Science.gov

Sample records for premix insulin analogues

  1. Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Premixed Insulin Analogues in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qayyum, Rehan; Bolen, Shari; Maruthur, Nisa; Feldman, Leonard; Wilson, Lisa M.; Marinopoulos, Spyridon S.; Ranasinghe, Padmini; Amer, Muhammed; Bass, Eric B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence comparing premixed insulin analogues with other antidiabetic agents is urgently required to guide appropriate therapy. Purpose To summarize the English-language literature on the effectiveness and safety of premixed insulin analogues as compared with other antidiabetic agents in adults with type 2 diabetes. Data Sources We searched MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from inception to February 2008, and unpublished data from U.S. Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and industry. Study Selection Studies with control arms that compared premixed insulin analogues to another antidiabetic medication in adults with type 2 diabetes Data Extraction Serial abstraction by 2 reviewers using standardized protocols Data Synthesis Evidence from clinical trials was inconclusive for clinical outcomes, such as mortality. Therefore, the review focused on intermediate outcomes. Premixed analogues were similar to premixed human insulin in lowering fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and the incidence of hypoglycemia but were more effective in lowering postprandial glucose (mean difference = -1.1 mmol/L; 95% CI = -1.4 to -0.7 mmol/L [-19.2 mg/dL; 95% CI=-25.9 to -12.5 mg/dL]). As compared to long-acting insulin analogues, premixed analogues were superior in lowering postprandial glucose (mean difference= -1.5 mmol/L; 95%CI = -1.9 to -1.2 mmol/L [-27.9 mg/dL; 95% CI=-34.3 to -21.5 mg/dL]) and hemoglobin A1c (mean difference=-0.39%; 95% CI=-0.50% to -0.28%) but inferior in lowering fasting glucose (mean difference=0.7 mmol/L; 95%CI = 0.3 to 1.0 mmol/L [12.0 mg/dL; 95% CI=6.0 to 18.1 mg/dL]) and had higher incidence of hypoglycemia. When compared to noninsulin antidiabetic agents, premixed analogues were more effective in lowering fasting glucose (mean difference= -1.1mmol/L; 95%CI = -1.7 to 0.6 mmol/L [-20.5 mg/dL; 95% CI=-29.9 to -11.2 mg/dL]), postprandial glucose (mean difference= -2.1 mmol/L; 95%CI

  2. Role of premixed insulin analogues in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Elizarova, Svetlana; Galstyan, Gagik R; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR

    2014-01-01

    Because of the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin therapy will eventually become necessary in most patients. Recent evidence suggests that maintaining optimal glycemic control by early insulin therapy can reduce the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications in patients with T2DM. The present review focuses on relevant clinical evidence supporting the use of premixed insulin analogues in T2DM when intensifying therapy, and as starter insulins in insulin-naïve patients. Our aim is to provide relevant facts and clinical evidence useful in the decision-making process of treatment selection and individualized treatment goal setting to obtain sustained blood glucose control. PMID:24127999

  3. Role of premixed insulin analogues in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Elizarova, Svetlana; Galstyan, Gagik R; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R

    2014-03-01

    Because of the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin therapy will eventually become necessary in most patients. Recent evidence suggests that maintaining optimal glycemic control by early insulin therapy can reduce the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications in patients with T2DM. The present review focuses on relevant clinical evidence supporting the use of premixed insulin analogues in T2DM when intensifying therapy, and as starter insulins in insulin-naïve patients. Our aim is to provide relevant facts and clinical evidence useful in the decision-making process of treatment selection and individualized treatment goal setting to obtain sustained blood glucose control. PMID:24127999

  4. [Insulin analogues: modifications in the structure, molecular and metabolic consequences].

    PubMed

    de Luis, D A; Romero, E

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has provided insulin analogues for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, with an efficacy and safety that has improved the treatment of this disease. We briefly review the principal characteristics of the insulin analogues currently available. Both rapid-acting (lispro, aspart and glulisine) and long acting (glargine and determir) insulin analogues are included in this review. We describe the pharmacology of each insulin analogue, their differences with the human insulin, the administration, indication, efficacy and safety. In addition we discussed the main controversies of the use of these insulin analogues. In particular, those related with the risk of cancer and retinopathy, and their use in pregnant women. PMID:23517895

  5. Current european regulatory perspectives on insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Harald G; Weise, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Insulin analogues are increasingly considered as an alternative to human insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. Insulin analogues (IAs) are chemically different from human insulin and may have different pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties. The significance of the modifications of the insulin molecule for the safety profile of IAs must be considered. This review describes the regulatory procedure and the expectations for the scientific content of European marketing authorization applications for innovative IAs submitted to the European Medicines Agency. Particular consideration is given to a potential cancer hazard. Specific regulatory guidance on how to address a possible carcinogenic or tumor promoting effect of innovative IAs in non-clinical studies is available. After marketing authorization, the factual access of patients to the new product will be determined to great extent by health technology assessment bodies, reimbursement decisions and the price. Whereas the marketing authorization is a European decision, pricing and reimbursement are national or regional responsibilities. The assessment of benefit and risk by the European Medicines Agency is expected to influence future decisions on price and reimbursement on a national or regional level. Collaborations between regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies have been initiated on European and national level to facilitate the use of the European Medicines Agency's benefit risk assessment as basis on which to build the subsequent health technology assessment. The option for combined or joint scientific advice procedures with regulators and health technology assessment bodies on European level or on a national level in several European Member States may help applicants to optimize their development program and dossier preparation in regard of both European marketing authorization application and reimbursement decisions. PMID:21736748

  6. Management of Type 2 diabetes in Ramadan: Low-ratio premix insulin working group practical advice

    PubMed Central

    Hassanein, Mohamed; Belhadj, Mohamed; Abdallah, Khalifa; Bhattacharya, Arpan D.; Singh, Awadhesh K.; Tayeb, Khaled; Al-Arouj, Monira; Elghweiry, Awad; Iraqi, Hinde; Nazeer, Mohamed; Jamoussi, Henda; Mnif, Mouna; Al-Madani, Abdulrazzaq; Al-Ali, Hossam; Ligthelm, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of insulin use during Ramadan could be minimized, if people with diabetes are metabolically stable and are provided with structured education for at least 2–3 months pre-Ramadan. Although, American diabetes association (ADA) recommendations 2010 and South Asian Consensus Guideline 2012 deal with management of diabetes in Ramadan and changes in insulin dosage, no specific guidance on widely prescribed low-ratio premix insulin is currently available. Hence, the working group for insulin therapy in Ramadan, after collective analysis, evaluation, and opinion from clinical practice, have formulated a practical advice to empower physicians with pre-Ramadan preparation, dose adjustment, and treatment algorithm for self-titration of low-ratio premix insulin. PMID:25364673

  7. Management of Type 2 diabetes in Ramadan: Low-ratio premix insulin working group practical advice.

    PubMed

    Hassanein, Mohamed; Belhadj, Mohamed; Abdallah, Khalifa; Bhattacharya, Arpan D; Singh, Awadhesh K; Tayeb, Khaled; Al-Arouj, Monira; Elghweiry, Awad; Iraqi, Hinde; Nazeer, Mohamed; Jamoussi, Henda; Mnif, Mouna; Al-Madani, Abdulrazzaq; Al-Ali, Hossam; Ligthelm, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The challenge of insulin use during Ramadan could be minimized, if people with diabetes are metabolically stable and are provided with structured education for at least 2-3 months pre-Ramadan. Although, American diabetes association (ADA) recommendations 2010 and South Asian Consensus Guideline 2012 deal with management of diabetes in Ramadan and changes in insulin dosage, no specific guidance on widely prescribed low-ratio premix insulin is currently available. Hence, the working group for insulin therapy in Ramadan, after collective analysis, evaluation, and opinion from clinical practice, have formulated a practical advice to empower physicians with pre-Ramadan preparation, dose adjustment, and treatment algorithm for self-titration of low-ratio premix insulin. PMID:25364673

  8. Review of insulin and its analogues in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mane, Krishnappa; Chaluvaraju, Kc; Niranjan, Ms; Zaranappa, Tr; Manjuthej, Tr

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where in human body does not produce or properly uses insulin, a hormone that is required to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy. Diabetes finally leads to more complications and to prevent these complications insulin and its analogues are used. After more than half a century of treating diabetics with animal insulin's, recombinant DNA technologies and advanced protein chemistry made human insulin preparations available in the early 1980s. As the next step, over the last decade, insulin analogues were constructed by changing the structure of the native protein with the goal of improving the therapeutic properties of it, because the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rapid, intermediate and long-acting preparations of human insulin make it almost impossible to achieve sustained normoglycemia. The first clinically available insulin analogue, lispro, confirmed the hopes by showing that improved glycaemic control can be achieved without an increase in hypoglycaemic events. Two new insulin analogues, insulin glargine and insulin aspart, have recently been approved for clinical use in the United States and several other analogues are being intensively tested. PMID:24826038

  9. What options are available when considering starting insulin: premix or basal?

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Several large studies in diabetes have shown that early initiation of intensive therapy is better for the prevention of long-term complications and suggest that patients with more advanced disease may be at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Despite these findings, insulin initiation is often delayed in patients with type 2 diabetes, typically until A1C exceeds 8.5%. Barriers to the use of insulin are many, arising from both a patient and a physician perspective, and the decision to initiate insulin treatment can be influenced by cost, risk of hypoglycemia, convenience, and the potential for weight gain. Choosing when to initiate insulin and which insulin/treatment regimen to adopt in patients with type 2 diabetes is key, and the importance of tailoring treatment to the patient is widely acknowledged. However, there is currently no universal consensus on the optimal course of action. Once-daily basal insulin and twice-daily premix insulin are commonly used for insulin initiation. Relatively few studies have directly compared these starter treatment regimens, although general findings suggest that, although glycemic control appears to be similar with once-daily basal insulin and twice-daily premix, the lower hypoglycemia rates, lower weight gain, simplicity, and convenience associated with basal insulin support its first-line use as a starter insulin regimen in patients failing on oral antidiabetes agents. Variables such as age, body mass index, and bedtime or post-breakfast plasma glucose levels may alter the efficacy of the chosen treatment regimen, further supporting the need to tailor treatment to meet individual patient's requirements. PMID:21668341

  10. The metabolic and mitogenic properties of basal insulin analogues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Context Retrospective, observational studies have reported an association between diabetes treatment with insulin and a higher incidence of cancer. Objective Overview the literature for in vitro and in vivo studies of the metabolic and mitogenic properties of basal insulin analogues and assess the implications for clinical use. Methods Relevant studies were identified through PubMed and congress abstract database searches; data on metabolic and mitogenic signalling in relation to insulin treatment of diabetes are included in this review. Results The balance of evidence shows that although some analogues have demonstrated mitogenic potency in some in vitro studies in cancer cell lines, these findings do not translate to the in vivo setting in animals or to the clinical setting in humans. Conclusions The current consensus is that there is no clinical or in vivo evidence to indicate that any commercially available insulin analogue has carcinogenic effects. Large-scale, prospective clinical and observational studies will further establish any potential link. PMID:23373726

  11. Pharmacokinetic model for the absorption of subcutaneously injected soluble insulin and monomeric insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Trajanoski, Z; Wach, P; Kotanko, P; Ott, A; Skraba, F

    1993-09-01

    A subcutaneous insulin absorption model is presented for parameter estimation from the time course of plasma insulin. Modifications of a published model were made for the absorption of soluble insulin and monomeric insulin analogues in the range of therapeutic concentrations and volumes. The modified diffusion-dissociation model with distributed parameters was approximated by a multiple-compartment model. Subcutaneous absorption of soluble insulin and monomeric insulin analogues with various volumes, concentrations, and injection depths was simulated. The model for soluble insulin exhibits volume, concentration, and injection depth dependent absorption, as experimentally observed. It was found that binding of soluble insulin in the subcutaneous tissue is negligible for U-40 and U-100 strengths. The absorption of identical doses (10 U) of soluble U-40 insulin was markedly faster (T-50% = 159.4 min) than the absorption of U-100 (T-50% = 196.2 min). According to the simulation results, the absorption rate of monomeric analogues is not dependent on concentration. No significant chances of the absorption rate could also be observed by varying volume and injection depth of the monomeric analogues. PMID:8218870

  12. Transdermal iontophoretic delivery of bovine insulin and monomeric human insulin analogue.

    PubMed

    Kanikkannan, N; Singh, J; Ramarao, P

    1999-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the possibility of delivering bovine insulin in streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats by iontophoresis. Further, the effect of iontophoresis of monomeric human insulin analogue (r-DNA origin) on the plasma glucose level (PGL) of diabetic rats was studied. Iontophoresis of bovine insulin (10-200 IU/ml) was not effective in decreasing the PGL in untreated diabetic rats. Pretreatment of skin with oleic acid or menthol for 3 h followed by iontophoresis of bovine insulin also failed to produce a fall in PGL. Application of a depilatory cream for hair removal (24 h before the experiment), followed by iontophoresis of bovine insulin (10, 30 and 100 IU/ml) produced a concentration-dependent fall in PGL. Further, application of depilatory cream immediately before the experiment produced a substantial fall in PGL both by passive diffusion and iontophoresis. Depilatory cream might have drastically reduced the barrier function of skin such that conventional bovine insulin (dimer and hexamer) penetrates through the intact skin by iontophoresis and even by passive diffusion. Depilatory cream or the active components of depilatory cream may be useful as penetration enhancers for transdermal delivery of drugs especially macromolecules such as insulin. Iontophoresis of monomeric human insulin analogue (B9 Asp, B27 Glu) through intact skin (untreated) produced a significant fall in PGL in diabetic rats. Monomeric human insulin analogues which have low tendency to self aggregation may be promising candidates for the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of insulin. PMID:10210726

  13. Engineering predictability and protraction in a basal insulin analogue: the pharmacology of insulin detemir.

    PubMed

    Kurtzhals, P

    2004-09-01

    The suboptimal nature of the absorption profiles of human insulin formulations following subcutaneous administration has prompted the development of insulin analogues better suited for therapeutic use in diabetes mellitus. A particular challenge has been to engineer long-acting agents that do not produce unduly variable responses from one injection to another. One recent approach that has met with success has been to acylate, the insulin molecule with a fatty acid, thereby enabling reversible albumin binding. The first clinically available agent of this type is insulin detemir. Pharmacological studies have established that this principle is effective in prolonging action, primarily by retarding absorption. The solubility of insulin detemir in the vial and after injection and an important buffering mechanism effected by plasma albumin binding explain a significant decrease in within-subject variability of pharmacodynamic response observed in repeat isoglycaemic clamp studies where insulin detemir was compared to other basal insulin products. Owing to the extremely high ratio of albumin-binding sites to insulin detemir molecules at therapeutic concentrations, no safety considerations have been identified pertaining to albumin binding. The insulin detemir molecule retains the molecular pharmacological properties of native human insulin, including a physiological balance between metabolic and mitogenic potencies. Thus, insulin detemir offers the promise of an improved tolerability:efficacy ratio in the clinical setting. PMID:15306834

  14. Intensification of insulin therapy with basal-bolus or premixed insulin regimens in type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Dario; Chiodini, Paolo; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Esposito, Katherine

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of intensified insulin regimens (basal-bolus versus premixed) on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. We conducted an electronic search until March 2015 on many electronic databases including online registries of ongoing trials. All RCTs comparing basal-bolus with premixed insulin regimens, with a duration of >12 weeks and with >30 patients per arm, were included. Investigators extracted data on study characteristics, outcome measures, and methodological quality. We found thirteen RCTs lasting 16-60 weeks and involving 5255 patients assessed for the primary endpoint (reduction of HbA1c from baseline). Meta-analysis of change in HbA1c level between basal-bolus and premixed insulin regimens resulted in a small and non-significant difference of 0.09% (95% CI -0.03 to 0.21), with substantial heterogeneity between studies (I(2) = 74.4%). There was no statistically significant difference in the event rate for overall hypoglycemia (0.16 episode/patient/year, 95%CI -2.07 to 2.3), weight change (-0.21 kg, -0.164 to 0.185), and daily insulin dose (-0.54 U/day, -2.7 to 1.6). The likelihood for reaching the HbA1c <7% was 8% higher (3-13%, I(2) = 68.8%) with the basal-bolus as compared with the premixed regimen. There is no clinically relevant difference in the efficacy of basal-bolus versus premixed insulin regimens for HbA1c decrease in type 2 diabetic patients. These findings may be helpful to adapt treatment to individual patient needs. PMID:26281001

  15. Therapeutics of Diabetes Mellitus: Focus on Insulin Analogues and Insulin Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Valla, Vasiliki

    2010-01-01

    Aim. Inadequately controlled diabetes accounts for chronic complications and increases mortality. Its therapeutic management aims in normal HbA1C, prandial and postprandial glucose levels. This review discusses diabetes management focusing on the latest insulin analogues, alternative insulin delivery systems and the artificial pancreas. Results. Intensive insulin therapy with multiple daily injections (MDI) allows better imitation of the physiological rhythm of insulin secretion. Longer-acting, basal insulin analogues provide concomitant improvements in safety, efficacy and variability of glycaemic control, followed by low risks of hypoglycaemia. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) provides long-term glycaemic control especially in type 1 diabetic patients, while reducing hypoglycaemic episodes and glycaemic variability. Continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems provide information on postprandial glucose excursions and nocturnal hypo- and/or hyperglycemias. This information enhances treatment options, provides a useful tool for self-monitoring and allows safer achievement of treatment targets. In the absence of a cure-like pancreas or islets transplants, artificial “closed-loop” systems mimicking the pancreatic activity have been also developed. Conclusions. Individualized treatment plans for insulin initiation and administration mode are critical in achieving target glycaemic levels. Progress in these fields is expected to facilitate and improve the quality of life of diabetic patients. PMID:20589066

  16. A critical appraisal of the role of insulin analogues in the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Oiknine, Ralph; Bernbaum, Marla; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2005-01-01

    Insulin is one of the oldest and best studied treatments for diabetes mellitus. Despite many improvements in the management of diabetes, the nonphysiological time-action profiles of conventional insulins remain a significant obstacle. However, the advent of recombinant DNA technology made it possible to overcome these limitations in the time-action profiles of conventional insulins. Used as prandial (e.g. insulin lispro or insulin aspart) and basal (e.g. insulin glargine) insulin, the analogues simulate physiological insulin profiles more closely than the older conventional insulins. If rapid-acting insulin analogues are used in the hospital, healthcare providers will need a new mind-set. Any error in coordination between timing of rapid-acting insulin administration and meal ingestion may result in hypoglycaemia. However, guidelines regarding in-hospital use of insulin analogues are few. The safety profile of insulin analogues is still not completely established in long-term clinical studies. Several studies have shown conflicting results with respect to the tumourigenic potential of this new class of agents. The clinical implications of these findings are not clear. Although novel insulin analogues are promising 'designer drugs' in our armamentarium to overcome some of the limitations of conventional insulin therapy, cost may be a limiting factor for some patients. PMID:15669878

  17. Insulin requirements in patients with diabetes and declining kidney function: differences between insulin analogues and human insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Kulozik, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In diabetic nephropathy the decline of renal function causes modifications of the insulin and carbohydrate metabolism resulting in changed insulin requirements. The aim of the present study was to identify potential differences in the requirements of human insulin and various insulin analogues in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and renal dysfunction. Methods: The insulin requirements of 346 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus under everyday life circumstances were assessed in an observational study. Simultaneously, laboratory parameters were measured and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the formula by Cockcroft–Gault. Medical history and concomitant medication were recorded. The insulin requirements of long- and short-acting insulin were tested for a relationship with the eGFR and laboratory parameters. Results: The dosage of long-acting human insulin did not show any relation to eGFR. In contrast, a strong positive relation between dosage and renal function was found for insulin glargine and insulin detemir. After classification according to renal function, the insulin dosage at eGFR less than 60 ml/min was 29.7% lower in glargine-treated and 27.3% lower in detemir-treated patients compared with eGFR greater than 90 ml/min. Considering the whole range of eGFR, short-acting human insulin did not show a relation with renal function. Only after classification according to renal function was a dose reduction found for human insulin at eGFR less than 60 ml/min. In contrast, requirements of insulin lispro were significantly related to eGFR over the whole range of eGFR. At eGFR less than 60 ml/min the insulin dosage was 32.6% lower than at eGFR greater than 90 ml/min. The requirements of insulin aspart did not show any association with the eGFR. Conclusions: Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus show different insulin requirements according to the renal function depending on the applied insulin. This finding is

  18. [Clinical importance of basal insulin analogues and insulin Toujeo® 300 units/ml].

    PubMed

    Adamíková, Alena

    2015-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous disease that requires a personalized approach to treatment with goals tailored to capabilities and abilities of the patient, his other diseases so as to ensure good diabetes control without the risk of hypoglycemic events and the development or progression of late diabetic complications. Recommendations for treatment of diabetes is classified in second-line as a one of the possibilities of treatment of basal insulin immediately after the failure of therapy with metformin and diet. The new generation of basal insulin analogues provides its effect profile and features a completely new quality to the treatment of diabetes. Toujeo® 300 units/ml is a new long-acting basal insulin glargine concentration of 300 units/ ml with a low glycemic variability, which in studies has demonstrated consistent control of diabetes in a significant reduction in the risk of hypoglycemia especially at night compared with insulin glargin of concentration 100 units/ml. PMID:26652788

  19. Insulin analogues in pregnancy and specific congenital anomalies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Josta; Garne, Ester; Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa; Morgan, Margery; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Wang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Insulin analogues are commonly used in pregnant women with diabetes. It is not known if the use of insulin analogues in pregnancy is associated with any higher risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring compared with use of human insulin. We performed a literature search for studies of pregnant women with pregestational diabetes using insulin analogues in the first trimester and information on congenital anomalies. The studies were analysed to compare the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses of mothers using insulin analogues with foetuses of mothers using human insulin. Of 29 studies, we included 1286 foetuses of mothers using short-acting insulin analogues with 1089 references of mothers using human insulin and 768 foetuses of mothers using long-acting insulin analogues with 685 references of mothers using long-acting human insulin (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn). The congenital anomaly rate was 4.84% and 4.29% among the foetuses of mothers using lispro and aspart. For glargine and detemir, the congenital anomaly rate was 2.86% and 3.47%, respectively. No studies on the use of insulin glulisine and degludec in pregnancy were found. There was no statistically significant difference in the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses exposed to insulin analogues (lispro, aspart, glargine or detemir) compared with those exposed to human insulin or Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin. The total prevalence of congenital anomalies was not increased for foetuses exposed to insulin analogues. The small samples in the included studies provided insufficient statistical power to identify a moderate increased risk of specific congenital anomalies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26431249

  20. Capillary electrokinetic chromatography of insulin and related synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Ortner, K; Buchberger, W; Himmelsbach, M

    2009-04-01

    With the implementation of recombinant DNA technology in the pharmaceutical industry, some synthetic insulins have been developed in order to improve the therapy of diabetes. These analogues differ only slightly in the amino acid sequence, therefore displaying a great challenge for analytical chemistry. Within the work presented in this paper, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) as micelle-forming agent, and microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) with microemulsions consisting of SDS, n-octane and 1-butanol were investigated for the separation of human insulin and five synthetic analogues. Best results were achieved with a solvent-modified MEKC system consisting of 100mM sodium dodecyl sulphate and 15% acetonitrile in 10mM borate buffer (pH 9.2). A similar system based on perfluorooctanoic acid as micelle-forming agent in ammonium acetate (pH 9.2) was successfully employed for the hyphenation with a quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer via a sheath-flow interface. In this case, detection limits at 10mg/L could be achieved. PMID:19027906

  1. Synthesis and Identification of FITC-Insulin Conjugates Produced Using Human Insulin and Insulin Analogues for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Dolly; Joan Taylor, M; Tomlins, Paul; Sahota, Tarsem S

    2016-03-01

    Human insulin was fluorescently labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and the conjugate species produced were identified using high performance liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectroscopy. Mono-labelled FITC-insulin conjugate (A1 or B1) was successfully produced using human insulin at short reaction times (up to 5 h) however the product always contained some unlabelled native human insulin. As the reaction time was increased over 45 h, no unlabelled native human insulin was present and more di-labelled FITC-insulin conjugate (A1B1) was produced than mono-labelled conjugate with the appearance of tri-labelled conjugate (A1B1B29) after 20 h reaction time. The quantities switch from mono-labelled to di-labelled FITC-insulin conjugate between reaction times 9 and 20 h. In the presence of phenol or m-cresol, there appears to be a 10 % decrease in the amount of mono-labelled conjugate and an increase in di-labelled conjugate produced at lower reaction times. Clinically used insulin analogues present in commercially available preparations were successfully fluorescently labelled for future biomedical applications. PMID:26658795

  2. The Effects of Anti-insulin Antibodies and Cross-reactivity with Human Recombinant Insulin Analogues in the E170 Insulin Immunometric Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Serim; Hur, Mina; Moon, Hee Won; Kim, Jin Q

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin assays are affected by varying degrees of interference from anti-insulin antibodies (IAs) and by cross-reactivity with recombinant insulin analogues. We evaluated the usefulness of the E170 insulin assay by assessing IA effects and cross-reactivity with 2 analogues. Methods Sera were obtained from 59 type 2 diabetes patients receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and 18 healthy controls. Insulin levels were determined using an E170 analyzer. To investigate the effects of IAs, we performed IA radioimmunoassays, and analyzed the differences between directly measured insulin (direct insulin) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-treated insulins (free, IA-unbound; total, IA-bound and unbound insulin). We performed in-vitro cross-reactivity tests with insulin aspart and insulin glulisine. Results In IA-positive patients, E170 free insulin levels measured using the E170 analyzer were significantly lower than the direct insulin levels. The mean value of the direct/free insulin ratio and IA-bound insulin, which were calculated as the difference between total and free insulin, increased significantly as endogenous IA levels increased. The E170 insulin assay showed low cross-reactivities with both analogues (< 0.7%). Conclusions IAs interfered with E170 insulin assay, and the extent of interference correlated with the IA levels, which may be attributable to the increase in IA-bound insulin, and not to an error in the assay. The E170 insulin assay may measure only endogenous insulin since cross-reactivity is low. Our results suggest that the measurement of free insulin after PEG pre-treatment could be useful for β cell function assessment in diabetic patients undergoing insulin therapy. PMID:21239867

  3. Short acting insulin analogues in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Guerra, Carolina; Badenes, Rafael; Lolli, Simona; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Blood glucose control in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, addressed to actively maintain blood glucose concentration within defined thresholds, is based on two major therapeutic interventions: to supply an adequate calories load and, when necessary, to continuously infuse insulin titrated to patients needs: intensive insulin therapy (IIT). Short acting insulin analogues (SAIA) have been synthesized to improve the chronic treatment of patients with diabetes but, because of the pharmacokinetic characteristics that include shorter on-set and off-set, they can be effectively used also in ICU patients and have the potential to be associated with a more limited risk of inducing episodes of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Medical therapies carry an intrinsic risk for collateral effects; this can be more harmful in patients with unstable clinical conditions like ICU patients. To minimize these risks, the use of short acting drugs in ICU patients have gained a progressively larger room in ICU and now pharmaceutical companies and researchers design drugs dedicated to this subset of medical practice. In this article we report the rationale of using short acting drugs in ICU patients (i.e., sedation and treatment of arterial hypertension) and we also describe SAIA and their therapeutic use in ICU with the potential to minimize iatrogenic hypoglycemia related to IIT. The pharmacodynamic and pharmachokinetic characteristics of SAIA will be also discussed. PMID:24936244

  4. Interactions of short-acting, intermediate-acting and pre-mixed human insulins with free radicals--Comparative EPR examination.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Paweł; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Ramos, Paweł; Mencner, Łukasz; Olczyk, Krystyna; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-07-25

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to examine insulins interactions with free radicals. Human recombinant DNA insulins of three groups were studied: short-acting insulin (Insuman Rapid); intermediate-acting insulins (Humulin N, Insuman Basal), and pre-mixed insulins (Humulin M3, Gensulin M50, Gensulin M40, Gensulin M30). The aim of an X-band (9.3GHz) study was comparative analysis of antioxidative properties of the three groups of human insulins. DPPH was used as a stable free radical model. Amplitudes of EPR lines of DPPH as the paramagnetic free radical reference, and DPPH interacting with the individual tested insulins were compared. For all the examined insulins kinetics of their interactions with free radicals up to 60 min were obtained. The strongest interactions with free radicals were observed for the short-acting insulin - Insuman Rapid. The lowest interactions with free radicals were characteristic for intermediate-acting insulin - Insuman Basal. The pre-mixed insulins i.e. Humulin M3 and Gensulin M50 revealed the fastest interactions with free radicals. The short acting, intermediate acting and premixed insulins have been found to be effective agents in reducing free radical formation in vitro and should be further considered as potential useful tools in attenuation of oxidative stress in diabetic patients. PMID:25975232

  5. Molecular Characterisation of Long-Acting Insulin Analogues in Comparison with Human Insulin, IGF-1 and Insulin X10

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Bo F.; Glendorf, Tine; Hegelund, Anne C.; Lundby, Anders; Lützen, Anne; Slaaby, Rita; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis There is controversy with respect to molecular characteristics of insulin analogues. We report a series of experiments forming a comprehensive characterisation of the long acting insulin analogues, glargine and detemir, in comparison with human insulin, IGF-1, and the super-mitogenic insulin, X10. Methods We measured binding of ligands to membrane-bound and solubilised receptors, receptor activation and mitogenicity in a number of cell types. Results Detemir and glargine each displayed a balanced affinity for insulin receptor (IR) isoforms A and B. This was also true for X10, whereas IGF-1 had a higher affinity for IR-A than IR-B. X10 and glargine both exhibited a higher relative IGF-1R than IR binding affinity, whereas detemir displayed an IGF-1R:IR binding ratio of ≤1. Ligands with high relative IGF-1R affinity also had high affinity for IR/IGF-1R hybrid receptors. In general, the relative binding affinities of the analogues were reflected in their ability to phosphorylate the IR and IGF-1R. Detailed analysis revealed that X10, in contrast to the other ligands, seemed to evoke a preferential phosphorylation of juxtamembrane and kinase domain phosphorylation sites of the IR. Sustained phosphorylation was only observed from the IR after stimulation with X10, and after stimulation with IGF-1 from the IGF-1R. Both X10 and glargine showed an increased mitogenic potency compared to human insulin in cells expressing many IGF-1Rs, whereas only X10 showed increased mitogenicity in cells expressing many IRs. Conclusions Detailed analysis of receptor binding, activation and in vitro mitogenicity indicated no molecular safety concern with detemir. PMID:22590494

  6. [Reflections of a clinician on the switch from human to analogue insulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Deák, László

    2012-10-01

    The development of insulin therapy has not been stopped since the manufacturing of human insulin, because better mimic of physiological insulin response made it necessary to modify the human insulin molecule in order to create rapidly absorbing insulin analogues and 24-hour acting basal insulin analogues. Clinical observations indicate that the complete switch from human basal-bolus therapy to insulin analogues means not only "unit-for-unit" switch but it represents a transfer to an insulin therapy with different basal/bolus ratio as a result of different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of insulin and the level of insulin resistance of the patient. With reference to a case-history, the author presents his experience on a switch from human insulin to insulin analogue. Furthermore, the author summarizes data obtained from a few cases reported in international literature which draw the attention to the fact that the basal/bolus ratio should be adjusted individually, which may be the key for the success in the therapy in these cases. PMID:23022882

  7. Type 1 Ig-E mediated allergy to human insulin, insulin analogues and beta-lactam antibiotics*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Pedro; Barros, Luísa; Gonçalo, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Insulin, a crucial therapeutic agent for diabetes mellitus, has been rarely associated with hypersensitivity events. We present a 69-year-old type-2 diabetic patient with urticariform lesions on the sites of subcutaneous injection of insulin. The patient denied any known allergies, except for an unspecific cutaneous reaction after intramuscular penicillin administration in childhood. Prick tests revealed positive reactions to all tested human insulins and insulin analogues. Serum IgE levels were above normal range and RAST tests were positive for human, bovine and porcine insulins, as well as beta-lactams. Type 1 IgE-mediated allergy to insulin analogues demands a prompt diagnosis and represents a significant therapeutic challenge in diabetic patients. PMID:23197216

  8. Can a new ultra-long-acting insulin analogue improve patient care? Investigating the potential role of insulin degludec.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer D; Neumiller, Joshua J; Campbell, R Keith

    2012-12-24

    The basal-bolus concept of delivering insulin to diabetic patients makes physiological sense, as it mimics normal insulin release in people without diabetes. In line with this concept, a major effort put forth by insulin manufacturers has been to develop the ideal exogenous basal insulin product. The perfect basal insulin product would be injected into subcutaneous tissue without causing irritation, release insulin continuously at a constant rate for at least 24 hours, be stable, not contribute to weight gain, have a low risk of allergic reactions and, very importantly, minimize the risk of hypoglycaemia. While the perfect insulin has not yet been discovered, advancements are still being made. Insulin degludec is an ultra-long-acting basal insulin analogue that possesses a flat, stable glucose-lowering effect in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin degludec achieves these pharmacokinetic properties by forming soluble multihexamers upon subcutaneous injection, resulting in the formation of a depot in the subcutaneous tissue that is slowly released and absorbed into circulation. Insulin degludec has been associated with slightly less weight gain and fewer nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes when compared with insulin glargine in some, but not all, clinical studies. This article briefly reviews current evidence for the use of insulin degludec in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus and discusses the potential impact of this new basal insulin on clinical practice. PMID:23145524

  9. Efficacy of insulin analogues in diabetic patients attending primary care centers

    PubMed Central

    Bardisi, Wedad M.; Khorsheed, Manal M.; Magliah, Faisal; Magliah, Ayman F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To measure the efficacy of new insulin analogues compared with the conventional types of insulin, and to compare their effects on patient satisfaction regarding their weight changes and the frequency of hypoglycemic episodes. Methods: In this retrospective cohort observational study, data was collected from the medical records of 122 eligible diabetics on insulin therapy attending government primary care centers in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from June 2013 to July 2014. The data collected considered the efficacy, safety, and patient satisfaction of the types of insulin therapy used for their treatment. Results: After 12 weeks, there was a reduction in mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of -0.88% for the analogue type versus -0.19% for the conventional type, and at 24 weeks, the mean drop in HbA1c was -2.02% for the analogue type versus -1.12% for the conventional type, but the differences were not statistically significant. More patients (87% versus 38%) on analogue compared with conventional insulin treatment were satisfied with therapy. Conclusion: In the primary health care setting, insulin analogues showed greater efficacy improvements than conventional insulin therapy within 6 months. However, conventional insulin therapy can still be used at primary care centers with limited resources, and when patients refuse to be converted. PMID:26108587

  10. Looking at the carcinogenicity of human insulin analogues via the intrinsic disorder prism

    PubMed Central

    Redwan, Elrashdy M.; Linjawi, Moustafa H.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic insulin, in its native and biosynthetic forms as well as several currently available insulin analogues, continues to be the protein of most interest to researchers. From the time of its discovery to the development of modern insulin analogues, this important therapeutic protein has passed through several stages and product generations. Beside the well-known link between diabetes and cancer risk, the currently used therapeutic insulin analogues raised serious concerns due to their potential roles in cancer initiation and/or progression. It is possible that structural variations in some of the insulin analogues are responsible for the appearance of new oncogenic species with high binding affinity to the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) receptor. The question we are trying to answer in this work is: are there any specific features of the distribution of intrinsic disorder propensity within the amino acid sequences of insulin analogues that may provide an explanation for the carcinogenicity of the altered insulin protein? PMID:26983499

  11. Looking at the carcinogenicity of human insulin analogues via the intrinsic disorder prism.

    PubMed

    Redwan, Elrashdy M; Linjawi, Moustafa H; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic insulin, in its native and biosynthetic forms as well as several currently available insulin analogues, continues to be the protein of most interest to researchers. From the time of its discovery to the development of modern insulin analogues, this important therapeutic protein has passed through several stages and product generations. Beside the well-known link between diabetes and cancer risk, the currently used therapeutic insulin analogues raised serious concerns due to their potential roles in cancer initiation and/or progression. It is possible that structural variations in some of the insulin analogues are responsible for the appearance of new oncogenic species with high binding affinity to the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) receptor. The question we are trying to answer in this work is: are there any specific features of the distribution of intrinsic disorder propensity within the amino acid sequences of insulin analogues that may provide an explanation for the carcinogenicity of the altered insulin protein? PMID:26983499

  12. Evidence-based clinical use of insulin premixtures.

    PubMed

    Tambascia, Marcos Antônio; Nery, Márcia; Gross, Jorge Luiz; Ermetice, Mariana Narbot; de Oliveira, Carolina Piras

    2013-01-01

    Brazil is expected to have 19.6 million patients with diabetes by the year 2030. A key concept in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is establishing individualized glycemic goals based on each patient's clinical characteristics, which impact the choice of antihyperglycemic therapy. Targets for glycemic control, including fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (A1C), are often not reached solely with antihyperglycemic therapy, and insulin therapy is often required. Basal insulin is considered an initial strategy; however, premixed insulins are convenient and are equally or more effective, especially for patients who require both basal and prandial control but desire a more simplified strategy involving fewer daily injections than a basal-bolus regimen. Most physicians are reluctant to transition patients to insulin treatment due to inappropriate assumptions and insufficient information. We conducted a nonsystematic review in PubMed and identified the most relevant and recently published articles that compared the use of premixed insulin versus basal insulin analogues used alone or in combination with rapid-acting insulin analogues before meals in patients with T2DM. These studies suggest that premixed insulin analogues are equally or more effective in reducing A1C compared to basal insulin analogues alone in spite of the small increase in the risk of nonsevere hypoglycemic events and nonclinically significant weight gain. Premixed insulin analogues can be used in insulin-naïve patients, in patients already on basal insulin therapy, and those using basal-bolus therapy who are noncompliant with blood glucose self-monitoring and titration of multiple insulin doses. We additionally provide practical aspects related to titration for the specific premixed insulin analogue formulations commercially available in Brazil. PMID:24011173

  13. [Significance of insulin analogues in the treatment of people with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Gallwitz, B; Westrup, D; Schmeisl, G-W

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of the significance of the different insulins used in type 2 diabetes mellitus is of fundamental importance for routine treatment. Compared with human insulin, rapid acting insulin analogues have a faster uptake and a higher peak effect as well as a shorter duration of action. Long acting insulin analogues have a flatter action profile and a longer duration of action than NPH insulin. Consequently, insulin analogues generally allow an improved glycaemic control to be achieved. Moreover, differences relating to practical aspects are of importance (snacks and interval between injection and meals in the case of short acting insulin as well as mixing of suspensions and number of injections in the case of long acting insulins). The consequences for clinical practice are seen differently by countries as shown by a prescription rate of 50 % for insulin analogues in Germany compared with approximately 90 % in certain other European countries. One of the main reasons why questions remain is the lack of meaningful long-term studies on diabetes-related complications. PMID:25317651

  14. Differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues approved for therapeutic use- compilation of reports from the past 20 years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide comprehensive information on the differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues, published in vitro comparisons of human insulin and the rapid acting analogues insulin lispro (Humalog®), insulin aspart ( NovoRapid®), insulin glulisine (Apidra®), and the slow acting analogues insulin glargine (Lantus®), and insulin detemir (Levemir®) were gathered from the past 20 years (except for receptor binding studies). A total of 50 reports were retrieved, with great heterogeneity among study methodology. However, various differences in bioactivity compared to human insulin were obvious (e.g. differences in effects on metabolism, mitogenesis, apoptosis, intracellular signalling, thrombocyte function, protein degradation). Whether or not these differences have clinical bearings (and among which patient populations) remains to be determined. PMID:21714872

  15. Metabolic effect and receptor signalling profile of a non-metabolisable insulin glargine analogue

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Marcus; Schmidt, Ronald; Wendrich, Thomas M.; Tennagels, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Context Insulin glargine (GLA) is rapidly metabolized in vivo to metabolite M1, which has in vitro metabolic and mitogenic profiles comparable with human insulin (HI). Objective To investigate the pharmacologic and signalling profiles of a non-metabolizable analogue (A21Gly,DiD-Arg) insulin (D-GLA). Methods Rats were injected s.c. with 1, 12.5 or 200 U/kg of GLA or D-GLA; blood glucose and phosphorylation status of the insulin receptor (IR), Akt and IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R) in tissue samples were investigated after 1 h. Plasma samples were analysed for insulin by LC-MS/MS. Results Blood glucose lowering was prolonged with D-GLA. D-GLA comprised ≥98% of insulin after D-GLA injection; M1 comprised 76–92% after GLA injection. IR and Akt phosphorylation were comparable with GLA and D-GLA. Neither analogue stimulated IGF1R phosphorylation. Conclusions Suprapharmacological doses of D-GLA did not activate IGF1R in vivo. Mitogenic effects of insulin and insulin analogues might be solely based on IR growth-promoting activity. PMID:25144413

  16. Quantitation of Insulin Analogues in Serum Using Immunoaffinity Extraction, Liquid Chromatography, and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Der Gugten, J Grace; Wong, Sophia; Holmes, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    Insulin analysis is used in combination with glucose, C-peptide, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and proinsulin determination for the investigation of adult hypoglycemia. The most common cause is the administration of too much insulin or insulin secretagogue to a diabetic patient or inadequate caloric intake after administration of either. Occasionally there is a question as to whether hypoglycemia has been caused by an exogenous insulin-whether by accident, intent, or even malicious intent. While traditionally this was confirmed by a low or undetectable C-peptide in a hypoglycemic specimen, this finding is not entirely specific and would also be expected in the context of impaired counter-regulatory response, fatty acid oxidation defects, and liver failure-though beta-hydroxybutyrate levels can lend diagnostic clarity. For this reason, insulin is often requested. However, popular automated chemiluminescent immunoassays for insulin have distinctly heterogeneous performance in detecting analogue synthetic insulins with cross-reactivities ranging from near 0 % to greater than 100 %. The ability to detect synthetic insulins is vendor-specific and varies between insulin products. Liquid Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers a means to circumvent these analytical issues and both quantify synthetic insulins and identify the specific type. We present an immunoaffinity extraction and LC-MS/MS method capable of independent identification and quantitation of native sequence insulins (endogenous, Insulin Regular, Insulin NPH), and analogues Glargine, Lispro, Detemir, and Aspart with an analytical sensitivity for endogenous insulin of between 1 and 2 μU/mL in patient serum samples. PMID:26602124

  17. The solution structure of a superpotent B-chain-shortened single-replacement insulin analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Kurapkat, G.; Siedentop, M.; Gattner, H. G.; Hagelstein, M.; Brandenburg, D.; Grötzinger, J.; Wollmer, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on an insulin analogue with 12.5-fold receptor affinity, the highest increase observed for a single replacement, and on its solution structure, determined by NMR spectroscopy. The analogue is [D-AlaB26]des-(B27-B30)-tetrapeptide-insulin-B26-amide. C-terminal truncation of the B-chain by four (or five) residues is known not to affect the functional properties of insulin, provided the new carboxylate charge is neutralized. As opposed to the dramatic increase in receptor affinity caused by the substitution of D-Ala for the wild-type residue TyrB26 in the truncated molecule, this very substitution reduces it to only 18% of that of the wild-type hormone when the B-chain is present in full length. The insulin molecule in solution is visualized as an ensemble of conformers interrelated by a dynamic equilibrium. The question is whether the "active" conformation of the hormone, sought after in innumerable structure/function studies, is or is not included in the accessible conformational space, so that it could be adopted also in the absence of the receptor. If there were any chance for the active conformation, or at least a predisposed state to be populated to a detectable extent, this chance should be best in the case of a superpotent analogue. This was the motivation for the determination of the three-dimensional structure of [D-AlaB26]des-(B27-B30)-tetrapeptide-insulin-B26-amide. However, neither the NMR data nor CD spectroscopic comparison of a number of related analogues provided a clue concerning structural features predisposing insulin to high receptor affinity. After the present study it seems more likely than before that insulin will adopt its active conformation only when exposed to the force field of the receptor surface. PMID:10091652

  18. Surface-expressed insulin receptors as well as IGF-I receptors both contribute to the mitogenic effects of human insulin and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Anders; Bolvig, Pernille; Hegelund, Anne Charlotte; Hansen, Bo F; Worm, Jesper; Lützen, Anne; Billestrup, Nils; Bonnesen, Christine; Oleksiewicz, Martin B

    2015-07-01

    There is a medical need for new insulin analogues. Yet, molecular alterations to the insulin molecule can theoretically result in analogues with carcinogenic effects. Preclinical carcinogenicity risk assessment for insulin analogues rests to a large extent on mitogenicity assays in cell lines. We therefore optimized mitogenicity assay conditions for a panel of five cell lines. All cell lines expressed insulin receptors (IR), IGF-I receptors (IGF-IR) and hybrid receptors, and in all cell lines, insulin as well as the comparator compounds X10 and IGF-I caused phosphorylation of the IR as well as IGF-IR. Insulin exhibited mitogenicity EC(50) values in the single-digit nanomolar to picomolar range. We observed correlations across cell types between (i) mitogenic potency of insulin and IGF-IR/IR ratio, (ii) Akt phosphorylation and mitogenic potency and (iii) Akt phosphorylation and IR phosphorylation. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown of IR and IGF-IR, we observed that in HCT 116 cells the IR appeared dominant in driving the mitogenic response to insulin, whereas in MCF7 cells the IGF-IR appeared dominant in driving the mitogenic response to insulin. Together, our results show that the IR as well as IGF-IR may contribute to the mitogenic potency of insulin. While insulin was a more potent mitogen than IGF-I in cells expressing more IR than IGF-IR, the hyper-mitogenic insulin analogue X10 was a more potent mitogen than insulin across all cell types, supporting that the hyper-mitogenic effect of X10 involves the IR as well as the IGF-IR. These results are relevant for preclinical safety assessment of developmental insulin analogues. PMID:25413577

  19. [Rational use of insulin analogues in the treatment of type 1 diabetic children and adolescents: personal experience].

    PubMed

    Dorchy, H

    2006-09-01

    In the last decade, four fast- and long-acting insulin analogues have been created. Due to the pharmacokinetic characteristics of insulin analogues, they provide an insulin profile closer to normal physiology than can be achieved with human insulins. However, they do not necessarily improve glycated haemoglobin, but they allow better quality of life. In the two daily insulin injection regime, fast-acting analogues are very useful to rapidly correct hyperglycaemia, to allow sleeping in and eating something sweet. In the basal-bolus regime (> or =4 insulin injections), long-acting analogues reduce nocturnal hypoglycaemias and improve fasting blood glucose. In the two insulin regime (2 or > or =4 injections), rapid-acting human insulin must not be systematically replaced by a fast-acting analogue. On the other hand, insulin dose alteration must be triple: retrospective, according to numerous previous experiments, in order to enjoy more freedom for meals, sports, etc.; prospective according to programmed changes in meals and sports; with only a "touch" of compensatory adaptation according to actual glycaemia. PMID:16920339

  20. Basal insulin analogues in the management of diabetes mellitus: What progress have we made?

    PubMed

    Owens, David R; Matfin, Glenn; Monnier, Louis

    2014-02-01

    Insulin remains the most effective and consistent means of controlling blood glucose levels in diabetes. Since 1946, neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) has been the predominant basal insulin in clinical use. However, absorption is variable due to the need for resuspension and the time-action profile (peak activity 4-6 h after subcutaneous administration) confers an increased propensity for between-meal and nocturnal hypoglycaemia. In the 1980s, recombinant DNA technology enabled modifications to the insulin molecule resulting in the soluble long-acting insulin analogues, glargine and detemir. Both exhibit a lower risk of hypoglycaemia compared with neutral protamine Hagedorn due to improved time-action profiles and reduced day-to-day glucose variability. Glargine is indicated for administration once daily and detemir once or twice daily. Degludec is the latest prolonged-acting insulin which forms long subcutaneous multi-hexamers that delay absorption. Recent phase III trials in type 1 and type 2 diabetes show that degludec was non-inferior to comparators (predominantly glargine) with a minimal although inconsistent reduction in overall hypoglycaemia and a small absolute difference in nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Newer developmental agents include LY2605541 and glargine U300. LY2605541 comprises insulin lispro combined with polyethylene glycol, thereby increasing its hydrodynamic size and retarding absorption from the subcutaneous tissue. Glargine U300 is a new formulation of glargine resulting in a flatter and more prolonged time-action profile than its predecessor. This article reviews recent advances in basal insulin analogues, including a critical appraisal of the degludec trials. PMID:24026961

  1. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-10-01

    [AsnB26]- and [GlyB26]-insulin mutants attain a B26-turn like fold without assistance of chemical modifications. Their structures match the insulin receptor interface and expand the spectrum of insulin conformations. The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms.

  2. Effect of Insulin Analogues on Insulin/IGF1 Hybrid Receptors: Increased Activation by Glargine but Not by Its Metabolites M1 and M2

    PubMed Central

    Pierre-Eugene, Cécile; Pagesy, Patrick; Nguyen, Tuyet Thu; Neuillé, Marion; Tschank, Georg; Tennagels, Norbert; Hampe, Cornelia; Issad, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    Background In diabetic patients, the pharmacokinetics of injected human insulin does not permit optimal control of glycemia. Fast and slow acting insulin analogues have been developed, but they may have adverse properties, such as increased mitogenic or anti-apoptotic signaling. Insulin/IGF1 hybrid receptors (IR/IGF1R), present in most tissues, have been proposed to transmit biological effects close to those of IGF1R. However, the study of hybrid receptors is difficult because of the presence of IR and IGF1R homodimers. Our objective was to perform the first study on the pharmacological properties of the five marketed insulin analogues towards IR/IGF1R hybrids. Methodology To study the effect of insulin analogues on IR/IGF1R hybrids, we used our previously developed Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) assay that permits specific analysis of the pharmacological properties of hybrid receptors. Moreover, we have developed a new, highly sensitive BRET-based assay to monitor phophatidylinositol-3 phosphate (PIP3) production in living cells. Using this assay, we performed a detailed pharmacological analysis of PIP3 production induced by IGF1, insulin and insulin analogues in living breast cancer-derived MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 cells. Results Among the five insulin analogues tested, only glargine stimulated IR/IGF1R hybrids with an EC50 that was significantly lower than insulin and close to that of IGF1. Glargine more efficiently stimulated PIP3 production in MCF-7 cells but not in MDA-MB231 cells as compared to insulin. In contrast, glargine metabolites M1 and M2 showed lower potency for hybrid receptors stimulation, PIP3 production, Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation and DNA synthesis in MCF-7 cells, compared to insulin. Conclusion Glargine, possibly acting through IR/IGF1R hybrids, displays higher potency, whereas its metabolites M1 and M2 display lower potency than insulin for the stimulation of proliferative/anti-apoptotic pathways in MCF-7 cells. PMID:22848683

  3. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Záková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M

    2014-10-01

    The structural characterization of the insulin-insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21-B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms. PMID:25286859

  4. A framework for the in vitro evaluation of cancer-relevant molecular characteristics and mitogenic potency of insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Baricevic, Ivona; Jones, David R; Roberts, Darren L; Lutzen, Anne; Lundby, Anders; Worm, Jesper; Hansen, Bo F; Renehan, Andrew G

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological and laboratory studies raise the possibility of a link between clinically prescribed insulin analogues and increased cancer risk. Accordingly, there is a regulatory mandate for cancer-related pre-clinical safety evaluation during insulin analogue development, but currently, there is no standardized framework for such in vitro evaluation. We tested human insulin; the super-mitogenic insulin, X10 and insulin-like growth factor I, in four cancer cell lines with a range of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR)/IR (insulin receptor) ratios (HCT 116, HT-29, COLO 205 and MCF7) and related these to IGF-IR and IR expression in 17 human adenocarcinomas. All cell types were IR-A isoform dominant. We determined IGF-IR/IR signalling pathway endpoints in dose- and time-varying experiments, and performed mitogenic dose-response equivalent assays to derive EC50 values, and correlated these with IGF-IR/IR ratios. We superimposed relative EC50 values onto data from the literature in a meta-analysis. The IGF-IR/IR ratios varied from <1 to 12 in the selected cell lines; similar pattern ranges were observed in human adenocarcinomas. The three ligands demonstrated differential IR/IGF-IR and Akt phosphorylation, which correlated with cell-specific IGF-IR/IR ratios. Mitogenic profiles of X10 mimicked those for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and correlated with IGF-IR/IR ratios. The meta-analysis, adding data from five additional studies, supported the hypothesis that ligand mitogenic potency, relative to human insulin, increases with increasing cell-specific IGF-IR/IR ratio. This study established a framework for the in vitro evaluation of cancer-relevant bioassays for comparisons of insulin analogues, and specifically consolidated earlier studies that determination of the cell-specific IGF-IR/IR ratio is crucial for the interpretation of ranking relative biological activities. PMID:26026165

  5. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-01-01

    The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms. PMID:25286859

  6. Somatostatin analogue, octreotide, reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in insulin-dependent diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Serri, O.; Beauregard, H.; Brazeau, P.; Abribat, T.; Lambert, J.; Harris, A.; Vachon, L. Sandoz Canada Inc., Dorval, Quebec )

    1991-02-20

    To determine whether treatment with a somatostatin analogue can reduce kidney hyperfiltration and hypertrophy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the authors studied 11 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and glomerular hyperfiltration. The patients were assigned randomly to receive continuous subcutaneous infusion of either octreotide, 300 {mu}g/24 h (five patients) or placebo (six patients) for 12 weeks. At baseline, mean glomerular filtration rate and mean total kidney volume were not significantly different in the two groups. However, after 12 weeks of treatment, the mean glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Furthermore, the mean total kidney volume was significantly lower after treatment in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Glycemic control did not change significantly in either group. They conclude that subcutaneous infusion of octreotide for 12 weeks reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus despite the fact that glycemic control remains unchanged.

  7. Interchangeability among reference insulin analogues and their biosimilars: regulatory framework, study design and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Dowlat, H A; Kuhlmann, M K; Khatami, H; Ampudia-Blasco, F J

    2016-08-01

    Biosimilars are regulated differently from small-molecule generic, chemically derived medicines. The complexity of biological products means that small changes in manufacturing or formulation may result in changes in efficacy and safety of the final product. In the face of this complexity, the regulatory landscape for biosimilars continues to evolve, and global harmonization regarding requirements is currently lacking. It is essential that clinicians and patients are reassured that biosimilars are equally safe and effective as their reference product, and this is particularly important when interchangeability, defined as 'changing one medicine for another one which is expected to achieve the same clinical effect in a given clinical setting in any one patient', is considered. Although the automatic substitution (i.e. substitution without input from the prescribing healthcare provider) of biosimilars for reference products is currently not permitted by the majority of countries, this may change in the future. In order to demonstrate interchangeability between reference products and a biosimilar, more stringent and specific studies of the safety and efficacy of biosimilars are likely to be needed; however, guidance on the design of and the need for any such studies is currently limited. The present article provides an overview of the current regulatory framework around the demonstration of interchangeability with biosimilars, with a specific focus on biosimilar insulin analogues, and details experiences with other biosimilar products. In addition, designs for studies to evaluate interchangeability with a biosimilar insulin analogue product are proposed and a discussion about the implications of interchangeability in clinical practice is included. PMID:27097592

  8. Synthesis and biological activities of d-chiro-inositol analogues with insulin-like actions.

    PubMed

    Rendle, P M; Kassibawi, F; Johnston, K A; Hart, J B; Cameron, S A; Falshaw, A; Painter, G F; Loomes, K M

    2016-10-21

    d-chiro-inositol (DCI, 1) evokes therapeutic actions in diabetes and insulin resistance but has sub-optimal pharmacokinetic profiles. To investigate what positions on the DCI cyclohexanol ring may be amenable to modification to improve pharmaceutical formulations, a series of analogues based on DCI were synthesised. These compounds were then evaluated for their ability to stimulate glucose transport using 3T3-L1 adipocytes as a model system. Positional analyses indicate that the hydroxyl group at position 1 is not essential for activity and can be modified without affecting glucose uptake. Removal of the hydroxyl at position 3 also had minimal effect on activity but this group is sensitive to modification. By comparison, the oxygen at position 2 is crucial to the potency of DCI, although this group can withstand modification without fundamentally affecting activity. These data reveal that positions 1 and 2 on the cyclohexanol ring of DCI offer further scope for modification to develop DCI analogues with desirable pharmacokinetic profiles for the potential treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:27410479

  9. Analysis of alternatives for insulinizing patients to achieve glycemic control and avoid accompanying risks of hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    GAO, JIALIN; XIONG, QIANYIN; MIAO, JUN; ZHANG, YAO; XIA, LIBING; LU, MEIQIN; ZHANG, BINHUA; CHEN, YUEPING; ZHANG, ANSU; YU, CUI; WANG, LI-ZHUO

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the efficacy of glycemic control and the risks of hypoglycemia with different methods of insulin therapy, and to provide reference data for the clinical treatment of diabetes. In this retrospective study, hospitalized patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between March and December 2014, in the Department of Endocrinology in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wannan Medical College, were divided into three groups, including an intensive insulin analogue therapy group, a premixed insulin analogue treatment group and a premixed human insulin therapy group. The efficacy of glycemic control and the incidence of hypoglycemia were determined in each of the insulin treatment groups. Compared with the other treatment groups, the intensive insulin analogue therapy group was associated with superior blood glucose control, shorter time to reach standard insulin regimen, shorter hospitalization time, fewer fluctuations in blood glucose levels and lower insulin dosage on discharge from hospital. However, this treatment was also associated with a high risk of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, when combined with the effective prevention of hypoglycemia and appropriate nursing care (especially in hospital care), intensive insulin analogue therapy may provide the greatest benefit to patients. PMID:26137223

  10. Synthesis and properties of carbonylbis(methionyl)insulin, a proinsulin analogue which is convertible to insulin by cyanogen bromide cleavage.

    PubMed

    Busse, W D; Carpenter, F H

    1976-04-20

    The preparation and use of carbonylbis (L-methionine p-nitrophenyl ester) as a reversible cross-linking reagent for insulin are described. The reaction of 1 equiv of reagent with zinc insulin in dimethylformamide in the presence of triethylamine yields as one of the products NalphaA1, NepsilonB29-carbonylbis(methionyl)insulin, (CBM-insulin). The CBM-insulin was characterized by end group analysis and by the products formed on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavage. It possessed 91% of the immunological and 6.5% of the hormonal activity of insulin. Treatment of CBM-insulin with cyanogen bromide (CNBr) in 70% formic acid for 1 h resulted in nearly complete removal of the methionine bridge to yield insulin. A small amount of a side product was removed on DEAE-cellulose at pH 7.2 to give an overall recovery of insulin of 70-80%. Oxidative sulfitolyses of CBM-insulin gave the hexa(S-sulfonate) which was reduced with dithiothreitol to yield reduced CBM-insulin. The latter compound, containing 6 sulfhydryls, exhibited a pH-dependent circular dichroic spectrum. The form at pH 10 exhibited a spectrum typical of random coil which was converted to a form at pH 7.8 which was characterized by a negative extremum at 213 nm. The change in the spectrum at 213 nm with pH was characterized by an apparent pKa of 8.5. Studies on the reoxidation of reduced CBM-insulin were performed at pH values between 7.8 and 10 and at protein concentrations of 0.01-1 mg/ml. The best yields (ca. 85%) of the correctly paired disulfide bonds were obtained in reoxidations at pH 9.5-10 at protein concentration of 0.01-0.1 mg/ml. CBM-insulin, which had been isolated from reoxidation at high pH of the reduced CBM-insulin, was cleaved by CNBr to yield a fully active insulin in an overall yield of 60% from the reduced CBM-insulin. PMID:5108

  11. Remission in models of type 1 diabetes by gene therapy using a single-chain insulin analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Kim, Su-Jin; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Shin, Hang-Cheol; Yoon, Ji-Won

    2000-11-01

    A cure for diabetes has long been sought using several different approaches, including islet transplantation, regeneration of β cells and insulin gene therapy. However, permanent remission of type 1 diabetes has not yet been satisfactorily achieved. The development of type 1 diabetes results from the almost total destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells by autoimmune responses specific to β cells. Standard insulin therapy may not maintain blood glucose concentrations within the relatively narrow range that occurs in the presence of normal pancreatic β cells. We used a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) that expresses a single-chain insulin analogue (SIA), which possesses biologically active insulin activity without enzymatic conversion, under the control of hepatocyte-specific L-type pyruvate kinase (LPK) promoter, which regulates SIA expression in response to blood glucose levels. Here we show that SIA produced from the gene construct rAAV-LPK-SIA caused remission of diabetes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and autoimmune diabetic mice for a prolonged time without any apparent side effects. This new SIA gene therapy may have potential therapeutic value for the cure of autoimmune diabetes in humans.

  12. A prospective randomised cross-over study of the effect of insulin analogues and human insulin on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and recurrent hypoglycaemia (the HypoAna trial): study rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe hypoglycaemia still represents a significant problem in insulin-treated diabetes. Most patients do not experience severe hypoglycaemia often. However, 20% of patients with type 1 diabetes experience recurrent severe hypoglycaemia corresponding to at least two episodes per year. The effect of insulin analogues on glycaemic control has been documented in large trials, while their effect on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia is less clear, especially in patients with recurrent severe hypoglycaemia. The HypoAna Trial is designed to investigate whether short-acting and long-acting insulin analogues in comparison with human insulin are superior in reducing the occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in patients with recurrent hypoglycaemia. This paper reports the study design of the HypoAna Trial. Methods/design The study is a Danish two-year investigator-initiated, prospective, randomised, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE), multicentre, cross-over trial investigating the effect of insulin analogues versus human insulin on the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Patients are randomised to treatment with basal-bolus therapy with insulin detemir / insulin aspart or human NPH insulin / human regular insulin in random order. The major inclusion criterion is history of two or more episodes of severe hypoglycaemia in the preceding year. Discussion In contrast to almost all other studies in this field the HypoAna Trial includes only patients with major problems with hypoglycaemia. The HypoAna Trial will elucidate whether basal-bolus regimen with short-acting and long-acting insulin analogues in comparison with human insulin are superior in reducing occurrence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in hypoglycaemia prone patients with type 1 diabetes. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00346996. PMID:22727048

  13. Insulin degludec, a long-acting once-daily basal analogue for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Berard, Lori; MacNeill, Gail

    2015-02-01

    Here, we discuss certain practical issues related to use of insulin degludec, a new long-acting basal insulin analogue. Degludec provides uniform ("peakless") action that extends over more than 24 hours and is highly consistent from dose to dose. Like the 2 previously available basal analogues (detemir and glargine), degludec is expected to simplify dose adjustment and enable patients to reach their glycemic targets with reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Phase 3 clinical trials involving type 1 and type 2 diabetes have demonstrated that degludec was noninferior to glargine in allowing patients to reach a target glycated hemoglobin (A1C) of 7%, and nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred significantly less frequently with degludec. In addition, when dosing intervals vary substantially from day to day, degludec continues to be effective and to maintain a low rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia. Degludec thus has the potential to reduce risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia, to enhance the flexibility of the dosing schedule and to improve patient and caregiver confidence in the stability of glycemic control. A dedicated injector, the FlexTouch prefilled pen, containing degludec 200 units/mL, will be recommended for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Degludec will also be available as 100 units/mL cartridges, to be used in the NovoPen 4 by patients requiring smaller basal insulin doses, including most patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25065475

  14. [Improvement in glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric data in type 2 diabetic patients after the switch from biphasic human insulin to biphasic premix analog insulin aspart].

    PubMed

    Gero, László; Gyimesi, András; Hidvégi, Tibor; Jánosi, István

    2009-08-30

    Long-term studies involving large number of type 2 diabetic patients supplied evidence that constant adequate metabolic control may prevent the late (micro- and macrovascular) diabetic complications. In the present non-interventional, retrospective study, authors performed an analysis of type 2 diabetic patients who had been previously treated with biphasic human insulin (BHI) and their therapy was changed to biphasic analog insulin aspart 30/70 (BIAsp = NovoMix 30). The switch of the insulin therapy was carried out in years 2007 and 2008 with the cooperation of 50 accredited diabetes centers. Data were obtained at the time of therapeutical change and six months later. The number of suitable patients was 2898 with an age of 66.20 +/- 10.10 year, and the duration of diabetes was >10 years in 43% of the patients. After the six-month therapy with NovoMix 30, the mean HbA 1c level decreased statistically significantly from the initial value of 9.10 +/- 1.44% to 7.62 +/- 1.00% ( p < 0.001). The lipid profile also improved although target values were not always attained. A reduction was also observed in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Mean body weight decreased from 84.2 +/- 14.9 kg to 82.6 +/- 13.9 kg ( p < 0.01). All these changes occurred in spite of a significantly reduced daily insulin dose (48.4 +/- 17.6 IU) as compared with the initial value (49.0 +/- 17.4 IU, p < 0.001). A marked decrement was also observed in the frequency of hypoglycemic reactions. These results confirm that treatment with NovoMix 30 insulin leads to a significant amelioration of glycemic control as reflected by the decreased level of HbA 1c and the higher proportion of patients attaining the target value, as well as the lower frequency of hypoglycemic episodes. The significant improvements in cardiovascular risk factors are also important, but the explanation is still missing and would require the accomplishment of prospective, controlled studies. PMID:19692308

  15. The role of GLP-1 mimetics and basal insulin analogues in type 2 diabetes mellitus: guidance from studies of liraglutide

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, A H

    2012-01-01

    In people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the incretin effect is reduced, but the recent advent of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 agonists/analogues has enabled restoration of at least some of the function of the incretin system, with accompanying improvements in glycaemic control. Two GLP-1 receptor agonists/analogues are currently approved for the treatment of T2DM—exenatide (Byetta®, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, IN, US) and liraglutide (Victoza®, Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark); a once-weekly formulation of exenatide (Bydureon®, Eli Lilly & Co.) has also been approved by the European Medicines Agency. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently published guidance on the use of liraglutide in T2DM, based on evidence from the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD) Phase III trial programme, which compared liraglutide with existing glucose-lowering therapies, such as exenatide and insulin glargine. The LEAD programme reported HbA1c reductions from 0.8 to 1.5% with liraglutide (1.2 and 1.8 mg), accompanied by low rates of hypoglycaemia and some weight loss; side effects were primarily gastrointestinal in nature (e.g. nausea and diarrhoea). Based on the findings of the LEAD studies and the NICE recommendation, liraglutide now represents an important therapy widely available in the UK for certain patient groups, including those with a body mass index (BMI) ≥35.0 kg/m2, and patients with a BMI <35 kg/m2 who are considered unsuitable for insulin and are failing to meet targets for glycaemic control with oral agents. NICE guidelines still suggest that most patients without considerable obesity (BMI <35 kg/m2) are probably best managed using insulin therapy. Evidence also suggests a future role for GLP-1 mimetics in combination with basal insulin. PMID:22051096

  16. Implications for the active form of human insulin based on the structural convergence of highly active hormone analogues

    PubMed Central

    Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka; Antolíková, Emília; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Dodson, Guy G.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin is a key protein hormone that regulates blood glucose levels and, thus, has widespread impact on lipid and protein metabolism. Insulin action is manifested through binding of its monomeric form to the Insulin Receptor (IR). At present, however, our knowledge about the structural behavior of insulin is based upon inactive, multimeric, and storage-like states. The active monomeric structure, when in complex with the receptor, must be different as the residues crucial for the interactions are buried within the multimeric forms. Although the exact nature of the insulin’s induced-fit is unknown, there is strong evidence that the C-terminal part of the B-chain is a dynamic element in insulin activation and receptor binding. Here, we present the design and analysis of highly active (200–500%) insulin analogues that are truncated at residue 26 of the B-chain (B26). They show a structural convergence in the form of a new β-turn at B24-B26. We propose that the key element in insulin’s transition, from an inactive to an active state, may be the formation of the β-turn at B24-B26 associated with a trans to cis isomerisation at the B25-B26 peptide bond. Here, this turn is achieved with N-methylated L-amino acids adjacent to the trans to cis switch at the B25-B26 peptide bond or by the insertion of certain D-amino acids at B26. The resultant conformational changes unmask previously buried amino acids that are implicated in IR binding and provide structural details for new approaches in rational design of ligands effective in combating diabetes. PMID:20133841

  17. Liposomes containing cholesterol analogues of botanical origin as drug delivery systems to enhance the oral absorption of insulin.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Wu, Wei; Hovgaard, Lars; Lu, Yi; Chen, Dawei; Qi, Jianping

    2015-07-15

    In fear of animal-associated diseases, there is a trend in searching for non-animal derived substitutes for existing excipients in the pharmaceutical industries. This paper aimed to screen cholesterol analogues as membrane stabilizers of liposomes from botanical sterols, including β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, ergosterol and lanosterol. Liposomes containing four kinds of sterols were prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo as oral delivery system of insulin. Liposomes containing β-sitosterol (Si-Lip), stigmasterol (St-Lip) and lanosterol (La-Lip) was found not to protect insulin against degradation. Only 10% of the initial insulin in liposomes was preserved after a 30 min exposure to simulated gastric fluids. However, the protective ability of liposomes containing ergosterol (Er-Lip) was similar to that of liposomes containing sodium glycocholate (Sgc-Lip) and superior to that of liposomes containing cholesterol (Ch-Lip). In addition, the blood glucose level can decrease to about 50% of initial level after oral Er-Lip which was significantly superior to the in vivo performance of Si-Lip and Ch-Lip and similar to Sgc-Lip. Er-Lips of ergosterol/phospholipids ratios of 1:4 or 1:6 exerts more pronounced protective ability of insulin in simulated gastrointestinal fluids and hypoglycemic effects in rats than other formulations. Furthermore, Er-Lips exerted low toxicity to Caco-2 cells through a cell viability study. Meahwhile, insulin permeability was significantly increased across Caco-2 monolayers by encapsulating in Er-Lip. It was concluded that ergosterol could be used as a substitute for cholesterol and bile salt derivatives in liposomes to enhance oral bioavailability of insulin. PMID:25957702

  18. Insulin analogues in children with Type 1 diabetes: a 52-week randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Thalange, N; Bereket, A; Larsen, J; Hiort, L C; Peterkova, V

    2013-01-01

    Aims This 52-week, randomized, multinational, open-label, parallel-group, non-inferiority trial investigated the efficacy and safety of basal–bolus treatment with insulin detemir vs. NPH (neutral protamine Hagedorn) insulin, in combination with insulin aspart, in subjects aged 2–16 years with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods Of the 347 randomized and exposed subjects, 177 received insulin detemir and 170 NPH insulin, both administered once or twice daily in combination with mealtime insulin aspart. Glycaemic measurements and weight were followed over 52 weeks. Results After 52 weeks, insulin detemir was shown to be non-inferior to NPH insulin with regard to HbA1c [mean difference insulin detemir–NPH: 1.30 mmol/mol, 95% CI –1.32 to 3.92 (0.12%, 95% CI –0.12 to 0.36) in the full analysis set and 1.41 mmol/mol, 95% CI –1.26 to 4.08 (0.13%, 95% CI –0.12 to 0.37) in the per protocol analysis set]. Hypoglycaemic events per subject-year of exposure of 24-h and nocturnal hypoglycaemia were significantly lower with insulin detemir than with NPH insulin (rate ratio 0.76, 95% CI 0.60–0.97, P = 0.028 and 0.62, 95% CI 0.47–0.84, P = 0.002, respectively). Weight standard deviation (sd) scores (body weight standardized by age and gender) decreased with insulin detemir, but increased slightly with NPH insulin (change: –0.12 vs. 0.04, P < 0.001). At end of the trial, median insulin doses were similar in both treatment groups. Conclusions Insulin detemir was non-inferior to NPH insulin after 52 weeks' treatment of children and adolescents aged 2–16 years, and was associated with a significantly lower risk of hypoglycaemia, together with significantly lower weight sd score when compared with NPH insulin. PMID:23094597

  19. Long-acting insulin analogues (insulin glargine or determir) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus in the paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Barrio Castellanos, Raquel

    2005-12-01

    Despite many improvements in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1), the non-physiological time-action profiles of conventional insulins remain a significant obstacle. In recent years, recombinant DNA technology has been used to design insulin molecules that overcome the limitations of regular and NPH insulin. The rapid insulin analogs used as prandial and the long-acting insulin analogs used as basal simulate physiological insulin profiles more closely than the older conventional insulins. The efficacy of insulin analogs now available for multiple daily injection (MDI) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy in DM1 has been established in pediatric patients. Insulin pumps have improved since they were first introduced. CSII therapy may provide an effective alternative for selected pediatric patients with DM1. In most studies at pediatric age, CSII therapy resulted in a improvement in HbA1c, a decreased rate of hypoglycemia without an abnormal increase in BMI, and without adversely affecting psychosocial outcomes in children and adolescents with DM1. PMID:16398447

  20. Metformin versus placebo in combination with insulin analogues in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus—the randomised, blinded Copenhagen Insulin and Metformin Therapy (CIMT) trial

    PubMed Central

    Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Tarnow, Lise; Boesgaard, Trine W; S Lund, Søren; Wiinberg, Niels; Perrild, Hans; Krarup, Thure; Snorgaard, Ole; Gade-Rasmussen, Birthe; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Røder, Michael; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Jensen, Tonny; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hedetoft, Christoffer; Breum, Leif; Duun, Elsebeth; Sneppen, Simone B; Pedersen, Oluf; Hemmingsen, Bianca; Carstensen, Bendix; Madsbad, Sten; Gluud, Christian; Wetterslev, Jørn; Vaag, Allan; Almdal, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of metformin versus placebo both in combination with insulin analogue treatment on changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design and setting Investigator-initiated, randomised, placebo-controlled trial with a 2×3 factorial design conducted at eight hospitals in Denmark. Participants and interventions 412 participants with type 2 diabetes (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥7.5% (≥58 mmol/mol); body mass index >25 kg/m2) were in addition to open-labelled insulin treatment randomly assigned 1:1 to 18 months blinded metformin (1 g twice daily) versus placebo, aiming at an HbA1c ≤7.0% (≤53 mmol/mol). Outcomes The primary outcome was change in the mean carotid IMT (a marker of subclinical cardiovascular disease). HbA1c, insulin dose, weight and hypoglycaemic and serious adverse events were other prespecified outcomes. Results Change in the mean carotid IMT did not differ significantly between the groups (between-group difference 0.012 mm (95% CI −0.003 to 0.026), p=0.11). HbA1c was more reduced in the metformin group (between-group difference −0.42% (95% CI −0.62% to −0.23%), p<0.001)), despite the significantly lower insulin dose at end of trial in the metformin group (1.04 IU/kg (95% CI 0.94 to 1.15)) compared with placebo (1.36 IU/kg (95% CI 1.23 to 1.51), p<0.001). The metformin group gained less weight (between-group difference −2.6 kg (95% CI −3.3 to −1.8), p<0.001). The groups did not differ with regard to number of patients with severe or non-severe hypoglycaemic or other serious adverse events, but the metformin group had more non-severe hypoglycaemic episodes (4347 vs 3161, p<0.001). Conclusions Metformin in combination with insulin did not reduce carotid IMT despite larger reduction in HbA1c, less weight gain, and smaller insulin dose compared with placebo plus insulin. However, the trial only reached 46% of the planned sample size and lack of power

  1. NA1, NA1, NA1-trimethylinsulin--an insulin analogue with a quaternary amino group at the A1 terminus.

    PubMed

    Drewes, S E; Magojo, H E; Gliemann, J

    1981-06-01

    By utilizing the differing reactivity of the amino groups in aqueous organic solvents, des-GlyA1-NB1,N epsilon B29-(Msc)2-insulin was prepared. Its reaction with the phenyl ester of N,N,N-trimethylglycine in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide afforded the crystalline NA1,NA1,NA1-trimethylinsulin analogue. In the fat cell assay this analogue has an activity of 49% and, in the mouse convulsion assay, it is 70%. PMID:7024089

  2. Determination of human insulin and its analogues in human blood using liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility mass spectrometry (LC-IM-MS).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative determination of insulin from human blood samples is an emerging topic in doping controls as well as in other related disciplines (e.g. forensics). Beside the therapeutic use, insulin represents a prohibited, performance enhancing substance in sports drug testing. In both cases accurate, sensitive, specific, and unambiguous determination of the target peptide is of the utmost importance. The challenges concerning identifying insulins in blood by liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility mass spectrometry (LC-IM-MS) are detecting the basal concentrations of approximately 0.2 ng/mL and covering the hyperinsulinaemic clamps at > 3 ng/mL simultaneously using up to 200 μL of plasma or serum. This is achieved by immunoaffinity purification of the insulins with magnetic beads and subsequent separation by micro-scale liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility / high resolution mass spectrometry. The method includes human insulin as well as the synthetic or animal analogues insulin aspart, glulisine, glargine, detemir, lispro, bovine, and porcine insulin. The method validation shows reliable results considering specificity, limit of detection (0.2 ng/mL except for detemir: 0.8 ng/mL), limit of quantification (0.5 ng/mL for human insulin), precision (CV < 20%), linearity (r > 0.99), recovery, accuracy (>90%), robustness (plasma/serum), and ion suppression. For quantification of human insulin a labelled internal standard ([[(2) H10 ]-Leu(B6,B11,B15,B17) ] - human Insulin) is introduced. By means of the additional ion mobility separation of the different analogues, the chromatographic run time is shortened to 8 min without losing specificity. As proof-of-concept, the procedure was successfully applied to different blood specimens from diabetic patients receiving recombinant synthetic analogues. PMID:25219675

  3. [Insulinization in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Intensification options].

    PubMed

    Fuente, Graciela V; Sinay, Isaac; Costa Gil, José E; Puchulu, Félix; Dieuzeide, Guillermo; Rodríguez, Martín; Faingold, María C; Litwak, León E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with vascular complications and high rates of morbidity and mortality. Timely insulin therapy, intensified when necessary, represent appropriate measures to prevent or delay the onset of complications. However, the incidence of hypoglycemia and difficulties in treatment adherence represent barriers to achieve therapeutic success. Premixes analogs and, specially, combinations of insulin analogues are associated with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic advantages, that translate into clinical benefits such as improved metabolic control, decreased hypoglycemic events and, for their simplicity, potentially greater adherence. PMID:27295707

  4. Response of isolated ruminant mammary arteries to the long R3 analogue of insulin-like growth factor I.

    PubMed

    Gow, I F

    2000-05-01

    Isolated mammary arteries from ruminants were used in a conventional organ bath system. Acetylcholine relaxed bovine but not ovine mammary arteries; both types responded to sodium nitroprusside. Noradrenaline (NA) caused a dose-dependent increase in generated tension. An analogue of insulin-like growth factor I (long R3-IGF-I) caused a rightward shift in the NA response curve in bovine vessels with intact endothelium (P < 0.02), and also in sheep arteries (P < 0.01). In bovine vessels, this effect was abolished when the endothelium was removed. The effect of long R3-IGF-I in bovine vessels was abolished by N -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, suggesting the effect of IGF-I on mammary arteries in vitro requires NO generation. PMID:10825414

  5. Inhibition of insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-I-stimulated growth of human breast cancer cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and the vitamin D3 analogue EB1089.

    PubMed

    Vink-van Wijngaarden, T; Pols, H A; Buurman, C J; Birkenhäger, J C; van Leeuwen, J P

    1996-05-01

    1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) and a number of synthetic vitamin D3 analogues with low calcaemic activity, have been shown to inhibit breast cancer cell growth in vitro as well as in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a possible interaction of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and the vitamin D3 analogue EB1089 with the insulin-IGF-I regulatory system. The oestrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells used in this study are able to grow autonomously and their growth is stimulated by insulin. In order to avoid interference of IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BPs), we used an analogue of IGF-I, long R3 IGF-I, which stimulated MCF-7 cell growth similar to insulin. The growth stimulation by insulin and by long R3 IGF-I was completely inhibited by 1,25-(OH)2D3 and EB1089. Autonomous growth was also inhibited by 1,25-(OH)2D3 and EB1089. The analogue EB1089 was active at 50 times lower concentrations than 1,25-(OH)2D3. It was shown that growth inhibition was not achieved through downregulation of insulin and IGF-I binding after 48 h. Paradoxically, after prolonged treatment (8 days), an upregulation of insulin and IGF-I binding was observed. Two possible intracellular mediators of the insulin-IGF mitogenic signal are C-FOS and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Insulin-induced C-FOS mRNA was inhibited by 1,25-(OH)2D3, suggesting that it could be involved in the growth inhibition by 1,25-(OH)2D3. MAP kinase activation appeared not to be involved in growth stimulation by both insulin and IGF-I. Together, the present study demonstrates that vitamin D3 compounds can block the mitogenic activity of insulin and IGF-I, which may contribute to their tumour suppressive activity observed in vivo. PMID:9081364

  6. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  7. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  8. Studies in premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sivashinsky, G.I.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on premixed combustion: theory of turbulent flame propagation; pattern formation in premixed flames and related problems; and pattern formation in extended systems. (LSP)

  9. Degradation, receptor binding, insulin secreting and antihyperglycaemic actions of palmitate-derivatised native and Ala8-substituted GLP-1 analogues.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian D; Gault, Victor A; Mooney, Mark H; Irwin, Nigel; Harriott, Patrick; Greer, Brett; Bailey, Cliff J; O'Harte, Finbarr P M; Flatt, Peter R

    2004-02-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) is released in response to ingested nutrients and acts to promote glucose-dependent insulin secretion ensuring efficient postprandial glucose homeostasis. Unfortunately, the beneficial actions of GLP-1 which give this hormone many of the desirable properties of an antidiabetic drug are short lived due to degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP IV) and rapid clearance by renal filtration. In this study we have attempted to extend GLP-1 action through the attachment of palmitoyl moieties to the epsilon-amino group in the side chain of the Lys26 residue and to combine this modification with substitutions of the Ala8 residue, namely Val or amino-butyric acid (Abu). In contrast to native GLP-1, which was rapidly degraded, [Lys(pal)26]GLP-1, [Abu8, Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 and [Val8 Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 all exhibited profound stability during 12 h incubations with DPP IV and human plasma. Receptor binding affinity and the ability to increase cyclic AMP in the clonal beta-cell line BRIN-BD11 were decreased by 86- to 167-fold and 15- to 62-fold, respectively compared with native GLP-1. However, insulin secretory potency tested using BRIN-BD11 cells was similar, or in the case of [Val8,Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 enhanced. Furthermore, when administered in vivo together with glucose to diabetic (ob/ob) mice, [Lys(pal)26]GLP-1, [Abu8,Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 and [Val8,Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 did not demonstrate acute glucose-lowering or insulinotropic activity as observed with native GLP-1. These studies support the potential usefulness of fatty acid linked analogues of GLP-1 but indicate the importance of chain length for peptide kinetics and bioavailability. PMID:15101559

  10. Conformational Analysis of the Host-Defense Peptides Pseudhymenochirin-1Pb and -2Pa and Design of Analogues with Insulin-Releasing Activities and Reduced Toxicities.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Giorgia; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Srinivasan, Dinesh; Attoub, Samir; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Casu, Mariano; Flatt, Peter R; Conlon, J Michael

    2015-12-24

    Pseudhymenochirin-1Pb (Ps-1Pb; IKIPSFFRNILKKVGKEAVSLIAGALKQS) and pseudhymenochirin-2Pa (Ps-2Pa; GIFPIFAKLLGKVIKVASSLISKGRTE) are amphibian peptides with broad spectrum antimicrobial activities and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. In the membrane-mimetic solvent 50% (v/v) trifluoroethanol-H2O, both peptides adopt a well-defined α-helical conformation that extends over almost all the sequence and incorporates a flexible bend. Both peptides significantly (p < 0.05) stimulate the rate of release of insulin from BRIN-BD11 clonal β-cells at concentrations ≥ 0.1 nM but produce loss of integrity of the plasma membrane at concentrations ≥ 1 μM. Increasing cationicity by the substitution Glu(17) → l-Lys in Ps-1Pb and Glu(27) → l-Lys in Ps-2Pa generates analogues with increased cytotoxicity and reduced insulin-releasing potency. In contrast, the analogues [R8r]Ps-1Pb and [K8k,K19k]Ps-2Pa, incorporating d-amino acid residues to destabilize the α-helical domains, retain potent insulin-releasing activity but are nontoxic to BRIN-BD11 cells at concentrations of 3 μM. [R8r]Ps-1Pb produces a significant increase in insulin release rate at 0.3 nM and [K8k,K19k]Ps-2Pa at 0.01 nM. Both analogues show low hemolytic activity (IC50 > 100 μM) but retain broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and remain cytotoxic to a range of human tumor cell lines, albeit with lower potency than the naturally occurring peptides. These analogues show potential for development into agents for type 2 diabetes therapy. PMID:26606380

  11. Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... pump is connected to your body by a flexible tube that has a tip that sticks under your skin. A cartridge of insulin is put in the pump. The insulin flows through the tube into your body. The pump controls how much insulin goes into your body. The ...

  12. Effect of a β-Hydroxyphosphonate Analogue of ʟ-Carnitine on Insulin-Sensitive and Insulin-Resistant 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Avalos-Soriano, Anaguiven; De la Cruz-Cordero, Ricardo; López-Martínez, Francisco Josue; Rosado, Jorge L; Duarte-Vázquez, Miguel Ángel; Garcia-Gasca, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a β-x200B;hydroxyphosphonate analog of ʟ-carnitine (L-CA) (CAS number: 1220955-x200B;20-3, Component: 1221068-91-2, C12H29NO4PI), (3-Hexanaminium, 1-(dimethoxyphosphinyl)-2-hydroxy-N,N,N,5-x200B;tetramethy-iodide (1:1), (2R, 3S)) on parameters related with type-2 diabetes in an in vitro model. Nontoxic concentrations of L-CA were assayed and compared to commercial ʟ-carnitine effects. L-CA did not affect adipogenesis in normal cells, but an increment of TG accumulation was observed on insulin-resistant adipocytes (80%) when compared with resistant control. L-CA also stimulated glucose analog 2-NBDG uptakes on insulin-resistant adipocytes in a similar way as insulin when compared to insulin-resistant cells. Our results show that the L-CA promoted insulin-like responses on insulin-resistant adipocytes without appreciable pro-adipogenic effect in sensitive adipocytes. PMID:26160659

  13. Total Chemical Synthesis of a Heterodimeric Interchain Bis-Lactam-Linked Peptide: Application to an Analogue of Human Insulin-Like Peptide 3

    PubMed Central

    Karas, John; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Wade, John D.; Scanlon, Denis B.

    2013-01-01

    Nonreducible cystine isosteres represent important peptide design elements in that they can maintain a near-native tertiary conformation of the peptide while simultaneously extending the in vitro and in vivo half-life of the biomolecule. Examples of these cystine mimics include dicarba, diselenide, thioether, triazole, and lactam bridges. Each has unique physicochemical properties that impact upon the resulting peptide conformation. Each also requires specific conditions for its formation via chemical peptide synthesis protocols. While the preparation of peptides containing two lactam bonds within a peptide is technically possible and reported by others, to date there has been no report of the chemical synthesis of a heterodimeric peptide linked by two lactam bonds. To examine the feasibility of such an assembly, judicious use of a complementary combination of amine and acid protecting groups together with nonfragment-based, total stepwise solid phase peptide synthesis led to the successful preparation of an analogue of the model peptide, insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), in which both of the interchain disulfide bonds were replaced with a lactam bond. An analogue containing a single disulfide-substituted interchain lactam bond was also prepared. Both INSL3 analogues retained significant cognate RXFP2 receptor binding affinity. PMID:24288548

  14. Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The manipulation of organic materials--cells, tissues, and even living organisms--offers many exciting possibilities for the future from organic computers to improved aquaculture. Commercial researchers are using the microgravity environment to produce large near perfect protein crystals Research on insulin has yielded crystals that far surpass the quality of insulin crystals grown on the ground. Using these crystals industry partners are working to develop new and improved treatments for diabetes. Other researchers are exploring the possibility of producing antibiotics using plant cell cultures which could lead to both orbital production and the improvement of ground-based antibiotic production.

  15. Gas turbine premixing systems

    DOEpatents

    Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Evulet, Andrei Tristan; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2013-12-31

    Methods and systems are provided for premixing combustion fuel and air within gas turbines. In one embodiment, a combustor includes an upstream mixing panel configured to direct compressed air and combustion fuel through premixing zone to form a fuel-air mixture. The combustor includes a downstream mixing panel configured to mix additional combustion fuel with the fule-air mixture to form a combustion mixture.

  16. Novel dual agonist peptide analogues derived from dogfish glucagon show promising in vitro insulin releasing actions and antihyperglycaemic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    O'Harte, F P M; Ng, M T; Lynch, A M; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R

    2016-08-15

    The antidiabetic potential of thirteen novel dogfish glucagon derived analogues were assessed in vitro and in acute in vivo studies. Stable peptide analogues enhanced insulin secretion from BRIN-BD11 β-cells (p < 0.001) and reduced acute glycaemic responses following intraperitoneal glucose (25 nmol/kg) in healthy NIH Swiss mice (p < 0.05-p<0.001). The in vitro insulinotropic actions of [S2a]dogfish glucagon, [S2a]dogfish glucagon-exendin-4(31-39) and [S2a]dogfish glucagon-Lys(30)-γ-glutamyl-PAL, were blocked (p < 0.05-p<0.001) by the specific GLP-1 and glucagon receptor antagonists, exendin-4(9-39) and (desHis(1)Pro(4)Glu(9))glucagon amide but not by (Pro(3))GIP, indicating lack of GIP receptor involvement. These analogues dose-dependently stimulated cAMP production in GLP-1 and glucagon (p < 0.05-p<0.001) but not GIP-receptor transfected cells. They improved acute glycaemic and insulinotropic responses in high-fat fed diabetic mice and in wild-type C57BL/6J and GIPR-KO mice (p < 0.05-p<0.001), but not GLP-1R-KO mice, confirming action on GLP-1 but not GIP receptors. Overall, dogfish glucagon analogues have potential for diabetes therapy, exerting beneficial metabolic effects via GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. PMID:27179756

  17. Characteristics of binding of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II analogues to the type 1 IGF receptor determined by BIAcore analysis.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Briony E; Hartfield, Perry J; McNeil, Kerrie A; Surinya, Kathy H; Milner, Steven J; Cosgrove, Leah J; Wallace, John C

    2002-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding to the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF1R) elicits mitogenic effects, promotion of differentiation and protection from apoptosis. This study has systematically measured IGF1R binding affinities of IGF-I, IGF-II and 14 IGF analogues to a recombinant high-affinity form of the IGF1R using BIAcore technology. The analogues assessed could be divided into two groups: (a) those designed to investigate binding of IGF-binding protein, which exhibited IGF1R-binding affinities similar to those of IGF-I or IGF-II; (b) those generated to probe IGF1R interactions with greatly reduced IGF1R-binding affinities. The relative binding affinities of IGF-I analogues and IGF-I for the IGF1R determined by BIAcore analysis agreed closely with existing data from receptor-binding assays using cells or tissue membranes, demonstrating that BIAcore technology is a powerful tool for measuring affinities of IGFs for IGF1R. In parallel studies, IGF1R-binding affinities were related to ability to protect against serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis in three different assays including Hoechst 33258 staining, cell survival, and DNA fragmentation assays using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. In this model system, IGF-I and IGF-II at low nanomolar concentrations are able to prevent apoptosis completely. We conclude that ability to protect against apoptosis is directly related to ability to bind the IGF1R. PMID:11846798

  18. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I and its analogues on bovine hydrogen peroxide release by neutrophils and blastogenesis by mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; McBride, B W; Trouten-Radford, L M; Burton, J H

    1993-11-01

    The biological potencies of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and two of its analogues were examined for hydrogen peroxide release by neutrophils and blastogenesis by mononuclear cells. The binding affinities of these peptides for bovine serum IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) and IGF-I receptors on bovine neutrophils and mononuclear cells were also investigated. Relative to control treatment containing no IGF-I, preincubation of neutrophils with 12.5 micrograms/l of IGF-I, des(1-3)IGF-I (an analogue of human IGF-I lacking the N-terminal tripeptide Gly-Pro-Glu) and long R3 IGF-I (an analogue of human IGF-I with arginine replacing glutamate at position 3 of human IGF-I and the N-terminal extension Met-Phe-Pro-Ala-Met-Pro-Leu-Ser-Ser-Leu-Phe-Val-Asn) increased the release of H2O2 by 65%, 64% and 32% respectively. However, the difference in stimulating the release of H2O2 between long R3 IGF-I and other two (IGF-I and des(1-3)IGF-I) was reduced at a dosage of 100 micrograms/l. In the absence or presence of 2.5% fetal calf serum (FCS), 100 micrograms/l of IGF-I, des(1-3)IGF-I but not long R3 IGF-I significantly stimulated thymidine incorporation into mononuclear cells. In addition, des(1-3)IGF-I was more potent than IGF-I in stimulating thymidine incorporation into mononuclear cells in the presence of 2.5% FCS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7508487

  19. Effect of IGFBP-3 on IGF- and IGF-analogue-induced insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGFIR) signalling.

    PubMed

    Devi, G R; Graham, D L; Oh, Y; Rosenfeld, R G

    2001-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) binds IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity, at least an order of magnitude higher than the affiniy of the IGFs for the IGFIR. It has been hypothesized that IGFBP-3 inhibits IGF binding to the IGFIR via a mechanism independent of its ability to sequester IGFs. In the present study, we examined the effects of IGFBP-3 and its proteolytic fragments on the initial events of the IGFIR signalling pathway. IGFBP-3 inhibited IGF-I-, IGF-II-, Des(1-3)IGF-I- and Long(R3)IGF-I-induced IGFIR phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner at similar concentration range but not QAYL-induced IGFIR-P. The((1-97))IGFBP-3 fragment was able to inhibit only IGF-I-induced IGFIR-P. The((1-97))IGFBP-3 fragment but not intact IGFBP-3 inhibited insulin-induced IGFIR-P. Monolayer cross-linking with [(125)I]IGFBP-3 indicated that there is no direct interaction of IGFBP-3 with the IGFIR. This study demonstrates that the effect on the initial step of IGFIR signalling by IGFBP-3 is largely due to its ability to sequester IGF and the IGF analogues in the extracellular milieu and not the result of any interaction of IGFBP-3 with the IGFIR or a mechanism independent of its ability to bind IGFs. PMID:11735239

  20. Effects of biphasic, basal-bolus or basal insulin analogue treatments on carotid intima-media thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the randomised Copenhagen Insulin and Metformin Therapy (CIMT) trial

    PubMed Central

    Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Vaag, Allan; Tarnow, Lise; Almdal, Thomas P; Lund, Søren S; Wetterslev, Jørn; Gluud, Christian; Boesgaard, Trine W; Wiinberg, Niels; Perrild, Hans; Krarup, Thure; Snorgaard, Ole; Gade-Rasmussen, Birthe; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Røder, Michael; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Jensen, Tonny; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hedetoft, Christoffer; Breum, Leif; Duun, Elsebeth; Sneppen, Simone B; Pedersen, Oluf; Hemmingsen, Bianca; Carstensen, Bendix; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of 3 insulin analogue regimens on change in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design and setting Investigator-initiated, randomised, placebo-controlled trial with a 2×3 factorial design, conducted at 8 hospitals in Denmark. Participants and interventions Participants with type 2 diabetes (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)≥7.5% (≥58 mmol/mol), body mass index >25 kg/m2) were, in addition to metformin versus placebo, randomised to 18 months open-label biphasic insulin aspart 1–3 times daily (n=137) versus insulin aspart 3 times daily in combination with insulin detemir once daily (n=138) versus insulin detemir alone once daily (n=137), aiming at HbA1c≤7.0% (≤53 mmol/mol). Outcomes Primary outcome was change in mean carotid IMT (a marker of subclinical cardiovascular disease). HbA1c, insulin dose, weight, and hypoglycaemic and serious adverse events were other prespecified outcomes. Results Carotid IMT change did not differ between groups (biphasic −0.009 mm (95% CI −0.022 to 0.004), aspart+detemir 0.000 mm (95% CI −0.013 to 0.013), detemir −0.012 mm (95% CI −0.025 to 0.000)). HbA1c was more reduced with biphasic (−1.0% (95% CI −1.2 to −0.8)) compared with the aspart+detemir (−0.4% (95% CI −0.6 to −0.3)) and detemir (−0.3% (95% CI −0.4 to −0.1)) groups (p<0.001). Weight gain was higher in the biphasic (3.3 kg (95% CI 2.7 to 4.0) and aspart+detemir (3.2 kg (95% CI 2.6 to 3.9)) compared with the detemir group (1.9 kg (95% CI 1.3 to 2.6)). Insulin dose was higher with detemir (1.6 IU/kg/day (95% CI 1.4 to 1.8)) compared with biphasic (1.0 IU/kg/day (95% CI 0.9 to 1.1)) and aspart+detemir (1.1 IU/kg/day (95% CI 1.0 to 1.3)) (p<0.001). Number of participants with severe hypoglycaemia and serious adverse events did not differ. Conclusions Carotid IMT change did not differ between 3 insulin regimens despite differences in HbA1c, weight gain and

  1. Crystal Structure of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase with Bound Substrate Analogue Provides Insight on Antigenic Epitope Precursor Recognition and Processing.

    PubMed

    Mpakali, Anastasia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Harlos, Karl; Zhao, Yuguang; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-09-15

    Aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides influence immunodominance and adaptive cytotoxic immune responses. The mechanisms that allow these enzymes to efficiently process a vast number of different long peptide substrates are poorly understood. In this work, we report the structure of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, an enzyme that prepares antigenic epitopes for cross-presentation in dendritic cells, in complex with an antigenic peptide precursor analog. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase is found in a semiclosed conformation with an extended internal cavity with limited access to the solvent. The N-terminal moiety of the peptide is located at the active site, positioned optimally for catalysis, whereas the C-terminal moiety of the peptide is stabilized along the extended internal cavity lodged between domains II and IV. Hydrophobic interactions and shape complementarity enhance peptide affinity beyond the catalytic site and support a limited selectivity model for antigenic peptide selection that may underlie the generation of complex immunopeptidomes. PMID:26259583

  2. Effects of APP 5-mer peptide analogue P165 on the synaptic proteins and insulin signal transduction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bo; Hu, Peng; Lu, Shu-Jun; Wang, Rong; Du, Yi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy (DE) is one of risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Our previous findings indicated that DE animals had impairment of learning and memory and degeneration of hippocampal neurons, which could be improved by neurotrophic peptide. APP 17-mer peptide is a synthesized peptide sequenced from soluble amyloid precursor protein. APP 17-mer peptide has neural protective effect, but is susceptible to enzyme degradation. Soluble APP 5-mer peptide is the active form of APP 17-mer peptide, and composed of arginine, glutamic acid, arginine, methionine and serine. P165, an APP 5-mer peptide analog reconstructed by our lab, is resistant to enzyme degradation, and can be orally used to protect neurons. In the present study, high glucose and Aβ25-35 were used to cause injury to human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y in vitro, and streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes in mice in vivo. The changes in synaptic proteins and proteins of insulin signal transduction which closely correlate with learning and memory were detected in these cells and the brain of mice. Results showed that P165 could up-regulate the expression of α-synuclein and insulin receptor (IR), down-regulate the expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), PSD-95, Shank1 and MAPK expression. All these findings suggest that nicorandil might be a potential drug used for the treatment of AD. PMID:24753747

  3. High-mix insulins

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Farooqi, Mohammad Hamed; El-Houni, Ali E.

    2015-01-01

    Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use. PMID:26425485

  4. Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, S; Edelman, S V

    2001-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a common disorder often accompanied by numerous metabolic abnormalities leading to a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Results from the UKPDS have confirmed that intensive glucose control delays the onset and retards the progression of microvascular disease and possibly of macrovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the early stages of the disease, insulin resistance plays a major role in the development of hyperglycemia and other metabolic abnormalities, and patients with type 2 diabetes often benefit from measures to improve insulin sensitivity such as weight loss, dietary changes, and exercise. Later, the use of oral insulin secretagogues and insulin sensitizers as monotherapy and in combination helps maintain glycemia for varying periods of time. Ultimately, because of the progressive nature of the disease and the progressive decline in pancreatic beta-cell function, insulin therapy is almost always obligatory to achieve optimal glycemic goals. Not all patients are candidates for aggressive insulin management; therefore, the goals of therapy should be modified, especially in elderly individuals and those with co-morbid conditions. Candidates for intensive management should be motivated, compliant, and educable, without other major medical conditions and physical limitations that would preclude accurate and reliable HGM and insulin administration. In selected patients, combination therapy with insulin and oral antidiabetic medications can be an effective method for normalizing glycemia without the need for rigorous multiple-injection regimens. The patients for whom combination therapy is most commonly successful are those who do not achieve adequate glycemic control using daytime oral agents but who still show some evidence of responsiveness to the medications. Bedtime intermediate-acting or predinner premixed intermediate- and rapid-acting insulin is administered and progressively increased until the FPG

  5. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Disseau, M.; Chakravarthy, V. K.; Jagoda, J.

    1997-01-01

    Papers included address the following topics: (1) Turbulent premixed flame propagation in microgravity; (2) The effect of gravity on turbulent premixed flame propagation - a preliminary cold flow study; and (3) Characteristics of a subgrid model for turbulent premixed combustion.

  6. Premixed direct injection nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Ziminsky, Willy Steve

    2011-02-15

    An injection nozzle having a main body portion with an outer peripheral wall is disclosed. The nozzle includes a plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes disposed within the main body portion and a fuel flow passage fluidly connected to the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes. Fuel and air are partially premixed inside the plurality of the tubes. A second body portion, having an outer peripheral wall extending between a first end and an opposite second end, is connected to the main body portion. The partially premixed fuel and air mixture from the first body portion gets further mixed inside the second body portion. The second body portion converges from the first end toward said second end. The second body portion also includes cooling passages that extend along all the walls around the second body to provide thermal damage resistance for occasional flame flash back into the second body.

  7. Basal insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hedrington, Maka S; Pulliam, Lindsay; Davis, Stephen N

    2011-06-01

    Insulin glargine is the first 24-h recombinant DNA insulin analog introduced to the market. Substitution of glycine for asparagine and addition of two arginine residues raise the isoelectric point of insulin glargine and result in microprecipitates, delaying absorption from subcutaneous tissue. This delayed absorption result in fairly flat 24-h insulin concentration profiles with no discernible peak. Large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes show that although NPH insulin and insulin glargine are equally effective in lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) and fasting blood glucose, there is a clear advantage of insulin glargine over NPH insulin in reducing nocturnal and overall hypoglycemia. Lower risk of hypoglycemia with glargine was also consistently demonstrated by trials comparing insulin glargine and premixed analog insulins. These studies also showed greater reduction in A1c with twice-daily premixed insulins compared with glargine, when insulin glargine was administered without mealtime insulin coverage. Insulin glargine was also compared with another insulin analog, insulin detemir. Trials showed that both insulin analogs are equally effective in lowering A1c and have comparable risk of hypoglycemia. Trials comparing insulin glargine with glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists showed comparable significant reductions in A1c with both regimens. Insulin glargine is well tolerated, has low immunogenicity, reduced risks for acute myocardial infarction, and a lower risk of hypoglycemia compared with NPH insulin in individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21668335

  8. Basal Insulin Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hedrington, Maka S.; Pulliam, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Insulin glargine is the first 24-h recombinant DNA insulin analog introduced to the market. Substitution of glycine for asparagine and addition of two arginine residues raise the isoelectric point of insulin glargine and result in microprecipitates, delaying absorption from subcutaneous tissue. This delayed absorption result in fairly flat 24-h insulin concentration profiles with no discernible peak. Large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes show that although NPH insulin and insulin glargine are equally effective in lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) and fasting blood glucose, there is a clear advantage of insulin glargine over NPH insulin in reducing nocturnal and overall hypoglycemia. Lower risk of hypoglycemia with glargine was also consistently demonstrated by trials comparing insulin glargine and premixed analog insulins. These studies also showed greater reduction in A1c with twice-daily premixed insulins compared with glargine, when insulin glargine was administered without mealtime insulin coverage. Insulin glargine was also compared with another insulin analog, insulin detemir. Trials showed that both insulin analogs are equally effective in lowering A1c and have comparable risk of hypoglycemia. Trials comparing insulin glargine with glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists showed comparable significant reductions in A1c with both regimens. Insulin glargine is well tolerated, has low immunogenicity, reduced risks for acute myocardial infarction, and a lower risk of hypoglycemia compared with NPH insulin in individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21668335

  9. Premixed direct injection disk

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  10. Lean premixed/prevaporized combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations were formulated on the status and application of lean premixed/prevaporized combustion to the aircraft gas turbine for the reduction of pollutant emissions. The approach taken by the NASA Stratospheric Cruise Emission Reduction Program (SCERP) in pursuing the lean premixed/prevaporized combustion technique was also discussed. The proceedings contains an overview of the SCERP program, the discussions and recommendations of the participants, and an overall summary.

  11. Several insulin-like growth factor-I analogues and complexes of insulin-like growth factors-I and -II with insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 fail to mimic the effect of growth hormone upon lactation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Flint, D J; Tonner, E; Beattie, J; Gardner, M

    1994-02-01

    Lactation was suppressed in rats using a combined treatment of bromocriptine (to reduce prolactin concentrations) and a specific antiserum to rat GH administered twice daily for 2 days. When milk production had ceased, as determined by litter weight loss and the absence of milk in the stomachs of pups, attempts were made to reinitiate lactation using prolactin, GH, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) precomplexed to recombinant human IGF-binding protein-3 (hIGFBP-3) or IGF-I plus IGF-II precomplexed to hIGFBP-3. Despite the fact that all treatments except prolactin led to increases in serum IGFs and IGFBP-3, only prolactin and GH provoked the reinitiation of milk production as determined by increased litter weight gain, milk in the stomach of pups and a significant increase in the weight of the mammary glands. Since the mammary gland has been shown to produce IGFBPs which may inhibit IGF action we also tested three IGF-I analogues, R3-IGF-I, Long-IGF-I and Long-R3-IGF-I. R3-IGF-I has a single amino acid substitution (Glu to Arg) at position 3 whereas Long-IGF-I has a 13 amino acid N-terminal extension. These modifications dramatically reduce the ability of these analogues to bind to IGFBPs although they remain active at the IGF-I receptor. Such IGF analogues would therefore be expected to be active irrespective of the production of inhibitory IGFBPs. However, none was effective in reinitiating lactation, even at doses which have been shown to be biologically effective in terms of nitrogen retention.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7513341

  12. Insulin degludec for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    Over the last few years there has been a steady increase in the number of prescriptions dispensed in primary care for intermediate and long-acting insulin analogues and a reduction in prescriptions for biphasic isophane insulin. For example, in England, the volume of intermediate and long-acting insulin analogues in general practice has risen from approximately 650,000 prescriptions per quarter in 2007 to over 850,000 per quarter in 2012.(1) ▾Insulin degludec (Tresiba, Novo Nordisk) is a new long acting basal insulin analogue for the management of diabetes mellitus in adults.(2) Two strengths of insulin degludec (100 units/mL and 200 units/mL) were launched in the UK in February 2013. Here we discuss evidence for the effectiveness and safety of insulin degludec. PMID:23842634

  13. Insulin degludec and insulin aspart: novel insulins for the management of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Atkin, Stephen; Javed, Zeeshan; Fulcher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus require insulin as disease progresses to attain or maintain glycaemic targets. Basal insulin is commonly prescribed initially, alone or with one or more rapid-acting prandial insulin doses, to limit mealtime glucose excursions (a basal–bolus regimen). Both patients and physicians must balance the advantages of improved glycaemic control with the risk of hypoglycaemia and increasing regimen complexity. The rapid-acting insulin analogues (insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine) all have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and clinical efficacy/safety profiles. However, there are important differences in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of basal insulins (insulin glargine, insulin detemir and insulin degludec). Insulin degludec is an ultra-long-acting insulin analogue with a flat and stable glucose-lowering profile, a duration of action exceeding 30 h and less inter-patient variation in glucose-lowering effect than insulin glargine. In particular, the chemical properties of insulin degludec have allowed the development of a soluble co-formulation with prandial insulin aspart (insulin degludec/insulin aspart) that provides basal insulin coverage for at least 24 h with additional mealtime insulin for one or two meals depending on dose frequency. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies have shown that the distinct, long basal glucose-lowering action of insulin degludec and the prandial glucose-lowering effect of insulin aspart are maintained in the co-formulation. Evidence from pivotal phase III clinical trials indicates that insulin degludec/insulin aspart translate into sustained glycaemic control with less hypoglycaemia and the potential for a simpler insulin regimen with fewer daily injections. PMID:26568812

  14. Insulin degludec and insulin aspart: novel insulins for the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Stephen; Javed, Zeeshan; Fulcher, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus require insulin as disease progresses to attain or maintain glycaemic targets. Basal insulin is commonly prescribed initially, alone or with one or more rapid-acting prandial insulin doses, to limit mealtime glucose excursions (a basal-bolus regimen). Both patients and physicians must balance the advantages of improved glycaemic control with the risk of hypoglycaemia and increasing regimen complexity. The rapid-acting insulin analogues (insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine) all have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and clinical efficacy/safety profiles. However, there are important differences in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of basal insulins (insulin glargine, insulin detemir and insulin degludec). Insulin degludec is an ultra-long-acting insulin analogue with a flat and stable glucose-lowering profile, a duration of action exceeding 30 h and less inter-patient variation in glucose-lowering effect than insulin glargine. In particular, the chemical properties of insulin degludec have allowed the development of a soluble co-formulation with prandial insulin aspart (insulin degludec/insulin aspart) that provides basal insulin coverage for at least 24 h with additional mealtime insulin for one or two meals depending on dose frequency. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies have shown that the distinct, long basal glucose-lowering action of insulin degludec and the prandial glucose-lowering effect of insulin aspart are maintained in the co-formulation. Evidence from pivotal phase III clinical trials indicates that insulin degludec/insulin aspart translate into sustained glycaemic control with less hypoglycaemia and the potential for a simpler insulin regimen with fewer daily injections. PMID:26568812

  15. Insulin formulations--a review.

    PubMed

    Gualandi-Signorini, A M; Giorgi, G

    2001-01-01

    Although the improvement on insulin therapy since it was first conceived, it is still far from mimicking physiological secretion of pancreatic b-cells and research to find new insulin formulations and new routes of administration continues. Human biosynthetic insulin (rapid-acting, intermediate-acting and long-acting), produced by recombinant DNA technique, is currently available. The pharmacokinetic profile of rapid-acting insulin (regular) does not adequately reproduce the physiological post-prandial insulin response. This has led to the development of molecular analogues with slight modifications that prevent the spontaneous polymerisation underlying delayed absorption. Fast-acting analogues such as Lyspro and Aspart can be injected immediately before the meal, inducing a very fast and substantial peak of insulin, similar to that produced by b-cells, but have the disadvantage of short duration of action. For this reason, and because of the difficulty of obtaining sufficient basal insulin concentrations to control preprandial blood glucose levels with current long-acting insulins, analogues known as Glargine and Detemir have been synthesized. They have virtually no plasma peak and acts for about 24 h. These characteristics make it ideal to cover basal insulin requirement. With insulin analogues, it also seems possible to overcome the problem of intra- and inter-individual variability in absorption after subcutaneous injection. This variability is directly proportional to the duration of insulin action. Research into new routes of administration has led to production of inhaled insulin powder, soon to become commercially available. Insulin is absorbed through the lung alveoli. Trials to evaluate efficacy and toleration have shown that inhaled insulin has a similar kinetic profile to the fast-acting injected analogue and can therefore be used for mealtime requirement, combined with a single daily injection of long-acting insulin. Oral insulin is currently being

  16. Premixed Prevaporized Combustor Technology Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Forum was held to present the results of recent and current work intended to provide basic information required for demonstration of lean, premixed prevaporized combustors for aircraft gas turbine engine application. Papers are presented which deal with the following major topics: (1) engine interfaces; (2) fuel-air preparation; (3) autoignition; (4) lean combustion; and (5) concept design studies.

  17. Statistics of premixed flame cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The statistics of random cellular patterns in premixed flames are analyzed. Agreement is found with a variety of topological relations previously found for other networks, namely, Lewis's law and Aboav's law. Despite the diverse underlying physics, flame cells are shown to share a broad class of geometric properties with other random networks-metal grains, soap foams, bioconvection, and Langmuir monolayers.

  18. Statistics of premixed flame cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noever, D.A. )

    1991-07-15

    The statistics of random cellular patterns in premixed flames are analyzed. Agreement is found with a variety of topological relations previously found for other networks, namely, Lewis's law and Aboav's law. Despite the diverse underlying physics, flame cells are shown to share a broad class of geometric properties with other random networks---metal grains, soap foams, bioconvection, and Langmuir monolayers.

  19. Insulin pump therapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kesavadev, Jothydev

    2016-09-01

    Control of blood glucose during pregnancy is difficult because of wide variations, ongoing hormonal changes and mood swings. The need for multiple injections, pain at the injection site, regular monitoring and skillful handling of the syringes/pen further makes insulin therapy inconvenient. Insulin pump is gaining popularity in pregnancy because it mimics the insulin delivery of a healthy human pancreas. Multiple guidelines have also recommended the use of insulin pump in pregnancy to maintain the glycaemic control. The pump can release small doses of insulin continuously (basal), or a bolus dose close to mealtime to control the spike in blood glucose after a meal and the newer devices can shut down insulin delivery before the occurrence of hypoglycaemia. Pump insulin of choice is rapid acting analogue insulin. This review underscores the role of insulin pump in pregnancy, their usage, advantages and disadvantages in the light of existing literature and clinic experience. PMID:27582150

  20. [Medication of the month. Insulin glargine (Lantus)].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2004-02-01

    Insulin glargine (Lantus) is a human insulin analogue produced by recombinant DNA technology and recently launched by Aventis. Modification of the human insulin molecule at position A21 and at the C-terminus of the B-chain results in the formation of a stable compound that is soluble at pH 4.0, but forms amorphous microprecipitates in subcutaneous tissue (pH > 7,4) from which small amounts of insulin glargine are gradually released. The plasma concentration versus time profile of insulin glargine is therefore relatively constant over 24 hours as compared to conventional human insulins, especially NPH. This allows once-daily injection as basal insulin therapy, at any moment of the clock time (but if possible at the same time from day to day). Reproducibility of plasma insulin levels is also improved with insulin glargine as compared to human NPH insulin. Insulin glargine administration should be combined to rapid insulin injections, before each meal in order to control postprandial hyperglycaemia, or with oral antidiabetic agents in type 2 diabetes. The pharmacokinetic properties of insulin glargine allow an easier titration of basal insulin dose, which should facilitate adequate blood glucose control while decreasing the risk of hypoglycaemia, especially during night time. Insulin glargine use is safe with no increased antigenicity, immunogenicity or mitogenicity reactions as compared to human insulin. Optimal use of this new insulin analogue should be integrated in a global management of the diabetic patient as well as in a new culture of insulin therapy. PMID:15112902

  1. Gas turbine premixer with internal cooling

    DOEpatents

    York, William David; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-12-18

    A system that includes a turbine fuel nozzle comprising an air-fuel premixer. The air-fuel premixed includes a swirl vane configured to swirl fuel and air in a downstream direction, wherein the swirl vane comprises an internal coolant path from a downstream end portion in an upstream direction through a substantial length of the swirl vane.

  2. Oscillating combustion from a premix fuel nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    Stringent emissions requirements for stationary gas turbines have produced new challenges in combustor design. In the past, very low NOx pollutant emissions have been achieved through various combustion modifications, such as steam or water injection, or post-combustion cleanup methods such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR). An emerging approach to NOx abatement is lean premix combustion. Lean premix combustion avoids the cost and operational problems associated with other NOx control methods. By premixing fuel and air at very low equivalence ratios, the high temperatures which produce NOx are avoided. The challenges of premix combustion include avoiding flashback, and ensuring adequate fuel/air premixing. In addition, the combustion must be stable. The combustor should not operate so close to extinction that a momentary upset will extinguish the flame (static stability), and the flame should not oscillate (dynamic stability). Oscillations are undesirable because the associated pressure fluctuations can shorten component lifetime. Unfortunately, experience has shown that premix fuel nozzles burning natural gas are susceptible to oscillations. Eliminating these oscillations can be a costly and time consuming part of new engine development. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is investigating the issue of combustion oscillations produced by lean premix fuel nozzles. METC is evaluating various techniques to stabilize oscillating combustion in gas turbines. Tests results from a premix fuel nozzle using swirl stabilization and a pilot flame are reported here.

  3. Flashback resistant pre-mixer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Laster, Walter R.; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2012-02-14

    A pre-mixer assembly associated with a fuel supply system for mixing of air and fuel upstream from a main combustion zone in a gas turbine engine. The pre-mixer assembly includes a swirler assembly disposed about a fuel injector of the fuel supply system and a pre-mixer transition member. The swirler assembly includes a forward end defining an air inlet and an opposed aft end. The pre-mixer transition member has a forward end affixed to the aft end of the swirler assembly and an opposed aft end defining an outlet of the pre-mixer assembly. The aft end of the pre-mixer transition member is spaced from a base plate such that a gap is formed between the aft end of the pre-mixer transition member and the base plate for permitting a flow of purge air therethrough to increase a velocity of the air/fuel mixture exiting the pre-mixer assembly.

  4. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I and its analogue, long-R3-IGF-I, on intestinal absorption of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose are less pronounced than gut mucosal growth responses.

    PubMed

    Garnaut, Sonja M; Howarth, Gordon S; Read, Leanna C

    2002-03-01

    The relationship between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) peptide-induced increases in bowel mass and functional improvement is unclear. We utilised three independent methods to investigate the effects of IGF-I peptides on intestinal absorption of the glucose analogue, 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3MG) in rats. Rats received vehicle, IGF-I or the more potent analogue, long-R3-IGF-I via subcutaneously implanted mini-pump, for 7 days, at which time intestinal absorption was assessed by: (1) plasma 3MG appearance following oral gavage, (2) single-pass- or (3) recirculating-perfusion of a jejunal segment. 3MG (320 or 800 mg) was gavaged on day 7 to rats treated with vehicle, IGR-I or long-R3-IGF-I. With the lower 3MG dose, only long-R3-IGF-I increased (40%) the initial rate of 3MG appearance in plasma. IGF-I had no significant effect, whilst at the higher 3MG dose neither peptide was effective. Utilising perfusion techniques, long-R3-IGF-I, but not IGF-I, significantly increased 3MG uptake per cm of jejunum by up to 69%, although significance was lost when expressed as a function of tissue weight. Long-R3-IGF-I, but not native IGF-I, enhanced 3MG absorption from the intestinal lumen, presumably reflecting an increased mucosal mass rather than an up-regulation of specific epithelial glucose transporters. PMID:11999215

  5. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) analogue, LR(3)IGF-I, ameliorates the loss of body weight but not of skeletal muscle during food restriction.

    PubMed

    Tomas, F M

    2001-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is known to have anabolic effects in freely fed rats. We have investigated the ability of infused LR(3)IGF-I, an analogue of IGF-I, to attenuate the loss of lean tissue due to food restriction in young (5 weeks) and adult (12 weeks) rats. Groups of rats received food at 100%, 78%, 56% or 33% of ad libitum levels. Within each nutrition group the rats were continuously infused with LR(3)IGF-I at (98 nmol/day)/kg body weight or vehicle for 7 days. At each level of food intake, rats infused with LR(3)IGF-I maintained higher body weight (around 3-8%;P< 0.001) and nitrogen retention (P< 0.001) than those infused with vehicle alone but muscle protein was not conserved. LR(3)IGF-I infusion increased fat loss only in young rats (P< 0.05) despite a reduction in plasma insulin levels in both age groups (P< 0.01). Muscle protein turnover rates were unaffected by LR(3)IGF-I in young rats. In adult rats LR(3)IGF-I exacerbated the effects of food restriction through increased rates of protein breakdown, reduced RNA content and reduced rates of protein synthesis (P< 0.05) despite their larger fat reserves. Although young and adult rats show differing metabolic responses, we conclude that infusion of LR(3)IGF-I to either group during short-term food restriction does not ameliorate the loss of lean tissue by allowing more efficient utilization and/or partitioning of nutrients. PMID:11472075

  6. Fuel premixing module for gas turbine engine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Jushan (Inventor); Rizk, Nader K. (Inventor); Razdan, Mohan K. (Inventor); Marshall, Andre W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fuel-air premixing module is designed to reduce emissions from a gas turbine engine. In one form, the premixing module includes a central pilot premixer module with a main premixer module positioned thereround. Each of the portions of the fuel-air premixing module include an axial inflow swirler with a plurality of fixed swirler vanes. Fuel is injected into the main premixer module between the swirler vanes of the axial inflow swirler and at an acute angle relative to the centerline of the premixing module.

  7. Insulin and the law.

    PubMed

    Marks, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Hypoglycaemia, if it can be proved, may be used as a defence against almost any criminal charge provided it can be established that the perpetrator was in a state of neuroglycopenic (hypoglycaemic) automatism at the time of the offence. Hypoglycaemia produced by exogenous insulin can also be used as a suicidal or homicidal weapon. This paper discusses some of the pitfalls confronting the investigator of suspected insulin misuse including problems arising from the increasing prevalence of insulin analogues and the unreliability of immunoassays for their detection and measurement in the forensic context. PMID:26092979

  8. A premixed hydrogen/oxygen catalytic igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.

    1989-01-01

    The catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants was studied using a premixing hydrogen/oxygen injector. The premixed injector was designed to eliminate problems associated with catalytic ignition caused by poor propellant mixing in the catalyst bed. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, and propellant inlet temperature were varied parametrically in testing, and a pulse mode life test of the igniter was conducted. The results of the tests showed that the premixed injector eliminated flame flashback in the reactor and increased the life of the igniter significantly. The results of the experimental program and a comparison with data collected in a previous program are given.

  9. How to achieve a predictable basal insulin?

    PubMed

    Kurtzhals, P

    2005-09-01

    The development of insulin analogues over the last two decades have aimed at optimising the pharmacokinetic profile of subcutaneously injected insulin for therapeutic use in diabetes mellitus. Rapid acting analogues were successfully engineered and marketed in the late 1990's. In engineering long-acting analogues it has been a particular challenge to obtain action profiles that would be predictable from day to day in the same person. The most recent approach has been to acylate the insulin molecule with a fatty acid which provides the insulin molecule with a specific affinity for albumin. The first clinically available agent of this type is insulin detemir. Pharmacological studies have shown that reversible albumin binding will protract absorption following subcutaneous injection but still allow the insulin molecule to be recognised by the insulin receptor following dissociation from the carrier protein. Moreover, the molecular features of insulin detemir are attractive in that the molecule can be formulated as a neutral aqueous solution and does not precipitate after injection. Together with an important buffering mechanism effected by plasma albumin binding, this explains a highly significant reduction of within-subject variability of pharmacodynamic response observed in repeat isoglycaemic clamp studies where insulin detemir was compared to other basal insulin products. No safety considerations have been identified in using albumin as an insulin carrier to protract and buffer insulin action. In assessing the clinical attractiveness of insulin analogues, it is furthermore critically important to consider how the molecular modifications impact efficacy and safety. A number of pharmacological studies have shown that insulin detemir overall retains the molecular pharmacological properties of native human insulin, including a physiological balance between metabolic and mitogenic potencies. Taken together, insulin detemir provides an attractive novel approach for

  10. Plerocercoid growth factor (PGF), a human growth hormone (hGH) analogue produced by the tapeworm Spirometra mansonoides, has direct insulin-like action in adipose tissue of normal rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, M.A.M.; Phares, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    The metabolic actions of GH can be divided into acute (insulin-like) and chronic (lipolytic/anti-insulin). The insulin-like actions of GH are most readily elicited in GH-deficient animals as GH induces resistance to its own insulin-like action. Like GH, PGF stimulates growth and cross-reacts with anti-hGH antibodies. Independent experiments were conducted comparing the direct actions of PGF to insulin or hGH in vitro. Insulin-like effects were determined by the ability of PGF, insulin or hGH to stimulate (U-/sup 14/C)glucose metabolism in epidydimal fat pads from normal rats and by inhibition of epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis. Direct stimulation of lipolysis was used as anti-insulin activity. To determine if PGF competes for insulin or GH receptors, adipocytes (3 x 10/sup 5/ cells/ml) were incubated with either (/sup 125/I)insulin or (/sup 125/I)hGH +/- PGF, +/- insulin or +/- hGH. PGF stimulated glucose oxidation and /sup 14/C-incorporation into lipids. Insulin, hGH and PGF inhibited lipolysis (33%, 29% and 34%, respectively). Adipose tissue was very sensitive to the lipolytic effect of hGH but PGF was neither lipolytic nor did it confer refractoriness to its insulin-like action. PGF bound to GH but not to insulin receptors. Therefore, PGF had direct insulin-like effects but did not stimulate lipolysis in tissue from normal rats in vitro.

  11. Personalized intensification of insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes - does a basal-bolus regimen suit all patients?

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Sieradzki, J; Stefanski, A; Gentilella, R

    2016-08-01

    Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) require insulin therapy. If basal insulin fails to achieve glycemic control, insulin intensification is one possible treatment intensification strategy. We summarized clinical data from randomized clinical trials designed to compare the efficacy and safety of basal-bolus and premixed insulin intensification regimens. We defined a between-group difference of ≥0.3% in end-of-study glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as clinically meaningful. A PubMed database search supplemented by author-identified papers yielded 15 trials which met selection criteria: randomized design, patients with T2DM receiving basal-bolus (bolus injection ≤3 times/day) vs. premixed (≤3 injections/day) insulin regimens, primary/major endpoint(s) HbA1c- and/or hypoglycemia-related, and trial duration ≥12 weeks. Glycemic control improved with both basal-bolus and premixed insulin regimens with - in most cases - acceptable levels of weight gain and hypoglycemia. A clinically meaningful difference between regimens in glycemic control was recorded in only four comparisons, all of which favored basal-bolus therapy. The incidence of hypoglycemia was significantly different between regimens in only three comparisons, one of which favored premixed insulin and two basal-bolus therapy. Of the four trials that reported a significant difference between regimens in bodyweight change, two favored basal-bolus therapy and two favored premixed insulin. Thus, on a population level, neither basal-bolus therapy nor premixed insulin showed a consistent advantage in terms of glycemic control, hypoglycemic risk, or bodyweight gain. It is therefore recommended that clinicians should adopt an individualized approach to insulin intensification - taking into account the benefits and risks of each treatment approach and the attitude and preferences of each patient - in the knowledge that both basal-bolus and premixed regimens may be successful. PMID:27126277

  12. LEM-CF Premixed Tool Kit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-01-19

    The purpose of LEM-CF Premixed Tool Kit is to process premixed flame simulation data from the LEM-CF solver (https://fileshare.craft-tech.com/clusters/view/lem-cf) into a large-eddy simulation (LES) subgrid model database. These databases may be used with a user-defined-function (UDF) that is included in the Tool Kit. The subgrid model UDF may be used with the ANSYS FLUENT flow solver or other commercial flow solvers.

  13. Premixed turbulent flame propagation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Jagoda, J.; Sujith, R.

    1995-01-01

    To reduce pollutant formation there is, at present, an increased interest in employing premixed fuel/air mixture in combustion devices. It is well known that greater control over local temperature can be achieved with premixed flames and with lean premixed mixtures, significant reduction of pollutants such as NO(x) can be achieved. However, an issue that is still unresolved is the predictability of the flame propagation speed in turbulent premixed mixtures, especially in lean mixtures. Although substantial progress has been made in recent years, there is still no direct verification that flame speeds in turbulent premixed flows are highly predictable in complex flow fields found in realistic combustors. One of the problems associated with experimental verification is the difficulty in obtaining access to all scales of motion in typical high Reynolds number flows, since, such flows contain scales of motion that range from the size of the device to the smallest Kolmogorov scale. The overall objective of this study is to characterize the behavior of turbulent premixed flames at reasonable high Reynolds number, Re(sub L). Of particular interest here is the thin flame limit where the laminar flame thickness is much smaller than the Kolmogorov scale. Thin flames occur in many practical combustion devices and will be numerically studied using a recently developed new formulation that is briefly described.

  14. Premixed macroporous calcium phosphate cement scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Lisa E.; Simon, Carl G.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets in situ to form resorbable hydroxyapatite and is promising for orthopaedic applications. However, it requires on-site powder-liquid mixing during surgery, which prolongs surgical time and raises concerns of inhomogeneous mixing. The objective of this study was to develop a premixed CPC scaffold with macropores suitable for tissue ingrowth. To avoid the on-site powder-liquid mixing, the CPC paste was mixed in advance and did not set in storage; it set only after placement in a physiological solution. Using 30% and 40% mass fractions of mannitol porogen, the premixed CPC scaffold with fibers had flexural strength (mean ± sd; n = 5) of (3.9 ± 1.4) MPa and (1.8 ± 0.8) MPa, respectively. The scaffold porosity reached (68.6 ± 0.7)% and (74.7 ± 1.2)%, respectively. Osteoblast cells colonized in the surface macropores of the scaffold and attached to the hydroxyapatite crystals. Cell viability values for the premixed CPC scaffold was not significantly different from that of a conventional non-premixed CPC known to be biocompatible (P > 0.1). In conclusion, using fast-dissolving porogen and slow-dissolving fibers, a premixed macroporous CPC scaffold was developed with strength approaching the reported strengths of sintered porous hydroxyapatite implants and cancellous bone, and non-cytotoxicity similar to a biocompatible non-premixed CPC. PMID:17277972

  15. Efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart and biphasic insulin lispro mix in patients with type 2 diabetes: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) represents an escalating burden worldwide, particularly in China and India. Compared with Caucasians, Asian people with diabetes have lower body mass index, increased visceral adiposity, and postprandial glucose (PPG)/insulin resistance. Since postprandial hyperglycemia contributes significantly to total glycemic burden and is associated with heightened cardiovascular risk, targeting PPG early in T2D is paramount. Premixed insulin regimens are widely used in Asia due to their convenience and effectiveness. Data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) with biphasic insulin lispro mix (LM 25/50) and versus other insulin therapies or oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) in T2D demonstrated that BIAsp 30 and LM 25/50 were associated with similar or greater improvements in glycemic control versus comparator regimens, such as basal–bolus insulin, in insulin-naÏve, and prior insulin users. Studies directly comparing BIAsp 30 and LM 25 provided conflicting glycemic control results. Safety data generally showed increased hypoglycemia and weight gain with premixed insulins versus basal–bolus insulin or OADs. However, large observational trials documented improvements in glycated hemoglobin, PPG, and hypoglycemia with BIAsp 30 in multi-ethnic patient populations. In summary, this literature review demonstrates that premixed insulin regimens are an appropriate and effective treatment choice in T2D. PMID:27186543

  16. Efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart and biphasic insulin lispro mix in patients with type 2 diabetes: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) represents an escalating burden worldwide, particularly in China and India. Compared with Caucasians, Asian people with diabetes have lower body mass index, increased visceral adiposity, and postprandial glucose (PPG)/insulin resistance. Since postprandial hyperglycemia contributes significantly to total glycemic burden and is associated with heightened cardiovascular risk, targeting PPG early in T2D is paramount. Premixed insulin regimens are widely used in Asia due to their convenience and effectiveness. Data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) with biphasic insulin lispro mix (LM 25/50) and versus other insulin therapies or oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) in T2D demonstrated that BIAsp 30 and LM 25/50 were associated with similar or greater improvements in glycemic control versus comparator regimens, such as basal-bolus insulin, in insulin-naÏve, and prior insulin users. Studies directly comparing BIAsp 30 and LM 25 provided conflicting glycemic control results. Safety data generally showed increased hypoglycemia and weight gain with premixed insulins versus basal-bolus insulin or OADs. However, large observational trials documented improvements in glycated hemoglobin, PPG, and hypoglycemia with BIAsp 30 in multi-ethnic patient populations. In summary, this literature review demonstrates that premixed insulin regimens are an appropriate and effective treatment choice in T2D. PMID:27186543

  17. A Comparison of the Effects of the GLP-1 Analogue Liraglutide and Insulin Glargine on Endothelial Function and Metabolic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Sapporo Athero-Incretin Study 2 (SAIS2)

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Furumoto, Tomoo; Oba, Koji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Arina; Kondo, Takuma; Tsuchida, Kenichi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Manda, Naoki; Kurihara, Yoshio; Aoki, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives GLP-1 improves hyperglycemia, and it has been reported to have favorable effects on atherosclerosis. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether GLP-1 is able to improve endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide on endothelial function and glycemic metabolism compared with insulin glargine therapy. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, prospective randomized parallel-group comparison study, 31 diabetic outpatients (aged 60.3 ± 10.3 years with HbA1c levels of 8.6 ± 0.8%) with current metformin and/or sulfonylurea treatment were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive liraglutide or glargine therapy once daily for 14 weeks. Flow mediated dilation (FMD), a comprehensive panel of hemodynamic parameters (Task Force Monitor), and serum metabolic markers were assessed before and after the treatment period. Results A greater reduction (worsening) in %FMD was observed in the glargine group, although this change was not statistically different from the liraglutide group (liraglutide; 5.7 to 5.4%, glargine 6.7 to 5.7%). The augmentation index, C-peptide index, derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites and BMI were significantly improved in the liraglutide group. Central systolic blood pressure and NT-proBNP also tended to be improved in the liraglutide-treated group, while improvements in HbA1c levels were similar between groups. Cardiac index, blood pressure and most other metabolic parameters were not different. Conclusions Regardless of glycemic improvement, early liraglutide therapy did not affect endothelial function but may provide favorable effects on beta-cell function and cardioprotection in type 2 diabetics without advanced atherosclerosis. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry System as trial ID UMIN000005331. PMID:26284918

  18. Turbulent Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1996-01-01

    The experimental cold-flow facility is now full operational and is currently being used to obtain baseline turbulence data in a Couette flow. The baseline turbulence data is necessary to confirm the capability of the chosen device to generate and maintain the required turbulence intensity. Subsequent reacting flow studies will assume that a similar turbulent flow field exists ahead of the premixed flame. Some modifications and refinements had to be made to enable accurate measurements. It consists of two rollers, one (driven by a motor) which drives a continuous belt and four smaller rollers used to set the belt spacing and tension to minimize belt flutter. The entire assemble is enclosed in a structure that has the dimensions to enable future drop tower experiments of the hot facility. All critical dimensions are the same as the original plans except for the pulley ratio which has been changed to enable a wider operating regime in terms of the Reynolds number. With the current setup, Reynolds numbers as low as 100 and as high as 14,000 can be achieved. This is because the in-between belt spacing can be varied from 1 cm to 7.6 cm, and the belt speed can be accurately varied from .15 m/sec to 3.1 m/sec.

  19. Design factors for stable lean premix combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.; Gemmen, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program includes the development of low-emission combustors. Low emissions have already been achieved by premixing fuel and air to avoid the hot gas pockets produced by nozzles without premixing. While the advantages of premixed combustion have been widely recognized, turbine developers using premixed nozzles have experienced repeated problems with combustion oscillations. Left uncontrolled, these oscillations can lead to pressure fluctuations capable of damaging engine hardware. Elimination of such oscillations is often difficult and time consuming - particularly when oscillations are discovered in the last stages of engine development. To address this issue, METC is studying oscillating combustion from lean premixing fuel nozzles. These tests are providing generic information on the mechanisms that contribute to oscillating behavior in gas turbines. METC is also investigating the use of so-called {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} control of combustion oscillations. This technique periodically injects fuel pulses into the combustor to disrupt the oscillating behavior. Recent results on active combustion control are presented in Gemmen et al. (1995) and Richards et al. (1995). This paper describes the status of METC efforts to avoid oscillations through simple design changes.

  20. NO formation in counterflow partially premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Mungekar, Hemant; Atreya, Arvind

    2007-02-15

    An experimental and computational study of NO formation in low-strain-rate partially premixed methane counterflow flames is reported. For progressive fuel-side partial premixing the peak NO concentration increased and the NO distribution along the stagnation streamline broadened. New temperature-dependent emissivity data for a SiO{sub 2}-coated Pt thermocouple was used to estimate the radiation correction for the thermocouple, thus improving the accuracy of the reported flame temperature. Flame structure computations with GRIMech 3.00 showed good agreement between measured and computed concentration distributions of NO and OH radical. With progressive partial premixing the contribution of the thermal NO pathway to NO formation increases. The emission index of NO (EINO) first increased and then decreased, reaching its peak value for the level of partial premixing that corresponds to location of the nonpremixed reaction zone at the stagnation plane. The observation of a maximum in EINO at a level of partial premixing corresponding to the nonpremixed reaction zone at the stagnation plane seems to be a consistent feature of low (<20 s{sup -1})-strain-rate counterflow flames. (author)

  1. Pragmatic use of insulin degludec/insulin aspart co-formulation: A multinational consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Latif, Zafar A; Comlekci, Abdurrahman; Galvez, Guillermo Gonzalez; Malik, Rached; Pathan, Md Faruque; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) is a modern coformulation of ultra-long-acting basal insulin degludec, with rapid-acting insulin aspart. IDegAsp provides effective, safe, well-tolerated glycemic control, with a low risk of hypoglycemia while allowing flexibility in meal patterns and timing of administration. This consensus statement describes a pragmatic framework to identify patients who may benefit from IDegAsp therapy. It highlights the utility of IDegAsp in type 2 diabetic patients who are insulin-naive, suboptimally controlled on basal or premixed insulin, or dissatisfied with basal-bolus regimens. It also describes potential IDegAsp usage in type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:27366723

  2. Pragmatic use of insulin degludec/insulin aspart co-formulation: A multinational consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Latif, Zafar A.; Comlekci, Abdurrahman; Galvez, Guillermo Gonzalez; Malik, Rached; Pathan, Md Faruque; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) is a modern coformulation of ultra-long-acting basal insulin degludec, with rapid-acting insulin aspart. IDegAsp provides effective, safe, well-tolerated glycemic control, with a low risk of hypoglycemia while allowing flexibility in meal patterns and timing of administration. This consensus statement describes a pragmatic framework to identify patients who may benefit from IDegAsp therapy. It highlights the utility of IDegAsp in type 2 diabetic patients who are insulin-naive, suboptimally controlled on basal or premixed insulin, or dissatisfied with basal–bolus regimens. It also describes potential IDegAsp usage in type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:27366723

  3. [Insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus: past and present].

    PubMed

    Pires, Antonio Carlos; Chacra, Antonio Roberto

    2008-03-01

    The discovery of insulin can be considered the milestone of diabetes mellitus history and a great achievement for its treatment. The first insulin available was the regular. Afterwards, Hagedorn added the protamine to the insulin, thus, creating the NPH insulin. In the 1950s an insulin free of protamine was synthesized: the lente insulin. With the advent of molecular biology, synthetic human insulin was synthesized using recombinant DNA technology. Most recently several types of insulin analogues were available, providing the patients with better metabolic control. Type 1 diabetes mellitus treatment includes plain substitution and individualization for short-acting plus long-acting insulin according to the physician's assistance, besides regular practice of physical activities and diet orientations. In type 1 diabetes mellitus the insulin of low variability is the best choice since basal/bolus insulin therapy or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump can mimetize the physiological release of insulin by beta cells. PMID:18438537

  4. Studies of Premixed Laminar and Turbulent Flames at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, M.; Aung, K.; Ronney, P. D.; Sharif, J. A.; Wu, M.-S.

    1999-01-01

    Several topics relating to combustion limits in premixed flames at reduced gravity have been studied. These topics include: (1) flame balls; (2) numerical simulation of flame ball and planar flame structure and stability; (3) experimental simulation of buoyancy effects in premixed flames using aqueous autocatalytic reactions; and (4) premixed flame propagation in Hele-Shaw cells.

  5. Flame propagation in partially premixed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetsch, G.; Poinsot, T.; Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.

    1996-11-01

    Turbulent flame propagation is studied under inhomogenously premixed conditions via data from direct numerical simulations. Departures from the premixed case are studied using four different configurations, ranging from one dimensional unsteady flames to turbulent three-dimensional simulations. Simulations are performed in these cases with various values of the mean equivalence ratio, fluctuations about the mean equivlalence ratio, correlation length scales, and probability denisty functions of the mixture composition. Propagation characteristics are described in terms of the flamelet approach, where the the main contribution of partial premixing on flame propagation is due to flame wrinkling relative to modification of the mean flamelet structure. This behavior is consistent over a broad range of conditions, with the exception being extreme departures from stoichiometric conditions where flamability limits are exceeded and flame quenching is observed.

  6. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Krishnan, S. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon-fueled flames affect emissions of pollutant soot, thermal loads on combustors, hazards of unwanted fires and capabilities for computational combustion. In view of these observations, the present study is considering processes of soot formation in both burner-stabilized and freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. These flames are being studied in order to simplify the interpretation of measurements and to enhance computational tractability compared to the diffusion flame environments of greatest interest for soot processes. In addition, earlier studies of soot formation in laminar premixed flames used approximations of soot optical and structure properties that have not been effective during recent evaluations, as well as questionable estimates of flow residence times). The objective of present work was to exploit methods of avoiding these difficulties developed for laminar diffusion flames to study soot growth in laminar premixed flames. The following description of these studies is brief.

  7. Colorimetric determination of selenium in mineral premixes .

    PubMed

    Hurlbut, J A; Burkepile, R G; Geisler, C A; Kijak, P J; Rummel, N G

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for determination of sodium selenite or sodium selenate in mineral-based premixes. It is based on the formation of intense-yellow piazselenol by Se(IV) and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine. Mineral premixes typically contain calcium carbonate as a base material and magnesium carbonate, silicon dioxide, and iron(III) oxide as minor components or additives. In this method, the premix is digested briefly in nitric acid, diluted with water, and filtered to remove any Iron(III) oxide. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and HCl are added to the filtrate, which is heated to near boiling for 1 h to convert any selenate to selenite. After heating, the solution is buffered between pH 2 and 3 with NaOH and formic acid and treated with NH2OH and EDTA; any Se present forms a complex with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine at 60 degrees C. The solution is made basic with NH4OH, and the piazselenol is extracted into toluene. The absorbance of the complex in dried toluene is measured at 420 nm. The method was validated independently by 2 laboratories. Samples analyzed included calcium carbonate fortified with 100, 200, and 300 micrograms Se in the form of sodium selenite or sodium selenate, a calcium carbonate premix containing sodium selenite, a calcium carbonate premix containing sodium selenate, and a commercial premix; 5 replicates of each sample type were analyzed by each laboratory. Average recoveries ranged from 89 to 109% with coefficients of variation from 1.2 to 13.6%. PMID:9241835

  8. Insulin therapy: going the "smarter" way.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Joshi, Ameya; Parmar, Girish

    2014-01-01

    Insulin pharmacology has evolved from nonhuman source based extraction of insulin, to use of recombinant technologies for human insulin production, to tailor made synthetic insulin analogues. The delivery techniques of insulin have also improved, from injections to pumps, and to pumps with sensors. However, to achieve the final goal of a closed loop insulin delivery is far from achieved. One of the researches in this direction includes synthetic smart insulins. These are systems with chemical sensors for glucose, linked to reactions that trigger glucose mediated insulin delivery. Interest in this field is high and recent publications and patents show promise. The current review tries to summarize the basic concept of smart insulin as well as cater the recent developments and patents in this direction. PMID:24975640

  9. Combining insulins for optimal blood glucose control in type I and 2 diabetes: focus on insulin glulisine.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Heather; Snyder, Benjamin; Garg, Satish K

    2007-01-01

    Normalization of blood glucose is essential for the prevention of diabetes mellitus (DM)-related microvascular and macrovascular complications. Despite substantial literature to support the benefits of glucose lowering and clear treatment targets, glycemic control remains suboptimal for most people with DM in the United States. Pharmacokinetic limitations of conventional insulins have been a barrier to achieving treatment targets secondary to adverse effects such as hypoglycemia and weight gain. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed modification of the insulin molecule to produce insulin analogues that overcome these pharmacokinetic limitations. With time action profiles that more closely mimic physiologic insulin secretion, rapid acting insulin analogues (RAAs) reduce post-prandial glucose excursions and hypoglycemia when compared to regular human insulin (RHI). Insulin glulisine (Apidra) is a rapid-acting insulin analogue created by substituting lysine for asparagine at position B3 and glutamic acid for lysine at position B29 on the B chain of human insulin. The quick absorption of insulin glulisine more closely reproduces physiologic first-phase insulin secretion and its rapid acting profile is maintained across patient subtypes. Clinical trials have demonstrated comparable or greater efficacy of insulin glulisine versus insulin lispro or RHI, respectively. Efficacy is maintained even when insulin glulisine is administered post-meal. In addition, glulisine appears to have a more rapid time action profile compared with insulin lispro across various body mass indexes (BMIs). The safety and tolerability profile of insulin glulisine is also comparable to that of insulin lispro or RHI in type 1 or 2 DM and it has been shown to be as safe and effective when used in a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). In summary, insulin glulisine is a safe, effective, and well tolerated rapid-acting insulin analogue across all BMIs and a worthy option for prandial

  10. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor.

    PubMed

    Kabiraj, Lipika; Saurabh, Aditya; Karimi, Nader; Sailor, Anna; Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P; Paschereit, Christian O

    2015-02-01

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration. PMID:25725637

  11. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiraj, Lipika Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian O.; Karimi, Nader; Sailor, Anna; Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P.

    2015-02-15

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration.

  12. NON-PREMIXED TURBULENT JET FLAMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper, part of a general investigation of mixing and chemical reaction in turbulent jets, concerns the length of non-premixed turbulent jet flames in a stationary environment. Experimental results for the turbulent flame length of chemically reacting jets in water show both i...

  13. [B17-D-leucine]insulin and [B17-norleucine]insulin: synthesis and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Knorr, R; Danho, W; Büllesbach, E E; Gattner, H G; Zahn, H; King, G L; Kahn, C R

    1983-11-01

    The chemical synthesis of two porcine insulin analogues is described. Leucine in position B17 of the native molecule was substituted by its D-enantiomer and by L-norleucine, respectively. Both B-chain derivatives were synthesized by fragment condensation and purified as di-S-sulphonates by gel filtration followed by ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sephadex at pH3. Combination with native sulphhydryl A-chain yielded [DLeuB17]insulin and [NleB17]insulin. Both insulin analogues were isolated by gel filtration followed by ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose at pH 4.0. Biological activities of the analogues were determined relative to native pork insulin: 1) glucose oxidation in rat epididymal adipocytes was 6% for [DLeuB17]insulin and 16% for [NleB17]insulin, 2) receptor-binding affinity tested with cultured human fibroblasts and with rat adipocytes was 3% for [DLeuB17]insulin and 26% for [NleB17]insulin, and 3) thymidine incorporation into DNA of human fibroblasts was 35% for [DLeuB17]insulin and 100% for [NleB17]insulin. PMID:6363268

  14. New insulin preparations: A primer for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The importance of glycemic control in preventing the chronic and devastating complications of diabetes is well established. Insulin administration is an important therapeutic option for managing diabetes, particularly for patients with profound insulin deficiency. Many insulin formulations are on the market, including short-acting insulin analogues, inhaled insulin, concentrated insulin, and basal insulin. Each category has a unique onset, peak, and duration of action. This article reviews the differing pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and safety and efficacy data, and discusses the implications for clinical practice. PMID:27176680

  15. Dynamics and structure of turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilger, R. W.; Swaminathan, N.; Ruetsch, G. R.; Smith, N. S. A.

    1995-01-01

    In earlier work (Mantel & Bilger, 1994) the structure of the turbulent premixed flame was investigated using statistics based on conditional averaging with the reaction progress variable as the conditioning variable. The DNS data base of Trouve and Poinsot (1994) was used in this investigation. Attention was focused on the conditional dissipation and conditional axial velocity in the flame with a view to modeling these quantities for use in the conditional moment closure (CMC) approach to analysis of kinetics in premixed flames (Bilger, 1993). Two remarkable findings were made: there was almost no acceleration of the axial velocity in the flame front itself; and the conditional scalar dissipation remained as high, or higher, than that found in laminar premixed flames. The first finding was surprising since in laminar flames all the fluid acceleration occurs through the flame front, and this could be expected also for turbulent premixed flames at the flamelet limit. The finding gave hope of inventing a new approach to the dynamics of turbulent premixed flames through use of rapid distortion theory or an unsteady Bernoulli equation. This could lead to a new second order closure for turbulent premixed flames. The second finding was contrary to our measurements with laser diagnostics in lean hydrocarbon flames where it is found that conditional scalar dissipation drops dramatically below that for laminar flamelets when the turbulence intensity becomes high. Such behavior was not explainable with a one-step kinetic model, even at non-unity Lewis number. It could be due to depletion of H2 from the reaction zone by preferential diffusion. The capacity of the flame to generate radicals is critically dependent on the levels of H2 present (Bilger, et al., 1991). It seemed that a DNS computation with a multistep reduced mechanism would be worthwhile if a way could be found to make this feasible. Truly innovative approaches to complex problems often come only when there is the

  16. Counter-gradient in premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libby, P. A.; Bray, K. N. C.

    1980-01-01

    A new theory for premixed turbulent flames normal to the oncoming reactants is developed on the basis of the Bray-Moss-Libby model of premixed combustion and second-order closure. Gradient transport assumptions are carefully avoided. The final formulation focuses on the intensity of the fluctuations of the velocity component normal to the flame and on the mean flux of product. At low rates of heat release corresponding to small intensities of the density fluctuations the new theory is in agreement with our earlier theory based on gradient transport. However, as the heat release increases toward values of practical interest, counter-gradient diffusion, i.e., mean flux in the direction of increasing mean concentration, arises and is attributable to the differential effect of mean pressure gradient on cold reactants and hot products. The implications of these results are discussed.

  17. Turbulent flame propagation in partially premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsot, T.; Veynante, D.; Trouve, A.; Ruetsch, G.

    1996-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flame propagation is essential in many practical devices. In the past, fundamental and modeling studies of propagating flames have generally focused on turbulent flame propagation in mixtures of homogeneous composition, i.e. a mixture where the fuel-oxidizer mass ratio, or equivalence ratio, is uniform. This situation corresponds to the ideal case of perfect premixing between fuel and oxidizer. In practical situations, however, deviations from this ideal case occur frequently. In stratified reciprocating engines, fuel injection and large-scale flow motions are fine-tuned to create a mean gradient of equivalence ratio in the combustion chamber which provides additional control on combustion performance. In aircraft engines, combustion occurs with fuel and secondary air injected at various locations resulting in a nonuniform equivalence ratio. In both examples, mean values of the equivalence ratio can exhibit strong spatial and temporal variations. These variations in mixture composition are particularly significant in engines that use direct fuel injection into the combustion chamber. In this case, the liquid fuel does not always completely vaporize and mix before combustion occurs, resulting in persistent rich and lean pockets into which the turbulent flame propagates. From a practical point of view, there are several basic and important issues regarding partially premixed combustion that need to be resolved. Two such issues are how reactant composition inhomogeneities affect the laminar and turbulent flame speeds, and how the burnt gas temperature varies as a function of these inhomogeneities. Knowledge of the flame speed is critical in optimizing combustion performance, and the minimization of pollutant emissions relies heavily on the temperature in the burnt gases. Another application of partially premixed combustion is found in the field of active control of turbulent combustion. One possible technique of active control consists of pulsating

  18. Flame front configuration of turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Junichi; Maruta, Kaoru; Hirano, Toshisuke

    1998-02-01

    The present study is performed to explore dependence of the wrinkle scale of propane-air turbulent premixed flames on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow, burner size, and mixture ratio. The wrinkle scales are examined and expressed in the frequency distribution of the radii of flame front curvatures. The average wrinkle scale depends not only on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow but also on burner diameter and mixture ratio. The average wrinkle scale of a lean propane-air flame is larger than those of the near stoichiometric and rich flames. The smallest wrinkle scale of turbulent premixed flame is in the range of 0.75--1.0 mm, which is much larger than the Kolmogorov scale of turbulence in the nonreacting flow.

  19. Studies of Premixed Laminar and Turbulent Flames at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, O. C.; Abid, M.; Porres, J.; Liu, J. B.; Ronney, P. D.; Struk, P. M.; Weiland, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    Several topics relating to premixed flame behavior at reduced gravity have been studied. These topics include: (1) flame balls; (2) flame structure and stability at low Lewis number; (3) experimental simulation of buoyancy effects in premixed flames using aqueous autocatalytic reactions; and (4) premixed flame propagation in Hele-Shaw cells. Because of space limitations, only topic (1) is discussed here, emphasizing results from experiments on the recent STS-107 Space Shuttle mission, along with numerical modeling efforts.

  20. Identification of Host Insulin Binding Sites on Schistosoma japonicum Insulin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Rachel J.; Toth, Istvan; Liang, Jiening; Mangat, Amanjot; McManus, Donald P.; You, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum insulin receptors (SjIRs) have been identified as encouraging vaccine candidates. Interrupting or blocking the binding between host insulin and the schistosome insulin receptors (IRs) may result in reduced glucose uptake leading to starvation and stunting of worms with a reduction in egg output. To further understand how schistosomes are able to exploit host insulin for development and growth, and whether these parasites and their mammalian hosts compete for the same insulin source, we identified insulin binding sites on the SjIRs. Based on sequence analysis and the predicted antigenic structure of the primary sequences of the SjIRs, we designed nine and eleven peptide analogues from SjIR-1 and SjIR-2, respectively. Using the Octet RED system, we identified analogues derived from SjIR-1 (10) and SjIR-2 (20, 21 and 22) with insulin-binding sequences specific for S. japonicum. Nevertheless, the human insulin receptor (HIR) may compete with the SjIRs in binding human insulin in other positions which are important for HIR binding to insulin. However, no binding occurred between insulin and parasite analogues derived from SjIR-1 (2, 7 and 8) and SjIR-2 (14, 16 and 18) at the same locations as HIR sequences which have been shown to have strong insulin binding affinities. Importantly, we found two analogues (1 and 3), derived from SjIR-1, and two analogues (13 and 15) derived from SjIR-2, were responsible for the major insulin binding affinity in S. japonicum. These peptide analogues were shown to have more than 10 times (in KD value) stronger binding capacity for human insulin compared with peptides derived from the HIR in the same sequence positions. Paradoxically, analogues 1, 3, 13 and 15 do not appear to contain major antigenic determinants which resulted in poor antibody responses to native S. japonicum protein. This argues against their future development as peptide-vaccine candidates. PMID:27441998

  1. Gravity Effects Observed In Partially Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Lock, Andrew J.; Gauguly, Ranjan; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    Partially premixed flames (PPFs) contain a rich premixed fuel air mixture in a pocket or stream, and, for complete combustion to occur, they require the transport of oxidizer from an appropriately oxidizer-rich (or fuel-lean) mixture that is present in another pocket or stream. Partial oxidation reactions occur in fuel-rich portions of the mixture and any remaining unburned fuel and/or intermediate species are consumed in the oxidizer-rich portions. Partial premixing, therefore, represents that condition when the equivalence ratio (phi) in one portion of the flowfield is greater than unity, and in another section its value is less than unity. In general, for combustion to occur efficiently, the global equivalence ratio is in the range fuel-lean to stoichiometric. These flames can be established by design by placing a fuel-rich mixture in contact with a fuel-lean mixture, but they also occur otherwise in many practical systems, which include nonpremixed lifted flames, turbulent nonpremixed combustion, spray flames, and unwanted fires. Other practical applications of PPFs are reported elsewhere. Although extensive experimental studies have been conducted on premixed and nonpremixed flames under microgravity, there is a absence of previous experimental work on burner stabilized PPFs in this regard. Previous numerical studies by our group employing a detailed numerical model showed gravity effects to be significant on the PPF structure. We report on the results of microgravity experiments conducted on two-dimensional (established on a Wolfhard-Parker slot burner) and axisymmetric flames (on a coannular burner) that were investigated in a self-contained multipurpose rig. Thermocouple and radiometer data were also used to characterize the thermal transport in the flame.

  2. Lifted Partially Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, Andrew J.; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suesh K.; Hegde, Uday

    2004-01-01

    Lifted Double and Triple flames are established in the UIC-NASA Partially Premixed microgravity rig. The flames examined in this paper are established above a coannular burner because its axisymmetric geometry allows for future implementation of other non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques easily. Both burner-attached stable flames and lifted flames are established at normal and microgravity conditions in the drop tower facility.

  3. Displacement speeds in turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Shepherd, Ian G.; Bell, J.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    The theory of turbulent premixed flames is based on acharacterization of the flame as a discontinuous surface propagatingthrough the fluid. The displacement speed, defined as the local speed ofthe flame front normal to itself, relative to the unburned fluid,provides one characterization of the burning velocity. In this paper, weintroduce a geometric approach to computing displacement speed anddiscuss the efficacy of the displacement speed for characterizing aturbulent flame.

  4. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1999-01-01

    A combined numerical-experimental study has been carried out to investigate the structure and propagation characteristics of turbulent premixed flames with and without the influence of buoyancy. Experimentally, the premixed flame characteristics are studied in the wrinkled regime using a Couette flow facility and an isotropic flow facility in order to resolve the scale of flame wrinkling. Both facilities were chosen for their ability to achieve sustained turbulence at low Reynolds number. This implies that conventional diagnostics can be employed to resolve the smallest scales of wrinkling. The Couette facility was also built keeping in mind the constraints imposed by the drop tower requirements. Results showed that the flow in this Couette flow facility achieves full-developed turbulence at low Re and all turbulence statistics are in good agreement with past measurements on large-scale facilities. Premixed flame propagation studies were then carried out both using the isotropic box and the Couette facility. Flame imaging showed that fine scales of wrinkling occurs during flame propagation. Both cases in Ig showed significant buoyancy effect. To demonstrate that micro-g can remove this buoyancy effect, a small drop tower was built and drop experiments were conducted using the isotropic box. Results using the Couette facility confirmed the ability to carry out these unique reacting flow experiments at least in 1g. Drop experiments at NASA GRC were planned but were not completed due to termination of this project.

  5. Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Almgren, Ann S.; Lijewski, MichaelJ.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Cheng, Robert K.; Shepherd, Ian G.

    2006-06-25

    There is considerable technological interest in developingnew fuel-flexible combustion systems that can burn fuels such ashydrogenor syngas. Lean premixed systems have the potential to burn thesetypes of fuels with high efficiency and low NOx emissions due to reducedburnt gas temperatures. Although traditional scientific approaches basedon theory and laboratory experiment have played essential roles indeveloping our current understanding of premixed combustion, they areunable to meet the challenges of designing fuel-flexible lean premixedcombustion devices. Computation, with itsability to deal with complexityand its unlimited access to data, hasthe potential for addressing thesechallenges. Realizing this potential requires the ability to perform highfidelity simulations of turbulent lean premixed flames under realisticconditions. In this paper, we examine the specialized mathematicalstructure of these combustion problems and discuss simulation approachesthat exploit this structure. Using these ideas we can dramatically reducecomputational cost, making it possible to perform high-fidelitysimulations of realistic flames. We illustrate this methodology byconsidering ultra-lean hydrogen flames and discuss how this type ofsimulation is changing the way researchers study combustion.

  6. Imaging of premixed flames in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, L. W.; Cheng, R. K.

    1994-12-01

    A laser schlieren system which uses video recording and digital images analysis has been developed and applied successfully to microgravity combustion experiments performed in a drop-tower. The optical system and the experiment are installed within a small package which is subjected to free-fall. The images are recorded on video tape and are digitized and analyzed by a computer-controlled image processor. The experimental results include laminar and turbulent premixed conical flames in microgravity, normal positive gravity (upward), and reverse gravity (downward). The procedures to extract frequency information from the digitized images are described. Many gross features of the effects of gravity on premixed conical flames are found. Flames that ignite easily in normal gravity fail to ignite in microgravity. Buoyancy driven instabilities associated with an interface formed between the hot products and the cold surrounding air is the mechanism through which gravity influences premixed laminar and turbulent flames. In normal gravity, this causes the flame to flicker. In reverse gravity, - g, and microgravity, μg, the interface is stable and flame flickering ceases. The flickering frequencies of + g flames vary with changing upstream boundary conditions. The absence of flame flickering in μg suggest that μg flames would be less sensitive to these changes.

  7. Insulin degludec. Uncertainty over cardiovascular harms.

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    Insulin isophane (NPH) is the standard long-acting human insulin for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Long-acting human insulin analogues are also available: insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Uncertainties remain concerning their long-term adverse effects. Insulin degludec (Tresiba, Novo Nordisk) is another long-acting human insulin analogue, also approved in the EU for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It was authorised at a concentration of 100 units per ml, like other insulins, and also at a concentration of 200 units per ml. There are no comparative data on insulin degludec 200 units per ml in patients using high doses of insulin. Insulin degludec has mainly been evaluated in ten randomised, unblinded, "non-inferiority" trials lasting 26 to 52 weeks, nine versus insulin glargine and one versus insulin detemir. Insulin degludec was administered at a fixed time each evening, or in either the morning or evening on alternate days, at varying intervals of 8 to 40 hours between doses. Efficacy in terms of HbA1c control was similar to that of the other insulin analogues administered once a day. The frequency of severe hypoglycaemia was similar in the groups treated with insulin degludec and those treated with the other insulins (10% to 12% among patients with type 1 diabetes and less than 5% in patients with type 2 diabetes). Deaths and other serious adverse events were similarly frequent in the different groups. A meta-analysis of clinical trials, carried out by the US Food and Drug Administration, suggested an increase of about 60% in the incidence of cardiovascular complications, based on a composite endpoint combining myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular death. Other adverse effects observed in these trials were already known to occur with human insulin and its analogues, including weight gain, hypersensitivity reactions, reactions at the injection site, etc. The trials were too short in duration to assess long-term harms

  8. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Qatar cohort of the A1chieve study

    PubMed Central

    Daghash, Mohamed Hasan; Raja, Jabbar Mubarak; Milad, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background: The A1chieve, a multicentric (28 countries), 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726) in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Qatar. Results: A total of 91 patients were enrolled in the study. Two insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 88), insulin detemir (n = 2), and other insulin combinations (n = 1). At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA1c: 10.9%) and insulin users (mean HbA1c: 9.1%) groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, all the study groups showed improvement in HbA1c (insulin naïve: −1.8%, insulin users: −1.3%). Major hypoglycaemia did not occur in the study patients. SADRs were reported in 1.4% of insulin users. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia. PMID:24404484

  9. Time resolved density measurements in premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dandekar, K. V.; Gouldin, F. C.

    1982-01-01

    Premixed, turbulent flames are important in connection with investigations of fundamental, turbulent-reacting-flow processes and the study of practical combustion devices, such as spark ignition engines and premixed, prevaporized gas turbine combustors which burn premixed reactants. The considered investigation is concerned with the application of laser induced Rayleigh scattering to measure the gas density in premixed, methane-air flames. A description is provided of the results of density and velocity measurements in an open, lean, premixed methane-air flame stabilized in grid turbulence of low Reynolds number. It is found that where applicable, Rayleigh scattering can be used to good advantage to measure molecular number density. Mean and rms density results show that the mean flame thickens with axial distance but that the maximum in rms does not change appreciably.

  10. Insulin degludec and insulin degludec/insulin aspart in Ramadan: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to document the utility and safety of insulin degludec (IDeg) and insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp) in persons with type 2 diabetes, observing the Ramadan fast. An observational study was conducted at a single center, in the real world setting, on six persons who either switched to IDeg or IDegAsp a month before Ramadan or changed time of administration of IDegAsp at the onset of Ramadan, to keep the fast in a safe manner. Subjects were kept under regular monitoring and surveillance before, during, and after Ramadan, and counseled in an opposite manner. Four persons, who shifted from premixed insulin to IDegAsp, experienced a 12–18% dose reduction after 14 days. At the onset of Ramadan, the Suhur dose was reduced by 30%, and this remained unchanged during the fasting month. The Iftar dose had to be increased by 4 units. One person who shifted from neutral protamine hagedorn to IDeg demonstrated a 25% dose reduction at 20 days, without any further change in insulin requirement during Ramadan. One person who changed time of injection of IDegAsp from morning to night reported no change in dosage. No episode of major hypoglycemia was reported. IDeg and IDegAsp are effective, safe, and well-tolerated means of achieving glycemic control in persons with type 2 diabetes who wish to fast. PMID:27366727

  11. Insulin degludec and insulin degludec/insulin aspart in Ramadan: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to document the utility and safety of insulin degludec (IDeg) and insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp) in persons with type 2 diabetes, observing the Ramadan fast. An observational study was conducted at a single center, in the real world setting, on six persons who either switched to IDeg or IDegAsp a month before Ramadan or changed time of administration of IDegAsp at the onset of Ramadan, to keep the fast in a safe manner. Subjects were kept under regular monitoring and surveillance before, during, and after Ramadan, and counseled in an opposite manner. Four persons, who shifted from premixed insulin to IDegAsp, experienced a 12-18% dose reduction after 14 days. At the onset of Ramadan, the Suhur dose was reduced by 30%, and this remained unchanged during the fasting month. The Iftar dose had to be increased by 4 units. One person who shifted from neutral protamine hagedorn to IDeg demonstrated a 25% dose reduction at 20 days, without any further change in insulin requirement during Ramadan. One person who changed time of injection of IDegAsp from morning to night reported no change in dosage. No episode of major hypoglycemia was reported. IDeg and IDegAsp are effective, safe, and well-tolerated means of achieving glycemic control in persons with type 2 diabetes who wish to fast. PMID:27366727

  12. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatnikov, A.N.

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  13. Lean stability augmentation for premixing, prevaporizing combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, J. B.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate techniques for improving the lean combustion limits of premixing, prevaporizing combustors applicable to gas turbine engine main burners. Augmented flameholders employing recessed perforated plates, catalyzed tube bundles, and configurations in which pilot fuel was injected into the wakes of V-gutters or perforated plates were designed and tested. Stable operation of the piloted designs was achieved at equivalence ratios as low as 0.25; NOx emissions of less than 1.0 g/kg at simulated turbine engine cruise conditions were obtained. A piloted perforated plate employing four percent pilot fuel flow produced the best performance while meeting severe NOx constraints.

  14. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Lean Premixed Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, S.L.; •Givi, P.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    The joint velocity-scalar-frequency probability density function (PDF) methodology is employed for prediction of a bluff-body stabilized lean premixed methane-air flame. A reduced mechanism with CO and NO chemistry is used to describe fuel oxidation. The predicted mean and rms values of the velocity, temperature and concentrations of major and minor species are compared with laboratory measurements. This technical effort was performed in support of the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s on-going research in “Assessment of Turbo-Chemistry Models for Gas Turbine Combustion Emissions” under the RDS contract DE-AC26-04NT41817.

  15. Premixed rapid-setting calcium phosphate composites for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Carey, Lisa E; Xu, Hockin H K; Simon, Carl G; Takagi, Shozo; Chow, Laurence C

    2005-08-01

    Although calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is promising for bone repair, its clinical use requires on site powder-liquid mixing. To shorten surgical time and improve graft properties, it is desirable to develop premixed CPC in which the paste remains stable during storage and hardens only after placement into the defect. The objective of this study was to develop premixed CPC with rapid setting when immersed in a physiological solution. Premixed CPCs were formulated using the following approach: Premixed CPC = CPC powder + nonaqueous liquid + gelling agent + hardening accelerator. Three premixed CPCs were developed: CPC-monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), CPC-chitosan, and CPC-tartaric. Setting time for these new premixed CPCs ranged from 5.3 to 7.9 min, significantly faster than 61.7 min for a premixed control CPC reported previously (p < 0.05). SEM revealed the formation of nano-sized needle-like hydroxyapatite crystals after 1 d immersion and crystal growth after 7 d. Diametral tensile strength for premixed CPCs at 7 d ranged from 2.8 to 6.4 MPa, comparable to reported strengths for cancellous bone and sintered porous hydroxyapatite implants. Osteoblast cells attained a normal polygonal morphology on CPC-MCPM and CPC-chitosan with cytoplasmic extensions adhering to the nano-hydroxyapatite crystals. In summary, fast-setting premixed CPCs were developed to avoid the powder-liquid mixing in surgery. The pastes hardened rapidly once immersed in physiological solution and formed hydroxyapatite. The cements had strengths matching those of cancellous bone and sintered porous hydroxyapatite and non-cytotoxicity similar to conventional non-premixed CPC. PMID:15769536

  16. Premixed rapid-setting calcium phosphate composites for bone repair✩

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Lisa E.; Xu, Hockin H.K.; Simon, Carl G.; Takagi, Shozo; Chow, Laurence C.

    2009-01-01

    Although calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is promising for bone repair, its clinical use requires on site powder–liquid mixing. To shorten surgical time and improve graft properties, it is desirable to develop premixed CPC in which the paste remains stable during storage and hardens only after placement into the defect. The objective of this study was to develop premixed CPC with rapid setting when immersed in a physiological solution. Premixed CPCs were formulated using the following approach: Premixed CPC = CPC powder+nonaqueous liquid+gelling agent+hardening accelerator. Three premixed CPCs were developed: CPC–monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), CPC–chitosan, and CPC–tartaric. Setting time for these new premixed CPCs ranged from 5.3 to 7.9 min, significantly faster than 61.7 min for a premixed control CPC reported previously (p<05). SEM revealed the formation of nano-sized needle-like hydroxyapatite crystals after 1 d immersion and crystal growth after 7 d. Diametral tensile strength for premixed CPCs at 7 d ranged from 2.8 to 6.4 MPa, comparable to reported strengths for cancellous bone and sintered porous hydroxyapatite implants. Osteoblast cells attained a normal polygonal morphology on CPC–MCPM and CPC–chitosan with cytoplasmic extensions adhering to the nano-hydroxyapatite crystals. In summary, fast-setting premixed CPCs were developed to avoid the powder–liquid mixing in surgery. The pastes hardened rapidly once immersed in physiological solution and formed hydroxyapatite. The cements had strengths matching those of cancellous bone and sintered porous hydroxyapatite and non-cytotoxicity similar to conventional non-premixed CPC. PMID:15769536

  17. Oral Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Oral insulin is an exciting area of research and development in the field of diabetology. This brief review covers the various approaches used in the development of oral insulin, and highlights some of the recent data related to novel oral insulin preparation. PMID:21059246

  18. Cell factories for insulin production.

    PubMed

    Baeshen, Nabih A; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Sheikh, Abdullah; Bora, Roop S; Ahmed, Mohamed Morsi M; Ramadan, Hassan A I; Saini, Kulvinder Singh; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of diabetic patients globally and exploration of alternate insulin delivery methods such as inhalation or oral route that rely on higher doses, is bound to escalate the demand for recombinant insulin in near future. Current manufacturing technologies would be unable to meet the growing demand of affordable insulin due to limitation in production capacity and high production cost. Manufacturing of therapeutic recombinant proteins require an appropriate host organism with efficient machinery for posttranslational modifications and protein refolding. Recombinant human insulin has been produced predominantly using E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae for therapeutic use in human. We would focus in this review, on various approaches that can be exploited to increase the production of a biologically active insulin and its analogues in E. coli and yeast. Transgenic plants are also very attractive expression system, which can be exploited to produce insulin in large quantities for therapeutic use in human. Plant-based expression system hold tremendous potential for high-capacity production of insulin in very cost-effective manner. Very high level of expression of biologically active proinsulin in seeds or leaves with long-term stability, offers a low-cost technology for both injectable as well as oral delivery of proinsulin. PMID:25270715

  19. A model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing application of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described; it was developed to explain experimental results and to provide guidance for developing active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a PC. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with bimolecular reaction between fuel and air. Although focus is on the model, it and experimental results are compared to understand effects of inlet air temperature and open loop control schemes. The model shows that both are related to changes in transport time.

  20. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  1. Particle clustering in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, Battista; F, Picano; G, Troiani; M, Casciola C.

    2011-12-01

    Transport of inertial particles in turbulent reacting flows is frequent in a number of engineering and natural systems. Aim of this work is to illustrate the effect of the fluctuating instantaneous flame front on the particle spatial distribution. To this purpose a Direct Numerical Simulation of a Bunsen premixed flame seeded with small inertial particles is performed. The flamelet Stokes number Stfl, defined as the ratio between the particle relaxation time and the flame front time scale, is found to be the proper parameter to characterize the particle dynamics in a premixed flame. Clustering of inertial particles is apparent, especially beyond the flame front. The amount of particle segregation is here quantified by the clustering index and two distinct contributions are found to interplay. The first is independent of the particle inertia and affects also tracers. Actually it is associated to the abrupt variation of the particle concentration induced by the fluid expansion across the flame front. The second effect is mainly due to the time lag associated to the particle inertia that, in proximity of the front, affects both the mean and the fluctuation of the particle number in a fixed volume. The global effect results in an intense clustering of the inertial particles in the flame brush region with a maximum for particles with flamelet Stokes number: Stfl = Script O(1).

  2. Confined superadiabatic premixed flame-flow interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Najm, H.N.

    1995-12-31

    Laminar premixed unity-Lewis number flames are studied numerically, to examine flow-flame interaction in a two-dimensional closed domain. Two opposed planar flame fronts are perturbed sinusoidally and allowed to develop by consuming premixed reactants. Combustion heat release leads to global pressure and temperature rise in the domain, due to confinement. A superadiabatic condition, with products temperature rising with distance behind the flame front, is observed due to stagnation pressure rise. Variations in tangential strain rate behind the perturbed flame fronts, due to flame curvature and heat release, result in a modified local superadiabatic temperature gradient in the products. These variations in temperature gradients are shown to determine the net local confinement-heating rate in the products, leading to corresponding deviations in products temperature, and the local reaction rate along the flame front. These observations, which are not consistent with one-dimensional superadiabatic stagnation flame behavior, are a direct result of the unrestrained unsteady nature of two-dimensional flame-flow interaction.

  3. Preparation of feed premix for veterinary purposes.

    PubMed

    Franc, Aleš; Lehocký, Róbert; Muselík, Jan; Vetchý, David; Dobšíková, Radka; Modrá, Helena

    2014-10-01

    This experimental study describes the preparation of a veterinary medicated premix containing tetracycline hydrochloride for oral administration to aquatic animals. For the manufacture of the premix, commercially produced animal feed is used, which is intended for consumption in the form of pellets that were coated with a mixture of chlortetracycline hydrochloride and other excipients. Feed pellets were combined with a mixture of an active substance and excipients with a large specific surface (colloidal silica - Aerosil® 200) allowing an easy adhesion to the surface of the pellets, and a solid polymer with a low glass transition point (Eudragit® E) which ensures the formation of a hard coat. A mixture of these substances has been applied to the surface of the pellets either A) in the solid state simply by dry adhesion; B) by coating the pellets with the mixture and additional impregnation with ethanol; or C) the polymer was subsequently applied in solution. In the final stage, the pellets were heated in order to achieve the glass transition point of the polymer to create a solid and mechanically resistant coating. Coated pellets prepared by three methods described above are almost identical in their physical properties. With this technology it is possible to produce a feed mixture with a very low content of the active substance in situ without the need for a complex technological equipment. PMID:25354741

  4. Stepwise intensification of insulin therapy in Type 2 diabetes management—exploring the concept of the basal-plus approach in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Owens, D R

    2013-01-01

    Basal insulin provides an effective method for initiating insulin therapy in people with Type 2 diabetes, resulting in significant improvements in glycaemic control, lower rates of hypoglycaemia and less weight gain than either prandial or premixed insulin regimens. However, the progressive nature of Type 2 diabetes and the inability of basal insulin to correct excessive postprandial glucose excursions mean that insulin therapy will eventually need to be intensified, typically by adding prandial insulin as part of a basal–bolus or premixed insulin regimen. The aim of this review is to summarize recent clinical evidence for a staged ‘basal-plus’ strategy for insulin intensification where one, two or three prandial insulin injections are added to basal insulin according to individual need. In the early stages of insulin therapy, most individuals seem to achieve favourable glycaemic control with basal insulin alone, or in combination with a single prandial insulin injection. The addition of a single prandial insulin injection at the largest meal is well tolerated and associated with significant improvements in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), low rates of hypoglycaemia and limited weight gain. More people achieve recommended HbA1c targets with a basal-plus strategy, compared with twice-daily premixed insulin therapy, with lower rates of hypoglycaemia. The data indicate that a step-by-step approach with the basal-plus strategy is a promising alternative method of insulin intensification that allows for individualization of treatment and may delay progression to a full basal–bolus insulin replacement therapy for many individuals. PMID:22998363

  5. Premixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin P. Lacy; Keith R. McManus; Balachandar Varatharajan; Biswadip Shome

    2005-12-16

    This 21-month project translated DLN technology to the unique properties of high hydrogen content IGCC fuels, and yielded designs in preparation for a future testing and validation phase. Fundamental flame characterization, mixing, and flame property measurement experiments were conducted to tailor computational design tools and criteria to create a framework for predicting nozzle operability (e.g., flame stabilization, emissions, resistance to flashback/flame-holding and auto-ignition). This framework was then used to establish, rank, and evaluate potential solutions to the operability challenges of IGCC combustion. The leading contenders were studied and developed with the most promising concepts evaluated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and using the design rules generated by the fundamental experiments, as well as using GE's combustion design tools and practices. Finally, the project scoped the necessary steps required to carry the design through mechanical and durability review, testing, and validation, towards full demonstration of this revolutionary technology. This project was carried out in three linked tasks with the following results. (1) Develop conceptual designs of premixer and down-select the promising options. This task defined the ''gap'' between existing design capabilities and the targeted range of IGCC fuel compositions and evaluated the current capability of DLN pre-mixer designs when operated at similar conditions. Two concepts (1) swirl based and (2) multiple point lean direct injection based premixers were selected via a QFD from 13 potential design concepts. (2) Carry out CFD on chosen options (1 or 2) to evaluate operability risks. This task developed the leading options down-selected in Task 1. Both a GE15 swozzle based premixer and a lean direct injection concept were examined by performing a detailed CFD study wherein the aerodynamics of the design, together with the chemical kinetics of the combustion process, were

  6. Examination of a Viral Infection Mimetic Model in Human iPS Cell-Derived Insulin-Producing Cells and the Anti-Apoptotic Effect of GLP-1 Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Baden, Megu Yamaguchi; Fukui, Kenji; Hosokawa, Yoshiya; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Imagawa, Akihisa; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-01-01

    Aims Viral infection is associated with pancreatic beta cell destruction in fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to investigate the acceleration and protective mechanisms of beta cell destruction by establishing a model of viral infection in pancreatic beta cells. Methods Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid was transfected into MIN6 cells and insulin-producing cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells via small molecule applications. Gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining. The anti-apoptotic effect of Exendin-4 was also evaluated. Results Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid transfection led to elevated expression of the genes encoding IFNα, IFNβ, CXCL10, Fas, viral receptors, and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors in MIN6 cells. Exendin-4 treatment suppressed the elevated gene expression levels and reduced polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid-induced apoptosis both in MIN6 cells and in insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor, protein kinase A, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors counteracted the anti-apoptotic effect of Exendin-4. Conclusions Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid transfection can mimic viral infection, and Exendin-4 exerted an anti-apoptotic effect both in MIN6 and insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26659307

  7. Effect of combined application insulin and insulin detemir on continous glucose monitor in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Yun; Dong, Qing; Li, Gui-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin detemir is a soluble long-acting human insulin analogue at neutral pH with a unique mechanism of action, which could strengthen the effects of insulin. This study aims to explore the effects of insulin combined with insulin detemir on the continous glucose in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this study, 150 patients with type 1 diabetes enrolled were included and randomly divided into 3 groups: insulin group (group A), insulin detemir group (group B) and insulin combined with insulin detemir group (group C). Each subject underwent 72 h of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). MAGE, HbA1c and Noctumal Hypoglycemia levels were examined by using the ELISA kits. The body weight changes were also detected in this study. The results indicated that the information including age, body weight, disease duration and glucose level and HbA1c percentage on the start time point among three groups indicated no statistical differences. Insulin combined with insulin detemir decrease MAGE and HbA1c level in Group C compared to Group A and Group A (P < 0.05). Insulin combined with insulin detemir decreas noctumal hypoglycemia levels and body weight changes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this study confirmed efficacy of insulin detemir by demonstrating non-inferiority of insulin detemir compared with insulin with respect to HbA1c, with an improved safety profile including significantly fewer hypoglycaemic episodes and less undesirable weight gain in children. PMID:26064343

  8. Intensifying Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes: Choices & Challenges.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Kesavadev, Jothydev; Sethi, Bipin; Jain, Sunil M; Guruprasad, C S; Shah, Siddharth N

    2015-05-01

    Insulin therapy remains the cornerstone of effective diabetes management. Timely intensification of insulin therapy reduces the progression of diabetes and the development of diabetes-related complications. Given that overall hyperglycaemia is a relative contribution of both fasting and postprandial hyperglycaemia, use of basal insulin alone may not achieve optimal glucose control due to its inability to cover postprandial glucose excursions. Intensifying therapy with addition of bolus insulin or switching to premixed insulin is a viable option in patients failing on basal alone therapy. Although the benefits of early insulin treatment are well established, a considerable delay in intensifying insulin therapy in patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control is still observed. Most of the patients and physicians are reluctant to intensify therapy due to the fear of hypoglycaemia, regimen complexity, and increased burden of multiple daily injections. In this context, there is a need for a flexible, alternative intensification option taking into account individual patient considerations to achieve or maintain individual glycaemic targets. An ideal insulin regimen should mimic physiological insulin release while providing optimal glycaemic control with low risk of hypoglycaemia, weight gain and fewer daily injections. The current paper reviews the challenges of insulin intensification in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus poorly controlled on current treatment regimens. PMID:26548029

  9. Influence of Unweighting on Insulin Signal Transduction in Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    2002-01-01

    Unweighting of the juvenile soleus muscle is characterized by an increased binding capacity for insulin relative to muscle mass due to sparing of the receptors during atrophy. Although carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation in the unweighted muscle develop increased sensitivity to insulin in vivo, protein synthesis in vivo and system A amino acid transport in vitro do not appear to develop such an enhanced response. The long-term goal is to identify the precise nature of this apparent resistance in the insulin signal transduction pathway and to consider how reduced weight-bearing may elicit this effect, by evaluating specific components of the insulin signalling pathway. Because the insulin-signalling pathway has components in common with the signal transduction pathway for insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and potentially other growth factors, the study could have important implications in the role of weight-bearing function on muscle growth and development. Since the insulin signalling pathway diverges following activation of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, the immediate specific aims will be to study the receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK) and those branches, which lead to phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and of Shc protein. To achieve these broader objectives, we will test in situ, by intramuscular injection, the responses of glucose transport, system A amino acid transport and protein synthesis to insulin analogues for which the receptor has either a weaker or much stronger binding affinity compared to insulin. Studies will include: (1) estimation of the ED(sub 50) for each analogue for these three processes; (2) the effect of duration (one to four days) of unweighting on the response of each process to all analogues tested; (3) the effect of unweighting and the analogues on IRTK activity; and (4) the comparative effects of unweighting and analogue binding on the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRTK, IRS-1, and Shc protein.

  10. Lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The application of lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion to aircraft turbine engine systems can result in benefits in terms of superior combustion performance, improved combustor and turbine durability, and environmentally acceptable pollutant emissions. Lean, premixed prevaporized combustion is particularly attractive for reducing the oxides of nitrogen emissions during high altitude cruise. The NASA stratospheric cruise emission reduction program will evolve and demonstrate lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion technology for aircraft engines. This multiphased program is described. In addition, the various elements of the fundamental studies phase of the program are reviewed, and results to date of many of these studies are summarized.

  11. Biosimilar Insulins

    PubMed Central

    Hompesch, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Until now most of the insulin used in developed countries has been manufactured and distributed by a small number of multinational companies. Beyond the established insulin manufacturers, a number of new players have developed insulin manufacturing capacities based on modern biotechnological methods. Because the patents for many of the approved insulin formulations have expired or are going to expire soon, these not yet established companies are increasingly interested in seeking market approval for their insulin products as biosimilar insulins (BI) in highly regulated markets like the EU and the United States. Differences in the manufacturing process (none of the insulin manufacturing procedures are 100% identical) can lead to insulins that to some extent may differ from the originator insulin. The key questions are if subtle differences in the structure of the insulins, purity, and so on are clinically relevant and may result in different biological effects. The aim of this article is to introduce and discuss basic aspects that may be of relevance with regard to BI. PMID:24876530

  12. Biosimilar insulins.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz

    2012-08-01

    Until now most insulin used in developed countries is manufactured and distributed by a small number of multinational companies. Other pharmaceutical companies - many of these are located in countries such as India or China - are also able to manufacture insulin with modern biotechnological methods. Additionally, the patents for many insulin formulations have expired or are going to expire soon. This enables such companies to produce insulins and to apply for market approval of these as biosimilar insulins (BIs) in highly regulated markets such as the EU or the US. To understand the complexity of BIs' approval and usage, scientific and regulatory aspects have to be discussed. Differences in the manufacturing process (none of the insulin-manufacturing procedures are identical) result in the fact that all insulin that might become BIs differ from the originator insulin to some extent. The question is, have such differences in the structure of the insulin molecule and or the purity and so on clinically relevant consequences for the biological effects induced or not. The guidelines already in place in the EU for market approval require that the manufacturer demonstrates that his insulin has a safety and efficacy profile that is similar to that of the 'original' insulin formulation. Recently guidelines for biosimilars were issued in the US; however, these do not cover insulin. Although a challenging approval process for insulins to become BI might be regarded as a hurdle to keep companies out of certain markets, it is fair to say that the potential safety and efficacy issues surrounding BI are substantial and relevant, and do warrant a careful and evidence-driven approval process. Nevertheless, it is very likely that in the next years, BIs will come to the market also in highly regulated markets. PMID:22583127

  13. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the West India cohort of the A1chieve study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sunil M.; Jindal, Sushil; Malve, Harshad; Shetty, Raman; Bhoraskar, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Background: The A1chieve, a multicentric (28 countries), 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726) in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from West India. Results: A total of 4192 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 2846), insulin detemir (n = 596), insulin aspart (n = 517), basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 140) and other insulin combinations (n = 83). At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA1c: 8.8%) and insulin user (mean HbA1c: 9.1%) groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA1c (insulin naïve: −1.6%, insulin users: −1.7%). SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia. PMID:24404488

  14. Premixed flames in closed cylindrical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzener, Philippe; Matalon, Moshe

    2001-09-01

    We consider the propagation of a premixed flame, as a two-dimensional sheet separating unburned gas from burned products, in a closed cylindrical tube. A nonlinear evolution equation, that describes the motion of the flame front as a function of its mean position, is derived. The equation contains a destabilizing term that results from the gas motion induced by thermal expansion and has a memory term associated with vorticity generation. Numerical solutions of this equation indicate that, when diffusion is stabilizing, the flame evolves into a non-planar form whose shape, and its associated symmetry properties, are determined by the Markstein parameter, and by the initial data. In particular, we observe the development of convex axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric flames, tulip flames and cellular flames.

  15. Nongradient diffusion in premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libby, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental results demonstrating the interaction between force fields and density inhomogeneities as they arise in premixed turbulent flames are discussed. In such flames, the density fluctuates between two levels, the high density in reactants rho sub r and the low density in products rho sub p, with the ratio rho sub r/rho sub p on the order of five to ten in flows of applied interest. The force fields in such flames arise from the mean pressure drop across the flame or from the Reynolds shear stresses in tangential flames with constrained streamlines. The consequence of the interaction is nongradient turbulent transport, countergradient in the direction normal to the flame and nongradient in the tangential direction. The theoretical basis for these results, the presently available experimental support therefore and the implications for other variable density turbulent flows are discussed.

  16. NOx Formation in a Premixed Syngas Flame

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, S.L.; Givi, P.; Strakey, P.; Casleton, K.

    2006-11-01

    Reduction of NOx is a subject of significant current interest in stationary gas turbines. The objective of this study is to examine the effects of turbulence on non-thermal NOx formation in a syngas flame. This is archived by a detailed parametric study via PDF simulations of a partially stirred reactor and a dumped axisymmetric premixed flame. Several different detailed and reduced kinetics schemes are considered. The simulated results demonstrate the strong dependence of combustion process on turbulence. It is shown that the amount of NOx formation is significantly influenced by the inlet conditions. That is, the turbulence intensity can be tweaked to attain optimal ultra-low NOx emissions at a given temperature.

  17. Implementation of Premixed Equilibrium Chemistry Capability in OVERFLOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mike E.; Liu, Yen; Vinokur, M.; Olsen, Tom

    2004-01-01

    An implementation of premixed equilibrium chemistry has been completed for the OVERFLOW code, a chimera capable, complex geometry flow code widely used to predict transonic flowfields. The implementation builds on the computational efficiency and geometric generality of the solver.

  18. Implementation of Premixed Equilibrium Chemistry Capability in OVERFLOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, M. E.; Liu, Y.; Vinokur, M.; Olsen, T.

    2003-01-01

    An implementation of premixed equilibrium chemistry has been completed for the OVERFLOW code, a chimera capable, complex geometry flow code widely used to predict transonic flowfields. The implementation builds on the computational efficiency and geometric generality of the solver.

  19. Mechanisms of combustion limits in premixed gas flames at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    A three-year experimental and theoretical research program on the mechanisms of combustion limits of premixed gasflames at microgravity was conducted. Progress during this program is identified and avenues for future studies are discussed.

  20. Studies of premixed laminar and turbulent flames at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    A two and one-half year experimental and theoretical research program on the properties of laminar and turbulent premixed gas flames at microgravity was conducted. Progress during this program is identified and avenues for future studies are discussed.

  1. Insulin during pregnancy, labour and delivery.

    PubMed

    de Valk, Harold W; Visser, Gerard H A

    2011-02-01

    Optimal glycaemic control is of the utmost importance to achieve the best possible outcome of a pregnancy complicated by diabetes. This holds for pregnancies in women with preconceptional type 1 or type 2 diabetes as well as for pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes. Glycaemic control is conventionally expressed in the HbA1c value but the HbA1c value does not completely capture the complexity of glycaemic control. The daily glucose profile measured by the patients themselves through measurements performed in capillary blood obtained by finger stick provides valuable information needed to adjust insulin therapy. Hypoglycaemia is the major threat to the pregnant woman or the woman with tight glycaemic control in the run-up to pregnancy. Repetitive hypoglycaemia can lead to hypoglycaemia unawareness, which is reversible with prevention of hypoglycaemia. A delicate balance should be struck between preventing hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia. Insulin requirements are not uniform across the day: it is low during the night with a more or less pronounced rise at dawn, followed by a gradual decrease during the remainder of the day. A basal amount of insulin is needed to regulate the endogenous glucose production, short-acting insulin shots are needed to handle exogenous glucose loads. Insulin therapy means two choices: the type of insulin used and the method of insulin administration. Regarding the type of insulin, the choice is between human and analogue insulins. The analogue short-acting insulin aspart has been shown to be safe during pregnancy in a randomised trial and has received registration for this indication; the short-acting analogue insulin lispro has been shown to be safe in observational studies. No such information is available on the long-acting insulin analogues detemir and glargine and both are prescribed off-label with human long-acting insulin as obvious alternatives. Randomised trials have not been able to show superiority of continuous

  2. Studies of Premixed Laminar and Turbulent Flames at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    The work of the Principal Investigator (PI) has encompassed four topics related to the experimental and theoretical study of combustion limits in premixed flames at microgravity, as discussed in the following sections. These topics include: (1) radiation effects on premixed gas flames; (2) flame structure and stability at low Lewis number; (3) flame propagation and extinction is cylindrical tubes; and (4) experimental simulation of combustion processes using autocatalytic chemical reactions.

  3. Pursuit of a perfect insulin.

    PubMed

    Zaykov, Alexander N; Mayer, John P; DiMarchi, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    Insulin remains indispensable in the treatment of diabetes, but its use is hampered by its narrow therapeutic index. Although advances in peptide chemistry and recombinant DNA-based macromolecule synthesis have enabled the synthesis of structurally optimized insulin analogues, the growing epidemics of obesity and diabetes have emphasized the need for diabetes therapies that are more efficacious, safe and convenient. Accordingly, a broad set of drug candidates, targeting hyperglycaemia plus other disease abnormalities, is now progressing through the clinic. The development of an insulin therapy that is responsive to glucose concentration remains an ultimate goal, with initial prototypes now reaching the proof-of-concept stage. Simultaneously, the first alternatives to injectable delivery have progressed to registration. PMID:26988411

  4. Fully Premixed Low Emission, High Pressure Multi-Fuel Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A low-emissions high-pressure multi-fuel burner includes a fuel inlet, for receiving a fuel, an oxidizer inlet, for receiving an oxidizer gas, an injector plate, having a plurality of nozzles that are aligned with premix face of the injector plate, the plurality of nozzles in communication with the fuel and oxidizer inlets and each nozzle providing flow for one of the fuel and the oxidizer gas and an impingement-cooled face, parallel to the premix face of the injector plate and forming a micro-premix chamber between the impingement-cooled face and the in injector face. The fuel and the oxidizer gas are mixed in the micro-premix chamber through impingement-enhanced mixing of flows of the fuel and the oxidizer gas. The burner can be used for low-emissions fuel-lean fully-premixed, or fuel-rich fully-premixed hydrogen-air combustion, or for combustion with other gases such as methane or other hydrocarbons, or even liquid fuels.

  5. beta-TCP/MCPM-based premixed calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Ma, Peng-Wei; Zhang, Li-Li; Yin, Yu-Ji; Yao, Kang-De; Zhang, Fu-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Dong; Li, Xiu-Lan; Nie, Wei

    2009-10-01

    Novel premixed calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were prepared by combining cement liquids comprised of glycerol or polyethylene glycol with CPC powders that consisted of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM). Changing the powder to liquid mass ratio enabled the setting time to be regulated, and improved the compressive strength of the CPCs. Although some ratios of the new premixed CPCs had long setting times, these ranged from 12.4 to 27.8 min which is much shorter than the hour or more reported previously for a premixed CPC. The premixed CPCs had tolerable washout resistance before final setting, and the cements had strengths matching that of cancellous bone (5-10 MPa); their maximum compressive strength was up to 12 MPa. The inflammatory response around the premixed CPCs implanted in the subcutaneous tissue in rabbits was more prominent than that of apatite cement. These differences might be due to the much faster resorption rate of the premixed CPCs. PMID:19427931

  6. Incorporating a Generic Model of Subcutaneous Insulin Absorption into the AIDA v4 Diabetes Simulator 3. Early Plasma Insulin Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Eldon D.; Tarín, Cristina; Bondia, Jorge; Teufel, Edgar; Deutsch, Tibor

    2009-01-01

    Introduction AIDA is an interactive educational diabetes simulator that has been available without charge via the Internet for over 12 years. Recent articles have described the incorporation of a novel generic model of insulin absorption into AIDA as a way of enhancing its capabilities. The basic model components to be integrated have been overviewed, with the aim being to provide simulations of regimens utilizing insulin analogues, as well as insulin doses greater than 40 IU (the current upper limit within the latest release of AIDA [v4.3a]). Some preliminary calculated insulin absorption results have also recently been described. Methods This article presents the first simulated plasma insulin profiles from the integration of the generic subcutaneous insulin absorption model, and the currently implemented model in AIDA for insulin disposition. Insulin absorption has been described by the physiologically based model of Tarín and colleagues. A single compartment modeling approach has been used to specify how absorbed insulin is distributed in, and eliminated from, the human body. To enable a numerical solution of the absorption model, a spherical subcutaneous depot for the injected insulin dose has been assumed and spatially discretized into shell compartments with homogeneous concentrations, having as its center the injection site. The number of these compartments will depend on the dose and type of insulin. Insulin inflow arises as the sum of contributions to the different shells. For this report the first bench testing of plasma insulin determinations has been done. Results Simulated plasma insulin profiles are provided for currently available insulin preparations, including a rapidly acting insulin analogue (e.g., lispro/Humalog or aspart/Novolog), a short-acting (regular) insulin preparation (e.g., Actrapid), intermediate-acting insulins (both Semilente and neutral protamine Hagedorn types), and a very long-acting insulin analogue (e.g., glargine/Lantus), as

  7. Insulin resistance and insulin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Stumvoll, M; Häring, H

    2001-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key factor in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a co-factor in the development of dyslipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The causes of insulin resistance include factors such as obesity and physical inactivity, and there may also be genetic factors. The mechanism of obesity-related insulin resistance involves the release of factors from adipocytes which exert a negative effect on glucose metabolism: free fatty acids, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and the recently discovered hormone, resistin. The two resulting abnormalities observed consistently in glucose-intolerant states are impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production, and impaired stimulation of glucose uptake. Among the genetic factors, a polymorphism (Pro12Ala) in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and increased insulin sensitivity, primarily that of lipolysis. On the other hand, the association with insulin resistance of a common polymorphism (Gly972Arg) in the insulin receptor substrate 1, long believed to be a plausible candidate gene, is weak at best. This polymorphism may instead be associated with reduced insulin secretion, which, in view of the recent recognition of the insulin signalling system in beta-cells, results in the development of a novel pathogenic concept. Finally, fine-mapping and positional cloning of the susceptibility locus on chromosome 2 resulted in the identification of a polymorphism (UCSNP-43 G/A) in the calpain-10 gene. In non-diabetic Pima Indians, this polymorphism was associated with insulin resistance of glucose disposal. The pharmacological treatment of insulin resistance has recently acquired a novel class of agents: the thiazolidinediones. They act through regulation of PPARgamma-dependent genes and probably interfere favourably with factors released from adipocytes which mediate obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:11684868

  8. Modern insulins, old paradigms and pragmatism: choosing wisely when deciding how to treat type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schaan, Beatriz D; Scheffel, Rafael Selbach

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical imperative to improve metabolic control in the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes, but in doing so, hypoglycemia should be avoided at all costs. Insulin analogues and the assumption they would better mimic the pharmacokinetic profile of endogenous insulin secretion emerged as a magic bullet in the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes. However, although insulin analogues have pharmaceutical properties, such as pharmacodynamic stability, reproducibility of action, and a more physiological timing of action, which could possibly facilitate insulin use, the results obtained in clinical practice have not been as good as expected. Like all clinical decisions, the decision regarding which insulin would be better for the patient should be, if possible, evidence based. Here, we briefly discuss evidence for the use of insulin analogues and the different views with respect to the available evidence that lead to different interpretations and decisions regarding the use of this new technology. PMID:25964802

  9. Studies in premixed combustion. Progress report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sivashinsky, G.I.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on premixed combustion: theory of turbulent flame propagation; pattern formation in premixed flames and related problems; and pattern formation in extended systems. (LSP)

  10. Flame front geometry in premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G.; Ashurst, W.T.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental and numerical determinations of flame front curvature and orientation in premixed turbulent flames are presented. The experimental data is obtained from planar, cross sectional images of stagnation point flames at high Damkoehler number. A direct numerical simulation of a constant energy flow is combined with a zero-thickness, constant density flame model to provide the numerical results. The computational domain is a 32{sup 3} cube with periodic boundary conditions. The two-dimensional curvature distributions of the experiments and numerical simulations compare well at similar q{prime}/S{sub L} values with means close to zero and marked negative skewness. At higher turbulence levels the simulations show that the distributions become symmetric about zero. These features are also found in the three dimensional distributions of curvature. The simulations support assumptions which make it possible to determine the mean direction cosines from the experimental data. This leads to a reduction of 12% in the estimated flame surface area density in the middle of the flame brush. 18 refs.

  11. The structure of particle cloud premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Berlad, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of premixed flames propagating in combustible systems containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles in an oxidizing gas mixture is analyzed. This analysis is motivated by experiments conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center on the structure of flames propagating in combustible mixtures of lycopodium particles and air. Several interesting modes of flame propagation were observed in these experiments depending on the number density and the initial size of the fuel particle. The experimental results show that steady flame propagation occurs even if the initial equivalence ratio of the combustible mixture based on the gaseous fuel available in the particles, phi sub u, is substantially larger than unity. A model is developed to explain these experimental observations. In the model, it is presumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical composition which then reacts with oxygen in a one-step overall process. The activation energy of the chemical reaction is presumed to be large. The activation energy characterizing the kinetics of vaporization is also presumed to be large. The equations governing the structure of the flame were integrated numerically. It is shown that the interplay of vaporization kinetics and oxidation process can result in steady flame propagation in combustible mixtures where the value of phi sub u is substantially larger than unity. This prediction is in agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2016-04-01

    Analytical treatment of the premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations for a quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by a strong gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are identified. Acceleration of methane-air flames in open tubes is shown to be a combined effect of the hydrostatic pressure difference produced by the ambient cold air and the difference of dynamic gas pressure at the tube ends. On the other hand, a strong spontaneous acceleration of the fast methane-oxygen flames at the initial stage of their evolution in open-closed tubes is conditioned by metastability of the quasi-steady propagation regimes. An extensive comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data is made.

  13. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the behavior of a premixed turbulent methane flame in three dimensions using numerical simulation. The simulations are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second-order projection formulation that conserves both species mass and total enthalpy. The species and enthalpy equations are treated using an operator-split approach that incorporates stiff integration techniques for modeling detailed chemical kinetics. The methodology also incorporates a mixture model for differential diffusion. For the simulations presented here, methane chemistry and transport are modeled using the DRM-19 (19-species, 84-reaction) mechanism derived from the GRIMech-1.2 mechanism along with its associated thermodynamics and transport databases. We consider a lean flame with equivalence ratio 0.8 for two different levels of turbulent intensity. For each case we examine the basic structure of the flame including turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The results indicate that flame wrinkling is the dominant factor leading to the increased turbulent flame speed. Joint probability distributions are computed to establish a correlation between heat release and curvature. We also investigate the effect of turbulent flame interaction on the flame chemistry. We identify specific flame intermediates that are sensitive to turbulence and explore various correlations between these species and local flame curvature. We identify different mechanisms by which turbulence modulates the chemistry of the flame.

  14. Dynamics of premixed confined swirling flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palies, P.; Durox, D.; Schuller, T.; Morenton, P.; Candel, S.

    2009-06-01

    Considerable effort is currently being extended to examine the fundamental mechanisms of combustion instabilities and develop methods allowing predictions of these phenomena. One central aspect of this problem is the dynamical response of the flame to incoming perturbations. This question is examined in the present article, which specifically considers the response of premixed swirling flames to perturbations imposed on the upstream side of the flame in the feeding manifold. The flame response is characterized by measuring the unsteady heat release induced by imposed velocity perturbations. A flame describing function is defined by taking the ratio of the relative heat release rate fluctuation to the relative velocity fluctuation. This quantity is determined for a range of frequencies and for different levels of incoming velocity perturbations. The flame dynamics is also documented by calculating conditional phase averages of the light emission from the flame and taking the Abel transform of these average images to obtain the flame geometry at various instants during the cycle of oscillation. These data can be useful to the determination of possible regimes of instability. To cite this article: P. Palies et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  15. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2011-02-01

    The predominant number of papers published from the middle of 2009 to the middle of 2010 about alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA) were still about inhaled insulin. Long-term experience with Exubera was the topic of a number of publications that are also of relevance for inhaled insulin in general. The clinical trials performed with AIR insulin by Eli Lilly were published in a supplement issue of one diabetes technology journal and most of these will be presented. A number of other publications (also one in a high ranked journal) about their inhaled insulin were from another company: MannKind. The driving force behind Technosphere insulin (TI) - which is the only one still in clinical development - is Al Mann; he has put a lot of his personal fortune in this development. We will know the opinion of the regulatory authorities about TI in the near future; however, I am personally relatively confident that the Food and Drug Administration will provide TI with market approval. The more critical question for me is: will diabetologists and patients jump on this product once it becomes commercially available? Will it become a commercial success? In view of many negative feelings in the scientific community about inhaled insulin, it might be of help that MannKind publish their studies with TI systematically. Acknowledging being a believer in this route of insulin administration myself, one has to state that Exubera and AIR insulin had not offered profound advantages in terms of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties in comparison with subcutaneously (SC) applied regular human insulin (RHI) and rapid-acting insulin analogues. The time-action profiles of these inhaled insulins were more or less comparable with that of rapid-acting insulin analogues. This is clearly different with TI which exhibits a strong metabolic effect shortly after application and a rapid decline in the metabolic effect thereafter; probably the duration of action is

  16. [Evidence based therapy with insulin in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György

    2005-02-20

    A fast development in therapy with insulin was observed after its discovery. Besides the widely used human regular insulin preparations, nowadays ultrashort and long-acting insulin analogues are also available for the patients. At present, the results of large clinical trials enable an evidence based diabetes care. It is well documented, that near-normoglycemia should be achieved by intensive conservative insulin treatment or pump therapy in type 1 diabetic patients. The beneficial effects of the good metabolic control could also be observed years later concerning late specific complications of diabetes. Similarly, as good as possible metabolic control should be aimed with antidiabetic treatment including insulin, if necessary, in type 2 diabetic patients. It is documented that the risk of cardiovascular complications is not increased in type 2 diabetic patients treated with insulin. Hypoglycemia and weight gain are the most important side effects of the insulin treatment. Recently, evidence based recommendations for treatment with ultrashort (insulin lispro, insulin aspart) and long-acting insulin analogues (glargine) can also be determined. PMID:15803885

  17. Soot Formation in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Hassan, M. I.; Faeth, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science. Thus, the present study is considering soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames, exploiting the microgravity environment to simplify measurements at the high-pressure conditions of interest for many practical applications. The findings of the investigation are relevant to reducing emissions of soot and continuum radiation from combustion processes, to improving terrestrial and spacecraft fire safety, and to developing methods of computational combustion, among others. Laminar premixed flames are attractive for studying soot formation because they are simple one-dimensional flows that are computationally tractable for detailed numerical simulations. Nevertheless, studying soot-containing burner-stabilized laminar premixed flames is problematical: spatial resolution and residence times are limited at the pressures of interest for practical applications, flame structure is sensitive to minor burner construction details so that experimental reproducibility is not very good, consistent burner behavior over the lengthy test programs needed to measure soot formation properties is hard to achieve, and burners have poor durability. Fortunately, many of these problems are mitigated for soot-containing, freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. The present investigation seeks to extend work in this laboratory for various soot processes in flames by observing soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. Measurements are being made at both Normal Gravity (NG) and MicroGravity (MG), using a short-drop free-fall facility to provide MG conditions.

  18. Insulin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with type 2 diabetes , polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) , prediabetes or heart disease , or metabolic syndrome . A ... resistance), especially in obese individuals and those with PCOS . This test involves an IV-infusion of insulin, ...

  19. Annular fuel and air co-flow premixer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Melton, Patrick Benedict; York, William David

    2013-10-15

    Disclosed is a premixer for a combustor including an annular outer shell and an annular inner shell. The inner shell defines an inner flow channel inside of the inner shell and is located to define an outer flow channel between the outer shell and the inner shell. A fuel discharge annulus is located between the outer flow channel and the inner flow channel and is configured to inject a fuel flow into a mixing area in a direction substantially parallel to an outer airflow through the outer flow channel and an inner flow through the inner flow channel. Further disclosed are a combustor including a plurality of premixers and a method of premixing air and fuel in a combustor.

  20. A filtered tabulated chemistry model for LES of premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorina, B.; Auzillon, P.; Darabiha, N.; Gicquel, O.; Veynante, D.; Vicquelin, R.

    2010-03-15

    A new modeling strategy called F-TACLES (Filtered Tabulated Chemistry for Large Eddy Simulation) is developed to introduce tabulated chemistry methods in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent premixed combustion. The objective is to recover the correct laminar flame propagation speed of the filtered flame front when subgrid scale turbulence vanishes as LES should tend toward Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). The filtered flame structure is mapped using 1-D filtered laminar premixed flames. Closure of the filtered progress variable and the energy balance equations are carefully addressed in a fully compressible formulation. The methodology is first applied to 1-D filtered laminar flames, showing the ability of the model to recover the laminar flame speed and the correct chemical structure when the flame wrinkling is completely resolved. The model is then extended to turbulent combustion regimes by including subgrid scale wrinkling effects in the flame front propagation. Finally, preliminary tests of LES in a 3-D turbulent premixed flame are performed. (author)

  1. Combustion-acoustic stability analysis for premixed gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darling, Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Oyediran, Ayo; Cowan, Lizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Lean, prevaporized, premixed combustors are susceptible to combustion-acoustic instabilities. A model was developed to predict eigenvalues of axial modes for combustion-acoustic interactions in a premixed combustor. This work extends previous work by including variable area and detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms, using the code LSENS. Thus the acoustic equations could be integrated through the flame zone. Linear perturbations were made of the continuity, momentum, energy, chemical species, and state equations. The qualitative accuracy of our approach was checked by examining its predictions for various unsteady heat release rate models. Perturbations in fuel flow rate are currently being added to the model.

  2. Metabolism of human insulin after subcutaneous administration: A possible means to uncover insulin misuse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Brinkkötter, Paul; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-10-15

    The misuse of insulin for performance enhancement in sport or as toxic agent has frequently been reported in the past. In contrast to synthetic insulin analogues, the administration of recombinant human insulin is hardly recognized by mass spectrometry. The present study was designed to uncover the misuse of recombinant human insulin for doping control purposes as well as for forensic applications. It is hypothesized that an altered metabolite profile of circulating insulin prevails after subcutaneous administration due to exposure of insulin to epidermal proteases. In vitro experiments with skin tissue lysates (S9 fraction and microsomes), different biological fluids (urine, serum, plasma) and recombinant human insulin were performed and the deriving metabolites were characterized by liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Afterwards, authentic blood samples of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus and a control group of healthy humans were analysed. Therefore, a method using protein precipitation, ultrafiltration and antibody-coated magnetic beads for purification with subsequent separation by nano-scale liquid chromatography coupled a Q Exactive mass spectrometer was applied. Several metabolites of insulin with C-terminally truncated sequences of the B-chain (and A-chain in minor extent) were identified within this study. Here, the DesB30 human insulin represents the major metabolite in all experiments. This metabolite is frequently found in urine samples due to degradation processes and, thus, disqualifies this matrix for the intended purposes. In contrast, blood samples do commonly not contain DesB30 insulin, which was corroborated by data obtained from the control group. In post-administration blood samples, minute but distinct amounts (approx. 50 pg mL(-1)) of DesB30 insulin were found and suggest the use of this analyte as potential marker for subcutaneous human insulin administration, supporting the attempts to

  3. Possible involvement of the A/sup 20/-A/sup 21/ peptide bond in the expression of the biological activity of insulin. 1. (21-Desasparagine,20-cysteinamide-A)insulin and (21-desasparagine,20-cysteine isopropylamide-A)insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.C.; Wang, R.Y.; Burke, G.T.; Chanley, J.D.; Katsoyannis, P.G.

    1987-11-03

    The C-terminal region of the A chain of insulin has been shown to play a significant role in the expression of the biological activity of the hormone. To further delineate the contribution of this segment, we have synthesized (21-desasparagine,20-cysteinamide-A)insulin and (21-desasparagine,20-cysteine isopropylamide-A)insulin, in which the C-terminal amino acid residue of the A chain of insulin, asparagine, has been removed and the resulting free carboxyl group of the A/sup 20/ cysteine residue has been converted to an amide and an isopropylamide, respectively. Both insulin analogues display biological activity, 14-15% for the unsubstituted amide analogue and 20-22% for the isopropylamide analogue, both relative to bovine insulin. In contrast, a (21-desasparagine-A)insulin analogue has been reported to display less than 4% of the activity of the natural hormone. The implications of these findings are discussed, and we conclude that the A/sup 20/-A/sup 21/ amide bond plays a significant role in the expression of the biological activity of insulin.

  4. Diabetes and Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... years, but may eventually need insulin to maintain glucose control. What are the different types of insulin? Different ... glulisine • Short-acting: regular human insulin Basal insulin. Controls blood glucose levels between meals and throughout the night. This ...

  5. Apparatus for the premixed gas phase combustion of liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Roffe, G.A.; Trucco, H.A.

    1981-04-21

    This invention relates to improvements in the art of liquid fuel combustion and, more particularly, concerns a method and apparatus for the controlled gasification of liquid fuels, the thorough premixing of the then gasified fuel with air and the subsequent gas-phase combustion of the mixture to produce a flame substantially free of soot, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and unburned fuel.

  6. Vorticity transformation in high Karlovitz number premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbitt, Brock; Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the two-way coupling between turbulence and chemistry, the changes in turbulence characteristics through a premixed flame are investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on vorticity, ω, which is characteristic of the smallest length and time scales of turbulence, analyzing its behavior within and across high Karlovitz number (Ka) premixed flames. This is accomplished through a series of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of premixed n-heptane/air flames, modeled with a 35-species finite-rate chemical mechanism, whose conditions span a wide range of unburnt Karlovitz numbers and flame density ratios. The behavior of the terms in the enstrophy, ω2 = ω ṡ ω, transport equation is analyzed, and a scaling is proposed for each term. The resulting normalized enstrophy transport equation involves only a small set of parameters. Specifically, the theoretical analysis and DNS results support that, at high Karlovitz number, enstrophy transport obtains a balance of the viscous dissipation and production/vortex stretching terms. It is shown that, as a result, vorticity scales in the same manner as in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence within and across the flame, namely, scaling with the inverse of the Kolmogorov time scale, τη. As τη is a function only of the viscosity and dissipation rate, this work supports the validity of Kolmogorov's first similarity hypothesis in premixed turbulent flames for sufficiently high Ka numbers. Results are unaffected by the transport model, chemical model, turbulent Reynolds number, and finally the physical configuration.

  7. PREMIXED ONE-DIMENSIONAL FLAME (PROF) CODE USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual that describes the problems that can be treated by the Premixed One-dimensional Flame (PROF) code. It also describes the mathematical models and solution procedures applied to these problems. Complete input instructions and a description of output ar...

  8. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2010-02-01

    foresee that with most new ways of insulin delivery the bioavailability/biopotency will be lower than with subcutaneous (SC) insulin administration. This in turn requires that more insulin has to be applied to induce the same metabolic (blood glucose lowering) effect in patients with diabetes. If the costs of insulin are of relevance for the price (this clearly depends on the source of insulin the individual company has to use) the price of the product will be higher relative to standard SC insulin therapy. The question is, clearly, what are the advantages of the new product? In times when SC insulin administration was painful and cumbersome it was clear that the ease of swallowing an insulin tablet was a good argument for many patients. With the invention of thin insulin needles that make the SC injection practically pain free in most cases, this argument of being 'convenient' becomes of limited relevance. However, for many patients (especially the public) the avoidance of 'injection' is an argument. The question is, how much is the patient (society) willing to pay for such a psychological 'advantage'? Most probably additional clear-cut clinical advantages must be demonstrable to convince the payers to reimburse a new product, especially when the price is higher than that of SC insulin. If, for example, postprandial glycaemic excursions are considerably better controlled because the pharmacodynamic (PD) effects are better than with SC injection of rapid-acting insulin analogues (this might be possible with inhaled Technosphere insulin), this would be a clinically relevant argument. Without such advantages, new products will have no market success. Most probably it will not be until one of the various ARIA developments (e.g. nasal insulin) makes it into a financially attractive product (sufficient return on investment) that more money will flow again in this area of research. The search for relevant articles about new ways to deliver insulin did not reveal very many

  9. A Method to Measure Flame Index in Turbulent Partially-Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, David Ari

    This dissertation describes the development of a diagnostic technique and data processing routine to measure the flame index in partially-premixed flames, called the Flame Index Measurement Method. Many modern combustion applications involve conditions in which the fuel and oxidizer are only partially mixed prior to entering the flame. These partially-premixed flames contain some regions of premixed and some regions of non-premixed flamelets. New computational approaches use the flame index concept: premixed regions are identified and a premixed model is applied; non-premixed regions are also identified and a non-premixed model is applied. The flame index is defined as the normalized dot product of the gradients of the fuel and oxidizer mass fractions; it is +1 in premixed flamelets and is -1 in non-premixed flamelets. Previously there had been no experimentally measured values of flame index available to assess the modeling approaches. A new method has been developed to measure the flame index using planar laser-induced fluorescence tracers to indicate the sign and direction of the fuel and oxygen gradients. Through the modeling of premixed and non-premixed flamelets, acetone was selected as a fuel tracer and nitrogen dioxide was selected as an oxygen tracer. The fluorescence properties of both acetone and nitrogen dioxide were studied. With acetone seeded into the fuel, and nitrogen dioxide seeded into the air, the Flame Index Measurement Method was evaluated in laminar premixed and non-premixed methane/acetone/air flames, as well as in a well-defined turbulent partially-premixed burner, the Gas Turbine Model Combustor (GTMC). The flame index was measured in the GTMC with methane, propane, and syngas flames. Statistics (mean, variance, and probability mass functions) of the flame index are reported for the highly-turbulent partially-premixed GTMC flames. Two new statistical quantities were developed that describe the probability for the occurrence of premixed

  10. Non-equivalent Role of Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in the Insulin Dimer Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Antolíková, Emília; Žáková, Lenka; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Watson, Christopher J.; Hančlová, Ivona; Šanda, Miloslav; Cooper, Alan; Kraus, Tomáš; Brzozowski, A. Marek; Jiráček, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Apart from its role in insulin receptor (IR) activation, the C terminus of the B-chain of insulin is also responsible for the formation of insulin dimers. The dimerization of insulin plays an important role in the endogenous delivery of the hormone and in the administration of insulin to patients. Here, we investigated insulin analogues with selective N-methylations of peptide bond amides at positions B24, B25, or B26 to delineate their structural and functional contribution to the dimer interface. All N-methylated analogues showed impaired binding affinities to IR, which suggests a direct IR-interacting role for the respective amide hydrogens. The dimerization capabilities of analogues were investigated by isothermal microcalorimetry. Selective N-methylations of B24, B25, or B26 amides resulted in reduced dimerization abilities compared with native insulin (Kd = 8.8 μm). Interestingly, although the N-methylation in [NMeTyrB26]-insulin or [NMePheB24]-insulin resulted in Kd values of 142 and 587 μm, respectively, the [NMePheB25]-insulin did not form dimers even at high concentrations. This effect may be attributed to the loss of intramolecular hydrogen bonding between NHB25 and COA19, which connects the B-chain β-strand to the core of the molecule. The release of the B-chain β-strand from this hydrogen bond lock may result in its higher mobility, thereby shifting solution equilibrium toward the monomeric state of the hormone. The study was complemented by analyses of two novel analogue crystal structures. All examined analogues crystallized only in the most stable R6 form of insulin oligomers (even if the dimer interface was totally disrupted), confirming the role of R6-specific intra/intermolecular interactions for hexamer stability. PMID:21880708

  11. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in diabetes: patient populations, safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Battelino, Tadej; Danne, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa; Renard, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The level of glycaemic control necessary to achieve optimal short-term and long-term outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) typically requires intensified insulin therapy using multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. For continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the insulins of choice are the rapid-acting insulin analogues, insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine. The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion over multiple daily injections in adult and paediatric populations with T1DM include superior glycaemic control, lower insulin requirements and better health-related quality of life/patient satisfaction. An association between continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and reduced hypoglycaemic risk is more consistent in children/adolescents than in adults. The use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is widely recommended in both adult and paediatric T1DM populations but is limited in pregnant patients and those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. All available rapid-acting insulin analogues are approved for use in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. However, minimum patient age varies (insulin lispro: no minimum; insulin aspart: ≥2 years; insulin glulisine: ≥6 years) and experience in pregnancy ranges from extensive (insulin aspart, insulin lispro) to limited (insulin glulisine). Although more expensive than multiple daily injections, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is cost-effective in selected patient groups. This comprehensive review focuses on the European situation and summarises evidence for the efficacy and safety of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, particularly when used with rapid-acting insulin analogues, in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. The review also discusses relevant European guidelines; reviews issues that surround use of this technology; summarises the effects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on patients

  12. Technosphere insulin: an inhaled prandial insulin product.

    PubMed

    Neumiller, Joshua J; Campbell, R Keith

    2010-06-01

    Given the important role of insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and in light of common barriers to insulin use, new strategies for insulin delivery by routes other than intravenous and subcutaneous injection have been investigated since the discovery of insulin in the 1920s. Most companies researching and developing pulmonary administration systems for the use of insulin announced the termination of product development following the failure of the first US FDA-approved inhaled insulin product, Exubera. One company in particular continued their pursuit of a useful inhaled insulin product. MannKind Corporation has developed a powder formulation of insulin that allows for a high percentage of the administered insulin to be absorbed via the lung. Their product, AFREZZA (Technosphere insulin), is currently under review by the FDA for use in patients with diabetes. Technosphere insulin appears to overcome some of the barriers that contributed to the market withdrawal of Exubera by the manufacturer. Studies with Technosphere insulin have shown it to be a unique insulin formulation in that it is very rapid acting, has a relatively short duration of action, and is efficacious in terms of improved glycemic control without contributing to increased weight gain or the incidence of hypoglycemia when compared with other prandial insulin products. Additionally, Technosphere insulin has demonstrated a favorable safety and tolerability profile in clinical studies to date. PMID:20462282

  13. Large eddy simulation of premixed and non-premixed combustion in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Undapalli, Satish

    A new combustor referred to as Stagnation Point Reverse Flow (SPRF) combustor has been developed at Georgia Tech to meet the increasingly stringent emission regulations. The combustor incorporates a novel design to meet the conflicting requirements of low pollution and high stability in both premixed and non-premixed modes. The objective of this thesis work is to perform Large Eddy Simulations (LES) on this lab-scale combustor and elucidate the underlying physics that has resulted in its excellent performance. To achieve this, numerical simulations have been performed in both the premixed and non-premixed combustion modes, and velocity field, species field, entrainment characteristics, flame structure, emissions, and mixing characteristics have been analyzed. Simulations have been carried out first for a non-reactive case to resolve relevant fluid mechanics without heat release by the computational grid. The computed mean and RMS quantities in the non-reacting case compared well with the experimental data. Next, the simulations were extended for the premixed reactive case by employing different sub-grid scale combustion chemistry closures: Eddy Break Up (EBU), Artificially Thickened Flame (TF) and Linear Eddy Mixing (LEM) models. Results from the EBU and TF models exhibit reasonable agreement with the experimental velocity field. However, the computed thermal and species fields have noticeable discrepancies. Only LEM with LES (LEMLES), which is an advanced scalar approach, has been able to accurately predict both the velocity and species fields. Scalar mixing plays an important role in combustion, and this is solved directly at the sub-grid scales in LEM. As a result, LEM accurately predicts the scalar fields. Due to the two way coupling between the super-grid and sub-grid quantities, the velocity predictions also compare very well with the experiments. In other approaches, the sub-grid effects have been either modeled using conventional approaches (EBU) or need

  14. Premixing quality and flame stability: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.; Heywood, J. B.; Tabaczynski, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Models for predicting flame ignition and blowout in a combustor primary zone are presented. A correlation for the blowoff velocity of premixed turbulent flames is developed using the basic quantities of turbulent flow, and the laminar flame speed. A statistical model employing a Monte Carlo calculation procedure is developed to account for nonuniformities in a combustor primary zone. An overall kinetic rate equation is used to describe the fuel oxidation process. The model is used to predict the lean ignition and blow out limits of premixed turbulent flames; the effects of mixture nonuniformity on the lean ignition limit are explored using an assumed distribution of fuel-air ratios. Data on the effects of variations in inlet temperature, reference velocity and mixture uniformity on the lean ignition and blowout limits of gaseous propane-air flames are presented.

  15. Partially Premixed Flame (PPF) Research for Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Lock, Andrew J.; Hegde, Uday

    2004-01-01

    Incipient fires typically occur after the partial premixing of fuel and oxidizer. The mixing of product species into the fuel/oxidizer mixture influences flame stabilization and fire spread. Therefore, it is important to characterize the impact of different levels of fuel/oxidizer/product mixing on flame stabilization, liftoff and extinguishment under different gravity conditions. With regard to fire protection, the agent concentration required to achieve flame suppression is an important consideration. The initial stage of an unwanted fire in a microgravity environment will depend on the level of partial premixing and the local conditions such as air currents generated by the fire itself and any forced ventilation (that influence agent and product mixing into the fire). The motivation of our investigation is to characterize these impacts in a systematic and fundamental manner.

  16. Partially premixed prevalorized kerosene spray combustion in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chrigui, M.; Ahmadi, W.; Sadiki, A.; Janicka, J.; Moesl, K.

    2010-04-15

    A detailed numerical simulation of kerosene spray combustion was carried out on a partially premixed, prevaporized, three-dimensional configuration. The focus was on the flame temperature profile dependency on the length of the pre-vaporization zone. The results were analyzed and compared to experimental data. A fundamental study was performed to observe the temperature variation and flame flashback. Changes were made to the droplet diameter, kerosene flammability limits, a combustion model parameter and the location of the combustion initialization. Investigations were performed for atmospheric pressure, inlet air temperature of 90 C and a global equivalence ratio of 0.7. The simulations were carried out using the Eulerian Lagrangian procedure under a fully two-way coupling. The Bray-Moss-Libby model was adjusted to account for the partially premixed combustion. (author)

  17. Adaptive resolution LES of a reacting non-premixed jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Carlos; Deiterding, Ralf; Hill, David; Pullin, Dale

    2004-11-01

    We present results of a turbulent reactive non-premixed jet using Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) performed within the blockstructured adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure AMROC. A fully compressible formulation of the transport equations and the stretched-vortex subgrid-stress model of Misra & Pullin (1997) are integrated with the assumed Beta subgrid pdf model for non-premixed combustion. Flamelet libraries are precomputed with the Cantera chemistry package. The modeling technique has been previously used and validated/verified in prior work, primarily for incompressible flows. One difficulty commonly encountered for these unstationary flows is the need to resolve certain regions of the flow field more finely than others. These can include thin shear layers and regions of steep density gradients produced by combustion. We show that adaptive resolution can be used successfully in the context of LES. This work is part of Caltech's ASC center supported by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  18. Swirl effects on combustion characteristics of premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Daurer, M.; Gupta, A.K.; Lewis, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    The effects of swirl direction on the structure of two different premixed flames are investigated in a double concentric premixed swirl burner. The flames were stabilized with two annular jets and a central pipe. Mean and fluctuating temperatures, thermal integral and micro time scales and direct flame photographs were taken to receive information about global flame structures, flame stability and the distribution of the thermal field in these flames. Direct flame photographs, compensated temperature data as well as thermal micro-time scales of temperature data are presented to give a complete insight in the thermal distribution in these flames. It was found that the swirl direction of the stabilizing annular jets seems to take great influence on flame symmetry. The flame with the counter-swirling jets showed a very unsymmetrical behavior which was confirmed in flame photographs, temperature maps and time scales.

  19. Aspartame and Its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. A.; Komarova, T. V.; Davidovich, Yurii A.; Rogozhin, S. V.

    1981-04-01

    The results of studies on the biochemistry of the sweet taste are briefly reviewed. The methods of synthesis of "aspartame" — a sweet dipeptide — are considered, its structural analogues are described, and quantitative estimates are made of the degree of sweetness relative to sucrose. Attention is concentrated mainly on problems of the relation between the structure of the substance and its taste in the series of aspartyl derivatives. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  20. Projections for insulin treatment for diabetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying; Lam, Laura

    2002-06-01

    The evolution of insulin treatment of diabetes has dramatically changed the natural course of this disease. Modern recombinant DNA technology has brought about many new insulin analogues with improved pharmacokinetics, resulting in better glycemic control. In addition, improved insulin delivery systems, such as insulin pumps and pens, have been introduced to provide convenience and to enhance patient compliance. Efforts are currently being devoted to developing noninvasive insulin formulations, such as oral and pulmonary insulin. A number of products are at different stages of clinical trials. Meanwhile, the quest for a permanent cure for diabetes continues. The frontier of diabetes research has gone through a period of substantial expansion, with the emergence of new areas that include gene therapy, islet cell transplantation and diabetic vaccine. Technological breakthroughs, such as recombinant DNA, nanotechnology, microarray-aided genomics and proteomics, will provide more profound insights into the pathogenesis, and the immunological and biological basis of diabetes. Our growing knowledge in these areas will ultimately contribute to the discovery of preventive methods against or a cure for this disease. PMID:12532178

  1. On burner-stabilized cylindrical premixed flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, James A.; Zhu, Delin; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical program on cylindrical and spherical premixed flames in microgravity has been initiated. We are especially interested in: (1) assessing heat loss versus flow divergence as the dominant stabilization mechanism; (2) understanding the effects of flame curvature on the burning intensity; and (3) determining the laminar burning velocity by using this configuration. In the present study we have performed analytical, computational, and mu g-experimental investigations of the cylindrical flame. The results are presented.

  2. Lean, Premixed-Prevaporized (LPP) combustor conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, R. A.; Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    Four combustion systems were designed and sized for the energy efficient engine. A fifth combustor was designed for the cycle and envelope of the twin-spool, high bypass ratio, high pressure ratio turbofan engine. Emission levels, combustion performance, life, and reliability assessments were made for these five combustion systems. Results of these design studies indicate that cruise NOx emission can be reduced by the use of lean, premixed-prevaporaized combustion and airflow modulation.

  3. Premixed burner experiments: Geometry, mixing, and flame structure issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.K.; Lewis, M.J.; Gupta, M.

    1995-10-01

    This research program is exploring techniques for improved fuel-air mixing, with the aim of achieving combustor operations up to stoichiometric conditions with minimal NO x and maximum efficiency. The experimental studies involve the use of a double-concentric natural gas burner that is operable in either premixed or non-premixed modes, and the system allows systematic variation of equivalence ratio, swirl strength shear length region and flow momentum in each annulus. Flame structures formed with various combinations of swirl strengths, flow throughput and equivalence ratios in premixed mode show the significant impact of swirl flow distribution on flame structure emanating from the mixedness. This impact on flame structure is expected to have a pronounced effect on the heat release rate and the emission of NO{sub x}. Thus, swirler design and configuration remains a key factor in the quest for completely optimized combustion. Parallel numerical studies of the flow and combustion phenomena were carried out, using the RSM and thek-{epsilon} turbulence models. These results have not only indicated the strengths and limitations of CFD in performance and pollutants emission predictions, but have provided guidelines on the size and strength of the recirculation produced and the spatio-temporal structure of the combustion flowfield. The first stage of parametric studies on geometry and operational parameters at Morgan State University have culminated in the completion of a one-dimensional flow code that is integrated with a solid, virtual model of the existing premixed burner. This coupling will provide the unique opportunity to study the impact of geometry on the flowfield and vice-versa, with particular emphasis on concurrent design optimization.

  4. Pulsed jet combustion generator for non-premixed charge engines

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheim, A. K.; Stewart, H. E.

    1990-01-01

    A device for introducing fuel into the head space of cylinder of non-premixed charge (diesel) engines is disclosed, which distributes fuel in atomized form in a plume, whose fluid dynamic properties are such that the compression heated air in the cylinder head space is entrained into the interior of the plume where it is mixed with and ignites the fuel in the plume interior, to thereby control combustion, particularly by use of a multiplicity of individually controllable devices per cylinder.

  5. Insulin Human Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin inhalation is used in combination with a long-acting insulin to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar ...

  6. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... One Type of Insulin Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin ... syringe before injecting it. Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin ...

  7. Insulin Lispro Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a short-acting, man-made version of human insulin. Insulin lispro works by replacing the insulin ... niacin (Niacor, Niaspan, in Advicor); certain medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) ...

  8. [Factors limiting glycaemic control in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Ferencz, Viktória; Domján, Beatrix; Gerő, László; Tänczer, Tímea; Tabák, Gy Ádám

    2015-09-01

    Insulin therapy is the most effective treatment of diabetes. It is proven to prevent microvascular disease and likely to decrease the risk of cardiovascular complications. However, these benefits are associated with a 2-3 times increased risk of hypoglycaemia and a faster weight gain compared to other antidiabetic medications. In addition, one study found elevated all-cause mortality among patients on intensive therapy (requiring more frequent insulinisation). Insulin has growth factor properties that may translate to increased mitogenicity. These factors could prevent the medical team or the patient from initiation or intensification of insulin therapy. The authors describe evidence on long-term remission related to transient intensified insulin therapy at diabetes diagnosis. The currently recommended method of insulin initiation is once daily basal insulin treatment that offers different schedules for intensification. The authors review the pharmacokinetics of analogue insulins that translate to similar efficacy to human insulins with a 20-30% lower risk of hypoglycaemia. PMID:26320598

  9. Characterization of oscillations during premix gas turbine combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Janus, M.C.

    1998-04-01

    The use of premix combustion in stationary gas turbines can produce very low levels of NO{sub x} emissions. This benefit is widely recognized, but turbine developers routinely encounter problems with combustion oscillations during the testing of new premix combustors. Because of the associated pressure fluctuations, combustion oscillations must be eliminated in a final combustor design. Eliminating these oscillations is often time-consuming and costly because there is no single approach to solve an oscillation problem. Previous investigations of combustion stability have focused on rocket applications, industrial furnaces, and some aeroengine gas turbines. Comparatively little published data is available for premixed combustion at conditions typical of an industrial gas turbine. In this paper, the authors report experimental observations of oscillations produced by a fuel nozzle typical of industrial gas turbines. Tests are conducted in a specially designed combustor capable of providing the acoustic feedback needed to study oscillations. Tests results are presented for pressures up to 10 atmospheres, theoretical considerations, it is expected that oscillations can be characterized by a nozzle reference velocity, with operating pressure playing a smaller role. This expectation is compared to observed data that shows both the benefits and limitations of characterizing the combustor oscillating behavior in terms of a reference velocity rather than other engine operating parameters. This approach to characterizing oscillations is then used to evaluate how geometric changes to the fuel nozzle will affect the boundary between stable and oscillating combustion.

  10. Premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement: characterization of strength and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Aberg, J; Brisby, H; Henriksson, H B; Lindahl, A; Thomsen, P; Engqvist, H

    2010-05-01

    By using a premixed calcium phosphate cement (CPC), the handling properties of the cement are drastically improved, which is a challenge for traditional injectable CPCs. Previously premixed cements have been based on apatitic cements. In this article, acidic cement has been developed and evaluated. Monocalcium phosphate monohydrate and beta-tricalcium phosphate were mixed with glycerol to form a paste. As the paste does not contain water, no setting reaction starts and thus the working time is indefinite. Powder/liquid ratios (P/L) of 2.25, 3.5 and 4.75 were evaluated. Setting time (ST) and compressive strength (CS) were measured after 1 day, 1 week and 4 weeks in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, and the corresponding microstructure was evaluated using electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The ST started when the cements were placed in PBS and ranged from 28 to 75 min, higher P/L gave a lower ST. Higher P/L also gave a higher CS, which ranged from 2 to 16 MPa. The microstructure mainly consisted of monetite, 1-5 microm in grain size. After 4 weeks in PBS, the strength increased. As acidic cements are resorbed faster in vivo, this cement should allow faster bone regeneration than apatitic cements. Premixed cements show a great handling benefit when compared with normal CPCs and can be formulated with similar ST and mechanical properties. PMID:20127991

  11. Posology of insulins: A review of standard textbooks and product inserts

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Garima; Kalra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The study is aimed to assess whether the information contained in standard pharmacology, endocrinology, and diabetology textbooks regarding timings of administration, frequency and dose of various insulins is adequate and also to see whether the information contained in these texts is concordant with product inserts. Materials and Methods: Four standard textbooks of pharmacology, two of diabetology and three of endocrinology were assessed for the published information regarding dose, timing, and frequency of insulin administration. The product inserts of commonly available insulins in India were also studied for the same. Results: Various omissions and disparities could be seen in the coverage of insulins in standard textbooks. Posology information about premixed insulins and basal insulins have been omitted by the majority of the textbooks. Details about dose, frequency and timings of ultra-short acting insulins have also not been covered by all textbooks. Some discrepancies regarding prescribing information was also noted in product inserts, especially in case of newer insulins. Conclusions: Thus, this article stresses upon the need of a uniform source of information for providing adequate and standardized knowledge regarding timing, frequency, and dose of insulins. PMID:26425471

  12. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  13. Experimental investigation of the liquid fuel evaporation in a premix duct for lean premixed and prevaporized combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, M.; Gugel, K.O.; Hassa, C.

    1997-10-01

    Liquid fuel evaporation was investigated in a premix duct, operating at conditions expected for lean premixed and prevaporized combustion. Results from a flat prefilming airblast atomizer are presented. Kerosine Jet A was used in all experiments. Air pressure, air temperature, and liquid fuel flow rate were varied separately; their relative influences on atomization, evaporation, and fuel dispersion are discussed. The results show that at pressures up to 15 bars and temperatures up to 850 K, nearly complete evaporation of the fuel was achieved, without autoignition of the fuel. For the configuration tested, the fuel distributions of the liquid and evaporated fuel show very little difference in their dispersion characteristics and were not much affected by a variation of the operating conditions.

  14. Properties of Injectable Apatite-Forming Premixed Cements

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yashushi; Chow, Laurence C.; Takagi, Shozo; Tagami, Junji

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies reported premixed calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) that were stable in the package and form hydroxyapatite (HA) as the product after exposure to an aqueous environment. These cements had setting times of greater than 60 min, which are too long to be useful for some clinical applications. The present study investigated properties of fast-setting HA-forming premixed CPCs that initially consisted of two separate premixed pastes: (1) finely ground (1.0 μm in median size) dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) mixed with an aqueous NaH2PO4 solution, 1.5 mol/L or 3.0 mol/L in concentration, and (2) tetracalcium phosphate consisting of combinations of particles of two different size distributions, 5 μm (TTCP5) and 17 μm (TTCP17) in median size, mixed with glycerin. Equal volume of Pastes 1 and 2 were injected with the use of atwo-barrel syringe fitted with a static mixer into sample molds. The molar Ca/P ratio of combined paste was approximately 1.5. Cements were characterized in terms of setting time (Gilmore needle), diametral tensile strength (DTS), and phase composition (powder x-ray diffraction, XRD). Setting times were found to range from (4.3 ± 0.6 to 68 ± 3) min (mean ± sd; n = 3), and 1-d and 7-d DTS values were from (0.89 ± 0.08 to 2.44 ± 0.16) MPa (mean ± sd; n = 5). Both the NaH2PO4 concentration and TTCP particle size distribution had significant (p < 0.01) effects on setting time and DTS. Powder XRD analysis showed that low crystallinity HA and unreacted DCPA were present in the 1-day specimens, and the extent of HA formation increased with increasing amount of TTCP5 in the TTCP paste. Conclusion: Injectable HA-forming premixed CPCs with setting times from 4 to 70 min can be prepared by using DCPA and TTCP as the ingredients. Compared to the conventional powder liquid cements, these premixed CPCs have the advantages of being easy to use and having a range of hardening times. PMID:21479133

  15. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    PubMed Central

    Lamos, Elizabeth M; Younk, Lisa M; Davis, Stephen N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK) and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration. PMID:27022271

  16. Structural Analogues of Selfotel.

    PubMed

    Dziuganowska, Zofia A; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Volle, Jean-Noël; Virieux, David; Pirat, Jean-Luc; Kafarski, Paweł

    2016-06-17

    A small library of phosphonopiperidylcarboxylic acids, analogues of NMDA antagonist selfotel (CGS 19755), was synthesized. First, the series of aromatic esters was obtained via a palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction (Hirao coupling) of dialkyl phosphites with bromopyridinecarboxylates, followed by their hydrolysis. Then, hydrogenation of the resulting phosphonopyridylcarboxylic acids over PtO2 yielded the desired phosphonopiperidylcarboxylic acids. NMR studies indicated that the hydrogenation reaction proceeds predominantly by cis addition. Several compounds were obtained as monocrystal structures. Preliminary biological studies performed on cultures of neurons suggest that the obtained compounds possess promising activity toward NMDA receptors. PMID:27187758

  17. Safety and efficacy of insulin glargine 300 u/mL compared with other basal insulin therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Freemantle, Nick; Chou, Engels; Frois, Christian; Zhuo, Daisy; Lehmacher, Walter; Vlajnic, Aleksandra; Wang, Hongwei; Chung, Hsing-wen; Zhang, Quanwu; Wu, Eric; Gerrits, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of a concentrated formulation of insulin glargine (Gla-300) with other basal insulin therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design This was a network meta-analysis (NMA) of randomised clinical trials of basal insulin therapy in T2DM identified via a systematic literature review of Cochrane library databases, MEDLINE and MEDLINE In-Process, EMBASE and PsycINFO. Outcome measures Changes in HbA1c (%) and body weight, and rates of nocturnal and documented symptomatic hypoglycaemia were assessed. Results 41 studies were included; 25 studies comprised the main analysis population: patients on basal insulin-supported oral therapy (BOT). Change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was comparable between Gla-300 and detemir (difference: −0.08; 95% credible interval (CrI): −0.40 to 0.24), neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH; 0.01; −0.28 to 0.32), degludec (−0.12; −0.42 to 0.20) and premixed insulin (0.26; −0.04 to 0.58). Change in body weight was comparable between Gla-300 and detemir (0.69; −0.31 to 1.71), NPH (−0.76; −1.75 to 0.21) and degludec (−0.63; −1.63 to 0.35), but significantly lower compared with premixed insulin (−1.83; −2.85 to −0.75). Gla-300 was associated with a significantly lower nocturnal hypoglycaemia rate versus NPH (risk ratio: 0.18; 95% CrI: 0.05 to 0.55) and premixed insulin (0.36; 0.14 to 0.94); no significant differences were noted in Gla-300 versus detemir (0.52; 0.19 to 1.36) and degludec (0.66; 0.28 to 1.50). Differences in documented symptomatic hypoglycaemia rates of Gla-300 versus detemir (0.63; 0.19to 2.00), NPH (0.66; 0.27 to 1.49) and degludec (0.55; 0.23 to 1.34) were not significant. Extensive sensitivity analyses supported the robustness of these findings. Conclusions NMA comparisons are useful in the absence of direct randomised controlled data. This NMA suggests that Gla-300 is also associated with a significantly lower risk of nocturnal hypoglycaemia

  18. Analogue-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analogue Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses circuits for three-bit and four-bit analogue digital converters and digital analogue converters. These circuits feature slow operating speeds that enable the circuitry to be used to demonstrate the mode of operation using oscilloscopes and signal generators. (DDR)

  19. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  20. Insulin regulation of Na/K pump activity in rat hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gelehrter, T.D.; Shreve, P.D.; Dilworth, V.M.

    1984-05-01

    Insulin rapidly increases Na/K pump activity in HTC rat hepatoma cells in tissue culture, as measured by the ouabain-sensitive influx of the potassium analogue 86Rb+. Increased influx is observed within minutes and is maximal (70% above control) within 1-2 h. The effect appears to be mediated by the insulin receptors, as: the concentration dependence on insulin is identical to that for insulin induction of tyrosine aminotransferase and stimulation of 2-aminoisobutyric acid transport, proinsulin is 6% as potent as insulin, and the effect is blocked by anti-receptor antibodies. The early stimulation of potassium influx is not blocked by cycloheximide and is not associated with an increased number of pump sites as measured by /sup 3/H-ouabain binding. The insulin effect is blocked by amiloride, which blocks sodium influx, and is mimicked by the sodium ionophore monensin, which increases sodium influx and intracellular accumulation. Insulin also rapidly increases the initial rate of /sup 22/Na+ influx, suggesting that insulin may enhance Na/K pump activity, in part, by increasing intracellular sodium concentration. Incubation of HTC cells with insulin for 24 h causes complete unresponsiveness to the insulin induction of transaminase and stimulation of amino acid transport, a phenomenon mediated by postbinding mechanisms. In contrast, similar incubation with insulin does not cause unresponsiveness to the insulin stimulation of Na/K pump activity. Therefore, the site of regulation of responsiveness to insulin must be distal to, or separate from, those events causing stimulation of ion fluxes.

  1. Periodic and Chaotic Modes in Premixed Laminar Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hamdi, Mohamed Abbes

    1991-06-01

    In this thesis, we report the discoveries of many periodic and chaotic modes of laminar premixed flames on porous plug burners. This report is the first confirmation of predictions of a number of recent theoretical studies on the dynamics of premixed flames. The experimental innovations and techniques presented in section 3.6 are at the heart of the discoveries of these dynamical modes. In our experiments, a flame front is stabilized on a porous plug burner enclosed within a pyrex chamber. By varying the total flow rate, the stoichiometry of the combustible mixture, and the chamber pressure, we discovered many periodic and chaotic modes. We show that different fuels and/or oxidizers as well as the symmetries of the system can affect the dynamics of the flame front. Experimental evidence is presented that shows that laminar premixed flames exhibit low-dimensional, deterministic chaos. The largest Liapunov exponent and the pointwise dimension calculations are used to confirm that chaos exists in certain regions of parameter space. We also describe a power spectrum technique that can be used to identify deterministic dynamics in real time. With the help of a spectrum analyzer, an experimentalist can map the dynamics (simple and complex) of the system under investigation in a relatively short time. As far as we know, this is the first time that nonlinear dynamics techniques are used to analyze experimental data from combustion. All the nonperiodic modes that we have discovered exhibit low-dimensional deterministic chaos and we believe that this result is a general one for propagating fronts. The implication of our work is that such nonperiodic states can be described by a tractable set of ordinary differential equations.

  2. Field Effects of Buoyancy on Lean Premixed Turbulent Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.; Johnson, M. R.; Greenberg, P. S.; Wernet, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    The study of field effects of buoyancy on premixed turbulent flames is directed towards the advancement of turbulent combustion theory and the development of cleaner combustion technologies. Turbulent combustion is considered the most important unsolved problem in combustion science and laboratory studies of turbulence flame processes are vital to theoretical development. Although buoyancy is dominant in laboratory flames, most combustion models are not yet capable to consider buoyancy effects. This inconsistency has impeded the validation of theories and numerical simulations with experiments. Conversely, the understanding of buoyancy effects is far too limited to help develop buoyant flame models. Our research is also relevant to combustion technology because lean premixed combustion is a proven method to reduce the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In industrial lean premixed combustion systems, their operating conditions make them susceptible to buoyancy thus affecting heat distribution, emissions, stability, flashback and blowoff. But little knowledge is available to guide combustion engineers as to how to avoid or overcome these problems. Our hypothesis is that through its influence on the mean pressure field, buoyancy has direct and indirect effects on local flame/turbulence interactions. Although buoyancy acts on the hot products in the farfield the effect is also felt in the nearfield region upstream of the flame. These changes also influence the generation and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy inside the flame brush and throughout the flowfield. Moreover, the plume of an open flame is unstable and the periodic fluctuations make additional contributions to flame front dynamics in the farfield. Therefore, processes such as flame wrinkling, flow acceleration due to heat release and flame- generated vorticity are all affected. Other global flame properties (e.g. flame stabilization limits and flame speed) may all be coupled to buoyancy. This

  3. The transient response of strained laminar-premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, C.A.; Ghoniem, A.F.

    1995-08-01

    Modeling and simulation of turbulent combustion in premixed gases, for relatively large-scale and low-intensity turbulence, have traditionally been based on the assumption that the flame response to strain is instantaneous. In this paper, the authors revisit the validity of this assumption by examining the time-dependent response of a premixed laminar flame when subjected to a sudden change in strain and a periodic strain. They find that at unity Lewis number and for a stepwise increase in strain, the settling time of the flame varies between the chemical time, the flame time and the flow time as the Karlovitz number changes from low to intermediate to high values, respectively, over the entire range of flame temperatures. At nonunity Lewis numbers, the settling time changes from the flame time to the flow time as the strain jump increases from intermediate to high Karlovitz numbers and over the entire range of flame temperatures. For given Lewis and Karlovitz numbers, the settling time decreases as these flame temperature increases. Thus, in a flamelet or thin flame modeling, and over the entire range of Lewis number, the response of a premixed flame can be considered instantaneous only for high flame temperatures. The same is found to be true for intermediate flame temperatures when the Lewis number is unity. Otherwise, for low and intermediate flame tempera tues, and nonunity Lewis number, corrections reflecting the lag between the flow an the flame should be considered. The response of the flame to oscillating strain whose maximum value is below unity Karlovitz number is also investigated for two values of the flame temperatures.

  4. Agonism and Antagonism at the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Louise; Hansen, Bo Falck; Jensen, Pia; Pedersen, Thomas Åskov; Vestergaard, Kirsten; Schäffer, Lauge; Blagoev, Blagoy; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Kiselyov, Vladislav V.; De Meyts, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Insulin can trigger metabolic as well as mitogenic effects, the latter being pharmaceutically undesirable. An understanding of the structure/function relationships between insulin receptor (IR) binding and mitogenic/metabolic signalling would greatly facilitate the preclinical development of new insulin analogues. The occurrence of ligand agonism and antagonism is well described for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other receptors but in general, with the exception of antibodies, not for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In the case of the IR, no natural ligand or insulin analogue has been shown to exhibit antagonistic properties, with the exception of a crosslinked insulin dimer (B29-B’29). However, synthetic monomeric or dimeric peptides targeting sites 1 or 2 of the IR were shown to be either agonists or antagonists. We found here that the S961 peptide, previously described to be an IR antagonist, exhibited partial agonistic effects in the 1–10 nM range, showing altogether a bell-shaped dose-response curve. Intriguingly, the agonistic effects of S961 were seen only on mitogenic endpoints (3H-thymidine incorporation), and not on metabolic endpoints (14C-glucose incorporation in adipocytes and muscle cells). The agonistic effects of S961 were observed in 3 independent cell lines, with complete concordance between mitogenicity (3H-thymidine incorporation) and phosphorylation of the IR and Akt. Together with the B29-B’29 crosslinked dimer, S961 is a rare example of a mixed agonist/antagonist for the human IR. A plausible mechanistic explanation based on the bivalent crosslinking model of IR activation is proposed. PMID:23300584

  5. Unusual pulsating states in hydrocarbon-oxygen premixed flames.

    PubMed

    Gorman, M; Perrollier, S

    2006-12-01

    An unusual type of pulsating state has been observed using a new ignition protocol for heavy hydrocarbon-oxygen premixed flames on a circular porous plug burner. The shape and motion of these states are quasicircular, luminous, pulsating regions of M (M=1, 2, 3, or 4) lobes that increase in size as the flame propagates outward. As the lobes expand, they break apart near their midpoints and form counterpropagating spiral-like arms. These spiral arms rotate, "collide" with arms generated by adjacent lobes, and are extinguished. We will describe the unusual characteristics of the dynamics of these states. PMID:17199402

  6. Response mechanisms of attached premixed flames subjected to harmonic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreekrishna

    The persistent thrust for a cleaner, greener environment has prompted air pollution regulations to be enforced with increased stringency by environmental protection bodies all over the world. This has prompted gas turbine manufacturers to move from nonpremixed combustion to lean, premixed combustion. These lean premixed combustors operate quite fuel-lean compared to the stochiometric, in order to minimize CO and NOx productions, and are very susceptible to oscillations in any of the upstream flow variables. These oscillations cause the heat release rate of the flame to oscillate, which can engage one or more acoustic modes of the combustor or gas turbine components, and under certain conditions, lead to limit cycle oscillations. This phenomenon, called thermoacoustic instabilities, is characterized by very high pressure oscillations and increased heat fluxes at system walls, and can cause significant problems in the routine operability of these combustors, not to mention the occasional hardware damages that could occur, all of which cumulatively cost several millions of dollars. In a bid towards understanding this flow-flame interaction, this research works studies the heat release response of premixed flames to oscillations in reactant equivalence ratio, reactant velocity and pressure, under conditions where the flame preheat zone is convectively compact to these disturbances, using the G-equation. The heat release response is quantified by means of the flame transfer function and together with combustor acoustics, forms a critical component of the analytical models that can predict combustor dynamics. To this end, low excitation amplitude (linear) and high excitation amplitude (nonlinear) responses of the flame are studied in this work. The linear heat release response of lean, premixed flames are seen to be dominated by responses to velocity and equivalence ratio fluctuations at low frequencies, and to pressure fluctuations at high frequencies which are in the

  7. Analysis of Lean Premixed/Prevaporized Combustion with KIVA-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deur, J. M.; Kundu, K. P.; Darling, D. D.; Cline, M. C.; Micklow, G. J.; Harper, M. R.; Simons, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    Requirements to reduce the emissions of pollutants from gas turbines used in aircraft propulsion and ground based power generation have led to consideration of lean premixed/prevaporized (LPP) combustion concept. This paper describes some of the LPP flame tube analyses performed at the NASA Research Center with KIVA-2, a well-known multi-dimensional CFD code for problems including sprays, turbulence, and combustion. Modifications to KIVA-2's boundary condition and chemistry treatments have been made to meet the needs of the present study. The study itself focuses on two key aspects of the LPP concept, low emissions and flame stability (including flashback and lean blowoff.

  8. Phosphonate analogues of aminoacyl adenylates.

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, C C; Dixon, H B

    1978-01-01

    Phosphonomethyl analogues of glycyl phosphate and valyl phosphate, i.e. NH2-CHR-CO-CH2-PO(OH)2, were synthesized and esterified with adenosine to give analogues of aminoacyl adenylates. The interaction of these adenylate analogues with valyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli was studied by fluorescence titration. The analogue of valyl phosphate has an affinity for the enzyme comparable with that of valine, but that of valyl adenylate is bound much less tightly than either valyl adenylate or corresponding derivative of valinol. The affinity of the analogue of glycyl adenylate was too low to be measured. We conclude that this enzyme interacts specifically with both the side chain and the anhydride linkage of the adenylate intermediate. PMID:743207

  9. Insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Pickup, J

    2011-02-01

    The last year has seen a continued uptake of insulin pump therapy in most countries. The USA is still a leader in pump use, with probably some 40% of type 1 diabetic patients on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), but the large variation in usage within Europe remains, with relatively high use (> 15%) in, for example, Norway, Austria, Germany and Sweden and low use (< 5%) in Spain, the UK, Finland and Portugal. There is much speculation on the factors responsible for this variation, and the possibilities include physician attitudes to CSII and knowledge about its benefits and indications for its use (and inappropriate beliefs about dangers), the availability of reimbursement from insurance companies or funding from national health services, the availability of sufficient diabetes nurse educators and dietitians trained in pump procedures, and clear referral pathways for the pump candidate from general practitioner or general hospital to specialist pump centre. There are now several comprehensive national guidelines on CSII use (see ATTD Yearbook 2009) but more work needs to be done in unifying uptake and ensuring all those who can benefit do so. Technology developments recently include increasing use of pumps with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) connectivity (see elsewhere in this volume) and the emergence of numerous manufacturers developing so-called 'patch pumps', often for the type 2 diabetes market. Interestingly, the evidence base for CSII in this group is not well established, and for this reason the selected papers on CSII in this section include several in this area. The use of CSII in diabetic pregnancy is a long-established practice, in spite of the lack of evidence that it is superior to multiple daily injections (MDI), and few randomised controlled trials have been done in recent years. Several papers in this field this year continue the debate about the usefulness of CSII in diabetic pregnancy and are reviewed here. It is pleasing

  10. Cellular Cations Control Conformational Switching of Inositol Pyrophosphate Analogues.

    PubMed

    Hager, Anastasia; Wu, Mingxuan; Wang, Huanchen; Brown, Nathaniel W; Shears, Stephen B; Veiga, Nicolás; Fiedler, Dorothea

    2016-08-22

    The inositol pyrophosphate messengers (PP-InsPs) are emerging as an important class of cellular regulators. These molecules have been linked to numerous biological processes, including insulin secretion and cancer cell migration, but how they trigger such a wide range of cellular responses has remained unanswered in many cases. Here, we show that the PP-InsPs exhibit complex speciation behaviour and propose that a unique conformational switching mechanism could contribute to their multifunctional effects. We synthesised non-hydrolysable bisphosphonate analogues and crystallised the analogues in complex with mammalian PPIP5K2 kinase. Subsequently, the bisphosphonate analogues were used to investigate the protonation sequence, metal-coordination properties, and conformation in solution. Remarkably, the presence of potassium and magnesium ions enabled the analogues to adopt two different conformations near physiological pH. Understanding how the intrinsic chemical properties of the PP-InsPs can contribute to their complex signalling outputs will be essential to elucidate their regulatory functions. PMID:27460418

  11. Rational steering of insulin binding specificity by intra-chain chemical crosslinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viková, Jitka; Collinsová, Michaela; Kletvíková, Emília; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kaplan, Vojtěch; Žáková, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Aviñó, Roberto J. Tarazona; Straková, Jana; Selicharová, Irena; Vaněk, Václav; Wright, Daniel W.; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Jiráček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone of human metabolism with major therapeutic importance for both types of diabetes. New insulin analogues with more physiological profiles and better glycemic control are needed, especially analogues that preferentially bind to the metabolic B-isoform of insulin receptor (IR-B). Here, we aimed to stabilize and modulate the receptor-compatible conformation of insulin by covalent intra-chain crosslinking within its B22-B30 segment, using the CuI-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes. This approach resulted in 14 new, systematically crosslinked insulin analogues whose structures and functions were extensively characterized and correlated. One of the analogues, containing a B26-B29 triazole bridge, was highly active in binding to both IR isoforms, with a significant preference for IR-B. Our results demonstrate the potential of chemistry-driven modulation of insulin function, also shedding new light on the functional importance of hormone’s B-chain C-terminus for its IR-B specificity.

  12. Histopathological nerve and skeletal muscle changes in rats subjected to persistent insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Heydenreich, Annette; Jensen, Karin Juul; Bertelsen, Line Olrik; Alifrangis, Lene; Andersen, Lene; Søeborg, Henrik; Chapman, Melissa; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Bøgh, Ingrid Brück

    2015-01-01

    New insulin analogues with a longer duration of action and a flatter pharmacodynamic profile are developed to improve convenience and safety for diabetic patients. During the nonclinical development of such analogues, safety studies must be conducted in nondiabetic rats, which consequently are rendered chronically hypoglycemic. A rat comparator model using human insulin would be valuable, as it would enable differentiation between effects related to either persistent insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) or a new analogue per se. Such a model could alleviate the need for an in-study-comparator and thereby reduce the number of animals used during development. Thus, the aims of the present study were i) to develop a preclinical animal model of persistent hypoglycemia in rats using human insulin infusion for four weeks and ii) to investigate histopathological changes in sciatic nerves and quadriceps femoris muscle tissue, as little is known about the response to persistent hypoglycemia in these tissues. Histopathologic changes in insulin-infused animals included axonal degeneration and myofibre degeneration. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that persistent IIH provokes peripheral nerve and skeletal myofiber degeneration within the same animals. This suggests that the model can serve as a nonclinical comparator model during development of long-acting insulin analogues. PMID:26989298

  13. Rational steering of insulin binding specificity by intra-chain chemical crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Viková, Jitka; Collinsová, Michaela; Kletvíková, Emília; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kaplan, Vojtěch; Žáková, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Tarazona Aviñó, Roberto J; Straková, Jana; Selicharová, Irena; Vaněk, Václav; Wright, Daniel W; Watson, Christopher J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Jiráček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone of human metabolism with major therapeutic importance for both types of diabetes. New insulin analogues with more physiological profiles and better glycemic control are needed, especially analogues that preferentially bind to the metabolic B-isoform of insulin receptor (IR-B). Here, we aimed to stabilize and modulate the receptor-compatible conformation of insulin by covalent intra-chain crosslinking within its B22-B30 segment, using the Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes. This approach resulted in 14 new, systematically crosslinked insulin analogues whose structures and functions were extensively characterized and correlated. One of the analogues, containing a B26-B29 triazole bridge, was highly active in binding to both IR isoforms, with a significant preference for IR-B. Our results demonstrate the potential of chemistry-driven modulation of insulin function, also shedding new light on the functional importance of hormone's B-chain C-terminus for its IR-B specificity. PMID:26792393

  14. NASA/ESMD Analogue Mission Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation exploring Earth and its analogues is shown. The topics include: 1) ESMD Goals for the Use of Earth Analogues; 2) Stakeholders Summary; 3) Issues with Current Analogue Situation; 4) Current state of Analogues; 5) External Implementation Plan (Second Step); 6) Recent Progress in Utilizing Analogues; 7) Website Layout Example-Home Page; 8) Website Layout Example-Analogue Site; 9) Website Layout Example-Analogue Mission; 10) Objectives of ARDIG Analog Initiatives; 11) Future Plans; 12) Example: Cold-Trap Sample Return; 13) Example: Site Characterization Matrix; 14) Integrated Analogue Studies-Prerequisites for Human Exploration; and 15) Rating Scale Definitions.

  15. Plasma insulin profiles after subcutaneous injection: how close can we get to physiology in people with diabetes?

    PubMed

    Home, P D

    2015-11-01

    Many people with diabetes rely on insulin therapy to achieve optimal blood glucose control. A fundamental aim of such therapy is to mimic the pattern of 'normal' physiological insulin secretion, thereby controlling basal and meal-time plasma glucose and fatty acid turnover. In people without diabetes, insulin release is modulated on a time base of 3-10 min, something that is impossible to replicate without intravascular glucose sensing and insulin delivery. Overnight physiological insulin delivery by islet β cells is unchanging, in contrast to requirements once any degree of hyperglycaemia occurs, when diurnal influences are evident. Subcutaneous pumped insulin or injected insulin analogues can approach the physiological profile, but there remains the challenge of responding to day-to-day changes in insulin sensitivity. Physiologically, meal-time insulin release begins rapidly in response to reflex activity and incretins, continuing with the rise in glucose and amino acid concentrations. This rapid response reflects the need to fill the insulin space with maximum concentration as early as 30 min after starting the meal. Current meal-time insulins, by contrast, are associated with a delay after injection before absorption begins, and a delay to peak because of tissue diffusion. While decay from peak for monomeric analogues is not dissimilar to average physiological needs, changes in meal type and, again, in day-to-day insulin sensitivity, are difficult to match. Recent and current developments in insulin depot technology are moving towards establishing flatter basal and closer-to-average physiological meal-time plasma insulin profiles. The present article discusses the ideal physiological insulin profile, how this can be met by available and future insulin therapies and devices, and the challenges faced by healthcare professionals and people with diabetes in trying to achieve an optimum plasma insulin profile. PMID:26041603

  16. Murder by insulin: suspected, purported and proven-a review.

    PubMed

    Marks, Vincent

    2009-04-01

    Murder by insulin-whether attempted, suspected or proven-is rare. Only 66 cases worldwide could be found for this review. A conviction was secured in 31 cases and additional weapon was employed in 11. Differentiation of attempted homicide from Munchausen syndrome by proxy in the young and from 'mercy killing' in the elderly was not attempted. Most perpetrators were close relatives and most victims were alive when discovered and responded to treatment. Hypoglycaemia is the first clue to homicidal insulin use in living subjects and requires the demonstration of a plasma insulin concentration of generally more than 1000 pmol/L and undetectable plasma C-peptide concentration to establish the diagnosis. Serum glucose measurements are valueless in victims found dead. The presence near the body of insulin vials, syringes or needles, loose talk by the suspected perpetrator or their ready access to insulin may be the only clue. The demonstration of insulin in tissue around an injection site by immunohistopathology or by measuring it in an extract clinches the diagnosis. Immunoassays suitable for clinical use to detect and measure insulin and C-peptide are subject to random errors and cannot be relied upon unless special precautions including separation by gel filtration or HPLC are undertaken prior to analysis. They do not detect or measure accurately a new generation of synthetic insulin analogues. Mass spectrometry will be required to do this and to validate clinical immunoassays, upon which convictions have always had to rely in the past. PMID:20355194

  17. [Feasibility and acceptability of insulin therapy using a pen suitable for injecting regular or intermediate insulin. Results of the French multicenter study conducted by the Optipen-France Study Group].

    PubMed

    Pinget, M; Vexiau, P; Sandre, D; Pasqual, C; Weisselberg, C

    1990-12-01

    Most of the commercially available insulin-pens are only suitable for regular insulin and have to be used in combination with syringe injections of long-acting insulin preparations. The aim of the french multicentric study is to estimate the clinical interest of a new insulin-pen (Optipen-Hoechst) with two main characteristics: the ability of a predetermination of the insulin dosage to be administered and the suitability for both regular, intermediate and pre-mixed regular (25%) and intermediate (75%) Hoechst insulin preparations. This new pen can so be used alone in all insulin regimen, consisting only of regular and/or intermediate insulin injection. Ninety five insulin treated patients, with at least two daily injections of these kinds of insulin, have been selected injection in a 8 weeks follow up study: After been included they were treated for two weeks by syringe injections of Hoechst insulin solutions (U40), equivalent to the former insulin preparations. Optipen was then used during 4 weeks to inject similar U100 insulin solution, without any other changes in diet and home blood glucose monitoring. Metabolic control was assessed by glycemic measurements, fructosamine and glycosylated hemoglobin determinations and remained unchanged all over the study. The acceptability of pen-treatment was excellent since 95% of the population decided not to return to syringe injections at the end of the study. Injections by mean of an Optipen are more convenient at home as well as outside. Further long term randomized studies are necessary to definite the clinical indications for Optipen use in insulin treated patient. PMID:2086280

  18. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli. PMID:12769691

  19. Down-regulation of cyclin G2 by insulin, IGF-I (insulin-like growth factor 1) and X10 (AspB10 insulin): role in mitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Angela M; Winge, Sofia B; Zimmermann, Maike; Lindvig, Anne B; Warzecha, Caroline B; Sajid, Waseem; Horne, Mary C; De Meyts, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby insulin analogues may cause enhanced mitogenicity through activation of either the IR (insulin receptor) or the IGF-IR (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor) are incompletely understood. We demonstrate that in L6 myoblasts expressing only IGF-IRs as well as in the same cells overexpressing the IR, IGF-I (insulin-like growth factor 1), insulin and X10 (AspB10 insulin) down-regulate the mRNA expression level of the cell cycle inhibitor cyclin G2, as measured by qRT-PCR (quantitative reverse transcription-PCR), and induce cell growth measured by [6-(3)H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. Western blotting showed a marked down-regulation of cyclin G2 at the protein level in both cell lines. Overexpression of cyclin G2 in the two cell lines diminished the mitogenic effect of all three ligands. The use of specific inhibitors indicated that both the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) pathways mediate the down-regulation of Ccng2. The down-regulation of CCNG2 by the three ligands was also observed in other cell lines: MCF-7, HMEC, Saos-2, R(-)/IR and INS-1. These results indicate that regulation of cyclin G2 is a key mechanism whereby insulin, insulin analogues and IGF-I stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:24059861

  20. Evaluation of fuel preparation systems for lean premixing- prevaporizing combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, W.J.; Ekstedt, .E.E.

    1986-04-01

    A series of tests was conducted to provide data for the design of premixing-prevaporizing fuel-air mixture preparation systems for aircraft gas turbine engine combustors. Fifteen configurations of four different fuel-air mixture preparation system design concepts were evaluated to determine fuel-air mixture uniformity at the system exit over a range of conditions representative of cruise operation for a modern commercial turbofan engine. Operating conditions, including pressure, temperature, fuel-air ratio and velocity had no clear effect on mixture uniformity in systems which used low-pressure fuel injectors. However, performance of systems using pressure atomizing fuel nozzles and large-scale mixing devices was shown to be sensitive to operating conditions. Variations in system design variables were also evaluated and correlated. Mixture uniformity improved with increased system length, pressure drop, and number of fuel injection points per unit area. A premixing system compatible with the combustor envelope of a typical combustion system and capable of providing mixture nonuniformity (standard deviation/mean) below 15% over a typical range of cruise operating conditions was demonstrated.

  1. Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing use of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations and to provide guidance for development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bimolecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and effectiveness of open loop control schemes.

  2. Finite amplitude wave interaction with premixed laminar flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Mohamad; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2014-11-01

    The physics underlying combustion instability is an active area of research because of its detrimental impact in many combustion devices, such as turbines, jet engines, and liquid rocket engines. Pressure waves, ranging from acoustic waves to strong shocks, are potential sources of these disturbances. Literature on flame-disturbance interactions are primarily focused on either acoustics or strong shock wave interactions, with little information about the wide spectrum of behaviors that may exist between these two extremes. For example, the interaction between a flame and a finite amplitude compression wave is not well characterized. This phenomenon is difficult to study numerically due to the wide range of scales that need to be captured, requiring powerful and efficient numerical techniques. In this work, the interaction of a perturbed laminar premixed flame with a finite amplitude compression wave is investigated using the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM). This method optimally solves the fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations while capturing the essential scales. The results show that depending on the amplitude and duration of a finite amplitude disturbance, the interaction between these waves and premixed flames can produce a broad range of responses.

  3. FUEL INTERCHANGEABILITY FOR LEAN PREMIXED COMBUSTION IN GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Don Ferguson; Geo. A. Richard; Doug Straub

    2008-06-13

    In response to environmental concerns of NOx emissions, gas turbine manufacturers have developed engines that operate under lean, pre-mixed fuel and air conditions. While this has proven to reduce NOx emissions by lowering peak flame temperatures, it is not without its limitations as engines utilizing this technology are more susceptible to combustion dynamics. Although dependent on a number of mechanisms, changes in fuel composition can alter the dynamic response of a given combustion system. This is of particular interest as increases in demand of domestic natural gas have fueled efforts to utilize alternatives such as coal derived syngas, imported liquefied natural gas and hydrogen or hydrogen augmented fuels. However, prior to changing the fuel supply end-users need to understand how their system will respond. A variety of historical parameters have been utilized to determine fuel interchangeability such as Wobbe and Weaver Indices, however these parameters were never optimized for today’s engines operating under lean pre-mixed combustion. This paper provides a discussion of currently available parameters to describe fuel interchangeability. Through the analysis of the dynamic response of a lab-scale Rijke tube combustor operating on various fuel blends, it is shown that commonly used indices are inadequate for describing combustion specific phenomena.

  4. Auto-ignition system for premixed gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, S.E.

    1993-08-24

    In a gas turbine power plant having at least one combustor, the combustor is described comprising a pilot section and a main burn section, the pilot section, having a recirculation zone and comprising inlet air vents for providing inlet air into the recirculation zone, the main burn section being downstream and adjacent to the pilot section, a method for establishing a diffusion flame in the pilot section, comprising the steps of: injecting a flow of natural gas fuel into the pilot section; providing inlet air into the recirculation zone through the inlet air vents; operating the pilot section in a premix mode where the natural gas fuel mixes with the inlet air without combustion in the pilot section; and injecting a flow of liquid fuel into the recirculation zone of the pilot section just prior to the end of operation of the pilot section in the premix mode, the liquid fuel having an auto-ignition temperature less than the temperature of the inlet air, whereby the liquid fuel is auto-ignited in the recirculation zone and the natural gas fuel bursts into flame to establish the diffusion flame in the pilot section.

  5. Gravitational effects on the structure and propagation of premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamins, A.; Heitor, M.; Libby, P. A.

    The influence of gravity on the propagation velocity and shape of premixed laminar flames is studied experimentally over the entire flammability range of methane-air mixtures. In the experiments reported here a vertical tube 10 cm dia, closed on both ends and open in the middle is filled with reactants and ignited in its central plane so that flames propagate in both the upward and downward directions. Additional experiments are made in a vertical tube 5 cm dia with flames propagating from an open towards a closed end. Steady flame propagation is achieved over the entire range of equivalence ratios by locating a series of holes along the length of the tubes covered with a thin film which is vaporized by the passage of the flame. Measurements in the larger tube indicate that gravity affects both rich and lean laminar flames in that upward propagating flames are faster than downward. The shape of the flames is complex with the former roughly hemispherical, the latter flat but with a cellular structure. In near stoichiometric mixtures the flames are oscillatory, are unaffected by gravity and correspond to weakly turbulent flames. The results in the smaller tube indicate that upward moving flames propagate faster than downward moving flames over the entire range of equivalence ratios studied and that the flame shape is always hemispherical. The preliminary results for turbulent premixed flames propagating upward and downward are discussed.

  6. Multiple mapping conditioning for flames with partial premixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenburg, A.; Cleary, M.J.

    2008-10-15

    Fully closed multiple mapping conditioning (MMC) is used to model partially premixed flames in homogeneous, isotropic decaying turbulence where the partial premixing is caused by local extinction and reignition phenomena. Two reference variables that represent mixing and reaction progress, such as mixture fraction and sensible enthalpy, are used to emulate turbulent scalar fluctuations. Local extinction is achieved by a priori coupling between scalar dissipation and temperature fluctuations via a correlation function that is based on the conditionally averaged sensible enthalpy at stoichiometric composition. The proposed model provides closures for the joint PDF of mixture fraction and sensible enthalpy, for the conditional variance equation of a reactive scalar, and for the doubly conditioned dissipation terms. Model results are compared with DNS in three flame cases with varying levels of local extinction, up to global extinction. The joint PDF predicted by MMC is in fair agreement with DNS. It constitutes, however, a clear improvement over conventional models using preassumed distribution functions for the PDFs. The doubly conditioned dissipation terms are modeled well and the results for all major chemical species are in good agreement with DNS. Predictions for intermediate species are also satisfactory. (author)

  7. Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to the increasing application of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations, and to provide guidance for the development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, and other pertinent factors. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bi- molecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, the effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and the effectiveness of active control schemes. The technique used in the model may also be valuable to understand oscillations in low NO{sub x} industrial burners.

  8. Experimental study of premixed flames in intense isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

    1994-04-01

    A methodology for investigating premixed turbulent flames propagating in intense isotropic turbulence has been developed. The burner uses a turbulence generator developed by Videto and Santavicca and the flame is stabilized by weak-swirl generated by air injectors. This set-up produces stable premixed turbulent flames under a wide range of mixture conditions and turbulence intensities. The experiments are designed to investigate systematically the changes in flame structures for conditions which can be classified as wrinkled laminar flames, corrugated flames and flames with distributed reaction zones. Laser Doppler anemometry and Rayleigh scattering techniques are used to determine the turbulence and scalar statistics. In the intense turbulence, the flames are found to produce very little changes in the mean and rams velocities. Their flame speed increase linearly with turbulence intensity as for wrinkled laminar flames. The Rayleigh scattering pdfs for flames within the distributed reaction zone regime are distinctly bimodal. The probabilities of the reacting states (i.e. contributions from within the reaction zone) is not higher than those of wrinkled laminar flame. These results show that there is no drastic changes in flame structures at Karlovitz number close to unity. This suggest that the Klimov-Williams criterion under-predicts the resilience of wrinkled flamelets to intense turbulence.

  9. Graded plasma spraying of premixed metalceramic powders on metallic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, C. R. C.; Trevisan, R.-E.

    1997-06-01

    The mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of ceramics and metals and the differential stresses it causes at the interface create problems in metal to ceramic joining. Research has been con-ducted to solve this problem in thermal barrier coating technology. Previous studies have considered met-al-ceramic multilayers or graded-coatings, which include a metallic bond coat. In this study, a graded plasma-sprayed metal-ceramic coating is developed using the deposition of premixed metal and ceramic powders without the conventional metallic bond coat. Influences of thickness variations, number, and composition of the layers are investigated. Coatings are prepared by atmospheric plasma-spraying on In-conel 718 superalloy substrates. Ni-Cr-Al and ZrO2 -8 % Y2O3 powders are used for plasma spraying. Ad-hesive and cohesive strength of the coatings are determined. The concentration profile of the elements is determined by x-ray energy-dispersive analysis. The microstructure and morphology of the coatings are investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that the mixed metal-ce-ramic coating obtained with the deposition of premixed powders is homogeneous. The morphology and microstructure of the coatings are considered satisfactory.

  10. Temperature response of turbulent premixed flames to inlet velocity oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoola, B.; Hartung, G.; Armitage, C. A.; Hult, J.; Cant, R. S.; Kaminski, C. F.

    2009-01-01

    Flame-turbulence interactions are at the heart of modern combustion research as they have a major influence on efficiency, stability of operation and pollutant emissions. The problem remains a formidable challenge, and predictive modelling and the implementation of active control measures both rely on further fundamental measurements. Model burners with simple geometry offer an opportunity for the isolation and detailed study of phenomena that take place in real-world combustors, in an environment conducive to the application of advanced laser diagnostic tools. Lean premixed combustion conditions are currently of greatest interest since these are able to provide low NO x and improved increased fuel economy, which in turn leads to lower CO2 emissions. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the response of a bluff-body-stabilised flame to periodic inlet fluctuations under lean premixed turbulent conditions. Inlet velocity fluctuations were imposed acoustically using loudspeakers. Spatially resolved heat release rate imaging measurements, using simultaneous planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH and CH2O, have been performed to explore the periodic heat release rate response to various acoustic forcing amplitudes and frequencies. For the first time we use this method to evaluate flame transfer functions and we compare these results with chemiluminescence measurements. Qualitative thermometry based on two-line OH PLIF was also used to compare the periodic temperature distribution around the flame with the periodic fluctuation of local heat release rate during acoustic forcing cycles.

  11. Insulin glargine: an updated review of its use in the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Christopher J; Plosker, Greg L; Keating, Gillian M; McKeage, Kate; Scott, Lesley J

    2003-01-01

    Insulin glargine is a human insulin analogue prepared by recombinant DNA technology. Modification of the human insulin molecule at position A21 and at the C-terminus of the B-chain results in the formation of a stable compound that is soluble at pH 4.0, but forms amorphous microprecipitates in subcutaneous tissue from which small amounts of insulin glargine are gradually released. The plasma concentration versus time profile of insulin glargine is therefore relatively constant in relation to conventional human insulins, with no pronounced peak over 24 hours. This allows once-daily administration as basal therapy. Early randomised trials with insulin glargine generally showed greater reductions in fasting blood or plasma glucose levels and a reduced frequency of nocturnal hypoglycaemia relative to neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In addition to this basal therapy, patients continued to use the regular mealtime insulin regimen to which they were accustomed. More recent data with insulin glargine have included evidence of improved glycaemic control, with improvements in satisfaction with treatment over NPH insulin. Furthermore, the time of day at which insulin glargine is injected has no clinically relevant effect on glycaemic control in these patients. There are also data from small, nonblind studies to suggest comparable glycaemic control with insulin glargine and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Results from comparative studies and meta-analyses in individuals with type 2 diabetes show lower incidences of nocturnal hypoglycaemia with insulin glargine than with NPH insulin, with two studies showing a significantly greater improvement in glycosylated haemoglobin levels with insulin glargine than with NPH. Insulin glargine is well tolerated, and is not associated with greater immunogenicity or increases in bodyweight than NPH insulin. Long-term data show maintenance of glycaemic control with insulin glargine

  12. The structure of partially premixed methane flames in high-intensity turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Yaldizli, Murat; Mehravaran, Kian; Mohammad, Hyderuddin; Jaberi, Farhad A.

    2008-09-15

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted to study the structure of partially premixed and non-premixed methane flames in high-intensity two-dimensional isotropic turbulent flows. The results obtained via ''flame normal analysis'' show local extinction and reignition for both non-premixed and partially premixed flames. Dynamical analysis of the flame with a Lagrangian method indicates that the time integrated strain rate characterizes the finite-rate chemistry effects and the flame extinction better than the strain rate. It is observed that the flame behavior is affected by the ''pressure-dilatation'' and ''viscous-dissipation'' in addition to strain rate. Consistent with previous studies, high vorticity values are detected close to the reaction zone, where the vorticity generation by the ''baroclinic torque'' was found to be significant. The influences of (initial) Reynolds and Damkoehler numbers, and various air-fuel premixing levels on flame and turbulence variables are also studied. It is observed that the flame extinction occurs similarly in flames with different fuel-air premixing. Our simulations also indicate that the CO emission increases as the partial premixing of the fuel with air increases. Higher values of the temperature, the OH mass fraction and the CO mass fraction are observed within the flame zone at higher Reynolds numbers. (author)

  13. Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition Induced by Hot Jets in a Supersonic Premixed Airstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Zhou, Jin; Lin, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Yu

    2013-05-01

    Detonation is initiated through a hot jet in a supersonic premixed mixture of H2 and air, which is produced by using a air heater. The results show that initiation fails in the low-equivalence-ratio premixed gas. With the increase of equivalence ratio, the hot jet can induce deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) in the premixed mixture, which an indirect initiation of detonation. Further studies show that the DDT process is due to the combined effect of a local hemispherical explosion shock wave, the bow shock, and the flame produced by the hot jet.

  14. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... room temperature for a month. Gather your supplies: insulin, needles, syringes, alcohol wipes, and a container for used needles ... the plunger to get the right dose of insulin into the syringe. Check the syringe for air bubbles. If there ...

  15. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    de Luca, Carl; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2008-01-01

    Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the Metabolic syndrome. In this review, we focus on the interconnection between obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause insulin resistance in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver by inhibiting insulin signal transduction. The sources of cytokines in insulin resistant states are the insulin target tissue themselves, primarily fat and liver, but to a larger extent the activated tissue resident macrophages. While the initiating factors of this inflammatory response remain to be fully determined, chronic inflammation in these tissues could cause localized insulin resistance via autocrine/paracrine cytokine signaling and systemic insulin resistance via endocrine cytokine signaling all of which contribute to the abnormal metabolic state. PMID:18053812

  16. Insulin pump (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  17. Adherence to Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarbacker, G Blair; Urteaga, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Six million people with diabetes use insulin either alone or in combination with an oral medication. Many barriers exist that lead to poor adherence with insulin. However, there is an underwhelming amount of data on interventions to address these barriers and improve insulin adherence. Until pharmacological advancements create easier, more acceptable insulin regimens, it is imperative to involve patients in shared decision-making. PMID:27574371

  18. Insulin therapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Jawad, Fatema

    2016-09-01

    Insulin is the mainstay of pharmacotherapy in pregnancy complicated by diabetes. This review covers the various insulin regimes and preparations, explaining how to use them, and decide appropriate doses in pregnancy. It approaches insulin treatment from a patient - centred, as well as physician and obstetrician friendly viewpoint, providing pragmatic guidance for management of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:27582152

  19. Rayleigh scattering for density measurements in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouldin, F. C.; Halthore, R. N.

    1986-09-01

    Rayleigh scattering measurements for molecular number density in turbulent, premixed CH4-air flames are discussed, and data for both flamelet passage time distributions and power spectral density functions are reported and compared to the recent predictions of Bray, Libby and Moss (1984). Measurement problems associated with variations in mixture-averaged Rayleigh scattering cross section, index of refraction fluctuations, finite spatial and temporal resolution and with scattering from particles are discussed. It is concluded that these effects are relatively minor in the reported experiments. Correction procedures are suggested for the effects of cross section variation and of finite resolution. Passage time and spectral data support the Bray, Libby and Moss hypothesis for the passage time distribution function. Furthermore, model predictions for the variation across the flame brush of mean passage times for both reactant and product eddies are in reasonable agreement with experiment. Finally, the data suggest that these mean times scale in part with Ū and λ in the reactant flow.

  20. Coaxial fuel and air premixer for a gas turbine combustor

    DOEpatents

    York, William D; Ziminsky, Willy S; Lacy, Benjamin P

    2013-05-21

    An air/fuel premixer comprising a peripheral wall defining a mixing chamber, a nozzle disposed at least partially within the peripheral wall comprising an outer annular wall spaced from the peripheral wall so as to define an outer air passage between the peripheral wall and the outer annular wall, an inner annular wall disposed at least partially within and spaced from the outer annular wall, so as to define an inner air passage, and at least one fuel gas annulus between the outer annular wall and the inner annular wall, the at least one fuel gas annulus defining at least one fuel gas passage, at least one air inlet for introducing air through the inner air passage and the outer air passage to the mixing chamber, and at least one fuel inlet for injecting fuel through the fuel gas passage to the mixing chamber to form an air/fuel mixture.

  1. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D.; Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  2. Flashback detection sensor for lean premix fuel nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Jimmy Dean; Richards, George Alan; Straub, Douglas L.; Liese, Eric Arnold; Trader, Jr., John Lee; Fasching, George Edward

    2002-08-06

    A sensor for detecting the flame occurring during a flashback condition in the fuel nozzle of a lean premix combustion system is presented. The sensor comprises an electrically isolated flashback detection electrode and a guard electrode, both of which generate electrical fields extending to the walls of the combustion chamber and to the walls of the fuel nozzle. The sensor is positioned on the fuel nozzle center body at a location proximate the entrance to the combustion chamber of the gas turbine combustion system. The sensor provides 360.degree. detection of a flashback inside the fuel nozzle, by detecting the current conducted by the flame within a time frame that will prevent damage to the gas turbine combustion system caused by the flashback condition.

  3. [Ulcerative contact dermitis caused by premixed concrete (cement burns)].

    PubMed

    Ancona Alayón; Aranda Martínez, J G

    1978-01-01

    Cement dermatitis manifests clinically as a chronic dermatitis of irritative character, due to its alkaline nature and as allergic contact dermatitis produced by sensitization to chromium and cobalt occurring as trace elements. the present report deals with a mason without previous dermatitis, presenting bullae, ulcers and necrosis in lower limbs, short time after incidental contact at work, with premixed concrete. The clinical manifestations, such as short evolution, clear limitation to sites in close contact with concrete, negativity to standard patch testing and good prognosis with early treatment, are mentioned. The acute irritant nature of the disease is clear, in opposition to the classical manifestations of cement dermatitis. The need of studies of the chemical properties of this material including pH, alkalinity and the possible roll of additives employed, is part of the strategy for prevention of occupational dermatitis in the building trade, which should include also, information of hazards and proper training in their trade. PMID:162070

  4. Temperature and velocity measurements in premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dandekar, K. V.; Gouldin, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Turbulent flame speed data for premixed flames of methane-air, propane-air and ethylene-air mixtures stabilized in grid turbulence are reported and discussed. It is shown that turbulence effects on flame speed cannot be fully correlated by the turbulence length scale and r.m.s. velocity in the cold flow. Rather there appear to be significant flame-flow-turbulence interactions affecting both turbulence level in the reaction zone and measured flame speeds. Results of detailed velocity measurements, including autocorrelations, by laser velocimetry are used to elucidate the nature of these interactions. It is concluded that flame speed experiments must be designed and conducted to provide sufficient information (e.g., boundary conditions) to allow for reconstruction of the flow field and these interactions by modelers if the data are to be of value in turbulent combustion model development and evaluation.

  5. Pre-mixing apparatus for a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Zuo, Baifang; Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Felling, David Kenton; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2012-04-03

    A pre-mixing apparatus for a turbine engine includes a main body having an inlet portion, an outlet portion and an exterior wall that collectively establish at least one fluid delivery plenum, and a plurality of fluid delivery tubes extending through at least a portion of the at least one fluid delivery plenum. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes at least one fluid delivery opening fluidly connected to the at least one fluid delivery plenum. With this arrangement, a first fluid is selectively delivered to the at least one fluid delivery plenum, passed through the at least one fluid delivery opening and mixed with a second fluid flowing through the plurality of fluid delivery tubes prior to being combusted in a combustion chamber of a turbine engine.

  6. Premixed flame propagation in combustible particle cloud mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Yang, B.

    1993-01-01

    The structures of premixed flames propagating in combustible systems, containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles, in an oxidizing gas mixtures is analyzed. The experimental results show that steady flame propagation occurs even if the initial equivalence ratio of the combustible mixture based on the gaseous fuel available in the particles, phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. A model is developed to explain these experimental observations. In the model it is presumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical composition which then reacts with oxygen in a one-step overall process. It is shown that the interplay of vaporization kinetics and oxidation process, can result in steady flame propagation in combustible mixtures where the value of phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. This prediction is in agreement with experimental observations.

  7. A numerical investigation of premixed combustion in wave rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalim, M. Razi; Paxson, Daniel E.

    1996-01-01

    Wave rotor cycles which utilize premixed combustion processes within the passages are examined numerically using a one-dimensional CFD-based simulation. Internal-combustion wave rotors are envisioned for use as pressure-gain combustors in gas turbine engines. The simulation methodology is described, including a presentation of the assumed governing equations for the flow and reaction in the channels, the numerical integration method used, and the modeling of external components such as recirculation ducts. A number of cycle simulations are then presented which illustrate both turbulent-deflagration and detonation modes of combustion. Estimates of performance and rotor wall temperatures for the various cycles are made, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed.

  8. Behaviour of a Premixed Flame Subjected to Acoustic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shafiq R.; Khan, Waqar A.; Prosser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional premixed laminar methane flame is subjected to acoustic oscillations and studied. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the effects of acoustic perturbations on the reaction rates of different species, with a view to their respective contribution to thermoacoustic instabilities. Acoustically transparent non reflecting boundary conditions are employed. The flame response has been studied with acoustic waves of different frequencies and amplitudes. The integral values of the reaction rates, the burning velocities and the heat release of the acoustically perturbed flame are compared with the unperturbed case. We found that the flame's sensitivity to acoustic perturbations is greatest when the wavelength is comparable to the flame thickness. Even in this case, the perturbations are stable with time. We conclude that acoustic fields acting on the chemistry do not contribute significantly to the emergence of large amplitude pressure oscillations. PMID:24376501

  9. Development of a methane premixed catalytic burner for household applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cerri, I.; Saracco, G.; Geobaldo, F.; Specchia, V.

    2000-01-01

    A catalytic premixed burner prototype for domestic-boiler applications was developed on the basis of a perovskite-type catalyst (LaMnO{sub 3}) deposited over a FeCrAlloy fiber panel. An economic and simple catalyst-deposition route, based on in situ pyrolysis of suitable precursors, was conceived and optimized on purpose. Finally, a catalytic burner and a reference noncatalytic one were comparatively tested in a pilot plant (maximum power, 30 kW, corresponding to about 2,000 kW/m{sup 2}). The catalytic burner allowed a strong reduction of CO and unburned hydrocarbon (HC) emissions to very low and acceptable levels (down to 3--5 times lower than those of the noncatalytic burner) when operated below 800 kW/m{sup 2}. In these conditions, the NO{sub x} emissions remained quite acceptable and practically unaffected by the presence of the catalyst.

  10. Dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flames in mesoscale channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pizza, Gianmarco; Frouzakis, Christos E.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mantzaras, John; Tomboulides, Ananias G.

    2008-10-15

    Direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry and transport is used to study the stabilization and dynamics of lean ({phi}=0.5) premixed hydrogen/air atmospheric pressure flames in mesoscale planar channels. Channel heights of h=2, 4, and 7 mm, and inflow velocities in the range 0.3{<=}U{sub IN}{<=}1100cm/ s are investigated. Six different burning modes are identified: mild combustion, ignition/extinction, closed steady symmetric flames, open steady symmetric flames, oscillating and, finally, asymmetric flames. Chaotic behavior of cellular flame structures is observed for certain values of U{sub IN}. Stability maps delineating the regions of the different flame types are finally constructed. (author)

  11. Forum for Injection Techniques, India: The First Indian Recommendations for Best Practice in Insulin Injection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Baruah, Manash P.; Chadha, Manoj; Chandalia, Hemraj B.; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Kumar, K. M. Prasanna; Modi, Sonal; Pitale, Shailesh; Shukla, Rishi; Sahay, Rakesh; Sundaram, Annamalai; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G.; Wangnoo, Subhash K.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of diabetes have led to an increase in the number of injectable therapies, such as human insulin, insulin analogues, and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues. The efficacy of injection therapy in diabetes depends on correct injection technique, among many other factors. Good injection technique is vital in achieving glycemic control and thus preventing complications of diabetes. From the patients’ and health-care providers’ perspective, it is essential to have guidelines to understand injections and injection techniques. The abridged version of the First Indian Insulin Injection technique guidelines developed by the Forum for Injection Technique (FIT) India presented here acknowledge good insulin injection techniques and provide evidence-based recommendations to assist diabetes care providers in improving their clinical practice. PMID:23226630

  12. Hydrodynamic instability and shear layer effects in turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlimpert, S.; Feldhusen, A.; Grimmen, J. H.; Roidl, B.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2016-01-01

    A turbulent premixed plane jet flame is analyzed by large-eddy simulations. The analysis shows that the flame front wrinkling is strongly influenced by the shear layer effect when the gas expansion effects are small leading to larger flame front amplitudes at the flame base than at high gas expansion ratios. However, the hydrodynamic instability effect induces a continuously increasing flame front amplitude which yields an enhanced flame pocket generation at the flame tip. Both phenomena influence the magnitude of the turbulent burning area and burning area rate response through the flame front deflections which are determined by the contribution coefficient. This coefficient represents the mutual interaction between the flame and the flow. At low gas expansion ratios, the total heat release rate spectra of the turbulent flame are wider in terms of dominant modes at Strouhal numbers which are linked to the mean flame height oscillations. Thus, at low gas expansion ratios, the vortex-flame interaction is less damped by the flame in the sense that vortices can perturb the flame front stronger. The total heat release rate trend of St-2.2 previously found for a round jet flame is also determined for the current slot jet at realistic gas expansion ratios indicating a general tendency to transfer energy from large to small flame structures. At high gas expansion ratios, an increasing Markstein length leads to an energy transfer between neighboring dominant modes in the low frequency range 1 < St < 10 and the burning area rate response becomes more important for the total heat release rate spectra of the turbulent slot flames which agrees with recent findings for a laminar premixed plane flame.

  13. Stabilization of premixed flames on rotating Bunsen burners

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, J.M.; Sohrab, S.H.

    1996-09-01

    The effect of rotation on stabilization of methane-air premixed Bunsen flame sis experimentally investigated. Both the flame blowoff and flashback contours are determined in the fuel mole fraction versus Reynolds number plane (X{sub F}-Re) with the rotational Reynolds number Re{sub 4} as a parameter. It is found that rotation of the gas increases the flame stabilization area A{sub s} = A{sub B} {minus} A{sub F} defined as the difference between the flame blowoff A{sub B} and flashback A{sub F} areas in the (X{sub F}-Re) plane. The flame stabilization efficiency is defined as {eta}{sub s} = 1 {minus} A{sub F}/A{sub B} that approaches unity in either A{sub B} {yields} {infinity} or A{sub F} {yields} 0 limit. The experimental results suggest that rotation decreases the flame stabilization efficiency. However, rotation is found to substantially increase the flame stabilization coefficient defined as {beta}{sub s} = A{sub s}/A{sub st}, where A{sub st} is the stabilization area of the standard nonrotating burner. The parameters {eta}{sub s} and {beta}{sub s} may be useful in combustion technology for quantitative evaluation of the stabilization performance of different types of flame holders. In addition, the local hydrodynamics near the center of rotating Bunsen burner is simulated by investigating stabilization of planar laminar premixed flames on rotating porous disks with uniform surface velocity. Physical concepts concerning mechanisms of flame stabilization are discussed in terms of three important parameters namely the translational Reynolds number Re, the rotation Reynolds number Re{sub r}, and the fuel mole fraction X{sub F}. The results of the experimental findings are shown to be in accordance with prior theoretical investigation.

  14. On burner-stabilized cylindrical premixed flames in microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, J.A.; Law, C.K.; Zhu, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    The structure and response of the curved but unstretched cylindrically symmetric one-dimensional premixed flame generated by a cylindrical porous burner has been studied using (1) activation energy asymptotics with one-step reaction and constant properties, (2) numerical computation with detailed chemistry and transport, and (3) drop-tower microgravity experimentation. The study emphasizes the relative importance of heat loss (to the burner surface) vs flow divergence as the dominant mechanism for flame stabilization, the possibility of establishing a one-dimensional, adiabatic, unstretched, premixed flame in microgravity, the influence of curvature on the upstream and downstream burning rates of the flame, and the relation of these burning rates to those of the inherently nonadiabatic flat-burner flame as well as the freely propagating adiabatic planar flame. Results show that, with increasing flow discharge rate, the dominant flame stabilization mechanism changes from heat loss to flow divergence, hence demonstrating the feasibility of establishing a freely standing, adiabatic, one-dimensional, unstretched flame. It is further shown that, in this adiabatic, divergence-stabilized regime in which the burner discharge flux exceeds that of the adiabatic planar flame, the downstream burning flux is equal to the (constant) burning flux of the adiabatic planar flame while the upstream burning flux exceeds it, and the upstream burning velocity exhibits a maximum with increasing discharge rate. Based on the property of the downstream burning flux, it is also proposed that the laminar burning velocity of a combustible can be readily determined from the experimental values of the burner discharge rate and flame radius. Microgravity results on the flame radius compare favorably with the computed values, while the corresponding laminar burning velocity also agrees well with that obtained from independent numerical computation.

  15. Premixed-Gas Flame Propagation in Hele-Shaw Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharif, J.; Abid, M.; Ronney, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that buoyancy and thermal expansion affect the propagation ra and shapes of premixed gas flames. The understanding of such effects is complicated by the large density ratio between the reactants and products, which induces a baroclinic production of vorticity due to misalignment of density and pressure gradients at the front, which in turn leads to a complicated multi-dimensional flame/flow interaction. The Hele-Shaw cell, i.e., the region between closely-spaced flat parallel plates, is probably the simplest system in which multi-dimensional convection is presents consequently, the behavior of fluids in this system has been studied extensively (Homsy, 1987). Probably the most important characteristic of Hele-Shaw flows is that when the Reynolds number based on gap width is sufficiently small, the Navier-Stokes equations averaged over the gap reduce to a linear relation, namely a Laplace equation for pressure (Darcy's law). In this work, flame propagation in Hele-Shaw cells is studied to obtain a better understanding of buoyancy and thermal expansion effects on premixed flames. This work is also relevant to the study of unburned hydrocarbon emissions produced by internal combustion engines since these emissions are largely a result of the partial burning or complete flame quenching in the narrow, annular gap called the "crevice volume" between the piston and cylinder walls (Heywood, 1988). A better understanding of how flames propagate in these volumes through experiments using Hele-Shaw cells could lead to identification of means to reduce these emissions.

  16. Extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel

    SciTech Connect

    Alliche, Mounir; Haldenwang, Pierre; Chikh, Salah

    2010-06-15

    A local refinement method is used to numerically predict the propagation and extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel considering a thermodiffusive model. A local refinement method is employed because of the numerous length scales that characterize this phenomenon. The time integration is self adaptive and the solution is based on a multigrid method using a zonal mesh refinement in the flame reaction zone. The objective is to determine the conditions of extinction which are characterized by the flame structure and its properties. We are interested in the following properties: the curvature of the flame, its maximum temperature, its speed of propagation and the distance separating the flame from the wall. We analyze the influence of heat losses at the wall through the thermal conductivity of the wall and the nature of the fuel characterized by the Lewis number of the mixture. This investigation allows us to identify three propagation regimes according to heat losses at the wall and to the channel radius. The results show that there is an intermediate value of the radius for which the flame can bend and propagate provided that its curvature does not exceed a certain limit value. Indeed, small values of the radius will choke the flame and extinguish it. The extinction occurs if the flame curvature becomes too small. Furthermore, this study allows us to predict the limiting values of the heat loss coefficient at extinction as well as the critical value of the channel radius above which the premixed flame may propagate without extinction. A dead zone of length 2-4 times the flame thickness appears between the flame and the wall for a Lewis number (Le) between 0.8 and 2. For small values of Le, local extinctions are observed. (author)

  17. Numerical modeling of combustion dynamics in a lean premixed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.M.; Smith, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a time-accurate, 2-D axi-symmetric CFD model to accurately predict combustion dynamics in a premixed pipe combustor driven by mixture feed variation. Independently measured data, including the magnitude and frequency of combustor pressure, were used to evaluate the model. The Smagorinsky, RGN k-{var{underscore}epsilon}, and molecular viscosity models were used to describe the subgrid turbulence, and a one-step, finite-rate reaction to equilibrium products model was used to describe the subgrid chemistry. Swirl source terms were included within the premix passage's computational domain and allowed the model to retain known boundary conditions at the choked flow inlet and the constant pressure exit. To ensure pressure waves were accurately captured, 1-D numerical analyses were first performed to assess the effects of boundary conditions, temporal and spatial differencing, time step, and grid size. It was found that the selected numerical details produced little numerical dissipation of the pressure waves. Then, 2-D axisymmetric analyses were performed in which the inlet temperature was varied. It was found that increases in the inlet temperature (keeping a constant mass flow rate) had a large effect on the unsteady combustor behavior since reaction and advection rates were increased. The correct trend of decreasing rms pressures with increasing inlet temperature was predicted. This agreement in rms pressure behavior supports the ability of the CFD model to accurately capture unsteady heat release and its coupling with resonant acoustic waves in multi-dimensional combustor systems. The effect of subgrid turbulence model was small for the unstable cases studied here.

  18. Inhibition of premixed methane-air flames by fluoromethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Linteris, G.T.; Truett, L.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents the first calculations and measurements of the burning velocity of premixed hydrocarbon flames inhibited by the three one-carbon fluorinated species CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, CF{sub 3}H, and CF{sub 4}. Studying their behavior in methane flames provides an important first step towards understanding the suppression mechanism of hydrocarbon fires by fluorinated compounds. The burning velocity of premixed methane-air flames is determined using the total area method from a schlieren image of the flame. The inhibitors are tested over a range of concentration and fuel-air equivalence ratio, {phi}. The measured burning velocity reduction caused by addition of the inhibitor is compared with that predicted by numerical solution of the species and energy conservation equations employing a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism recently developed at NIST. Even in this first test of the kinetic mechanism on inhibited hydrocarbon flames, the numerically predicted burning velocity reductions for methane-air flames with values of {phi} of 0.9, 1.0, and 1.1 and inhibitor mole fractions in the unburned gases up to 0.08, are in excellent agreement for CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} and CF{sub 4} and within 35% for CF{sub 3}H. The numerical results indicate that the agents CF{sub 3}H and CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} are totally consumed in the flame and the burning velocity is reduced primarily by a reduction in the H-atom concentration through reactions leading to HF formation. In contrast, only about 10% of the CF{sub 4} is consumed and it reduces the burning velocity primarily by lowering the final temperature of the burned gases.

  19. Insulin Degludec (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... man-made version of human insulin. Insulin degludec works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced ... insulin label to make sure you received the right type of insulin from the pharmacy.Insulin degludec ...

  20. Embedded computer controlled premixing inline injection system for air-assisted variable-rate sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvements to reduce chemical waste and environmental pollution for variable-rate sprayers used in orchards and ornamental nurseries require inline injection techniques. A microprocessor controlled premixing inline injection system implementing a ceramic piston chemical metering pump and two small...

  1. LES and acoustic analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a partially premixed model combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Ignacio; Staffelbach, Gabriel; Poinsot, Thierry; Román Casado, Juan C.; Kok, Jim B. W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations were performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and acoustic analysis tools to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in a methane/air academic burner installed at the University of Twente (The Netherlands). It operates under fuel-lean partially premixed conditions at atmospheric pressure, and was built to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in conditions representative of gas turbine Lean Premixed systems: gaseous fuel is injected upstream of the combustor and has a limited time to mix with air. Even though the objective is to burn in a premixed mode, the actual regime corresponds to a partially premixed flame where strong equivalence ratio variations are created especially during combustion instabilities. Capturing these modes with LES is a challenge: here, simulations for both stable and unstable regimes are performed. In the unstable case, the limit cycle oscillations (LCO) are characterized and compared to experimental results. Reasonable agreement is found between simulations and experiments.

  2. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Li, Shan; Wang, Hu; Ren, Zhuyin

    2015-11-01

    Predictive simulations of turbulent premixed flames over a wide range of Damköhler numbers in the framework of Probability Density Function (PDF) method still remain challenging due to the deficiency in current micro-mixing models. In this work, a hybrid micro-mixing model, valid in both the flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime, is proposed. A priori testing of this model is first performed by examining the conditional scalar dissipation rate and conditional scalar diffusion in a 3-D direct numerical simulation dataset of a temporally evolving turbulent slot jet flame of lean premixed H2-air in the thin reaction zone regime. Then, this new model is applied to PDF simulations of the Piloted Premixed Jet Burner (PPJB) flames, which are a set of highly shear turbulent premixed flames and feature strong turbulence-chemistry interaction at high Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. Supported by NSFC 51476087 and NSFC 91441202.

  3. Comparison of a Multiple Daily Insulin Injection Regimen (Glargine or Detemir Once Daily Plus Prandial Insulin Aspart) and Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (Aspart) in Short-Term Intensive Insulin Therapy for Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wen-shan; Li, Li; Wen, Jun-ping; Pan, Rong-fang; Sun, Rui-xia; Wang, Jing; Xian, Yu-xin; Cao, Cai-xia; Gao, Yan-yan

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To examine the potential differences between multiple daily injection (MDI) regimens based on new long-acting insulin analogues (glargine or detemir) plus prandial insulin aspart and continuous subcutaneous insulin aspart infusion (CSII) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods. Patients (n = 119) with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes of a duration exceeding five years were randomly assigned into three groups: Group A treated with CSII using insulin aspart; Group B treated with glargine-based MDI and Group C treated with detemir-based MDI. Results. Good glycemic control was achieved by patients in Group A in a significantly shorter duration than patients in Groups B and C. Total daily insulin, basal insulin dose and dose per kg body weight in Group A were significantly less than those in Groups B and C. Daily blood glucose fluctuation in Group A was significantly less than that in Groups B and C. There were no differences between Groups B and C. Conclusions. Aspart-based CSII may achieve good blood glucose control with less insulin doses over a shorter period compared with glargine or detemir-based MDI. No differences between glargine- and detemir-based MDI were detected in poorly controlled subjects with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23737776

  4. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  5. Chemical Kinetic Study of Toluene Oxidation Under Premixed and Nonpremixed Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, I D; Bozzelli, J W; Seiser, R; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Chen, C -; Fournet, R; Seshadri, K; Battin-Leclerc, F; Billaud, F

    2003-12-10

    A study was performed to elucidate the chemical-kinetic mechanism of combustion of toluene. A detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for toluene was improved by adding a more accurate description of the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction channels, toluene decomposition reactions and the benzyl + O reaction. Results of the chemical kinetic mechanism are compared with experimental data obtained from premixed and non-premixed systems. Under premixed conditions, predicted ignition delay times are compared with new experimental data obtained in shock tube. Also, calculated species concentration histories are compared to experimental flow reactor data from the literature. Under non-premixed conditions, critical conditions of extinction and autoignition were measured in strained laminar flows in the counterflow configuration. Numerical calculations are performed using the chemical-kinetic mechanism at conditions corresponding to those in the experiments. Critical conditions of extinction and autoignition are predicted and compared with the experimental data. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental results of ignition delay times in shock tube, and extinction and autoignition in non-premixed systems show that the chemical-kinetic mechanism predicts that toluene/air is overall less reactive than observed in the experiments. For both premixed and non-premixed systems, sensitivity analysis was used to identify the reaction rate constants that control the overall rate of oxidation in each of the systems considered. Under shock tube conditions, the reactions that influence ignition delay time are H + O{sub 2} chain branching, the toluene decomposition reaction to give an H atom, and the toluene + H abstraction reaction. The reactions that influence autoignition in non-premixed systems involve the benzyl + HO{sub 2} reaction and the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction.

  6. Incorporating a Generic Model of Subcutaneous Insulin Absorption into the AIDA v4 Diabetes Simulator: 1. A Prospective Collaborative Development Plan

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Eldon D.; Tarín, Cristina; Bondia, Jorge; Teufel, Edgar; Deutsch, Tibor

    2007-01-01

    Introduction AIDA v4 is an interactive educational diabetes simulator that has been made available, for over a decade, without charge via the Internet. The software is currently freely accessible at http://www.2aida.org. This report sets out a collaborative development plan to enhance the program with a new model of subcutaneous insulin absorption, which permits the simulation of rapidly acting and very long-acting insulin analogues, as well as insulin injection doses larger than 40 units. Methods A novel, generic, physiological subcutaneous insulin absorption model is overviewed and a methodology is proposed by which this can be substituted in place of the previously adopted insulin absorption model utilized within AIDA v4.3a. Apart from this substitution it is proposed to retain the existing model of the glucoregulatory system currently used in AIDA v4.3a. Results Initial simulation results based on bench testing of this approach using MATLAB are presented for the exogenous insulin flow profile (Iex) following subcutaneous injections of a rapidly acting insulin analogue, a short-acting (regular) insulin preparation, intermediate-acting insulins (both Semilente and neutral protamine Hagedorn types), and a very long-acting insulin analogue. Discussion It is proposed to implement this collaborative development plan—first by bench testing the approach in MATLAB and then by integrating the generic subcutaneous insulin absorption Iex model into the AIDA simulator in Pascal. The aim is to provide enhanced functionality and educational simulations of regimens utilizing novel insulin analogues, as well as injections larger than 40 units of insulin. PMID:19885100

  7. The Behavior of Methane-Air Partially Premixed Flames Under Normal- and Zero-G Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Choi, Chun Wai; Hegde, Uday

    2001-01-01

    Partially premixed flames (PPFs) represent a class of hybrid flames containing multiple reaction zones. These flames are established when less than stoichiometric quantity of oxidizer is molecularly mixed with the fuel stream before entering the reaction zone where additional oxidizer is available for complete combustion. This mode of combustion can be used to exploit the advantages of both nonpremixed and premixed flames regarding operational safety, lower pollutant emissions and flame stabilization. A double flame containing a fuel-rich premixed reaction zone, which is anchored by a nonpremixed reaction zone, is one example of a partially premixed flame. A triple flame is also a PPF that contains three reaction zones, namely, a fuel-rich premixed zone, a fuel-lean premixed zone, and a nonpremixed reaction zone. Herein we focus on two aspects of our investigation, one involving the development of optical diagnostics that can be used on a microgravity rig, which has been recently fabricated, and the other on the numerically predicted differences between normal- and zero-gravity PPFs. Both the measurements and simulations examine the detailed structure of methane-air PPFs stabilized on a Wolfhard-Parker slot burner.

  8. Influence of Acarbose on Plasma Glucose Fluctuations in Insulin-Treated Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-fei; Xu, Xiao-hua; Fu, Li-yuan; Su, Xiao-fei; Wu, Jin-dan; Lu, Chun-feng; Ye, Lei; Ma, Jian-hua

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. To evaluate the effect of adding acarbose on glycemic excursions measured by continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) already on insulin therapy. Materials and Methods. This was an opened and unblended study. 134 patients with T2DM were recruited. After initial rapidly corrected hyperglycaemia by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for 7 d, a 4–6-day premixed insulin titration period subsequently followed. Patients were then randomized 1 : 1 to acarbose plus insulin group or insulin therapy group for 2 weeks. CGMS was used to measure glucose fluctuations for at least 3 days after therapy cessation. Results. Patients in acarbose plus insulin group achieved a significant improvement of MAGE compared to that of insulin therapy only group (5.56 ± 2.16 versus 7.50 ± 3.28 mmol/L, P = 0.044), accompanied by a significant decrease in the incremental AUC of plasma glucose concentration above 10.0 mmol/L (0.5 [0.03, 0.9] versus 0.85 [0.23,1.4]  mmol/L per day, P = 0.037). Conclusions. Add-on acarbose to insulin therapy further improves glucose fluctuation in patients with T2DM. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov registration number ChiCTR-TRC-11001218. PMID:26640487

  9. Phosphonomethyl analogues of hexose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Webster, D; Jondorf, W R; Dixon, H B

    1976-05-01

    The analogue of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in which the phosphate group, -O-PO3H2, on C-6 is replaced by the phosphonomethyl group, -CH2-PO3H2, was made enzymically from the corresponding analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate. It was a substrate for aldolase, which was used to form it, but not for fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase. It was hydrolysed chemically to yield the corresponding analogue of fructose 6-phosphate [i.e. 6-deoxy-6-(phosphonomethyl)-D-fructose, or, more strictly, 6,7-dideoxy-7-phosphono-D-arabino-2-heptulose]. This proved to be a substrate for the sequential actions of glucose 6-phosphate isomerase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Thus seven out of the nine enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways so far tested catalyse the reactions of the phosphonomethyl isosteres of their substrates. PMID:7247

  10. Determinants of intensive insulin therapeutic regimens in patients with type 1 diabetes: data from a nationwide multicenter survey in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the determinants of intensive insulin regimens (ITs) in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods This multicenter study was conducted between December 2008 and December 2010 in 28 public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities. Data were obtained from 3,591 patients (56.0% female, 57.1% Caucasian). Insulin regimens were classified as follows: group 1, conventional therapy (CT) (intermediate human insulin, one to two injections daily); group 2 (three or more insulin injections of intermediate plus regular human insulin); group 3 (three or more insulin injections of intermediate human insulin plus short-acting insulin analogues); group 4, basal-bolus (one or two insulin injections of long-acting plus short-acting insulin analogues or regular insulin); and group 5, basal-bolus with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Groups 2 to 5 were considered IT groups. Results We obtained complete data from 2,961 patients. Combined intermediate plus regular human insulin was the most used therapeutic regimen. CSII was used by 37 (1.2%) patients and IT by 2,669 (90.2%) patients. More patients on IT performed self-monitoring of blood glucose and were treated at the tertiary care level compared to CT patients (p < 0.001). The majority of patients from all groups had HbA1c levels above the target. Overweight or obesity was not associated with insulin regimen. Logistic regression analysis showed that economic status, age, ethnicity, and level of care were associated with IT (p < 0.001). Conclusions Given the prevalence of intensive treatment for T1D in Brazil, more effective therapeutic strategies are needed for long term-health benefits. PMID:24920963

  11. Flexibility in insulin prescription

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    This communication explores the concept of flexibility, a propos insulin preparations and insulin regimes used in the management of type 2 diabetes. The flexibility of an insulin regime or preparation is defined as their ability to be injected at variable times, with variable injection-meal time gaps, in a dose frequency and quantum determined by shared decision making, with a minimal requirement of glucose monitoring and health professional consultation, with no compromise on safety, efficiency and tolerability. The relative flexibility of various basal, prandial and dual action insulins, as well as intensive regimes, is compared. The biopsychosocial model of health is used to assess the utility of different insulins while encouraging a philosophy of flexible insulin usage. PMID:27186563

  12. Flexibility in insulin prescription.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    This communication explores the concept of flexibility, a propos insulin preparations and insulin regimes used in the management of type 2 diabetes. The flexibility of an insulin regime or preparation is defined as their ability to be injected at variable times, with variable injection-meal time gaps, in a dose frequency and quantum determined by shared decision making, with a minimal requirement of glucose monitoring and health professional consultation, with no compromise on safety, efficiency and tolerability. The relative flexibility of various basal, prandial and dual action insulins, as well as intensive regimes, is compared. The biopsychosocial model of health is used to assess the utility of different insulins while encouraging a philosophy of flexible insulin usage. PMID:27186563

  13. Short communication: Preference for flavored concentrate premixes by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Harper, M T; Oh, J; Giallongo, F; Lopes, J C; Weeks, H L; Faugeron, J; Hristov, A N

    2016-08-01

    Flavor preferences may be used to stimulate feed intake in dairy cows, which may improve use of robotic milking systems and increase feed intake of sick cows. A cafeteria-design experiment was used to determine if dairy cows have flavor preferences. Sixteen lactating Holstein cows averaging 197±32d in milk, 1.9±0.8 lactations, 27.8±4.2kg/d of dry matter intake, and 41.5±7.4kg/d of milk yield were involved in the experiment. Cows were offered 7 flavored concentrate premixes (FCP) and 1 control premix. The FCP flavors were anise, fenugreek, honey, orange, thyme, molasses, and vanilla; the absence of flavor, neutral, acted as a control. The inclusion rate of the flavors in FCP was 250 to 300g/t on an as-is basis. Cows were not adapted to the flavors before the experiment. Cows were housed in a tiestall barn and offered, on each day, 4 different FCP (1kg each) in plastic bins placed in front of each cow. The experiment lasted 6 consecutive days. Each FCP was presented to each cow once every 2d, 2h after the morning feeding. Flavors and position of the bins in front of the cows were randomized. As a result, each flavor was presented to each cow 3 times during the experiment, at 3 different bin locations. Each cow had access to the FCP for 5min from the time they started eating. Eating time and amount eaten were recorded. The vanilla and fenugreek FCP were consumed the most, at 408 and 371g/5-min offering, respectively, whereas the orange and anise FCP were consumed the least, at 264 and 239g/5-min offering, respectively. Similarly, cows spent the most time eating the vanilla and fenugreek FCP at 99 and 75 s/offering, respectively, and the least amount of time eating the orange and anise FCP at 49 and 50 s/offering, respectively. We detected an effect of bin position: the 2 center FCP were consumed more than the outer 2 FCP. Flavor had no effect on consumption rate. In conclusion, relative to the control, concentrate intake was not affected by flavor, but dairy cows

  14. Partially-Premixed Flames in Internal Combustion Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Pitz; Michael C. Drake; Todd D. Fansler; Volker Sick

    2003-11-05

    This was a joint university-industry research program funded by the Partnerships for the Academic-Industrial Research Program (PAIR). The research examined partially premixed flames in laboratory and internal combustion engine environments at Vanderbilt University, University of Michigan, and General Motors Research and Development. At Vanderbilt University, stretched and curved ''tubular'' premixed flames were measured in a unique optically accessible burner with laser-induced spontaneous Raman scattering. Comparisons of optically measured temperature and species concentration profiles to detailed transport, complex chemistry simulations showed good correspondence at low-stretch conditions in the tubular flame. However, there were significant discrepancies at high-stretch conditions near flame extinction. The tubular flame predictions were found to be very sensitive to the specific hydrogen-air chemical kinetic mechanism and four different mechanisms were compared. In addition, the thermo-diffusive properties of the deficient reactant, H2, strongly affected the tubular flame structure. The poor prediction near extinction is most likely due to deficiencies in the chemical kinetic mechanisms near extinction. At the University of Michigan, an optical direct-injected engine was built up for laser-induced fluorescence imaging experiments on mixing and combustion under stratified charge combustion conditions with the assistance of General Motors. Laser attenuation effects were characterized both experimentally and numerically to improve laser imaging during the initial phase of the gasoline-air mixture development. Toluene was added to the isooctane fuel to image the fuel-air equivalence ratio in an optically accessible direct-injected gasoline engine. Temperature effects on the toluene imaging of fuel-air equivalence ratio were characterized. For the first time, oxygen imaging was accomplished in an internal combustion engine by combination of two fluorescence trackers

  15. Numerical computations and optical diagnostics of unsteady partially premixed methane/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Nogenmyr, K.J.; Bai, X.S.; Kiefer, J.; Li, Z.S.; Alden, M.

    2010-05-15

    The structures and dynamics of unsteady laminar partially premixed methane/air Bunsen flames are studied by means of numerical simulations, OH and CH PLIF imaging, and high speed chemiluminescence imaging employing a high framing speed intensified charge coupled device camera. The Bunsen burner has a diameter of 22 mm. Rich methane/air mixtures with an equivalence ratio of 1.5 are injected from the burner into atmosphere at different flow speeds ranging from 0.77 to 1.7 m/s, with Reynolds numbers based on the nozzle flow ranging from 1100 to 2500. The numerical simulations are based on a two-scalar flamelet manifold tabulation approach. Detailed chemistry is used to generate the flamelet manifold tabulation which relates the species concentrations, reaction rates, temperature and density to a distance function G and mixture fraction Z. Two distinct reaction zones are identified using CH and OH PLIF imaging and numerical simulations; one inner reaction zone corresponds to premixed flames on the rich side of the mixture and one outer reaction zone corresponds to mixing controlled diffusion flames on the lean side of the mixture. Under normal gravity conditions both the inner premixed flames and the outer diffusion flames are unsteady. The outer diffusion flames oscillate with a flickering frequency of about 15 Hz, which slightly increases with the burner exit velocity. The inner premixed flames are more random with much more small-scale wrinkling structures. Under zero gravity conditions the outer diffusion flames are stable whereas the inner premixed flames are unstable and highly wrinkled. It appears that the outer diffusion flames are governed by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability whereas the inner premixed flames are dictated by Landau-Darrieus instability. The two-scalar flamelet approach is shown to capture the basic structures and dynamics of the investigated unsteady partially premixed flames. (author)

  16. Insulin structure and function.

    PubMed

    Mayer, John P; Zhang, Faming; DiMarchi, Richard D

    2007-01-01

    Throughout much of the last century insulin served a central role in the advancement of peptide chemistry, pharmacology, cell signaling and structural biology. These discoveries have provided a steadily improved quantity and quality of life for those afflicted with diabetes. The collective work serves as a foundation for the development of insulin analogs and mimetics capable of providing more tailored therapy. Advancements in patient care have been paced by breakthroughs in core technologies, such as semisynthesis, high performance chromatography, rDNA-biosynthesis and formulation sciences. How the structural and conformational dynamics of this endocrine hormone elicit its biological response remains a vigorous area of study. Numerous insulin analogs have served to coordinate structural biology and biochemical signaling to provide a first level understanding of insulin action. The introduction of broad chemical diversity to the study of insulin has been limited by the inefficiency in total chemical synthesis, and the inherent limitations in rDNA-biosynthesis and semisynthetic approaches. The goals of continued investigation remain the delivery of insulin therapy where glycemic control is more precise and hypoglycemic liability is minimized. Additional objectives for medicinal chemists are the identification of superagonists and insulins more suitable for non-injectable delivery. The historical advancements in the synthesis of insulin analogs by multiple methods is reviewed with the specific structural elements of critical importance being highlighted. The functional refinement of this hormone as directed to improved patient care with insulin analogs of more precise pharmacology is reported. PMID:17410596

  17. Numerical evaluation of equivalence ratio measurement using OH{sup *} and CH{sup *} chemiluminescence in premixed and non-premixed methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Panoutsos, C.S.; Hardalupas, Y.; Taylor, A.M.K.P.

    2009-02-15

    This work presents results from detailed chemical kinetics calculations of electronically excited OH (A{sup 2}{sigma}, denoted as OH{sup *}) and CH (A{sup 2}{delta}, denoted as CH{sup *}) chemiluminescent species in laminar premixed and non-premixed counterflow methane-air flames, at atmospheric pressure. Eight different detailed chemistry mechanisms, with added elementary reactions that account for the formation and destruction of the chemiluminescent species OH{sup *} and CH{sup *}, are studied. The effects of flow strain rate and equivalence ratio on the chemiluminescent intensities of OH{sup *}, CH{sup *} and their ratio are studied and the results are compared to chemiluminescent intensity ratio measurements from premixed laminar counterflow natural gas-air flames. This is done in order to numerically evaluate the measurement of equivalence ratio using OH{sup *} and CH{sup *} chemiluminescence, an experimental practise that is used in the literature. The calculations reproduced the experimental observation that there is no effect of strain rate on the chemiluminescent intensity ratio of OH{sup *} to CH{sup *}, and that the ratio is a monotonic function of equivalence ratio. In contrast, the strain rate was found to have an effect on both the OH{sup *} and CH{sup *} intensities, in agreement with experiment. The calculated OH{sup *}/CH{sup *} values showed that only five out of the eight mechanisms studied were within the same order of magnitude with the experimental data. A new mechanism, proposed in this work, gave results that agreed with experiment within 30%. It was found that the location of maximum emitted intensity from the excited species OH{sup *} and CH{sup *} was displaced by less than 65 and 115 {mu}m, respectively, away from the maximum of the heat release rate, in agreement with experiments, which is small relative to the spatial resolution of experimental methods applied to combustion applications, and, therefore, it is expected that intensity

  18. Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... pumps contain enough insulin for several days. An infusion set carries insulin from the pump to the ... tube or needle inserted under the skin. Disposable infusion sets are used with insulin pumps to deliver ...

  19. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  20. Possible involvement of the A/sup 20/-A/sup 21/ peptide bond in the expression of the biological activity of insulin. 2. (21-Asparagine diethylamide-A)insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.C.; Burke, G.T.; Chanley, J.D.; Katsoyannis, P.G.

    1987-11-03

    The authors have synthesized (21-asparagine diethylamide-A)insulin, which differs from the parent molecule in that the free carboxyl group of the C-terminal amino acid residue, asparagine, of the A chain moiety has been converted to a diethylamide group. The analogue displays equivalent potency in receptor binding and biological activity, 48% and 56%, respectively, relative to bovine insulin. In contrast, they have reported previously that (21-asparaginamide-A)insulin exhibits a divergence in these properties, ca. 60% in receptor binding and ca. 13% in biological activity. The disparity in the biological behavior of these analogues is discussed, and we ascribe the modulation of biological activity independent of receptor binding activity observed between these analogues to the difference in the negativity of the carbonyl oxygen of the A chain moiety C-terminal amino acid residue.

  1. Binding and degradation of /sup 125/I-insulin by renal glomeruli and tubules isolated from rats

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Freychet, P.

    1982-04-01

    Isolated rat renal glomeruli and tubules were shown to exhibit specific binding of /sup 125/I-insulin and enzymatic degradation of the hormone. Binding to both renal fractions reached a plateau by 1 h at 22/sup 0/C and increased linearly with increasing protein concentrations. Binding was inhibited in both preparations by insulin and its analogues in the order of relative potency: insulin > despentapeptide insulin > proinsulin, but insulin was ten times more potent in inhibiting /sup 125/I-insulin binding to glomeruli than that to tubules, indicating a different affinity of receptors for the hormone in the two renal fractions (about 17 versus 210 ..mu..g unlabelled insulin/1 inhibiting 50% of the /sup 125/I-insulin binding to glomeruli and tubules, respectively). Bound /sup 125/I-insulin dissociated at a faster rate from tubules than from glomeruli; this release was accelerated by unlabelled insulin in both renal fractions, but to a greater extent in glomeruli than in tubules. Two-thirds of the total bound material released from glomeruli was found to be intact insulin as measured by trichloroacetic acid precipitation, whereas only one-third of the material released from tubules was intact. No direct relationship between binding and degradation of /sup 125/I-insulin in these renal fractions could be demonstrated, however, because of the release of proteolytic enzymes into the incubation medium resulting in almost all degradation being extracellular. Although differing in their affinity for /sup 125/I-insulin the high affinity glomerular insulin receptor and the lower affinity tubular insulin receptor have characteristics similar to those of insulin receptors in insulin responsive tissues.

  2. Freely propagating open premixed turbulent flames stabilized by swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.K.; Lau, K.S.; Chin, W.K.; Cheng, R.K.

    1991-12-01

    A novel means has been developed for using weak swirl to stabilize freely propagating open premixed turbulent flames (swirl numbers between 0.05 to 0.3). By injecting a small amount of air tangentially into the co-flow of a concentric burner, stationary flames can be maintained above the burner exit for a large range of mixture, turbulence and flow conditions. The absence of physical surfaces in the vicinity of the flame provides free access to laser diagnostics. Laser Doppler anemometry and laser Mie scattering measurements of four flames with and without incident turbulence show that their features are typical of wrinkled laminar flames. The most distinct characteristics is that flame stabilization does not rely on flow recirculation. Centrifugal force induced by swirl causes flow divergence, and the flame is maintained at where the local mass flux balances the burning rate. The flame speeds can be estimated based on the centerline velocity vector, which is locally normal to the flame brush. This flame geometry is the closest approximation to the 1-D planar flame for determining fundamental properties to advance turbulent combustion theories. 18 refs.

  3. Numerical simulation of premixed flame propagation in a closed tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuu, Kazuto; Ishii, Katsuya; Kuwahara, Kunio

    1996-08-01

    Premixed flame propagation of methane-air mixture in a closed tube is estimated through a direct numerical simulation of the three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations coupled with chemical reaction. In order to deal with a combusting flow, an extended version of the MAC method, which can be applied to a compressible flow with strong density variation, is employed as a numerical method. The chemical reaction is assumed to be an irreversible single step reaction between methane and oxygen. The chemical species are CH 4, O 2, N 2, CO 2, and H 2O. In this simulation, we reproduce a formation of a tulip flame in a closed tube during the flame propagation. Furthermore we estimate not only a two-dimensional shape but also a three-dimensional structure of the flame and flame-induced vortices, which cannot be observed in the experiments. The agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data is satisfactory, and we compare the phenomenon near the side wall with the one in the corner of the tube.

  4. Lean premixed flames for low NO{sub x} combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, P.; Tseng, L.; Bryyjak, J.

    1995-12-31

    The overall objectives of the research at Purdue are to: obtain a reduced mechanism description of high pressure NO formation chemistry using experiments and calculations for laminar lean premixed methane air flames, develop a statistical model of turbulence NO chemistry interactions using a Bunsen type jet flame, and utilize the high pressure chemistry and turbulence models in a commercial design code, then evaluate its predictions using data from an analog gas turbine combustor. Work to date has resulted in the following achievements: spatially resolved measurements of NO in high-pressure high-temperature flat flames, plus evaluation of the influence of flame radiation on the measured temperature profile; measurements of temperature and velocity PDFs for a turbulent methane/air flame were obtained for the first time, under operating conditions which allow their study in the distributed regimes, and the increase in EINO{sub x} with equivalence ratio predicted using a chemical kinetics model; and simulation of non-reacting combustor flow fields from ambient to elevated pressure and temperature conditions and comparison of those results with experimental velocity profiles.

  5. Blowoff dynamics of bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Kostka, Stanislav; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2010-04-15

    This article concerns the flame dynamics of a bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches lean blowoff. Time resolved chemiluminescence imaging along with simultaneous particle image velocimetry and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence were utilized in an axisymmetric bluff body stabilized, propane-air flame to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff and provide a quantitative analysis of the experimental results. It was found that as lean blowoff is approached by reduction of equivalence ratio, flame speed decreases and the flame shape progressively changes from a conical to a columnar shape. For a stably burning conical flame away from blowoff, the flame front envelopes the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, the columnar flame front and shear layer vortices overlap to induce high local stretch rates that exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously and in the mean, resulting in local flame extinction along the shear layers. Following shear layer extinction, fresh reactants can pass through the shear layers to react within the recirculation zone with all other parts of the flame extinguished. This flame kernel within the recirculation zone may survive for a few milliseconds and can reignite the shear layers such that the entire flame is reestablished for a short period. This extinction and reignition event can happen several times before final blowoff which occurs when the flame kernel fails to reignite the shear layers and ultimately leads to total flame extinguishment. (author)

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in non-premixed reacting flames.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2015-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) occurs at a perturbed interface between fluids of different densities when a light fluid pushes a heavier fluid. The mixing driven by RTI affects several physical phenomena, such as Inertial Confinement Fusion, Supernovae detonation, centrifugal combustors and liquid rocket engines. The RTI in such flows is often coupled with chemical/nuclear reactions that may form complex density stratifications in the form of flames or ablative layers. We investigate such a non-premixed fuel-air interface subject to a constant acceleration and developing under the influence of chemical reactions using high-resolution, Navier-Stokes simulations. The H2 fuel is diluted with N2 to vary the density difference across the interface in thermal equilibrium (at 1000K). The intervening layer between fuel and air is subject to exothermic combustion reactions to form a flame. Following combustion, initially unstable fuel-air interfaces at an Atwood number (At) <0.5, transform into stable (fuel-flame) and unstable (flame-air) interfaces. We report on interfaces (At = 0.2 and 0.6) with single wavelength, sinusoidal perturbations and a broadband spectrum of multimode perturbations.

  7. Transport of inertial particles in a turbulent premixed jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, F.; Picano, F.; Troiani, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    The heat release, occurring in reacting flows, induces a sudden fluid acceleration which particles follow with a certain lag, due to their finite inertia. Actually, the coupling between particle inertia and the flame front expansion strongly biases the spatial distribution of the particles, by inducing the formation of localized clouds with different dimensions downstream the thin flame front. A possible indicator of this preferential localization is the so-called Clustering Index, quantifying the departure of the actual particle distribution from the Poissonian, which would correspond to a purely random spatial arrangement. Most of the clustering is found in the flame brush region, which is spanned by the fluctuating instantaneous flame front. The effect is significant also for very light particles. In this case a simple model based on the Bray-Moss-Libby formalism is able to account for most of the deviation from the Poissonian. When the particle inertia increases, the effect is found to increases and persist well within the region of burned gases. The effect is maximum when the particle relaxation time is of the order of the flame front time scale. The evidence of this peculiar source of clustering is here provided by data from a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent premixed jet flame and confirmed by experimental data.

  8. Effect of dilatation on scalar dissipation in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, N.; Bray, K.N.C.

    2005-12-01

    The scalar dissipation rate signifies the local mixing rate and thus plays a vital role in the modeling of reaction rate in turbulent flames. The local mixing rate is influenced by the turbulence, the chemical, and the molecular diffusion processes which are strongly coupled in turbulent premixed flames. Thus, a model for the mean scalar dissipation rate, and hence the mean reaction rate, should include the contributions of these processes. Earlier models for the scalar dissipation rate include only a turbulence time scale. In this study, we derive exact transport equations for the instantaneous and the mean scalar dissipation rates. Using these equations, a simple algebraic model for the mean scalar dissipation rate is obtained. This model includes a chemical as well as a turbulence time scale and its prediction compares well with direct numerical simulation results. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculations of a test flame using the model obtained here show that the contribution of dilatation to local turbulent mixing rate is important to predict the propagation phenomenon.

  9. A test device for premixed gas turbine combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S.; Yip, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    This report discusses design and operation of a single-nozzle test combustor for studying lean, premixed combustion oscillations from gas turbine fuel nozzles. It was used to study oscillations from a prototype fuel nozzle that produced oscillations during testing in a commercial engine. Similar, but not identical, oscillations were recorded in the test device. Basic requirements of the device design were that the flame geometry be maintained and acoustic losses be minimized; this was achieved by using a Helmholtz resonator as the combustor geometry. Surprisingly, the combustor oscillated strongly at several frequencies, without modification of the resonator. Brief survey of operating conditions suggests that it may be helpful to characterize oscillating behavior in terms of reference velocity and inlet air temperature with the rig backpressure playing a smaller role. The preliminary results do not guarantee that the single-nozzle test device will reproduce arbitrary oscillations that occur on a complete engine test. Nozzle/nozzle interactions may complicate the response, and oscillations controlled by acoustic velocities transverse to the nozzle axis may not be reproduced in a test device that relies on a bulk Helmholtz mode. Nevertheless, some oscillations can be reproduced, and the single-nozzle test device allows both active and passive control strategies to be tested relatively inexpensively.

  10. Development of a lean premixed burner for hydrogen utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.O.

    1996-10-01

    The long-term mandate of the hydrogen program is to develop the technologies needed to establish a hydrogen economy. Although a hydrogen fueled automobile has been established as a demonstration project, there are at least three other end use sectors that are recognized by the H{sub 2} program and that are addressed by this project. These end uses are: (1) power generation from stationary turbines, (2) generation of process heat or steam, and (3) commercial and residential direct use applications. Eliminating carbon from the fuel will remove carbon containing species from the emissions, however, NO{sub x} resulting from thermal NO production cannot be ignored. Thermal NO production is minimized by reducing the peak combustion temperature and the residence time at the peak temperature. NO can be reduced to extremely low levels (a few ppm) by operating sufficiently lean to reduce the peak combustion temperatures below 1700 to 1800 K. The objectives for this project are to: (1) develop an environmentally benign and safe burner operating on hydrogen in a lean premixed mode, (2) provide a facility in which fundamental investigations can be performed to support other programs.

  11. A ring stabilizer for lean premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.R.; Kostiuk, L.W.; Cheng, R.K.

    1998-08-01

    In previous experiments on conical flame behavior in microgravity, which were conducted in drop-towers and in airplanes, the use of a pilot flame was not an option. To permit combustion of stable lean premixed conical flames without a pilot, a ring stabilizer was developed. Although similar types of bluff-body stabilization have been used in the past, the ring stabilizer is somewhat unique. It is designed to fit inside the burner exit port and has demonstrated to be highly effective in stabilizing flames over a very wide range of conditions (including ultra-lean flames at high flow-rates) without adversely affecting flame emissions. Unlike a simple rod stabilizer or a stagnation flame system, the benefit of having the stabilizer conform to the burner port is that there is very little leakage of the unburned fuel. The purpose of this brief communication is to offer this simple and highly useful device to the combustion research community. Presented are highlights of a parametric study that measured the stabilization limits and pollutant emissions of several different rings, and demonstrated their potential for use in practical systems.

  12. Torch ignition: Ideal for lean burn premixed-charge engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mavinahally, N.S. ); Assanis, D.N. ); Govinda Mallan, K.R.; Gopalakrishnan, K.V. )

    1994-10-01

    Sluggish flame initiation and propagation, and even potential misfiring, become major problems with lean-fueled, premixed-charge, spark-ignited engines. This work studies torch ignition as a means for improving combustion, fuel economy, and emissions of a retrofitted, large combustion chamber with nonideal spark plug location. A number of alternative configurations, employing different torch chamber designs, spark-plug locations, and materials, were tested under full-load and part-load conditions. Results indicate a considerable extension of the lean operating limit of the engine, especially under part-load conditions. In addition, torch ignition can lead to substantial thermal efficiency gains for either leaner or rich air-fuel ratios than the optimum for the conventional ignition system. On the richer side, in particular, the torch-ignited engine is capable of operating at maximum brake torque spark timings, rather than compromised, knock-limited spark timings used with conventional ignition. This translates into thermal efficiency improvements as high as 8% at an air-fuel ratio of 20:1 and full load.

  13. Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, premixed flames: the transition to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Elizabeth; Rosner, Robert

    2010-11-01

    A premixed flame moving against a sufficiently strong gravitational field becomes deformed and creates vorticity. If gravity is strong enough, this vorticity is shed and deposited behind the flame front. We present two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of this vortex shedding process and its effect on the flame front for various values of the gravitational force. The flame and its shed vortices go through the following stages as gravity is increased: no vorticity and a flat flame front; long vortices attached to a cusped flame front; instability of the attached vortices and vortex shedding (Hopf bifurcation); disruption of the flame front by the shed vortices, causing the flame to pulsate; loss of left/right symmetry (period doubling); dominance of Rayleigh-Taylor instability over burning (torus bifurcation); and, finally, complex interactions between the flame front and the vortices. We measure the subsequent wrinkling of the flame front by computing its fractal dimension and also measure mixing behind the flame front by computing the finite-time Lyapunov exponents.

  14. Direct simulations of premixed turbulent flames with nonunity Lewis numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Rutland, C.J.; Trouve, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA . Center for Turbulence Research)

    1993-07-01

    A principal effect of turbulence on premixed flames in the flamelet regime is to wrinkle the flame fronts. For nonunity Lewis numbers, Le [ne] 1, the local flame structure is altered in curved regions. This effect is examined using direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional isotropic turbulence with constant density, single-step Arrhenius kinetics chemistry. Simulations of Lewis numbers 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 are compared. At the local level, curvature effects dominated changes to the flame structure while strain effects were insignificant. A strong Lewis-number-dependent correlation was found between surface curvature and the local flame speed. The correlation was positive for Le < 1 and negative for Le > 1. At the global level, strain-related effects were more significant than curvature effects. The turbulent flame speed changed significantly with Lewis number, increasing as Le decreased. This was found to be due to strain effect that have a nonzero mean over the flame surface, rather than to curvature effects that have a nearly zero mean. The mean product temperature was also found to vary with Lewis number, being higher for Le > 1 and lower for Le < 1.

  15. A tomographic study of premixed turbulent stagnation point flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G.; Cheng, R.K.; Goix, P.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-10-01

    The high speed tomographic technique has been used to study premixed flame propagation in stagnation flow stabilized flames. Studies are performed on CH4/Air and C2H4/Air flames with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.75 to 1.0. The gas velocity at the nozzle exit is 5 m/s, the turbulence intensity is varied from 5% to 7% and the turbulence Reynolds number is 70. The light source is a copper vapor laser which produces 20ns, 5 mJ pulses at a 4KHz repetition rate. Cylindrical lenses transform the 38 mm circular laser beam to a sheet 50 mm high and 0.6 mm thick. A high speed Fastax camera is used to record the tomographic images. The films are digitized and the flame front extracted from the images by a thresholding technique. A fractal analysis was performed on the flame boundaries in order to characterize the flame geometry and provide an estimate of the flame surface area. The flame area increase was found to give a reasonable estimate of the burning rate when compared with other methods if the effects of flow tube divergence were considered. Characteristic wrinkle sizes were found to be much larger than the length scales of the turbulence in the reactant stream. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Direct simulations of premixed turbulent flames with nonunity Lewis numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutland, C. J.; Trouve, A.

    1993-01-01

    A principal effect of turbulence on premixed flames in the flamelet regime is to wrinkle the flame fronts. For nonunity Lewis numbers, Le is not equal to 1, the local flame structure is altered in curved regions. This effect is examined using direct numerical simulations of 3D isotropic turbulence with constant density, single-step Arrhenius kinetics chemistry. Simulations of Lewis numbers 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 are compared. At the local level, curvature effects dominated changes to the flame structure while strain effects were insignificant. A strong Lewis-number-dependent correlation was found between surface curvature and the local flame speed. The correlation was positive for Le less than 1 and negative for Le greater than 1. At the global level, strain-related effects were more significant than curvature effects. The turbulent flame speed changed significantly with Lewis number, increasing as Le decreased. This was found to be due to strain effects that have a nonzero mean over the flame surface, rather than to curvature effects that have a nearly zero mean. The mean product temperature was also found to vary with Lewis number, being higher for Le greater than 1 and lower for Le less than 1.

  17. Stationary premixed flames in spherical and cylindrical geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, P. D.; Whaling, K. N.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Gatto, J. L.; Pisowiscz, V. L.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary source-free spherical flames ('flame balls') in premixed combustible gases were studied by employing low-gravity (micro-g) environments in a drop tower and an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories to diminish the impact of buoyancy-induced convective flow. Flame balls were found in all mixture families tested when: (1) the Lewis number Le of the deficient reactant was sufficiently low; and (2) the compositions were sufficiently close to the flammability limits. Probably as a consequence of the reduction in buoyant convection, the flammability limits at micro-g were significantly more dilute than those at Earth gravity; for example, 3.35% H2 vs 4.0% H2 in lean H2-air mixtures. By comparison with analytical and computational models, it is inferred that the phenomenon is probably related to diffusive-thermal effects in low-Le mixtures in conjunction with flame-front curvature and radiative heat losses from the combustion products. The chemical reaction mechanism appears to play no qualitative role. In the aircraft experiments, the gravity levels (approximately equal 10(exp -2)g(sub 0)) were found to cause noticeable motion of flame balls due to buoyancy, which in turn influenced the behavior of flame balls. At these g levels, a new type of transient, nearly cylindrical flame structure, termed 'flame strings,' was observed.

  18. Monitoring and inhibition of insulin fibrillation by a small organic fluorogen with aggregation-induced emission characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yuning; Meng, Luming; Chen, Sijie; Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Da, Lin-Tai; Faisal, Mahtab; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Liu, Jianzhao; Lam, Jacky Wing Yip; Huang, Xuhui; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2012-01-25

    Amyloid fibrillation of proteins is associated with a great variety of pathologic conditions. Development of new molecules that can monitor amyloidosis kinetics and inhibit fibril formation is of great diagnostic and therapeutic value. In this work, we have developed a biocompatible molecule that functions as an ex situ monitor and an in situ inhibitor for protein fibrillation, using insulin as a model protein. 1,2-Bis[4-(3-sulfonatopropoxyl)phenyl]-1,2-diphenylethene salt (BSPOTPE) is nonemissive when it is dissolved with native insulin in an incubation buffer but starts to fluoresce when it is mixed with preformed insulin fibril, enabling ex situ monitoring of amyloidogenesis kinetics and high-contrast fluorescence imaging of protein fibrils. Premixing BSPOTPE with insulin, on the other hand, inhibits the nucleation process and impedes the protofibril formation. Increasing the dose of BSPOTPE boosts its inhibitory potency. Theoretical modeling using molecular dynamics simulations and docking reveals that BSPOTPE is prone to binding to partially unfolded insulin through hydrophobic interaction of the phenyl rings of BSPOTPE with the exposed hydrophobic residues of insulin. Such binding is assumed to have stabilized the partially unfolded insulin and obstructed the formation of the critical oligomeric species in the protein fibrillogenesis process. PMID:22191699

  19. Possible involvement of the A/sup 20/-A/sup 21/ peptide bond in the expression of the biological activity of insulin. 3. (21-Desasparagine,20-cysteine ethylamide-A)insulin and (21-desasparagine,20-cysteine 2,2,2-trifluoroethylamide-A)insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.C.; Wang, R.Y.; Burke, G.T.; Chanley, J.D.; Katsoyannis, P.G.

    1987-11-03

    The authors have synthesized (21-desasparagine,20-cysteine ethylamide-A)insulin and (21-desasparagine,20-cysteine,2,2,2,-trifluoroethylamide-A)insulin, which differ from natural insulin in that the C-terminal amino residue of the A chain, asparagine, has been removed and the resulting free carboxyl group of the A/sup 20/ cysteine residue has been converted to an ethylamide and a trifluoroethylamide group, respectively. (21-Desasparagine,20-cysteine ethylamide-A)insulin displayed equivalent potency in receptor binding and biological activity, ca. 12% and ca. 14%, respectively, relative to bovine insulin. In contrast, (21-desasparagine,20-cysteine 2,2,2-trifluoroethylamide-A)insulin displayed a divergence in these properties, ca. 13% in receptor binding and ca. 6% in biological activity. This disparity is ascribed to a difference in the electronic state of the A/sup 20/-A/sup 21/ amide bond in these two analogues. A model is proposed to account for the observation of divergence between receptor binding and biological activity in a number of synthetic insulin analogues and naturally occurring insulins. In this model, changes in the electronic state and/or the orientation of the A/sup 20/-A/sup 21/ amide bond can modulate biological activity independently of receptor binding affinity. The A/sup 20/-A/sup 21/ amide bond is thus considered as an important element in the message region of insulin.

  20. Photon-counting chirped amplitude modulation lidar using a smart premixing method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhang, Jianlong; Wu, Long; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yuan; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-11-01

    We proposed a new premixing method for photon-counting chirped amplitude modulation lidar (PCCAML). Earlier studies used the counting results of the returned signal detected by a Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector (Gm-APD) to mix with the reference signal, called the postmixing method. We use an alternative method known as the premixing method, in which the reference signal is used to directly modulate the sampling gate width of the Gm-APD, and the mixing of the returned signal and the reference signal is completed before the Gm-APD. This premixing method is more flexible and may perform better than the postmixing method in terms of signal-to-noise ratio by cutting down a separated mixer commonly used in the postmixing lidar system. Furthermore, this premixing method lowers the demand for the sampling frequency of the Gm-APD. It allows the use of a much wider modulation bandwidth to improve the range accuracy and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to use the premixing method in the PCCAML system, which will benefit future lidar applications. PMID:24177101

  1. Response of partially premixed flames to acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A.

    2010-09-15

    This article describes an experimental investigation of the forced response of a swirl-stabilized partially premixed flame when it is subjected to acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio fluctuations. The flame's response is analyzed using phase-resolved CH{sup *} chemiluminescence images and flame transfer function (FTF) measurements, and compared with the response of a perfectly premixed flame under acoustic perturbations. The nonlinear response of the partially premixed flame is manifested by a partial extinction of the reaction zone, leading to rapid reduction of flame surface area. This nonlinearity, however, is observed only when the phase difference between the acoustic velocity and the equivalence ratio at the combustor inlet is close to zero. The condition, {delta}{phi}{sub {phi}}'-V'{approx}0 , indicates that reactant mixtures with high equivalence ratio impinge on the flame front with high velocity, inducing large fluctuations of the rate of heat release. It is found that the phase difference between the acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio nonuniformities is a key parameter governing the linear/nonlinear response of a partially premixed flame, and it is a function of modulation frequency, inlet velocity, fuel injection location, and fuel injector impedance. The results presented in this article will provide insight into the response of a partially premixed flame, which has not been well explored to date. (author)

  2. Influence of drop size distribution and fuel vapor fraction on premixed spray combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machiroutu, Sridhar Venkatabojji

    Premixed spray combustion is affected by fuel and oxidizer properties, mixture equivalence ratio and spray quality. The spray quality is characterized by a mean droplet diameter (SMD) and a droplet size distribution (DSD). Prior experimental studies have considered only the influence of SMD, in part due to the difficulty in controlling the DSD independently. The present work provides experimental evidence demonstrating the effect of the fuel droplet size distribution and fuel vapor fraction on premixed spray combustion. Combustion experiments were performed in a pilot-ignited, continuous flow, tubular, vertical test rig wherein fuel sprays were injected into an air stream. A novel twin-atomizer technique that allowed control over overall equivalence ratio, SMD, DSD, and fuel vapor fraction of the premixed spray was used to generate test sprays. A line-of-sight, infrared (IR) extinction technique was developed to quantify the fuel vapor fraction in premixed sprays. Radial distributions of fuel vapor were evaluated using an 'onion peeling' deconvolution technique. Combustion of test sprays indicated flame propagation among regions of high fuel vapor fraction to generate a high rate of combustion. In lean premixed sprays, the presence of a low fuel vapor concentration does not impact the combustion process. Experimental evidence demonstrating the enhancement of flame propagation velocity for optimal SMDs of ethanol sprays has been found. It was observed that test sprays with narrower DSDs have faster burning rates and more complete combustion. The DSD of the sprays were characterized with a droplet surface-area-based standard deviation of the DSD.

  3. Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion

    DOEpatents

    Tuthill, Richard Sterling; Bechtel, II, William Theodore; Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur; Black, Stephen Hugh; Bland, Robert James; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne; Meyer, Stefan Martin; Taura, Joseph Charles; Battaglioli, John Luigi

    2002-01-01

    A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

  4. Preparation of lipid nanoemulsions by premix membrane emulsification with disposable materials.

    PubMed

    Gehrmann, Sandra; Bunjes, Heike

    2016-09-25

    The possibility to prepare nanoemulsions as drug carrier systems on small scale was investigated with disposable materials. For this purpose premix membrane emulsification (premix ME) as a preparation method for nanoemulsions with narrow particle size distributions on small scale was used. The basic principle of premix ME is that the droplets of a coarse pre-emulsion get disrupted by the extrusion through a porous membrane. In order to implement the common preparation setup for premix ME with disposable materials, the suitability of different syringe filters (made from polyethersulfone, cellulose acetate, cellulose ester and nylon) and different pharmaceutically relevant emulsifiers (phospholipids, polysorbate 80 and sucrose laurate) for the preparation of nanoemulsions was investigated. Already the preparation of the premix could be realized by emulsification with the help of two disposable syringes. As shown for a phospholipid-stabilized emulsion, the polyethersulfone filter was the most appropriate one and was used for the study with different emulsifiers. With this syringe filter, the median particle size of all investigated emulsions was below 500nm after 21 extrusion cycles through a 200nm filter and a subsequent extrusion cycle through a 100nm filter. Furthermore, the particle size distribution of the polysorbate 80- and sucrose laurate-stabilized emulsions prepared this way was very narrow (span value of 0.7). PMID:27477104

  5. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  6. Devices for insulin administration.

    PubMed

    Selam, J L; Charles, M A

    1990-09-01

    There is a significant need for revised, safe, and more effective insulin-delivery methods than subcutaneous injections in the treatment of both type I (insulin-dependent) and type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. The aim of this review is to describe the rationale and methods for better use of injection and infusion devices for intensive insulin therapy and to describe results of animal and human research that will lead to an implantable artificial pancreas. Injection devices, e.g., jet injectors, insulin pens, and access ports, cannot be considered as a major breakthrough in the quest for improved control, although they may improve the patient's comfort. External pumps have benefits over multiple injections and conventional insulin therapy only in specific subgroups of patients, e.g., those with recurrent severe hypoglycemia, but only when used by experienced personnel. The external artificial pancreas (Biostator) is also to be used by experienced personnel for limited clinical and research applications, e.g., surgery of the diabetic patient. The development of an implantable version of the artificial pancreas is linked to progress in the field of reliable long-duration glucose sensors. Finally, programmable implantable insulin pumps, used as an open-loop delivery system, are the most promising alternative to intensive subcutaneous insulin strategies in the short term, although clear evidence of improved safety and efficacy remains to be documented. PMID:2226111

  7. Insulin use: preventable errors.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is vital for patients with type 1 diabetes and useful for certain patients with type 2 diabetes. The serious consequences of insulin-related medication errors are overdose, resulting in severe hypoglycaemia, causing seizures, coma and even death; or underdose, resulting in hyperglycaemia and sometimes ketoacidosis. Errors associated with the preparation and administration of insulin are often reported, both outside and inside the hospital setting. These errors are preventable. By analysing reports from organisations devoted to medication error prevention and from poison control centres, as well as a few studies and detailed case reports of medication errors, various types of error associated with insulin use have been identified, especially in the hospital setting. Generally, patients know more about the practicalities of their insulin treatment than healthcare professionals with intermittent involvement. Medication errors involving insulin can occur at each step of the medication-use process: prescribing, data entry, preparation, dispensing and administration. When prescribing insulin, wrong-dose errors have been caused by the use of abbreviations, especially "U" instead of the word "units" (often resulting in a 10-fold overdose because the "U" is read as a zero), or by failing to write the drug's name correctly or in full. In electronic prescribing, the sheer number of insulin products is a source of confusion and, ultimately, wrong-dose errors, and often overdose. Prescribing, dispensing or administration software is rarely compatible with insulin prescriptions in which the dose is adjusted on the basis of the patient's subsequent capillary blood glucose readings, and can therefore generate errors. When preparing and dispensing insulin, a tuberculin syringe is sometimes used instead of an insulin syringe, leading to overdose. Other errors arise from confusion created by similar packaging, between different insulin products or between insulin and other

  8. Insulin Resistance of Puberty.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zeitler, Philip S

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is a time of considerable metabolic and hormonal change. Notably, puberty is associated with a marked decrease in insulin sensitivity, on par with that seen during pregnancy. In otherwise healthy youth, there is a nadir in insulin sensitivity in mid-puberty, and then it recovers at puberty completion. However, there is evidence that insulin resistance (IR) does not resolve in youth who are obese going into puberty and may result in increased cardiometabolic risk. Little is known about the underlying pathophysiology of IR in puberty, and how it might contribute to increased disease risk (e.g., type 2 diabetes). In this review, we have outlined what is known about the IR in puberty in terms of pattern, potential underlying mechanisms and other mediating factors. We also outline other potentially related metabolic changes that occur during puberty, and effects of underlying insulin resistant states (e.g., obesity) on pubertal changes in insulin sensitivity. PMID:27179965

  9. Is it dietary insulin?

    PubMed

    Vaarala, Outi

    2006-10-01

    In humans the primary trigger of insulin-specific immunity is a modified self-antigen, that is, dietary bovine insulin, which breaks neonatal tolerance to self-insulin. The immune response induced by bovine insulin spreads to react with human insulin. This primary immune response induced in the gut immune system is regulated by the mechanisms of oral tolerance. Genetic factors and environmental factors, such as the gut microflora, breast milk-derived factors, and enteral infections, control the development of oral tolerance. The age of host modifies the immune response to oral antigens because the permeability of the gut decreases with age and mucosal immune response, such as IgA response, develops with age. The factors that control the function of the gut immune system may either be protective from autoimmunity by supporting tolerance, or they may induce autoimmunity by abating tolerance to dietary insulin. There is accumulating evidence that the intestinal immune system is aberrant in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Intestinal immune activation and increased gut permeability are associated with T1D. These aberrancies may be responsible for the impaired control of tolerance to dietary insulin. Later in life, factors that activate insulin-specific immune cells derived from the gut may switch the response toward cytotoxic immunity. Viruses, which infect beta cells, may release autoantigens and potentiate their presentation by an infection-associated "danger signal." This kind of secondary immunization may cause functional changes in the dietary insulin primed immune cells, and lead to the infiltration of insulin-reactive T cells to the pancreatic islets. PMID:17130578

  10. [Management of type 1 diabetes (insulin, diet, sport): "Dorchy's recipes"].

    PubMed

    Dorchy, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The principal aims of therapeutic management of the child, adolescent and adult with type 1 diabetes are to allow good quality of life and to avoid long-term complications by maintaining blood glucose concentrations close to the normal range and an HbA1c level under 7%. The number of daily insulin injections, 2 or > or = 4, by itself does not necessarily give better results, but the 4-injection regimen allows greater freedom, taking into account that the proper insulin adjustment is difficult before adolescence. Successful glycemic control in young patients depends mainly on the quality and intensity of diabetes education. Any dogmatism must be avoided. Due to their pharmakokinetic characteristics, fast-acting and long-acting insulin analogues have specific indications in both the twice-daily injection regimen and the basal-bolus insulin therapy. They improve quality of life, without necessarily reducing HbA1c. Dietary recommendations issued over the last few years are the same for diabetic and non-diabetic individuals in order to avoid degenerative diseases. In the twice-daily free-mix regimen, the allocation of carbohydrates throughout the day is essential. There is no linear correlation between the metabolization of x grams of glucose by y units of insulin and carbohydrate counting is a piece of nonsense. Glycamic changes during exercise depend largely on blood insulin levels. In the young diabetic, during insulin deficiency, and therefore in a poor degree of metabolic control, i.e. hyperglycemic and ketotic, exercise accentuates hyperglycemia and ketosis, leading to extreme fatigue. If the insulin dosage is too high, the increase in muscular assimilation, combined with the shutdown of liver glucose production, may result in a severe hypoglycemia. During the recovery period, the repletion of muscular and hepatic glycogen stores may also provoke an hypoglycemia during hours after the cessation of muscular work. PMID:21812215

  11. A second-order closure prediction of premixed turbulent combustion in jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davé, N.; Kollmann, W.

    1987-02-01

    In this paper, a numerical prediction is reported involving second-order closure of a turbulent flow of a vertically burning, lean mixture of premixed combustible gases discharging from a pipe and developing into a turbulent combusting roundjet. Classical closures are used where available. Expressions for the chemical reaction rate term and other unclosed terms related to variable density flow in the Favre-averaged turbulent transport equations are based on the Bray-Moss-Libby aerothermochemistry for premixed turbulent combustion, extended to variable enthalpy systems. Mixing of hot burned and cool ambient gases and the attendant buoyancy effects are found to be significant physical phenomena in the behavior of such lean premixed combusting jets. Results of the simulation are compared with experimental data of Yoshida [Proceedings of the Eighteenth International Symposium on Combustion (The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh, 1981), p. 931] with which reasonable numerical agreement is obtained. Reasons for discrepancies and possible lines for future research are discussed.

  12. Study of premixing phase of steam explosion with JASMINE code in ALPHA program

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Yamano, Norihiro; Maruyama, Yu; Kudo, Tamotsu; Sugimoto, Jun

    1996-08-01

    Premixing phase of steam explosion has been studied in ALPHA Program at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). An analytical model to simulate the premixing phase, JASMINE (JAERI Simulator for Multiphase Interaction and Explosion), has been developed based on a multi-dimensional multi-phase thermal hydraulics code MISTRAL (by Fuji Research Institute Co.). The original code was extended to simulate the physics in the premixing phenomena. The first stage of the code validation was performed by analyzing two mixing experiments with solid particles and water: the isothermal experiment by Gilbertson et al. (1992) and the hot particle experiment by Angelini et al. (1993) (MAGICO). The code predicted reasonably well the experiments. Effectiveness of the TVD scheme employed in the code was also demonstrated.

  13. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  14. Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Robert C.; Edmonds, Ryan G.; Williams, Joseph T.; Baldwin, Stephen P.

    2009-10-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Radiation Effects on Pollutant Emissions in Diluted Turbulent Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunno, A. Cody; Mueller, Michael E.

    2015-11-01

    Radiation effects are examined in turbulent premixed flames using a detailed Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach. The approach combines a tabulated premixed flamelet model (Flamelet Generated Manifolds) with an optically thin radiation model. Radiation heat loss is tracked using an enthalpy deficit coordinate. Heat loss in the flamelets is calculated by varying a coefficient on the radiation source term, ranging from zero (adiabatic) to unity (full optically thin heat loss). NOx emissions are modeled with an additional transport equation that is able to capture unsteady effects resulting from slow kinetics. The model is compared against experimental measurements of methane-air piloted turbulent premixed planar jet flames with increasing levels of water dilution that maintain a constant adiabatic flame temperature. The effects of water dilution on global flame structure and NO emissions resulting directly and indirectly from radiation are examined in detail.

  16. Effect of premixing quality on oxides of nitrogen in gas turbine combustors foi HC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roffe, G.; Ferri, A.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of several premixing prevaporizing gas turbine combustor designs in reducing formation of oxides of nitrogen at the supersonic cruise condition. An atomized spray from a single injector mounted on the axis of the mixer tube produced a high initial concentration of fuel near the axis and only moderate premixed conditions entering the combustor. A fuel spray produced by 12 flush-mounted normal injection orifices in the mixer tube wall produced a good initial despersion of fuel and resulted in nearly complete premixing. Oxides of nitrogen emission levels of the order of 0.2 g NO2/kg fuel were obtained at 99 percent combustion efficiency at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. Overall total pressure drop was less than 3 percent through the 1-meter combustor module.

  17. Exhaust emissions from a premixing, prevaporizing flame tube using liquid jet A fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Papathakos, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbons were measured in a burner where liquid Jet A fuel was sprayed into the heated air stream and vaporized upstream of a perforated plate flameholder. The burner was tested at inlet air temperatures at 640, 800, and 833 K, an inlet pressure of 5.6 X 100,000 N/m squared, a reference velocity of 25 m/sec, and equivalence ratios from lean blowout to 0.7. Nitrogen oxide levels of below 1.0 g NO2/kg fuel were obtained at combustion efficiencies greater than 99 percent. The measured emission levels for the liquid fuel agreed well with previously reported premixed gaseous propane data and agreed with well stirred reactor predictions. Autoignition of the premixed fuel air mixture was a problem at inlet temperatures above 650 K with 104 msec premixing time.

  18. Muscarinic interactions of bisindolylmaleimide analogues.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J

    1998-11-01

    We have used radioligand binding studies to determine the affinities of seven bisindolylmaleimide analogues, six of which are selective inhibitors of protein kinase C, at human muscarinic M1-M4 receptors. The compounds were most potent at M1 receptors, and Ro-31-8220 was the most potent analogue, with a Kd of 0.6 microM at M1 receptors. The weakest compounds, bisindolylmaleimide IV and bisindolylmaleimide V, had Kd values of 100 microM. If it is necessary to use protein kinase C inhibitors at concentrations of 10 microM or more in studies involving muscarinic receptors then bisindolylmaleimide IV may be the most appropriate inhibitor to use. PMID:9851596

  19. Tabulated Combustion Model Development For Non-Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Prithwish

    Turbulent non-premixed flames play a very important role in the field of engineering ranging from power generation to propulsion. The coupling of fluid mechanics and complicated combustion chemistry of fuels pose a challenge for the numerical modeling of these type of problems. Combustion modeling in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is one of the most important tools used for predictive modeling of complex systems and to understand the basic fundamentals of combustion. Traditional combustion models solve a transport equation of each species with a source term. In order to resolve the complex chemistry accurately it is important to include a large number of species. However, the computational cost is generally proportional to the cube of number of species. The presence of a large number of species in a flame makes the use of CFD computationally expensive and beyond reach for some applications or inaccurate when solved with simplified chemistry. For highly turbulent flows, it also becomes important to incorporate the effects of turbulence chemistry interaction (TCI). The aim of this work is to develop high fidelity combustion models based on the flamelet concept and to significantly advance the existing capabilities. A thorough investigation of existing models (Finite-rate chemistry and Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF)) and comparative study of combustion models was done initially on a constant volume combustion chamber with diesel fuel injection. The CFD modeling was validated with experimental results and was also successfully applied to a single cylinder diesel engine. The effect of number of flamelets on the RIF model and flamelet initialization strategies were studied. The RIF model with multiple flamelets is computationally expensive and a model was proposed on the frame work of RIF. The new model was based on tabulated chemistry and incorporated TCI effects. A multidimensional tabulated chemistry database generation code was developed based on the 1

  20. Selective targeting of nuclear receptor FXR by avermectin analogues with therapeutic effects on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lihua; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yanlin; Zheng, Weili; Han, Yaping; Guo, Fusheng; Ye, Frank Bin; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a predictive factor of death from many diseases. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an ideal target for NAFLD drug development due to its crucial roles in lipid metabolism. The aim of this work is to examine the molecular mechanisms and functional roles of FXR modulation by avermectin analogues in regulating metabolic syndromes like NAFLD. We found that among avermectin analogues studied, the analogues that can bind and activate FXR are effective in regulating metabolic parameters tested, including reducing hepatic lipid accumulation, lowering serum cholesterol and glucose levels, and improving insulin sensitivity, in a FXR dependent manner. Mechanistically, the avermectin analogues that interact with FXR exhibited features as partial agonists, with distinctive properties in modulating coregulator recruitment. Structural features critical for avermectin analogues to selectively bind to FXR were also revealed. This study indicated that in addition to antiparasitic activity, avermectin analogues are promising drug candidates to treat metabolism syndrome including NAFLD by directly targeting FXR. Additionally, the structural features that discriminate the selective binding of FXR by avermectin analogues may provide a unique safe approach to design drugs targeting FXR signaling. PMID:26620317

  1. Cost comparison of insulin glargine with insulin detemir in a basal-bolus regime with mealtime insulin aspart in type 2 diabetes in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Pscherer, Stefan; Dietrich, Eva Susanne; Dippel, Franz-Werner; Neilson, Aileen Rae

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the treatment costs of insulin glargine (IG; Lantus®) to detemir (ID; Levemir®), both combined with bolus insulin aspart (NovoRapid®) in type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Germany. Methods: Cost comparison was based on data of a 1-year randomised controlled trial [1]. IG was administered once daily and ID once (57% of patients) or twice daily (43%) according to treatment response. At the end of the trial, mean daily basal insulin doses were 0.59 U/kg (IG) and 0.82 U/kg (ID). Aspart doses were 0.32 U/kg (IG) and 0.36 U/kg (ID). Costs were calculated from the German statutory health insurance (SHI) perspective using official 2008 prices. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test robustness of the results. Results: Annual basal and bolus insulin costs per patient were € 1,473 (IG) and € 1,940 (ID). The cost of lancets and blood glucose test strips were € 1,125 (IG) and € 1,286 (ID). Annual costs for needles were € 393 (IG) and € 449 (ID). The total annual cost per patient of administering IG was € 2,991 compared with € 3,675 for ID, translating into a 19% annual cost difference of € 684/patient. Base case results were robust to varying assumptions for insulin dose, insulin price, change in weight and proportion of ID once daily administrations. Conclusion: IG and ID basal-bolus regimes have comparative safety and efficacy, based on the Hollander study, IG however may represent a significantly more cost saving option for T2D patients in Germany requiring basal-bolus insulin analogue therapy with potential annual cost savings of € 684/patient compared to ID. PMID:20725588

  2. The propagation of premixed flames in closed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalon, Moshe; Metzener, Philippe

    1997-04-01

    A nonlinear evolution equation that describes the propagation of a premixed flame in a closed tube has been derived from the general conservation equations. What distinguishes it from other similar equations is a memory term whose origin is in the vorticity production at the flame front. The two important parameters in this equation are the tube's aspect ratio and the Markstein parameter. A linear stability analysis indicates that when the Markstein parameter [alpha] is above a critical value [alpha]c the planar flame is the stable equilibrium solution. For [alpha] below [alpha]c the planar flame is no longer stable and there is a band of growing modes. Numerical solutions of the full nonlinear equation confirm this conclusion. Starting with random initial conditions the results indicate that, after a short transient, a at flame develops when [alpha]>[alpha]c and it remains flat until it reaches the end of the tube. When [alpha]<[alpha]c, on the other hand, stable curved flames may develop down the tube. Depending on the initial conditions the flame assumes either a cellular structure, characterized by a finite number of cells convex towards the unburned gas, or a tulip shape characterized by a sharp indentation at the centre of the tube pointing toward the burned gases. In particular, if the initial conditions are chosen so as to simulate the elongated finger-like flame that evolves from an ignition source, a tulip flame evolves downstream. In accord with experimental observations the tulip shape forms only after the flame has travelled a certain distance down the tube, it does not form in short tubes and its formation depends on the mixture composition. While the initial deformation of the flame front is a direct result of the hydrodynamic instability, the actual formation of the tulip flame results from the vortical motion created in the burned gas which is a consequence of the vorticity produced at the flame front.

  3. Effects of pressure gradients on turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veynante, D.; Poinsot, T.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of a constant acceleration on a turbulent premixed flame is studied by direct numerical simulation. This acceleration induces a mean pressure gradient across the flame brush, leading to a modification of the turbulent flame structure due to differential buoyancy mechanisms between heavy cold fresh and light hot burnt gases. Such a pressure gradient may be encountered in practical applications in ducted flames. A favorable pressure gradient, i.e. the pressure decreases from unburnt to burnt gases, is found to decrease the flame wrinkling, the flame brush thickness, and the turbulent flame speed. A favorable pressure gradient also promotes counter-gradient turbulent transport. On the other hand, adverse pressure gradients tend to increase the flame brush thickness and turbulent flame speed, and promote classical gradient turbulent transport. The balance equation for the turbulent flux of the Favre averaged progress variable is also analyzed. The first results show that the fluctuating pressure term, cannot be neglected as generally assumed in models. Simple models assuming that a high mean pressure gradient may only be balanced by the cross-dissipation term seem too approximate. This analysis has to be continued to compare simulation data and closure schemes proposed for the transport equation. The analysis developed by Veynante et al.(1995) has been extended to imposed acceleration and mean pressure gradients. A simple model for the turbulent flux is proposed and validated from simulation data. Then, a modified criterion is derived to delineate between counter-gradient and gradient turbulent diffusion. In fact, counter-gradient diffusion may occur in most practical applications, especially for ducted flames.

  4. Spatially resolved heat release rate measurements in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoola, B.O.; Kaminski, C.F.; Balachandran, R.; Mastorakos, E.; Frank, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Heat release rate is a fundamental property of great importance for the theoretical and experimental elucidation of unsteady flame behaviors such as combustion noise, combustion instabilities, and pulsed combustion. Investigations of such thermoacoustic interactions require a reliable indicator of heat release rate capable of resolving spatial structures in turbulent flames. Traditionally, heat release rate has been estimated via OH or CH radical chemiluminescence; however, chemiluminescence suffers from being a line-of-sight technique with limited capability for resolving small-scale structures. In this paper, we report spatially resolved two-dimensional measurements of a quantity closely related to heat release rate. The diagnostic technique uses simultaneous OH and CH{sub 2}O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the pixel-by-pixel product of the OH and CH{sub 2}O PLIF signals has previously been shown to correlate well with local heat release rates. Results from this diagnostic technique, which we refer to as heat release rate imaging (HR imaging), are compared with traditional OH chemiluminescence measurements in several flames. Studies were performed in lean premixed ethylene flames stabilized between opposed jets and with a bluff body. Correlations between bulk strain rates and local heat release rates were obtained and the effects of curvature on heat release rate were investigated. The results show that the heat release rate tends to increase with increasing negative curvature for the flames investigated for which Lewis numbers are greater than unity. This correlation becomes more pronounced as the flame gets closer to global extinction.

  5. Lewis number effects on turbulent premixed flame structure

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, P.J. , 230 - Mont-Saint-Aignan . URA CORIA); Shepherd, I.G. )

    1992-09-01

    The influence of the Lewis number on turbulent flame front geometry is investigated in a premixed turbulent stagnation point flame. A laser tomography technique is used to obtain the flame shape, a fractal analysis of the multiscale flame edges is performed and the distribution of local flame front curvature is determined. Lean H[sub 2]/Air and C[sub 3]H[sub 8]/Air mixtures with similar burning rates were investigated with Lewis numbers of 0.33 and 1.85 respectively. At the conditions studied the laminar H[sub 2]/Air mixture is unstable and a cellular structure is observed. Turbulence in the reactant is generated by a perforated plate and the turbulent length scale (3mm) and intensity (7%) at the nozzle exit are fixed. The equivalence ratio is set so that the burning velocity is the same for all the cases. Results show clearly that the turbulent flame surface area is dependent on the Lewis number. For a Lewis number less than unity surface area production is observed. The shape of the flame front curvature distribution is not found to be very sensitive to the Lewis number. For the H[sub 2]/Air mixture the distribution is skewed toward the positive values indicating the presence of cusps while for the C[sub 3]H[sub 8]/Air mixture the distribution is more symmetrical. In both cases the average curvature is found to be zero, and if the local burning speed varies linearly with curvature, the local positive and negative burning velocity variations due to curvature will balance.

  6. Lewis number effects on turbulent premixed flame structure

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, P.J.; Shepherd, I.G.

    1992-09-01

    The influence of the Lewis number on turbulent flame front geometry is investigated in a premixed turbulent stagnation point flame. A laser tomography technique is used to obtain the flame shape, a fractal analysis of the multiscale flame edges is performed and the distribution of local flame front curvature is determined. Lean H{sub 2}/Air and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/Air mixtures with similar burning rates were investigated with Lewis numbers of 0.33 and 1.85 respectively. At the conditions studied the laminar H{sub 2}/Air mixture is unstable and a cellular structure is observed. Turbulence in the reactant is generated by a perforated plate and the turbulent length scale (3mm) and intensity (7%) at the nozzle exit are fixed. The equivalence ratio is set so that the burning velocity is the same for all the cases. Results show clearly that the turbulent flame surface area is dependent on the Lewis number. For a Lewis number less than unity surface area production is observed. The shape of the flame front curvature distribution is not found to be very sensitive to the Lewis number. For the H{sub 2}/Air mixture the distribution is skewed toward the positive values indicating the presence of cusps while for the C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/Air mixture the distribution is more symmetrical. In both cases the average curvature is found to be zero, and if the local burning speed varies linearly with curvature, the local positive and negative burning velocity variations due to curvature will balance.

  7. Characteristics of Non-Premixed Turbulent Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.; Yuan, Z. G.; Stocker, D. P.; Bahadori, M. Y.

    2001-01-01

    This project is concerned with the characteristics of turbulent hydrocarbon (primarily propane) gas-jet diffusion flames in microgravity. A microgravity environment provides the opportunity to study the structure of turbulent diffusion flames under momentum-dominated conditions (large Froude number) at moderate Reynolds number which is a combination not achievable in normal gravity. This paper summarizes progress made since the last workshop. Primarily, the features of flame radiation from microgravity turbulent jet diffusion flames in a reduced gravity environment are described. Tests were conducted for non-premixed, nitrogen diluted propane flames burning in quiescent air in the NASA Glenn 5.18 Second Zero Gravity Facility. Measured flame radiation from wedge-shaped, axial slices of the flame are compared for microgravity and normal gravity flames. Results from numerical computations of the flame using a k-e model for the turbulence are also presented to show the effects of flame radiation on the thermal field. Flame radiation is an important quantity that is impacted by buoyancy as has been shown in previous studies by the authors and also by Urban et al. It was found that jet diffusion flames burning under microgravity conditions have significantly higher radiative loss (about five to seven times higher) compared to their normal gravity counterparts because of larger flame size in microgravity and larger convective heat loss fraction from the flame in normal gravity. These studies, however, were confined to laminar flames. For the case of turbulent flames, the flame radiation is a function of time and both the time-averaged and time-dependent components are of interest. In this paper, attention is focused primarily on the time-averaged level of the radiation but the turbulent structure of the flame is also assessed from considerations of the radiation power spectra.

  8. An experimental investigation of an acoustically excited laminar premixed flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kartheekeyan, S.; Chakravarthy, S.R.

    2006-08-15

    A two-dimensional laminar premixed flame is stabilized over a burner in a confined duct and is subjected to external acoustic forcing from the downstream end. The equivalence ratio of the flame is 0.7. The flame is stabilized in the central slot of a three-slotted burner. The strength of the shear layer of the cold reactive mixture through the central slot is controlled by the flow rate of cold nitrogen gas through the side slots. The frequency range of acoustic excitation is 400-1200 Hz, and the amplitude levels are such that the acoustic velocity is less than the mean flow velocity of the reactants. Time-averaged chemiluminescence images of the perturbed flame front display time-mean changes as compared to the unperturbed flame shape at certain excitation frequencies. Prominent changes to the flame front are in the form of stretching or shrinkage, asymmetric development of its shape, increased/preferential lift-off of one or both of the stabilization points of the flame, and nearly random three-dimensional fluctuations over large time scales under some conditions. The oscillations of the shear layer and the response of the confined jet of the hot products to the acoustic forcing, such as asymmetric flow development and jet spreading, are found to be responsible for the observed mean changes in the flame shape. A distinct low-frequency component ({approx}60-90 Hz) relative to the excitation frequency is observed in the fluctuations of the chemiluminescent intensity in the flame under most conditions. It is observed that fluctuations in the flame area predominantly contribute to the origin of the low-frequency component. This is primarily due to the rollup of vortices and the generation of enthalpy waves at the burner lip. Both of these processes are excited at the externally imposed acoustic time scale, but convect/propagate downstream at the flow time scale, which is much larger. (author)

  9. Accelerating confined premixed flames using a transverse slot jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Joseph P.

    2011-12-01

    An experimental study of the transient interaction of a premixed laminar methane-air flame propagating into a transverse fluidic obstacle is considered. The de agration-to-detonation transition (DDT) mechanism for use in pulse detonation engines (PDE) is the main but not only motivation for this study. When DDT is initiated through the use of solid obstacles, the system incurs a drag penalty and subsequent total pressure losses due to the physical obstacle impeding on the flow. This study utilizes a fluidic obstacle to generate flame acceleration without the subsequent penalties associated with form drag of a solid obstacle. The experimental setup was designed specifically for non-intrusive optical measurement techniques such as schlieren, CH* chemiluminescence and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The channel utilizes a length to width aspect ratio of L/W = 6, and was chosen along with the fuel (CH4) to guarantee the impossibility of excessive overpressures associated with unanticipated detonations. The mixture is ignited in the center of the closed end of the channel, and the flame propagates towards the obstacle located at 3.1H. The medium emitted from the slot-jet orifice is the same methane-air mixture used to fill the channel and is released post ignition to allow an interaction with the laminar propagating flame. A comparison of this transverse fluidic slot jet obstacle is made to four different solid obstacle geometries at various blockage ratios (BR) and at stoichiometric and lean (φ = 0:88) equivalence ratios. The results of this study show that a transverse slot jet is capable of increasing heat release, flame surface area and subsequently flame speed compared to that of any tested solid obstacle with similar maximum flame deflection over an obstacle.

  10. Lean premixed flames for low NO{sub x} combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, P.; Tseng, L.; Bryjak, J.

    1995-10-01

    Gas turbines are being used throughout the world to generate electricity. Due to increasing fuel costs and environmental concerns, gas turbines must meet stringent performance requirements, demonstrating high thermal efficiencies and low pollutant emissions. In order for U.S. manufactured gas turbines to stay competitive, their NO{sub x} levels must be below 10 ppm and their thermal efficiencies should approach 60%. Current technology is being stretched to achieve these goals. The twin goals of high efficiency and low NO{sub x} emissions require extending the operating range of current gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires operation at higher pressures and temperatures. Lower NO{sub x} emissions requires lower flame temperatures. Lower flame temperatures can be achieved through partially to fully pre-mixed combustion. However, increased performance and lower emissions result in a set of competing goals. In order to achieve a successful compromise between high efficiency and low NO{sub x} emissions, advanced design tools must be developed. One key design tool is a computationally efficient, high pressure, turbulent flow, combustion model capable of predicting pollutant formation in an actual gas turbine. Its development is the goal of this program. Achieving this goal requires completion of three tasks. The first task is to develop a reduced chemical kinetics model describing N{sub O}x formation in natural gas-air systems. The second task is to develop a computationally efficient model that describes turbulence-chemistry interactions. The third task is to incorporate the reduced chemical kinetics and turbulence-chemistry interaction models into a commercially available flow solver and compare its predictions with experimental data obtained under carefully controlled conditions so that the accuracy of model predictions can be evaluated.

  11. Premixed Flame-Vortex Interactions Imaged in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, J. F.; Sichel, M.; Sinibaldi, J. O.

    1997-01-01

    A unique experiment makes it now possible to obtain detailed images in microgravity showing how an individual vortex causes the wrinkling, stretching, area increase, and eventual extinction of a premixed flame. The repeatable, controllable flame-vortex interaction represents the fundamental building block of turbulent combustion concepts. New information is provided that is central to turbulent flame models, including measurements of all components of flame stretch, strain, and vorticity. Simultaneous measurements of all components of these quantities are not possible in fully turbulent flames but are possible in the present axisymmetric, repeatable experiment. Advanced PIV diagnostics have been used at one-g and have been developed for microgravity. Numerical simulations of the interaction are being performed at NRL. It is found that microgravity conditions greatly augment the flame wrinkling process. Flame area and the amplitude of wrinkles at zero-g are typically twice that observed at one-g. It is inferred that turbulent flames in microgravity could have larger surface area and thus propagate significantly faster than those in one-g, which is a potential safety hazard. A new mechanism is identified by PIV images that shows how buoyancy retards flame wrinkling at one-g; buoyancy produces new vorticity (due to baroclinic torques) that oppose the wrinkling and the stretch imposed by the original vortex. Microgravity conditions remove this stabilizing mechanism and the amplitude of flame wrinkling typically is found to double. Microgravity also increases the flame speed by a factor of 1.8 to 2.2. Both methane and propane-air flames were studied at the NASA Lewis drop tower. Results indicate that it is important to add buoyancy to models of turbulent flames to simulate the correct flame wrinkling, stretch and burning velocity.

  12. Intermittent features of inertial particle distributions in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, F.; Picano, F.; Troiani, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Clustering is widely observed in many turbulent flows, where it results from the inability of finite inertia particles to comply with the different time scales, which characterize a turbulent field. Depending on their inertia, particles are found to be instantaneously organized in clusters, whose size depends on the Kolmogorov-Stokes number and which presumably form as a consequence of particle ejection from persistent vortical structures. In reacting flows, the abrupt acceleration of the fluid across the thin flame front due to combustion adds new and unexpected features. The particles follow such acceleration with a certain time lag which, coupled with the flame front fluctuations, gives rise to an entirely different mechanism of cluster formation. As suggested in previous studies, a possible indicator of this preferential localization is the so-called clustering index, quantifying the departure of the actual particle arrangement from the Poissonian distribution. Most of the clustering is found in the flame brush region, where it cannot be explained by the standard arguments used in cold flows. Actually, the effect is significant also for very light particles, where the simple model we propose, based on the Bray-Moss-Libby formalism, is able to account for most of the deviation from the Poissonian. When the particle inertia increases, the effect becomes larger and it is found to persist well within the region of the burned gases. The observed clustering is confirmed by a more precise analysis in terms of a generalization of the radial distribution function to inhomogeneous, anisotropic flows. The results taken from a direct numerical simulation with single step kinetics favorably compare with experiments on a premixed Bunsen turbulent flame. The present findings are expected to be of some relevance for the plenty of applications dealing with particles in presence of combustion, e.g., liquid droplet swarms for combustion temperature control, soot dynamics, or

  13. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  14. Policy issues in space analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, Robin N.; Facktor, Debra D.

    Space mission planning is increasingly focusing on destinations beyond Earth orbit. Advancements in technology will inevitably be required to enable long-duration human spaceflight missions, and breakthroughs in the policy arena will also be needed to achieve success in such missions. By exploring how policy issues have been addressed in analogous extreme environments, policymakers can develop a framework for addressing these issues as they apply to long-term human spaceflight. Policy issues that need to be addressed include: crew selection, training, organization, and activities, medical testing, illness, injury, and death; communication; legal accountability and liability; mission safety and risk management; and environmental contamination. This paper outlines the approach of a study underway by The George Washington University and ANSER to examine how these policy issues have been addressed in several analogues and how the experiences of these analogues can help formulate policies for long-duration human spaceflight missions. Analogues being studied include Antarctic bases, submarine voyages, undersea stations, Biosphere 2, and the U.S. Skylab and Russian Mir space stations.

  15. Phosphonate analogue substrates for enolase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, V E; Cleland, W W

    1990-11-20

    Phosphonate analogues in which the bridge between C-2 and phosphorus is a CH2 group are slow substrates for yeast enolase. The pH variation of the kinetic parameters for the methylene analogue of 2-phosphoglycerate suggests that the substrate binds as a dianion and that Mg2+ can bind subsequently only if a metal ligand and the catalytic base are unprotonated. Primary deuterium isotope effects of 4-8 on V/KMg, but ones of only 1.15-1.32 on V for dehydration, show that proton removal to give the carbanion intermediate largely limits V/KMg and that a slow step follows which largely limits V (presumably carbanion breakdown). Since there is a D2O solvent isotope effect on V for the reverse reaction of 5, but not an appreciable one on the forward reaction, it appears that the slow rates with phosphonate analogues result from the fact that the carbanion intermediate is more stable than that formed from the normal substrates, and its reaction in both directions limits V. Increased stability as a result of replacement of oxygen by carbon at C-2 of the carbanion is the expected chemical behavior. PMID:2271661

  16. Drosophila insulin degrading enzyme and rat skeletal muscle insulin protease cleave insulin at similar sites

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, W.C.; Garcia, J.V.; Liepnieks, J.J.; Hamel, F.G.; Hermodson, M.A.; Frank, B.H.; Rosner, M.R. )

    1989-03-21

    Insulin degradation is an integral part of the cellular action of insulin. Recent evidence suggests that the enzyme insulin protease is involved in the degradation of insulin in mammalian tissues. Drosophila, which has insulin-like hormones and insulin receptor homologues, also expresses an insulin degrading enzyme with properties that are very similar to those of mammalian insulin protease. In the present study, the insulin cleavage products generated by the Drosophila insulin degrading enzyme were identified and compared with the products generated by the mammalian insulin protease. Both purified enzymes were incubated with porcine insulin specifically labeled with {sup 125}I on either the A19 or B26 position, and the degradation products were analyzed by HPLC before and after sulfitolysis. Isolation and sequencing of the cleavage products indicated that both enzymes cleave the A chain of intact insulin at identical sites between residues A13 and A14 and A14 and A15. These results demonstrate that all the insulin cleavage sites generated by the Drosopohila insulin degrading enzyme are shared in common with the mammalian insulin protease. These data support the hypothesis that there is evolutionary conservation of the insulin degrading enzyme and further suggest that this enzyme plays an important role in cellular function.

  17. Tagging insulin in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobeck, Michael; Nelson, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the exact subcellular sites of action of insulin in the body has the potential to give basic science investigators a basis from which a cause and cure for this disease can be approached. The goal of this project is to create a test reagent that can be used to visualize these subcellular sites. The unique microgravity environment of the Shuttle will allow the creation of a reagent that has the possibility of elucidating the subcellular sites of action of insulin. Several techniques have been used in an attempt to isolate the sites of action of items such as insulin. One of these is autoradiography in which the test item is obtained from animals fed radioactive materials. What is clearly needed is to visualize individual insulin molecules at their sites of action. The insulin tagging process to be used on G-399 involves the conjugation of insulin molecules with ferritin molecules to create a reagent that will be used back on Earth in an attempt to elucidate the sites of action of insulin.

  18. Technosphere inhaled insulin (Afrezza).

    PubMed

    Rendell, M

    2014-12-01

    Technosphere® insulin uses a unique carrier -fumaryl diketopiperazine (FDKP)- which adsorbs insulin to form microparticles to permit delivery to the alveoli by inhalation. Toxicity studies have been entirely negative. The pulmonary absorption of insulin is very rapid, and the disappearance time is shorter than for subcutaneously delivered rapid-acting insulins. As a result, after inhalation, there is a rapid drop in glucose levels which subsequently return to normal in a shorter time than after subcutaneous insulin administration. Consequently, there is a lower incidence of hypoglycemic reactions. Pulmonary function studies have shown a small, reversible decrease in FEV1, and pulmonary imaging studies have shown no adverse effect. The inhalation of Technosphere insulin can produce a cough in up to 27% of patients. The cough has resulted in discontinuance in as many as 9% of users. Technosphere insulin has been approved for use in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Long-term studies of pulmonary safety and surveillance for malignancy will be performed in the future. Studies to assess the optimal time dosing regimen are needed. PMID:25588086

  19. [Alleged suicide by insulin].

    PubMed

    Birngruber, Christoph G; Krüll, Ralf; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old man, who was on probation, was found dead in his home by his mother. Insulin vials and 2 insulin pens, which the man's stepfather (an insulin-dependent diabetic) had been missing for over a week, were found next to the deceased. The circumstances suggested suicide by an injected insulin overdose. At the time of the autopsy, the corpse showed already marked signs of autolysis. Clinical chemical tests confirmed the injection of insulin, but indicated hyperglycemia at the time of death. Toxicological analyses revealed that the man had consumed amphetamine, cannabinoids, and tramadol in the recent past. Histological examination finally revealed extensive bronchopneumonia as the cause of death. The most plausible explanation for the results of the autopsy and the additional examinations was an injection of insulin as a failed attempt of self-treatment. It is conceivable that the man had discovered by a rapid test that he was a diabetic, but had decided not to go to a doctor to avoid disclosure of parole violation due to continued drug abuse. He may have misinterpreted the symptoms caused by his worsening bronchitis and the developing bronchopneumonia as symptoms of a diabetic metabolic status and may have felt compelled to treat himself with insulin. PMID:26419091

  20. Pdf modeling for premixed turbulent combustion based on the properties of iso-concentration surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vervisch, L.; Kollmann, W.; Bray, K. N. C.; Mantel, T.

    1994-01-01

    In premixed turbulent flames the presence of intense mixing zones located in front of and behind the flame surface leads to a requirement to study the behavior of iso-concentration surfaces defined for all values of the progress variable (equal to unity in burnt gases and to zero in fresh mixtures). To support this study, some theoretical and mathematical tools devoted to level surfaces are first developed. Then a database of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed flames is generated and used to investigate the internal structure of the flame brush, and a new pdf model based on the properties of iso-surfaces is proposed.

  1. Insulin glulisine: insulin receptor signaling characteristics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hennige, Anita M; Lehmann, Rainer; Weigert, Cora; Moeschel, Klaus; Schäuble, Myriam; Metzinger, Elisabeth; Lammers, Reiner; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2005-02-01

    In recent years, recombinant DNA technology has been used to design insulin molecules that overcome the limitations of regular insulin in mealtime supplementation. However, safety issues have been raised with these alternatives, as the alteration of the three-dimensional structure may alter the interaction with the insulin and/or IGF-I receptors and therefore lead to the activation of alternate metabolic as well as mitogenic signaling pathways. It is therefore essential to carefully study acute and long-term effects in a preclinical state, as insulin therapy is meant to be a lifelong treatment. In this study, we determined in vivo the insulin receptor signaling characteristics activated by insulin glulisine (Lys(B3), Glu(B29)) at the level of insulin receptor phosphorylation, insulin receptor substrate phosphorylation, and downstream signaling elements such as phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, AKT, and mitogen-activated protein kinase. C57BL/6 mice were injected with insulin glulisine or regular insulin and Western blot analysis was performed for liver and muscle tissue. The extent and time course of insulin receptor phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling elements after insulin glulisine treatment was similar to that of human regular insulin in vivo. Moreover, insulin signaling in hypothalamic tissue determined by PI 3-kinase activity was comparable. Therefore, insulin glulisine may be a useful tool for diabetes treatment. PMID:15677493

  2. All about Insulin Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... news is that cutting calories, being active, and losing weight can reverse insulin resistance and lower your ... you’ll lose weight. Studies have shown that losing even 7% of your weight, may help. For ...

  3. Insulin Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

  4. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep apnea; and cigarette smoking. [ Top ] Does sleep matter? Yes. Studies show that untreated sleep problems, especially ... a severe form of insulin resistance may have dark patches of skin, usually on the back of ...

  5. Insulin Lispro Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to inject subcutaneously ( ... if it is colored, cloudy, or contains solid particles. If you are using insulin lispro suspension, the ...

  6. Insulin Human Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhalation comes as a powder to inhale by mouth using a special inhaler. It is usually used ... to your doctor.Before you use your insulin oral inhaler the first time, read the written instructions ...

  7. Structural Integrity of the B24 Site in Human Insulin Is Important for Hormone Functionality*

    PubMed Central

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Veverka, Václav; Lepšík, Martin; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the recent first structural insight into the insulin-insulin receptor complex, the role of the C terminus of the B-chain of insulin in this assembly remains unresolved. Previous studies have suggested that this part of insulin must rearrange to reveal amino acids crucial for interaction with the receptor. The role of the invariant PheB24, one of the key residues of the hormone, in this process remains unclear. For example, the B24 site functionally tolerates substitutions to d-amino acids but not to l-amino acids. Here, we prepared and characterized a series of B24-modified insulin analogues, also determining the structures of [d-HisB24]-insulin and [HisB24]-insulin. The inactive [HisB24]-insulin molecule is remarkably rigid due to a tight accommodation of the l-His side chain in the B24 binding pocket that results in the stronger tethering of B25-B28 residues to the protein core. In contrast, the highly active [d-HisB24]-insulin is more flexible, and the reverse chirality of the B24Cα atom swayed the d-HisB24 side chain into the solvent. Furthermore, the pocket vacated by PheB24 is filled by PheB25, which mimics the PheB24 side and main chains. The B25→B24 downshift results in a subsequent downshift of TyrB26 into the B25 site and the departure of B26-B30 residues away from the insulin core. Our data indicate the importance of the aromatic l-amino acid at the B24 site and the structural invariance/integrity of this position for an effective binding of insulin to its receptor. Moreover, they also suggest limited, B25-B30 only, unfolding of the C terminus of the B-chain upon insulin activation. PMID:23447530

  8. Moving toward the ideal insulin for insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Eda; Bode, Bruce; Van Name, Michelle; Tamborlane, William V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in insulin formulations have been important for diabetes management and achieving optimal glycemic control. Rapid-acting insulin analogs provide a faster time-action profile than regular insulin and are approved for use in pumps. However, the need remains for therapy to deliver a more physiologic insulin profile. New insulin formulations and delivery methods are in development, with the aim of accelerating insulin absorption to accomplish ultra-fast-acting insulin time-action profiles. Furthermore, the integration of continuous glucose monitoring with insulin pump therapy enables on-going adjustment of insulin delivery to optimize glycemic control throughout the day and night. These technological and pharmacological advances are likely to facilitate the development of closed-loop pump systems (i.e., artificial pancreas), and improve glycemic control and quality of life for patients with diabetes. PMID:26560137

  9. Insulin allergy treated with human insulin (recombinant DNA).

    PubMed

    De Leeuw, I; Delvigne, C; Bekaert, J

    1982-01-01

    Two insulin-dependent diabetic subjects treated with pork and beef insulin during a period of 6 mo developed severe local reactions. Both patients had an important allergic history (asthma, urticaria, drug reactions, rhinitis). Skin-testing revealed type I allergy to beef and pork insulin. Specific IgE-insulin binding was demonstrated with both insulins. After negative skin testing with NPH Lilly human insulin (recombinant DNA), treatment was started with this compound and remained successful during a period of 6-9 mo. In one patient a local reaction occurred when regular human insulin (recombinant DNA) was added to NPH in order to obtain better control. Skin testing with regular human insulin was positive, but not with NPH human insulin alone. The mechanism of this phenomenon remains unsolved. PMID:6765530

  10. Time-dependent Computational Studies of Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kailasanath, K.; Patnaik, Gopal; Oran, Elaine S.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the research performed at the Center for Reactive Flow and Dynamical Systems in the Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, at the Naval Research Laboratory, in support of NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program. The primary focus of this research is on investigating fundamental questions concerning the propagation and extinction of premixed flames in earth gravity and in microgravity environments. Our approach is to use detailed time-dependent, multispecies, numerical models as tools to simulate flames in different gravity environments. The models include a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of elementary reactions among the eight reactive species involved in hydrogen combustion, coupled to algorithms for convection, thermal conduction, viscosity, molecular and thermal diffusion, and external forces. The external force, gravity, can be put in any direction relative to flame propagation and can have a range of values. Recently more advanced wall boundary conditions such as isothermal and no-slip have been added to the model. This enables the simulation of flames propagating in more practical systems than before. We have used the numerical simulations to investigate the effects of heat losses and buoyancy forces on the structure and stability of flames, to help resolve fundamental questions on the existence of flammability limits when there are no external losses or buoyancy forces in the system, to understand the interaction between the various processes leading to flame instabilities and extinguishment, and to study the dynamics of cell formation and splitting. Our studies have been able to bring out the differences between upward- and downward-propagating flames and predict the zero-gravity behavior of these flames. The simulations have also highlighted the dominant role of wall heat losses in the case of downward-propagating flames. The simulations have been able to qualitatively predict the

  11. Non-premixed acoustically perturbed swirling flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Idahosa, Uyi; Saha, Abhishek; Xu, Chengying; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-09-15

    An investigation into the response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (f{sub p}=0-315 Hz) and swirl intensities (S=0.09 and 0.34) is carried out. Perturbations are generated using a loudspeaker at the base of an atmospheric co-flow burner with resulting velocity oscillation amplitudes vertical stroke u'/U{sub avg} vertical stroke in the 0.03-0.30 range. The dependence of flame dynamics on the relative richness of the flame is investigated by studying various constant fuel flow rate flame configurations. Flame heat release rate is quantitatively measured using a photomultiplier with a 430 nm bandpass filter for observing CH* chemiluminescence which is simultaneously imaged with a phase-locked CCD camera. The flame response is observed to exhibit a low-pass filter characteristic with minimal flame response beyond pulsing frequencies of 200 Hz. Flames at lower fuel flow rates are observed to remain attached to the central fuel pipe at all acoustic pulsing frequencies. PIV imaging of the associated isothermal fields show the amplification in flame aspect ratio is caused by the narrowing of the inner recirculation zone (IRZ). Good correlation is observed between the estimated flame surface area and the heat release rate signature at higher swirl intensity flame configurations. A flame response index analogous to the Rayleigh criterion in non-forced flames is used to assess the potential for a strong flame response at specific perturbation configurations and is found to be a good predictor of highly responsive modes. Phase conditioned analysis of the flame dynamics yield additional criteria in highly responsive modes to include the effective amplitude of velocity oscillations induced by the acoustic pulsing. In addition, highly responsive modes were characterized by velocity to heat release rate phase differences in the {+-}{pi}/2 range. A final observed characteristic in highly responsive flames is a Strouhal number between

  12. Impact of telephonic interviews on persistence and daily adherence to insulin treatment in insulin-naïve type 2 diabetes patients: dropout study

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Dilek Gogas; Bilen, Habip; Sancak, Seda; Garip, Tayfun; Hekimsoy, Zeliha; Sahin, Ibrahim; Yilmaz, Murat; Aydin, Hasan; Atmaca, Aysegul; Sert, Murat; Karakaya, Pinar; Arpaci, Dilek; Oguz, Aytekin; Guvener, Nilgun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of sequential telephonic interviews on treatment persistence and daily adherence to insulin injections among insulin-naïve type 2 diabetes patients initiated on different insulin regimens in a 3-month period. Methods A total of 1,456 insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes (mean [standard deviation, SD] age: 56.0 [12.0] years, 49.1% were females) initiated on insulin therapy and consecutively randomized to sequential (n=733) and single (n=723) telephonic interview groups were included. Data on insulin treatment and self-reported blood glucose values were obtained via telephone interview. Logistic regression analysis was performed for factors predicting increased likelihood of persistence and skipping an injection. Results Overall, 76.8% patients (83.2% in sequential vs 70.3% in single interview group, (P<0.001) remained on insulin treatment at the third month. Significantly higher rate for skipping doses was noted in basal bolus than in other regimens (27.0% vs 15.0% for premixed and 15.8% basal insulin, respectively, P<0.0001). Logistic regression analysis revealed sequential telephonic interview (odds ratio [OR], 1.531; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.093–2.143; P=0.013), higher hemoglobin A1c levels (OR, 1.090; 95% CI, 0.999–1.189; P=0.049), and less negative appraisal of insulin therapy as significant predictors of higher persistence. Basal bolus regimen (OR, 1.583; 95% CI, 1.011–2.479; P=0.045) and higher hemoglobin A1c levels (OR, 1.114; 95% CI, 1.028–1.207; P=0.008) were the significant predictors of increased likelihood of skipping an injection. Conclusion Our findings revealed positive influence of sequential telephonic interview, although including no intervention in treatment, on achieving better treatment persistence in type 2 diabetes patients initiating insulin. PMID:27274207

  13. Partially premixed flames in stagnating turbulence: The merging of planar triple flames

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, Ken; Champion, Michel; Libby, Paul A.

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this work, which takes a RANS perspective, is to consider the prospect of establishing a planar turbulent triple flame whose mean consists of two parallel premixed flame brushes separated by a nonpremixed flame brush. Experiments involving a counterflow between fuel-rich and fuel-lean turbulent streams are considered. A correlation of published experimental data is used to estimate premixed turbulent flame brush locations and brush thicknesses. Previously validated model calculations then allow an estimate to be made of the thickness of a central nonpremixed flame or mixing layer, a thickness which is shown to be strongly influenced by flame-turbulence interactions in the premixed flames. This thickness turns out to be orders-of-magnitude greater than the width of the hot burned gas region between the two premixed flames strongly suggesting that the three reacting flow regions will merge with each other. It is concluded that unlike the corresponding laminar counterflow planar turbulent triple flames will be difficult to establish in laboratory scale experiments. (author)

  14. A simulation of a bluff-body stabilized turbulent premixed flame using LES-PDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Pope, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    A turbulent premixed flame stabilized by a triangular cylinder as a flame-holder is simulated. The computational condition matches the Volvo experiments (Sjunnesson et al. 1992). Propane is premixed at a fuel lean condition of ϕ = 0 . 65 . For this reactive simulation, LES-PDF formulation is used, similar to Yang et al. (2012). The evolution of Lagrangian particles is simulated by solving stochastic differential equations modeling transport of the composition PDF. Mixing is modeled by the modified IEM model (Viswanathan et al. 2011). Chemical reactions are calculated by ISAT and for the good load balancing, PURAN distribution of ISAT tables is applied (Hiremath et al. 2012). To calculate resolved density, the two-way coupling (Popov & Pope 2013) is applied, solving a transport equation of resolved specific volume to reduce statistical noise. A baseline calculation shows a good agreement with the experimental measurements in turbulence statistics, temperature, and minor species mass fractions. Chemical reaction does not significantly contribute to the overall computational cost, in contrast to non-premixed flame simulations (Hiremath et al. 2013), presumably due to the restricted manifold of the purely premixed flame in the composition space.

  15. Kinetic mechanisms for premixed, laminar, steady state hydrogen/nitrous oxide flames

    SciTech Connect

    Coffee, T.P.

    1986-07-01

    A model has been developed for premixed, laminar, one-dimensional hydrogen/nitrous oxide flames. Results have been compared with a range of experimental data. The present model roughly reproduces the data, but inaccuracies still exist. Sensitivity and screening analyses have been used to indicate the additional experimental data needed to improve the model.

  16. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... guanylate, hydrolysates of animal or plant origin (such as hydrolyzed vegetable protein), oleoresins of... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170.60 Section 170.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  17. AROMATIC AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN A LAMINAR PREMIXED N-BUTANE FLAME. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butane¯oxygen¯argon burner s...

  18. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH distribution in lean premixed swirling flames

    SciTech Connect

    Birouk, M.; Gupta, A.K.; Lewis, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    The spatial distribution of OH specie in lean premixed methane-air swirling flames at atmospheric pressure conditions has been investigated using a Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) technique. Tests were conducted in a burner with a central nozzle surrounded by two concentric annuli, through which the methane-air mixture could be injected with variable equivalence ratio, swirl and momentum. The geometry was chosen to simulate a single burner in a typical gas turbine combustor. Experiments were carried out across a range of three independently-varied parameters: the swirl distribution in the outer annulus, the axial momentum in the inner annulus, and the premixed equivalence ratio ({phi} = 0.75, 0.68, and 0.61). Instantaneous and ensemble-averaged OH images were obtained at vertical cross-sections of the flame (referenced through the centerline) under different flame conditions. These images provide information on the flame reaction zone which is of interest for understanding the complex structure and dynamics of a swirling premixed combustion system. These images also assist in understanding why lean premixed gas turbine combustion systems may experience combustion instability, particularly under leaner conditions.

  19. Study on Turbulent Premixed Flame Regimes with Ignition Using a Reactor Assisted Turbulent Slot Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Sang Hee; Reuter, Christopher; Windom, Bret; Ju, Yiguang

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent premixed flames of n-heptane/air and toluene/air mixtures affected by ignition have been experimentally investigated by using a reactor-assisted turbulent slot (RATS) burner at two burner temperatures, 450 K and 700 K. Turbulent burning velocities (ST) and flame structures have been measured by the simultaneous OH and CH2O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging at various equivalence ratios and turbulent Reynolds numbers. Three distinct turbulent premixed flame regimes are identified for n-heptane/air mixture; chemical frozen (CF) regime at low temperature, low temperature ignition (LTI) regime, and high temperature ignition (HTI) regime for respectively lean and rich conditions at 700 K. For CF regime, the measured turbulent burning velocities of n-heptane and toluene at 450 K follow a conventional correlation of turbulent intensity (defined as u'/SL). In LTI regime, substantial changes in chemical composition alter the laminar flame speed and transport property, leading to rapid increase of turbulent burning velocity. In HTI regime, it is found that the turbulent premixed flame structure is significantly modified by the appearance of volumetric ignition kernel structures associated with the transition from LTI to HTI. The turbulent premixed flame regime in HTI is no longer represented by the thin reaction zone regime. The measured turbulent burning velocities in HTI regime increase substantially as increasing ignition Damkőhler number over those in LTI regime.

  20. IMPORTANCE OF THE NITROUS OXIDE PATHWAY TO NOX IN LEAN-PREMIXED COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results of a study addressing the importance of the different chemical pathways responsible for nitrogen oxides (NOx) formation in lean-premixed combustion, and especially the role of the nitrous oxide pathway relative to the traditional Zeldovich pathway. he pr...

  1. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  2. Ecstasy analogues found in cacti.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham R; Stephanson, Nikolai; Beck, Olof; Shulgin, Alexander T

    2008-06-01

    Human interest in psychoactive phenethylamines is known from the use of mescaline-containing cacti and designer drugs such as Ecstasy. From the alkaloid composition of cacti we hypothesized that substances resembling Ecstasy might occur naturally. In this article we show that lophophine, homopiperonylamine and lobivine are new minor constituents of two cactus species, Lophophora williamsii (peyote) and Trichocereus pachanoi (San Pedro). This is the first report of putatively psychoactive phenethylamines besides mescaline in these cacti. A search for further biosynthetic analogues may provide new insights into the structure-activity relationships of mescaline. An intriguing question is whether the new natural compounds can be called "designer drugs." PMID:18720674

  3. Subfilter Scale Combustion Modelling for Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazian, Nasim

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a powerful computational tool for modelling turbulent combustion processes. However, for reactive flows, LES is still under significant development. In particular, for turbulent premixed flames, a considerable complication of LES is that the flame thickness is generally much smaller than the LES filter width such that the flame front and chemical reactions cannot be resolved on the grid. Accurate and robust subfilter-scale (SFS) models of the unresolved turbulence-chemistry interactions are therefore required and studies are needed to evaluate and improve them. In this thesis, a detailed comparison and evaluation of five different SFS models for turbulence- chemistry interactions in LES of premixed flames is presented. These approaches include both flamelet- and non-flamelet-based models, coupled with simple or tabulated chemistry. The mod- elling approaches considered herein are: algebraic- and transport-equation variants of the flame surface density (FSD) model, the presumed conditional moment (PCM) with flame prolongation of intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (FPI) tabulated chemistry, or PCM-FPI approach, evaluated with two different presumed probability density function (PDF) models; and conditional source-term estimation (CSE) approach. The predicted LES solutions are compared to the existing laboratory-scale experimental observation of Bunsen-type turbulent premixed methane-air flames, corresponding to lean and stoichiometric conditions lying from the upper limit of the flamelet regime to well within the thin reaction zones regime of the standard regimes diagram. Direct comparison of different SFS approaches allows investigation of stability and performance of the models, while the weaknesses and strengths of each approach are identified. Evaluation of algebraic and transported FSD models highlights the importance of non-equilibrium transport in turbulent premixed flames. The effect of the PDF type for the reaction progress

  4. Short Term Palmitate Supply Impairs Intestinal Insulin Signaling via Ceramide Production.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Postal, Bárbara Graziela; Demignot, Sylvie; Ribeiro, Agnès; Osinski, Céline; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Leturque, Armelle; Rousset, Monique; Ferré, Pascal; Hajduch, Eric; Carrière, Véronique

    2016-07-29

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases is increasing, and there are global recommendations to limit consumption of certain nutrients, especially saturated lipids. Insulin resistance, a common trait occurring in obesity and type 2 diabetes, is associated with intestinal lipoprotein overproduction. However, the mechanisms by which the intestine develops insulin resistance in response to lipid overload remain unknown. Here, we show that insulin inhibits triglyceride secretion and intestinal microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression in vivo in healthy mice force-fed monounsaturated fatty acid-rich olive oil but not in mice force-fed saturated fatty acid-rich palm oil. Moreover, when mouse intestine and human Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes were treated with the saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid, the insulin-signaling pathway was impaired. We show that palmitic acid or palm oil increases ceramide production in intestinal cells and that treatment with a ceramide analogue partially reproduces the effects of palmitic acid on insulin signaling. In Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes, ceramide effects on insulin-dependent AKT phosphorylation are mediated by protein kinase C but not by protein phosphatase 2A. Finally, inhibiting de novo ceramide synthesis improves the response of palmitic acid-treated Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes to insulin. These results demonstrate that a palmitic acid-ceramide pathway accounts for impaired intestinal insulin sensitivity, which occurs within several hours following initial lipid exposure. PMID:27255710

  5. Influence of anti-insulin antibodies on insulin immunoassays in the autoimmune insulin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Casesnoves, A; Mauri, M; Dominguez, J R; Alfayate, R; Picó, A M

    1998-11-01

    The autoimmune insulin syndrome (AIS) is a rare, benign syndrome characterized by hyperinsulinaemia and hypoglycaemia associated with the presence of autoantibodies to insulin in patients who have not been treated with insulin. We report here the case of a 52-year-old patient with recurrent attacks of severe postprandial hypoglycaemia and we also present the effect of anti-insulin antibodies on insulin immunoassays. The patient was submitted to the following diagnostic tests: 5-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a prolonged 72-h fast and an insulin tolerance test (ITT). Serum glucose, total and free insulin, C-peptide, proinsulin, insulin antibodies and other autoantibodies were measured. Insulin concentrations were measured by two methods: a double antibody radioimmunoassay (RIA) and an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Insulin concentration measured by RIA was extremely high in the OGTT and 72-h fast. In contrast, insulin concentrations measured by IRMA were between 120 and 888 pmol/L in the OGTT and between 37 and 133 pmol/L during the 72-h fast. Fasting free-insulin concentrations measured by RIA were between 2224 and 2669 pmol/L, whereas free-insulin concentrations measured by IRMA ranged between 93 and 237 pmol/L. Total insulin concentrations measured by RIA and IRMA were 57,615 and 94,021 pmol/L, respectively. The C-peptide concentrations were moderately high in the three tests. Serum insulin antibody concentrations were extremely high (62-71%), compared with less than 3% in normal serum samples. In conclusion, the high insulin concentrations measured by RIA were caused by insulin autoantibodies. However, insulin concentrations measured by IRMA were not influenced by them. We conclude that IRMA is the more accurate method for measuring insulin concentrations in such cases. PMID:9838991

  6. The role of reactant unmixedness, strain rate, and length scale on premixed combustor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsen, S.; LaRue, J.; Vilayanur, S.; Guillaume, D.

    1995-12-31

    Lean premixed combustion provides a means to reduce pollutant formation and increase combustion efficiency. However, fuel-air mixing is rarely uniform in space and time. This nonuniformity in concentration will lead to relative increases in pollutant formation and decreases in combustion efficiency. The nonuniformity of the concentration at the exit of the premixer has been defined by Lyons (1981) as the ``unmixedness.`` Although turbulence properties such as length scales and strain rate are known to effect unmixedness, the exact relationship is unknown. Evaluating this relationship and the effect of unmixedness in premixed combustion on pollutant formation and combustion efficiency are an important part of the overall goal of US Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program and are among the goals of the program described herein. The information obtained from ATS is intended to help to develop and commercialize gas turbines. The contributions to the program which the University of California (Irvine) Combustion Lab (UCICL) will provide are: (1) establish the relationship of inlet unmixedness, length scales, and mean strain rate to performance, (2) determine the optimal levels of inlet unmixedness, length scales, and mean strain rates to maximize combustor performance, and (3) identify efficient premixing methods for achieving the necessary inlet conditions. The program during this reporting period is focused on developing a means to measure and qualify different degrees of temporal and spatial unmixedness. Laser diagnostic methods for planer unmixedness measurements are being developed and preliminary results are presented herein. These results will be used to (1), aid in the design of experimental premixers, and (2), determine the unmixedness which will be correlated with the emissions of the combustor. This measure of unmixedness coupled with length scale, strain rate and intensity information is required to attain the UCI goals.

  7. Development of Criteria for Flameholding Tendencies within Premixer Passages for High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Elliot; McDonell, Vincent

    2015-03-31

    Due to increasingly stringent air quality requirements stationary power gas turbines have moved to lean-premixed operation, which reduces pollutant emissions but can result in flashback. Flashback can cause serious damage to the premixer hardware. Curtailing flashback can be difficult with hydrocarbon fuels and becomes even more challenging when hydrogen is used as the fuel. The two main approaches for coping with flashback are either to design a combustor that is resistant to flashback, or to design a premixer that will not anchor a flame if flashback occurs. Even with a well-designed combustor flashback can occur under certain circumstances, thus it is necessary to determine how to avoid flameholding within the premixer passageways of a gas turbine. To this end, an experiment was designed that would determine the flameholding propensities at elevated pressures and temperatures of three different classes of geometric features commonly found in gas turbine premixers, with both natural gas and hydrogen fuel. Experiments to find the equivalence ratio at blow off were conducted within an optically accessible test apparatus with four flameholders: 0.25 and 0.50 inch diameter cylinders, a reverse facing step with a height of 0.25 inches, and a symmetric airfoil with a thickness of 0.25 inches and a chord length of one inch. Tests were carried out at temperatures between 300 K and 750 K, at pressures up to 9 atmospheres. Typical bulk velocities were between 40 and 100 m/s. The effect of airfoil’s angle of rotation was also investigated. Blow off for hydrogen flames was found to occur at much lower adiabatic flame temperatures than natural gas flames. Additionally it was observed that at high pressures and high turbulence intensities, reactant velocity does not have a noticeable effect on the point of blow off due in large part to corresponding increases in turbulent flame speed. Finally a semi empirical correlation was developed that predicts flame extinction for both

  8. Premixed and nonpremixed generated manifolds in large-eddy simulation of Sandia flame D and F

    SciTech Connect

    Vreman, A.W.; Albrecht, B.A.; van Oijen, J.A.; de Goey, L.P.H.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.

    2008-05-15

    Premixed and nonpremixed flamelet-generated manifolds have been constructed and applied to large-eddy simulation of the piloted partially premixed turbulent flames Sandia Flame D and F. In both manifolds the chemistry is parameterized as a function of the mixture fraction and a progress variable. Compared to standard nonpremixed flamelets, premixed flamelets cover a much larger part of the reaction domain. Comparison of the results for the two manifolds with experimental data of flame D show that both manifolds yield predictions of comparable accuracy for the mean temperature, mixture fraction, and a number of chemical species, such as CO{sub 2}. However, the nonpremixed manifold outperforms the premixed manifold for other chemical species, the most notable being CO and H{sub 2}. If the mixture is rich, CO and H{sub 2} in a premixed flamelet are larger than in a nonpremixed flamelet, for a given value of the progress variable. Simulations have been performed for two different grids to address the effect of the large-eddy filter width. The inclusion of modeled subgrid variances of mixture fraction and progress variable as additional entries to the manifold have only small effects on the simulation of either flame. An exception is the prediction of NO, which (through an extra transport equation) was found to be much closer to experimental results when modeled subgrid variances were included. The results obtained for flame D are satisfactory, but despite the unsteadiness of the LES, the extinction measured in flame F is not properly captured. The latter finding suggests that the extinction in flame F mainly occurs on scales smaller than those resolved by the simulation. With the presumed {beta}-pdf approach, significant extinction does not occur, unless the scalar subgrid variances are overestimated. A thickened flame model, which maps unresolved small-scale dynamics upon resolved scales, is able to predict the experimentally observed extinction to some extent

  9. Retention and degradation of 125I-insulin by perfused livers from diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Terris, S; Steiner, D F

    1976-04-01

    The retention of degradation of insulin by isolated perfused liver have been examined. Noncyclically perfused livers from streptozotocin-diabetic rats retained 25% and degraded 10% of 125I-insulin administered as a 1-min pulse. On gel filtration (Sephadex G50F), the degradation products released into the vascular effluent eluted in the salt peak. During the 45-min interval after the end of the 125I-insulin infusion, 0.19% of the total dose was excreted in the bile. 60-90% of this material consisted of iodinated, low-molecular-weight degradation products. Inclusion of native insulin with the 125I-insulin in the pulse depressed both the retention and degradation of iodinated material; however, this reflected increased retention and degradation of the total insulin dose (125I-insulin plus native hormone). The log of the total amounts of insulin retained and degraded were linearly related to the log of the total amount of insulin infused at concentrations between 12.7 nM and 2.84 muM. Increasing the amount of native insulin in the infused pulse also depressed the total amount of iodinated material found in the bile and led to the appearance in the bile of intermediate-sized degradation products that did not simultaneously appear in the vascular effluent. Addition of high concentrations of glucagon to the infused 125I-insulin had no effect on the retention or degradation of the labeled hormone, or on the apparent size and amount of iodinated degradation products found in the vascular effluent or in the bile. Preinfusion of concanavalin A inhibited both 125I-insulin retention and degradation. A greater depression by concanavalin A of degradation than binding was also observed with isolated hepatocytes. In contrast to 125I-insulin, the retention and degradation of two iodinated insulin analogues of relative low biological potency, proinsulin and desalanyl-desasparaginyl insulin, were small. The amount of radioactivity appearing in the bile after infusion of these

  10. Retention and degradation of 125I-insulin by perfused livers from diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Terris, S; Steiner, D F

    1976-01-01

    The retention of degradation of insulin by isolated perfused liver have been examined. Noncyclically perfused livers from streptozotocin-diabetic rats retained 25% and degraded 10% of 125I-insulin administered as a 1-min pulse. On gel filtration (Sephadex G50F), the degradation products released into the vascular effluent eluted in the salt peak. During the 45-min interval after the end of the 125I-insulin infusion, 0.19% of the total dose was excreted in the bile. 60-90% of this material consisted of iodinated, low-molecular-weight degradation products. Inclusion of native insulin with the 125I-insulin in the pulse depressed both the retention and degradation of iodinated material; however, this reflected increased retention and degradation of the total insulin dose (125I-insulin plus native hormone). The log of the total amounts of insulin retained and degraded were linearly related to the log of the total amount of insulin infused at concentrations between 12.7 nM and 2.84 muM. Increasing the amount of native insulin in the infused pulse also depressed the total amount of iodinated material found in the bile and led to the appearance in the bile of intermediate-sized degradation products that did not simultaneously appear in the vascular effluent. Addition of high concentrations of glucagon to the infused 125I-insulin had no effect on the retention or degradation of the labeled hormone, or on the apparent size and amount of iodinated degradation products found in the vascular effluent or in the bile. Preinfusion of concanavalin A inhibited both 125I-insulin retention and degradation. A greater depression by concanavalin A of degradation than binding was also observed with isolated hepatocytes. In contrast to 125I-insulin, the retention and degradation of two iodinated insulin analogues of relative low biological potency, proinsulin and desalanyl-desasparaginyl insulin, were small. The amount of radioactivity appearing in the bile after infusion of these

  11. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  12. Depression and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Sue; Schmidt, Mike; Patton, George; Dwyer, Terry; Blizzard, Leigh; Otahal, Petr; Venn, Alison

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between depressive disorder and insulin resistance in a sample of young adults using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to ascertain depression status. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cross-sectional data were collected from 1,732 participants aged between 26 and 36 years. Insulin resistance was derived from blood chemistry measures of fasting insulin and glucose using the homeostasis model assessment method. Those identified with mild, moderate, or severe depression were classified as having depressive disorder. RESULTS The 12-month prevalence of depressive disorder was 5.4% among men and 11.7% among women. In unadjusted models mean insulin resistance was 17.2% (95% CI 0.7–36.0%, P = 0.04) higher in men and 11.4% (1.5–22.0%, P = 0.02) higher in women with depressive disorder. After adjustment for behavioral and dietary factors, the increased level of insulin resistance associated with depressive disorder was 13.2% (−3.1 to 32.3%, P = 0.12) in men and 6.1% (−4.1 to 17.4%, P = 0.25) in women. Waist circumference was identified as a mediator in the relationship between depression and insulin resistance, reducing the β coefficient in the fully adjusted models in men by 38% and in women by 42%. CONCLUSIONS A positive association was found between depressive disorder and insulin resistance in this population-based sample of young adult men and women. The association seemed to be mediated partially by waist circumference. PMID:20185745

  13. Treating Diabetes Mellitus: Pharmacophore Based Designing of Potential Drugs from Gymnema sylvestre against Insulin Receptor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Khan, Md. Arif; Rakib-Uz-Zaman, S. M.; Ali, Mohammad Tuhin; Islam, Md. Saidul; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders which can affect the quality of life severely. Injectable insulin is currently being used to treat DM which is mainly associated with patient inconvenience. Small molecules that can act as insulin receptor (IR) agonist would be better alternatives to insulin injection. Herein, ten bioactive small compounds derived from Gymnema sylvestre (G. sylvestre) were chosen to determine their IR binding affinity and ADMET properties using a combined approach of molecular docking study and computational pharmacokinetic elucidation. Designing structural analogues were also performed for the compounds associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the ten parent compounds, six were found to have significant pharmacokinetic properties with considerable binding affinity towards IR while four compounds were associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the forty structural analogues, four compounds demonstrated considerably increased binding affinity towards IR and less toxicity compared with parent compounds. Finally, molecular interaction analysis revealed that six parent compounds and four analogues interact with the active site amino acids of IR. So this study would be a way to identify new therapeutics and alternatives to insulin for diabetic patients. PMID:27034931

  14. Treating Diabetes Mellitus: Pharmacophore Based Designing of Potential Drugs from Gymnema sylvestre against Insulin Receptor Protein.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Khan, Md Arif; Rakib-Uz-Zaman, S M; Ali, Mohammad Tuhin; Islam, Md Saidul; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders which can affect the quality of life severely. Injectable insulin is currently being used to treat DM which is mainly associated with patient inconvenience. Small molecules that can act as insulin receptor (IR) agonist would be better alternatives to insulin injection. Herein, ten bioactive small compounds derived from Gymnema sylvestre (G. sylvestre) were chosen to determine their IR binding affinity and ADMET properties using a combined approach of molecular docking study and computational pharmacokinetic elucidation. Designing structural analogues were also performed for the compounds associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the ten parent compounds, six were found to have significant pharmacokinetic properties with considerable binding affinity towards IR while four compounds were associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the forty structural analogues, four compounds demonstrated considerably increased binding affinity towards IR and less toxicity compared with parent compounds. Finally, molecular interaction analysis revealed that six parent compounds and four analogues interact with the active site amino acids of IR. So this study would be a way to identify new therapeutics and alternatives to insulin for diabetic patients. PMID:27034931

  15. Prkar1a in the regulation of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Stratakis, C; Kirschner, L

    2012-09-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly increasing worldwide with significant consequences on individual quality of life as well as economic burden on states' healthcare costs. While origins of the pathogenesis of T2DM are poorly understood, an early defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells is considered a hallmark of T2DM. Upon a glucose stimulus, insulin is secreted in a biphasic manner with an early first-phase burst of insulin, which is followed by a second, more sustained phase of insulin output. First phase insulin secretion is diminished early in T2DM as well is in subjects who are at risk of developing T2DM. An effective treatment of T2DM with incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or its long acting peptide analogue exendin-4 (E4), restores first-phase and augments second-phase glucose stimulated insulin secretion. This effect of incretin action occurs within minutes of GLP-1/E4 infusion in T2DM humans. An additional important consideration is that incretin hormones augment GSIS only above a certain glucose threshold, which is slightly above the normal glucose range. This ensures that incretin hormones stimulate GSIS only when glucose levels are high, while they are ineffective when insulin levels are below a certain threshold. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor, which is highly expressed on pancreatic β-cells, stimulates 2 -distinct intracellular signaling pathways: a) the cAMP-protein kinase A branch and b) the cAMP-EPAC2 (EPAC=exchange protein activated by cAMP) branch. While the EPAC2 branch is considered to mediate GLP-1 effects on first-phase GSIS, the PKA branch is necessary for the former branch to be active. However, how these 2 branches interplay and converge and how their effects on insulin secretion and insulin vesicle exocytosis are coordinated is poorly understood.Thus, at the outset of our studies we have a poorly understood intracellular interplay of cAMP-dependent signaling

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flatt, Peter R.; Bailey, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Information and current ideas on the factors regulating insulin secretion, the mechanisms underlying the secretion and biological actions of insulin, and the main characteristics of diabetes mellitus are presented. (Author)

  17. New Insulins and New Aspects in Insulin Delivery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Vincent C

    2015-08-01

    The major abnormality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is insulin deficiency. The methods of replacing insulin have improved throughout the decades, but hypoglycemia is still the limiting factor for many individuals with diabetes, and it prevents them from achieving ideal glycemic targets. New insulin and newer delivery systems are being developed that can improve some of the limitations of current insulins or make the delivery of insulins more acceptable for some patients. Extending the duration of action of basal insulins and shortening the peak of fast-acting insulins may have advantages for individuals with diabetes. Different delivery systems may make insulin more acceptable to patients and may have other advantages, which may aid in attaining better glycemic control. PMID:26233724

  18. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin aspart ... also can be used with an external insulin pump. Before using insulin aspart in a pump system, ...

  19. Insulin Detemir (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... man-made version of human insulin. Insulin detemir works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced ... using an insulin pen, always remove the needle right after you inject your dose. Dispose of needles ...

  20. Development of insulin delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, N I; Siddiqui, Ni; Rahman, S; Nessa, A

    2008-01-01

    Delivery system of insulin is vital for its acceptance and adherence to therapy for achieving the glycemic targets. Enormous developments have occurred in the delivery system of insulin during the last twenty years and each improvement was aimed at two common goals: patients convenience and better glycemic control. Till to date, the various insulin delivery systems are: syringes/vials, injection aids, jet injectors, transmucosal delivery, transdermal delivery, external insulin infusion pump, implantable insulin pumps, insulin pens and insulin inhalers. Syringe/vial is the oldest and conventional method, still widely used and relatively cheaper. Modern plastic syringes are disposable, light weight with microfine needle for patients convenience and comfort. Oral route could be the most acceptable and viable, if the barriers can be overcome and under extensive trial. Insulin pen device is an important milestone in the delivery system of insulin as it is convenient, discrete, painless, attractive, portable with flexible life style and improved quality of life. More than 80% of European diabetic patients are using insulin pen. Future digital pen will have better memory option, blood glucose monitoring system, insulin dose calculator etc. Insulin infusion pump is a good option for the children, busy patients with flexible lifestyle and those who want to avoid multiple daily injections. Pulmonary route of insulin delivery is a promising, effective, non-invasive and acceptable alternative method. Exubera, the world first insulin inhaler was approved by FDA in 28 January 2006. But due to certain limitations, it has been withdrawn from the market in October 2007. The main concern of inhaled insulin are: long term pulmonary safety issues, cost effectiveness and user friendly device. In future, more acceptable and cost effective insulin inhaler will be introduced. Newer avenues are under extensive trial for better future insulin delivery systems. PMID:18285745

  1. Insulin degludec aspart: One-year real world experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This retrospective analysis describes the use of insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp) in India. Material and Methods: All subjects who had received IDegAsp for 52 weeks at two endocrine centers were included in this study. Results: Forty-eight subjects (40 men), with mean age of 54.33 ± 9.63 years and mean duration of diabetes of 6.33 ± 2.96 years, started IDegAsp as insulin of initiation (16), as an intensification regime (4), as de-escalation from basal-bolus therapy (16), or as switch from premixed insulin (12). The dose of IDegAsp fell from 43.17 ± 21.18 U/day or 0.56 ± 0.23 U/kg to 37.75 ± 17.13U/day (0.51 ± 0.12 U/kg) at 24 weeks and 41.41 ± 15.33 U/day (0.56 ± 0.17 U/kg) at 52 weeks. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), which was 9.52 ± 1.27% at the start of therapy, fell to 7.51 ± 0.46% at 26 weeks and to 7.48 ± 0.40% at 52 weeks. Fasting plasma glucose fell from 154.08 ± 33.30 mg% to 108.58 ± 22.26 mg% at 26 weeks and 102.17 ± 12.79 mg% at 52 weeks. Of the 48 subjects, 39 (81.25%) achieved a target of HbA1c <7.0% at both 26 and 52 weeks. No episode of hypoglycemia was reported in the 4 weeks preceding the analysis. Conclusion: This communication highlights the efficacy, safety, and tolerability, while providing insight into the usage patterns of IDegAsp. PMID:27186556

  2. Short- and Longterm Glycemic Control of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Using Different Insulin Preparations.

    PubMed

    Luippold, Gerd; Bedenik, Jessica; Voigt, Anke; Grempler, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The chemical induction of diabetes with STZ has gained popularity because of the relative ease of rendering normal animals diabetic. Insulin substitution is required in STZ-rats in long-term studies to avoid ketoacidosis and consequently loss of animals. Aim of the present studies was to test different insulin preparations and different ways of administration in their ability to reduce blood glucose in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Single dosing of the long-acting insulin analogue glargine was able to dose-dependently reduce blood glucose over 4 h towards normoglycemia in STZ-treated rats. However, this effect was not sustained until 8 h post injection. A more sustained glucose-lowering effect was achieved using insulin-releasing implants. In STZ-rats, 1 insulin implant moderately lowered blood glucose levels 10 days after implantation, while 2 implants induced normoglycemia over the whole day. According to the glucose-lowering effect 1 as well as 2 insulin implants significantly reduced HbA1c measured after 26 days of implantation. In line with the improved glucose homeostasis due to the implants, urinary glucose excretion was also blunted in STZ-treated rats with 2 implants. Since diabetic nephropathy is one of the complications of longterm diabetes, renal function was characterized in the STZ-rat model. Increases in creatinine clearance and urinary albumin excretion resemble early signs of diabetic nephropathy. These functional abnormalities of the kidney could clearly be corrected with insulin-releasing implants 27 days after implantation. The data show that diabetic STZ-rats respond to exogenous insulin with regard to glucose levels as well as kidney parameters and a suitable dose of insulin implants for glucose control was established. This animal model together with the insulin dosing regimen is suitable to address diabetes-induced early diabetic nephropathy and also to study combination therapies with insulin for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27253523

  3. Short- and Longterm Glycemic Control of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Using Different Insulin Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Luippold, Gerd; Bedenik, Jessica; Voigt, Anke; Grempler, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The chemical induction of diabetes with STZ has gained popularity because of the relative ease of rendering normal animals diabetic. Insulin substitution is required in STZ-rats in long-term studies to avoid ketoacidosis and consequently loss of animals. Aim of the present studies was to test different insulin preparations and different ways of administration in their ability to reduce blood glucose in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Single dosing of the long-acting insulin analogue glargine was able to dose-dependently reduce blood glucose over 4 h towards normoglycemia in STZ-treated rats. However, this effect was not sustained until 8 h post injection. A more sustained glucose-lowering effect was achieved using insulin-releasing implants. In STZ-rats, 1 insulin implant moderately lowered blood glucose levels 10 days after implantation, while 2 implants induced normoglycemia over the whole day. According to the glucose-lowering effect 1 as well as 2 insulin implants significantly reduced HbA1c measured after 26 days of implantation. In line with the improved glucose homeostasis due to the implants, urinary glucose excretion was also blunted in STZ-treated rats with 2 implants. Since diabetic nephropathy is one of the complications of longterm diabetes, renal function was characterized in the STZ-rat model. Increases in creatinine clearance and urinary albumin excretion resemble early signs of diabetic nephropathy. These functional abnormalities of the kidney could clearly be corrected with insulin-releasing implants 27 days after implantation. The data show that diabetic STZ-rats respond to exogenous insulin with regard to glucose levels as well as kidney parameters and a suitable dose of insulin implants for glucose control was established. This animal model together with the insulin dosing regimen is suitable to address diabetes-induced early diabetic nephropathy and also to study combination therapies with insulin for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27253523

  4. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  5. Diabetes-associated mutations in human insulin: crystal structure and photo-cross-linking studies of a-chain variant insulin Wakayama.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhu-li; Huang, Kun; Xu, Bin; Hu, Shi-Quan; Wang, Shuhua; Chu, Ying-Chi; Katsoyannis, Panayotis G; Weiss, Michael A

    2005-04-01

    Naturally occurring mutations in insulin associated with diabetes mellitus identify critical determinants of its biological activity. Here, we describe the crystal structure of insulin Wakayama, a clinical variant in which a conserved valine in the A chain (residue A3) is substituted by leucine. The substitution occurs within a crevice adjoining the classical receptor-binding surface and impairs receptor binding by 500-fold, an unusually severe decrement among mutant insulins. To resolve whether such decreased activity is directly or indirectly mediated by the variant side chain, we have determined the crystal structure of Leu(A3)-insulin and investigated the photo-cross-linking properties of an A3 analogue containing p-azidophenylalanine. The structure, characterized in a novel crystal form as an R(6) zinc hexamer at 2.3 A resolution, is essentially identical to that of the wild-type R(6) hexamer. The variant side chain remains buried in a nativelike crevice with small adjustments in surrounding side chains. The corresponding photoactivatable analogue, although of low affinity, exhibits efficient cross-linking to the insulin receptor. The site of photo-cross-linking lies within a 14 kDa C-terminal domain of the alpha-subunit. This domain, unrelated in sequence to the major insulin-binding region in the N-terminal L1 beta-helix, is also contacted by photoactivatable probes at positions A8 and B25. Packing of Val(A3) at this interface may require a conformational change in the B chain to expose the A3-related crevice. The structure of insulin Wakayama thus evokes the reasoning of Sherlock Holmes in "the curious incident of the dog in the night": the apparent absence of structural perturbations (like the dog that did not bark) provides a critical clue to the function of a hidden receptor-binding surface. PMID:15794638

  6. Lean Premixed Combustion Stabilized by Low Swirl a Promising Concept for Practical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception, the low-swirl burner (LSB) has shown to be a useful laboratory apparatus for fundamental studies of premixed turbulent flames. The LSB operates under wide ranges of equivalence ratios, flow rates, and turbulence intensities. Its flame is lifted and detached from the burner and allows easy access for laser diagnostics. The flame brush is axisymmetric and propagates normal to the incident reactants. Therefore, the LSB is well suited for investigating detailed flame structures and empirical coefficients such as flame speed, turbulence transport, and flame generated turbulence. Due to its capability to stabilize ultra-lean premixed turbulent flames (phi approx. = 0.55), the LSB has generated interest from the gas appliance industry for use as an economical low-NO(x) burner. Lean premixed combustion emits low levels of NO(x), due primarily to the low flame temperature. Therefore, it is a very effective NO(x) prevention method without involving selective catalytic reduction (SCR), fuel-air staging, or flue gas recirculation (FGR). En the gas turbine industry, substantial research efforts have already been undertaken and engines with lean premixed combustors are already in use. For commercial and residential applications, premixed pulsed combustors and premixed ceramic matrix burners are commercially available. These lean premixed combustion technologies, however, tend to be elaborate but have relatively limited operational flexibility, and higher capital, operating and maintenance costs. Consequently, these industries are continuing the development of lean premixed combustion technologies as well as exploring new concepts. This paper summarizes the research effects we have undertaken in the past few years to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the low-swirl flame stabilization method for a wide range of heating and power generation systems. The principle of flame stabilization by low-swirl is counter to the conventional high-swirl methods that

  7. Ovarian tumors secreting insulin.

    PubMed

    Battocchio, Marialberta; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Chiarelli, Silvia; Trento, Mariangela; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Pasquali, Claudio; De Carlo, Eugenio; Dassie, Francesca; Mioni, Roberto; Rebellato, Andrea; Fallo, Francesco; Degli Uberti, Ettore; Martini, Chiara; Vettor, Roberto; Maffei, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    Combined ovarian germ cell and neuroendocrine tumors are rare. Only few cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion have been hypothesized in the literature. An ovarian tumor was diagnosed in a 76-year-old woman, referred to our department for recurrent hypoglycemia with hyperinsulinism. In vivo tests, in particular fasting test, rapid calcium infusion test, and Octreotide test were performed. Ectopic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia was demonstrated in vivo and hypoglycemia disappeared after hysteroadnexectomy. Histological exam revealed an ovarian germ cell tumor with neuroendocrine and Yolk sac differentiation, while immunostaining showed insulin positivity in neuroendocrine cells. A cell culture was obtained by tumoral cells, testing Everolimus, and Pasireotide. Insulin was detected in cell culture medium and Everolimus and Pasireotide demonstrated their potentiality in reducing insulin secretion, more than controlling cell viability. Nine cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion reported in literature have been reviewed. These data confirm the ovarian tissue potentiality to induce hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic syndrome after neoplastic transformation. PMID:25896552

  8. Acetoacetylation of insulin

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, D. G.; Shall, S.

    1969-01-01

    Insulin was treated with diketen at pH6·9. The reaction mixture was resolved into four components by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. The first component was unchanged insulin. The second and third components were shown by end-group analysis to be substituted on phenylalanine B-1 and glycine A-1 respectively. The fourth component was disubstituted on both phenylalanine B-1 and glycine A-1. The ∈-amino group of lysine B-29 was not involved in the reaction at low reagent concentrations. The purity of these derivatives was checked by their electrophoretic behaviour and by measurement of the rate of their reaction with trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid. The hormonal activity of the derivatives was determined. The effect of the modifications on the hormonal activity and the tertiary structure of insulin is discussed. ImagesFig. 10. PMID:5353531

  9. Insulin and carbohydrate dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Gelato, Marie C

    2003-04-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may experience abnormal body composition changes as well as metabolic abnormalities, including dyslipidemia, increases in triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism, ranging from insulin resistance with and without glucose intolerance to frank diabetes. Whether the body composition changes (i.e., increased visceral adiposity and fat wasting in the peripheral tissues) are linked to abnormalities in carbohydrate metabolism is unclear. The use of HAART with and without therapy with protease inhibitors (PIs) is related to carbohydrate abnormalities and changes in body composition. Regimens that include PIs appear to have a higher incidence of insulin resistance (up to 90%) and diabetes mellitus (up to 40%). The etiology of these abnormalities is not well understood; what is known about insulin and carbohydrate dysregulation with HAART is discussed. PMID:12652377

  10. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin produced by the body and insulin injected ...

  11. Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system an insulin delivery system a computer program that adjusts insulin delivery based on changes in glucose levels CGM systems approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ( ...

  12. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  13. An analogue study of intrusions.

    PubMed

    Laposa, Judith M; Alden, Lynn E

    2006-07-01

    According to cognitive theorists, intrusive trauma memories have their origin in how information during the event is processed. Two studies investigated functional cognitive strategies during medical crises that might protect against intrusions. In Study 1, interviews with health-care professionals were used to identify cognitive strategies judged to be effective in controlling emotions and dealing with medical crises. Study 2 systematically manipulated the use of those strategies in a trauma analogue film paradigm. Experimental participants reported fewer intrusions, and less fear and avoidance of film-related stimuli during the subsequent week than controls. The manipulation did not affect anxiety during the film or memory disorganization. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusion development are discussed. PMID:16125135

  14. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  15. Laboratory study of cometary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; Brucato, J.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, P.

    In situ exploration (e.g., GIOTTO mission) and astronomical observations (e.g., ISO) of comets have provided fundamental information about the structure, chemistry and physical properties of materials present in such primordial bodies of the Solar System. Moreover, it is known that cosmic materials evolve, depending on the efficiency of active processes (e.g., thermal annealing, UV irradiation, ion bombardment, gassolid interactions) in different space environments. Thus, the properties of cometary constituents must be considered in a wider perspective, including cosmic dust formation around cold stars and evolution in the interstellar medium until the formation of proto-planetary nebulae. In this scenario, laboratory experiments provide important hints to clarify the status of cometary compounds. The laboratory work is aimed at both reproducing material properties and at simulating their evolution based on the most effective mechanisms active in space. Several techniques are used to synthesise "analogues" of cometary compounds with controlled chemical and physical characteristics. The study of optical properties, complemented by other analytical techniques, is applied to investigate the products of synthesis in the experiments. The monitoring of the effects produced by processing methods, similar to those active in space, provides information both on the reactivity of materials and on the efficiency of treatments. Such an approach is able to provide quantitative information on chemical and structural modifications produced on organic and refractory materials. The comparison of laboratory results with data coming from space observations and in situ measurements provides a powerful tool to understand the real nature of comets and to place constraints on formation and evolution pathways. The laboratory experiments on analogues gain even more relevance as a sort of training in the future perspective of analysing cometary samples returned to Earth by space missions (e

  16. New Atglistatin closely related analogues: Synthesis and structure-activity relationship towards adipose triglyceride lipase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pierre-Philippe; D'Souza, Kenneth; Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Kienesberger, Petra C; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL) performs the first and rate-limiting step in lipolysis by hydrolyzing triacylglycerols stored in lipid droplets to diacylglycerols. By mediating lipolysis in adipose and non-adipose tissues, ATGL is a major regulator of overall energy metabolism and plasma lipid levels. Since chronically high levels of plasma lipids are linked to metabolic disorders including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, ATGL is an interesting therapeutic target. In the present study, fourteen closely related analogues of Atglistatin (1), a newly discovered ATGL inhibitor, were synthesized, and their ATGL inhibitory activity was evaluated. The effect of these analogues on lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes clearly shows that inhibition of the enzyme by Atglistatin (1) is due to the presence of the carbamate and N,N-dimethyl moieties on the biaryl central core at meta and para position, respectively. Mono carbamate-substituted analogue C2, in which the carbamate group was in the meta position as in Atglistatin (1), showed slight inhibition. Low dipole moment of Atglistatin (1) compared to the synthesized analogues possibly explains the lower inhibitory activities. PMID:27155760

  17. Oral Insulin and Buccal Insulin: A Critical Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Jacques, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Despite the availability of modern insulin injection devices with needles that are so sharp and thin that practically no injection pain takes place, it is still the dream of patients with diabetes to, for example, swallow a tablet with insulin. This is not associated with any pain and would allow more discretion. Therefore, availability of oral insulin would not only ease insulin therapy, it would certainly increase compliance. However, despite numerous attempts to develop such a “tablet” in the past 85 years, still no oral insulin is commercially available. Buccal insulin is currently in the last stages of clinical development by one company and might become available in the United States and Europe in the coming years (it is already on the market in some other countries). The aim of this review is to critically describe the different approaches that are currently under development. Optimal coverage of prandial insulin requirements is the aim with both routes of insulin administration (at least with most approaches). The speed of onset of metabolic effect seen with some oral insulin approaches is rapid, but absorption appears to be lower when the tablet is taken immediately prior to a meal. With all approaches, considerable amounts of insulin have to be applied in order to induce therapeutically relevant increases in the metabolic effect because of the low relative biopotency of buccal insulin. Unfortunately, the number of publications about clinical–experimental and clinical studies is surprisingly low. In addition, there is no study published in which the variability of the metabolic effect induced (with and without a meal) was studied adequately. In summary, after the failure of inhaled insulin, oral insulin and buccal insulin are hot candidates to come to the market as the next alternative routes of insulin administration. PMID:20144297

  18. Cinnamon, glucose and insulin sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compounds found in cinnamon not only improve the function of insulin but also function as antioxidants and may be anti-inflammatory. This is very important since insulin function, antioxidant status, and inflammatory response are closely linked; with decreased insulin sensitivity there is also decr...

  19. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  20. Insulin resistance in the liver: Deficiency or excess of insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Bazotte, Roberto B; Silva, Lorena G; Schiavon, Fabiana PM

    2014-01-01

    In insulin-resistant states (obesity, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes), hepatic production of glucose and lipid synthesis are heightened in concert, implying that insulin deficiency and insulin excess coexists in this setting. The fact that insulin may be inadequate or excessive at any one point in differing organs and tissues has many biologic ramifications. In this context the concept of metabolic compartmentalization in the liver is offered herein as one perspective of this paradox. In particular, we focus on the hypothesis that insulin resistance accentuates differences in periportal and perivenous hepatocytes, namely periportal glucose production and perivenous lipid synthesis. Subsequently, excessive production of glucose and accumulation of lipids could be expected in the livers of patients with obesity and insulin resistance. Overall, in this review, we provide our integrative perspective regarding how excessive production of glucose in periportal hepatocytes and accumulation of lipids in perivenous hepatocytes interact in insulin resistant states. PMID:25486190

  1. [Insulin therapy of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Roden, Michael; Weitgasser, Raimund; Ludvik, Bernhard; Fasching, Peter; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Schernthaner, Guntram; Prager, Rudolf; Wascher, Thomas C

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. Thus, reaching treatment targets with regard to control of glycemia is a central goal in the therapy of diabetic patients. The present article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the practical use of insulin according to current scientific evidence and clinical studies. PMID:27052221

  2. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be used in most health care providers' offices. The clamp is a research tool used by scientists to learn more about glucose metabolism. Research has shown that if blood tests indicate prediabetes, insulin ... care provider's office or commercial facility and sending the sample to ...

  3. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes. PMID:27594187

  4. Experimental study on the flame behaviors of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongliang; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Sining; Liu, Yi; Chu, Guanquan

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the flame propagation characteristics and tulip flame formation mechanism of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts, the techniques of Schlieren and high-speed video camera are used to study the flame behaviors of the premixed gases in a closed duct and opened one respectively, and the propagation characteristics in both cases and the formation mechanism of the tulip flame are analyzed. The results show that, the propagation flame in a closed duct is prior to form a tulip flame structure than that in an opened duct, and the tulip flame structure formation in a closed duct is related to the flame propagation velocity decrease. The sharp decrease of the flame propagation velocity is one of the reasons to the tulip flame formation, and the decrease of the flame propagation velocity is due to the decrease of the burned product flow velocity mainly.

  5. Analysis of the flamelet concept in the numerical simulation of laminar partially premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Consul, R.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.; Carbonell, D.; de Goey, L.P.H.

    2008-04-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the application of flamelet models based on the mixture fraction variable and its dissipation rate to the numerical simulation of partially premixed flames. Although the main application of these models is the computation of turbulent flames, this work focuses on the performance of flamelet concept in laminar flame simulations removing, in this way, turbulence closure interactions. A well-known coflow methane/air laminar flame is selected. Five levels of premixing are taken into account from an equivalence ratio {phi}={infinity} (nonpremixed) to {phi}=2.464. Results obtained using the flamelet approaches are compared to data obtained from the detailed solution of the complete transport equations using primitive variables. Numerical simulations of a counterflow flame are also presented to support the discussion of the results. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of the scalar dissipation rate modeling. (author)

  6. Effects of operating pressure on flame oscillation and emission characteristics in a partially premixed swirl combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Ryul; Choi, Gyung-Min; Kim, Duck-Jool

    2011-01-15

    The influence of varying combustor pressure on flame oscillation and emission characteristics in the partially premixed turbulent flame were investigated. In order to investigate combustion characteristics in the partially premixed turbulent flame, the combustor pressure was controlled in the range of -30 to 30 kPa for each equivalence ratio ({phi} = 0.8-1.2). The r.m.s. of the pressure fluctuations increased with decreasing combustor pressure for the lean condition. The combustor pressure had a sizeable influence on combustion oscillation, whose dominant frequency varied with the combustor pressure. Combustion instabilities could be controlled by increasing the turbulent intensity of the unburned mixture under the lean condition. An unstable flame was caused by incomplete combustion; hence, EICO greatly increased. Furthermore, EINO{sub x} simply reduced with decreasing combustor pressure at a rate of 0.035 g/10 kPa. The possibility of combustion control on the combusting mode and exhaust gas emission was demonstrated. (author)

  7. PREMIXED FLAME PROPAGATION AND MORPHOLOGY IN A CONSTANT VOLUME COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, A; Wichman, IS

    2014-06-04

    This work presents an experimental and numerical investigation of premixed flame propagation in a constant volume rectangular channel with an aspect ratio of six (6) that serves as a combustion chamber. Ignition is followed by an accelerating cusped finger-shaped flame-front. A deceleration of the flame is followed by the formation of a "tulip"-shaped flame-front. Eventually, the flame is extinguished when it collides with the cold wall on the opposite channel end. Numerical computations are performed to understand the influence of pressure waves, instabilities, and flow field effects causing changes to the flame structure and morphology. The transient 2D numerical simulation results are compared with transient 3D experimental results. Issues discussed are the appearance of oscillatory motions along the flame front and the influences of gravity on flame structure. An explanation is provided for the formation of the "tulip" shape of the premixed flame front.

  8. Degree of vaporization using an airblast type fuel injector for a premixed-prevaporized combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Vaporization data are presented which could be useful in designing premixed-prevaporized fuel preparation systems for gas turbine combustors. Lean, premixed-prevaporized combustion systems are being developed because they operate with low flame temperatures and, therefore, produce low levels of nitrogen oxides. Parametric tests of the effect of inlet air temperature, length (residence time), reference velocity, pressure and fuel-air ratio on the degree of vaporization are reported. Jet A and Diesel no. 2 fuel were tested. A formula is provided which shows the effect of inlet air temperature, residence time, reference velocity, and pressure on the degree of vaporization for a constant fuel-air ratio of 0.020. The results of the effect of inlet air temperature on the degree of vaporization using Jet A and Diesel no. 2 are nearly identical.

  9. On the Interaction of a Premixed Flame with an Acoustic Disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Caroline; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to analyze the effect of acoustic disturbances on a premixed flame and determine their role in the onset of combustion instabilities. Computations for the one-dimensional, unsteady combustion of a lean premixed methane-air mixture are performed. An acoustic excitation is introduced in the chamber and interacts with the flame front. Our results indicate that as the amplitude of the acoustic excitation is increased, the flame front position fluctuates rapidly. This phenomenon is even more intense when the frequency of the acoustic disturbance matches the fundamental frequency of the chamber. Our results suggest that the interactions between the flame and the acoustic excitation may result in flame extinguishment. In addition various passive control devices are tested and we found that the Helmholtz resonator with rounded inlet corners is the most efficient.

  10. Extinction and near-extinction instability of non-premixed tubular flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shengteng; Pitz, Robert W.; Yu, Wang

    2009-01-15

    Tubular non-premixed flames are formed by an opposed tubular burner, a new tool to study the effects of curvature on extinction and flame instability of non-premixed flames. Extinction of the opposed tubular flames generated by burning diluted H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} or C{sub 3}H{sub 8} with air is investigated for both concave and convex curvature. To examine the effects of curvature on extinction, the critical fuel dilution ratios at extinction are measured at various stretch rates, initial mixture strengths and flame curvature for fuels diluted in N{sub 2}, He, Ar or CO{sub 2}. In addition, the onset conditions of the cellular instability are mapped as a function of stretch rates, initial mixture strengths, and flame curvature. For fuel mixtures with Lewis numbers much less than unity, such as H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, concave flame curvature towards the fuel suppresses cellular instabilities. (author)

  11. Consistent flamelet modeling of differential molecular diffusion for turbulent non-premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng

    2016-03-01

    Treating differential molecular diffusion correctly and accurately remains as a great challenge to the modeling of turbulent non-premixed combustion. The aim of this paper is to develop consistent modeling strategies for differential molecular diffusion in flamelet models. Two types of differential molecular diffusion models are introduced, linear differential diffusion models and nonlinear differential diffusion models. A multi-component turbulent mixing layer problem is analyzed in detail to gain insights into differential molecular diffusion and its characteristics, particularly the dependence of differential molecular diffusion on the Reynolds number and the Lewis number. These characteristics are then used to validate the differential molecular diffusion models. Finally, the new models are applied to the modeling of a series of laboratory-scale turbulent non-premixed jet flames with different Reynolds number (Sandia Flames B, C, and D) to further assess the models' performance.

  12. Development of lean premixed low-swirl burner for low NO{sub x} practical application

    SciTech Connect

    Yegian, D.T.; Cheng, R.K.

    1999-07-07

    Laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the performance of a premixed low-swirl burner (LSB) in configurations that simulate commercial heating appliances. Laser diagnostics were used to investigate changes in flame stabilization mechanism, flowfield, and flame stability when the LSB flame was confined within quartz cylinders of various diameters and end constrictions. The LSB adapted well to enclosures without generating flame oscillations and the stabilization mechanism remained unchanged. The feasibility of using the LSB as a low NO{sub x} commercial burner has also been verified in a laboratory test station that simulates the operation of a water heater. It was determined that the LSB can generate NO{sub x} emissions < 10 ppm (at 3% O{sub 2}) without significant effect on the thermal efficiency of the conventional system. The study has demonstrated that the lean premixed LSB has commercial potential for use as a simple economical and versatile burner for many low emission gas appliances.

  13. Emissions of oxides of nitrogen from an experimental premixed-hydrogen burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1976-01-01

    Flame-tube experiments using premixed hydrogen and air were conducted to determine the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) resulting from ultralean combustion. Measurements of NOx emissions and combustion efficiency were made for inlet mixture temperatures of 600 and 700 K, pressures of 3.8 x 10 to the 5th power and 5.2 x 10 to the 5th power N/m squared, reference velocities of 15 to 18 m/sec, and equivalence ratios of 0.2 to 0.4. At the 700 K inlet mixture temperature, NOx emissions were 0.06 ppmv, and combustion efficiency was 98 percent at an equivalence ratio of 0.24. The use of a high-blockage (92-percent blockage) flameholder made it possible to conduct tests without upstream burning in the premixing duct for mixtures with equivalence ratios less than 0.4. For richer mixtures upstream burning did occur and prevented further testing.

  14. Study of Turbulent Premixed Flame Propagation using a Laminar Flamelet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, H. G.

    1995-01-01

    The laminar flamelet concept in turbulent reacting flows is considered applicable to many practical combustion systems (Linan & Williams 1993). For turbulent premixed combustion, the laminar flamelet regime is valid when turbulent Karlovitz number is less than unity, which is equivalent to stating that the characteristic thickness of the flame is less than that of a Kolmogorov eddy; this is known as the Klimov-Williams criterion (Williams 1985). In such a case, the flame maintains its laminar structure, and the effect of turbulent flow is merely to wrinkle and strain the flame front. The propagating wrinkled premixed flame can then be described as an infinitesimally thin surface dividing the unburnt fresh mixture and the burnt product.

  15. Plant volatile analogues strengthen attractiveness to insect.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  16. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  17. Selective Insulin Resistance in Adipocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Ng, Yvonne; Pant, Himani; Li, Jia; Meoli, Christopher C.; Coster, Adelle C. F.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; James, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Aside from glucose metabolism, insulin regulates a variety of pathways in peripheral tissues. Under insulin-resistant conditions, it is well known that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is impaired, and many studies attribute this to a defect in Akt signaling. Here we make use of several insulin resistance models, including insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes and fat explants prepared from high fat-fed C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice, to comprehensively distinguish defective from unaffected aspects of insulin signaling and its downstream consequences in adipocytes. Defective regulation of glucose uptake was observed in all models of insulin resistance, whereas other major actions of insulin such as protein synthesis and anti-lipolysis were normal. This defect corresponded to a reduction in the maximum response to insulin. The pattern of change observed for phosphorylation in the Akt pathway was inconsistent with a simple defect at the level of Akt. The only Akt substrate that showed consistently reduced phosphorylation was the RabGAP AS160 that regulates GLUT4 translocation. We conclude that insulin resistance in adipose tissue is highly selective for glucose metabolism and likely involves a defect in one of the components regulating GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface in response to insulin. PMID:25720492

  18. Adipocyte lipolysis and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Morigny, Pauline; Houssier, Marianne; Mouisel, Etienne; Langin, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Basal fat cell lipolysis (i.e., fat cell triacylglycerol breakdown into fatty acids and glycerol in the absence of stimulatory factors) is elevated during obesity and is closely associated with insulin resistance. Inhibition of adipocyte lipolysis may therefore be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating insulin resistance and preventing obesity-associated type 2 diabetes. In this review, we explore the relationship between adipose lipolysis and insulin sensitivity. After providing an overview of the components of fat cell lipolytic machinery, we describe the hypotheses that may support the causality between lipolysis and insulin resistance. Excessive circulating fatty acids may ectopically accumulate in insulin-sensitive tissues and impair insulin action. Increased basal lipolysis may also modify the secretory profile of adipose tissue, influencing whole body insulin sensitivity. Finally, excessive fatty acid release may also worsen adipose tissue inflammation, a well-known parameter contributing to insulin resistance. Partial genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of fat cell lipases in mice as well as short term clinical trials using antilipolytic drugs in humans support the benefit of fat cell lipolysis inhibition on systemic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, which occurs without an increase of fat mass. Modulation of fatty acid fluxes and, putatively, of fat cell secretory pattern may explain the amelioration of insulin sensitivity whereas changes in adipose tissue immune response do not seem involved. PMID:26542285

  19. Transdermal Insulin Delivery Using Microdermabrasion

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Samantha; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Seong-O

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Transdermal insulin delivery is an attractive needle-free alternative to subcutaneous injection conventionally used to treat diabetes. However, skin’s barrier properties prevent insulin permeation at useful levels. Methods We investigated whether microdermabrasion can selectively remove skin’s surface layers to increase skin permeability as a method to administer insulin to diabetic rats. We further assessed the relative roles of stratum corneum and viable epidermis as barriers to insulin delivery. Results Pretreatment of skin with microdermabrasion to selectively remove stratum corneum did not have a significant effect on insulin delivery or reduction in blood glucose level (BGL). Removal of full epidermis by microdermabrasion significantly reduced BGL, similar to the positive control involving subcutaneous injection of 0.1U insulin. Significant pharmacokinetic differences between microdermabrasion and subcutaneous injection were faster time to peak insulin concentration after injection and larger peak insulin concentration and area-under-the-curve after microdermabrasion. Conclusions Microdermabrasion can increase skin permeability to insulin at levels sufficient to reduce BGL. Viable epidermis is a barrier to insulin delivery such that removal of full epidermis enables significantly more insulin delivery than removal of stratum corneum alone. PMID:21499837

  20. Nonlinear hydrodynamic and thermoacoustic oscillations of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin Yik; Li, Larry Kin Bong; Juniper, Matthew P.; Cant, Robert Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flames often experience thermoacoustic instabilities when the combustion heat release rate is in phase with acoustic pressure fluctuations. Linear methods often assume a priori that oscillations are periodic and occur at a dominant frequency with a fixed amplitude. Such assumptions are not made when using nonlinear analysis. When an oscillation is fully saturated, nonlinear analysis can serve as a useful avenue to reveal flame behaviour far more elaborate than period-one limit cycles, including quasi-periodicity and chaos in hydrodynamically or thermoacoustically self-excited system. In this paper, the behaviour of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed propane/air flame in a model jet-engine afterburner configuration is investigated using computational fluid dynamics. For the frequencies of interest in this investigation, an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach is found to be appropriate. Combustion is represented using a modified laminar flamelet approach with an algebraic closure for the flame surface density. The results are validated by comparison with existing experimental data and with large eddy simulation, and the observed self-excited oscillations in pressure and heat release are studied using methods derived from dynamical systems theory. A systematic analysis is carried out by increasing the equivalence ratio of the reactant stream supplied to the premixed flame. A strong variation in the global flame structure is observed. The flame exhibits a self-excited hydrodynamic oscillation at low equivalence ratios, becomes steady as the equivalence ratio is increased to intermediate values, and again exhibits a self-excited thermoacoustic oscillation at higher equivalence ratios. Rich nonlinear behaviour is observed and the investigation demonstrates that turbulent premixed flames can exhibit complex dynamical behaviour including quasiperiodicity, limit cycles and period-two limit cycles due to the interactions of various

  1. Gradient, counter-gradient transport and their transition in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimont, Vladimir L.; Biagioli, Fernando

    2002-03-01

    We theoretically and numerically analyse the phenomenon of counter-gradient transport in turbulent premixed flames with pressure distribution across the flame brush mainly controlled by heat release. The focus is on the transition from counter-gradient to gradient transport obtained when increasing the turbulence intensity/laminar flame speed ratio, a phenomenon recently found in open laboratory flame experiments by Frank et al (1999 Combust. Flame 116 220). The analysis is based on the turbulent flame closure combustion model for the simulation of turbulent premixed flames at strong turbulence (u' >> sL). In this case, earlier work suggests that turbulent premixed flames have non-equilibrium increasing flame brush width controlled in the model only by turbulence and independent from the counter-gradient transport phenomenon which has gasdynamic nature, and equilibrium turbulent flame speed which quickly adapts to the local turbulence. Flames of this type have been called intermediate steady propagation flames. According to the present analysis, transport in turbulent premixed flames is composed of two contributions: real physical gradient turbulent diffusion, which is responsible for the growth of flame brush thickness, and counter-gradient pressure-driven convective transport related to the different acceleration of burnt and unburnt gases subject to the average pressure variation across the turbulent flame. The original gasdynamics model for the pressure-driven transport which is developed here shows that the overall transport may be of gradient or counter-gradient nature according to which of these two contributions is dominant, and that along the flame a transformation from gradient to counter-gradient transport takes place. Reasonable agreement with the mentioned laboratory experimental data strongly support the validity of the present modelling ideas. Finally, we explain why this phenomenon is also highly probable in large-scale industrial burners at much

  2. Low and High Temperature Combustion Chemistry of Butanol Isomers in Premixed Flames and Autoignition Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Yasunaga, K; Curran, H J; Tsujimura, T; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K

    2010-12-12

    Butanol is a fuel that has been proposed as a bio-derived alternative to conventional petroleum derived fuels. The structural isomer in traditional 'bio-butanol' fuel is n-butanol, but newer conversion technologies produce iso-butanol as a fuel. In order to better understand the combustion chemistry of bio-butanol, this study presents a comprehensive chemical kinetic model for all the four isomers of butanol (e.g., 1-, 2-, iso- and tert-butanol). The proposed model includes detailed high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. In this study, the primary experimental validation target for the model is premixed flat low-pressure flame species profiles obtained using molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). The model is also validated against previously published data for premixed flame velocity and n-butanol rapid compression machine and shock tube ignition delay. The agreement with these data sets is reasonably good. The dominant reaction pathways at the various pressures and temperatures studied are elucidated. At low temperature conditions, we found that the reaction of alphahydroxybutyl with O{sub 2} was important in controlling the reactivity of the system, and for correctly predicting C{sub 4} aldehyde profiles in low pressure premixed flames. Enol-keto isomerization reactions assisted by HO{sub 2} were also found to be important in converting enols to aldehydes and ketones in the low pressure premixed flames. In the paper, we describe how the structural features of the four different butanol isomers lead to differences in the combustion properties of each isomer.

  3. Laser-saturated fluorescence of nitric oxide and chemiluminescence measurements in premixed ethanol flames

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Carla S.T.; Barreta, Luiz G.; Sbampato, Maria E.; dos Santos, Alberto M.

    2010-11-15

    In this study, nitric oxide laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) measurements were acquired from premixed ethanol flames at atmospheric pressure in a burner. NO-LSF experimental profiles for fuel-rich premixed ethanol flames ({phi} = 1.34 and {phi} = 1.66) were determined through the excitation/detection scheme of the Q{sub 2}(26.5) rotational line in the A{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +} - X{sup 2}{pi} (0,0) vibronic band and {gamma}(0,1) emission band. A calibration procedure by NO doping into the flame was applied to establish the NO concentration profiles in these flames. Chemiluminescent emission measurements in the (0, 0) vibronic emission bands of the OH{sup *} (A{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +} - X{sup 2}{pi}) and CH{sup *}(A{sup 2}{delta} - X{sup 2}{pi}) radicals were also obtained with high spatial and spectral resolution for fuel-rich premixed ethanol flames to correlate them with NO concentrations. Experimental chemiluminescence profiles and the ratios of the integrated areas under emission spectra (A{sub CH*}/A{sub CH*}(max.) and A{sub CH*}/A{sub OH*}) were determined. The relationships between chemiluminescence and NO concentrations were established along the premixed ethanol flames. There was a strong connection between CH{sup *} radical chemiluminescence and NO formation and the prompt-NO was identified as the governing mechanism for NO production. The results suggest the optimum ratio of the chemiluminescence of two radicals (A{sub CH*}/A{sub OH*}) for NO diagnostic purposes. (author)

  4. Evidence against extrapancreatic insulin synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Yalow, R S

    1981-01-01

    Labeled and unlabeled insulin in acid/ethanol tissue extracts can be concentrated up to 100-fold by using a hydrophobic adsorption technique. After adsorption to and elution from an octadecylsilyl silica column, insulin is recovered in yields greater than 75%. By using this method of concentration, insulin in brain tissues of three of four fed rats and one rabbit was found to be less than 20% of plasma concentration. The kidney is the only extrapancreatic organ in which insulin is observed to be markedly above plasma levels. Porcine-insulin-like material was not detectable in guinea pig tissues (less than 0.02 ng/g). It is concluded that insulin is not synthesized in brain or other extrapancreatic tissues and that other mammalian insulins are not found in guinea pig tissues. PMID:6270683

  5. [Current concept of insulin therapy intensification, and the role of human regular insulin and rapid-acting insulin analogs in insulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Tomoya; Sadahiro, Katsuhiko; Satoh, Tomomi

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of insulin therapy from animal insulin to recombinant human regular insulin has improved diabetes treatment. Generating of rapid-acting insulin analogs, mimicking physiologic insulin action enables us to provide better control of post-prandial glucose level and lower incidence of hypoglycemia compared with human regular insulin. These rapid-acting insulin analogs show lower susceptibility of insulin precipitation and catheter occlusions, and are suitable for insulin pump therapy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Insulin lispro and insulin aspart are also applicable for diabetic patients with pregnancy, requiring excellent glycemic control. In some studies, stepwise addition of prandial insulin, as well as full basal-bolus regimen can improve glycemic control with less hypoglycemia. Treatment intensification with rapid-acting insulin analogs may offer a proper method to reach glycemic goals. PMID:25812371

  6. Gravitational Influences on Flame Propagation Through Non-Uniform, Premixed Gas Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Easton, John; Marchese, Anthony; Hovermann, Fred

    2003-01-01

    Flame propagation through non-uniformly premixed (or layered) gases has importance both in useful combustion systems and in unintentional fires. As summarized recently and in previous Microgravity Workshop papers, non-uniform premixed gas combustion receives scant attention compared to the more usual limiting cases of diffusion or uniformly premixed flames, especially regarding the role gravity plays. This paper summarizes our recent findings on gravitational effects on layered combustion along a floor, in which the fuel concentration gradient exists normal to the direction of flame spread. In an effort to understand the mechanism by which the flames spread faster in microgravity (and much faster, in laboratory coordinates, than the laminar burning velocity for uniform mixtures), we have begun making pressure measurements across the spreading flame front that are described here. Earlier researchers, testing in 1g, claimed that hydrostatic pressure differences could account for the rapid spread rates. Additionally, we present the development of a new apparatus to study flame spread in free (i.e., far from walls), non-homogeneous fuel layers formed in a flow tunnel behind an airfoil that has been tested in normal gravity.

  7. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed mc1hane/oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt: the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames. for reasons that still must be explained.

  8. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed methanefoxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt; the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogenabstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames, for reasons that still must be explained.

  9. a Second-Order Closure Prediction of Premixed Turbulent Combustion in Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Nikhil

    1985-12-01

    This thesis is a report on work carried out and results obtained in the prediction of a turbulent flow of premixed combustible gases discharging from a pipe and developing into a turbulent, combusting roundjet. The expressions for the chemical reaction rate term and other unclosed terms in the Favre averaged turbulent transport equations at the level of second-order closure are based on the Bray-Moss-Libby aerothermochemistry for premixed turbulent combustion, extended to variable enthalpy systems as in Bray, Champion, Dave, Libby (referenced herein). The numerical technique used is a parabolic solver developed by Kollmann from the GENMIX program due to Patankar and Spalding. Various test cases such as constant density and variable density jets are calculated using the program and the results are compared herein with experimentally observed values. Results for premixed turbulent combusting jets are compared with experimental data of Yoshida and of Shepherd and Moss. Buoyancy is found to play an important role in the behavior of these primixed combusting jets. Reasonable numerical agreement is obtained with the results of Yoshida, and good qualitative agreement is obtained with the data of Shepherd and Moss. Reasons for the discrepancies and limitations of the numerical simulation are discussed.

  10. On the Structure and Stabilization Mechanisms of Planar and Cylindrical Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, James A.; Zhu, Delin; Law, Chung K.

    1993-01-01

    The configurational simplicity of the stationary one-dimensional flames renders them intrinsically attractive for fundamental flame structure studies. The possibility and fidelity of studies of such flames on earth, however, have been severely restricted by the unidirectional nature of the gravity vector. To demonstrate these complications, let us first consider the premixed flame. Here a stationary, one-dimensional flame can be established by using the flat-flame burner. We next consider nonpremixed flames. First it may be noted that in an unbounded gravity-free environment, the only stationary one-dimensional flame is the spherical flame. Indeed, this is a major motivation for the study of microgravity droplet combustion, in which the gas-phase processes can be approximated to be quasi-steady because of the significant disparity between the gas and liquid densities for subcritical combustion. In view of the above considerations, an experimental and theoretical program on cylindrical and spherical premixed and nonpremixed flames in microgravity has been initiated. For premixed flames, we are interested in: (1) assessing the heat loss versus flow divergence as the dominant stabilization mechanism; (2) determining the laminar flame speed by using this configuration; and (3) understanding the development of flamefront instability and the effects of the flame curvature on the burning intensity.

  11. An ergonomic analysis of premixing and compounding processes in an animal health plant.

    PubMed

    Lu, C; Goggins, W B

    1999-01-01

    This study is based on an ergonomic job analysis designed to develop a hazard prevention program for the premixing and compounding processes in animal health products plants. Animal health products plants are "pharmaceutical facilities" for livestock or domestic animals. A hazardous aerosol (highly concentrated antibiotics, anthelmintics, mineral oil, and animal hormones) is generated in the premixing or compounding processes. The animal health premixing jobs are heavy-duty jobs and have high potential for chemical exposure, heat stress, and ergonomic hazards. Ergonomic job analysis was used to recognize, identify, and evaluate actuarial and potential risks of injures or irritations. Chemical hazards and eight ergonomic factors were discussed: (1) forceful exertions, (2) awkward postures, (3) localized contract stresses, (4) vibration, (5) noise, (6) temperature extremes, (7) repetitive activities, and (8) prolonged activities. The results show that (1) current practices do not violate occupational safety and health regulations or recommended guidelines, but that hazards should be identified to protect worker health and safety; (2) for chemical hazards prevention, operators wear whole-body protection equipment, which also causes heat stress and increases the noise level in the work zone; and (3) the loading weight of the bags used needs to be reduced. PMID:10386360

  12. A dynamic model for the turbulent burning velocity for large eddy simulation of premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, E.; Pitsch, H.

    2008-09-15

    Turbulent premixed combustion is particularly difficult to describe using large eddy simulation (LES). In LES, premixed flame structures typically exist on subfilter length scales. Consequently, premixed LES models must be capable of describing how completely unresolved flame structures propagate under the influence of completely unresolved eddies. This description is usually accomplished through the implementation of a model for the turbulent burning velocity. Here, a dynamic model for describing the turbulent burning velocity in the context of LES is presented. This model uses a new surface filtering procedure that is consistent with standard LES filtering. Additionally, it only uses information that comes directly from the flame front. This latter attribute is important for two reasons. First, it guarantees that the model can be consistently applied when level set methods, where arbitrary constraints can be imposed on field variables away from fronts, are used to track the flame. Second, it forces the model to recognize that the physics governing flame front propagation are only valid locally at the front. Results showing model validation in the context of direct numerical simulation (DNS), and model application in the context of LES, are presented. (author)

  13. Relevance of the Bray number in the small-scale modeling of turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Mura, Arnaud; Champion, Michel

    2009-03-15

    The present study is devoted to the analysis of the influence of expansion phenomena on turbulent small scales in premixed reactive flows. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the expansion that takes place across wrinkled laminar flamelet can be sufficient to control the fluctuating velocity gradients and associated dissipation rate functions. These conditions are fixed by the respective values of a set of nondimensional parameters, namely the turbulence Reynolds number Re{sub T}, the Bray number, and the ratio between integral length scale of turbulence and thermal flame front thickness. A new criterion is introduced that makes it possible to delineate the influence of expansion phenomena on small-scale turbulent premixed reactive flows. The relevance of this criterion is analyzed in the light of experimental results represented in the classical diagram of combustion regime. The present analysis confirms that special care is required to represent and include the influence of expansion phenomena when using either RANS or LES closures to model turbulent premixed combustion. (author)

  14. The role of reactant unmixedness, strain rate, and length scale on premixed combustor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsen, S.; LaRue, J.; Vilayanur, S.

    1995-10-01

    Lean premixed combustion provides a means to reduce pollutant formation and increase combustion efficiency. However, fuel-air mixing is rarely uniform in space and time. This nonuniformity in concentration will lead to relative increases in pollutant formation and decreases in combustion efficiency. The nonuniformity of the concentration at the exit of the premixer has been defined by Lyons (1981) as the {open_quotes}unmixedness.{close_quotes} Although turbulence properties such as length scales and strain rate are known to effect unmixedness, the exact relationship is unknown. Evaluating this relationship and the effect of unmixedness in premixed combustion on pollutant formation and combustion efficiency are an important part of the overall goal of US Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program and are among the goals of the program described herein. The information obtained from ATS is intended to help to develop and commercialize gas turbines which have (1) a wide range of operation/stability, (2) a minimal amount of pollutant formation, and (3) high combustion efficiency. Specifically, with regard to pollutants, the goals are to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions by at least 10%, obtain less than 20 PPM of both CO and UHC, and increase the combustion efficiency by 5%.

  15. Optimization of instant dalia dessert pre-mix production by using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Jha, Alok; Shalini, B N; Patel, Ashok Ambalal; Singh, Mithilesh; Rasane, Prasad

    2015-02-01

    Dalia, a wheat-based, particulate containing dairy dessert is popularly consumed as a breakfast food and is also considered as a health food. Though popular throughout Northern parts of the country, its limited shelf-life even under refrigeration imposes severe restrictions on its organized manufacture and marketing. In order to promote dalia dessert as a marketable product, in the present study, a process was developed for manufacture of instant dalia pre-mix, as a dry product with long shelf-life, which could be attractively packaged and easily reconstituted for consumption. During the investigation, the effect of different levels of milk solids and wheat solids was studied on dalia pre-mix quality by employing a central composite rotatable design (CCRD). The suggested formulation had 17.82 % milk solids and 2.87 % wheat solids. This formulation was found to be most appropriate for manufacture of instant dalia pre-mix with predicted sensory scores (Max. 100) of 85.35, 41.98 and 67.27 for mouthfeel, consistency and flavor, respectively; the viscosity of the product was 941.0 cp. PMID:25694701

  16. Influence of polymer addition on the mechanical properties of a premixed calcium phosphate cement

    PubMed Central

    Engstrand, Johanna; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Premixed calcium phosphate cements can reduce handling complications that are associated with the mixing of cements in the operating room. However, to extend the clinical indication of ceramic cements their mechanical properties need to be further improved. The incorporation of a polymeric material with intrinsically high tensile properties could possibly assist in increasing the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cement. In this study polymer microparticles made from poly(lactid-co-glycolide) plasticised with poly(ethylene glycol) 400 (PLGA/PEG microparticles) were added in amounts of up to 5 wt% to a premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement. The PLGA/PEG microparticles added undergo a shape transformation at 37 °C, which could give a better integration between polymer microparticles and ceramic cement compared with polymer microparticles lacking this property. The results showed that the incorporation of 1.25 wt% PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the compressive strength by approximately 20% up to 15.1 MPa while the diametral tensile strength was kept constant. The incorporation of PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the brushite to monetite ratio after setting compared with pure ceramic cements. In conclusion, small amounts of PLGA/PEG microparticles can be incorporated into premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement and increase their mechanical properties, which could lead to increased future applications. PMID:24270588

  17. Detection of temperature and equivalence ratio in turbulent premixed flames using chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Roby, R.J.; Reaney, J.E.; Johnsson, E.L.

    1998-07-01

    A non-intrusive, fast-response method for the determination of temperature and equivalence ratio has been developed for laminar and turbulent premixed methane/air flames. This method utilizes chemiluminescent flame emissions to make correlations with flame temperature and equivalence ratio. Emissions from two radical groups were used for the correlations: an OH system at 309 nm and a CH system at 431 nm. the experimental apparatus consisted of a laminar or turbulent premixed burner, an optical system (lenses, monochromator, and photomultiplier tube), and a data collection system (digital oscilloscope and computer). An optical system using fiber optics and band pass interference filters was also investigated. The spectra of laminar and turbulent, premixed methane flames of known stoichiometry were recorded and a high temperature Pt-Pt10%Rh thermocouple was used to establish flame temperature. The ratio of signal width to signal height of the OH spectra was used to correlate flame temperature. The ratio of OH to CH signal heights was used to correlate equivalence ratio. Similar correlations were found for both temperature and equivalence ratio when the turbulent and laminar correlations were compared. The effect of increasing turbulence was investigated and found to have little or not effect on the correlations over the Reynolds number range of 3,000 to 7,000.

  18. Use of laser-induced ionization to detect soot inception in premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Manzello, Samuel L.; Lee, Eui Ju; Mulholland, George W

    2005-08-20

    Experimental measurements of laser-induced ionization were performed for ethene-air premixed flames operated near the soot inception point. Soot was ionized with a pulsed laser operated at 532 nm. The ionization signal was collected with a tungsten electrode located in the postflame region. Ionization signals were collected by use of both single-electrode and dual-electrode configurations. Earlier laser-induced- ionization studies focused on the use of a single biased electrode to generate the electric field, with the burner head serving as the path to ground. In many practical combustion systems, a path to ground is not readily available. To apply the laser-induced- ionization diagnostic to these geometries, a dual-electrode geometry must be employed. The influence of electrode configuration, flame equivalence ratio, and flame height on ionization signal detection was determined. The efficacy of the laser-induced-ionization diagnostic in detecting soot inception in the postflame region of a premixed flame by use of a dual-electrode configuration was investigated. Of the dual-electrode configurations tested, the dual-electrode geometry oriented parallel to the laser beam was observed to be most sensitive for detecting the soot inception point in a premixed flame.

  19. Gravitational Influences on Flame Propagation through Non-Uniform, Premixed Gas Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Easton, John; Ross, Howard D.; Marchese, Anthony; Perry, David; Kulis, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Flame propagation through non-uniformly premixed (or layered) gases has importance both in useful combustion systems and in unintentional fires. As summarized previously, non-uniform premixed gas combustion receives scant attention compared to the more usual limiting cases of diffusion or uniformly premixed flames, especially regarding the role gravity plays. This paper summarizes our progress on furthering the knowledge of layered combustion, in which a fuel concentration gradient exists normal to the direction of flame spread. We present experimental and numerical results for flame spread through propanol-air layers formed near the flash point temperature (25 C) or near the stoichiometric temperature (33 C). Both the model and experimental results show that the removal of gravity results in a faster spreading flame, by as much as 80% depending on conditions. This is exactly the opposite effect as that predicted by an earlier model reported. We also found that having a gallery lid results in faster flame spread, an effect more pronounced at normal gravity, demonstrating the importance of enclosure geometry. Also reported here is the beginning of our spectroscopic measurements of fuel vapor.

  20. Bluff-body stabilized flame dynamics of lean premixed syngas combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hong G.; Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Bok Jik; Kaust Team

    2015-11-01

    Recently, syngas combustion has been actively investigated for the potential application to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While lean premixed combustion is attractive for both reduced emission and enhanced efficiency, flame instability becomes often an issue. Bluff-bodies have been adopted as effective flame holders for practical application of premixed flames. In the present study, high-fidelity direct numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of lean premixed syngas flames stabilized on a bluff-body, in particular at the near blow-off regime of the flame. A two-dimensional domain of 4 mm height and 20 mm length with a flame holder of a 1 mm-by-1 mm square geometry is used. For a syngas mixture with the equivalence ratio of 0.5 and the CO:H2 ratio of 1, several distinct flame modes are identified as the inflow velocity approaches to the blowoff limit. The sequences of extinction pathway and combustion characteristics are discussed.

  1. How ''flat'' is the rich premixed flame produced by your McKenna burner?

    SciTech Connect

    Migliorini, F.; De Iuliis, S.; Cignoli, F.; Zizak, G.

    2008-05-15

    McKenna burners are widely used in the combustion community for producing ''flat'' premixed flames. These flames are considered as standards for the development and calibration of optical techniques. Rich premixed flames produced by McKenna burners are frequently investigated in order to understand soot formation processes both by optical and by sampling techniques. Measurements are normally performed along the axis of the flames, with a uniform distribution of temperature and species concentration assumed in the radial direction. In this work it is shown that the soot radial profiles of rich premixed ethylene-air flames produced by a McKenna burner with a stainless steel porous plug may be far from being ''flat.'' Soot is mainly distributed in an annular region and nonsoot fluorescing species are present in the core of the flames. This surprising result was verified under several working conditions. Furthermore, flames cannot be considered axial-symmetric but present a skewed soot distribution. Another McKenna burner with a bronze porous disk was used to produce flames of the same equivalence ratio and flows. These flames show a completely different soot radial profile, closer to the claimed flat distribution. These results cast doubts about the conclusions drawn in several studies on soot formation performed with a stainless steel McKenna burner. (author)

  2. Effect of hydrogen injection stability and emissions of an experimental premixed prevaporized propane burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen in quantities up to 5 percent by weight of the total fuel flow was injected into a premixed propane burner. The hydrogen was either premixed with the propane and air upstream of the burner or introduced as a torch at the flameholder. Emissions of total nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbon are reported as are combustion efficiencies and lean blowout limits. To maintain at least 99 percent combustion efficiency at a 700 K inlet mixture temperature with no hydrogen added, it was necessary to burn with a propane equivalence ratio of 0.525. When 4 percent hydrogen was premixed with the propane and air, a combustion efficiency greater than 99 percent was recorded at a propane equivalence ratio of 0.425. The total nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions corresponding to these two conditions were 0.8 g NO2/kg equivalent propane and 0.44 g NO2/kg equivalent propane, respectively. The hydrogen torch did not reduce NOx emissions.

  3. Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications: injectability, setting time and radiopacity.

    PubMed

    Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and amount of calcium sulfate (added to control the setting time) were screened using a statistical model. In the second part of the study, the liquid-to-powder ratio was optimized for cements containing three different amounts of radiopacifier. Finally, the effect of using glycerol rather than water was evaluated in terms of radiopacity. The setting time was found to increase with the amount of radiopacifier when the liquid-to-powder ratio was fixed. This was likely due to the higher density of the radiopacifier in comparison to the calcium silicate, which gave a higher liquid-to-powder ratio in terms of volume. Using glycerol rather than water to mix the cements led to a decrease in radiopacity of the cement. In conclusion, we were able to produce premixed calcium silicate cements with acceptable properties for use in endodontic applications. PMID:23507729

  4. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-09-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mltogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  5. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  6. Antimicrobial activity of resveratrol analogues.

    PubMed

    Chalal, Malik; Klinguer, Agnès; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Meunier, Philippe; Vervandier-Fasseur, Dominique; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew). Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold). The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups) and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24918540

  7. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  8. Heterocyclic chalcone analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Vipin; Kumar, Pradeep

    2013-03-01

    Chalcones, aromatic ketones and enones acting as the precursor for flavonoids such as Quercetin, are known for their anticancer effects. Although, parent chalcones consist of two aromatic rings joined by a three-carbon α,β-unsaturated carbonyl system, various synthetic compounds possessing heterocyclic rings like pyrazole, indole etc. are well known and proved to be effective anticancer agents. In addition to their use as anticancer agents in cancer cell lines, heterocyclic analogues are reported to be effective even against resistant cell lines. In this connection, we hereby highlight the potential of various heterocyclic chalcone analogues as anticancer agents with a brief summary about therapeutic potential of chalcones, mechanism of anticancer action of various chalcone analogues, and current and future prospects related to the chalcones-derived anticancer research. Furthermore, some key points regarding chalcone analogues have been reviewed by analyzing their medicinal properties. PMID:22721390

  9. Synthesis and SAR of vinca alkaloid analogues.

    PubMed

    Voss, Matthew E; Ralph, Jeffery M; Xie, Dejian; Manning, David D; Chen, Xinchao; Frank, Anthony J; Leyhane, Andrew J; Liu, Lei; Stevens, Jason M; Budde, Cheryl; Surman, Matthew D; Friedrich, Thomas; Peace, Denise; Scott, Ian L; Wolf, Mark; Johnson, Randall

    2009-02-15

    Versatile intermediates 12'-iodovinblastine, 12'-iodovincristine and 11'-iodovinorelbine were utilized as substrates for transition metal based chemistry which led to the preparation of novel analogues of the vinca alkaloids. The synthesis of key iodo intermediates, their transformation into final products, and the SAR based upon HeLa and MCF-7 cell toxicity assays is presented. Selected analogues 27 and 36 show promising anticancer activity in the P388 murine leukemia model. PMID:19147348

  10. Combination therapy with insulin and oral agents: optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2002-01-01

    The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) showed that tight glycemic control with any of several therapeutic regimens has the potential to significantly reduce the risk for long-term microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes. An important question that remains to be answered is what is the best approach to optimizing glycemic control in patients with this disease. This article reviews results of studies in which insulin was used alone or in combination with oral antidiabetic agents for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. Analysis of comparative studies (13 in insulin-naive and 26 in previously insulin-treated patients) showed that combination therapy involving one to two insulin injections per day plus oral therapy is usually more effective than insulin monotherapy for achieving and maintaining glycemic control. Combination treatment for type 2 diabetes can be significantly improved by newly developed preparations that lack the major limitations of older products. Once-daily administration of isophane insulin (NPH insulin) is limited by a 15-18-h duration of action and a peak effect that occurs about 6 h after injection. Insulin glargine, a new insulin analogue developed using recombinant DNA technology, has a flat pharmacodynamic profile and a 24-h duration of action. Results from a recent comparative study indicate that insulin glargine plus oral therapy may provide better post-dinner glucose control as well as less symptomatic and nocturnal hypoglycemia than oral therapy combined with NPH insulin. The studies reviewed in the present article support the conclusion that combination therapy with insulin glargine combined with one or more oral antidiabetic agents may be the treatment of choice for achieving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:12324990

  11. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  12. Variability of NPH Insulin Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, M. M.; Colle, E.; deBelle, R.; Murthy, D. Y. N.

    1971-01-01

    In 1968-69 certain juvenile diabetics receiving NPH insulin began having pre-breakfast glucosuria and mid-morning hypoglycemic reactions. A mail survey of our clinic population and a study done at the Quebec camp for diabetic children in 1969 revealed that certain lot numbers were associated with poor control and that a change to new lot numbers or alternate insulin preparations resulted in better control. “Suspect” insulin preparations and non-suspect insulins were given to newly diagnosed diabetics, and plasma insulin and glucose levels were measured over a 24-hour period. The data confirmed that the “suspect” insulins were causing early hypoglycemia and failing to control hyperglycemia during the latter hours of the 24-hour period. The lower glucose levels were associated with higher plasma insulin levels. The “suspect” insulins were further found to have elevated levels of free insulin in the supernatant fluid. The requirements for quality control of modified insulin preparations are reviewed and suggestions are offered for their improvement. PMID:5539004

  13. Pitfalls of Insulin Pump Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to raise awareness about the importance of ensuring that insulin pumps internal clocks are set up correctly at all times. This is a very important safety issue because all commercially available insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled (though this is controversial), nor equipped with automatically adjusting internal clocks. Special attention is paid to how basal and bolus dose errors can be introduced by daylight savings time changes, travel across time zones, and am-pm clock errors. Correct setting of insulin pump internal clock is crucial for appropriate insulin delivery. A comprehensive literature review is provided, as are illustrative cases. Incorrect setting can potentially result in incorrect insulin delivery, with potential harmful consequences, if too much or too little insulin is delivered. Daylight saving time changes may not significantly affect basal insulin delivery, given the triviality of the time difference. However, bolus insulin doses can be dramatically affected. Such problems may occur when pump wearers have large variations in their insulin to carb ratio, especially if they forget to change their pump clock in the spring. More worrisome than daylight saving time change is the am-pm clock setting. If this setting is set up incorrectly, both basal rates and bolus doses will be affected. Appropriate insulin delivery through insulin pumps requires correct correlation between dose settings and internal clock time settings. Because insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled or automatically time-adjusting, extra caution should be practiced by patients to ensure correct time settings at all times. Clinicians and diabetes educators should verify the date/time of insulin pumps during patients’ visits, and should remind their patients to always verify these settings. PMID:25355713

  14. [Intensified insulin therapy and insulin micro-pumps during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Galuppi, V

    1994-06-01

    Before conception and during pregnancy in diabetic patients, every possible effort should be made in order to obtain a good, if not perfect, metabolic control and to warrant maternal and fetal health. Multiple daily injections are required to achieve a very strict glucose regulation in pregnant patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The most usual intensive insulin administration patterns require 3 premeal doses of short-acting insulin and 1 (at bedtime) or 2 (one in the morning and one at bedtime) injections of intermediate or slow-acting insulin. As an alternative choice, insulin pumps allow a continuous subcutaneous infusion with short-acting insulin according to a basal rate which cover the insulin need during the night and between meals. Premeal and presnack surges of insulin are administrated by the patient herself. Home glucose monitoring must be used to adjust insulin doses. Target glucose levels every diabetic pregnant woman should try to achieve are lower than in non-pregnant women: fasting glycaemia should be below 100 mg/dl, 1 hour post-prandial value below 140 mg/dl and 2 hour post-prandial level below 120 mg/dl. The stricter the control and treatment goals are, the more frequently hypoglycaemia may occur. Hypoglycaemia may be harmful especially for patients with severe diabetic complications and may affect the fetus. Therefore, every pregnant diabetic woman should receive individualized treatment and glycaemic goals according to her clinical features, her compliance and her social and cultural background. PMID:7968932

  15. Clinical Use and Evaluation of Insulin Pens.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Barry H

    2016-01-01

    Insulin pens are more accurate and easier to teach than other methods of insulin delivery. They also do not suffer from the risk of mismatch of insulin concentration and type of insulin syringe. The ISO standard used to test insulin pens, however, needs to be updated to reflect their clinical use. PMID:26323484

  16. Planetary habitability: lessons learned from terrestrial analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Louisa J.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial analogue studies underpin almost all planetary missions and their use is essential in the exploration of our Solar system and in assessing the habitability of other worlds. Their value relies on the similarity of the analogue to its target, either in terms of their mineralogical or geochemical context, or current physical or chemical environmental conditions. Such analogue sites offer critical ground-truthing for astrobiological studies on the habitability of different environmental parameter sets, the biological mechanisms for survival in extreme environments and the preservation potential and detectability of biosignatures. The 33 analogue sites discussed in this review have been selected on the basis of their congruence to particular extraterrestrial locations. Terrestrial field sites that have been used most often in the literature, as well as some lesser known ones which require greater study, are incorporated to inform on the astrobiological potential of Venus, Mars, Europa, Enceladus and Titan. For example, the possibility of an aerial habitable zone on Venus has been hypothesized based on studies of life at high-altitudes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We also demonstrate why many different terrestrial analogue sites are required to satisfactorily assess the habitability of the changing environmental conditions throughout Martian history, and recommend particular sites for different epochs or potential niches. Finally, habitable zones within the aqueous environments of the icy moons of Europa and Enceladus and potentially in the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan are discussed and suitable analogue sites proposed. It is clear from this review that a number of terrestrial analogue sites can be applied to multiple planetary bodies, thereby increasing their value for astrobiological exploration. For each analogue site considered here, we summarize the pertinent physiochemical environmental features they offer and critically assess the fidelity with which

  17. Insulin Degludec, The New Generation Basal Insulin or Just another Basal Insulin?

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Sami N; Reynolds, L Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The advances in recombinant DNA technology have led to an improvement in the properties of currently available long-acting insulin analogs. Insulin degludec, a new generation ultra-long-acting basal insulin, currently in phase 3 clinical trials, has a promising future in clinical use. When compared to its rival basal insulin analogs, a longer duration of action and lower incidence of hypoglycemic events in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients has been demonstrated.1,2 Its unique mechanism of action is based on multihexamer formation after subcutaneous injection. This reportedly allows for less pharmacodynamic variability and within-subject variability than currently available insulin analogs, and a duration of action that is over 24 hours.3 The lack of proof of carcinogenicity with insulin degludec is yet another factor that would be taken into consideration when choosing the optimal basal insulin for a diabetic individual.4 A formulation of insulin degludec with insulin aspart, Insulin degludec 70%/aspart 30%, may permit improved flexibly of dosing without compromising glycemic control or safety.5. PMID:22879797

  18. Measurements and Modeling of Nitric Oxide Formation in Counterflow, Premixed CH4/O2/N2 Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Douglas; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    2000-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of NO concentration in a variety of CH4/O2/N2 flames are used to evaluate the chemical kinetics of NO formation. The analysis begins with previous measurements in flat, laminar, premixed CH4/O2/N2 flames stabilized on a water-cooled McKenna burner at pressures ranging from 1 to 14.6 atm, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.6, and volumetric nitrogen/oxygen dilution ratios of 2.2, 3.1 and 3.76. These measured results are compared to predictions to determine the capabilities and limitations of the comprehensive kinetic mechanism developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), version 2.11. The model is shown to predict well the qualitative trends of NO formation in lean-premixed flames, while quantitatively underpredicting NO concentration by 30-50%. For rich flames, the model is unable to even qualitatively match the experimental results. These flames were found to be limited by low temperatures and an inability to separate the flame from the burner surface. In response to these limitations, a counterflow burner was designed for use in opposed premixed flame studies. A new LIF calibration technique was developed and applied to obtain quantitative measurements of NO concentration in laminar, counterflow premixed, CH4/O2/N2 flames at pressures ranging from 1 to 5.1 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.6 to 1.5, and an N2/O2 dilution ratio of 3.76. The counterflow premixed flame measurements are combined with measurements in burner-stabilized premixed flames and counterflow diffusion flames to build a comprehensive database for analysis of the GRI kinetic mechanism. Pathways, quantitative reaction path and sensitivity analyses are applied to the GRI mechanism for these flame conditions. The prompt NO mechanism is found to severely underpredict the amount of NO formed in rich premixed and nitrogen-diluted diffusion flames. This underprediction is traced to uncertainties in the CH kinetics as well as in the nitrogen oxidation chemistry

  19. Effect of Premixed Fuel Preparation for Partially Premixed Combustion with a Low Octane Gasoline on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Compression Ignition Engine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dempsey, Adam B.; Curran, Scott; Wagner, Robert M.; Cannella, William C.

    2015-05-12

    Gasoline compression ignition concepts with the majority of the fuel being introduced early in the cycle are known as partially premixed combustion (PPC). Previous research on single- and multi-cylinder engines has shown that PPC has the potential for high thermal efficiency with low NOx and soot emissions. A variety of fuel injection strategies has been proposed in the literature. These injection strategies aim to create a partially stratified charge to simultaneously reduce NOx and soot emissions while maintaining some level of control over the combustion process through the fuel delivery system. The impact of the direct injection strategy to createmore » a premixed charge of fuel and air has not previously been explored, and its impact on engine efficiency and emissions is not well understood. This paper explores the effect of sweeping the direct injected pilot timing from -91° to -324° ATDC, which is just after the exhaust valve closes for the engine used in this study. During the sweep, the pilot injection consistently contained 65% of the total fuel (based on command duration ratio), and the main injection timing was adjusted slightly to maintain combustion phasing near top dead center. A modern four cylinder, 1.9 L diesel engine with a variable geometry turbocharger, high pressure common rail injection system, wide included angle injectors, and variable swirl actuation was used in this study. The pistons were modified to an open bowl configuration suitable for highly premixed combustion modes. The stock diesel injection system was unmodified, and the gasoline fuel was doped with a lubricity additive to protect the high pressure fuel pump and the injectors. The study was conducted at a fixed speed/load condition of 2000 rpm and 4.0 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). The pilot injection timing sweep was conducted at different intake manifold pressures, swirl levels, and fuel injection GTP-15-1067, Dempsey 2 pressures. The gasoline used in this study

  20. Effect of Premixed Fuel Preparation for Partially Premixed Combustion with a Low Octane Gasoline on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Compression Ignition Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, Adam B.; Curran, Scott; Wagner, Robert M.; Cannella, William C.

    2015-05-12

    Gasoline compression ignition concepts with the majority of the fuel being introduced early in the cycle are known as partially premixed combustion (PPC). Previous research on single- and multi-cylinder engines has shown that PPC has the potential for high thermal efficiency with low NOx and soot emissions. A variety of fuel injection strategies has been proposed in the literature. These injection strategies aim to create a partially stratified charge to simultaneously reduce NOx and soot emissions while maintaining some level of control over the combustion process through the fuel delivery system. The impact of the direct injection strategy to create a premixed charge of fuel and air has not previously been explored, and its impact on engine efficiency and emissions is not well understood. This paper explores the effect of sweeping the direct injected pilot timing from -91° to -324° ATDC, which is just after the exhaust valve closes for the engine used in this study. During the sweep, the pilot injection consistently contained 65% of the total fuel (based on command duration ratio), and the main injection timing was adjusted slightly to maintain combustion phasing near top dead center. A modern four cylinder, 1.9 L diesel engine with a variable geometry turbocharger, high pressure common rail injection system, wide included angle injectors, and variable swirl actuation was used in this study. The pistons were modified to an open bowl configuration suitable for highly premixed combustion modes. The stock diesel injection system was unmodified, and the gasoline fuel was doped with a lubricity additive to protect the high pressure fuel pump and the injectors. The study was conducted at a fixed speed/load condition of 2000 rpm and 4.0 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). The pilot injection timing sweep was conducted at different intake manifold pressures, swirl levels, and fuel injection GTP-15-1067, Dempsey 2 pressures. The gasoline used in this study has