouts. PMID:26932450

  13. Premature termination codons in modern human genomes.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    The considerable range of genetic variation in human populations may partly reflect distinctive processes of adaptation to variable environmental conditions. However, the adaptive genomic signatures remain to be completely elucidated. This research explores candidate loci under selection at the population level by characterizing recently arisen premature termination codons (PTCs), some of which indicate a human knockout. From a total of 7595 participants from two population exome projects, 246 PTCs were found where natural selection has resulted in new alleles with a high frequency (from 1% to 96%) of derived alleles and various levels of population differentiation (FST = 0.00139-0.626). The PTC genes formed protein and regulatory networks limited to 15 biological processes or gene families, of which seven categories were previously unreported. PTC mutations have a strong tendency to be introduced into members of the same gene family, even during modern human evolution, although the exact nature of the selection is not fully known. The findings here suggest the ongoing evolutionary plasticity of modern humans at the genetic level and also partly provide insights into common human knockouts. PMID:26932450

  14. Nuclear Chk1 prevents premature mitotic entry.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Makoto; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Makoto; Kiyono, Tohru; Goshima, Naoki; Inagaki, Masaki

    2011-07-01

    Chk1 inhibits the premature activation of the cyclin-B1-Cdk1. However, it remains controversial whether Chk1 inhibits Cdk1 in the centrosome or in the nucleus before the G2-M transition. In this study, we examined the specificity of the mouse monoclonal anti-Chk1 antibody DCS-310, with which the centrosome was stained. Conditional Chk1 knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts reduced nuclear but not centrosomal staining with DCS-310. In Chk1(+/myc) human colon adenocarcinoma (DLD-1) cells, Chk1 was detected in the nucleus but not in the centrosome using an anti-Myc antibody. Through the combination of protein array and RNAi technologies, we identified Ccdc-151 as a protein that crossreacted with DCS-310 on the centrosome. Mitotic entry was delayed by expression of the Chk1 mutant that localized in the nucleus, although forced immobilization of Chk1 to the centrosome had little impact on the timing of mitotic entry. These results suggest that nuclear but not centrosomal Chk1 contributes to correct timing of mitotic entry. PMID:21628425

  15. Characterization of pre-mature nanocomposite crazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toepperwein, Gregory N.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2011-03-01

    Crazing is a unique mode of failure by which polymer strands are stretched into a periodic array of columns. It has been shown that these crazes follow cavitation under deformation. Inclusion of nanoparticles drastically alters the glass transition temperature and the globally measurable mechanical properties of these polymer glasses. However, limited literature exists to explain the behavior on the lengths scales of the heterogeneous domains within the glass in the context of nanocomposites. In this work, we investigate the nucleation and growth of voids that precede craze formation to elucidate the role these inclusions play in failure and further characterize the pre-mature craze itself. Extensive Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of highly entangled polymer nanocomposites allow for calculation of local densities, local elastic moduli, and local orientation of additives. We find that the site of void formation is inexorably linked to the local mechanical properties of polymer. This relationship is more evident upon the inclusion of reinforcing additives which induce a broader distribution of local moduli leading to the nucleation of more, smaller voids. Within the developing craze, larger additives resist incorporation, but those that do are subject to ordering.

  16. Retinopathy of prematurity: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parag K; Prabhu, Vishma; Karandikar, Smita S; Ranjan, Ratnesh; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Kalpana, Narendran

    2016-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vasoproliferative disorder of the retina occurring principally in new born preterm infants. It is an avoidable cause of childhood blindness. With the increase in the survival of preterm babies, ROP has become the leading cause of preventable childhood blindness throughout the world. A simple screening test done within a few weeks after birth by an ophthalmologist can avoid this preventable blindness. Although screening guidelines and protocols are strictly followed in the developed nations, it lacks in developing economies like India and China, which have the highest number of preterm deliveries in the world. The burden of this blindness in these countries is set to increase tremendously in the future, if corrective steps are not taken immediately. ROP first emerged in 1940s and 1950s, when it was called retrolental fibroplasia. Several epidemics of this disease were and are still occurring in different regions of the world and since then a lot of research has been done on this disease. However, till date very few comprehensive review articles covering all the aspects of ROP are published. This review highlights the past, present and future strategies in managing this disease. It would help the pediatricians to update their current knowledge on ROP. PMID:26862500

  17. Dapoxetine and the treatment of premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Sangkum, Premsant; Badr, Rhamee; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2013-01-01

    Background Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common male sexual complaint. Off-label oral selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed for the treatment of PE. Dapoxetine is a short-acting SSRI specifically designed for on-demand use. The objective of this communication is to summarize the clinical and physiological evidence regarding the role of the serotonergic pathway and specifically dapoxetine in the treatment of PE. Methods A PubMed search was conducted on articles reporting data on dapoxetine for the treatment of PE. Articles describing the pathophysiology and treatment options for PE were additionally included for review. Results The etiology of PE is multi-factorial in nature. There are many treatment options for PE such as psychological/behavioral therapy, topical anesthetic agents, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors, and tramadol hydrochloride. SSRIs play a major role in PE treatment. Animal and clinical studies in addition to its pharmacokinetic document dapoxetine’s clinical efficacy and safety for on-demand treatment of PE. Conclusions Dapoxetine demonstrates clinical efficacy and a favorable side effect profile. Dapoxetine is currently the oral drug of choice for on-demand treatment of PE. PMID:26816743

  18. Increased Mortality in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Maurice M.; Black, Jed; Lai, Chinglin; Eller, Mark; Guinta, Diane; Bhattacharyya, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the mortality rate in patients with narcolepsy. Design: Data were derived from a large database representative of the US population, which contains anonymized patient-linked longitudinal claims for 173 million individuals. Setting: Symphony Health Solutions (SHS) Source Lx, an anonymized longitudinal patient dataset. Patients/Participants: All records of patients registered in the SHS database between 2008 and 2010. Interventions: None Measurements and Results: Identification of patients with narcolepsy was based on ≥ 1 medical claim with the diagnosis of narcolepsy (ICD-9 347.xx) from 2002 to 2012. Dates of death were acquired from the Social Security Administration via a third party; the third party information was encrypted in the same manner as the claims data such that anonymity is ensured prior to receipt by SHS. Annual all-cause mortality rates for 2008, 2009, and 2010 were calculated retrospectively for patients with narcolepsy and patients without narcolepsy in the database, and standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated. Mortality rates were also compared with the general US population (Centers for Disease Control data). SMRs of the narcolepsy population were consistent over the 3-year period and showed an approximate 1.5-fold excess mortality relative to those without narcolepsy. The narcolepsy population had consistently higher mortality rates relative to those without narcolepsy across all age groups, stratified by age decile, from 25-34 years to 75+ years of age. The SMR for females with narcolepsy was lower than for males with narcolepsy. Conclusions: Narcolepsy was associated with approximately 1.5-fold excess mortality relative to those without narcolepsy. While the cause of this increased mortality is unknown, these findings warrant further investigation. Citation: Ohayon MM; Black J; Lai C; Eller M; Guinta D; Bhattacharyya A. Increased mortality in narcolepsy. SLEEP 2014;37(3):439-444. PMID:24587565

  19. Effect of Interventions for Premature Ejaculation in the Treatment of Chronic Prostatitis with Secondary Premature Ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Qing; Yi, Qing-Tong; Chen, Chu-Hong; Gong, Min

    2016-08-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of interventions for premature ejaculation (PE) in the management of patients with chronic prostatitis and secondary premature ejaculation. Methods Totally 90 patients diagnosed as chronic prostatitis with PE were randomly divided into control group (n=45) and interventional group (n=45). Control group received a conventional therapy consisted of oral administration of antibiotics,α-receptor blocker,and proprietary Chinese medicine for clearing away heat and promoting diuresis. Interventional group received a conventional therapy combined with treatment for ameliorating the PE symptom (oral dapoxetine on-demand and ejaculation control exercise).National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI),Chinese Index of Sexual Function for Premature Ejaculation (CIPE)-5 questionnaires,intravaginal ejaculatory latency time,and the number of coituses per week were applied for evaluating the treatment outcomes. Results Follow-up was accomplished in 35 and 38 patients in the control and interventional group.The CIPE-5 score,intravaginal ejaculatory latency time,and the number of coituses per week were significantly improved in both two groups but more significantly in interventional group (all P<0.05). The NIH-CPSI pain,urination,and quality of life subscores and total score were improved significantly in both two groups after treatment,but the NIH-CPSI pain and quality of life subscores had been improved more significantly in the interventional group (all P<0.05). The variation of NIH-CPSI was negatively correlated with that of CIPE-5 in both two groups (r=-0.362,P=0.016;r=-0.330,P=0.021). Conclusions For CP with secondary PE patients,the interventions for PE can not only improve the quality of sexual life but also help improve the NIH-CPSI pain and quality of life subscores. PE should be routinely screened and treated during the management of CP.p. PMID:27594150

  20. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K. D.; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  1. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize.

    PubMed

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K D; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  2. Rheumatic Heart Disease-Attributable Mortality at Ages 5–69 Years in Fiji: A Five-Year, National, Population-Based Record-Linkage Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Tom; Kado, Joseph; Miller, Anne E.; Ward, Brenton; Heenan, Rachel; Colquhoun, Samantha M.; Bärnighausen, Till W.; Mirabel, Mariana; Bloom, David E.; Bailey, Robin L.; Tukana, Isimeli N.; Steer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is considered a major public health problem in developing countries, although scarce data are available to substantiate this. Here we quantify mortality from RHD in Fiji during 2008–2012 in people aged 5–69 years. Methods and Findings Using 1,773,999 records derived from multiple sources of routine clinical and administrative data, we used probabilistic record-linkage to define a cohort of 2,619 persons diagnosed with RHD, observed for all-cause mortality over 11,538 person-years. Using relative survival methods, we estimated there were 378 RHD-attributable deaths, almost half of which occurred before age 40 years. Using census data as the denominator, we calculated there were 9.9 deaths (95% CI 9.8–10.0) and 331 years of life-lost (YLL, 95% CI 330.4–331.5) due to RHD per 100,000 person-years, standardised to the portion of the WHO World Standard Population aged 0–69 years. Valuing life using Fiji’s per-capita gross domestic product, we estimated these deaths cost United States Dollar $6,077,431 annually. Compared to vital registration data for 2011–2012, we calculated there were 1.6-times more RHD-attributable deaths than the number reported, and found our estimate of RHD mortality exceeded all but the five leading reported causes of premature death, based on collapsed underlying cause-of-death diagnoses. Conclusions Rheumatic heart disease is a leading cause of premature death as well as an important economic burden in this setting. Age-standardised death rates are more than twice those reported in current global estimates. Linkage of routine data provides an efficient tool to better define the epidemiology of neglected diseases. PMID:26371755

  3. Early and Late Outcome of Premature Newborns with History of Neonatal Intensive Care Units Admission at 6 Years Old in Zanjan, Northwestern Iran

    PubMed Central

    SADEGHZADEH, Mansour; KHOSHNEVISASL, Parisa; PARVANEH, Mehdi; MOUSAVINASAB, Noreddin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Premature birth is an important factor for mortality and morbidity of neonates. This study was designed to evaluate the outcome of preterm neonates who needed neonatal intensive care (NICU) hospitalization after 6 yr at their entrance to the school. Materials & Methods This cross sectional study was conducted on premature neonates consecutively hospitalized in NICU of Valie Asr Hospital (the Academic Pediatric Hospital, Zanjan, Northwestern Iran) from September 2001 to September 2003. All children with a history of prematurity and NICU treatment were evaluated at their entrance to the school. Demographic findings, clinical examinations, IQ test, hearing and visual acuity exams were recorded. Results From 179 neonates, 78 (43.6%) survived and were discharged from hospital. Fifty-four of them were available and entered first grade in primary school. Only one case had severe mental retardation. One case had severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Hearing abnormality was not detected in any case. There was no significant relation between IQ score, visual as well as hearing findings and gestational age. Conclusion We did not find significant disability in the outcome of surviving infants. This could be explained by the high mortality rate of neonates during hospitalization. PMID:27247586

  4. Association of Amino Acids with Common Complications of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Ryckman, Kelli K; Dagle, John M; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Ehinger, Noah; Poole, Stanley D.; Berberich, Stanton L.; Reese, Jeff; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2013-01-01

    Background Tandem mass spectrometry has been proposed as a method of diagnosing or predicting the development of common complex neonatal diseases. Our objective was to identify metabolites associated with common complications of prematurity. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of medical data and metabolite measurements from routine neonatal screening on 689 preterm (<37 weeks of gestational age) neonates. Results We observed higher levels of phenylalanine in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS; P=1.7×10−5), the only association that was significant after correction for multiple testing. We found suggestive significance (P<0.001) of higher essential amino acids in infants with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Functionality of these findings was explored in the ductus arteriosus (DA) isolated from term and preterm mouse pups. None of the amino acids had a direct vasodilatory effect on the isolated DA. Conclusion We found newborns with RDS had higher levels of phenylalanine that may be due to impaired phenylalanine hydroxylase activity. We also detected marginally higher levels of all measured essential amino acids in infants with PDA. We did not find dilation of the mouse ductus for these metabolites indicating that instead of potentially causing PDA they are likely serving as markers of catabolism. PMID:23481552

  5. Recent advances in the treatment of premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Linton, Kate D; Wylie, Kevan R

    2010-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common sexual problem affecting men. It can affect men at all ages and has a serious impact on the quality of life for men and their partners. Currently there are no pharmaceutical agents approved for use in the UK, and so all drugs used for this condition are off label. Behavioral therapy has been used to treat PE, but the results are not durable once therapy has been concluded. Several topical therapies have been used including severance-secret (SS) cream, lignocaine spray, lidocaine-prilocaine cream and lidocaine-prilocaine spray (TEMPE). There has been recent interest in the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the treatment of PE, due to the fact that one of their common side effects is delayed ejaculation. Currently used SSRIs have several non-sexual side effects and long half lives, therefore there has been interest in developing a short acting, efficacious SSRI that can be used on-demand for PE. Dapoxetine has been recently evaluated for the treatment of PE by several groups, and results so far appear promising. PMID:20368901

  6. Premature Craniosynostosis: A Complication of Thyroid Replacement Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfold, James L.; Simpson, Donald A.

    1975-01-01

    Presented are case studies of 3 children, infancy to 9-years-old, whose premature skull ossification (craniosynostosis) is traced to iatrogenic hyperthyroidism from the administration of excessive amounts of thyroid hormone. (CL)

  7. Mortality in Central Java: results from the indonesian mortality registration system strengthening project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mortality statistics from death registration systems are essential for health policy and development. Indonesia has recently mandated compulsory death registration across the entire country in December 2006. This article describes the methods and results from activities to ascertain causes of registered deaths in two pilot registration areas in Central Java during 2006-2007. The methods involved several steps, starting with adaptation of international standards for reporting causes of registered deaths for implementation in two sites, Surakarta (urban) and Pekalongan (rural). Causes for hospital deaths were certified by attending physicians. Verbal autopsies were used for home deaths. Underlying causes were coded using ICD-10. Completeness of registration was assessed in a sample of villages and urban wards by triangulating data from the health sector, the civil registration system, and an independent household survey. Finally, summary mortality indicators and cause of death rankings were developed for each site. Findings A total of 10,038 deaths were registered in the two sites during 2006-2007; yielding annual crude death rates of 5.9 to 6.8 per 1000. Data completeness was higher in rural areas (72.5%) as compared to urban areas (52%). Adjusted life expectancies at birth were higher for both males and females in the urban population as compared to the rural population. Stroke, ischaemic heart disease and chronic respiratory disease are prominent causes in both populations. Other important causes are diabetes and cancer in urban areas; and tuberculosis and diarrhoeal diseases in rural areas. Conclusions Non-communicable diseases cause a significant proportion of premature mortality in Central Java. Implementing cause of death reporting in conjunction with death registration appears feasible in Indonesia. Better collaboration between health and registration sectors is required to improve data quality. These are the first local mortality measures for

  8. Population Assessment of Future Trajectories in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Thorolfsdottir, Rosa Björk; Aspelund, Thor; Capewell, Simon; Critchley, Julia; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Andersen, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates have been decreasing in Iceland since the 1980s, largely reflecting improvements in cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this study was to predict future CHD mortality in Iceland based on potential risk factor trends. Methods and findings The previously validated IMPACT model was used to predict changes in CHD mortality between 2010 and 2040 among the projected population of Iceland aged 25–74. Calculations were based on combining: i) data on population numbers and projections (Statistics Iceland), ii) population risk factor levels and projections (Refine Reykjavik study), and iii) effectiveness of specific risk factor reductions (published meta-analyses). Projections for three contrasting scenarios were compared: 1) If the historical risk factor trends of past 30 years were to continue, the declining death rates of past decades would level off, reflecting population ageing. 2) If recent trends in risk factors (past 5 years) continue, this would result in a death rate increasing from 49 to 70 per 100,000. This would reflect a recent plateau in previously falling cholesterol levels and recent rapid increases in obesity and diabetes prevalence. 3) Assuming that in 2040 the entire population enjoys optimal risk factor levels observed in low risk cohorts, this would prevent almost all premature CHD deaths before 2040. Conclusions The potential increase in CHD deaths with recent trends in risk factor levels is alarming both for Iceland and probably for comparable Western populations. However, our results show considerable room for reducing CHD mortality. Achieving the best case scenario could eradicate premature CHD deaths by 2040. Public health policy interventions based on these predictions may provide a cost effective means of reducing CHD mortality in the future. PMID:24465713

  9. Biodemographic analysis of male honey bee mortality.

    PubMed

    Rueppell, Olav; Fondrk, M Kim; Page, Robert E

    2005-02-01

    Biodemographic studies of insects have significantly enhanced our understanding of the biology of aging. Eusocial insects have evolved to form different groups of colony members that are specialized for particular tasks and highly dependent on each other. These different groups (castes and sexes) also differ strongly in their life expectancy but relatively little is known about their mortality dynamics. In this study we present data on the age-specific flight activity and mortality of male honey bees from two different genetic lines that are exclusively dedicated to reproduction. We show that males initiating flight at a young age experience more flight events during their lifetime. No (negative) relation between the age at flight initiation and lifespan exists, as might be predicted on the basis of the antagonistic pleiotropy theory of aging. Furthermore, we fit our data to different aging models and conclude that overall a slight deceleration of the age-dependent mortality increase at advanced ages occurs. However, mortality risk increases according to the Gompertz-Makeham model when only days with flight activity (active days) are taken into account. Our interpretation of the latter is that two mortality components act on honey bee males during flight: increasing, age-dependent deaths (possibly from wear-and-tear), and age-independent deaths (possibly due to predation). The overall mortality curve is caused by the interaction of the distribution of age at foraging initiation and the mortality function during the active (flight) lifespan. PMID:15659209

  10. DENGUE DURING PREGNANCY: ASSOCIATION WITH LOW BIRTH WEIGHT AND PREMATURITY

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Christiane Fernandes; LOPES, Vânia Glória Silami; Brasil, Patricia; da Silva, Licinio Esmeraldo; RIBEIRO, Pedro Henrique Fernandes Josephson; UGENTI, Luca Cipriani; NOGUEIRA, Rita Maria Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of dengue virus infection during pregnancy and its correlation with low birth weight, prematurity, and asphyxia. A non-concurrent cohort study reveals the association of dengue during pregnancy with prematurity and low birth weight, when birth occurred during the maternal-fetal viremia period (p = 0.016 and p < 0.0001, respectively). PMID:26910454

  11. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia in a Premature Neonate Mimicking Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Luen; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hung, Giun-Yi; Tsao, Pei-Chen; Soong, Wen-Jue

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare hematologic malignancy in children. Its presentations include anemia, thrombocytopenia, monocytosis, skin rash, marked hepatomegaly, and/or splenomegaly. Fever and respiratory involvement are common. Here, we report a case of a premature neonate with initial symptoms of respiratory distress. She gradually developed clinical manifestations of JMML that mimicked neonatal sepsis. Three weeks after birth, JMML was diagnosed. This is the first reported case of JMML presenting in a premature infant in Taiwan. PMID:24269860

  12. Premature ejaculation: do we have effective therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Serefoglu, Ege Can; Saitz, Theodore R.; Trost, Landon

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common sexual dysfunction, with the majority of PE patients remaining undiagnosed and undertreated. Despite its prevalence, there is a current paucity of data regarding available treatment options and mechanisms. The objective of the current investigation is to review and summarize pertinent literature on therapeutic options for the treatment of PE, including behavioral/psychologic, oral pharmacotherapy, and surgery. Methods A pubmed search was conducted on articles reporting data on available treatment options for PE. Articles describing potential mechanisms of action were additionally included for review. Preference was given towards randomized, controlled trials, when available. Results PE remains an underdiagnosed and undertreated disease process, with limited data available regarding potential underlying mechanisms and long-term outcomes of treatment options. Psychological/behavioral therapies, including the stop-start, squeeze, and pelvic floor rehabilitation techniques have demonstrated improvements in short-term series, with decreased efficacy with additional follow-up. Topical therapies, which are commonly utilized result in prolonged intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) at the expense of potential penile/vaginal Hypothesia. Oral therapies similarly demonstrate improved IELTs with variable side effect profiles and include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (daily or on demand), phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists, and tramadol. Alternative therapies such as acupuncture have shown benefits in limited studies. Surgery is not commonly performed and is not recommended by available guidelines. Conclusions PE is a common condition, with limited data available regarding its underlying pathophysiology and treatment. Available therapies include topical, oral, behavioral/psychologic modification, or a combination thereof. Additional research is required to assess the optimal

  13. Pharmacology for the treatment of premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, François; Clèment, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Male sexual response comprises four phases: excitement, including erection; plateau; ejaculation, usually accompanied by orgasm; and resolution. Ejaculation is a complex sexual response involving a sequential process consisting of two phases: emission and expulsion. Ejaculation, which is basically a spinal reflex, requires a tight coordination between sympathetic, parasympathetic, and somatic efferent pathways originating from different segments and area in the spinal cord and innervating pelvi-perineal anatomical structures. A major relaying and synchronizing role is played by a group of lumbar neurons described as the spinal generator of ejaculation. Excitatory and inhibitory influences from sensory genital and cerebral stimuli are integrated and processed in the spinal cord. Premature ejaculation (PE) can be defined by ≤1-min ejaculatory latency, an inability to delay ejaculation, and negative personal consequences. Because there is no physiological impairment in PE, any pharmacological agent with central or peripheral mechanism of action that is delaying the ejaculation is a drug candidate for the treatment of PE. Ejaculation is centrally mediated by a variety of neurotransmitter systems, involving especially serotonin and serotonergic pathways but also dopaminergic and oxytocinergic systems. Pharmacological delay of ejaculation can be achieved either by inhibiting excitatory or reinforcing inhibitory pathways from the brain or the periphery to the spinal cord. PE can be treated with long-term use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or tricyclic antidepressants. Dapoxetine, a short-acting SSRI, is the first treatment registered for the on-demand treatment of PE. Anesthetics applied on the glans penis have the ability to lengthen the time to ejaculation. Targeting oxytocinergic, neurokinin-1, dopaminergic, and opioid receptors represent future avenues to delaying ejaculation. PMID:22679220

  14. Psychosocial Functioning and Intelligence Both Partly Explain Socioeconomic Inequalities in Premature Death. A Population-Based Male Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Falkstedt, Daniel; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Hemmingsson, Tomas; Deary, Ian J.; Melin, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Objective The possible contributions of psychosocial functioning and intelligence differences to socioeconomic status (SES)-related inequalities in premature death were investigated. None of the previous studies focusing on inequalities in mortality has included measures of both psychosocial functioning and intelligence. Methods The study was based on a cohort of 49 321 men born 1949–1951 from the general community in Sweden. Data on psychosocial functioning and intelligence from military conscription at ∼18 years of age were linked with register data on education, occupational class, and income at 35–39 years of age. Psychosocial functioning was rated by psychologists as a summary measure of differences in level of activity, power of initiative, independence, and emotional stability. Intelligence was measured through a multidimensional test. Causes of death between 40 and 57 years of age were followed in registers. Results The estimated inequalities in all-cause mortality by education and occupational class were attenuated with 32% (95% confidence interval: 20–45%) and 41% (29–52%) after adjustments for individual psychological differences; both psychosocial functioning and intelligence contributed to account for the inequalities. The inequalities in cardiovascular and injury mortality were attenuated by as much as 51% (24–76%) and 52% (35–68%) after the same adjustments, and the inequalities in alcohol-related mortality were attenuated by up to 33% (8–59%). Less of the inequalities were accounted for when those were measured by level of income, with which intelligence had a weaker correlation. The small SES-related inequalities in cancer mortality were not attenuated by adjustment for intelligence. Conclusions Differences in psychosocial functioning and intelligence might both contribute to the explanation of observed SES-related inequalities in premature death, but the magnitude of their contributions likely varies with measure of socioeconomic

  15. Serum prohepcidin levels in premature newborns with oxygen radical diseases.

    PubMed

    Çelik, H Tolga; Yurdakök, Murat; Korkmaz, Ayşe; Yiğit, Şule

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prohepcidin levels in premature newborns with oxygen radical diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and necrotizing enterocolitis and to compare these levels with those of healthy premature newborns. Eighty premature infants (25-34 weeks gestational age) were enrolled. The patient group was composed of 38 premature babies with oxygen radical diseases, and the control group consisted of 42 healthy premature newborns. Complete blood count, serum iron and ferritin concentrations, iron-binding capacity (IBC), transferrin and prohepcidin levels were measured. The mean ferritin and prohepcidin levels were higher in the patient group than in the control group (p = 0.038 and p = 0.022, respectively). No significant correlations were found between serum prohepcidin levels and iron parameters. We believe that this finding will contribute to a greater understanding of the etiopathogenesis of oxygen radical diseases. There is a need for future studies to explore the link between underlying inflammatory mechanisms and hepcidin in oxygen radical diseases. PMID:25363011

  16. Risk Factors for premature birth in a hospital 1

    PubMed Central

    Ahumada-Barrios, Margarita E.; Alvarado, German F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to determine the risk factors for premature birth. Methods: retrospective case-control study of 600 pregnant women assisted in a hospital, with 298 pregnant women in the case group (who gave birth prematurely <37 weeks) and 302 pregnant women who gave birth to a full-term newborn in the control group. Stata software version 12.2 was used. The Chi-square test was used in bivariate analysis and logistic regression was used in multivariate analysis, from which Odds Ratios (OR) and Confidence Intervals (CI) of 95% were derived. Results: risk factors associated with premature birth were current twin pregnancy (adjusted OR= 2.4; p= 0.02), inadequate prenatal care (< 6 controls) (adjusted OR= 3.2; p <0.001), absent prenatal care (adjusted OR= 3.0; p <0.001), history of premature birth (adjusted OR= 3.7; p <0.001) and preeclampsia (adjusted OR= 1.9; p= 0.005). Conclusion: history of premature birth, preeclampsia, not receiving prenatal care and receiving inadequate prenatal care were risk factors for premature birth. PMID:27463110

  17. 40-Year CHD Mortality Trends and the Role of Risk Factors in Mortality Decline: The North Karelia Project Experience.

    PubMed

    Jousilahti, Pekka; Laatikainen, Tiina; Salomaa, Veikko; Pietilä, Arto; Vartiainen, Erkki; Puska, Pekka

    2016-06-01

    In the 1960s and early 1970s, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in Finland was the highest in the world, and within Finland, mortality was particularly high in the eastern part of the country. The North Karelia Project, the first large community-based cardiovascular diseases prevention program was established in 1972 to reduce the extremely high CHD mortality through behavioral change and reduction of the main cardiovascular disease risk factors among the whole population of North Karelia, the easternmost province of Finland. During the 40-year period from 1972 to 2012, smoking prevalence, serum total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure declined markedly, except a small increase in serum cholesterol levels between 2007 and 2012. From the early 1970s to 2012, CHD mortality decreased by 82% (from 643 to 118 per 100,000) among working-age (35 to 64 years) men. Among working-age women, the decline was 84% (from 114 to 17 per 100,000). During the first 10 years, changes in these 3 target risk factors explained nearly all of the observed mortality reduction. Since the mid-1980s, the observed reduction in mortality has been larger than the predicted reduction. In the early 1970s, premature CHD mortality (35 to 74 years) was about 37% higher among Eastern Finnish men and 23% higher among Eastern Finnish women, compared with men and women in Southwestern Finland. During the last 40 years, premature CHD mortality declined markedly in both areas, but the decline was larger in Eastern Finland and the mortality gap between the two areas nearly disappeared. PMID:27242088

  18. Tobacco Control and the Reduction in Smoking-related Premature Deaths in the United States, 1964–2012

    PubMed Central

    Holford, Theodore R.; Meza, Rafael; Warner, Kenneth E.; Meernik, Clare; Jeon, Jihyoun; Moolgavkar, Suresh H.; Levy, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Importance The 50th anniversary of the first Surgeon General’s Report on smoking and health is celebrated in 2014. This seminal document inspired efforts by government s, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to reduce the toll of cigarette smoking through reduced initiation and increased cessation. Objective To quantify reductions in smoking -related mortality associated with implementation of tobacco control since 1964. Design, Setting and Participants Smoking histories for individual birth cohorts that actually occurred and under likely scenarios had tobacco control never emerged were estimated. National mortality rates and mortality rate ratio estimates from analytical studies of the effect of smoking on mortality yielded death rates by smoking status. Actual smoking -related mortality from 1964–2012 was compared to estimated mortality under no tobacco control that included a likely scenario (primary counterfactual) and upper and lower bounds that would capture plausible alternatives. Exposure National Health Interview Surveys yielded cigarette smoking histories for the US adult population from 1964–2012. Main Outcomes and Measures Number of premature deaths avoided and years of life saved were primary outcomes. Change in life expectancy at age 40 associated with change in cigarette smoking exposure constituted another measure of overall health outcomes. Results From 1964–2012, an estimated 17.6 million deaths were related to smoking, an estimated 8.0 (7.4–8.3, for the lower and upper tobacco control counterfactuals, respectively) million fewer premature smoking-induced deaths than what would have occurred under the alternatives and thus associated with tobacco control (5.3 (4.8–5.5) million males and 2.7 (2.5–2.7) million females). This resulted in an estimated 157 (139–165) million years of life saved, a mean of 19.6 years for each beneficiary, (111 (97–117) million for males, 46 (42–48) million for females). During this

  19. Can Machine Learning Methods Predict Extubation Outcome in Premature Infants as well as Clinicians?

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Martina; Almeida, Jonas S.; Stanislaus, Romesh; Wagner, Carol L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Though treatment of the prematurely born infant breathing with assistance of a mechanical ventilator has much advanced in the past decades, predicting extubation outcome at a given point in time remains challenging. Numerous studies have been conducted to identify predictors for extubation outcome; however, the rate of infants failing extubation attempts has not declined. Objective To develop a decision-support tool for the prediction of extubation outcome in premature infants using a set of machine learning algorithms Methods A dataset assembled from 486 premature infants on mechanical ventilation was used to develop predictive models using machine learning algorithms such as artificial neural networks (ANN), support vector machine (SVM), naïve Bayesian classifier (NBC), boosted decision trees (BDT), and multivariable logistic regression (MLR). Performance of all models was evaluated using area under the curve (AUC). Results For some of the models (ANN, MLR and NBC) results were satisfactory (AUC: 0.63–0.76); however, two algorithms (SVM and BDT) showed poor performance with AUCs of ~0.5. Conclusion Clinician's predictions still outperform machine learning due to the complexity of the data and contextual information that may not be captured in clinical data used as input for the development of the machine learning algorithms. Inclusion of preprocessing steps in future studies may improve the performance of prediction models. PMID:25419493

  20. TAp63 prevents premature aging by promoting adult stem cell maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaohua; Paris, Maryline; Gi, Young Jin; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Cho, Min Soon; Lin, Yu-Li; Biernaskie, Jeffrey A.; Sinha, Satrajit; Prives, Carol; Pevny, Larysa H.; Miller, Freda D.; Flores, Elsa R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The cellular mechanisms that regulate the maintenance of adult tissue stem cells are still largely unknown. We show here that the p53 family member, TAp63, is essential for maintenance of epidermal and dermal precursors and that, in its absence, these precursors senesce and skin ages prematurely. Specifically, we have developed a TAp63 conditional knockout mouse and used it to ablate TAp63 in the germline (TAp63−/−) or in K14-expressing cells in the basal layer of the epidermis (TAp63fl/fl;K14cre+). TAp63−/− mice age prematurely and develop blisters, skin ulcerations, senescence of hair follicle-associated dermal and epidermal cells, and decreased hair morphogenesis. These phenotypes are likely due to loss of TAp63 in dermal and epidermal precursors since both cell types show defective proliferation, early senescence, and genomic instability. These data indicate that TAp63 serves to maintain adult skin stem cells by regulating cellular senescence and genomic stability, thereby preventing premature tissue aging. PMID:19570515

  1. A calibration system of O2 consumption and CO2 production for premature infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Ching; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Yeh, Tsu-Fuh

    2001-03-01

    An apparatus to calibrate the system of measuring O2 consumption and CO2 production has been developed for premature infants. This system is based on the alcohol combustion principal. The alcohol combustion is used to test the indirect calorimetric system due to its simplicity and reliability. In the previous studies, the O2 consumption rate of alcoholic combustion is too large to simulate the breath of premature infants. A new design is proposed to burn alcohol continuously at a rate as low as 0.004 ml min-1, equivalent to an O2 consumption rate of only 3.9 ml min-1, a level in the breath range of preterms of about 660 g based on the measurement 5.9 ml kg-1 min-1. The alcohol combusts with various steady-state rates to imitate the breath of premature infants, and it is useful for a canopy open-circuit system. The calibration tool proposed here would be helpful in the clinical study of energy expenditure for preterms.

  2. Alcohol and fatal life trajectories in Russia: understanding narrative accounts of premature male death in the family

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the post-Soviet period, Russian working-age men have suffered unusually high mortality rates. Earlier quantitative work found that part of this is attributable to hazardous and harmful patterns of alcohol consumption, which increased in the period of transition at a time of massive social and economic disruption and uncertainty. However, there has been very little work done to document and understand in detail the downward life trajectories of individual men who died prematurely from alcohol-related conditions. Building on an earlier case-control study, this unique qualitative study investigates the perceived interplay between men's drinking careers, their employment and family history, health and eventual death. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with close relatives (most often the widow) of 19 men who died between 2003 and 2005 aged 25-54 years whose close relatives reported that alcohol contributed to their death. The study was conducted in a typical medium-sized Russian city. The relative's accounts were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The accounts describe how hazardous drinking both contributed to serious employment, family and health problems, and was simultaneously used as a coping mechanism to deal with life crises and a decline in social status. The interviews highlighted the importance of the workplace and employment status for shaping men's drinking patterns. Common themes emerged around a culture of drinking in the workplace, peer pressure from colleagues to drink, use of alcohol as remuneration, consuming non-beverage alcohols, Russian-specific drinking patterns, attitudes to treatment, and passive attitudes towards health and drinking. Conclusions The study provides a unique insight into the personal decline that lies behind the extremely high working-age mortality due to heavy drinking in Russia, and highlights how health status and hazardous drinking are often closely intertwined with economic and social

  3. Cardiac patients who completed a longitudinal psychosocial study had a different clinical and psychosocial baseline profile than patients who dropped out prematurely.

    PubMed

    Damen, Nikki L; Versteeg, Henneke; Serruys, Patrick W; van Geuns, Robert-Jan M; van Domburg, Ron T; Pedersen, Susanne S; Boersma, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Non-response is a serious threat to the external validity of longitudinal psychosocial studies. Little is known about potential systematic differences between patients with coronary artery disease who complete a psychosocial study and those who drop out prematurely due to non-response, or whether drop-outs may have a different cardiovascular risk. We studied a cohort of 1132 consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). At baseline, all patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Type D Scale (DS14). At 12 months follow-up, 70.8% (n = 802) of patients completed both questionnaires, while 29.2% (n = 330) dropped out. We observed significant differences in socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological baseline characteristics between completers and drop-outs. Drop-outs were younger, more likely to smoke, but less often prescribed cardiovascular medications, including calcium antagonists and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, as compared with completers. Drop-outs more often had depression, anxiety, and negative affectivity, as compared with completers (all p-values <0.05). After a median follow-up of 4 years, we found no significant differences in mortality risk between completers and drop-outs (6.5 vs. 7.3%; adjusted HR 1.34, 95% CI 0.82-2.19, respectively). In conclusion, a possible attrition bias occurred, as drop-outs and completers differed systematically on some socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological baseline characteristics. Despite these differences, this did not translate into a poorer short-term prognosis, as there were no differences in the mortality risk of completers vs. drop-outs after a median follow-up of 4 years. In future prospective studies, attention should be paid to attrition bias, and its possible impact on study results and implications should be discussed. PMID:24065741

  4. Allometry of Herring mortality

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, M.D. )

    1993-11-01

    The author calculated the relationship between instantaneous natural mortality, M (d[sup [minus]1]), and dry body weight, W ([mu]g), for herring larvae and adults using data from the scientific literature. Geometric mean mortality of adult Pacific herring Clupea pallasi (0.52[center dot]year[sup [minus]1]), was about three times greater than that of adult Atlantic herring Clupea harengus (0.18 year[sup [minus]1]), which may reflect greater reproductive effort per unit size by Pacific herring than by Atlantic herring. Geometric mean mortality of Pacific herring larvae (0.083[center dot]d[sup [minus]1]) was 30% greater than that of Atlantic herring larvae (0.064[center dot]d[sup [minus]1]), but the difference was not significant. The functional regression for Atlantic herring was log[sub e](M) = -0.4924 - 0.4064[center dot]log[sub e](W), and the regression for Pacific herring was log[sub e](M) = 0.1553 0.3935[center dot]log[sub e](W). The regressions provide preliminary estimates of average M of herring eggs and juveniles, life history stages for which there are few direct estimates of mortality. They also indicate that the weight exponent of instantaneous growth of herring should be greater than -0.4. Allometry of herring mortality implies that year-class strength of herring should be positively correlated with size at recruitment. 78 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Retinopathy of prematurity in port harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adio, Adedayo O; Ugwu, Rosemary O; Nwokocha, Chidi G; Eneh, Augusta U

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. With many preterm babies now surviving as a result of improvement in neonatal care in Nigeria, the incidence of visual impairment/blindness as a result of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) may rise. We describe our findings after screening starts for the first time in a 15-year-old special care baby unit so as to establish the incidence and risk factors for developing ROP. Methods. A prospective study carried out at the Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU) and Pediatric Outpatient Clinics of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital between January 1 and October 31, 2012. Fifty-three preterm babies (of 550 neonates admitted within the study period) delivered before 32 completed weeks and weighing less than 1500 g were included in the study following informed consent and the main outcome measure was the development of any stage of ROP. Results. Mean gestational age at birth was 28.98 ± 1.38 weeks. Mean birth weight was 1411 ± 128 g. Out of 550 babies admitted at SCBU, 87 of 100 preterms survived with 53 included in study. Twenty-five (47.2%) had different degrees of ROP with prevalence found to be 47.2%. Prevalence was higher (75%) in babies weighing <1300 g and those delivered before 30-week gestation (58%). Twenty-one (84%) had stage 1 no plus disease and 3 (12%) had stage 2 no plus disease. Only 1 (4%) had threshold disease in Zone 1. None had disease at stage 4 or 5 or AP-ROP. Receiving supplemental oxygen (χ (2) = 6.17; P = 0.01), presence of sepsis (χ (2) = 7.47; P = 0.006), multiple blood transfusions (χ (2) = 5.11; P = 0.02), and delivery by caesarian section (χ (2) = 4.22; P = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of ROP. There were no significant differences with gender, apneic spells, jaundice, or phototherapy. Conclusions and Relevance. All live infants with ROP were noted to regress spontaneously in this study. Though it may not be cost effective to acquire treatment facilities at the moment (the only child with

  6. Preclinical Models of Encephalopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Jantzie, Lauren L.; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Encephalopathy of prematurity (EoP) encompasses the central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities associated with injury from preterm birth. Although rapid progress is being made, limited understanding exists of how the cellular and molecular CNS injury from early birth manifests as the myriad of neurological deficits in children who are born preterm. More importantly, this lack of direct insight into the pathogenesis of these deficits hinders both our ability to diagnose those infants who are at risk in real-time and could potentially benefit from treatment, and our ability to develop more effective interventions. Current barriers to clarifying the pathophysiology, developmental trajectory, injury timing and evolution include preclinical animal models that only partially recapitulate the molecular, cellular, histological and functional abnormalities observed in the mature CNS following EoP. Inflammation from hypoxic-ischemic and/or infectious injury induced in utero in lower mammals, or actual prenatal delivery of more phylogenetically-advanced mammals, are likely to be the most clinically relevant EOP models, facilitating translation to benefit infants. Injury timing, type, severity and pathophysiology need to be optimized to address the specific hypothesis being tested. Functional assays of the mature animal following perinatal injury to mimic EoP should ideally test for the array of neurological deficits commonly observed in preterm infants including gait, seizure threshold, cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. Here, we review the merits of various preclinical models, identify gaps in knowledge that warrant further study and consider challenges that animal researchers may face in embarking on these studies. While no one model system is perfect, insights relevant to the clinical problem can be gained with interpretation of experimental results within the context of inherent limitations of the chosen model system. Collectively, optimal use of multiple models will

  7. Retinopathy of Prematurity in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adio, Adedayo O.; Ugwu, Rosemary O.; Nwokocha, Chidi G.; Eneh, Augusta U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. With many preterm babies now surviving as a result of improvement in neonatal care in Nigeria, the incidence of visual impairment/blindness as a result of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) may rise. We describe our findings after screening starts for the first time in a 15-year-old special care baby unit so as to establish the incidence and risk factors for developing ROP. Methods. A prospective study carried out at the Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU) and Pediatric Outpatient Clinics of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital between January 1 and October 31, 2012. Fifty-three preterm babies (of 550 neonates admitted within the study period) delivered before 32 completed weeks and weighing less than 1500 g were included in the study following informed consent and the main outcome measure was the development of any stage of ROP. Results. Mean gestational age at birth was 28.98 ± 1.38 weeks. Mean birth weight was 1411 ± 128 g. Out of 550 babies admitted at SCBU, 87 of 100 preterms survived with 53 included in study. Twenty-five (47.2%) had different degrees of ROP with prevalence found to be 47.2%. Prevalence was higher (75%) in babies weighing <1300 g and those delivered before 30-week gestation (58%). Twenty-one (84%) had stage 1 no plus disease and 3 (12%) had stage 2 no plus disease. Only 1 (4%) had threshold disease in Zone 1. None had disease at stage 4 or 5 or AP-ROP. Receiving supplemental oxygen (χ2 = 6.17; P = 0.01), presence of sepsis (χ2 = 7.47; P = 0.006), multiple blood transfusions (χ2 = 5.11; P = 0.02), and delivery by caesarian section (χ2 = 4.22; P = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of ROP. There were no significant differences with gender, apneic spells, jaundice, or phototherapy. Conclusions and Relevance. All live infants with ROP were noted to regress spontaneously in this study. Though it may not be cost effective to acquire treatment facilities at the moment (the only child with treatable disease

  8. Early repolarization as a predictor of premature ventricular beats.

    PubMed

    Matoshvili, Z T; Petriashvili, Sh G; Archadze, A T; Azaladze, I G

    2015-02-01

    Early repolarization pattern (ERP) is a common ECG variant, characterized by J point elevation manifested either as terminal QRS slurring (the transition from the QRS segment to the ST segment) or notching (a positive deflection inscribed on terminal QRS complex) associated with concave upward ST-segment elevation and prominent T waves in at least two contiguous leads. Aim of this observational study was to compare number of premature ventricular beats in the different groups of patients with early repolarization. The result of this observational study shows that there are: 1,74 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in 41-74 year subgroup VS 19-40 year subgroup; 1,31 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in male subgroup VS female subgroup (But this difference is not statistically significant, because t=1,49, p=0,141); 2,85 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in CAD+ERP subgroup VS ERP without CAD subgroup; 1,74 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in HF+ERP subgroup VS ERP without HF subgroup; 1,81 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in CAD+ERP subgroup VS CAD without ERP subgroup; 1,58 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in HF+ERP subgroup VS HF without ERP subgroup; So, CAD+ERP is very arrhythmogenic condition, after this is HF+ERP, Then Age. This study shows that ERP independently increase number of PVB in different groups (CAD, HF). This is principally new and very important result. Also the number of patients is enough to make this conclusion. PMID:25802448

  9. The mortality of companies.

    PubMed

    Daepp, Madeleine I G; Hamilton, Marcus J; West, Geoffrey B; Bettencourt, Luís M A

    2015-05-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  10. The mortality of companies

    PubMed Central

    Daepp, Madeleine I. G.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; West, Geoffrey B.; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  11. Autoantibodies, mortality and ageing.

    PubMed

    Richaud-Patin, Y; Villa, A R

    1995-01-01

    Immunological failure may be the cause of predisposition to certain infections, neoplasms, and vascular diseases in adulthood. Mortality risks through life may reflect an undetermined number of causes. This study describes the prevalence of positivity of autoantibodies through life, along with general and specific mortality causes in three countries with different socioeconomic development (Guatemala, Mexico and the United States). Prevalence of autoantibodies by age was obtained from previous reports. In spite of having involved different ethnic groups, the observed trends in prevalence of autoantibodies, as well as mortality through life, showed a similar behavior. Thus, both the increase in autoantibody production and death risk as age rises, may share physiopathological phenomena related to the ageing process. PMID:7539882

  12. Years of Life Lost and Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Mortality in Yazd Province, Iran (2004-2009)

    PubMed Central

    Mirzadeh, M; Mirzaei, M; Mirzaei, M; ShogaeiFar, H

    2015-01-01

    Background The Years of Life Lost (YLL) due to cancer can be a more illustrative index to promote preventive and therapeutic services, this study aimed to investigate the childhood cancer mortality and its trend over the past few years in Yazd to provide planners with baseline data. Material and Method Data obtained from death registration system of the healthcare center were used to calculate the age-specific standardized mortality for 5-year age groups. To calculate the YLL, the standardized expected YLL method was used with a discount rate of 0.03 for health gain in the future, the age weight of 0.04 for different years of age, and a constant age weight correction factor of 0.165. The collected data were analyzed using the Epi 6 and Excel 2007. Results 28 patients in Yazd aged 0-19 die annually due Leukemia and CNS tumors were the most common causes of death. The crude cancer death rate is 8.48 in boys and 6.72 in girls per 100000. Premature cancer deaths have caused 3,436 YLL in boys and 2,561 YLL in girls (4.92% of total YLL in both sex) .The average death age did not have a significant relationship with sex or location of residence. Conclusion Childhood cancer mortality has had a decreasing trend. This study can help in the assessment of healthcare needs and improvement of the quality of healthcare services. It can also help in the design and prioritization of interventions to identify cancer risk factors which can facilitate early diagnosis. PMID:26705450

  13. [Lung maturation therapy with glucocorticoids in threatened premature labor. Considerations of risk-benefit in evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Sauerwald, A; Rath, W

    2000-01-01

    Prematurity is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Antenatal administration of glucocorticoids improves the neonatal outcome of preterm born infants. 1994 the NIH published recommendations for the use of glucocorticoids for women at risk of preterm delivery. A recent evaluation by the Cochrane Collaboration in 1999 showed that antenatal administration of glucocorticoids significantly reduced the rate of RDS and IVH in the gestational age between 24 and 34 weeks. Consequences of repeated courses of antenatal glucocorticoids are not sufficiently studied. The effectivity and safety regarding birth weights, infectious diseases, and the best timing remains unknown. Administration of glucocorticoids lowers fetal activity and heart rate variability. Effects on fetal growth, maternal and fetal immunosystem, and the development of atopic diseases are controversely discussed. Thus preterm labour not leading to a cervical ripening is not necessarily a reason for antenatal glucocorticoids. Antenatal glucocorticoids with PROM do not lower the rate of RDS but of IVH. No prospective randomized trial evaluated the effectivity of antenatal glucocorticoids in diabetes mellitus and IUGR. In preeclampsia beta-methason could improve the rate of RDS and the neonatal outcome. Still our knowledge of antenatal glucocorticoid administration is not sufficient. But despite possible (longtime-) risks for mother and child the administration of glucocorticoids according to the guidelines of the NIH is a major part in the treatment of prematurity and improves the outcome of premature infants. The indication for multiple courses of glucocorticoids should be considered carefully. PMID:11199148

  14. Macular edema in Asian Indian premature infants with retinopathy of prematurity: Impact on visual acuity and refractive status after 1-year

    PubMed Central

    Vinekar, Anand; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Jayadev, Chaitra; Bauer, Noel; Munusamy, Sivakumar; Kemmanu, Vasudha; Kurian, Mathew; Mahendradas, Padmamalini; Avadhani, Kavitha; Shetty, Bhujang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the impact of transient, self-resolving, untreated “macular edema” detected on spectral domain optical coherence tomography in Asian Indian premature infants with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) on visual acuity (VA) and refraction at 1-year of corrected age. Materials and Methods: Visual acuity and refraction of 11 infants with bilateral macular edema (Group A) was compared with gestational age-matched 16 infants with ROP without edema (Group B) and 17 preterms infants without ROP and without edema (Group C) at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of corrected age using Teller Acuity Cards and cycloplegic retinoscopy. Sub-group analysis of the previously described pattern A and B macular edema was performed. Results: Visual acuity was lower in infants with macular edema compared with the other two control groups throughout the study period, but statistically significant only at 3 months. Visual improvement in these infants was highest between the 3rd and 6th month and plateaued by the end of the 1st year with acuity comparable to the other two groups. The edema cohort was more hyperopic compared to the other two groups between 3 and 12 months of age. Pattern A edema had worse VA compared to pattern B, although not statistically significant. Conclusion: Macular edema, although transient, caused reduced VA as early as 3 months of corrected age in Asian Indian premature infants weighing <2000 g at birth. The higher hyperopia in these infants is possibly due to visual disturbances caused at a critical time of fovealization. We hypothesize a recovery and feedback mechanism based on the principles of active emmetropization to explain our findings. PMID:26139806

  15. Prognostic Significance of Premature Atrial Complexes Burden in Prediction of Long-Term Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chen, Yun-Yu; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chung, Fa-Po; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chong, Eric; Cheng, Hao-Min; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Liao, Jo-Nan; Chiou, Chuen-Wang; Huang, Jin-Long; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background The prognostic significance of premature atrial complex (PAC) burden is not fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the relationship between the burden of PACs and long-term outcome. Methods and Results We investigated the clinical characteristics of 5371 consecutive patients without atrial fibrillation (AF) or a permanent pacemaker (PPM) at baseline who underwent 24-hour electrocardiography monitoring between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2004. Clinical event data were retrieved from the Bureau of National Health Insurance of Taiwan. During a mean follow-up duration of 10±1 years, there were 1209 deaths, 1166 cardiovascular-related hospitalizations, 3104 hospitalizations for any reason, 418 cases of new-onset AF, and 132 PPM implantations. The optimal cut-off of PAC burden for predicting mortality was 76 beats per day, with a sensitivity of 63.1% and a specificity of 63.5%. In multivariate analysis, a PAC burden >76 beats per day was an independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio: 1.384, 95% CI: 1.230 to 1.558), cardiovascular hospitalization (hazard ratio: 1.284, 95% CI: 1.137 to 1.451), new-onset AF (hazard ratio: 1.757, 95% CI: 1.427 to 2.163), and PPM implantation (hazard ratio: 2.821, 95% CI: 1.898 to 4.192). Patients with frequent PAC had increased risk of mortality attributable to myocardial infarction, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Frequent PACs increased risk of PPM implantation owing to sick sinus syndrome, high-degree atrioventricular block, and/or AF. Conclusions The burden of PACs is independently associated with mortality, cardiovascular hospitalization, new-onset AF, and PPM implantation in the long term. PMID:26316525

  16. Non-Communicable Disease Mortality and Risk Factors in Formal and Informal Neighborhoods, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso: Evidence from a Health and Demographic Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Rossier, Clémentine; Soura, Abdramane Bassiahi; Duthé, Géraldine; Findley, Sally

    2014-01-01

    The expected growth in NCDs in cities is one of the most important health challenges of the coming decades in Sub-Saharan countries. This paper aims to fill the gap in our understanding of socio-economic differentials in NCD mortality and risk in low and middle income neighborhoods in urban Africa. We use data collected in the Ouagadougou Health and Demographic Surveillance System. 409 deaths were recorded between 2009–2011 among 20,836 individuals aged 35 years and older; verbal autopsies and the InterVA program were used to determine the probable cause of death. A random survey asked in 2011 1,039 adults aged 35 and over about tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, lack of physical activity and measured their weight, height, and blood pressure. These data reveal a high level of premature mortality due to NCDs in all neighborhoods: NCD mortality increases substantially by age 50. NCD mortality is greater in formal neighborhoods, while adult communicable disease mortality remains high, especially in informal neighborhoods. There is a high prevalence of risk factors for NCDs in the studied neighborhoods, with over one-fourth of the adults being overweight and over one-fourth having hypertension. Better-off residents are more prone to physical inactivity and excessive weight, while vulnerable populations such as widows/divorced individuals and migrants suffer more from higher blood pressure. Females have a significantly lower risk of being smokers or heavy drinkers, while they are more likely to be physically inactive or overweight, especially when married. Muslim individuals are less likely to be smokers or heavy drinkers, but have a higher blood pressure. Everything else being constant, individuals living in formal neighborhoods are more often overweight. The data presented make clear the pressing need to develop effective programs to reduce NCD risk across all types of neighborhoods in African cities, and suggest several entry points for community

  17. Non-Communicable Disease Mortality and Risk Factors in Formal and Informal Neighborhoods, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso: Evidence from a Health and Demographic Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Rossier, Clémentine; Soura, Abdramane Bassiahi; Duthé, Géraldine; Findley, Sally

    2014-01-01

    The expected growth in NCDs in cities is one of the most important health challenges of the coming decades in Sub-Saharan countries. This paper aims to fill the gap in our understanding of socio-economic differentials in NCD mortality and risk in low and middle income neighborhoods in urban Africa. We use data collected in the Ouagadougou Health and Demographic Surveillance System. 409 deaths were recorded between 2009-2011 among 20,836 individuals aged 35 years and older; verbal autopsies and the InterVA program were used to determine the probable cause of death. A random survey asked in 2011 1,039 adults aged 35 and over about tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, lack of physical activity and measured their weight, height, and blood pressure. These data reveal a high level of premature mortality due to NCDs in all neighborhoods: NCD mortality increases substantially by age 50. NCD mortality is greater in formal neighborhoods, while adult communicable disease mortality remains high, especially in informal neighborhoods. There is a high prevalence of risk factors for NCDs in the studied neighborhoods, with over one-fourth of the adults being overweight and over one-fourth having hypertension. Better-off residents are more prone to physical inactivity and excessive weight, while vulnerable populations such as widows/divorced individuals and migrants suffer more from higher blood pressure. Females have a significantly lower risk of being smokers or heavy drinkers, while they are more likely to be physically inactive or overweight, especially when married. Muslim individuals are less likely to be smokers or heavy drinkers, but have a higher blood pressure. Everything else being constant, individuals living in formal neighborhoods are more often overweight. The data presented make clear the pressing need to develop effective programs to reduce NCD risk across all types of neighborhoods in African cities, and suggest several entry points for community

  18. [Vitamin A level and diseases of premature infants].

    PubMed

    Tao, En-Fu; Yuan, Tian-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin, and it is not only necessary for the normal growth and development of epithelial cells, but also plays a very important role in the normal growth and development of the retina, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, brain, and immune system. Studies have confirmed that the low level of vitamin A in premature infants at birth can last through the entire infancy. Recently, there have been particular concerns about the level of vitamin A and development of diseases in premature infants, with major focuses on the related mechanisms of action of vitamin A in respiratory distress syndrome, chronic lung disease, retinopathy of prematurity, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and infections in premature infants, which still awaits further investigation.This paper summarizes and analyzes the current status of research on vitamin A level and diseases of premature infants at home and abroad. In addition, although enough evidence suggests that vitamin A supplementation is beneficial to preterm infants, evidence is still lacking for recommended methods for supplementation and dose of vitamin A, and further studies are needed. PMID:26903067

  19. Clinical assessment of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sanjiv B

    2004-10-01

    The clinical assessment of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants remains difficult in the absence of a gestational age-specific total or free (unbound) bilirubin level that predicts bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. Because the total serum bilirubin concentration is an unreliable predictor of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants, alternative mean for predicting bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in jaundiced preterm newborns is needed. Over the last few years, we have witnessed substantial gain in our knowledge involving usefulness of bilirubin-binding variables (total bilirubin, free bilirubin, bilirubin:albumin molar ratio) for clinical assessment of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in preterm infants. The knowledge gained has provided impetus for more clinical studies that are geared toward confirming the usefulness of free bilirubin as a predictor of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity and identifying the gestational age-specific free bilirubin level that may increase the risk of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants. The paper has attempted to provide an overview of bilirubin-induced auditory toxicity along with the existing clinical evidence in favor of free bilirubin assay and usefulness of auditory brainstem evoked response for evaluation of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants. In addition, the author has described findings that suggest an association of apnea, a clinical manifestation, with acute bilirubin encephalopathy in premature infants. PMID:15686265

  20. Absence of premature senescence in Werner's syndrome keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Badr; Sheerin, Angela N; Jennert-Burston, Katrin; Bird, Joe L E; Massala, M V; Illsley, Matthew; James, S Elizabeth; Faragher, Richard G A

    2016-10-01

    Werner's syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by loss of function mutation in wrn and is a useful model of premature in vivo ageing. Cellular senescence is a plausible causal mechanism of mammalian ageing and, at the cellular level, WS fibroblasts show premature senescence resulting from a combination of telomeric attrition and replication fork stalling. Over 90% of WS fibroblast cultures achieve <20 population doublings (PD) in vitro compared to wild type human fibroblast cultures. It has been proposed that some cell types, capable of proliferation, will fail to show a premature senescence phenotype in response to wrn mutations. To test this hypothesis, human dermal keratinocytes (derived from both WS and wild type patients) were cultured long term. WS Keratinocytes showed a replicative lifespan in excess of 100 population doublings but maintained functional growth arrest mechanisms based on p16 and p53. The karyotype of the cells was superficially normal and the cultures retained markers characteristic of keratinocyte holoclones (stem cells) including p63 expression and telomerase activity. Accordingly we conclude that, in contrast to WS fibroblasts, WS keratinocytes do not demonstrate slow growth rates or features of premature senescence. These findings suggest that the epidermis is among the tissue types that do not display symptoms of premature ageing caused by loss of function of wrn. This is in support that Werner's syndrome is a segmental progeroid syndrome. PMID:27492502

  1. GIS as a community engagement tool: developing a plan to reduce infant mortality risk factors.

    PubMed

    Detres, Maridelys; Lucio, Robert; Vitucci, Judi

    2014-07-01

    This article describes how a community coalition focusing on maternal and child health engages community participation through the use of geographic information systems (GIS) mapping, developing strategies that culminate in the implementation of a service delivery plan to improve birth outcomes. Vital statistics data from 2007 to 2009 was analyzed by zip code in Pinellas County Florida to produce choropleth thematic maps using ArcGIS for 3 year rolling average infant deaths and single year percentages for prematurity. The maps were presented at the organization's annual coalition meeting to discuss risk areas, changes over time in the selected indicators and solicit community feedback on how to best target issues addressing infant mortality and prematurity. The maps identified new zip codes of concern for prematurity in addition to known high risk zip codes for both infant mortality and prematurity. The community identified changes in demographic composition and changes in housing patterns, such as new mobile home areas, in the high risk areas. In response, the community assisted the Coalition in developing a holistic plan addressing risk factors affecting birth outcomes by expanding current services, hiring a nutritionist, and contracting a health navigator. When compared to tables and charts, a visual depiction of a neighborhood by recognizable zip codes is a useful tool to help community decision makers better visualize public health concerns and interpret trends based on local knowledge. Public health professionals should use this community knowledge to interpret research results and implement strategies to improve birth outcomes. PMID:23934057

  2. INTEGRATED MONITORING OF MARINE DISEASE AND MORTALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been apparent increases over the last several decades in disease and mortality of marine and estuarine organisms, including shellfish, presumably due to greater anthropogenic stress generated both in watersheds and coastal areas. These events are investigated from a lo...

  3. Accelerating global forest mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    Forest mortality is apparently accelerating globally. The evidence supporting this contention is now substantial, as is the evidence suggesting the acceleration has just begun and will become progressively worse in upcoming decades. I will review the data and models used to make these contentions.

  4. Screening for retinopathy of prematurity: a report from upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mahmoud M.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To detect the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in a tertiary referral neonatal intensive care unit in upper Egypt and to describe the obstacles faced during implementing the screening protocol for the first time. METHODS Consecutive infants were enrolled at birth and screened for ROP. We used the UK ROP guideline (May 2008) for infant selection, follow up and treatment. Repeat examinations were performed until retinal vascularisation was complete. RESULTS Fifty-two infants were enrolled: 24 males and 28 females. Mean gestational age was 31.3wk (±2.8 SD) and mean birth weight was 1234.6 g (±221.1 SD). Incidence of ROP was 36.5% (stages 1, 2, 3 and 4a were 9.6%, 9.6%, 15.4% and 1.9% respectively), no stages 4b or 5 were found in this series. Six infants (11.5%) died during screening without ROP, 25 infants (48.1%) were discharged from screening with retinal vascularisation reaching zone III, 5 infants (9.6%) were treated with indirect diode with or without additional cryotherapy and 16 infants (30.8%) were lost to follow up. In this series gestational age rather than birth weight was found significantly correlated and predictive (P<0.05) with ROP stages. CONCLUSION ROP in a single site in Upper Egypt appears to have comparable incidence to other areas worldwide. The main screening obstacle was missing cases due to the absence of a national ROP screening protocol. PMID:26949647

  5. Mortality and development revisited.

    PubMed

    Preston, S H

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to update results reported in 2 earlier papers about the role of socioeconomic factors in worldwide mortality declines since the 1930s. Preston (1975) demonstrated that the relationship between life expectancy at birth and per capita income (in constant dollars) had shifted between the 1930s and the 1960s. A country at a particular level of national income per capita was estimated to have a level of life expectancy at birth that was, on average, 9.7 years higher in the 1960s than it would have been in the 1930s at the same level of income. That shift clearly was attributable to factors other than measured income gains. To identify the contribution of advances in literacy and nutrition to the apparent shift, Preston (1980) added those variables to income in regression equations estimated with data on 36 countries around 1940 and 120 countries around 1970. For the less developed countries (LDCs), the shift in the relationship between 1940-70 was estimated to be 8.8 years after those variables were introduced along with income. Thus, literacy and nutritional gains were responsible for relatively little of the shift. The goal here is to estimate the amount of shift in the relation between mortality and other development indicators during the 1965-69 to 1975-79 period. The focus is on the 70% of the developing world (exclude China) where, in the aggregate, there are indications of a slowdown in the pace of mortality change during the 1960s and the early 1970s. In all cases a mortality indicator was used as the dependent variable in a cross-national regression analysis that includes data from LDCs and from developed countries. Also, in all cases, the set of independent variables included some transformation of the following: the percentage of adults who were literate, gross domestic product per capita in constant dollars, and the excess of per capita daily calories supplied above 1500. Data were drawn from the standard UN, UNESCO, and World Bank

  6. Unintentional injury mortality in India, 2005: Nationally representative mortality survey of 1.1 million homes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Unintentional injuries are an important cause of death in India. However, no reliable nationally representative estimates of unintentional injury deaths are available. Thus, we examined unintentional injury deaths in a nationally representative mortality survey. Methods Trained field staff interviewed a living relative of those who had died during 2001-03. The verbal autopsy reports were sent to two of the130 trained physicians, who independently assigned an ICD-10 code to each death. Discrepancies were resolved through reconciliation and adjudication. Proportionate cause specific mortality was used to produce national unintentional injury mortality estimates based on United Nations population and death estimates. Results In 2005, unintentional injury caused 648 000 deaths (7% of all deaths; 58/100 000 population). Unintentional injury mortality rates were higher among males than females, and in rural versus urban areas. Road traffic injuries (185 000 deaths; 29% of all unintentional injury deaths), falls (160 000 deaths, 25%) and drowning (73 000 deaths, 11%) were the three leading causes of unintentional injury mortality, with fire-related injury causing 5% of these deaths. The highest unintentional mortality rates were in those aged 70years or older (410/100 000). Conclusions These direct estimates of unintentional injury deaths in India (0.6 million) are lower than WHO indirect estimates (0.8 million), but double the estimates which rely on police reports (0.3 million). Importantly, they revise upward the mortality due to falls, particularly in the elderly, and revise downward mortality due to fires. Ongoing monitoring of injury mortality will enable development of evidence based injury prevention programs. PMID:22741813

  7. Causes of Mortality and Risk Factors for Injury Mortality among Children in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Flower, Kori B; Hoppin, Jane A; Shore, David L; Lynch, Charles F; Blair, Aaron; Knott, Charles; Alavanja, Michael C R; Sandler, Dale P

    2007-06-01

    Farm children face unique health risks due to sharing their residential environment with hazardous machinery and materials. Causes of mortality among farm children have not been comprehensively described. OBJECTIVE: In the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) cohort, we examined causes of mortality among 21,360 children in Iowa and North Carolina between 1975 and 1998. METHODS: We matched identifying information for children provided by mothers on self-administered questionnaires to state death registries (1975-1998). Data on farm and family characteristics were provided by parents via enrollment questionnaires (1993-1997). Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated, using state mortality data to generate expected deaths. We used logistic regression to examine parent, child and farm characteristics associated with injury mortality. RESULTS: There were 162 deaths in Iowa (SMR=0.69; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.60, 0.81) and 26 deaths in North Carolina (SMR=0.42; 95%CI=0.28, 0.61) in children aged 0-19 years. This deficit was largely due to deaths in the first year of life. Although deaths from overall unintentional injury were not increased, excess agricultural machinery mortality was observed in Iowa (SMR=9.25; 95% CI=5.12, 16.70). In case-control comparisons, maternal age less than 25 years at child's birth (OR=2.17; 95%CI=1.05, 4.49) and having more than 2 children in the family (OR=2.79; 95%CI=1.47, 5.30) were associated with increased child injury mortality. For children under 14 years, participation in farm work was associated with increased risk of agricultural machine-related mortality (OR=3.92; 95% CI=1.04, 14.78). CONCLUSIONS: Parent and child characteristics associated with child injury mortality could be used to target farm safety interventions. PMID:18535666

  8. Mortality among a cohort of uranium mill workers: an update

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, L; Bloom, T; Hein, M; Ward, E

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the mortality experience of 1484 men employed in seven uranium mills in the Colorado Plateau for at least one year on or after 1 January 1940. Methods: Vital status was updated through 1998, and life table analyses were conducted. Results: Mortality from all causes and all cancers was less than expected based on US mortality rates. A statistically significant increase in non-malignant respiratory disease mortality and non-significant increases in mortality from lymphatic and haematopoietic malignancies other than leukaemia, lung cancer, and chronic renal disease were observed. The excess in lymphatic and haematopoietic cancer mortality was due to an increase in mortality from lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma and Hodgkin's disease. Within the category of non-malignant respiratory disease, mortality from emphysema and pneumoconioses and other respiratory disease was increased. Mortality from lung cancer and emphysema was higher among workers hired prior to 1955 when exposures to uranium, silica, and vanadium were presumably higher. Mortality from these causes of death did not increase with employment duration. Conclusions: Although the observed excesses were consistent with our a priori hypotheses, positive trends with employment duration were not observed. Limitations included the small cohort size and limited power to detect a moderately increased risk for some outcomes of interest, the inability to estimate individual exposures, and the lack of smoking data. Because of these limitations, firm conclusions about the relation of the observed excesses in mortality and mill exposures are not possible. PMID:14691274

  9. Premature saturation in backpropagation networks: Mechanism and necessary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Vitela, J.E.; Reifman, J.

    1997-08-01

    The mechanism that gives rise to the phenomenon of premature saturation of the output units of feedforward multilayer neural networks during training with the standard backpropagation algorithm is described. The entire process of premature saturation is characterized by three distinct stages and it is concluded that the momentum term plays the leading role in the occurrence of the phenomenon. The necessary conditions for the occurrence of premature saturation are presented and a new method is proposed, based on these conditions, that eliminates the occurrence of the phenomenon. Validity of the conditions and the proposed method are illustrated through simulation results. Three case studies are presented. The first two came from a training session for classification of three component failures in a nuclear power plant. The last case, comes from a training session for classification of welded fuel elements.

  10. Risk factors of intracranial hemorrhage in premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Khalessi, Nasrin; Farahani, Zahra; Shariat, Mamak; Rezaeizadeh, Golnaz

    2014-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is an important cause of brain injury in premature neonates. Current study tries to define associated risk factors of IVH in preterm neonates in Aliasghar Children Hospital during 2008 to 2011. In this study, the risk factors have been evaluated in premature neonates with IVH, who had at least one brain sonography since their admission in NICU. A total of 63 premature neonates with IVH were assessed. Mean gestational age was 29.81 (24-34) weeks and mean birth weight was 1290.83±382.96 gr. Other risk factors such as sex, mode of delivery, history of using infertility drugs, maternal disease, maternal hypertension and preeclampsia, lumbar puncture, ventilator therapy and pneumothorax were considered. Because no absolute treatment for IVH is available, identifying risk factors is important in prevention and management of IVH. PMID:25421841

  11. The effectiveness of video interaction guidance in parents of premature infants: A multicenter randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have consistently found a high incidence of neonatal medical problems, premature births and low birth weights in abused and neglected children. One of the explanations proposed for the relation between neonatal problems and adverse parenting is a possible delay or disturbance in the bonding process between the parent and infant. This hypothesis suggests that due to neonatal problems, the development of an affectionate bond between the parent and the infant is impeded. The disruption of an optimal parent-infant bond -on its turn- may predispose to distorted parent-infant interactions and thus facilitate abusive or neglectful behaviours. Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) is expected to promote the bond between parents and newborns and is expected to diminish non-optimal parenting behaviour. Methods/design This study is a multi-center randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Video Interaction Guidance in parents of premature infants. In this study 210 newborn infants with their parents will be included: n = 70 healthy term infants (>37 weeks GA), n = 70 moderate term infants (32–37 weeks GA) which are recruited from maternity wards of 6 general hospitals and n = 70 extremely preterm infants or very low birth weight infants (<32 weeks GA) recruited by the NICU of 2 specialized hospitals. The participating families will be divided into 3 groups: a reference group (i.e. full term infants and their parents, receiving care as usual), a control group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving care as usual) and an intervention group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving VIG). The data will be collected during the first six months after birth using observations of parent-infant interactions, questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Primary outcomes are the quality of parental bonding and parent-infant interactive behaviour. Parental secondary outcomes are (posttraumatic) stress symptoms

  12. Relation Between Family History of Premature Coronary Artery Disease and the Risk of Death in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Abdi-Ali, Ahmed; Shaheen, AbdelAziz; Southern, Danielle; Zhang, Mei; Knudtson, Merril; White, James; Graham, Michelle; James, Mathew T; Wilton, Stephen B

    2016-02-01

    Family history (FHx) of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) is a risk factor for development of incident cardiovascular disease. However the association between FHx and outcomes in patients with established CAD is unclear. We followed 84,373 patients with angiographic CAD enrolled in the inclusive Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease registry between April 2002 and March 2013. Overall, 25,566 (30%) self-reported an FHx of CAD, defined as a first-degree relative with premature CAD (men, age <55 years; women, age <65 years). We tested the association between FHx and all-cause mortality using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. After adjusting for baseline differences in clinical characteristics, indication, and extent of CAD, FHx was associated with reduced all-cause mortality over a median 5.6 years in follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 0.77 [95% CI 0.73 to 0.80]). The magnitude of this protective association was weaker in those with versus without a previous myocardial infarction (HR 0.87 [95% CI 0.81 to 0.93] versus 0.72 [0.69 to 0.76], interaction p <0.0001) and slightly stronger in those presenting with versus without an acute coronary syndrome (HR 0.74 [0.70 to 0.79] versus 0.80 [0.75 to 0.85], interaction p = 0.08). There was attenuation of association with increasing age, but FHx remained protective even in those aged older than 80 years (HR 0.86 [0.77 to 0.95]). In conclusion, in patients with angiographic CAD, self-reported FHx of premature CAD is associated with improved long-term survival rate, independent of clinical characteristics, mode of presentation, and extent of disease. Further investigation of potential patient- and system-level mediators of this seemingly paradoxical relation is required. PMID:26723106

  13. Low-dosage clomiphene reduces premature ovulation rates and increases transfer rates in natural-cycle IVF.

    PubMed

    von Wolff, M; Nitzschke, M; Stute, P; Bitterlich, N; Rohner, S

    2014-08-01

    Natural-cycle IVF has been suggested as an alternative IVF treatment. However, efficacy is limited due to high premature ovulation rates, resulting in low transfer rates. This study investigates whether low dosages of clomiphene citrate reduce premature ovulation rate and increase transfer rate. Of 112 women included (aged 35.2 ± 4.5 years) 108 underwent one natural-cycle IVF cycle with human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) to induce ovulation and 103 underwent one natural-cycle IVF cycle with 25 mg/day clomiphene from about day 7 until HCG administration. Before retrieval, 1.2 monitoring consultations per cycle were required. Clomiphene reduced premature ovulation rate, from 27.8% without to 6.8% with clomiphene (P < 0.001) and increased transfer rate from 39.8% to 54.4% (P = 0.039). Clinical pregnancy rates without and with clomiphene were 27.9% versus 25.0% per transfer and 11.1% versus 13.6% per initiated cycle. Use of clomiphene resulted in mild hot flushes and headache in 5% of patients. Nausea and persisting ovarian cyst formation was not observed. In conclusion, clomiphene citrate led to very few side effects, required 1.2 monitoring consultations, significantly reduced premature ovulation rate and significantly increased transfer rate per initiated cycle, an effect which was not age dependent. PMID:24947066

  14. Ethical dilemmas in extreme prematurity: recent answers; more questions.

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Umberto; Vendemmia, Mariella; Rizzotti, Alina; Gamerre, Marc

    2004-11-15

    Advances in perinatal care allow survival of more extremely premature infants, but the implementation and continuation of intensive care may itself constitute an ethical dilemma, given the limited chances of intact survival among the patients most at risk. This paper discusses several key issues raised by the options that are under general consideration with reference to births of infants at the threshold of viability, in particular: the implications of making a distinction between extreme prematurity and other general medical situations that may involve decisions on ending support; the concrete nature of the restrictions on therapy in such patients interactions and the need for feedback between parents, medical staff and society. PMID:15530714

  15. Impact of heat waves on mortality in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaninović, Ksenija; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the criteria for heat loads associated with an increase in mortality in different climatic regions of Croatia. The relationship between heat stress and mortality was analysed for the period 1983-2008. The input series is excess mortality defined as the deviations of mortality from expected values determined by means of a Gaussian filter of 183 days. The assessment of the thermal environment was performed by means of physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The curve depicting the relationship between mortality and temperature has a U shape, with increased mortality in both the cold and warm parts of the scale but more pronounced in the warm part. The threshold temperature for increased mortality was determined using a scatter plot and fitting data by means of moving average of mortality; the latter is defined as the temperature at which excess mortality becomes significant. The values are higher in the continental part of Croatia than at the coast due to the refreshing influence of the sea during the day. The same analysis on a monthly basis shows that at the beginning of the warm season increased mortality occurs at a lower temperature compared with later on in the summer, and the difference is up to 15 °C between August and April. The increase in mortality is highest during the first 3-5 days and after that it decreases and falls below the expected value. Long-lasting heat waves present an increased risk, but in very long heat waves the increase in mortality is reduced due to mortality displacement.

  16. Trends in Gastroenteritis-Associated Mortality in the United States, 1985-2005

    EPA Science Inventory

    Worldwide, gastrointestinal infections are a major, and often preventable, cause of mortality. In much of the developing world, mortality due to gastrointestinal infections disproportionately impacts children and is often associated with poor hygienic conditions (e.g., contaminat...

  17. Mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Scalfari, Antonio; Knappertz, Volker; Cutter, Gary; Goodin, Douglas S.; Ashton, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is significantly increased compared with the general population. Many questions concerning survival in MS are still unanswered due to the difficulty of comparing information collected at different times and in different geographic areas. The increasing incidence of MS, the improvement in care of the chronically disabled, and different methodologies may explain the lack of coherence among studies' results. Reported times to death from birth and from disease onset/diagnosis are highly variable. Patients older at onset or with primary progressive course have shorter survival; however, data on sex and mortality are contradictory. Changes in sex ratio in MS over time represent one possible explanation. MS is the main cause of death in ≥50% of patients and the incidence of deaths not due to MS varies among countries. Particularly, suicide is substantially increased in patients with MS, and, despite its varying incidence, mainly due to “cultural bias,” it should be considered an MS-related cause of death. Recent results of the long-term follow-up study of interferon-β-1b demonstrated a significant reduction of mortality among treated patients. Notwithstanding its long latency, mortality is therefore an unambiguously valid long-term outcome in randomized controlled trials. It usefully combines the net impact of treatment efficacy on longevity and adverse events, which may reduce it. PMID:23836941

  18. Mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Scalfari, Antonio; Knappertz, Volker; Cutter, Gary; Goodin, Douglas S; Ashton, Raymond; Ebers, George C

    2013-07-01

    Mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is significantly increased compared with the general population. Many questions concerning survival in MS are still unanswered due to the difficulty of comparing information collected at different times and in different geographic areas. The increasing incidence of MS, the improvement in care of the chronically disabled, and different methodologies may explain the lack of coherence among studies' results. Reported times to death from birth and from disease onset/diagnosis are highly variable. Patients older at onset or with primary progressive course have shorter survival; however, data on sex and mortality are contradictory. Changes in sex ratio in MS over time represent one possible explanation. MS is the main cause of death in ≥50% of patients and the incidence of deaths not due to MS varies among countries. Particularly, suicide is substantially increased in patients with MS, and, despite its varying incidence, mainly due to "cultural bias," it should be considered an MS-related cause of death. Recent results of the long-term follow-up study of interferon-β-1b demonstrated a significant reduction of mortality among treated patients. Notwithstanding its long latency, mortality is therefore an unambiguously valid long-term outcome in randomized controlled trials. It usefully combines the net impact of treatment efficacy on longevity and adverse events, which may reduce it. PMID:23836941

  19. Net Costs Due to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination — United States, 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Carias, Cristina; Reed, Carrie; Kim, Inkyu K.; Foppa, Ivo M.; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Meltzer, Martin I.; Finelli, Lyn; Swerdlow, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality across all age groups, and influenza vaccination was recommended in 2010 for all persons aged 6 months and above. We estimated the averted costs due to influenza vaccination, taking into account the seasonal economic burden of the disease. Methods We used recently published values for averted outcomes due to influenza vaccination for influenza seasons 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, and 2008-09, and age cohorts 6 months-4 years, 5-19 years, 20-64 years, and 65 years and above. Costs were calculated according to a payer and societal perspective (in 2009 US$), and took into account medical costs and productivity losses. Results When taking into account direct medical costs (payer perspective), influenza vaccination was cost saving only for the older age group (65≥) in seasons 2005-06 and 2007-08. Using the same perspective, influenza vaccination resulted in total costs of $US 1.7 billion (95%CI: $US 0.3–4.0 billion) in 2006-07 and $US 1.8 billion (95%CI: $US 0.1–4.1 billion) in 2008-09. When taking into account a societal perspective (and including the averted lost earnings due to premature death) averted deaths in the older age group influenced the results, resulting in cost savings for all ages combined in season 07-08. Discussion Influenza vaccination was cost saving in the older age group (65≥) when taking into account productivity losses and, in some seasons, when taking into account medical costs only. Averted costs vary significantly per season; however, in seasons where the averted burden of deaths is high in the older age group, averted productivity losses due to premature death tilt overall seasonal results towards savings. Indirect vaccination effects and the possibility of diminished case severity due to influenza vaccination were not considered, thus the averted burden due to influenza vaccine may be even greater than reported. PMID:26230271

  20. Mortality and fertility control.

    PubMed

    Tietze, C; Lewit, S

    1977-01-01

    The authors present a continuation of the thesis suggesting that the most rational procedure for regulating fertility is a perfectly safe, even though not completely effective, contraceptive method combined with safe methods for terminating pregnancy when the contraceptive fails. This analysis demonstrates that, compared with the risk of death from pregnancy and childbirth, major reversible methods of fertility control--the pill, IUDs, condoms, and diaphragms--and abortion are associated with very low levels of mortality. The exception to this statement is pill use after age 40 by women who smoke. This analysis also confirms the very low mortality associated with using the condom and diaphragm with early induced abortion as a backup to terminate pregnancies resulting from contraceptive failures. PMID:606579

  1. Improving maternal care reduces mortality.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    Reduction of maternal mortality in developing countries by community-based action is complex but possible. Deaths related to pregnancy are primarily due to bleeding, infection, toxemia and illegal abortion. The excess maternal deaths in developing countries are also related to high numbers of high-risk pregnancies, total lack of prenatal and obstetric care in some areas, poor nutrition and overwork. The basic interventions available to communities include prenatal care, improved alarm and transport systems, referral centers and improved community-based care. Prenatal care can include nutritional supplements and exams and referrals by traditional birth attendants, targeting women suffering from toxemia, bleeding and infections. Local ambulances with life-support equipment, and maternity waiting houses are examples of ways of dealing with transport problems. Referral centers should be capable of providing sterile conditions and blood transfusions. Nurses can be trained to do caesarean sections. Birth attendants can use checklists to administer antibiotics and oxytocic drugs, for example. PMID:12281272

  2. Data base on animal mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    A data base on animal mortality has been compiled. The literature on LD/sub 50/ and the dose-response function for radiation-induced lethality, reflect several inconsistencies - primarily due to dose assignments and to analytical methods and/or mathematical models used. Thus, in order to make the individual experiments which were included in the data base as consistent as possible, an estimate of the uniform dose received by the bone marrow in each treatment group was made so that the interspecies differences are minimized. The LD/sub 50/ was recalculated using a single estimation procedure for all studies for which sufficient experimental data are available. For small animals such as mice, the dose to the hematopoietic system is approximately equal to the treatment dose, but for large animals the marrow dose may be about half of the treatment dose.

  3. Nutrient Enrichment Increases Mortality of Mangroves

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Ball, Marilyn C.; Martin, Katherine C.; C. Feller, Ilka

    2009-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment of the coastal zone places intense pressure on marine communities. Previous studies have shown that growth of intertidal mangrove forests is accelerated with enhanced nutrient availability. However, nutrient enrichment favours growth of shoots relative to roots, thus enhancing growth rates but increasing vulnerability to environmental stresses that adversely affect plant water relations. Two such stresses are high salinity and low humidity, both of which require greater investment in roots to meet the demands for water by the shoots. Here we present data from a global network of sites that documents enhanced mortality of mangroves with experimental nutrient enrichment at sites where high sediment salinity was coincident with low rainfall and low humidity. Thus the benefits of increased mangrove growth in response to coastal eutrophication is offset by the costs of decreased resilience due to mortality during drought, with mortality increasing with soil water salinity along climatic gradients. PMID:19440554

  4. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

  5. Predictors of Severity and Mortality in Children Hospitalized With Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Tropical Region

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Cárdenas, Andrea Constanza; Quilaguy, Ivonne Emilce; Mayorga, Leydy Yasmin; Falla, Luz Marlesvy; Nino, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) in infants and young children. Although ALRI is a major public health problem in developing countries located in tropical areas, studies about RSV epidemiology in these regions are scarce. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, we investigated the epidemiology and predictive variables that reflect disease severity and mortality in young children hospitalized with ALRI due to RSV in Colombia, South-America, during a 2-year period (2009–2011). Results Of a total of 6,344 children with a diagnosis of ALRI, we selected 2,147 (33.8%) that were positive for RSV. After controlling for pre-existing conditions, we found that independent predictors of severe disease in our population included age <6 months (RR 2.01; CI 95% 1.70–2.38; P < 0.001), prematurity (RR 1.61; CI 95% 1.20–2.17; P = 0.001), congenital heart disease (RR 2.03; CI 95% 1.16–3.54; P = 0.013), and mixed RSV-adenovirus infection (RR 2.09; CI 95% 1.60–2.73; P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis identified that cancer (RR 31.60; CI 95% 5.97–167.13; P < 0.001) is a predictor of mortality in our RSV-infected pediatric population independently of age and other co-morbidities. Conclusions RSV is an important cause of ALRI in infants and young children living in tropical regions, especially during the rainy season. The identified predictors of severe disease and mortality should be taken into account when planning interventions to reduce the burden of ALRI in young children living in these regions. PMID:23401345

  6. Maternal mortality in Yazd Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Ghane-Ezabadi, Marzie; Vafaienasab, Mohammadreza; Dehghan, Ali; Ghasemi, Fateme; Zaidabadi, Mahbube; Zanbagh, Leila; Yazdian-Anari, Pouria; Teimoori, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Five hundred thousand maternal deaths occur each year worldwide, many of which are in developing countries. The maternal mortality rate is a measure that demonstrates the degree of adequacy of prenatal care and of economic and social conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and causes of pregnancy-related mortality rates in Yazd Province. Methods This cross-sectional study examined the maternal deaths related to pregnancy that were recorded in Yazd Province, Iran, from 2002 to 2011. All maternal deaths that occurred during pregnancy, during delivery, and 42 days after birth were analyzed in this study. The data were collected through a questionnaire, and both direct and indirect causes of maternal deaths were determined. Results Forty pregnancy-related deaths occurred in this period, and the maternal mortality rate was 20.8 deaths per 100,000 live births. The mean age of death in the mothers in this study was 29.17. Fifty-five percent of women of the women who died delivered their babies by cesarean section, and only 20% of them delivered their babies vaginally. Bleeding was the most common cause of maternal mortality (30%), and it was associated directly with maternal mortality. Furthermore 20% of the mothers died due to heart disease and cardiac complications, which were associated indirectly with maternal mortality. Conclusion Cesarean section and its complications were the main cause of death in many cases. Thus, providing a strategic plan to reduce the use of this procedure, educate mothers, and ensure adequate access to pre-maternal care and to care during pregnancy are the most important measures that can be taken to decrease the maternal mortality rate. PMID:27054003

  7. A Program of Stimulation for Infants Born Prematurely.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Kathryn

    Examined was the effect of low frequency auditory and kinesthetic stimulation on the sleep behavior of seven premature normal infants. Stimulation consisted of positioning in a rockerbed and exposure to a recorded heartbeat for 15 minutes an hour. Measured were Ss's sleep wakefulness, weight change, and gestational development. Analysis of the…

  8. Ablating Premature Ventricular Complexes: Justification, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Noheria, Amit; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed the underlying principles that allow for safe and effective ablation for premature ventricular complexes. Clinical scenarios that necessitate consideration for ablation, the underlying anatomy, and the unique consideration to maximize energy delivery without compromising safety are sequentially examined. PMID:26306129

  9. Digestion of Protein in Premature and Term Infants.

    PubMed

    Dallas, David C; Underwood, Mark A; Zivkovic, Angela M; German, J Bruce

    2012-04-23

    Premature birth rates and premature infant morbidity remain discouragingly high. Improving nourishment for these infants is the key for accelerating their development and decreasing disease risk. Dietary protein is essential for growth and development of infants. Studies on protein nourishment for premature infants have focused on protein requirements for catch-up growth, nitrogen balance, and digestive protease concentrations and activities. However, little is known about the processes and products of protein digestion in the premature infant. This review briefly summarizes the protein requirements of term and preterm infants, and the protein content of milk from women delivering preterm and at term. An in-depth review is presented of the current knowledge of term and preterm infant dietary protein digestion, including human milk protease and anti-protease concentrations; neonatal intestinal pH, and enzyme activities and concentrations; and protein fermentation by intestinal bacteria. The advantages and disadvantages of incomplete protein digestion as well as factors that increase resistance to proteolysis of particular proteins are discussed. In order to better understand protein digestion in preterm and term infants, future studies should examine protein and peptide fragment products of digestion in saliva, gastric, intestinal and fecal samples, as well as the effects of the gut micro biome on protein degradation. The confluence of new mass spectrometry technology and new bioinformatics programs will now allow thorough identification of the array of peptides produced in the infant as they are digested. PMID:24744976

  10. SIGIRR Genetic Variants in Premature Infants With Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Menden, Heather; Helbling, Daniel; Li, Keguo; Gastonguay, Adam; Ramchandran, Ramani; Dimmock, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a severe form of bowel disease that develops in premature infants. Although animal data and human studies suggest that aberrant activation of the intestinal immune system contributes to NEC, the pathogenesis remains unclear. We hypothesized that inherited defects in the regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling can contribute to NEC susceptibility in premature infants. A forward genetic screen done in an infant with lethal NEC using exome sequencing identified a novel stop mutation (p.Y168X) and a rare missense variant (p.S80Y) in SIGIRR, a gene that inhibits intestinal Toll-like receptor signaling. Functional studies carried out in human embryonic kidney cells and intestinal epithelial cells demonstrated that SIGIRR inhibited inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide, a cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria implicated in NEC. The genetic variants identified in the infant with NEC resulted in loss of SIGIRR function and exaggerated inflammation in response to lipopolysaccharide. Additionally, Sanger sequencing identified missense, stop, or splice region SIGIRR variants in 10 of 17 premature infants with stage II+ NEC. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first reports of a phenotype associated with SIGIRR in humans. Our data provide novel mechanistic insight into the probable causation of NEC and support additional investigation of the hypothesis that inherited defects in the regulation of innate immune signaling can contribute to NEC susceptibility in premature infants. PMID:25963006

  11. Caretaker Psychological Factors Predicting Premature Termination of Children's Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venable, William Mark; Thompson, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Caretakers' psychological factors are related to premature termination of counseling for their children (N=85). General hostility, anxiety, depression, and paranoia were studied. Descriptive statistics, correlations of variables, and a predictive discriminant analysis are reported. Effects of caretaker variables on early termination of treatment…

  12. Effect of Prematurity Labeling on Caregiver Perceptions of Newborns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Cynthia A.

    This study examined adult attitudes toward infants labeled premature. Fifty-two subjects, including infant specialists, experienced special educators, and preservice special educators, viewed a videotape of 9-month-old infants, each labeled full-term or preterm and male or female. A questionnaire administered after viewing the videotape rated each…

  13. Brain Maturity and Variation of Oxygen Extraction in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    El-Dib, Mohamed; Aly, Safwat; Govindan, Rathinaswamy; Mohamed, Mohamed; du Plessis, Adre; Aly, Hany

    2016-07-01

    Objectives The ability of the premature brain to extract and use oxygen has not been studied adequately. This study aimed to determine factors that influence fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE) of the brain in premature infants using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and pulse oximetry. Study Design We prospectively studied FTOE in very low birth weight (BW) infants (< 1,500 g and ≤ 34 weeks' gestation). Factors affecting FTOE and its variability were examined using bivariate and linear regression models. FTOE variability was measured on two scales: short scales (3-20 seconds) and long scales (20-150 seconds). Results We examined 147 simultaneous NIRS and pulse oximetry recordings that were collected from 72 premature infants (gestational age [GA] = 28 weeks and BW = 1,036 g). In regression models, average FTOE correlated negatively with hemoglobin (Hb) and increased significantly in patients with severe intraventricular hemorrhage/periventricular leukomalacia. Both FTOE short- and long-scale variabilities correlated negatively with GA and positively with postnatal age (PNA). Moreover, FTOE long-scale variability was significantly reduced in infants supported with invasive ventilation. Conclusions In premature infants, cerebral oxygen extraction increased with reduced Hb and severe brain injury. Variability in oxygen extraction showed differential changes with GA and PNAs and was affected by invasive ventilation. PMID:26906179

  14. [A premature neonate with a right pre-auricular swelling].

    PubMed

    Schene, Kiry M; Schiering, Irene A M; Mallant, Maarten P J H

    2015-01-01

    We present a 14-day-old premature born girl with a temperature of 37.8°C and a swelling and redness of the right parotid gland. Laboratory tests revealed a CRP of 79 mg/l and ultrasound examination confirmed a parotitis. Treatment with augmentin i.v. resolved the condition. PMID:26043253

  15. Premature Discontinuation in Adult Psychotherapy: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Joshua K.; Greenberg, Roger P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Premature discontinuation from therapy is a widespread problem that impedes the delivery of otherwise effective psychological interventions. The most recent comprehensive review found an average dropout rate of 47% across 125 studies (Wierzbicki & Pekarik, 1993); however, given a number of changes in the field over the past 2 decades,…

  16. To Correct or Not to Correct: Age Adjustment for Prematurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aylward, Glen P.; And Others

    To evaluate whether conceptional or chronologic age should be used to determine scores in developmental follow-up studies, a study was made of 236 normal and 66 neurologically abnormal infants who were similar with respect to conceptional age but different with respect to degree of prematurity. Assessments of possible differences in cognitive and…

  17. Prematurity: A Major Health Problem. Matrix No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Gordon B.

    Premature birth (defined as delivery before 37 weeks gestation) and low birthweight (below 2,500 grams) are major health problems in the United States. Infants in these categories account for 75 per cent of neonatal deaths and 50 per cent of deaths in the first year of life. Survivors contribute disproportionately to the pool of handicapped…

  18. Evaluation of internet websites about retinopathy of prematurity patient education

    PubMed Central

    Martins, E N; Morse, L S

    2005-01-01

    Background/aims: The success of the treatment in patients with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is mainly associated with timely diagnosis and appropriate management. Information dissemination is crucial for the outcome of ROP. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of the information about ROP available for patients on the internet. Methods: Cross sectional study. In March 2004 the ROP information available on the internet was evaluated using two search engines (MetaCrawler and MSN) and four key terms (“retinopathy of prematurity,” “premature eye,” “premature retina,” and “ROP”). The quality of each website was evaluated using a score system. The sites were classified as academic, organisational, or commercial. Readability, general quality of the website (based on ownership, purpose, authorship, author qualification, attribution, interactivity, and currency), and quality of the content specific to ROP (definition, causes, epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, classification, treatment, and prognosis) were analysed. Results: Of 114 websites evaluated, 40 were included. 10 sites (25.0%) were academic, eight (20.0%) organisational, and 22 (55.0%) commercial. In the majority of the sites (62.5%) the ROP information was fair or poor. Conclusions: A large amount of information about ROP is available on the internet. However, most websites were considered incomplete. PMID:15834086

  19. Current Concepts in Nutrition--Pregnant Women and Premature Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Janet C.; Charlet, Sara

    1978-01-01

    Discusses energy and nutrient requirements of pregnant women with respect to kcal needs and vitamins B-6, folacin, vitamin E, and intake of certain trace elements. Also discusses nutritional needs of the premature infant and the ways of supplying these nutrients. (MA)

  20. Behaviour Difficulties and Cognitive Function in Children Born Very Prematurely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayless, Sarah; Pit-ten Cate, Ineke M.; Stevenson, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Children born very prematurely are at risk of low average IQ and behaviour difficulties throughout childhood and adolescence. Associations among preterm birth, IQ and behaviour have been reported; however, the nature of the relationship among these outcomes is not fully understood. Some studies have proposed that the consequences of preterm birth,…

  1. Clostridium septicum brain abscesses in a premature neonate.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Sapna P; Batdorf, Rachel; Buchhalter, Lillian C; Mrelashvili, Anna; Banerjee, Ritu; Henry, Nancy K; Huskins, W Charles; Boyce, Thomas G

    2014-05-01

    Brain abscesses in neonates are typically caused by Gram-negative organisms. There are no previously described cases caused by Clostridium septicum. We present a case of a premature male infant who developed recurrent episodes of suspected necrotizing enterocolitis followed by brain abscesses, cerebritis and ventriculitis caused by C. septicum. PMID:24220230

  2. Mortality modeling of early detection programs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sandra J; Zelen, Marvin

    2008-06-01

    Consider a group of subjects who are offered an opportunity to receive a sequence of periodic special examinations for the purpose of diagnosing a chronic disease earlier relative to usual care. The mortality for the early detection group is to be compared with a group receiving usual care. Benefit is reflected in a potential reduction in mortality. This article develops a general probability model that can be used to predict cumulative mortality for each of these groups. The elements of the model assume (i) a four-state progressive disease model in which a subject may be in a disease-free state (or a disease state that cannot be detected), preclinical disease state (capable of being diagnosed by a special exam), clinical state (diagnosis by usual care), and a death state; (ii) age-dependent transitions into the states; (iii) age-dependent examination sensitivity; (iv) age-dependent sojourn time in each state; and (v) the distribution of disease stages on diagnosis conditional on modality of detection. The model may be used to (i) compare mortality rates for different screening schedules; (ii) explore potential benefit of subpopulations; and (iii) compare relative reductions in disease-specific mortality due to advances and dissemination of both treatment and early detection screening programs. PMID:17725809

  3. Cancer mortality among magazine printing workers.

    PubMed Central

    Luce, D; Landre, M F; Clavel, T; Limousin, I; Dimerman, S; Moulin, J J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: After an inquiry from the employees of an offset printing plant, a historical cohort study was conducted to investigate cancer mortality among these workers. METHODS: The cohort comprised 262 men, who contributed 2771 person-years of observation. 16 deaths were identified during the follow up period (1980-91). Expected numbers of deaths were derived from age specific regional rates. Standardised mortality ratios (SMR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. RESULTS: An increased cancer mortality was found after 10 years of employment (SMR 213, 95% CI 98 to 405, based on nine deaths), mainly due to a high mortality from lung cancer (SMR 381, 95% CI 104 to 975, four deaths), and from oesophageal cancer (SMR 1049, 95% CI 216 to 3065, three deaths). For workers with at least 20 years since the start of employment, the SMR was 262 (95% CI 105 to 540) for all cancer sites, 447 (95% CI 92 to 1306) for lung cancer, and 1094 (95% CI 132 to 3952) for oesophageal cancer. The increased cancer mortality was concentrated among pressmen. CONCLUSION: Although based on small numbers, the findings suggest an increased risk of cancer among these workers, which should be further investigated. PMID:9166132

  4. Reasons for premature termination of dialectical behavior therapy for inpatients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Christoph; Roepke, Stefan; Röepke, Stefan; Kliem, Sören

    2014-09-01

    Although one of the main aims of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is to increase the retention rates, premature termination rates for DBT inpatient programs were found to be over 30%. The aim of the study was to identify the reasons for, and to analyze, patient characteristics that are associated with premature termination. We studied 541 inpatients with BPD, who were consecutively admitted for an open-door 3-month DBT inpatient treatment in Berlin, Germany. All participants completed several self-rating measures and participated in clinical interviews. Fourteen percent, who did not complete the full 84 days of assigned treatment, were expelled, mainly due to treatment-disturbing behaviors, or substance abuse or possession. Nearly 19% dropped out of treatment, mostly due to lack of motivation, arguments with others, and poor tolerance of emotional distress. Using non-parametric conditional inference trees, expulsion was associated with anorexia nervosa and alcohol abuse, whereas more than 9 suicide attempts, antisocial personality disorders, and more than 86 weeks in a psychiatric hospital were risk factors for dropout. We discussed measures and interventions that might lead to an adaptation of DBT inpatient programs. Future research should examine the symptom course and utilization of health-care services of non-completers. PMID:25058040

  5. Study of Five Pubertal Transition-Related Gene Polymorphisms as Risk Factors for Premature Coronary Artery Disease in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chengchun; Ma, Genshan; Wei, Li; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (DLK-rs10144321, SIX6-rs1254337, MKRN3-rs12148769, LIN28B-rs7759938, and KCNK9-rs1469039) were found to be strongly associated with age at menarche. Recent studies also suggested that age at menarche is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Since an association between these five SNPs and premature coronary artery disease (CAD) has never been reported, we investigated whether these SNPs are associated with premature CAD and its severity in a Chinese Han population. Methods We enrolled 432 consecutive patients including 198 with premature CAD (<55 years in men and <65 years in women) and 234 controls. All subjects were genotyped for the five SNPs by the PCR-ligase detection reaction method. The associations between these SNPs and premature CAD and its severity were analyzed. Results The following genotypes were identified: GG, AG, and AA at rs10144321 and rs12148769; TT, AT, and AA at rs1254337; CC, CT, and TT at rs1469039; and TT and CT at rs7759938. Significant differences in genotype distribution frequencies at rs1254337 were found between controls and patients with premature CAD (P<0.05). No associations were found between the five SNPs and the severity of coronary lesions (all P>0.05). Compared with controls, patients with premature CAD had a higher prevalence of T2DM and dyslipidemia, and the proportion of patients with T2DM rose significantly with an increase in the number of stenosed coronary vessels (all P<0.05). After adjustment for the clinical parameters in multivariable analysis, three factors were identified that significantly increased the risk of premature CAD: the AA genotype at rs1254337 (OR: 2.388, 95% CI: 1.190–4.792, P = 0.014), male gender (OR: 1.565, 95% CI: 1.012–2.420, P = 0.044), and T2DM (OR 2.252, 95% CI: 1.233–4.348, P = 0.015). Conclusions Among the five pubertal

  6. Understanding Vascular Diseases: Lessons From Premature Aging Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuichi; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Motozawa, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-05-01

    Early human mummies examined recently by computed tomography demonstrated a high prevalence of vascular calcification, a pathognomonic sign of atherosclerosis, which was correlated with estimated age at death. Early populations had little exposure to modern-day metabolic risk factors: these observations thus suggest that humans have an inherent age-dependent predisposition to atherosclerosis. Premature aging syndromes are extremely rare genetic disorders that exhibit clinical phenotypes resembling accelerated aging, including severe atherosclerosis, but those phenotypes are usually segmental. Controversy persists, therefore, regarding the extent to which the molecular mechanisms underlying premature aging syndromes overlap with those of physiological aging. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and Werner syndrome are well-characterized premature aging syndromes. HGPS is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the LMNA gene, which result in the accumulation of a mutant nuclear protein, called "progerin," at the nuclear rim. In contrast, loss-of-function mutations in Werner syndrome ATP-dependent helicase (WRN) lead to Werner syndrome. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can differentiate into vascular cells to maintain vascular homeostasis in response to injury, are severely affected in these syndromes. Mechanistically, either aberrant expression of progerin or loss of WRN protein in MSCs alters heterochromatin structure, resulting in premature senescence and exhaustion of functional MSCs in premature aging syndromes. Surprisingly, vascular cells and MSCs in elderly healthy individuals have shown progerin expression and decreased expression levels of WRN, respectively. Studying these rare genetic disorders could thus provide valuable insights into age-related vascular diseases that occur in the general population. PMID:26948039

  7. Age at menarche, total mortality and mortality from ischaemic heart disease and stroke: the Adventist Health Study, 1976–88

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, B K; Oda, K; Knutsen, S F; Fraser, G E

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the relationship between age at menarche and total mortality and mortality from ischaemic heart disease and stroke. Methods A cohort study of 19 462 Californian Seventh-Day Adventist women followed-up from 1976 to 1988. A total of 3313 deaths occurred during follow-up, of which 809 were due to ischaemic heart disease and 378 due to stroke. Results An early menarche was associated with increased total mortality (P-value for linear trend <0.001), ischaemic heart disease (P-value for linear trend = 0.01) and stroke (P-value for linear trend = 0.02) mortality. There were, however, also some indications of an increased ischaemic heart disease mortality in women aged 16–18 at menarche (5% of the women). When assessed as a linear relationship, a 1-year delay in menarche was associated with 4.5% (95% CI 2.3–6.7) lower total mortality. The association was stronger for ischaemic heart disease [6.0% (95% CI 1.2–10.6)] and stroke [8.6% (95% CI 1.6–15.1)] mortality. Conclusions The results suggest that there is a linear, inverse relationship between age at menarche and total mortality as well as with ischaemic heart disease and stroke mortality. PMID:19188208

  8. Comparative Study of Nutritive Sucking in the Newborn (Premature and Full-Term)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortial, Christiane; Lezine, Irene

    1974-01-01

    Describes a graphic analysis of the disorganized sucking patterns in premature infants, and points out the psychoprophylactic importance of individually appropriate feeding procedures which should be used in the care of premature infants. (Author/CS)

  9. Respiratory consequences of prematurity: evolution of a diagnosis and development of a comprehensive approach.

    PubMed

    Maitre, N L; Ballard, R A; Ellenberg, J H; Davis, S D; Greenberg, J M; Hamvas, A; Pryhuber, G S

    2015-05-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common respiratory consequence of premature birth and contributes to significant short- and long-term morbidity, mortality and resource utilization. Initially defined as a radiographic, clinical and histopathological entity, the chronic lung disease known as BPD has evolved as obstetrical and neonatal care have improved the survival of lower gestational age infants. Now, definitions based on the need for supplementary oxygen at 28 days and/or 36 weeks provide a useful reference point in the neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU), but are no longer based on histopathological findings, and are neither designed to predict longer term respiratory consequences nor to study the evolution of a multifactorial disease. The aims of this review are to critically examine the evolution of the diagnosis of BPD and the challenges inherent to current classifications. We found that the increasing use of respiratory support strategies that administer ambient air without supplementary oxygen confounds oxygen-based definitions of BPD. Furthermore, lack of reproducible, genetic, biochemical and physiological biomarkers limits the ability to identify an impending BPD for early intervention, quantify disease severity for standardized classification and approaches and reliably predict the long-term outcomes. More comprehensive, multidisciplinary approaches to overcome these challenges involve longitudinal observation of extremely preterm infants, not only those with BPD, using genetic, environmental, physiological and clinical data as well as large databases of patient samples. The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) will provide such a framework to address these challenges through high-resolution characterization of both NICU and post-NICU discharge outcomes. PMID:25811285

  10. Mortality Among Patients With Familial Hypercholesterolemia: A Registry‐Based Study in Norway, 1992–2010

    PubMed Central

    Mundal, Liv; Sarancic, Mirza; Ose, Leiv; Iversen, Per Ole; Borgan, Jens‐Kristian; Veierød, Marit B.; Leren, Trond P.; Retterstøl, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    Background Untreated patients with familial hypercholesterolemia are at increased risk of premature cardiovascular death. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether this is also the case in the statin era. Methods and Results In this registry‐based study, 4688 male and female patients from the Unit for Cardiac and Cardiovascular Genetics (UCCG) Registry with verified molecular genetic diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia in the period 1992–2010 were linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Standardized mortality ratios and 95% CIs were estimated. There were 113 deaths. Mean age of death was 61.1 years. Cardiovascular disease was the most common cause of death (46.0%), followed by cancer (30.1%). Compared with the Norwegian population, cardiovascular disease mortality was significantly higher in the UCCG Registry in all age groups younger than 70 years (standardized mortality ratio 2.29, 95% CI 1.65 to 3.19 in men and women combined; standardized mortality ratio 2.00, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.04 in men; standardized mortality ratio 3.03, 95% CI 1.76 to 5.21 in women). No significant differences were found in all‐cause mortality or cancer mortality. Conclusions Despite prescription of lipid‐lowering drugs, familial hypercholesterolemia patients still had significantly increased cardiovascular disease mortality compared with the general Norwegian population. PMID:25468658

  11. American-Indian diabetes mortality in the Great Plains Region 2002–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Allyson; Giroux, Jennifer; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Bob; Wallace, Debra; Bell, Ronny; Morrison, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare American-Indian and Caucasian mortality rates from diabetes among tribal Contract Health Service Delivery Areas (CHSDAs) in the Great Plains Region (GPR) and describe the disparities observed. Research design and methods Mortality data from the National Center for Vital Statistics and Seer*STAT were used to identify diabetes as the underlying cause of death for each decedent in the GPR from 2002 to 2010. Mortality data were abstracted and aggregated for American-Indians and Caucasians for 25 reservation CHSDAs in the GPR. Rate ratios (RR) with 95% CIs were used and SEER*Stat V.8.0.4 software calculated age-adjusted diabetes mortality rates. Results Age-adjusted mortality rates for American-Indians were significantly higher than those for Caucasians during the 8-year period. In the GPR, American-Indians were 3.44 times more likely to die from diabetes than Caucasians. South Dakota had the highest RR (5.47 times that of Caucasians), and Iowa had the lowest RR, (1.1). Reservation CHSDA RR ranged from 1.78 to 10.25. Conclusions American-Indians in the GPR have higher diabetes mortality rates than Caucasians in the GPR. Mortality rates among American-Indians persist despite special programs and initiatives aimed at reducing diabetes in these populations. Effective and immediate efforts are needed to address premature diabetes mortality among American-Indians in the GPR. PMID:25926992

  12. Impact of Music Therapy on Breast Milk Secretion in Mothers of Premature Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanagowda, Preethi Bangalore; G C M, Pradeep; Goturu, Jaisri

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The promotion of breastfeeding is a simple and efficient strategy in reducing morbidity and mortality in neonates worldwide. Milk from the mother of a Preterm New Born (PTNB) infant contains a higher concentration of nutrients and energy than that produced by mothers of a full-term infant. Studies have shown that music therapy can reduce maternal anxiety, helping mothers cope with the hospitalization of their newborns in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Objective To evaluate the impact of music therapy on amount of breast milk secretion among mothers of premature newborns by reducing maternal stress. Materials and Methods Mothers of premature babies who were admitted to NICU at a tertiary health care centre were included as subjects. Mothers of premature infants were enrolled in the study once they came to NICU to express breast milk from Dec 2012 to May 2013. Each subject was assessed for 4 sessions on MT (Music Therapy) and 4 sessions on NMT (No Music Therapy) over 4 days. Breast milk was expressed using breast milk pump and quantity was measured for two sessions each day once at 11.00am and other at 4.00pm. Raga malkauns and yaman by flute was used for music therapy. MT was administered for 4 sessions in a randomized manner during the study period of 30mins (15mins prior to and 15mins during Breast milk amount). To assess the psychological stress, PSS questionnaire was administered on day 1 and day 4 of MT. Mother’s saliva was collected to estimate salivary cortisol level on the last day of study during the sessions with MT and NMT. Results Music therapy was associated with a significant reduction in stress level as shown by improved PSS score and reduced salivary cortisol. Subjects who received music therapy had significant increase (p-value- 0.033) in breast milk expression when compared to mothers who didn’t. Conclusion Music therapy can be easily used in the breast milk expression room as a method to increase breast milk secretion in

  13. IMF-lending programs and suicide mortality.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Eleftherios; Zervoyianni, Athina

    2016-03-01

    While the economic consequences of IMF programs have been extensively analyzed in the literature, much less is known about how key welfare indicators, including suicide-mortality rates, correlate with countries' participation in such programs. This paper examines the impact of IMF lending on suicide mortality, using data from 30 developing and transition countries that received non-concessionary IMF loans during 1991-2008. Our results support the hypothesis of a positive causal relationship between suicide mortality and participation in IMF programs but reveal no systematic suicide-increasing effect from the size of IMF loans. This holds after accounting for self-selection into programs, resulting from the endogeneity of a country's decision to resort to the IMF for funding, and after controlling for standard socio-economic influences on suicidal behaviour. In particular, we find a positive aggregate suicide-mortality differential due to IMF-program participation of between 4 and 14 percentage points. We also find that the positive association between suicides and program participation is stronger and more robust among males. Comparing age groups, individuals belonging to the age group 45-to-64 exhibit the highest increase in suicide due to program-participation, which amounts to over 18 percentage points. Overall, our results imply that when countries are exposed to IMF programs in an attempt to resolve their economic problems, social-safety nets need to be designed to protect the adversely-affected part of the population. PMID:26874823

  14. Is retinopathy of prematurity decreasing?--comparison of two different periods in the same NICU.

    PubMed

    Satar, Mehmet; Ozlü, Ferda; Cekinmez, Eren K; Yapıcıoğlu-Yıldıztaş, Hacer; Narlı, Nejat; Erdem, Elif; Soylu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a retinal vascular disorder seen frequently in very premature infants, and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity and mechanical ventilation, oxygen therapy, gestational age, and antenatal steroids in extremely low birth weight infants as well as to retrospectively analyze changes in the incidence and risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity over two study periods. PMID:24911851

  15. New insights on premature ejaculation: a review of definition, classification, prevalence and treatment.

    PubMed

    Serefoglu, Ege C; Saitz, Theodore R

    2012-11-01

    There are ongoing debates about the definition, classification and prevalence of premature ejaculation (PE). The first evidence-based definition of PE was limited to heterosexual men with lifelong PE who engage in vaginal intercourse. Unfortunately, many patients with the complaint of PE do not meet these criteria. However, these men can be diagnosed as one of the PE subtypes, namely acquired PE, natural variable PE or premature-like ejaculatory dysfunction. Nevertheless, the validity of these subtypes has not yet been supported by evidence. The absence of a universally accepted PE definition and lack of standards for data acquisition have resulted in prevalence studies that have reported conflicting rates. The very high prevalence of 20%-30% is probably due to the vague terminology used in the definitions at the time when such surveys were conducted. Although many men may complain of PE when questioned for a population-based prevalence study, only a few of them will actively seek treatment for their complaint, even though most of these patients would define symptoms congruent with PE. The complaints of acquired PE patients may be more severe, whereas complaints of patients experiencing premature-like ejaculatory dysfunction seem to be least severe among men with various forms of PE. Although numerous treatment modalities have been proposed for management of PE, only antidepressants and topical anaesthetic creams have currently been proven to be effective. However, as none of the treatment modalities have been approved by the regulatory agencies, further studies must be carried to develop a beneficial treatment strategy for PE. PMID:23064688

  16. Erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation in men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Shindel, Alan W.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Quantitative research into sexual function and dysfunction in men who have sex with men (MSM) has been sparse due in large part to a lack of validated, quantitative instruments for the assessment of sexuality in this population. Aim To assess prevalence and associations of erectile problems and premature ejaculation in MSM. Methods MSM were invited to complete an online survey of sexual function. Ethnodemographic, sexuality, and health related factors were assessed. Main Outcome Measure Participants completed a version of the International Index of Erectile Function modified for use in MSM (IIEF-MSM) and the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool. Total score on the erectile function domain of the IIEF-EF (IIEF-MSM-EF) was used to stratify erectile dysfunction (ED) severity (25–30=no ED, 16–24 mild or mild moderate ED, 11–15 moderate ED, and ≤ 10 severe ED). PEDT scores were used to stratify risk of premature ejaculation (PE, diagnosed as PEDT score ≥9). Results Nearly 80% of the study cohort of 2,640 men resided in North America. The prevalence of ED was higher in older men whereas the prevalence of PE was relatively constant across age groups. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that increasing age, HIV seropositivity, prior use of erectogenic therapy, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and lack of a stable sexual partner were associated with greater odds of ED. A separate multivariate analysis revealed that younger age, LUTS, and lower number of lifetime sexual partners were associated with greater odds of PE. Conclusions Risk factors for sexual problems in MSM are similar to what has been observed in quantitative studies of non-MSM males. Urinary symptoms are associated with poorer sexual function in MSM. PMID:22214402

  17. New insights on premature ejaculation: a review of definition, classification, prevalence and treatment

    PubMed Central

    C Serefoglu, Ege; Saitz, Theodore R

    2012-01-01

    There are ongoing debates about the definition, classification and prevalence of premature ejaculation (PE). The first evidence-based definition of PE was limited to heterosexual men with lifelong PE who engage in vaginal intercourse. Unfortunately, many patients with the complaint of PE do not meet these criteria. However, these men can be diagnosed as one of the PE subtypes, namely acquired PE, natural variable PE or premature-like ejaculatory dysfunction. Nevertheless, the validity of these subtypes has not yet been supported by evidence. The absence of a universally accepted PE definition and lack of standards for data acquisition have resulted in prevalence studies that have reported conflicting rates. The very high prevalence of 20%–30% is probably due to the vague terminology used in the definitions at the time when such surveys were conducted. Although many men may complain of PE when questioned for a population-based prevalence study, only a few of them will actively seek treatment for their complaint, even though most of these patients would define symptoms congruent with PE. The complaints of acquired PE patients may be more severe, whereas complaints of patients experiencing premature-like ejaculatory dysfunction seem to be least severe among men with various forms of PE. Although numerous treatment modalities have been proposed for management of PE, only antidepressants and topical anaesthetic creams have currently been proven to be effective. However, as none of the treatment modalities have been approved by the regulatory agencies, further studies must be carried to develop a beneficial treatment strategy for PE. PMID:23064688

  18. Accident mortality among children

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Albrecht, R. M.; Grab, B.

    1956-01-01

    The authors present statistics on mortality from accidents, with special reference to those relating to the age-group 1-19 years. For a number of countries figures are given for the proportional mortality from accidents (the number of accident deaths expressed as a percentage of the number of deaths from all causes) and for the specific death-rates, per 100 000 population, from all causes of death, from selected causes, from all causes of accidents, and from various types of accident. From these figures it appears that, in most countries, accidents are becoming relatively increasingly prominent as a cause of death in childhood, primarily because of the conquest of other causes of death—such as infectious and parasitic diseases, which formerly took a heavy toll of children and adolescents—but also to some extent because the death-rate from motor-vehicle accidents is rising and cancelling out the reduction in the rate for other causes of accidental death. In the authors' opinion, further epidemiological investigations into accident causation are required for the purpose of devising quicker and more effective methods of accident prevention. PMID:13383361

  19. Mortality among sulfide ore miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlman, K.; Koskela, R.S.; Kuikka, P.; Koponen, M.; Annanmaeki, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Lung cancer mortality was studied during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township in North Karelia, where an old copper mine was located. Age-specific lung cancer death rates (1968-1985) were higher among the male population of Outokumpu than among the North Karelian male population of the same age excluding the Outokumpu district (p less than .01). Of all 106 persons who died from lung cancer during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township, 47 were miners of the old mine, 39 of whom had worked there for at least three years and been heavily exposed to radon daughters and silica dust. The study cohort consisted of 597 miners first employed between 1954 and 1973 by a new copper mine and a zinc mine, and employed there for at least 3 years. The period of follow-up was 1954-1986. The number of person-years was 14,782. The total number of deaths was 102; the expected number was 72.8 based on the general male population and 97.8 based on the mortality of the male population of North Karelia. The excess mortality among miners was due mainly to ischemic heart disease (IHD); 44 were observed, the expected number was 22.1, based on the general male population, and the North Karelian expected number was 31.2 (p less than .05). Of the 44 miners who died from IHD, 20 were drillers or chargers exposed to nitroglycerin in dynamite charges, but also to several simultaneous stress factors including PAHs, noise, vibration, heavy work, accident risk, and working alone. Altogether 16 tumors were observed in the cohort. Ten of these were lung cancers, the expected number being 4.3. Miners who had died from lung cancer were 35-64 years old, and had entered mining work between 1954 and 1960. Five of the ten lung cancer cases came from the zinc mine (1.7 expected). Three of them were conductors of diesel-powered ore trains.

  20. Altered Amygdala Development and Fear Processing in Prematurely Born Infants

    PubMed Central

    Cismaru, Anca Liliana; Gui, Laura; Vasung, Lana; Lejeune, Fleur; Barisnikov, Koviljka; Truttmann, Anita; Borradori Tolsa, Cristina; Hüppi, Petra S.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Prematurely born children have a high risk of developmental and behavioral disabilities. Cerebral abnormalities at term age have been clearly linked with later behavior alterations, but existing studies did not focus on the amygdala. Moreover, studies of early amygdala development after premature birth in humans are scarce. Objective: To compare amygdala volumes in very preterm infants at term equivalent age (TEA) and term born infants, and to relate premature infants’ amygdala volumes with their performance on the Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery (Lab-TAB) fear episode at 12 months. Participants: Eighty one infants born between 2008 and 2014 at the University Hospitals of Geneva and Lausanne, taking part in longitudinal and functional imaging studies, who had undergone a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan at TEA enabling manual amygdala delineation. Outcomes: Amygdala volumes assessed by manual segmentation of MRI scans; volumes of cortical and subcortical gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) automatically segmented in 66 infants; scores for the Lab-TAB fear episode for 42 premature infants at 12 months. Results: Amygdala volumes were smaller in preterm infants at TEA than term infants (mean difference 138.03 mm3, p < 0.001), and overall right amygdala volumes were larger than left amygdala volumes (mean difference 36.88 mm3, p < 0.001). White matter volumes were significantly smaller (p < 0.001) and CSF volumes significantly larger (p < 0.001) in preterm than in term born infants, while cortical and subcortical gray matter volumes were not significantly different between groups. Amygdala volumes showed significant correlation with the intensity of the escape response to a fearsome toy (rs = 0.38, p = 0.013), and were larger in infants showing an escape response compared to the infants showing no escape response (mean difference 120.97 mm3, p = 0.005). Amygdala volumes were not significantly correlated with the intensity

  1. Neonatal resuscitation and immediate newborn assessment and stimulation for the prevention of neonatal deaths: a systematic review, meta-analysis and Delphi estimation of mortality effect

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Of 136 million babies born annually, around 10 million require assistance to breathe. Each year 814,000 neonatal deaths result from intrapartum-related events in term babies (previously “birth asphyxia”) and 1.03 million from complications of prematurity. No systematic assessment of mortality reduction from tactile stimulation or resuscitation has been published. Objective To estimate the mortality effect of immediate newborn assessment and stimulation, and basic resuscitation on neonatal deaths due to term intrapartum-related events or preterm birth, for facility and home births. Methods We conducted systematic reviews for studies reporting relevant mortality or morbidity outcomes. Evidence was assessed using GRADE criteria adapted to provide a systematic approach to mortality effect estimates for the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Meta-analysis was performed if appropriate. For interventions with low quality evidence but strong recommendation for implementation, a Delphi panel was convened to estimate effect size. Results We identified 24 studies of neonatal resuscitation reporting mortality outcomes (20 observational, 2 quasi-experimental, 2 cluster randomized controlled trials), but none of immediate newborn assessment and stimulation alone. A meta-analysis of three facility-based studies examined the effect of resuscitation training on intrapartum-related neonatal deaths (RR= 0.70, 95%CI 0.59-0.84); this estimate was used for the effect of facility-based basic neonatal resuscitation (additional to stimulation). The evidence for preterm mortality effect was low quality and thus expert opinion was sought. In community-based studies, resuscitation training was part of packages with multiple concurrent interventions, and/or studies did not distinguish term intrapartum-related from preterm deaths, hence no meta-analysis was conducted. Our Delphi panel of 18 experts estimated that immediate newborn assessment and stimulation would reduce both intrapartum

  2. Racial and ethnic disparities in perinatal mortality: applying the perinatal periods of risk model to identify areas for intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Besculides, Melanie; Laraque, Fabienne

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the feto-infant mortality rate for New York City, assess racial/ethnic variations and identify areas for intervention using the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) approach. METHODS: The PPOR model examines fetal and infant deaths by age at death (fetal, neonatal, postneonatal) and birthweight (500-1499, > or =1500 g). It groups age at death and birthweight into four categories to identify problems hypothesized to lead to the death: factors related to Maternal Health and Prematurity, Maternal Care, Newborn Care and Infant Health. The model was applied to fetal and infant deaths occurring in New York City using Vital Records data from 1996-2000. Analysis was completed for the entire city and by race/ethnicity (white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, Hispanic, Asians/Pacific Islander). RESULTS: The overall feto-infant mortality rate was 11.5/1,000 live births plus fetal deaths. This rate varied by race/ethnicity; black non-Hispanics had a higher rate than other racial/ethnic groups. Conditions related to maternal health and prematurity were the largest contributing factors to feto-infant mortality (5.9/1000) in New York City. Among blacks and Hispanics, problems related to maternal health and prematurity contributed a larger share than among whites and Asians/Pacific Islanders. CONCLUSION: The use of the PPOR approach shows that the racial/ethnic disparities in feto-infant mortality that exist in New York City are largely related to maternal health and prematurity. Interventions to reduce the feto-infant mortality rate should include preconception care and improvements in women's health. PMID:16173328

  3. Brain tumour mortality in immigrants.

    PubMed

    Neutel, C I; Quinn, A; Brancker, A

    1989-03-01

    All Canadian deaths due to malignant brain tumour for the years 1970-73 were identified and analysed for country of birth. The years 1970-73 were chosen since in later years country of birth was no longer available for each death. The brain tumour population consisted of 1551 male and 1058 female deaths and matched controls were chosen from deaths due to other causes. Americans who died of brain tumour in Canada had a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of 1.0 compared to their fellow Americans in the USA. Italian, German, Dutch and British immigrants had SMR between 1.5 and 2.6 compared to rates in their home countries and between 1.24 and 2.09 when compared to Canadian rates. A series of graphs shows the increased risk for male immigrants quite dramatically, and indicates that for females the increases were less pronounced. Further analysis showed that the excess risk is confined to those who were born in Western Europe while their Canadian-born children experienced the same rates as all Canadians. Based on the limited information available, occupation could not be shown to play a role in establishing risk. An attempt was made to pinpoint the years of immigration which showed the greatest risk. It is concluded that the determination of risk of brain tumour has a strong environmental component. The possibilities for identification of this component are discussed. PMID:2722385

  4. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, Jesús; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality. PMID:26788502

  5. Infant and fetal mortality among a high fertility and mortality population in the Bolivian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Gurven, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Indigenous populations experience higher rates of poverty, disease and mortality than non-indigenous populations. To gauge current and future risks among Tsimane Amerindians of Bolivia, I assess mortality rates and growth early in life, and changes in risks due to modernization, based on demographic interviews conducted Sept. 2002–July 2005. Tsimane have high fertility (Total Fertility Rate = 9) and infant mortality (13%). Infections are the leading cause of infant death (55%). Infant mortality is greatest among women who are young, monolingual, space births close together, and live far from town. Infant mortality declined during the period 1990–2002, and a higher rate of reported miscarriages occurred during the 1950–1989 period. Infant deaths are more frequent among those born in the wet season. Infant stunting, underweight and wasting are common (34%, 15% and 12%, respectively) and greatest for low-weight mothers and high parity infants. Regression analysis of infant growth shows minimal regional differences in anthropometrics but greater stunting and underweight during the first two years of life. Males are more likely to be underweight, wasted, and spontaneously aborted. Whereas morbidity and stunting are prevalent in infancy, greater food availability later in life has not yet resulted in chronic diseases (e.g. hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetes) in adulthood due to the relatively traditional Tsimane lifestyle. PMID:23092724

  6. Infant and fetal mortality among a high fertility and mortality population in the Bolivian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Gurven, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Indigenous populations experience higher rates of poverty, disease and mortality than non-indigenous populations. To gauge current and future risks among Tsimane Amerindians of Bolivia, I assess mortality rates and growth early in life, and changes in risks due to modernization, based on demographic interviews conducted Sept. 2002-July 2005. Tsimane have high fertility (total fertility rate = 9) and infant mortality (13%). Infections are the leading cause of infant death (55%). Infant mortality is greatest among women who are young, monolingual, space births close together, and live far from town. Infant mortality declined during the period 1990-2002, and a higher rate of reported miscarriages occurred during the 1950-1989 period. Infant deaths are more frequent among those born in the wet season. Infant stunting, underweight and wasting are common (34%, 15% and 12%, respectively) and greatest for low-weight mothers and high parity infants. Regression analysis of infant growth shows minimal regional differences in anthropometrics but greater stunting and underweight during the first two years of life. Males are more likely to be underweight, wasted, and spontaneously aborted. Whereas morbidity and stunting are prevalent in infancy, greater food availability later in life has not yet resulted in chronic diseases (e.g. hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetes) in adulthood due to the relatively traditional Tsimane lifestyle. PMID:23092724

  7. Allocentric Spatial Performance Higher in Early-Blind and Sighted Adults Than in Retinopathy-of-Prematurity Adults.

    PubMed

    Eardley, Alison F; Edwards, Geoffrey; Malouin, Francine; Kennedy, John M

    2016-03-01

    The question as to whether people totally blind since infancy process allocentric or external spatial information like the sighted has caused considerable debate within the literature. Due to the extreme rarity of the population, researchers have often included individuals with retinopathy of prematurity (RoP--over oxygenation at birth) within the sample. However, RoP is inextricably confounded with prematurity per se. Prematurity, without visual disability, has been associated with spatial processing difficulties. In this experiment, blindfolded sighted participants and two groups of functionally totally blind participants heard tex