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Sample records for prenatal irradiation nitric

  1. Effects and consequences of prenatal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vos, O

    1989-06-01

    After a brief introduction about the historic development of risk estimates and maximum permissible doses of ionizing radiation, the risks of prenatal irradiation are discussed. Experimental data mainly obtained with mice indicate that the most important risk exists during the period of organogenesis and concerns the induction of malformations. Although in man this period lies between about 10 and 80 days after fertilization for most organs, the main development of the brain occurs later, namely between the 8th and 15th week after conception. Data from Japanese victims of the atomic bomb explosions above Hiroshima and Nagasaki indicate that during development the brain is the most sensitive organ to irradiation and maximal sensitivity is found between the 8th and 15th week after fertilization. A dose of one Gray received during this period induces a severe mental retardation in about 45% of the newborns. The dose response relationship is not significantly different from a linear one without a threshold dose. Studies of intelligence and school performance have shown that 1 Gray received during the 8th-15th week causes a shift of the average intelligence of about 30 points. Irradiation before the 8th week and after the 25th week had no effect on intelligence or mental retardation. During the 16th and 25th week sensitivity was about one fourth of that during the 8th-15th week. Although the irradiation of the embryo and fetus should be avoided as much as possible, the new data have led to an abandonment of the so-called 10-day rule. Generally an accidental irradiation of the embryo or fetus of less than 5 cGy is not considered as a medical indication for abortion. Retrospective studies showed that mothers from children who died from leukemia or other childhood tumors, had been subjected to a diagnostic irradiation of the pelvis or lower abdomen more frequently than mothers from children that did not develop a tumor. It has been estimated that prenatal sensitivity for

  2. Prenatal exposure to gamma/neutron irradiation: Sensorimotor alterations and paradoxical effects on learning

    SciTech Connect

    Di Cicco, D.; Antal, S.; Ammassari-Teule, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of prenatal exposure on gamma/neutron radiations (0.5 Gy at about the 18th day of fetal life) were studied in a hybrid strain of mice (DBA/Cne males x C57BL/Cne females). During ontogeny, measurements of sensorimotor reflexes revealed in prenatally irradiated mice (1) a delay in sensorial development, (2) deficits in tests involving body motor control, and (3) a reduction of both motility and locomotor activity scores. In adulthood, the behaviour of prenatally irradiated and control mice was examined in the open field test and in reactivity to novelty. Moreover, their learning performance was compared in several situations. The results show that, in the open field test, only rearings were more frequent in irradiated mice. In the presence of a novel object, significant sex x treatment interactions were observed since ambulation and leaning against the novel object increased in irradiated females but decreased in irradiated males. Finally, when submitted to different learning tasks, irradiated mice were impaired in the radial maze, but paradoxically exhibited higher avoidance scores than control mice, possibly because of their low pain thresholds. Taken together, these observations indicate that late prenatal gamma/neutron irradiation induces long lasting alterations at the sensorimotor level which, in turn, can influence learning abilities of adult mice.

  3. Prenatal stress induces alterations in cerebellar nitric oxide that are correlated with deficits in spatial memory in rat's offspring.

    PubMed

    Maur, Damián G; Romero, Carolina B; Burdet, Berenice; Palumbo, María L; Zorrilla-Zubilete, María A

    2012-12-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) has been linked to abnormal cognitive, behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in both animals and humans. Since PS has been shown to induce a cerebellar cytoarchitectural disarrangement and cerebellar abnormalities that have been linked to an impairment of behavioral functions, the aim of the present work was to investigate whether the exposure to PS in a period in which the cerebellum is still immature can induce behavioral deficits in the adult and whether this alterations are correlated with changes in nitric oxide (NO) and cellular oxidative mechanisms in offspring's cerebellum. Our results show impairments in spatial memory and territory discrimination in PS adult rats. PS offspring also displayed alterations in cerebellar nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and activity. Moreover, a correlation between spatial memory deficits and the increase in NOS activity was found. The results found here may point to a role of cerebellar NO in the behavioral alterations induced by stress during early development stages. PMID:23022609

  4. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  5. Effects of low-dose prenatal irradiation on the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Scientists are in general agreement about the effects of prenatal irradiation, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Differing concepts and research approaches have resulted in some uncertainties about some quantitative relationships, underlying interpretations, and conclusions. Examples of uncertainties include the existence of a threshold, the quantitative relationships between prenatal radiation doses and resulting physical and functional lesions, and processes by which lesions originate and develop. A workshop was convened in which scientists with varying backgrounds and viewpoints discussed these relationships and explored ways in which various disciplines could coordinate concepts and methodologies to suggest research directions for resolving uncertainties. This Workshop Report summarizes, in an extended fashion, salient features of the presentations on the current status of our knowledge about the radiobiology and neuroscience of prenatal irradiation and the relationships between them.

  6. Morphological changes in cultures of hippocampus following prenatal irradiation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdorf, G.; Shahar, A.; Cervos-Navarro, J.; Scheffler, A.; Sparenberg, A.; Skoberla, A. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of prenatal irradiation was studied in organotypic cultures of hippocampus, prepared from newborn rats that had been exposed to whole-body irradiation of 1 Gy from a {sup 60}Co-source at day 13 of pregnancy. Light and electron microscopic observations showed remarkable damage to neuronal mitochondria accompanied by extensive swelling, vacuolation of the Golgi complex, and formation of multilamellar bodies and vesicles of the lysosomal type. In contrast to neuronal alterations, no delay in synaptogenesis or onset of myelination was observed based upon the absence of significant morphological changes in synapses and myelin sheaths. Using this tissue culture model it could be confirmed that prenatal exposure to irradiation, even at low doses, induces specific morphological changes in the brain.

  7. Involvement of Nitric Oxide, Neurotrophins and HPA Axis in Neurobehavioural Alterations Induced by Prenatal Stress.

    PubMed

    Maur, Damian G; Pascuan, Cecilia G; Genaro, Ana M; Zorrilla-Zubilete, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that negative emotions during pregnancy generate adverse effects on the cognitive, behavioural and emotional development of the descendants. The psychoneuroendocrine pathways involve the transplacentary passage of maternal glucocorticoids in order to influence directly on fetal growth and brain development.Nitric oxide is a gaseous neurotransmitter that plays an important role in the control of neural activity by diffusing into neurons and participates in learning and memory processes. It has been demonstrated that nitric oxide is involved in the regulation of corticosterone secretion. Thus, it has been found that the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an endogenous inhibitor of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the hippocampus and that nNOS in the hippocampus may participate in the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity via GR.Neurotrophins are a family of secreted growth factors consisting of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT3) and NT4. Although initially described in the nervous system, they regulate processes such as cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in several other compartments. It has been demonstrated that the NO-citrulline cycle acts together with BDNF in maintaining the progress of neural differentiation.In the present chapter, we explore the interrelation between nitric oxide, glucocorticoids and neurotrophins in brain areas that are key structures in learning and memory processes. The participation of this interrelation in the behavioural and cognitive alterations induced in the offspring by maternal stress is also addressed. PMID:25287536

  8. [Structural and functional status of the hypophyseal-thyroid system in prenatally irradiated children].

    PubMed

    Makiienko, T S; Pavliuk, V P; Pavliuk, I V; Mosiienko, A P

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate the morphologic-and-functional state of the hypophysis-thyroid system long after the Chernobyl accident we examined 1491 children from the northern territories of the Zhitomir region. Of these, 261 had not been in utero exposed to radioiodine, 1230 pediatric subjects proved to be postconception-exposed. In utero radioiodine has not been found to affect the thyroid size in any noticeable way. The degree of structural-and-functional indices for the thyreostat system in prenatally irradiated children depends on the stage of the thyroid development just when there happened to be an exposure to radioiodine. PMID:11881349

  9. Effect of low-level prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal development in the Wistar rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of low-dose prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal growth and neurobehavioral development, and whether alterations would manifest at dosages lower than those which produce anatomic malformations from exposure at the most sensitive period of organogenesis. Ninety-eight Wistar strain rats were exposed to 0.1, 0.2, or 0.4 Gy X-radiation of were sham irradiated on the 9th or 17th day of gestation. A conventional teratologic evaluation was completed on half of the animals (572 fetuses). The age of appearance of four physiologic markers and of acquisition of six reflexes was observed in 372 offspring. Exposure during early organogenesis at these levels had no effect on any of these parameters. Prenatal exposure to X-radiation on the 17th day of gestation at dosage levels greater than 0.1 Gy resulted in alterations in the appearance of three postnatal neurophysiologic parameters. Growth retardation throughout the postpartum period also was observed in the offspring. The induction of developmental and reflex alterations had a comparable threshold to the known threshold for anatomic malformations on the 9th day. These results indicate that all of the parameters studied had thresholds either at or above 0.2 Gy acute radiation, and that the postpartum developmental and reflex acquisition measures were not more sensitive indicators of exposure to X-radiation than growth parameters.

  10. Effects of Prenatal Irradiation with an Accelerated Heavy-Ion Beam on Postnatal Development in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Murakami, M.; Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Nojima, K.; Shang, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Fujita, K.; Coffigny, H.; Hayata, I.

    Effects on postnatal neurophysiological development in offspring were studied following exposure of pregnant Wistar rats to accelerated neon-ion beams with a LET value of about 30 keV mu m at a dose range from 0 1 Gy to 2 0Gy on the 15th day of gestation The age at which four physiologic markers appeared and five reflexes were acquired was examined prior to weaning Gain in body weight was monitored until the offspring were 3 months old Male offspring were evaluated as young adults using two behavioral tests The effects of X-rays at 200 kVp measured for the same biological end points were studied for comparison Our previous study on carbon-ion beams with a LET value of about 13 keV mu m was also cited to elucidate a possible LET-related effect For most of the endpoints at early age significant alteration was even observed in offspring prenatally received 0 1 Gy of accelerated neon ions while neither X rays nor carbon-ions under the same dose resulted in such a significant alteration compared to that from the sham-irradiated dams All offspring whose mothers received 2 0 Gy died prior to weaning Offspring from dams irradiated with accelerated neon ions generally showed higher incidences of prenatal death and preweaning mortality markedly delayed accomplishment in their physiological markers and reflexes and gain in body weight compared to those exposed to X-rays or carbon ions at doses of 0 1 to 1 5 Gy Significantly reduced ratios of main organ weight to body weight at postnatal ages of 30 60 and 90 days were also observed

  11. Effects of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure on locomotor activity, and hippocampal weight, neurons, and nitric oxide synthase activity of the young postnatal guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Gibson, M A; Butters, N S; Reynolds, J N; Brien, J F

    2000-01-01

    Decreased nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-catalyzed formation of NO from L-arginine may be involved in ethanol teratogenesis involving the hippocampus. This hypothesis was tested by determining the effects of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure on locomotor activity and on hippocampal weight, number of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and dentate gyrus granule cells, and NOS activity of the postnatal guinea pig. Timed, pregnant guinea pigs received one of the following chronic oral regimens throughout gestation: 4 g ethanol/kg maternal body weight/day, isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding, or water. At postnatal day (PD) 10, spontaneous locomotor activity was measured. At PD 12, histological analysis was performed on the hippocampal formation, in which hippocampal CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and dentate gyrus granule cells were counted; body, brain, and hippocampal weights were measured; and hippocampal NOS enzymatic activity was determined using a radiometric assay. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure produced hyperactivity, decreased the brain and hippocampal weights with no change in body weight, decreased the number of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells by 25-30%, and had no effect on hippocampal NOS activity compared with the two control groups. These data, together with our previous findings in the fetal guinea pig, demonstrate that chronic prenatal ethanol exposure decreases hippocampal NOS activity in near-term fetal life that temporally precedes the selective loss of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in postnatal life. PMID:10758347

  12. Effect of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure on nitric oxide synthase I and III proteins in the hippocampus of the near-term fetal guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K A; Chiu, J; Reynolds, J N; Brien, J F

    1999-01-01

    Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure suppresses nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymatic activity, in the hippocampus of the near-term fetal guinea pig at gestational day (GD) 62. The objective of this study was to determine if this decrease in NOS activity is the result of decreased NOS I and NOS III protein expression. Pregnant guinea pigs received oral administration of 4 g ethanol/kg maternal body weight/day (n = 8), isocaloric-sucrose/pair feeding (n = 8), or water (n = 8) from GD 2 to GD 61. The NOS I and NOS III protein expression and localization in the hippocampus were determined using Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The chronic ethanol regimen produced fetal body, brain, and hippocampal growth restriction compared with the isocaloric-sucrose/pair fed and water groups but did not affect the expression or localization of NOS I and NOS III proteins in the hippocampus. The decrease in NOS enzymatic activity induced by chronic prenatal ethanol exposure may be the result of posttranslational modification of NOS I and/or NOS III protein in the hippocampus of the near-term fetal guinea pig. PMID:10386828

  13. Dose rate dependence of the speciation of neptunium in irradiated solutions of nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Precek, M.; Paulenova, A.; Mincher, B.J.; Mezyk, S.P.

    2013-07-01

    The effects of radiation on the redox speciation of neptunium are of interest due to their impact on the performance of separation of neptunium from highly radioactive solutions of dissolved used nuclear fuel. In this study, the influence of dose rate change from 0.4 kGy/h to 6 kGy/h was examined during irradiation of solutions of initially hexavalent 2.0-2.5 mM neptunium in nitric acid of two different concentrations (0.5 and 1 M). Results indicate that the immediate radiolytic steady-state concentration of neptunium(V) were depressed and its initial radiolytic yield was up to 2-times lower (in 1 M HNO{sub 3} solutions)during irradiations with the higher dose rate. The finding is explained on the basis of the enhancement of the role of oxidizing radicals during the radiolytic process. (authors)

  14. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  15. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  16. Dose-related cerebellar abnormality in rats with prenatal exposure to X-irradiation by magnetic resonance imaging volumetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazuhiko; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Horiuchi-Hirose, Miwa; Mori, Yuki; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Murase, Kenya

    2013-09-01

    Cerebellar abnormalities in 4-week-old rats with a single whole body X-irradiation at a dose of 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 Gy on embryonic day (ED) 15 were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetry. A 3D T2 W-MRI anatomical sequence with high-spatial resolution at 11.7-tesla was acquired from the fixed rat heads. By MRI volumetry, whole cerebellar volumes decreased dose-dependently. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the cortical volume (standardized β=0.901; P<0.001) was a major explanatory variable for the whole cerebellar volume, whereas both volumes of the white matter and deep cerebellar nuclei also decreased depending on the X-irradiation dose. The present MRI volumetric analysis revealed a dose-related cerebellar cortical hypoplasia by prenatal exposure to X-irradiation on E15. PMID:23998266

  17. Prenatal Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our ePublications > Prenatal care fact sheet ePublications Prenatal care fact sheet Print this fact sheet Health Care ... More information on prenatal care What is prenatal care? Prenatal care is the health care you get ...

  18. Prenatal Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Home > Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Prenatal tests Prenatal tests E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... if you’re feeling fine. What are prenatal tests? Prenatal tests are medical tests you get during ...

  19. Nitric oxide production by visible light irradiation of aqueous solution of nitrosyl ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Sauaia, Marília Gama; de Lima, Renata Galvão; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio; da Silva, Roberto Santana

    2005-12-26

    [Ru(II)L(NH(3))(4)(pz)Ru(II)(bpy)(2)(NO)](PF(6))(5) (L is NH(3), py, or 4-acpy) was prepared with good yields in a straightforward way by mixing an equimolar ratio of cis-[Ru(NO(2))(bpy)(2)(NO)](PF(6))(2), sodium azide (NaN(3)), and trans-[RuL(NH(3))(4)(pz)] (PF(6))(2) in acetone. These binuclear compounds display nu(NO) at ca. 1945 cm(-)(1), indicating that the nitrosyl group exhibits a sufficiently high degree of nitrosonium ion (NO(+)). The electronic spectrum of the [Ru(II)L(NH(3))(4)(pz)Ru(II)(bpy)(2)(NO)](5+) complex in aqueous solution displays the bands in the ultraviolet and visible regions typical of intraligand and metal-to-ligand charge transfers, respectively. Cyclic voltammograms of the binuclear complexes in acetonitrile give evidence of three one-electron redox processes consisting of one oxidation due to the Ru(2+/3+) redox couple and two reductions concerning the nitrosyl ligand. Flash photolysis of the [Ru(II)L(NH(3))(4)(pz)Ru(II)(bpy)(2)(NO)](5+) complex is capable of releasing nitric oxide (NO) upon irradiation at 355 and 532 nm. NO production was detected and quantified by an amperometric technique with a selective electrode (NOmeter). The irradiation at 532 nm leads to NO release as a consequence of a photoinduced electron transfer. All species exhibit similar photochemical behavior, a feature that makes their study extremely important for their future application in the upgrade of photodynamic therapy in living organisms. PMID:16363866

  20. Fine spatiotemporal control of nitric oxide release by infrared pulse-laser irradiation of a photolabile donor.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hidehiko; Hishikawa, Kazuhiro; Eto, Kei; Ieda, Naoya; Namikawa, Tomotaka; Kamada, Kenji; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Miyata, Naoki; Nabekura, Jun-ichi

    2013-11-15

    Two-photon-excitation release of nitric oxide (NO) from our recently synthesized photolabile NO donor, Flu-DNB, was confirmed to allow fine spatial and temporal control of NO release at the subcellular level in vitro. We then evaluated in vivo applications. Femtosecond near-infrared pulse laser irradiation of predefined regions of interest in living mouse brain treated with Flu-DNB induced NO-release-dependent, transient vasodilation specifically at the irradiated site. Photoirradiation in the absence of Flu-DNB had no effect. Further, NO release from Flu-DNB by pulse laser irradiation was shown to cause chemoattraction of microglial processes to the irradiated area in living mouse brain. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of induction of biological responses in vitro and in vivo by means of precisely controlled, two-photon-mediated release of NO. PMID:23978195

  1. Effects of prenatal irradiation with accelerated heavy-ion beams on postnatal development in rats: III. Testicular development and breeding activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Murakami, M.; Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Nojima, K.; Shang, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, K.; Fujita, K.; Moreno, S. G.; Coffigny, H.; Hayata, I.

    With a significant increase in human activities dealing with space missions, potential teratogenic effects on the mammalian reproductive system from prenatal exposure to space radiation have become a hot topic that needs to be addressed. However, even for the ground experiments, such effects from exposure to high LET ionizing radiation are not as well studied as those for low LET ionizing radiations such as X-rays. Using the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and Wistar rats, effects on gonads in prenatal male fetuses, on postnatal testicular development and on breeding activity of male offspring were studied following exposure of the pregnant animals to either accelerated carbon-ion beams with a LET value of about 13 keV/μm or neon-ion beams with a LET value of about 30 keV/μm at a dose range from 0.1 to 2.0 Gy on gestation day 15. The effects of X-rays at 200 kVp estimated for the same biological end points were studied for comparison. A significantly dose-dependent increase of apoptosis in gonocytes appeared 6 h after irradiations with a dose of 0.5 Gy or more. Measured delayed testis descent and malformed testicular seminiferous tubules were observed to be significantly different from the control animals at a dose of 0.5 Gy. These effects are observed to be dose- and LET-dependent. Markedly reduced testicular weight and testicular weight to body weight ratio were scored at postnatal day 30 even in the offspring that were prenatally irradiated with neon-ions at a dose of 0.1 Gy. A dose of 0.5 Gy from neon-ion beams induced a marked decrease in breeding activity in the prenatally irradiated male rats, while for the carbon-ion beams or X-rays, the significantly reduced breeding activity was observed only when the prenatal dose was at 1.0 Gy or more. These findings indicated that prenatal irradiations with heavy-ion beams on gestation day 15 generally induced markedly detrimental effects on prenatal gonads, postnatal testicular development and male

  2. Effects of 0. 6-Gy prenatal X irradiation on postnatal neurophysiologic development in the Wistar rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1986-04-01

    Forty-one pregnant Wistar strain rats were irradiated with 0.6-Gy X rays or were sham irradiated on the 9th or 17th days of gestation to determine if this dosage level would result in alterations in postnatal neurophysiologic development. Half of the mothers were sacrificed at term, and the developmental status of 221 newborns was evaluated. The remaining mothers delivered and raised their litters. The 161 offspring were observed for the age of attainment of the following physiologic parameters: pinna detachment, eye opening, testes opening. Offspring were also tested for the acquisition of the following selected reflexes: surface righting, negative geotaxis, auditory startle, air righting, and visual placing. Term fetal weight was lower than the controls in the group irradiated on the 9th day but was recuperable postnatally. None of the 9 developmental tests performed postnatally were abnormal in the animals irradiated on the 9th day. Thus, at least with regard to these measures, the surviving embryos exposed during the all-or-none period could not be differentiated from the controls. Offspring irradiated on the 17th day exhibited retarded growth which persisted during neonatal life. The three-day-mean neonatal weight was significantly lower in the group irradiated on the 17th day compared to controls. There were no significant maternal body weight or organ/weight differences between the groups. Rats exposed in utero on the 17th day had a significantly delayed acquisition of air righting. These results demonstrate that 0.6-Gy in utero irradiation on the 17th day of gestation can cause subtle alterations in growth and development of the Wistar strain rat during postnatal life.

  3. The pyramidal neuron in cerebral cortex following prenatal X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Donoso, J.A.; Norton, S.

    1982-07-01

    Pregnant rats were subjected to whole body X-irradiation amounting to 125 R, on gestational day 15. Cortical pyramidal neurons were examined in irradiated and control offspring at 4 weeks and 4 to 6 months postnatally. All gestationally irradiated rats developed ectopic cortex located below the corpus callosum adjacent to the caudate nucleus in the forebrain. With the rapid Golgi stain, counts were made of dendritic spines on the apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal cells in the normally-located cortex and compared with similar neurons in the ectopias. Dendritic spines were present on all pyramidal cells but spines were more sparse on ectopic pyramidal cells. Electron microscopic examination of ectopic and layered cortex in irradiated rats showed axodendritic synapses on the spines and shafts of the dendrites and axosomatic synapses, all of which were indistinguishable morphologically from synapses in control cortex. As a result of the observations made with the light and electron microscopes, it is concluded that the ectopic cortex may contain functional cells in spite of the abnormal location of the tissue.

  4. Forebrain damage following prenatal exposure to low-dose X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.; Donoso, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    Exposure of fetal rats to X-irradiation on gestational day 15 resulted postnatally in dose-related effects on body weight, growth of forebrain structures, and branching of dendrites of caudate neurons. Rats were followed for 4 months postnatally after 125, 75, 50, or 25 R whole-body irradiation to the dam. Significant decreases in body weight were present at birth after the three high doses and continued as long as 4 months after 125 or 75 R. Decreased thickness of the cerebral cortex and decreased area of the caudate nucleus were also seen. Cortical thickness was reduced by 125 R to half the size of the control cortex and the caudate nucleus to two-thirds of the control. Significant decreases were present to 50 R. Dendritic branching was reduced in caudate neurons by 125 R but not in the basilar dendrites of cortical pyramidal cells. No reduction in number of cortical synapses was seen from electron micrographs of cortical layers 1 or 5. The effect on the cerebral cortex was interpreted as a loss of neurons with retention of branching and synaptogenesis of remaining neurons. In contrast, the caudate nucleus, which develops somewhat before the cerebral cortex, showed effects as a consequence either of direct damage to caudate neurons or of reduced neuropil from reduced afferent input.

  5. Health effects of low-level irradiation during development: experimental design and prenatal and early neonatal mortality in beagles exposed to /sup 60/Co gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Angleton, G.M.; Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.

    1988-07-01

    As part of a long-term study of the effects of irradiation during development, prenatal and early neonatal mortality were evaluated for beagles exposed in utero at 8 days postcoitus (dpc), 28 dpc, 55 dpc, or 2 days postpartum. Mean doses used were 0,0.16, or 0.83 Gy. A decrease in whelping rates was observed for female breeders irradiated at 8 dpc. There was a significant decrease in litter sizes from female breeders irradiated at 8 and 28 dpc. Both of these findings are indicative of increased embryonic mortality. There was a significant decrease in the percentage of females born after exposures given at 28 dpc, indicating a differential radiosensitivity by sex. A significant increase in early neonatal mortality up to 14 days of age was observed for beagles exposed 8 or 28 dpc, again with an excess mortality in females.

  6. Follow-up study on histogenesis of microcephaly associated with ectopic gray matter induced by prenatal {gamma}-irradiation in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xue-Zhi; Inouye, Monoru; Takagishi, Yoshiko

    1996-03-01

    Brain malformation with ectopic gray matter was visualized with magnetic resonance imaging in small-sized heads of prenatally exposed atomic bomb survivors. The identical brain malformation was reproduced in mice and its histogenesis was studied in the present experiment. Pregnant mice were exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiation at a single dose of 1.5 Gy on embryonic day 13 (E13), and then injected intraperitoneally with 30 mg/kg BrdU on E15. The extensive dead cells appeared throughout the brain mantle at 6 hours (h) after exposure. On E16 cell aggregations formed rosettes. On E18 a high proportion of BrdU-labeled cells reached the superficial layers of the cortical plate with the remaining cells located in the ectopic neuronal masses. The quantitative study showed that labeled cells in layers II to III were fewer and those in layers IV to VI more numerous in the prenatally irradiated adult mice than in controls. The anti-GFAP immunostaining revealed that the glial fibers in the irradiated mice were preserved, but disorganized. These findings suggested that the majority of migrating neurons were able to arrive at their normal layers, but some neurons remained due to the interrupted migratory pathway and eventually formed ectopic neuronal masses beneath the subcortical white matter. 60 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. UVA irradiation of human skin vasodilates arterial vasculature and lowers blood pressure independently of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Donald; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Hamilton, Alistair; Lang, Ninian N; Gallagher, Julie M C; Newby, David E; Feelisch, Martin; Weller, Richard B

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD) correlates with latitude and rises in winter. The molecular basis for this remains obscure. As nitric oxide (NO) metabolites are abundant in human skin, we hypothesized that exposure to UVA may mobilize NO bioactivity into the circulation to exert beneficial cardiovascular effects independently of vitamin D. In 24 healthy volunteers, irradiation of the skin with two standard erythemal doses of UVA lowered blood pressure (BP), with concomitant decreases in circulating nitrate and rises in nitrite concentrations. Unexpectedly, acute dietary intervention aimed at modulating systemic nitrate availability had no effect on UV-induced hemodynamic changes, indicating that cardiovascular effects were not mediated via direct utilization of circulating nitrate. UVA irradiation of the forearm caused increased blood flow independently of NO synthase (NOS) activity, suggesting involvement of pre-formed cutaneous NO stores. Confocal fluorescence microscopy studies of human skin pre-labeled with the NO-imaging probe diaminofluorescein 2 diacetate revealed that UVA-induced NO release occurs in a NOS-independent, dose-dependent manner, with the majority of the light-sensitive NO pool in the upper epidermis. Collectively, our data provide mechanistic insights into an important function of the skin in modulating systemic NO bioavailability, which may account for the latitudinal and seasonal variations of BP and CVD. PMID:24445737

  8. UV-B irradiation alleviates the deterioration of cold-stored mangoes by enhancing endogenous nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jiazhao; Li, Mengya; Jin, Haihong; Sun, Lina; Zhu, Yun; Xu, Maojun; Dong, Jufang

    2015-02-15

    Effects of UV-B radiation on chilling injury, ripening and endogenous nitric oxide (NO) levels in mango fruit were evaluated. Chilling injury index, ion leakage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the fruit pretreated with 5kJm(-2) UV-B for 4h were significantly lower than those of the control during fruit ripening at ambient temperature following cold storage at 6°C for 10days. Fruit firmness of the mangoes irradiated with UV-B was significantly higher than the control during the ripening period. Endogenous NO levels of the UV-B-irradiated fruit were rapidly increased after UV-B treatment. Pre-treatment of mangoes with the NO specific scavenger, not only abolished UV-B-triggered NO accumulation, but also suppressed the UV-B-reduced chilling injury, oxidative damage, and ripening delay of the fruit. Together, the results suggest that UV-B treatment may enhance chilling tolerance and delay fruit ripening of mangoes by triggering endogenous NO generation in the fruit. PMID:25236246

  9. Prenatal Care

    MedlinePlus

    Prenatal care is the health care you get while you are pregnant. It includes your checkups and prenatal testing. Prenatal care can help keep you and your baby healthy. It lets your health care provider spot health problems early. Early treatment ...

  10. Effects of prenatal irradiation with an accelerated heavy-ion beam on postnatal development in rats: II. Further study on neurophysiologic alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Murakami, M.; Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Nojima, K.; Shang, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, K.; Fujita, K.; Moreno, S. G.; Coffigny, H.; Hayata, I.

    Organogenesis is a highly radiosensitive period, study of prenatal exposure to high LET heavy ion beams on postnatal development is important for clarifying the radiation risk in space and promoting the evidence-based mechanism research. The effects from heavy ion irradiations are not well studied as those for low LET radiations such as X-rays in this field, even the ground-based investigations remain to be addressed. Using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and Wistar rats, postnatal neurophysiological development in offspring was investigated following exposure of pregnant rats to accelerated neon-ion beams with a LET value of about 30 keV/μm at a dose range from 0.1 to 2.0 Gy on the 15th day of gestation. The age for appearance of four physiologic markers and attainment of five neonatal reflexes, and gain in body weight were monitored. Male offspring were evaluated as young adults using two behavioral tests including open field and hole-board dipping tests. The effects of X-rays at 200 kVp measured for the same biological end points were studied for comparison. For most of the endpoints at early age, significant neurophysiological alteration was observed even in offspring receiving 0.1 Gy of accelerated neon ions but not X-rays. All offspring receiving 2.0 Gy of accelerated neon ions died prior to weaning. Offspring prenatally irradiated with neon ions generally showed higher incidences of prenatal death, increased preweaning mortality, markedly delayed accomplishment in physiological markers and reflexes, significantly lower body weight and reduced ratios of main organ weight to body weight, and altered behavior compared to those exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1 1.5 Gy. These findings indicate that irradiations with neon ions at 0.1 1.5 Gy on day 15 of gestation caused varied developmental alterations in offspring, and efficient dose leading to the detrimental effects seemed to be lower than that of X-rays.

  11. Effects of prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal testicular development and function in the Wistar rat: development/teratology/behavior/radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1988-11-01

    It is evident that significant permanent tissue hypoplasia can be produced following radiation exposure late in fetal development. Because two organs, brain and testes, are developmentally and functionally interrelated, it was of interest to determine whether fetal testicular hypoplasia was a primary or a secondary effect of fetal brain irradiation. Twenty-four pregnant Wistar strain rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups, and a laparotomy was performed on day 18 of gestation. The fetuses received sham irradiation, whole body irradiation, or only head/thorax or pelvic body irradiation at a dosage level of 1.5 Gy. Mothers were allowed to deliver and raise their offspring until postnatal day 30, when the offspring were weaned. At 60 days of age, 74 male offspring were allowed to mate with colony control females of similar age until successful insemination or until the males reached 90 days of age, when they were killed. Testes were weighed and processed for histologic examination. Direct radiation of testes, due to whole body or pelvic exposure, resulted in testicular growth retardation and significantly reduced spermatogenesis. Breeding activity of the males and the percent of positive inseminations were also slightly reduced. However, a significant percentage of male offspring receiving direct testicular radiation did produce offspring. Head/thorax-only irradiation did not adversely affect testicular growth or spermatogenesis. Therefore, the use of histologic analysis as the sole determinant of infertility may be misleading. This study indicates that testicular growth retardation and an increased infertility rate result from direct prenatal exposure of rat testes to X-radiation and are not necessarily mediated via X-irradiation effects on the central nervous system.

  12. Effects of chronic postnatal opioid receptor blockade by naltrexone upon proliferation capacity in the prenatally x-irradiated brain of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Schmahl, W.; Miaskowski, U. )

    1991-01-01

    We recently reported that in rats prenatally x-irradiated on gestation day 14 with 1 Gy, postnatal chronic application of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (Nx) led to a remarkable growth spurt of the microencephalic brain. In the present study we present histological and autoradiographic results found in the subependymal layer (SEL) of the forebrain lateral ventricles. Nx led to an intermittent augmentation of the mitotic index of the x-irradiated brains within a postnatal observation period of 24 weeks. The most conspicuous finding was transient hyperplasia of the SEL at 4-6 weeks of age which occurred in close proximity to an intact ependymal lining. Districts of the lateral ventricles which were denuded from ependyme and where the rest of the ependymal layer (EL) was dislocated peripherally showed upon Nx treatment a long-lasting SEL hyperplasia with a tendency towards dysplasia. These results revealed that repair proliferation of embryotoxic x-irradiation is normally under strong control by the opioid system. If that system, which exerts a suppressing effect upon glial growth, is blocked by Nx, prominent hyperplastic reactions occur which may be useful for repairing the lesion pattern.

  13. Prenatal hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Fefer, Sergio; Ellsworth, Pamela

    2006-06-01

    Hydronephrosis is the most common genitourinary tract anomaly identified on prenatal ultrasound studies. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction accounts for approximately 50% of the cases of prenatally detected hydronephrosis. Postnatal evaluation allows for the identification of the cause and further management. Rarely, in utero intervention may be performed for severe oligohydramnios associated with hydronephrosis. Prenatal consultation with a pediatric urologist is useful in decreasing parental anxiety and facilitating postnatal management. PMID:16716789

  14. The roles of nitric oxide synthase and eIF2alpha kinases in regulation of cell cycle upon UVB-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Shiyong

    2010-01-01

    In response to ultraviolet light (UV)-induced damage, cells initiate cellular recovery mechanisms including activation of repair genes and redistribution of cell cycle phases. While most studies have focused on DNA damage-inducible transcriptional regulation of cell cycle checkpoints, translational regulation also plays an important role in control of cell cycle progression upon UV-irradiation. UV-irradiation activates two kinases, PERK and GCN2, which phosphorylate the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha) and subsequently inhibit protein synthesis. We recently identified an upstream regulator, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which controls the activation of both PERK and GCN2 upon UVB-irradiation. Our data suggested that UVB induces NOS activation and NO(.) production, which reacts with superoxide (O(2)(*-)) to form peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and activate PERK. The NO(*) production also leads to L-Arg depletion and GCN2 activation. The elevation of nitric oxide and activation of PERK/GCN2 have been shown to play roles in regulation of cell cycle upon UVB irradiation. In the present study, we show that the cell cycle phases were redistributed by inhibition of NOS activation or reduction of oxidative stress upon UVB irradiation, indicating the roles of NO(*) and its oxidative products in regulation of cell cycle. We also demonstrate that both PERK and GCN2 were involved in regulation of cell cycle upon UVB-irradiation, but the regulation is independent of eIF2alpha phosphorylation. While the mechanism for UVB-induced cell cycle control is yet to be unraveled, we here discuss the differential roles of NOS, PERK and GCN2 in regulation of cell cycle upon UVB-irradiation. PMID:20016280

  15. Prenatal Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests are considered routine — that is, almost all pregnant women receiving prenatal care get them. They include things like checking urine levels for protein, sugar, or signs of infection. Other non- routine tests are recommended only for ...

  16. Effects of prenatal /sup 60/Co irradiation on postnatal neural, learning, and hormonal development of the squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Ordy, J.M.; Brizzee, K.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Knight, C.

    1982-02-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the effects of 0, 50, and 100 rad of /sup 60/Co administered prenatally on postnatal development of neuromuscular coordination, visual discrimination learning, spontaneous light-dark stabilimeter activity, plasma cortisol, and somatometric growth rates of diurnal squirrel monkeys from birth to 90 days. In terms of accuracy, completeness, and time required for performance of reflexes and neuromuscular coordination, the performance of 50- and 100-rad offspring was less accurate and poorly coordinated and required more time for completion to that of controls. In visual orientation, discrimination, and reversal learning, the percentage correct responses of the 50- and 100-rad offspring were significantly lower than those of controls. Spontaneous light-dark stabilimeter activity of 50- and 100-rad offspring was significantly higher in the dark session than that of controls. Plasma cortisol was significantly higher in 100-rad infants than in controls. Comparisons of somatometric growth rates indicated that postnatal head circumference, crown-rump length, and to a lesser extent body weight increased at significantly slower rates in 50- and 100-rad offspring. These findings should provide essential information for formulating and carrying out multivariate behavioral, biochemical, and morphometric assessments of low-dose effects on the brain of primate offspring within demonstrable dose-response curves.

  17. Developmental disturbance of rat cerebral cortex following prenatal low-dose gamma-irradiation: a quantitative study

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; Hoshino, K.; Hayasaka, I.; Inouye, M.; Kameyama, Y. )

    1991-06-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to a single whole-body gamma-irradiation on Day 15 of gestation at a dose of 0.27, 0.48, 1.00, or 1.46 Gy. They were allowed to give birth and the offspring were killed at 6 or 12 weeks of age for microscopic and electron microscopic examinations of the cerebrum. Their body weight, brain weight, cortical thickness, and numerical densities of whole cells and synapses in somatosensory cortex were examined. Growth of the dendritic arborization of layer V pyramidal cells was also examined quantitatively with Golgi-Cox specimens. A significant dose-related reduction in brain weight was found in all irradiated groups. Neither gross malformation nor abnormality of cortical architecture was observed in the groups exposed to 0.27 Gy. A significant change was found in thickness of cortex in the groups exposed to 0.48 Gy or more. Cell packing density increased significantly in the group exposed to 1.00 Gy. Significant reduction in the number of intersections of dendrites with the zonal boundaries were found in the groups exposed to 0.27 Gy or more. There was no difference in the numerical density of synapses in layer I between the control and irradiated groups. These results suggested that doses as low as 0.27 Gy could cause a morphologically discernible change in the mammalian cerebrum.

  18. Effects of prenatal X irradiation on the appearance of reflexes and physiologic markers in the neonatal rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1988-12-01

    Seventy pregnant adult Wistar strain rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 12 exposure groups; 9th or 17th day irradiation at the 0-, 0.1-, 0.2-, 0.4-, 0.6-, or 0.8-Gy dosage level. On the first day of postnatal life, litters were reduced to a maximum of eight pups per litter. A total of 508 pups were observed for the age of acquisition of five reflexes (air righting, surface righting, visual placing, negative geotaxis, auditory startle) and the appearance of four physiologic markers (pinna detachment, eye opening, vaginal opening, testes descent). A dose-response relationship for alterations in reflex acquisition and physiologic marker appearance was observed due to exposure above 0.2 Gy on the 17th day of gestation. Therefore, 0.2 to 0.4-Gy exposure may represent a threshold range for exposure on the 17th day using these postnatal parameters.

  19. Prenatal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Initially published by the Children's Bureau in 1913, this pamphlet has been revised frequently. Its purpose is to point out the importance of medical care during pregnancy. Comfortable pregnancies, easy labor, and better care for their new infants are the usual concerns of prospective mothers. Consequently, this 1962 edition of "Prenatal Care"…

  20. Prenatal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Maternal and Child Health Services.

    This booklet is the first in a series of publications designed to provide parents with useful information about childrearing. Contents are organized into three parts. Part I focuses on the pregnancy, prenatal care, development of the baby, pregnant lifestyles, nutrition, common discomforts, and problems of pregnancy. Part II provides information…

  1. Altered spatial arrangement of layer V pyramidal cells in the mouse brain following prenatal low-dose X-irradiation. A stereological study using a novel three-dimensional analysis method to estimate the nearest neighbor distance distributions of cells in thick sections.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Christoph; Grolms, Norman; Hof, Patrick R; Boehringer, Robert; Glaser, Jacob; Korr, Hubert

    2002-09-01

    Prenatal X-irradiation, even at doses <1 Gy, can induce spatial disarray of neurons in the brains of offspring, possibly due to disturbed neuronal migration. Here we analyze the effects of prenatal low-dose X-irradiation using a novel stereological method designed to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) spatial arrangement of neurons in thick sections. Pregnant mice were X-irradiated with 50 cGy on embryonic day 13 or were sham-irradiated. The right brain halves of their 180-day-old offspring were dissected into entire series of 150 microm thick frontal cryostat sections and stained with gallocyanin. Approximately 700 layer V pyramidal cells per animal were sampled in a systematic-random manner in the middle of the section's thickness. The x-y-z coordinates of these 'parent neurons' were recorded, as well as of all neighboring (up to 10) 'offspring neurons' close to each 'parent neuron'. From these data, the nearest neighbor distance (NND) distributions for layer V pyramidal cells were calculated. Using this novel 3D analysis method, we found that, in comparison to controls, prenatal X-irradiation had no effect on the total neuron number, but did cause a reduction in the mean volume of layer V by 26.5% and a more dispersed spatial arrangement of these neurons. Considering the recent literature, it seems reasonable to consider abnormal neuronal migration as the potential basic cause of this finding. PMID:12183394

  2. Prenatal ultrasound - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100197.htm Prenatal ultrasound - series To use the sharing features on this ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Prenatal Testing Ultrasound A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  3. Optimal Prenatal Care

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optimal prenatal care begins before conception, when health habits can be reviewed. The most important task of the initial prenatal assessment is establishing dates. Ongoing assessments should emphasize measurement of symphisis to fundus height, maternal nutrition and screening, especially for urinary tract infection and gestational diabetes. Prenatal care is an excellent opportunity for patient education and involvement of the family. Good prenatal care is today's best health investment. PMID:21286515

  4. Effect of prenatal X irradiation on chemical components of DNA and DNA-protein crosslinks in rat cerebrum in the perinatal periods

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, S.; Tanaka, H.; Arima, M.

    1987-04-01

    Wistar rats were X-irradiated in utero with 100 or 200 R on Day 13 of gestation. X Irradiation resulted in decreases not only in cerebral weight up to 15 days old but also in DNA content from Day 19 of gestation to 5 days old, and in a tendency to increase the ratio of protein to DNA in the perinatal period. The DNA contents of the homogenate, isolated nuclei, and chromatin of the cerebrum in the irradiated group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The ratio of protein to DNA at the nuclei, chromatin, and isolated DNA steps increased on irradiation. The total nucleoside content of isolated DNA determined by high-performance liquid chromatography was higher in the irradiated group than that in the control group on Day 21 of gestation but not on Day 19 of gestation. No new peaks were observed and no change in the guanine-cytosine content was seen on irradiation. X Irradiation resulted in decreases in the cytosine and deoxycytidine contents and an increase in the deoxyadenosine content. The formation of DNA-protein crosslinks in the cerebral chromatin as determined by a filter binding assay tended to increase in the irradiated groups.

  5. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Effects of prenatal X-irradiation on the 14th-18th days of gestation on postnatal growth and development in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1988-11-01

    Thirty-nine pregnant adult Wistar strain rats were randomly assigned to one of three exposure groups: 0, 0.75, or 1.50 Gy X-radiation total exposure. Animals were exposed from the 14th to the 18th days of gestation at 0, 0.15, or 0.30 Gy per day. At term, 15 rats were killed and morphologic analyses were completed. Twenty-four rats were allowed to deliver their offspring. On the first day of postnatal life, litters were reduced to a maximum of eight pups per litter, with equal numbers of male and female offspring wherever possible. A total of 187 pups were observed for the age of acquisition of five reflexes (air righting, surface righting, visual placing, negative geotaxis, auditory startle) and the appearance of four physiologic markers (pinna detachment, eye opening, vaginal opening, testes descent). There was significant dose-related weight reduction in term fetuses and offspring throughout the 86-day postnatal period. Postnatal growth rate (g gained/day) was unaffected. Adult offspring brain and gonadal weight and organ weight:body weight ratios were reduced. Using the PAC50 methodology, dose-related alterations occurred in the acquisition of several reflexes. All physiologic markers exhibited a dose-related delay in appearance. These results indicate that fractionated exposure to X-radiation during the fetal period in the rat results in dose-dependent alterations in postnatal growth and physiologic development. These studies are important for our understanding of the long-range effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation late in gestation.

  7. Understanding Prenatal Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... several things, particularly the risk of Down Syndrome. Rh Incompatibility This test determines whether the mother and ... at the first prenatal visit. If there is Rh incompatibility, treatments can help prevent later complications. Ultrasound ...

  8. Prenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Golbus, M S; Hall, B D; Filly, R A; Poskanzer, L B

    1977-09-01

    Severe rhizomelic and mesomelic dwarfism was demonstrated in a 20-week gestation fetus by amniography. A systematic progressive approach to prenatal diagnosis in the absence of a definitive diagnosis and the use of contrast radiography is discussed. PMID:894421

  9. Errors in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Anumba, Dilly O C

    2013-08-01

    Prenatal screening and diagnosis are integral to antenatal care worldwide. Prospective parents are offered screening for common fetal chromosomal and structural congenital malformations. In most developed countries, prenatal screening is routinely offered in a package that includes ultrasound scan of the fetus and the assay in maternal blood of biochemical markers of aneuploidy. Mistakes can arise at any point of the care pathway for fetal screening and diagnosis, and may involve individual or corporate systemic or latent errors. Special clinical circumstances, such as maternal size, fetal position, and multiple pregnancy, contribute to the complexities of prenatal diagnosis and to the chance of error. Clinical interventions may lead to adverse outcomes not caused by operator error. In this review I discuss the scope of the errors in prenatal diagnosis, and highlight strategies for their prevention and diagnosis, as well as identify areas for further research and study to enhance patient safety. PMID:23725900

  10. Comparison of a thermospheric photochemical model with Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) observations of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C. A.; Bailey, S. M.

    2004-03-01

    A time-dependent thermospheric model has been used to calculate the nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere for a 935-day period, 11 March 1998 to 30 September 2000. This model uses daily values of the observed solar soft X-ray irradiance (2-7 nm) as an energy input parameter. The model does not include an energy input from auroral electron precipitation. The results of the model calculation of nitric oxide density at 110 km were compared with observations of nitric oxide density made with the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) for the 935-day period. At the equator the model calculations and the observations agree very well with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.876. The correlation coefficient remains high for the altitude region 107-117 km, the region where solar soft X-rays (2-7 nm) are the major source of nitric oxide production. The comparison of the model calculations with the observations as a function of latitude show that there is excess nitric oxide poleward of 30°N and S latitude particularly during the fall-winter season. We believe that the source of this excess nitric oxide is the nitric oxide that is produced in the auroral region (65°-75°N and S geomagnetic latitude) by precipitating auroral electrons. We believe that aurorally produced nitric oxide is transported equatorward by horizontal winds. At midlatitudes the excess nitric oxide decays to about half of its initial value in one day. At times of large geomagnetic storms we believe that aurorally produced nitric oxide is transported all the way to the equator by horizontal winds. The excellent correlation of the model calculations and the SNOE observations of nitric oxide at 110 km between 30°S and 30°N support the hypothesis that solar soft X-rays are the source of the variability of nitric oxide in the thermosphere at low latitudes.

  11. Nitric oxide inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian (Wai Chong); Lerner, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is involved in many physiologic processes. There are efforts, described elsewhere in this volume, to deliver nitric oxide to tissues as a therapy. Nitric oxide also contributes to pathophysiologic processes. Inhibiting nitric oxide or its production can thus also be of therapeutic benefit. This article addresses such inhibitory strategies. PMID:26634146

  12. Global observations of nitric oxide in the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C. A.; Mankoff, K. D.; Bailey, S. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere (97-150 km) has been measured from the polar-orbiting Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite as a function of latitude, longitude, and altitude for the 2 1/2 year period from 11 March 1998 until 30 September 2000. The observations show that the maximum density occurs near 106-110 km and that the density is highly variable. The nitric oxide density at low latitudes correlates well with the solar soft X-ray irradiance (2-7 nm), indicating that it is the solar X-rays that produce thermospheric nitric oxide at low and midlatitudes. Nitric oxide is produced at auroral latitudes (60°-70° geomagnetic) by the precipitation of electrons (1-10 keV) into the thermosphere. During high geomagnetic activity, increased nitric oxide may be present at midlatitudes as the result of meridional winds that carry the nitric oxide equatorward.

  13. Prenatal Influences on the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, Lise

    2002-01-01

    Gives an overview of embryology and prenatal brain, sensory, and motor development. Includes discussion of maternal nutrition, chemical exposure, prenatal drug and alcohol hazards, cigarette smoking, and some causes of neural tube defects and premature birth. (Author/KB)

  14. Why Take a Prenatal Supplement?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsroom Dietary Guidelines Communicator’s Guide Why take a prenatal supplement? You are here Home / Audience / Adults / Moms/ Moms-to-Be / Dietary Supplements Why take a prenatal supplement? Print Share During pregnancy, your needs increase ...

  15. Prenatal Genetic Counseling (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Prenatal Genetic Counseling KidsHealth > For Parents > Prenatal Genetic Counseling Print ... how can they help your family? What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling is the process of: evaluating ...

  16. Your First Prenatal Care Checkup

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prenatal Providers project include HRSA, March of Dimes Foundation, National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics, Genetic ... Prenatal Providers project include HRSA, March of Dimes Foundation, National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics, Genetic ...

  17. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Lun; Hsiao, Ching-Hua; Tseng, Hua-Wei; Lee, Tai-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Prenatal examination plays an important role in present medical diagnosis. It provides information on fetal health status as well as the diagnosis of fetal treatment feasibility. The diagnosis can provide peace of mind for the perspective mother. Timely pregnancy termination diagnosis can also be determined if required. Amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling are two widely used invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures. To obtain complete fetal genetic information and avoid endangering the fetus, noninvasive prenatal diagnosis has become the vital goal of prenatal diagnosis. However, the development of a high-efficiency separation technology is required to obtain the scarce fetal cells from maternal circulation. In recent years, the rapid development of microfluidic systems has provided an effective method for fetal cell separation. Advantages such as rapid analysis of small samples, low cost, and various designs, greatly enhance the efficiency and convenience of using microfluidic systems for cell separation. In addition, microfluidic disks can be fully automated for high throughput of rare cell selection from blood samples. Therefore, the development of microfluidic applications in noninvasive prenatal diagnosis is unlimited. PMID:26384048

  18. Role of the Esophageal Vagus Neural Pathway in Ionizing Irradiation-induced Seizures in Nitric Oxide Synthase-1 Homologous Recombinant Negative NOS1−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    BERNARD, MARK E.; KIM, HYUN; RWIGEMA, JEAN-CLAUDE; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; KELLEY, ERIC E.; MURDOCH, GEOFFERY H.; DIXON, TRACY; WANG, HONG; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim We sought to define the mechanism of total body irradiation (TBI)-induced seizures in NOS1−/− mice and amelioration by intra-esophageal manganese superoxide dismutase-plasmid liposomes (MnSOD-PL). Materials and Methods We evaluated the role of vagus nerve pathways in irradiation-induced seizures using biochemical, physiologic, and histopathologic techniques. Results Heterozygous NOS1+/− mice demonstrated radioresistance similar to wild-type C57BL/6NHsd mice (p=0.9269). Irradiation-induced lipid peroxidation in fetal brain cultures from NOS1−/− or wild-type mice was reduced by MnSOD-PL. Right-sided vagotomy did not alter the TBI radiation response of wild-type or reverse the radiosensitivity of NOS1−/− mice. Excised esophagus from irradiated NOS1−/− mice demonstrated an increased histopathologic inflammatory response compared to C57BL/6NHsd mice. Conclusion NOS1−/− mice represent a model system for dissecting the developmental abnormalities leading to esophageal-mediated TBI-induced seizures. PMID:22021678

  19. Human prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Filkins, K.; Russo, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the field of prenatal diagnosis have been rapid during the past decade. Moreover, liberal use of birth control methods and restriction of family size have placed greater emphasis on optimum outcome of each pregnancy. There are many prenatal diagnostic techniques of proven value; the risks, including false negatives and false positives, are known. With the rapid proliferation of new and experimental techniques, many disorders are potential diagnosable or even treatable; however, risk factors are unknown and issues relating to quality control have not been resolved. These problems are readily appreciated in the dramatic new techniques involving recombinant DNA, chorion villus sampling, and fetal surgery. Unfortunately, clinicians may not appreciate the difficulties that may also be encountered in the more mundane prenatal diagnostic tests such as ultrasonography or enzymatic testing. The aim of this volume is to clarify and rationalize certain aspects of diagnosis, genetic counseling, and intervention. New and experimental techniques are presented in the light of current knowledge.

  20. Prenatal Care Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Michael

    Described is the development and evaluation of a prenatal instructional program designed to prevent birth defects. It is explained that the program, composed of five slide tape units on such topics as nutrition and environmental factors, was field tested and found effective with 97 participants (pregnant high school students, nursing students, and…

  1. [Prenatal care in Germany].

    PubMed

    Vetter, K; Goeckenjan, M

    2013-12-01

    Prenatal care in Germany is based on a nationwide standardized program of care for pregnant women. Besides support and health counseling, it comprises prevention or early detection of diseases or unfavorable circumstances with risks for mother and child. Prenatal care is regulated by law and structured by directives and standard procedures in maternity guidelines (Mutterschafts-Richtlinien). This includes information and counseling of future mothers on offers of psychosocial and medical assistance in normal pregnancies as well as in unplanned or unwanted pregnancies. Further aspects are clinical examinations and risk determinations for genetic variations or direct genetic analysis. During pregnancy, medical history, clinical examination, and blood testing are part of the sophisticated program, which includes at least three standardized sonographic examinations at 10, 20, and 30 weeks of gestation. The maternity passport allows a pregnant woman to carry the most relevant information on her pregnancy and her personal risks with her. For 45 years now, women in Germany are used to carrying their Mutterpass. Societal changes have influenced the central goals of maternity care: In the beginning, the mortality of mother and child had to be reduced. Today, maternal morbidity and impaired development of the child are the center of interest, with expansion to familial satisfaction. The reduction in the mortality and morbidity of both the mother and the child during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum can be attributed to prenatal care. Thus, investment in a program of nationwide structured prenatal care seems to be worthwhile-despite the lack of evidence concerning its effectiveness. PMID:24337130

  2. Development of nitrosyl ruthenium complex-loaded lipid carriers for topical administration: improvement in skin stability and in nitric oxide release by visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Marquele-Oliveira, Franciane; Santana, Danielle Cristine de Almeida; Taveira, Stephânia Fleury; Vermeulen, Deise Mirella; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes; da Silva, Roberto Santana; Lopez, Renata Fonseca Vianna

    2010-12-01

    The prominent nitric oxide (NO) donor [Ru(terpy)(bdqi)NO](PF(6))(3) has been synthesized and evaluated with respect to noteworthy biological effects due to its NO photorelease, including vascular relaxation and melanoma cell culture toxicity. The potential for delivering NO in therapeutic quantities is tenable since the nitrosyl ruthenium complex (NRC) must first reach the "target tissue" and then release the NO upon stimulus. In this context, NRC-loaded lipid carriers were developed and characterized to further explore its topical administration for applications such as skin cancer treatment. NRC-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers were prepared via the microemulsification method, with average diameters of 275+/-15 nm and 211+/-31 nm and zeta potentials of -40.7+/-10.4 mV and -50.0+/-7.5 mV, respectively. In vitro kinetic studies of NRC release from nanoparticles showed sustained release of NRC from the lipid carriers and illustrated the influence of the release medium and the lyophilization process. Stability studies showed that NO is released from NRC as a function of temperature and time and due to skin contact. The encapsulation of NRC in SLN followed by its lyophilization, significantly improved the complex stability. Furthermore, of particular interest was the fact that in the NO photorelease study, the NO release from the NRC-loaded SLN was approximately twice that of just NRC in solution. NRC-loaded SLN performs well enough at releasing and protecting NO degradation in vitro that it is a promising carrier for topical delivery of NO. PMID:20634015

  3. The Prenatal Care at School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Carol H.; Nasso, Jacqueline T.; Swider, Susan; Ellison, Brenda R.; Griswold, Daniel L.; Brooks, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    School absenteeism and poor compliance with prenatal appointments are concerns for pregnant teens. The Prenatal Care at School (PAS) program is a new model of prenatal care involving local health care providers and school personnel to reduce the need for students to leave school for prenatal care. The program combines prenatal care and education…

  4. Prenatal Surgery: Helping Babies Before Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Zika & Pregnancy Prenatal Surgery: Helping Babies Before Birth KidsHealth > For Parents > Prenatal Surgery: Helping Babies Before ... A Text Size Prenatal Surgery: Helping Babies Before Birth Operating on a baby before birth may seem ...

  5. Human prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Filkins, K.; Russo, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The multiauthor text is written as a ''guide to rationalize and clarify certain aspects of diagnosis, general counseling and intervention'' for ''health professionals who provide care to pregnant women.'' The text is not aimed at the ultrasonographer but rather at the physicians who are clinically responsible for patient management. Chapters of relevance to radiologists include an overview of prenatal screening and counseling, diagnosis of neural tube defects, ultrasonographic (US) scanning of fetal disorders in the first and second trimesters of pregnancy, US scanning in the third trimester, multiple gestation and selective termination, fetal echo and Doppler studies, and fetal therapy. Also included are overviews of virtually all currently utilized prenatal diagnostic techniques including amniocentesis, fetal blood sampling, fetoscopy, recombinant DNA detection of hemoglobinopathies, chorionic villus sampling, embryoscopy, legal issues, and diagnosis of Mendelian disorders by DNA analysis.

  6. Solar-terrestrial coupling: Solar soft X-rays and thermospheric nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Charles A.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    Simultaneous measurements were made of the solar soft x-ray irradiances and the thermospheric nitric oxide density in the tropics from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite. The analysis of these observations for 44 days of low geomagnetic activity in the spring of 1998 show that there is a correlation between the solar soft x-ray irradiances and thermospheric nitric oxide densities in the tropics. Photochemical model calculations that used the measured solar soft x-ray irradiances as input parameters adequately reproduce the magnitude of the time-varying component of the thermospheric nitric oxide in the tropics. An additional amount of nitric oxide is present in the tropics that does not vary with the time period of the solar rotation. The conclusion of this analysis is that solar soft x-rays are the primary cause of the variation in the thermospheric nitric oxide densities in the tropics during times of low geomagnetic activity.

  7. Nitric Oxide Nanoparticle Technology

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections account for the majority of skin and soft tissue infections in the United States. Staphylococcus aureus is rapidly evolving resistance to contemporary topical as well as systemic antibiotics. Alternatives to current treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections are needed for more effective treatment now and in the future. Nitric oxide's proven roles in both wound repair and as an antimicrobial agent make it an excellent candidate for the treatment of skin infections. Recent attempts at novel nitric oxide therapies, in the form of nitric oxide donors, have shown limited potential in treating cutaneous infection. However, more recent developments in nitric oxide delivery, using nitric oxide nanoparticle technology, demonstrate substantial promise in the promotion of wound repair and eradication of skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:20725551

  8. Prenatal immunotoxicant exposure and postnatal autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, S D

    1999-01-01

    Reports in humans and rodents indicate that immune development may be altered following perinatal exposure to immunotoxic compounds, including chemotherapeutics, corticosteroids, polycyclic hydrocarbons, and polyhalogenated hydrocarbons. Effects from such exposure may be more dramatic or persistent than following exposure during adult life. For example, prenatal exposure to the insecticide chlordane or to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[(italic)a(/italic)]pyrene produces what appears to be lifelong immunosuppression in mice. Whether prenatal immunotoxicant exposure may predispose the organism to postnatal autoimmune disease remains largely unknown. In this regard, the therapeutic immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) crosses the placenta poorly. However, lethally irradiated rodents exposed to CsA postsyngeneic bone marrow transplant (i.e., during re-establishment of the immune system) develop T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, suggesting this drug may produce a fundamental disruption in development of self-tolerance by T cells. The environmental contaminant 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-(italic)p(/italic)-dioxin (TCDD) crosses the placenta and produces fetal thymic effects (italic)in vivo(/italic) similar to effects of CsA in fetal thymic organ culture, including inhibited thymocyte maturation and reduced expression of thymic major histocompatability complex class II molecules. These observations led to the suggestion that gestational exposure to TCDD may interfere with normal development of self-tolerance. Possibly supporting this hypothesis, when mice predisposed to development of autoimmune disease were treated with TCDD during gestation, postnatal autoimmunity was exacerbated. Similar results have been reported for mice exposed to diethylstilbestrol during development. These reports suggest that prenatal exposure to certain immunotoxicants may play a role in postnatal expression of autoimmunity. PMID:10502532

  9. Prenatal Detection of Inherited Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    1981-01-01

    The following is a review of current concepts of prenatal detection. Transabdominal amniocentesis is recognized to be an integral adjunct to prenatal care. The analysis of cultured amniotic fluid cells collected at about 16 weeks of gestation provides in utero diagnosis of nearly all chromosomal aberration syndromes, several metabolic disorders which are due to a specific enzymic deficiency due to single gene disorders, and some multifactorial disorders, such as prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects by estimation of alphafeto protein in amniotic fluid. Various aspects of amniocentesis are discussed. PMID:7205985

  10. Eugenics and prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, R

    1986-01-01

    Prejudices against people with disabilities, poor people, and immigrants during the nineteenth century generated a science of "race improvement" called eugenics. In the United States, a number of eugenic measures were enacted early in this century, but it was in Nazi Germany that eugenics flourished under the name of racial hygiene (Rassenhygiene). In the guise of furthering the health of the German people, German scientists and physicians initially designed programs of sterilization. Next came euthanasia and finally mass extermination of "lives not worth living." Remembering this history, many German women oppose the new technical developments in prenatal diagnosis because they see them as yet another way to specify what kinds of people are and are not fit to inhabit the world. This paper tries to place the new technologies in the context of eugenics and to point out some of the ways in which the new, supposedly liberating, choices in fact limit women's control over our lives. PMID:3516893

  11. Ethical issues in prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Burgess, M M

    1994-04-01

    Many ethical concerns raised by prenatal testing are based on the use and effects of genetic information in nonclinical contexts. Correct or incorrect beliefs about social uses of genetic information may limit the voluntariness of informed consent to prenatal testing. A qualitative study of persons predictively tested for Huntington's disease illustrates how the social context, in this case the family history of being at risk, affects the interpretation of the genetic information and alters relationships. This constitutes a risk of genetic testing. Prenatal testing also requires ethical analysis based on careful understanding of how social attitudes and nonclinical uses affect voluntariness and potential harm and benefits of testing. Investigators conducting research on prenatal tests share the responsibility to evaluate social attitudes toward at-risk persons, nonclinical uses of genetic information, and the social benefits and harm of such uses. PMID:8070072

  12. MedlinePlus: Prenatal Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reliable Is Laboratory Testing? (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Prenatal Testing: Is It Right for You? (Mayo ... Spanish Amniotic Fluid Analysis (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Biophysical Profile (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  13. Prenatal Depression Restricts Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify whether prenatal depression is a risk factor for fetal growth restriction. Methods Midgestation (18-20 weeks GA) estimated fetal weight and urine cortisol and birth weight and gestational age at birth data were collected on a sample of 40 depressed and 40 non-depressed women. Estimated fetal weight and birthweight data were then used to compute fetal growth rates. Results Depressed women had a 13% greater incidence of premature delivery (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.61) and 15% greater incidence of low birthweight (OR = 4.75) than non-depressed women. Depressed women also had elevated prenatal cortisol levels (p = .006) and fetuses who were smaller (p = .001) and who showed slower fetal growth rates (p = .011) and lower birthweights (p = .008). Mediation analyses further revealed that prenatal maternal cortisol levels were a potential mediator for the relationship between maternal symptoms of depression and both gestational age at birth and the rate of fetal growth. After controlling for maternal demographic variables, prenatal maternal cortisol levels were associated with 30% of the variance in gestational age at birth and 14% of the variance in the rate of fetal growth. Conclusion Prenatal depression was associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, including premature delivery and slower fetal growth rates. Prenatal maternal cortisol levels appear to play a role in mediating these outcomes. PMID:18723301

  14. Inhaled nitric oxide to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Olivier, Paul; Loron, Gauthier; Fontaine, Romain; Maury, Laure; Baud, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease that affects premature infants and contributes to their morbidity and mortality. With the advent of prenatal steroids and postnatal exogenous surfactant and less aggressive respiratory support, premature infants can develop chronic oxygen dependency without even acute respiratory distress. This 'new bronchopulmonary dysplasia' could be the result of impaired postnatal growth. Several experimental studies have suggested a possible role of the vascular endothelial growth factor/nitric oxide (VEGF/NO) pathway in restoring pulmonary angiogenesis and enhancing distal lung growth. The results of the clinical studies are, however, inconclusive, and it is currently unclear which subsets of premature infants might benefit from inhaled nitric oxide. Besides, severe intracranial haemorrhage and/or cystic periventricular leucomalacia may affect the most immature babies, many of whom are spared from severe initial respiratory disease. Recently, inhaled nitric oxide was shown to significantly decrease the incidence of these neurological events, and to improve the long-term outcome in a few clinical trials. At times neuroprotective, at times neurotoxic, nitric oxide is capable of divergent effects depending upon the extent of cerebral damage, the redox state of the cell, and the experimental model used. Recently, our group found that inhaled nitric oxide had remote effects including angiogenesis and maturation on the developing brain in rodent pups. Thus, we await the results of the recently completed randomised clinical trial of inhaled nitric oxide to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (the European Nitric Oxide or 'EUNO' trial) where, besides the primary endpoint of chronic oxygen dependency reduction at 36 weeks' postconceptional age, long-term lung and brain will be followed-up until 7 years of age. PMID:18986855

  15. Prenatal exercise research.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2012-06-01

    In this review of recent research on prenatal exercise, studies from several different countries suggest that only approximately 40% of pregnant women exercise, even though about 92% are encouraged by their physicians to exercise, albeit with some 69% of the women being advised to limit their exercise. A moderate exercise regime reputedly increases infant birthweight to within the normal range, but only if exercise is decreased in late pregnancy. Lower intensity exercise such as water aerobics has decreased low back pain more than land-based physical exercise. Heart rate and blood pressure have been lower following yoga than walking, and complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension with associated intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity have been less frequent following yoga. No studies could be found on tai chi with pregnant women even though balance and the risk of falling are great concerns during pregnancy, and tai chi is one of the most effective forms of exercise for balance. Potential underlying mechanisms for exercise effects are that stimulating pressure receptors during exercise increases vagal activity which, in turn, decreases cortisol, increases serotonin and decreases substance P, leading to decreased pain. Decreased cortisol is particularly important inasmuch as cortisol negatively affects immune function and is a significant predictor of prematurity. Larger, more controlled trials are needed before recommendations can be made about the type and amount of pregnancy exercise. PMID:22721740

  16. Complex Developmental Issues of Prenatal Drug Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronstadt, Diana

    1991-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of prenatal drug exposure on child development, and reviews ideal early intervention programs. Researchers agree that prenatal drug exposure is only one of many factors that can influence a child's development. Specialized treatment programs and family support can ameliorate prenatal drug exposure effects. (SLD)

  17. Prenatal Famine and Adult Health

    PubMed Central

    Lumey, L.H.; Stein, Aryeh D.; Susser, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    We review human studies on the relation between acute exposures to prenatal famine and adult physical and mental health. These studies are observational and include exposures to a famine environment by natural or man-made causes or, more commonly, from the interplay between natural and human factors. These natural experiments provide an opportunity to examine long-term outcomes after famine exposures by comparing exposed and nonexposed individuals. The studies show consistent associations between prenatal famine and adult body size, diabetes, and schizophrenia. For other measures of adult health, findings are less robust. A relation between prenatal famine and some reported epigenetic changes may provide a potential mechanism to explain specific associations. Much progress can be made if current separate studies are further analyzed with comparable definitions of exposures and outcomes and using common analytic strategies. PMID:21219171

  18. Update on prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Zolotor, Adam J; Carlough, Martha C

    2014-02-01

    Many elements of routine prenatal care are based on tradition and lack a firm evidence base; however, some elements are supported by more rigorous studies. Correct dating of the pregnancy is critical to prevent unnecessary inductions and to allow for accurate treatment of preterm labor. Physicians should recommend folic acid supplementation to all women as early as possible, preferably before conception, to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. Administration of Rho(D) immune globulin markedly decreases the risk of alloimmunization in an RhD-negative woman carrying an RhD-positive fetus. Screening and treatment for iron deficiency anemia can reduce the risks of preterm labor, intrauterine growth retardation, and perinatal depression. Testing for aneuploidy and neural tube defects should be offered to all pregnant women with a discussion of the risks and benefits. Specific genetic testing should be based on the family histories of the patient and her partner. Physicians should recommend that pregnant women receive a vaccination for influenza, be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria, and be tested for sexually transmitted infections. Testing for group B streptococcus should be performed between 35 and 37 weeks' gestation. If test results are positive or the patient has a history of group B streptococcus bacteriuria during pregnancy, intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis should be administered to reduce the risk of infection in the infant. Intramuscular or vaginal progesterone should be considered in women with a history of spontaneous preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, or shortened cervical length (less than 2.5 cm). Screening for diabetes should be offered using a universal or a risk-based approach. Women at risk of preeclampsia should be offered low-dose aspirin prophylaxis, as well as calcium supplementation if dietary calcium intake is low. Induction of labor may be considered between 41 and 42 weeks' gestation. PMID:24506122

  19. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, M.; Dominiczak, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide is an important regulatory molecule in cardiovascular function. Reduced availability of nitric oxide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:9497971

  20. Prenatal Nutrition and Later Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, T. N.

    1972-01-01

    Text of an affidavit in the case, Kennedy v. Detroit Board of Education. Reports on a study which established that prenatal nutrition is directly related to brain size and volume determined at 48 hours of infancy and at eight months of age. Pinpoints the relationship between inadequate nutrition in pregnancy, infant brain size, and intellectual…

  1. UV Induced Oxidation of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde, F. (Inventor); Luecke, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated at least in part using in situ UV radiation sources. The sources of the oxidizing species include oxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen may be a component of the gaseous stream or added to the gaseous stream, preferably near a UV radiation source, and is converted to ozone by the UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is decomposed through a combination of vaporization and UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50% by volume and increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding vaporization within the flow channel of the gaseous stream and in the presence of the UV radiation sources.

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of cloacal anomaly.

    PubMed

    Cacciaguerra, S; Lo Presti, L; Di Leo, L; Grasso, S; Gangarossa, S; Di Benedetto, V; Di Benedetto, A

    1998-02-01

    The authors present a case of prenatal diagnosis of cloacal anomaly, characterized by the presence of oligohydramnios and cystic pelvic mass with changing features during observation. Postnatal study confirmed the presence of a recto-cloacal fistula, with a high confluence of the urinary, genital and intestinal systems. Both parents had a chromosome 9 inversion (p11q13), but the child was chromosomally normal. PMID:9561584

  3. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yau, Mabel; Khattab, Ahmed; New, Maria I

    2016-06-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a monogenic disorder of adrenal steroidogenesis. To prevent genital ambiguity, in girls, prenatal dexamethasone treatment is administered early in the first trimester. Prenatal genetic diagnosis of CAH and fetal sex determination identify affected female fetuses at risk for genital virilization. Advancements in prenatal diagnosis are owing to improved understanding of the genetic basis of CAH and improved technology. Cloning of the CYP21A2 gene ushered in molecular genetic analysis as the current standard of care. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis allows for targeted treatment and avoids unnecessary treatment of males and unaffected females. PMID:27241964

  4. The Future of Prenatal Diagnosis and Screening

    PubMed Central

    Pergament, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    The future of prenatal diagnosis and screening lies in developing clinical approaches and laboratory technologies applicable to genetic analyses and therapeutic interventions during embryonic development. PMID:26237604

  5. Prenatal Vitamin D Supplementation and Child Respiratory Health: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Stephen T.; Griffiths, Chris J.; Martineau, Adrian R.; Robinson, Stephen; Yu, Christina; Poulton, Sheree; Kirkby, Jane C.; Stocks, Janet; Hooper, Richard; Shaheen, Seif O.; Warner, John O.; Boyle, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Observational studies suggest high prenatal vitamin D intake may be associated with reduced childhood wheezing. We examined the effect of prenatal vitamin D on childhood wheezing in an interventional study. Methods We randomised 180 pregnant women at 27 weeks gestation to either no vitamin D, 800 IU ergocalciferol daily until delivery or single oral bolus of 200,000 IU cholecalciferol, in an ethnically stratified, randomised controlled trial. Supplementation improved but did not optimise vitamin D status. Researchers blind to allocation assessed offspring at 3 years. Primary outcome was any history of wheeze assessed by validated questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included atopy, respiratory infection, impulse oscillometry and exhaled nitric oxide. Primary analyses used logistic and linear regression. Results We evaluated 158 of 180 (88%) offspring at age 3 years for the primary outcome. Atopy was assessed by skin test for 95 children (53%), serum IgE for 86 (48%), exhaled nitric oxide for 62 (34%) and impulse oscillometry of acceptable quality for 51 (28%). We found no difference between supplemented and control groups in risk of wheeze [no vitamin D: 14/50 (28%); any vitamin D: 26/108 (24%) (risk ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval 0.49, 1.50; P = 0.69)]. There was no significant difference in atopy, eczema risk, lung function or exhaled nitric oxide between supplemented groups and controls. Conclusion Prenatal vitamin D supplementation in late pregnancy that had a modest effect on cord blood vitamin D level, was not associated with decreased wheezing in offspring at age three years. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN68645785 PMID:23826104

  6. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Yoshimaru, H.; Otake, M.; Annegers, J.F.; Schull, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to seizure, epilepsy, or convulsion. Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures.

  7. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures.

    PubMed

    Dunn, K; Yoshimaru, H; Otake, M; Annegers, J F; Schull, W J

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to "seizure," "epilepsy," or "convulsion." Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures. PMID:2293744

  8. NITRIC ACID PICKLING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Boller, E.R.; Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-19

    An improved process is described for the treatment of metallic uranium surfaces preparatory to being given hot dip coatings. The process consists in first pickling the uraniunn surInce with aqueous 50% to 70% nitric acid, at 60 to 70 deg C, for about 5 minutes, rinsing the acid solution from the uranium article, promptly drying and then passing it through a molten alkali-metal halide flux consisting of 42% LiCl, 53% KCla and 5% NaCl into a molten metal bath consisting of 85 parts by weight of zinc and 15 parts by weight of aluminum

  9. Prenatal Maternal Stress Programs Infant Stress Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M.; Waffarn, Feizal; Sandman, Curt A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Prenatal exposure to inappropriate levels of glucocorticoids (GCs) and maternal stress are putative mechanisms for the fetal programming of later health outcomes. The current investigation examined the influence of prenatal maternal cortisol and maternal psychosocial stress on infant physiological and behavioral responses to stress.…

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of inherited metabolic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Diukman, R; Goldberg, J D

    1993-01-01

    Advances in the prenatal diagnosis of inherited metabolic disease have provided new reproductive options to at-risk couples. These advances have occurred in both sampling techniques and methods of analysis. In this review we present an overview of the currently available prenatal diagnostic approaches for the diagnosis of metabolic disease in a fetus. Images PMID:8236980

  11. Conceptions of Prenatal Development: Behavioral Embryology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Gilbert

    1976-01-01

    Describes recent progress in research on prenatal behavioral development and in a systematic fashion the various ways in which prenatal experience can affect the development of behavior in the neonate as well as in the embryo and fetus. (Author/RK)

  12. Tropospheric nitric oxide measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in tropospheric photo-chemistry. The photochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons, for example, can serve as either a source or a sink for ozone, depending on the local abundance of NO. Nitric oxide also helps govern atmospheric concentrations of the hydroxyl (OH) radical. The OH radical is the single most important player in photochemical transformations because it controls the atmospheric lifetimes of so many chemical species. Although NO serves as a very effective catalyst in many important chemical processes, its concentration is low enough to normally be expressed in units of parts per trillion by volume (pptv). Consequently, commercially available detectors for NO (with detection limits of about one part per billion) have proven to be unsuitable for use anywhere except in urban areas and near other local pollution sources. Under the sponsorship of NASA's Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE), Wallops has developed an extremely sensitive detector with a detection limit of a few pptv. The system was specifically designed for aircraft use, with the objective of applying it in global aircraft studies of tropospheric chemistry. Studies with the detector are examined.

  13. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Dermal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, Sharif; Mohan, Yedathore; Malik, Asif; Malik, Ghaus; Gonik, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Congenital dermal sinus (CDS) is an uncommon form of spinal dysraphism. Although postdelivery identification in the neonate is aided by several associated physical examination findings, establishing this diagnosis prenatally has proven to be elusive. Case Report We present a case of CDS where the prenatal findings at 20 weeks gestation led to the diagnosis, which was confirmed postnatally. The associated protrusion of fibrotic membranes through the sinus tract helped in the identification of this lesion prenatally, but created confusion with a more common type of lesion, an open neural tube defect. This is the first case report in the literature describing prenatal diagnosis of fetal CDS. Conclusion Prenatal diagnosis with postnatal confirmation of CDS leads to early intervention, better long-term outcomes, and lesser complications. PMID:26199797

  14. Medicaid reimbursement, prenatal care and infant health.

    PubMed

    Sonchak, Lyudmyla

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of state-level Medicaid reimbursement rates for obstetric care on prenatal care utilization across demographic groups. It also uses these rates as an instrumental variable to assess the importance of prenatal care on birth weight. The analysis is conducted using a unique dataset of Medicaid reimbursement rates and 2001-2010 Vital Statistics Natality data. Conditional on county fixed effects, the study finds a modest, but statistically significant positive relationship between Medicaid reimbursement rates and the number of prenatal visits obtained by pregnant women. Additionally, higher rates are associated with an increase in the probability of obtaining adequate care, as well as a reduction in the incidence of going without any prenatal care. However, the effect of an additional prenatal visit on birth weight is virtually zero for black disadvantaged mothers, while an additional visit yields a substantial increase in birth weight of over 20 g for white disadvantaged mothers. PMID:26355229

  15. Prenatal management of disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Chitty, Lyn S; Chatelain, Pierre; Wolffenbuttel, Katja P; Aigrain, Yves

    2012-12-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) rarely present prenatally but, as they are very complex conditions, management should be directed by highly specialised medical teams to allow consideration of all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and ethical issues. In this brief review, we present an overview of the prenatal presentation and management of DSD, including the sonographic appearance of normal genitalia and methods of determining genetic sex, the prenatal management of pregnancies with the unexpected finding of genital ambiguity on prenatal ultrasound and a review of the prenatal management of pregnancies at high risk of DSD. As this is a rapidly developing field, management options will change over time, making the involvement of clinical geneticists, paediatric endocrinologists and urologists, as well as fetal medicine specialists, essential in the care of these complex pregnancies. The reader should also bear in mind that local social, ethical and legal aspects may also influence management. PMID:23131529

  16. Prenatal microwave exposure and behavior

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The hypotheses for the initial investigation was based on the idea that failure to observe structural teratogenesis following microwave exposure did not preclude the possibility that such exposure would result in behavioral changes. We also proposed that such exposure might specifically alter some aspect of thermoregulatory behavior. The results of these studies support both of these hypotheses. Whether the studies show enhanced thermal sensitivity or enhanced development, they do support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to microwave radiation is more likely to alter postnatal sensitivity to thermally related stimuli or conditions as compared to stimuli that are thermally neutral.

  17. Prenatal Stress, Prematurity, and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the United States and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced "premature asthma." Prenatal stress may cause not only abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring TH2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: interleukin 6 (IL-6), which has been associated with premature labor, can promote TH2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing "premature asthma." If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common comorbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (eg, from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health. PMID:26676148

  18. Demystified … Nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Stuart-Smith, K

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) demonstrated that cells could communicate via the manufacture and local diffusion of an unstable lipid soluble molecule. Since the original demonstration of the vascular relaxant properties of endothelium derived NO, this fascinating molecule has been shown to have multiple, complex roles within many biological systems. This review cannot hope to cover all of the recent advances in NO biology, but seeks to place the discovery of NO in its historical context, and show how far our understanding has come in the past 20 years. The role of NO in mitochondrial respiration, and consequently in oxidative stress, is described in detail because these processes probably underline the importance of NO in the development of disease. PMID:12456772

  19. Observations of Lower Thermospheric Nitric Oxide from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    The production of nitric oxide is a key response of the upper atmosphere to solar energy deposition. NO plays a strong role in the thermospheric energy balance as it emits efficiently in the infrared, it is the terminal ion in the lower ionosphere, and if transported to lower altitudes will catalytically destroy ozone. NO is primarily produced through the reaction of excited atomic nitrogen with molecular oxygen. One of the primary loss mechanisms of NO is photodissociation by solar ultraviolet irradiance. In order to produce the excited atomic nitrogen atom, the strong N2 molecular bond must be broken. At low latitudes, solar soft X-ray irradiance is the energy source that leads to NO. At high latitudes, auroral electrons and the energetic secondary electrons provide the source of energy that leads to the large amounts of NO observed there. Coupling between latitude regions may occur as high latitude NO is transported by winds to lower latitude. In this talk we describe observations of NO from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE). SNOE observed fluorescently scattered sunlight by NO at 215 and 237 nm to obtain global concentrations of NO in the lower thermosphere daily from February 1998 through December 2003. We will present case studies of the observed response to large auroral storms. In particular, the effects of the large storms of April 2002 and November 2003 will be presented. The SNOE observations show that auroral energy deposition produces a significant global effect on the upper atmosphere.

  20. Prenatal Exposure to Traffic-related Air Pollution and Risk of Early Childhood Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Jo Kay C.; Heck, Julia E.; Cockburn, Myles; Su, Jason; Jerrett, Michael; Ritz, Beate

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy has been linked to the risk of childhood cancer, but the evidence remains inconclusive. In the present study, we used land use regression modeling to estimate prenatal exposures to traffic exhaust and evaluate the associations with cancer risk in very young children. Participants in the Air Pollution and Childhood Cancers Study who were 5 years of age or younger and diagnosed with cancer between 1988 and 2008 were had their records linked to California birth certificates, and controls were selected from birth certificates. Land use regression–based estimates of exposures to nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxides were assigned based on birthplace residence and temporally adjusted using routine monitoring station data to evaluate air pollution exposures during specific pregnancy periods. Logistic regression models were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, educational level, parity, insurance type, and Census-based socioeconomic status, as well as child's sex and birth year. The odds of acute lymphoblastic leukemia increased by 9%, 23%, and 8% for each 25-ppb increase in average nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxide levels, respectively, over the entire pregnancy. Second- and third-trimester exposures increased the odds of bilateral retinoblastoma. No associations were found for annual average exposures without temporal components or for any other cancer type. These results lend support to a link between prenatal exposure to traffic exhaust and the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bilateral retinoblastoma. PMID:23989198

  1. Prenatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and risk of early childhood cancers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Jo Kay C; Heck, Julia E; Cockburn, Myles; Su, Jason; Jerrett, Michael; Ritz, Beate

    2013-10-15

    Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy has been linked to the risk of childhood cancer, but the evidence remains inconclusive. In the present study, we used land use regression modeling to estimate prenatal exposures to traffic exhaust and evaluate the associations with cancer risk in very young children. Participants in the Air Pollution and Childhood Cancers Study who were 5 years of age or younger and diagnosed with cancer between 1988 and 2008 were had their records linked to California birth certificates, and controls were selected from birth certificates. Land use regression-based estimates of exposures to nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxides were assigned based on birthplace residence and temporally adjusted using routine monitoring station data to evaluate air pollution exposures during specific pregnancy periods. Logistic regression models were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, educational level, parity, insurance type, and Census-based socioeconomic status, as well as child's sex and birth year. The odds of acute lymphoblastic leukemia increased by 9%, 23%, and 8% for each 25-ppb increase in average nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxide levels, respectively, over the entire pregnancy. Second- and third-trimester exposures increased the odds of bilateral retinoblastoma. No associations were found for annual average exposures without temporal components or for any other cancer type. These results lend support to a link between prenatal exposure to traffic exhaust and the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bilateral retinoblastoma. PMID:23989198

  2. Prenatal diagnosis and obstetric management.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Pat; Nugent, Mae; Khalil, Asma

    2015-10-01

    Conjoined twins are rare, representing 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 200,000 live births, and the prognosis is generally poor. Accurate prenatal diagnosis by an experienced multidisciplinary team using a combination of imaging modalities allows parents to make fully informed choices. This may include termination of pregnancy, which is easier and safer at the earlier gestations at which diagnosis is now being made; continuing with the pregnancy but accepting that only palliative care is appropriate after birth; or planned intensive care and separation of the twins after birth. Delivery will invariably be by cesarean section in order to minimize the risk of peripartum harm to both mother and babies. PMID:26382256

  3. Prenatal cannibalism in an insect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Thomas; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2007-06-01

    Host selection and infection strategies of parasitoids often correlate with high parental investment and low numbers of progeny. In this study, we investigate how additional internal mechanisms might shape brood size and fitness of the offspring. Emblemasoma auditrix is a parasitoid fly in which about 38 larvae hatch simultaneously in utero. After host location, a single larva is deposited into the host, where it rapidly develops and pupates after about 5 days. The search for hosts can take several weeks, and during that time, the larvae arrest their development and remain in the first larval instar. Nevertheless, the larvae increase in weight within the uterus, and this growth correlates to a decrease in the number of larvae, although no larvae are deposited. Thus, our data indicate a first case of prenatal cannibalism in an invertebrate with larvae feeding on each other within the uterus of the adult.

  4. Genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Genetic counseling (and prenatal diagnosis) provides parents with the knowledge to make intelligent, informed decisions regarding possible pregnancy and its outcome. If a pregnancy occurs the couple may want to evaluate the ...

  5. Prenatal Methamphetamine Exposure Linked with Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... a sequence of effects following prenatal exposure to cocaine, a stimulant similar to methamphetamine. Identifying such problems ...

  6. Improving Prenatal Care for Minority Women.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Susan; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; OʼConnor, Caitlin; Gibeau, Anne M; Nadel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Since the inception of prenatal care in the early 1900s, the focus of care has been on risk reduction rather than on health promotion. Prenatal care began as individualized care, but more recently group prenatal care has been shown to be very successful in improving birth outcomes. For all women, an emphasis on improving health behaviors is important at this critical time while women are engaging regularly with the healthcare system. An emphasis on mental health promotion may decrease some of the disparities in birth outcomes that are well documented between minority and majority women, as minority women are known to experience increased levels of stress, anxiety, and depression. Providing support for pregnant women and incorporating knowledge and skills through prenatal care may promote both physical and mental health in minority women. PMID:26854915

  7. Prenatal Care for the 80s

    PubMed Central

    Mohide, P. T.

    1981-01-01

    Despite improvements in the last decade, Canada's perinatal mortality rate is still higher than those of many other developed countries. Consumer expectations have increased not only for a good outcome, but also a more personal and humane process. The physician has to make a decision to be involved in prenatal care. Appropriate steps are suggested for initial assessment, genetic evaluation, and ongoing prenatal care. PMID:21289752

  8. Chemiluminescence of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Rusch, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the intensities of the delta and gamma bands of nitric oxide in the nighttime terrestrial thermosphere are presented and used to infer the rate coefficient for the transition from the C 2 Pi to the A 2 Sigma + states. The nightglow spectrum was observed between 1900 and 2300 A at a resolution of 15 A by a rocket-borne scanning 1/4-m spectrometer pointing north at an apogee of 150 km. Progressions of the delta, gamma and epsilon bands are identified on the spectra by the construction of synthetic spectra, and the contributions of resonance fluorescence to the total band intensities are calculated. Finally, the ratio of the sum of the gamma bands for v-prime = 0 to the sum of the delta bands for v-prime = 0 is used to derive a branching ratio of 0.21 + or - 0.04 to the A 2 Sigma + state, which yields a probability for the C-A transition of 5.6 + or - 1.5 x to the 6th/sec.

  9. Biotransformation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K; Kasama, K

    1987-01-01

    Previous investigations into the health effects of nitrogen oxides (NOx) have mostly been conducted with special reference to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and its direct effects on the respiratory system, while the study of nitric oxide (NO) has been disregarded. We carried out a study on NO by exposing rats and mice to 15NO or administering 15N-nitrite and 15N-nitrate to these animals by IP injection in order to elucidate the metabolic fate of NO. The results of our study and previous findings led us to assume that the major metabolic path of inhaled NO is as follows: inhaled NO reacts with hemoglobin, forming nitrosyl-hemoglobin (NOHb), and from NOHb, nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) are generated. Major quantities of NO3- are discharged into the urine and a certain amount is discharged into the oral cavity through the salivary glands and transformed to NO2-. Part of this NO2- is converted to N2 gas in the stomach. Nitrate in the intestine is partly reduced to ammonia (NH3) through NO2-, reabsorbed into the body, and converted to urea. Most of the metabolites of inhaled NO are excreted rapidly from the body within 48 hr. PMID:3665863

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of 45,X/46,XX

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.Y.F.

    1996-03-01

    I read with great interest the paper on {open_quotes}Prenatal Diagnosis of 45,X/46,XX mosaicism and 45,X: Implications for Postnatal Outcome{close_quotes} by Koeberl et al. They reported their experience with 12 prenatally diagnosed cases of 45,X/46,XX mosaicism and made a clinical comparison between those 12 cases and their own 41 postnatally diagnosed cases of 45,X/46,XX mosaicism. As expected, they found an overall milder phenotypic manifestation in the prenatal cases than in the postnatal ones. These authors report a lack of previous prognostic information on this type of prenatally diagnosis of mosaicism and offer their findings to fill this need. However, considerable information on this topic has been published. There have been >200 prenatally diagnosed cases of 45,X/46,XX. According to my data on 189 cases with a prenatal diagnosis of 45,X/46,XX mosaicism (Hsu 1992), there are 114 cases with available information on phenotypic outcome. Of these, 12 (10.5%) were reported to have some features of Turner syndrome, 4 had other anomalies probably not related to Turner syndrome, and 2 resulted in stillbirth. The overall rate for an abnormal phenotype in this category was thus 16/114 (14.03%). However, we must realize that, even in patients with a nonmosaic 45,X complement, the major features of Turner syndrome, such as short stature and sexual infantilism, are manifested only later in childhood or in adolescence. 3 refs.

  11. Nitrones are able to release nitric oxide in aqueous environment under hydroxyl free radical attack.

    PubMed

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Ibolya, Fülöp; Pop, Maria Cristiana; Dergez, Timea; Mitroi, Brânduşa; Dogaru, Maria Titica; Tokés, Béla

    2011-10-30

    Importance of a nitric oxide donor that can act as a spin trap might bring some new therapeutic possibilities regarding the treatment of ischemic diseases by reducing the intensity of free radical produced reperfusion lesions. These substances might be also used as a new type of photo protectors since they can absorb UV radiation, capture free radicals formed by interaction of UV radiation with tissue constituents, and tanning of the skin will be permitted due to nitric oxide release. The purpose of this work was to measure the ability of nitrones to release nitric oxide and how different factors (temperature, nitrone concentration, and free radicals) influence the releasing ability. Mostly, indirect determination of nitric oxide was carried out, by measuring nitrite and nitrate amounts (as decomposition products of nitric oxide), all nitrones proved to release significant amounts of nitric oxide. Nitrite measurements were made based on an HPLC-VIS method that uses pre-column derivatization of nitrite by forming an azo dye (limit of quantification: 5ng/ml). No good correlation was found between the amount of nitric oxide and temperature for most studied nitrones but between the formation of nitric oxide and nitrone concentration an asymptotic correlation was found. Fenton reagent also yielded formation of nitric oxide from nitrones and formed amounts were not different from those recorded for UV irradiation. Most of the nitrones effectively released about 0.5% of the maximum amount of nitric oxide that is chemically possible and estimated concentrations of 0.1μM were present in the solutions during decomposition. PMID:21645628

  12. Nitric oxide as an antioxidant

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, J.; Harel, S.; Granit, R. )

    1991-08-15

    Benzoate monohydroxy compounds, and in particular salicylate, were produced during interaction of ferrous complexes with hydrogen peroxide (Fenton reaction) in a N2 environment. These reactions were inhibited when Fe complexes were flushed, prior to the addition in the model system, by nitric oxide. Methionine oxidation to ethylene by Fenton reagents was also inhibited by nitric oxide. Myoglobin in several forms such as metmyoglobin, oxymyoglobin, and nitric oxide-myoglobin were interacted with an equimolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Spectra changes in the visible region and the changes in membrane (microsomes) lipid peroxidation by the accumulation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) were determined. The results showed that metmyoglobin and oxymyoglobin were activated by H2O2 to ferryl myoglobin, which initiates membrane lipid peroxidation; but not nitric oxide-myoglobin, which, during interaction with H2O2, did not form ferryl but metmyoglobin which only poorly affected lipid peroxidation. It is assumed that nitric oxide, liganded to ferrous complexes, acts to prevent the prooxidative reaction of these complexes with H2O2.

  13. Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon and prenatal counseling: a case series.

    PubMed

    Beissel, Anne; Riou, Stéphanie; Fischer Fumeaux, Céline Julie; Cassart, Marie; Blanc, Sébastien; Claris, Olivier; Guibaud, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon can be encountered in the perinatal period. No consensus exists regarding prenatal management. We report one prenatal case leading to therapeutic abortion and one neonatal case, successfully treated by a multimodal therapy. Prenatal counseling should include the possibility of neonatal multimodal treatment that can lead to favorable outcomes. PMID:27386131

  14. Prenatal pharmacogenomics: a promising area for research.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, E H; Cheng, E Y; Hebert, M F; Thummel, K E; Burke, W

    2016-08-01

    Clinical applications of prenatal genetic screening currently focus on detection of aneuploidy and other genetic diseases in the developing fetus. Growing evidence suggests that the fetal genome may also be informative about fetal exposures through contributions to placental transport as well as placental and fetal metabolism. Possible clinical applications of prenatal pharmacogenomic screening include prospective optimization of medication selection and dosage, as well as retrospective assessment of whether a fetus was previously exposed to significant risk. Newly available noninvasive methods of prenatal genetic screening mean that relevant fetal genotypes could be made available to obstetricians for use in management of a current pregnancy. This promising area for research merits more attention than it has thus far received.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 10 May 2016; doi:10.1038/tpj.2016.33. PMID:27168097

  15. Women's experience of group prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Novick, Gina; Sadler, Lois S; Kennedy, Holly Powell; Cohen, Sally S; Groce, Nora E; Knafl, Kathleen A

    2011-01-01

    Group prenatal care (GPNC) is an innovative alternative to individual prenatal care. In this longitudinal study we used ethnographic methods to explore African American and Hispanic women's experiences of receiving GPNC in two urban clinics. Methods included individual, in-depth, semistructured interviews of women and group leaders in GPNC, participant observation of GPNC sessions, and medical record review. GPNC offered positive experiences and met many of women's expressed preferences regarding prenatal care. Six themes were identified, which represented separate aspects of women's experiences: investment, collaborative venture, a social gathering, relationships with boundaries, learning in the group, and changing self. Taken together, the themes conveyed the overall experience of GPNC. Women were especially enthusiastic about learning in groups, about their relationships with group leaders, and about having their pregnancy-related changes and fears normalized; however, there were also important boundaries on relationships between participants, and some women wished for greater privacy during physical examinations. PMID:20693516

  16. Prenatal chromosomal microarray for the Catholic physician

    PubMed Central

    Bringman, Jay J.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal chromosomal microarray (CMA) is a test that is used to diagnose certain genetic problems in the fetus. While the test has been used in the pediatric setting for several years, it is now being introduced for use in the prenatal setting. The test offers great hope for detection of certain genetic defects in the fetus so that early intervention can be performed to improve the outcome for that individual. As with many biotechnical advances, CMA comes with certain bioethical issues that need to be addressed prior to its implementation. This paper is intended to provide guidance to all those that provide counseling regarding genetic testing options during pregnancy. PMID:24899750

  17. Hydronephrosis: prenatal and postnatal evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dennis B; Armstrong, William R; Maizels, Max

    2014-09-01

    Antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH) is one of the most frequently detected abnormalities found on routine prenatal ultrasounds, affecting 1% to 4.5% of all pregnancies. Despite its prevalence, there continues to be uncertainty regarding the clinical impact after birth. Prognosis depends on the severity of the dilation. Expectant prenatal management is the rule with fetal intervention rarely needed in a few select cases. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction and vesicoureteral reflux are the most common postnatal diagnoses. A renal and bladder ultrasound is essential in the follow-up of patients with ANH and helps dictate further investigation with voiding cystourethrography and/or diuretic renography. PMID:25155734

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of a paraurethral cyst.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Clark T; Millard, Sarah E; Wang, Ming-Hsien; Ehsanipoor, Robert M

    2013-02-01

    Paraurethral cysts arising from Skene's gland are a rare cause of urogenital masses in the neonate. We report the case of a pelvic mass noted at the vaginal introitus on prenatal ultrasound that following delivery was found to be a paraurethral cyst. On prenatal ultrasound, there was no evidence of involvement of the urinary, gastrointestinal, or upper genital tract. Serial ultrasounds demonstrated slight enlargement of the cyst without other changes. The patient delivered at 33 weeks and postnatal evaluation demonstrated a paraurethral cyst. The cyst was managed expectantly and drained spontaneously on the second day of life with complete resolution. PMID:23146295

  19. Prenatal diagnosis and assessment of congenital spinal anomalies: Review for prenatal counseling

    PubMed Central

    Upasani, Vidyadhar V; Ketwaroo, Pamela Deaver; Estroff, Judy A; Warf, Benjamin C; Emans, John B; Glotzbecker, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen continuous advances in prenatal ultrasonography and in utero magnetic resonance imaging. These technologies have increasingly enabled the identification of various spinal pathologies during early stages of gestation. The purpose of this paper is to review the range of fetal spine anomalies and their management, with the goal of improving the clinician’s ability to counsel expectant parents prenatally. PMID:27458551

  20. Prenatal diagnosis and assessment of congenital spinal anomalies: Review for prenatal counseling.

    PubMed

    Upasani, Vidyadhar V; Ketwaroo, Pamela Deaver; Estroff, Judy A; Warf, Benjamin C; Emans, John B; Glotzbecker, Michael P

    2016-07-18

    The last two decades have seen continuous advances in prenatal ultrasonography and in utero magnetic resonance imaging. These technologies have increasingly enabled the identification of various spinal pathologies during early stages of gestation. The purpose of this paper is to review the range of fetal spine anomalies and their management, with the goal of improving the clinician's ability to counsel expectant parents prenatally. PMID:27458551

  1. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  2. An update on current prenatal testing options: first trimester and noninvasive prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Latendresse, Gwen; Deneris, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal genetic testing is rapidly evolving and requires that prenatal care providers stay up-to-date with accurate, evidence-based knowledge. Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), first trimester maternal serum markers, and fetal nuchal translucency are the most recently developed screening tests added to the testing repertoire for detection of chromosomal disorders such as trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). NIPT is a new, highly accurate technique that uses maternal serum and is rapidly being introduced as a first trimester screening tool and increasingly being requested by pregnant women. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that all pregnant women be offered first and second trimester screening options, regardless of risk status, but does not yet recommend NIPT. It is important for prenatal care providers to be aware of and understand these testing options in order to assist women and their families in making well-informed decisions during pregnancy. The purpose of this article is to update midwives and other prenatal care providers on the current prenatal genetic testing options available and how to appropriately offer and discuss them with their clients. We discuss how these tests work; what to do with the results; and most importantly, how to support and communicate accurate information to women and families as they navigate through an increasingly complicated array of testing choices. PMID:25712277

  3. Ethical Considerations in Prenatal Sex Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Leslie Doty

    2005-01-01

    Developments in assisted reproductive technologies have made it possible for couples to select the sex of a child prenatally. This article used the NASW Code of Ethics and information from the Ethics Committee of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine to consider ethical dilemmas related to social justice (for example, reinforcement of…

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of amniotic band syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Laxmi Devi; Hamza, Zareena V; Thampi, Madhavan Venugopalan; Nampoothiri, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic band can cause a broad spectrum of anomalies ranging from simple band constrictions to major craniofacial and visceral defects. It can cause significant neonatal morbidity. Accurate diagnosis will help in the management of the present pregnancy and in counseling with regard to future pregnancies. Here we report three cases of amniotic band syndrome detected in the prenatal period. PMID:27081225

  5. Prenatal care in your first trimester

    MedlinePlus

    ... first visit, your doctor or midwife will draw blood for a group of tests known as the prenatal panel. These tests are done to find problems or infections early in the pregnancy. ... blood count (CBC) Blood typing (including Rh screen) Rubella ...

  6. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed,…

  7. MALDI-TOF MS in Prenatal Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiao Yan; Holzgreve, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Summary Prenatal diagnosis aims either to provide the reassurance to the couples at risk of having an affected child by timely appropriate therapy or to give the parents a chance to decide the fate of the unborn babies with health problems. Invasive prenatal diagnosis (IPD) is accurate, however, carrying a risk of miscarriage. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) has been developed based on the existing of fetal genetic materials in maternal circulation; however, a minority fetal DNA in majority maternal background DNA hinders the detections of fetal traits. Different protocols and assays, such as homogenous MassEXTEND (hME), single allele base extension reaction (SABER), precise measuring copy number variation of each allele, and quantitative methylation and expression analysis using the high-throughput sensitive matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), allow NIPD for single gene disorders, fetal blood group genotyping and fetal aneuploidies as well as the development of fetal gender-independent biomarkers in maternal circulation for management of pathological pregnancies. In this review, we summarise the use of MALDI-TOF MS in prenatal genomics. PMID:21049077

  8. Psychiatric Conditions Associated with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Mary J.; Paley, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Since the identification of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) over 35 years ago, mounting evidence about the impact of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy has prompted increased attention to the link between prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) and a constellation of developmental disabilities that are characterized by physical, cognitive, and…

  9. Noninvasive Prenatal Molecular Karyotyping from Maternal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Stephanie C. Y.; Jiang, Peiyong; Choy, Kwong W.; Chan, Kwan Chee Allen; Won, Hye-Sung; Leung, Wing C.; Lau, Elizabeth T.; Tang, Mary H. Y.; Leung, Tak Y.; Lo, Yuk Ming Dennis; Chiu, Rossa W. K.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal DNA is present in the plasma of pregnant women. Massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA has been used to detect fetal trisomies 21, 18, 13 and selected sex chromosomal aneuploidies noninvasively. Case reports describing the detection of fetal microdeletions from maternal plasma using massively parallel sequencing have been reported. However, these previous reports were either polymorphism-dependent or used statistical analyses which were confined to one or a small number of selected parts of the genome. In this report, we reported a procedure for performing noninvasive prenatal karyotyping at 3 Mb resolution across the whole genome through the massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA. This method has been used to analyze the plasma obtained from 6 cases. In three cases, fetal microdeletions have been detected successfully from maternal plasma. In two cases, fetal microduplications have been detected successfully from maternal plasma. In the remaining case, the plasma DNA sequencing result was consistent with the pregnant mother being a carrier of a microduplication. Simulation analyses were performed for determining the number of plasma DNA molecules that would need to be sequenced and aligned for enhancing the diagnostic resolution of noninvasive prenatal karyotyping to 2 Mb and 1 Mb. In conclusion, noninvasive prenatal molecular karyotyping from maternal plasma by massively parallel sequencing is feasible and would enhance the diagnostic spectrum of noninvasive prenatal testing. PMID:23613765

  10. Ionizing radiation and the conceptus: neurophysiologic effects of prenatal X-radiation on offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    A brief review of the literature precedes the presentation of a radiation behavioral teratology study. The various types of radiation and the units of measure used in radiation biology are discussed. The concept of the radiation-induced teratogenic ''triad'' of growth retardation, malformation, and death is presented. A discussion of stage- and dose-dependent sensitivity to prenatal irradiation is followed by an introduction to behavioral teratology as a new interdisciplinary area of investigation, emphasizing postnatal psychophysiologic analyses of the effects of prenatal exposure. In the present study, rats were exposed to an acute dosage level of 0.6 Gy (60 RAD) X-radiation on day 9 or 17 of gestation. The neonates were given five neonatal reflex tests, observed for the appearance of four physiologic markers, and, as young adults, subjected to three of six behavioral tests. The irradiated offspring exhibited retarded postnatal growth and altered reflex and behavioral activity. These results indicate that irradiation at a dosage level which does not cause overt morphologic malformations at birth does result in altered postnatal growth and psychophysiologic development.

  11. Prenatal depression effects and interventions: a review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2010-12-01

    This review covers research on the negative effects of prenatal depression and cortisol on fetal growth, prematurity and low birthweight. Although prenatal depression and cortisol were typically measured at around 20 weeks gestation, other research suggests the stability of depression and cortisol levels across pregnancy. Women with Dysthymia as compared to Major Depression Disorder had higher cortisol levels, and their newborns had lower gestational age and birthweight. The cortisol effects in these studies were unfortunately confounded by low serotonin and low dopamine levels which in themselves could contribute to non-optimal pregnancy outcomes. The negative effects of depression and cortisol were also potentially confounded by comorbid anxiety, by demographic factors including younger age, less education and lower SES of the mothers and by the absence of a partner or a partner who was unhappy about the pregnancy or a partner who was depressed. Substance use (especially caffeine use) was still another risk factor. All of these problems including prenatal depression, elevated cortisol, prematurity and low birthweight and even postpartum depression have been reduced by prenatal massage therapy provided by the women's partners. Massage therapy combined with group interpersonal psychotherapy was also effective for reducing depression and cortisol levels. Several limitations of these studies were noted and suggestions for future research included exploring other predictor variables like progesterone/estriol ratios, immune factors and genetic determinants. Further research is needed both on the potential use of cortisol as a screening measure and the use of other therapies that might reduce prenatal depression and cortisol in the women and prematurity and low birthweight in their infants. PMID:20471091

  12. [Nitric oxide production in plants].

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Urszula

    2007-01-01

    There are still many controversial observations and opinions on the cellular/subcellular localization and sources of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis in plant cells. NO can be produced in plants by non-enzymatic and enzymatic systems depending on plant species, organ or tissue as well as on physiological state of the plant and changing environmental conditions. The best documented reactions in plant that contribute to NO production are NO production from nitrite as a substrate by cytosolic (cNR) and membrane bound (PM-NR) nitrate reductases (NR), and NO production by several arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase-like activities (NOS). The latest papers indicate that mitochondria are an important source of arginine- and nitrite-dependent NO production in plants. There are other potential enzymatic sources of NO in plants including xanthine oxidoreductase, peroxidase, cytochrome P450. PMID:18399354

  13. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N₂O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c₅₅₁ as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa₃, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  14. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening

    PubMed Central

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  15. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening.

    PubMed

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-11-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  16. Effect of Prenatal Hypoxia in Transgenic Mouse Models of Preeclampsia and Fetal Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Clausen, C. F.; Thambiraj, D. F.; Poudel, R.; Davidge, S. T.; Baker, P. N.

    2014-01-01

    Mice lacking endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS− /−) or catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT−/−) exhibit a preeclampsia-like phenotype and fetal growth restriction. We hypothesized that a hypoxic insult would result in a more severe phenotype. Pregnant eNOS−/−, COMT−/− and control (C57BL/6J) mice were randomized to hypoxic (10.5% O2) or normal conditions (20.9% O2) from gestational day 10.5 to 18.5. Hypoxia increased the blood pressure in all genotypes and proteinuria in C57BL/6J and eNOS−/− mice. Fetal survival was significantly reduced following hypoxia, particularly in eNOS−/− mice. Birth weight was decreased in both C57BL/6J and COMT−/− mice. Placentas from COMT−/− mice demonstrated increased peroxynitrite. Despite similar hypoxia-induced effects on maternal blood pressure and proteinuria, eNOS−/− embryos have a decreased tolerance to hypoxia. Compared to C57BL/6J, COMT−/− mice exhibited less severe changes in proteinuria and fetal growth when exposed to prenatal hypoxia. This relative resistance to prenatal hypoxia was associated with a significant increase in placental levels of peroxynitrite. PMID:24084523

  17. Nitric oxide function in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthys, K. E.

    1997-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process in the intima of conduit arteries, which disturbs the endothelium-dependent regulation of the vascular tone by the labile liposoluble radical nitric oxide (NO) formed by the constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). This defect predisposes to coronary vasospasm and cardiac ischaemia, with anginal pain as the typical clinical manifestation. It is now appreciated that endothelial dysfunction is an early event in atherogenesis and that it may also involve the microcirculation, in which atherosclerotic lesions do not develop. On the other hand, the inflammatory environment in atherosclerotic plaques may result in the expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) isozyme. Whether the dysfunction in endothelial NO production is causal to, or the result of, atherosclerotic lesion formation is still highly debated. Most evidence supports the hypothesis that constitutive endothelial NO release protects against atherogenesis e.g. by preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation and leukocyte adhesion. Nitric oxide generated by the inducible isozyme may be beneficial by replacing the failing endothelial production but excessive release may damage the vascular wall cells, especially in combination with reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:18472828

  18. Neoplasms in young dogs after perinatal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Williams, J.S.; Brewster, R.D.; Long, R.I.

    1986-08-01

    For a study of the life-time effects of irradiation during development, 1,680 beagles were given single, whole-body exposures to /sup 60/Co gamma-radiation at one of three prenatal (preimplantation, embryonic, and fetal) or at one of three postnatal (neonatal, juvenile, and young adult) ages. Mean doses were 0, 0.16, or 0.83 Gy. For comparison with data on childhood cancer after prenatal irradiation, examination was made of tumors occurring in young dogs in this life-span experiment. Up to 4 years of age, 18 dogs had neoplasms diagnosed, 2 of these being in controls. Four dogs that were irradiated in the perinatal (late fetal or neonatal) period died of cancers prior to 2 years of age. This risk was of significant increase compared to the risks for other experimental groups and for the canine population in general. Overall, 71% (5 of 7) of all cancers and 56% (10 of 18) of all benign and malignant neoplasms seen in the first 4 years of life occurred in 29% (480 of 1680) of the dogs irradiated in the perinatal period. These data suggest an increased risk for neoplasia after perinatal irradiation in dogs.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of central nervous system abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Angtuaco, E E; Angtuaco, T L; Angtuaco, E J

    1994-01-01

    Fetal anomalies have been the subject of innumerable publications both in the prenatal and neonatal literature. This has significantly increased in the last 10 years, mainly because of the advent of high-resolution ultrasound equipment and improvement of scanning techniques. In addition, guidelines issued by professional organizations involved in prenatal diagnosis have encouraged a more universal approach to the imaging and documentation of prenatal findings. The fetal central nervous system is the most frequently investigated organ system, mainly because of its easy accessibility and prominence even in the early stages of embryologic development. The biparietal diameter was the first fetal measurement to be widely used in determining gestational age. As investigators gained more experience, the appearance of ultrasound images achieved the resolution that allows direct comparisons with gross specimens and more recent sophisticated techniques of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Now endovaginal ultrasound can document early first trimester development and compare it to known embryologic landmarks. Interest in demonstrating the ultrasound counterpart of central nervous system structures in the early stages of development has resulted in a plethora of articles proving the unique ability of ultrasound in imaging the developing fetus. In view of all these developments, the beginning ultrasound specialist is faced with the challenge and responsibility not only of being familiar with the literature but also of the mastery of scanning techniques that allow accurate prenatal diagnosis. It is therefore helpful to review key developmental milestones in embryologic life and correlate them with the corresponding prenatal ultrasound appearance. In addition, the changing appearance of the developing fetus has created a need for a systematic approach in the evaluation of structures so routine protocols can be established. This has been the subject of other

  20. Nitric acid recovery from waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A. S.

    1959-04-14

    The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

  1. NITRIC ACID RECPVERY FROM WASTE COLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A.S.

    1959-04-14

    The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acids ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of rutheniuim.

  2. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  3. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Salvemini, D; Marino, M H

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), derived from L-arginine (L-Arg) by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is involved in acute and chronic inflammatory events. In view of the complexity associated with the inflammatory response, the dissection of possible mechanisms by which NO modulates this response will be profitable in designing novel and more efficacious NOS inhibitors. In this review we describe the consequences associated with the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and its therapeutic implications. PMID:15991919

  4. Religious Traditions and Prenatal Genetic Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rebecca Rae

    2009-01-01

    Members of organized religious groups may look to their faith traditions for guidance regarding the moral implications of prenatal diagnosis and intervention. Many denominations have doctrinal statements relevant to these deliberations. In this paper, common spiritual issues arising in the genetic counseling encounter are described. Representative doctrinal positions, derived from the responses of 31 U.S. religious denominations to a survey relating to prenatal genetic counseling, are given. Because the long-term adjustment of patients may be dependent in part on their ability to reconcile their actions with their faith traditions, genetic counselors best serve their patients when they invite discussion of matters of faith. Unless invited, patients may assume these topics are ‘off limits’ or that care providers are indifferent to their beliefs. Although genetics professionals ought not assume the role of spiritual advisor, a working knowledge of doctrinal approaches should help counselors frame the issues, and avoid missteps. PMID:19170093

  5. Teaching prenatal ultrasound to family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Dresang, Lee T; Rodney, William MacMillan; Dees, Jason

    2004-02-01

    Prenatal ultrasound is a powerful diagnostic tool, but there has been little research on how to teach ultrasound to family physicians. The available evidence supports teaching through didactics followed by supervised scanning. Didactic topics include physics and machine usage, indications, fetal biometry, anatomic survey, practice management, ethical issues, and resources. Supervised scanning reinforces the didactic components of training. A "hand-on-hand" supervised scanning technique is recommended for the transmission of psychomotor skills in these sessions. Curricula for teaching ultrasound should include information on which residents will be taught prenatal ultrasound, who will teach them, how to create time for learning ultrasound skills, and how to test for competency. The literature suggests that competency can be achieved within 25-50 supervised scans. Measures of competency include examination and qualitative analysis of scanning. Competency-based testing needs further development because no uniform standards have been established. PMID:14872356

  6. Astaxanthin improves behavioral disorder and oxidative stress in prenatal valproic acid-induced mice model of autism.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Md Mamun; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Khan, Fazlur Rahman; Zaman, Fahmida; Mahmud Reza, Hasan

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to valproic acid on gestational day 12.5 may lead to the impaired behavior in the offspring, which is similar to the human autistic symptoms. To the contrary, astaxanthin shows neuroprotective effect by its antioxidant mechanism. We aimed to (i) develop mice model of autism and (ii) investigate the effect of astaxanthin on such model animals. Valproic acid (600 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to the pregnant mice on gestational day 12.5. Prenatal valproic acid-exposed mice were divided into 2 groups on postnatal day 25 and astaxanthin (2mg/kg) was given to the experimental group (VPA_AST, n=10) while saline was given to the control group (VPA, n=10) for 4 weeks. Behavioral test including social interaction, open field and hot-plate were conducted on postnatal day 25 and oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation, advanced protein oxidation product, nitric oxide, glutathione, and activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase were estimated on postnatal day 26 to confirm mice model of autism and on postnatal day 56 to assess the effect of astaxanthin. On postnatal day 25, prenatal valproic acid-exposed mice exhibited (i) delayed eye opening (ii) longer latency to respond painful stimuli, (iii) poor sociability and social novelty and (iv) high level of anxiety. In addition, an increased level of oxidative stress was found by determining different oxidative stress markers. Treatment with astaxanthin significantly (p<0.05) improved the behavioral disorder and reduced the oxidative stress in brain and liver. In conclusion, prenatal exposure to valproic day in pregnant mice leads to the development of autism-like features. Astaxanthin improves the impaired behavior in animal model of autism presumably by its antioxidant activity. PMID:25732953

  7. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  8. Prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Evans, Neil P; Bellingham, Michelle; Robinson, Jane E

    2016-07-01

    It is now well recognized that the gestational environment can have long-lasting effects not only on the life span and health span of an individual but also, through potential epigenetic changes, on future generations. This article reviews the "prenatal programming" of the neuroendocrine systems that regulate reproduction, with a specific focus on the lessons learned using ovine models. The review examines the critical roles played by steroids in normal reproductive development before considering the effects of prenatal exposure to exogenous steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens, the effects of maternal nutrition and stress during gestation, and the effects of exogenous chemicals such as alcohol and environment chemicals. In so doing, it becomes evident that, to maximize fitness, the regulation of reproduction has evolved to be responsive to many different internal and external cues and that the GnRH neurosecretory system expresses a degree of plasticity throughout life. During fetal life, however, the system is particularly sensitive to change and at this time, the GnRH neurosecretory system can be "shaped" both to achieve normal sexually differentiated function but also in ways that may adversely affect or even prevent "normal function". The exact mechanisms through which these programmed changes are brought about remain largely uncharacterized but are likely to differ depending on the factor, the timing of exposure to that factor, and the species. It would appear, however, that some afferent systems to the GnRH neurons such as kisspeptin, may be critical in this regard as it would appear to be sensitive to a wide variety of factors that can program reproductive function. Finally, it has been noted that the prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function can be associated with epigenetic changes, which would suggest that in addition to direct effects on the exposed offspring, prenatal programming could have transgenerational effects on

  9. Cerebral ultrasound images in prenatal cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Tomà, P; Magnano, G M; Mezzano, P; Lazzini, F; Bonacci, W; Serra, G

    1989-01-01

    A male newborn with prenatal cytomegalovirus infection was referred for cranial ultrasound. The cranial ultrasound demonstrated areas of increased echogenicity in the thalamic and gray nuclei resembling "a branched candlestick". Doppler technique located the "branched candlestick" along the thalamostriate arteries. This image is particularly interesting because to our knowledge it has never before been described in congenital cytomegalovirus infection, but only in congenital rubella. PMID:2550848

  10. In defense of prenatal genetic interventions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2014-09-01

    Jürgen Habermas has argued against prenatal genetic interventions used to influence traits on the grounds that only biogenetic contingency in the conception of children preserves the conditions that make the presumption of moral equality possible. This argument fails for a number of reasons. The contingency that Habermas points to as the condition of moral equality is an artifact of evolutionary contingency and not inviolable in itself. Moreover, as a precedent for genetic interventions, parents and society already affect children's traits, which is to say there is moral precedent for influencing the traits of descendants. A veil-of-ignorance methodology can also be used to justify prenatal interventions through its method of advance consent and its preservation of the contingency of human identities in a moral sense. In any case, the selection of children's traits does not undermine the prospects of authoring a life since their future remains just as contingent morally as if no trait had been selected. Ironically, the prospect of preserving human beings as they are--to counteract genetic drift--might even require interventions to preserve the ability to author a life in a moral sense. In light of these analyses, Habermas' concerns about prenatal genetic interventions cannot succeed as objections to their practice as a matter of principle; the merits of these interventions must be evaluated individually. PMID:23025348

  11. Urinary biomarkers in prenatally diagnosed unilateral hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mia Gebauer; Nørregaard, Rikke; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Jørgensen, Troels Munch

    2011-04-01

    The introduction of prenatal ultrasonography as a screening method entails an increasing number of infants diagnosed with prenatal hydronephrosis. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction accounts for 35% of prenatal hydronephrotic cases. Urinary tract obstruction that occurs during early kidney development affects renal morphogenesis, maturation and growth, and in the most severe cases this will ultimately cause renal insufficiency. A major challenge in the clinical management of these patients is to preserve renal function by selection of the 15%-20% who require early surgical intervention, leaving those for whom watchful waiting may be appropriate because of spontaneous resolution/stabilization without significant loss of renal function. Today, this requires medical surveillance, including repetitive invasive diuretic renograms relying on arbitrary threshold values, and therefore there is a need for non-arbitrary, non-invasive urinary biomarkers that may be used as predictors for renal structural changes and/or decreasing renal function, and thereby provide the surgeon with more clear indications for surgical intervention. In this review, we summarize the currently well-known facts about urinary biomarkers in ureteropelvic junction obstruction concerning renal function, and we also suggest potential novel urinary biomarkers. PMID:21220211

  12. The Epigenetic Effects of Prenatal Cadmium Exposure.

    PubMed

    Vilahur, Nadia; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to the highly toxic and common pollutant cadmium has been associated with adverse effects on child health and development. However, the underlying biological mechanisms of cadmium toxicity remain partially unsolved. Epigenetic disruption due to early cadmium exposure has gained attention as a plausible mode of action, since epigenetic signatures respond to environmental stimuli and the fetus undergoes drastic epigenomic rearrangements during embryogenesis. In the current review, we provide a critical examination of the literature addressing prenatal cadmium exposure and epigenetic effects in human, animal, and in vitro studies. We conducted a PubMed search and obtained eight recent studies addressing this topic, focusing almost exclusively on DNA methylation. These studies provide evidence that cadmium alters epigenetic signatures in the DNA of the placenta and of the newborns, and some studies indicated marked sexual differences for cadmium-related DNA methylation changes. Associations between early cadmium exposure and DNA methylation might reflect interference with de novo DNA methyltransferases. More studies, especially those including environmentally relevant doses, are needed to confirm the toxicoepigenomic effects of prenatal cadmium exposure and how that relates to the observed health effects of cadmium in childhood and later life. PMID:25960943

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of proximal focal femoral deficiency: Literature review of prenatal sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Valentina; Pasquali, Gaia; Squarcella, Antonia; Marcoccia, Eleonora; Filippis, Angela De; Gatto, Silvia; Camilla, Aliberti; Pizzuti, Antonio; Torre, Renato La; Giancotti, Antonella

    2016-05-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a rare musculoskeletal malformation that occurs in 0.11-0.2 per 10,000 live births. This congenital anomaly involves the pelvis and proximal femur with widely variable manifestations, from mild femoral shortening and hypoplasia to the absence of any functional femur and acetabular aplasia. Prenatal diagnosis of PFFD is still a challenge, but early recognition of this malformation could provide useful information to both parents and physicians concerning management and therapeutic planning. For this review, we analyzed all the cases of prenatally diagnosed PFFD that were reported in the literature from 1990 to 2014 and provide a description of the most common prenatal sonographic findings. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:252-259, 2016. PMID:26408260

  14. Study of Atmospheric Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of energetic nitrogen atoms to the production of nitric oxide in the thermosphere and their influence on the infrared emission spectrum. The nitric oxide molecules are important contributors to the cooling of the atmosphere. We first pointed out that in determining the energy distribution of the nitrogen atoms, it is important to take into account the thermal motion of the atmospheric gases. It had been ignored in all earlier studies. The source spectra are broadened considerably by the center of mass motion of the reactants. We worked out the consequences for the production of nitric oxide at night, using as sources of energetic N atoms, NO(+) + e yield N + O, N(D-2) + O yield N + O. The high energy tail is enhanced by orders of magnitude. We had earlier suggested (Sharma et al. 1993) that the reaction of energetic nitrogen atoms with O2 was responsible for the rotationally enhanced NO identified in the infrared spectrum. Our calculations provided quantitative confirmation of the suggestion. We proceeded to explore the validity of another approximation used in earlier analyses, the hard sphere approximation for the energy loss in elastic collisions. We carried out precise quantum mechanical calculations of the elastic 2 differential scattering of nitrogen atoms in collisions with oxygen atoms and showed that although the hard sphere approximation was nowhere of high precision, reasonable results could be obtained with an effective cross section of 6 x 10(exp 15)sq cm. We also initiated a program to include inelastic energy loss processes in the determination of the energy distribution function. We began a calculation of the rotation and vibrational excitation cross sections of molecular nitrogen and nitrogen atoms and developed a method for including inelastic energy loss as a function of scattering angle in the Boltzmann equation. A procedure for obtaining the solution of the Boltzman equation was worked out.

  15. Nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Deckel, A W

    2001-04-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active inorganic molecule produced when the semiessential amino acid l-arginine is converted to l-citrulline and NO via the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NO is known to be involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, such as control of blood flow, platelet adhesion, endocrine function, neurotransmission, neuromodulation, and inflammation, to name only a few. During neuropathological conditions, the production of NO can be either protective or toxic, dependent on the stage of the disease, the isoforms of NOS involved, and the initial pathological event. This paper reviews the properties of NO and NOS and the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD). It discusses ways in which NO and NOS may interact with the protein product of HD and reviews data implicating NOS in the neuropathology of HD. This is followed by a synthesis of current information regarding how NO/NOS may contribute to HD-related pathology and identification of areas for potential future research. PMID:11288139

  16. Novel effects of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, K. L.; Martin, E.; Turko, I. V.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a simple free radical gas, elicits a surprisingly wide range of physiological and pathophysiological effects. NO interacts with soluble guanylate cyclase to evoke many of these effects. However, NO can also interact with molecular oxygen and superoxide radicals to produce reactive nitrogen species that can modify a number of macromolecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. NO can also interact directly with transition metals. Here, we have reviewed the non--3',5'-cyclic-guanosine-monophosphate-mediated effects of NO including modifications of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

  17. Localized cell stimulation by nitric oxide using a photoactive porous coordination polymer platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diring, Stéphane; Wang, Dan Ohtan; Kim, Chiwon; Kondo, Mio; Chen, Yong; Kitagawa, Susumu; Kamei, Ken-Ichiro; Furukawa, Shuhei

    2013-10-01

    Functional cellular substrates for localized cell stimulation by small molecules provide an opportunity to control and monitor cell signalling networks chemically in time and space. However, despite improvements in the controlled delivery of bioactive compounds, the precise localization of gaseous biomolecules at the single-cell level remains challenging. Here we target nitric oxide, a crucial signalling molecule with site-specific and concentration-dependent activities, and we report a synthetic strategy for developing spatiotemporally controllable nitric oxide-releasing platforms based on photoactive porous coordination polymers. By organizing molecules with poor reactivity into polymer structures, we observe increased photoreactivity and adjustable release using light irradiation. We embed photoactive polymer crystals in a biocompatible matrix and achieve precisely controlled nitric oxide delivery at the cellular level via localized two-photon laser activation. The biological relevance of the exogenous nitric oxide produced by this strategy is evidenced by an intracellular change in calcium concentration, mediated by nitric oxide-responsive plasma membrane channel proteins.

  18. Localized cell stimulation by nitric oxide using a photoactive porous coordination polymer platform

    PubMed Central

    Diring, Stéphane; Wang, Dan Ohtan; Kim, Chiwon; Kondo, Mio; Chen, Yong; Kitagawa, Susumu; Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Furukawa, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    Functional cellular substrates for localized cell stimulation by small molecules provide an opportunity to control and monitor cell signalling networks chemically in time and space. However, despite improvements in the controlled delivery of bioactive compounds, the precise localization of gaseous biomolecules at the single-cell level remains challenging. Here we target nitric oxide, a crucial signalling molecule with site-specific and concentration-dependent activities, and we report a synthetic strategy for developing spatiotemporally controllable nitric oxide-releasing platforms based on photoactive porous coordination polymers. By organizing molecules with poor reactivity into polymer structures, we observe increased photoreactivity and adjustable release using light irradiation. We embed photoactive polymer crystals in a biocompatible matrix and achieve precisely controlled nitric oxide delivery at the cellular level via localized two-photon laser activation. The biological relevance of the exogenous nitric oxide produced by this strategy is evidenced by an intracellular change in calcium concentration, mediated by nitric oxide-responsive plasma membrane channel proteins. PMID:24158008

  19. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as... sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as impurities, when offered for transportation or transported by rail... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section...

  20. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as... sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as impurities, when offered for transportation or transported by rail... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section...

  1. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as... sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as impurities, when offered for transportation or transported by rail... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section...

  2. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as... sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as impurities, when offered for transportation or transported by rail... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section...

  3. Compensatory Feto-Placental Upregulation of the Nitric Oxide System during Fetal Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Pisaneschi, Silvia; Strigini, Francesca A. L.; Sanchez, Angel M.; Begliuomini, Silvia; Casarosa, Elena; Ripoli, Andrea; Ghirri, Paolo; Boldrini, Antonio; Fink, Bruno; Genazzani, Andrea R.; Coceani, Flavio; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2012-01-01

    Background Fetal Growth Restriction is often associated with a feto-placental vascular dysfunction conceivably involving endothelial cells. Our study aimed to verify this pathogenic role for feto-placental endothelial cells and, coincidentally, demonstrate any abnormality in the nitric oxide system. Methods Prenatal assessment of feto-placental vascular function was combined with measurement of nitric oxide (in the form of S-nitrosohemoglobin) and its nitrite byproduct, and of the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine. Umbilical vein endothelial cells were also harvested to determine their gene profile. The study comprised term pregnancies with normal (n = 40) or small-for-gestational-age (n = 20) newborns, small-for-gestational-age preterm pregnancies (n = 15), and bi-chorial, bi-amniotic twin pregnancies with discordant fetal growth (n = 12). Results Umbilical blood nitrite (p<0.001) and S-nitrosohemoglobin (p = 0.02) rose with fetal growth restriction while asymmetric dimethylarginine decreased (p = 0.003). Nitrite rise coincided with an abnormal Doppler profile from umbilical arteries. Fetal growth restriction umbilical vein endothelial cells produced more nitrite and also exhibited reciprocal changes in vasodilator (upwards) and vasoconstrictor (downwards) transcripts. Elevation in blood nitrite and S-nitrosohemoglobin persisted postnatally in the fetal growth restriction offspring. Conclusion Fetal growth restriction is typified by increased nitric oxide production during pregnancy and after birth. This response is viewed as an adaptative event to sustain placental blood flow. However, its occurrence may modify the endothelial phenotype and may ultimately represent an element of risk for cardiovascular disease in adult life. PMID:23028913

  4. Prenatal stress alters amygdala functional connectivity in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Lacadie, Cheryl; Sze, Gordon; Sinha, Rajita; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal and early-life stress results in alterations in neural connectivity and an increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. In particular, alterations in amygdala connectivity have emerged as a common effect across several recent studies. However, the impact of prenatal stress exposure on the functional organization of the amygdala has yet to be explored in the prematurely-born, a population at high risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. We test the hypothesis that preterm birth and prenatal exposure to maternal stress alter functional connectivity of the amygdala using two independent cohorts. The first cohort is used to establish the effects of preterm birth and consists of 12 very preterm neonates and 25 term controls, all without prenatal stress exposure. The second is analyzed to establish the effects of prenatal stress exposure and consists of 16 extremely preterm neonates with prenatal stress exposure and 10 extremely preterm neonates with no known prenatal stress exposure. Standard resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and seed connectivity methods are used. When compared to term controls, very preterm neonates show significantly reduced connectivity between the amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the brainstem, and the insula (p < 0.05). Similarly, when compared to extremely preterm neonates without exposure to prenatal stress, extremely preterm neonates with exposure to prenatal stress show significantly less connectivity between the left amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, and the peristriate cortex (p < 0.05). Exploratory analysis of the combined cohorts suggests additive effects of prenatal stress on alterations in amygdala connectivity associated with preterm birth. Functional connectivity from the amygdala to other subcortical regions is decreased in preterm neonates compared to term controls. In addition, these data, for the first time, suggest that prenatal stress exposure amplifies these

  5. Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.

    2005-10-04

    A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

  6. Prenatal Estrogens and the Development of Homosexual Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the hypothesis that prenatal estrogens contribute to the development of human sexual orientation. Several groups of women with a history of prenatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) were compared with several samples of control women. Findings showed that more DES-exposed women than controls were rated as bisexual or homosexual,…

  7. Does Rural Residence Affect Access to Prenatal Care in Oregon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Beth; Grant, Therese; Schiff, Melissa; Kasehagen, Laurin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying how maternal residential location affects late initiation of prenatal care is important for policy planning and allocation of resources for intervention. Purpose: To determine how rural residence and other social and demographic characteristics affect late initiation of prenatal care, and how residence status is associated…

  8. Prenatal Smoking Exposure, Low Birth Weight, and Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Breslau, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Prenatal problems are among theorized etiologies for child disruptive behavior problems. A key question concerns whether etiological contributors are shared across the broad range of disruptive psychopathology or are partially or largely distinct. Method: We examined prenatal smoking exposure and low birth weight as risk factors for…

  9. Triangular congenital cataract morphology associated with prenatal methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Michael E; Schloff, Susan; Bothun, Erick D

    2009-08-01

    Bilateral congenital cataracts are often characterized by morphology, etiology, and related conditions. We report a case of unique congenital cataracts with triangular morphology and associated prenatal methamphetamine exposure. Although this association is likely coincidental, the cataract's morphology in light of the specific timing of prenatal drug use deserves reporting. PMID:19464935

  10. Memory and Brain Volume in Adults Prenatally Exposed to Alcohol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Claire D.; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Chen, Xiangchuan; Kable, Julie A.; Johnson, Katrina C.; Hu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    The impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on memory and brain development was investigated in 92 African-American, young adults who were first identified in the prenatal period. Three groups (Control, n = 26; Alcohol-related Neurodevelopmental Disorder, n = 36; and Dysmorphic, n = 30) were imaged using structural MRI with brain volume calculated for…

  11. Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Depression and Cortisol Influences Infant Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Hobel, Calvin; Chicz-Demet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence indicates that prenatal maternal and fetal processes can have a lasting influence on infant and child development. Results from animal models indicate that prenatal exposure to maternal stress and stress hormones has lasting consequences for development of the offspring. Few prospective studies of human pregnancy…

  12. Prenatal Care: A Content-Based ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassel, Elissa Anne

    A content-based curriculum in English as a Second Language (ESL) focusing on prenatal self-care is presented. The course was designed as a solution to the problem of inadequate prenatal care for limited-English-proficient Mexican immigrant women. The first three sections offer background information on and discussion of (1) content-based ESL…

  13. Long-term behavioral consequences of prenatal MDMA exposure.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Valerie B; Heiman, Justin; Chambers, James B; Benoit, Stephen C; Buesing, William R; Norman, Mantana K; Norman, Andrew B; Lipton, Jack W

    2009-03-23

    The current study sought to determine whether prenatal 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine (MDMA) exposure from E14-20 in the rat resulted in behavioral sequelae in adult offspring. Prenatal MDMA exposure results in increased dopaminergic fiber density in the prefrontal cortex, striatum and nucleus accumbens of young rats. Since these areas are critical in response to novelty, reward, attention and locomotor activity, we hypothesized that prenatal MDMA exposure would produce significant changes in the performance of tasks that examine such behaviors in adult rats. Adult rats prenatally exposed to MDMA exhibited greater activity and spent more time in the center during a novel open field test as compared to controls. This increased activity was not reflected in normal home cage activity. Prenatal exposure to MDMA did not affect feeding or food reward. It did not alter cocaine self-administration behaviors, nor did it have an effect on the locomotor response to amphetamine challenge. Finally, while prenatal MDMA did not affect performance in the radial arm maze or the Morris water maze (MWM), these animals demonstrated altered performance in a cued MWM paradigm. Prenatal MDMA exposure resulted in perseverative attendance to a hanging cue when the platform in the MWM was removed as compared to controls. Together, these data demonstrate that prenatal exposure to MDMA results in a behavioral phenotype in adult rats characterized by reduced anxiety, a heightened response to novelty, and "hyperattentiveness" to environmental cues during spatial learning. PMID:19162054

  14. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Infant Information Processing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Sandra W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A total of 403 black, inner-city infants born to women recruited prenatally on basis of their alcohol consumption during pregnancy were assessed on a battery of tests focusing on information processing and complexity of play. Increased prenatal alcohol exposure was associated with longer fixation duration, a result indicative of less efficient…

  15. Prenatal Imaging of the Gastrointestinal Tract with Postnatal Imaging Correlation.

    PubMed

    Blask, Anna Nussbaum; Fagen, Kimberly

    2016-03-01

    Prenatal detection of a wide variety of anomalies and masses of the gastrointestinal tract is now possible. Prenatal imaging with ultrasonography and in selected cases magnetic resonance imaging provides invaluable information to the referring obstetrician, the maternal fetal medicine specialist, the neonatologist and pediatrician who will care for the child after birth, the surgeons and pediatric specialists who will repair or manage a prenatally detected anomaly, and of course to the parents, allowing them to prepare psychologically and financially for the specific interventions that may be needed for their child. Additional screening for associated anomalies can take place, route of delivery can be decided, and arrangements for delivery in an appropriate setting can be made. Prenatal detection also allows for consideration for pregnancy termination. This article will give a broad overview of anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract that can be detected prenatally and their imaging appearance postnatally. PMID:26086457

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of osteochondrodysplasias in high risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gordienko IYu; Grechanina EYa; Sopko, N I; Tarapurova, E N; Mikchailets, L P

    1996-05-01

    We collected data on 39 prenatally diagnosed osteochondrodysplasias. We detected 30 (76.9%) cases in the first and second trimesters, including 18 (46.2%) with two twins before the 24th week of gestation. Of 39 cases 11 (28.2%) had osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II. Verification of the prenatal diagnosis was attempted in 26 cases on the basis of the data obtained from ultrasonographs, radiographs, external examination, and autopsy protocols. The prenatal diagnosis was confirmed in 19 (73%) fetuses. In 13 cases verification was not possible because one or several investigations could not be performed. Counselling followed all identified cases with osteochondrodysplasia. We present the pedigree of two families indicating the possibility of early prenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis type I and metatropic dysplasia. We propose indications for ultrasonographic anatomical screening with subsequent phenotype analysis in high risk pregnancy to provide for the prenatal detection of malformations and hereditary diseases. PMID:8723093

  17. Sociodemographic factors and the quality of prenatal care.

    PubMed Central

    Hansell, M J

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, maternal sociodemographic factors are examined in relationship to the quality of prenatal health services US women receive. METHODS: Data from the 1980 National Natality Survey and 1980 Fetal Mortality Survey were used for the analysis. Indicator variables for prenatal care quality are the percentages of prenatal visits at which blood pressure and urine were tested, the performance of hemoglobin or hematocrit tests, and the presence or absence of advice regarding salt restriction and diuretics usage during pregnancy. RESULTS: Distribution of the basic examinations in prenatal care vary according to marital status, parity, education, and residence in a metropolitan or nonmetropolitan county. The advice received concerning salt and diuretics usage was also influenced by sociodemographic variables. CONCLUSIONS: The analyses reveal that prenatal care is not of even minimally acceptable quality for many women. PMID:1953875

  18. Social Behavior of Offspring Following Prenatal Cocaine Exposure in Rodents: A Comparison with Prenatal Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Sobrian, Sonya K.; Holson, R. R.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and experimental reports suggest that prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) alters the offsprings’ social interactions with caregivers and conspecifics. Children exposed to prenatal cocaine show deficits in caregiver attachment and play behavior. In animal models, a developmental pattern of effects that range from deficits in play and social interaction during adolescence, to aggressive reactions during competition in adulthood is seen. This review will focus primarily on the effects of PCE on social behaviors involving conspecifics in animal models. Social relationships are critical to the developing organism; maternally directed interactions are necessary for initial survival. Juvenile rats deprived of play behavior, one of the earliest forms of non-mother directed social behaviors in rodents, show deficits in learning tasks and sexual competence. Social behavior is inherently complex. Because the emergence of appropriate social skills involves the interplay between various conceptual and biological facets of behavior and social information, it may be a particularly sensitive measure of prenatal insult. The social behavior surveyed include social interactions, play behavior/fighting, scent marking, and aggressive behavior in the offspring, as well as aspects of maternal behavior. The goal is to determine if there is a consensus of results in the literature with respect to PCE and social behaviors, and to discuss discrepant findings in terms of exposure models, the paradigms, and dependent variables, as well as housing conditions, and the sex and age of the offspring at testing. As there is increasing evidence that deficits in social behavior may be sequelae of developmental exposure alcohol, we compare changes in social behaviors reported for prenatal alcohol with those reported for prenatal cocaine. Shortcomings in the both literatures are identified and addressed in an effort to improve the translational value of future experimentation. PMID:22144967

  19. Causes and outcome of prenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Ali; Tahmasebi, Morteza; Gharibvand, Mohammad Momen

    2009-03-01

    Hydronephrosis is the most common abnormal finding in the urinary tract on prenatal screening with ultrasonography (U/S). Hydronephrosis may be obstructive or non-obstructive; obstructive lesions are more harmful to the developing kidneys. The aim of the study was to evaluate the causes of renal pelvic dilatation and the outcome of postnatal treatment in infants with hydronephrosis diagnosed prenatally with U/S. We prospectively studied 67 (60 males) newborns with hydronephrosis diagnosed prenatally and confirmed postnatally with U/S from Sept. 2005 to Oct. 2007. The patients were allocated to three groups based on the mea-surement of the anteroposterior renal pelvic diameter (APRPD) in transverse plane: mild (6-9.9 mm), moderate (10-14.9 mm) and severe (> or =15 mm) hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) was obtained in all of the patients to rule out vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). In cases with negative VUR, Diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) scan with diuretic renography was performed to detect ureteropelvic joint obstruction (UPJO). Twenty two cases (32.8%) had mild, 20 (29.9%) had moderate, and 25 (37.3%) had severe hydronephrosis. The causes of hydroneph-rosis were VUR (40.2%), UPJO (32.8%), posterior urethral valves (PUVs) (13.4 %), and transient hydronephrosis (13.4 %). The lesion was obstructive in 37 (55.2%) infants. Totally, 33 (49.2%) patients with hydronephrosis (9 mild, 9 moderate, and 15 severe) subsequently developed com-plications such as UTI and renal insufficiency, or required surgery. Associated abnormalities were observed in 15 (22.4%) patients. We conclude that every newborn with any degree of hydro-nephrosis should be assessed postnatally for specific diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19237812

  20. Culturally sensitive prenatal care for Southeast Asians.

    PubMed

    Mattson, S; Lew, L

    1992-01-01

    The outreach program for Southeast Asian immigrants, chiefly Cambodians who arrived after 1980, begun by St. Mary Medical CEnter of Long Beach California, called the Southeast Asian Health Project (SEAHP) was evaluated by structured interviews of 199 women. The obstacles to full participation by these Asian immigrants in health care are described at length. They range from illiteracy and abuse in refugee camps to the immense cultural barrier involving philosophy of health to language barriers. The SEAHP Outreach services began with door-to-door canvassing, ads in refugee papers, and meetings in temples. Special educational resource materials were printed covering prenatal care, nutrition, child development, and feeding. Oral classes were held in CAmbodian and Lao with Vietnamese translators, as well as babysitters, transportation, and snacks. Class topics were nutrition, parenting skills, labor and delivery, child development, hygiene, and breast feeding. Training was also given to professional staff. 600 clients in prenatal clinics since 1987, 119 were interviewed by 4 workers fluent in Cambodian and Lao. The women were typical of refugees, only 1/2 were literate in native languages. 49% had delivered babies at home in Asia; 39% had delivered in refugee camp clinics. Women cited several different behaviors as a result of SEAHP classes: intake of milk products, use of food substitutes, food preparation, attendance at regular medical care, child care, and bathing. They said that they felt more comfortable at the clinic, and would recommend that friends go to the clinic for prenatal care. The concept of culture broker, and the role of nurses as culture brokers are discussed. PMID:1564588

  1. Empowering Women's Prenatal Communication: Does Literacy Matter?

    PubMed

    Roter, Debra L; Erby, Lori H; Rimal, Rajiv N; Smith, Katherine C; Larson, Susan; Bennett, Ian M; Cole, Katie Washington; Guan, Yue; Molloy, Matthew; Bienstock, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the impact of an interactive computer program developed to empower prenatal communication among women with restricted literacy skills. A total of 83 women seeing 17 clinicians were randomized to a computer-based communication activation intervention (Healthy Babies Healthy Moms [HBHM]) or prenatal education (Baby Basics [BB]) prior to their prenatal visit. Visit communication was coded with the Roter Interaction Analysis System, and postvisit satisfaction was reported. Participants were on average 24 years of age and 25 weeks pregnant; 80% were African American. Two thirds scored ≤8th grade on a literacy screener. Women with literacy deficits were more verbally active, disclosed more medical and psychosocial/lifestyle information, and were rated as more dominant by coders in the HBHM group relative to their counterparts in the BB group (all ps < .05). Clinicians were less verbally dominant and more patient centered with literate HBHM relative to BB group women (p < .05); there was a similar, nonsignificant trend (p < .1) for lower literate women. Clinicians communicated less medical information and made fewer reassurance statements to lower literate women in the HBHM relative to the BB group (p < .05). There was a trend toward lower visit satisfaction for women with restricted literacy in the HBHM relative to the BB group (p < .1); no difference in satisfaction was evident for more literate women. The HBHM intervention empowered communication of all women and facilitated verbal engagement and relevant disclosure of medical and psychosocial information of women with literacy deficits. Satisfaction, however, tended to be lower for these women. PMID:26513032

  2. Nanocarriers for Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Juliana; Marotta-Oliveira, Samantha S.; Cicillini, Simone Aparecida; Eloy, Josimar de Oliveira; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a promising pharmaceutical agent that has vasodilative, antibacterial, and tumoricidal effects. To study the complex and wide-ranging roles of NO and to facilitate its therapeutic use, a great number of synthetic compounds (e.g., nitrosothiols, nitrosohydroxyamines, N-diazeniumdiolates, and nitrosyl metal complexes) have been developed to chemically stabilize and release NO in a controlled manner. Although NO is currently being exploited in many biomedical applications, its use is limited by several factors, including a short half-life, instability during storage, and potential toxicity. Additionally, efficient methods of both localized and systemic in vivo delivery and dose control are needed. One strategy for addressing these limitations and thus increasing the utility of NO donors is based on nanotechnology. PMID:21869934

  3. Nitric oxide in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Kim, Moon Young

    2015-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives play important roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the liver. Despite its diverse and complicated roles, certain patterns of the effect of NO on the pathogenesis and progression of liver diseases are observed. In general, NO derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) is protective against disease development, while inducible NOS (iNOS)-derived NO contributes to pathological processes. This review addresses the roles of NO in the development of various liver diseases with a focus on recently published articles. We present here two recent advances in understanding NO-mediated signaling - nitrated fatty acids (NO2-FAs) and S-guanylation - and conclude with suggestions for future directions in NO-related studies on the liver. PMID:26027855

  4. Analytical Chemistry of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research, owing primarily to its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. A requirement for understanding its origin, activity, and regulation is the need for accurate and precise measurement techniques. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO’s unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span pM to µM in physiological milieu, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with special focus on the fundamentals behind each technique and approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools or exploited to create novel NO sensors. PMID:20636069

  5. Airway nitric oxide in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, D.; Gustafsson, L.; Hemmingsson, Tryggve; Frostell, C.; Paiva, M.

    2005-10-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO), a molecule with a wide range of biological effects, is found in exhaled gas. Elevation of expired NO is an early sign of airway inflammation in asthma and dust inhalation. Animal experiments have demonstrated a marked increase of expired NO after venous gas emboli (bubbles, VGE), which may occur after decompression in conjunction with extravehicular activity (EVA). For this MAP project, astronauts will perform a simple inhalation-exhalation procedure weekly during their flights, and before and after EVA. Furthermore, the microgravity environment offers a possibility to gain new insights into how and where NO is formed in the lungs and what local effects NO may have there. The planned experiments have been made possible by recent developments of new techniques by the team's industrial partners; Aerocrine has developed a highly compact and accurate NO analyser, and Linde Gas Theapeutics has developed a highly compact device for NO administration in the inhaled air.

  6. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of congenital varicella syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tongsong, Theera; Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee

    2012-01-01

    Congenital varicella syndrome is a rare disorder occurring in less than 1% of maternal varicella during early pregnancy but is associated with high fetal morbidity and mortality. This case report aimed to describe the sonographic features of congenital varicella syndrome following maternal varicella. Well-documented maternal chicken pox was made at 12 weeks of gestation and prenatal ultrasound was performed at 16 weeks. Striking sonographic features included hydropic changes and disseminated calcifications in multiple organs, especially liver and myocardium. Elective termination of pregnancy was done at 17 weeks. The presence of disseminated calcifications could suggest the diagnosis of congenital varicella syndrome. PMID:22323269

  7. Intrauterine temporomandibular joint dislocation: prenatal sonographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Çil, Ahmet Said; Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara

    2014-09-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases are very rare disorders and are usually diagnosed in childhood. Developmental disorders of the TMJ such as hypoplasia, hyperplasia, and aplasia of the TMJ compartments are characterized by TMJ dysfunction. In childhood, these patients experience recurrent dislocation, pain, and malocclusion. We present the case of a 25-week fetus with unilateral TMJ dislocation with fluid retention in the joint diagnosed by ultrasonography. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of TMJ dislocation diagnosed by ultrasonographic evaluation during the prenatal period. PMID:23669613

  8. Prenatal choline and the development of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    FREEDMAN, Robert; ROSS, Randal G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The primary prevention of illness at the population level, the ultimate aim of medicine, seems out of reach for schizophrenia. Schizophrenia has a strong genetic component, and its pathogenesis begins long before the emergence of psychosis, as early as fetal brain development. Cholinergic neurotransmission at nicotinic receptors is a pathophysiological mechanism related to one aspect of this genetic risk. Choline activates these nicotinic receptors during fetal brain development. Dietary supplementation of maternal choline thus emerges as a possible intervention in pregnancy to alter the earliest developmental course of the illness. Aim Review available literature on the relationship of choline supplementation or choline levels during pregnancy and fetal brain development. Methods A Medline search was used to identify studies assessing effects of choline in human fetal development. Studies of other prenatal risk factors for schizophrenia and the role of cholinergic neurotransmission in its pathophysiology were also identified. Results Dietary requirements for choline are high during pregnancy because of its several uses, including membrane biosynthesis, one-carbon metabolism, and cholinergic neurotransmission. Its ability to act directly at high concentrations as a nicotinic agonist is critical for normal brain circuit development. Dietary supplementation in the second and third trimesters with phosphatidyl-choline supports these functions and is associated generally with better fetal outcome. Improvement in inhibitory neuronal functions whose deficit is associated with schizophrenia and attention deficit disorder has been observed. Conclusion Prenatal dietary supplementation with phosphatidyl-choline and promotion of diets rich in choline-containing foods (meats, soybeans, and eggs) are possible interventions to promote fetal brain development and thereby decrease the risk of subsequent mental illnesses. The low risk and short (sixmonth) duration of the

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of ductus arteriosus aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, S; Hutchinson, D P; Sampson, A J

    2015-11-01

    The ductus arteriosus holds major functional importance within the fetal circulation, and anomalies within the ductus arteriosus may interfere with the integrity of the fetal circulation. Ductus arteriosus aneurysm, previously considered a rare lesion, is now a well-reported finding in infancy with some reports describing this finding in the prenatal period. Postnatally, most ductus arteriosus aneurysms resolve spontaneously; however, a small group of infants show complications such as connective-tissue disorders, thrombo-embolism, compression of surrounding thoracic structures and life-threatening spontaneous rupture requiring surgical correction. As such, postnatal assessment in this group is recommended. PMID:27433265

  10. Prenatal and perinatal risk factors of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Meli, Giampiero; Ottl, Birgit; Paladini, Angela; Cataldi, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Schizophrenia could be considered the most severe of all psychiatric disorders. It shows a heterogeneous clinical picture and presents an etiopathogenesis that is not cleared sufficiently. Even if the etiopathogenesis remains a puzzle, there is a scientific consensus that it is an expression of interaction between genotype and environmental factors. In the present article, following a study of literature and the accumulated evidence, the role of prenatal and perinatal factors in the development of schizophrenia will be revised and synthesized. We think that better knowledge of the risk factors could be helpful not only for better comprehension of the pathogenesis but especially to optimize interventions for prevention of the disorder. PMID:22646662

  11. Intrauterine Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation: Prenatal Sonographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Çil, Ahmet Said; Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara

    2014-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases are very rare disorders and are usually diagnosed in childhood. Developmental disorders of the TMJ such as hypoplasia, hyperplasia, and aplasia of the TMJ compartments are characterized by TMJ dysfunction. In childhood, these patients experience recurrent dislocation, pain, and malocclusion. We present the case of a 25-week fetus with unilateral TMJ dislocation with fluid retention in the joint diagnosed by ultrasonography. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of TMJ dislocation diagnosed by ultrasonographic evaluation during the prenatal period. PMID:23669613

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of dicephalic parapagus conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Camuzcuoglu, Hakan; Toy, Harun; Vural, Mehmet; Cece, Hasan; Aydin, Halef

    2010-03-01

    Dicephalic parapagus is a rare anomaly of monochorionic twinning. We present prenatal diagnosis of this anomaly with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. She was at the 19th week of gestation. Even if earlier diagnosis is possible, this was her first examination unfortunately. Baby had two head and a common trunk. This is one of the rarest twinning. Termination of pregnancy is performed and baby is delivered by cesarean section. Imaging findings of the case are illustrated and discussed with the autopsy findings. PMID:19714344

  13. Sensory Processing Disorder in a Primate Model: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study of Prenatal Alcohol and Prenatal Stress Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Mary L.; Moore, Colleen F.; Gajewski, Lisa L.; Larson, Julie A.; Roberts, Andrew D.; Converse, Alexander K.; DeJesus, Onofre T.

    2008-01-01

    Disrupted sensory processing, characterized by over- or underresponsiveness to environmental stimuli, has been reported in children with a variety of developmental disabilities. This study examined the effects of prenatal stress and moderate-level prenatal alcohol exposure on tactile sensitivity and its relationship to striatal dopamine system…

  14. Revised reference model for nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Bailey, P. L.; Craig, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    A nearly global set of data on the nitric acid distribution was obtained for seven months by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The evaluation of the accuracy, precision, and resolution of these data is described, and a description of the major features of the nitric acid distributions is presented. The zonal mean for nitric acid is distributed in a stratospheric layer that peaks near 30 mb, with the largest mixing ratios occurring in polar regions, especially in winter.

  15. Revised reference model for nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, J. C.; Bailey, P. L.; Craig, C. A.

    A nearly global set of data on the nitric acid distribution was obtained for seven months by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The evaluation of the accuracy, precision and resolution of these data is described, and a description of the major features of the nitric acid distributions is presented. The zonal mean for nitric acid is distributed in a stratospheric layer that peaks near 30 mb, with the largest mixing ratios occurring in polar regions, especially in winter.

  16. Sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Houseman, J.; Teixeira, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental study of several sampling tube and probe material compositions and designs aimed at preventing nitric oxide reduction when sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases. A 250,000 Btu/h furnace fired with technical grade methane was used for testing the sampling probes over a wide range of air-fuel mixtures. The results obtained include the finding that the use of stainless steel in probes creates inaccuracies in near-stoichiometric and fuel-rich sampling in hydrocarbon flames. For very fuel-rich flames, water cooling is needed even in quartz probes to prevent significant reduction of nitric oxide.-

  17. Revised reference model for nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Bailey, P. L.; Craig, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A nearly global set of data on the nitric acid distribution was obtained for seven months by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The evaluation of the accuracy, precision, and resolution of these data is described, and a description of the major features of the nitric acid distributions is presented. The zonal mean for nitric acid is distributed in a stratospheric layer that peaks near 30 mb, with the largest mixing ratios occurring in polar regions, especially in winter.

  18. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  20. Noninvasive Prenatal Measurement of the Fetal Genome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H. Christina; Gu, Wei; Wang, Jianbin; Blumenfeld, Yair J.; El-Sayed, Yasser Y.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of prenatal genetic testing requires invasive sampling. Since this poses a risk to the fetus, one must make a decision that weighs the desire for genetic information against the risk of an adverse outcome due to hazards of the testing process. These issues are not required to be coupled, and it would be desirable to discover genetic information about the fetus without incurring a health risk. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to noninvasively sequence the entire prenatal genome. Our results show that molecular counting of parental haplotypes in maternal plasma by shotgun sequencing of maternal plasma DNA allows the inherited fetal genome to be deciphered noninvasively. We also applied the counting principle directly to each allele in the fetal exome by performing exome capture on maternal plasma DNA prior to shotgun sequencing. This approach enables noninvasive exome screening of clinically relevant and deleterious alleles that were paternally inherited or had arisen as de novo germline mutations, and complements the haplotype counting approach to provide a comprehensive view of the fetal genome. Noninvasive determination of the fetal genome may ultimately facilitate the diagnosis of all inherited and de novo genetic disease. PMID:22763444

  1. Environmental noise and human prenatal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    To determine whether chronic exposure to relatively loud noise has demonstrable biological effects in humans, a study was conducted on the effect of mother's exposure to airport noise while pregnant, and of social and biological characteristics of the family upon birthweight and gestation length. The sample of births was drawn from a community located adjacent to an international airport in the U.S., where noise levels had been measured previously. Mother's noise exposure was based upon noise levels near her residence in the community while she was pregnant. Data from 115 births were used, these being from mothers whose noise exposure history was most complete throughout the pregnancy. Using multivariate analysis to correct for family characteristics, the partial correlation coefficient for noise exposure and gestation length was negative, large, and significant in girls (r . -0.49, p less than 0.001). In boys the partial correlation coefficient was also negative but was smaller and did not quite reach statistical significance. Partial correlations with birthweight were smaller in both boys and girls and not significant. These results agree best with previous studies that suggest that noise may reduce prenatal growth. The size of the observed effects may be related to a conservative research design biased towards underestimation, as well as to the real effects of noise upon human prenatal growth.

  2. PRENATAL TCDD IN MICE INCREASES ADULT AUTOIMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, Steven D.; Gogal, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Two immunologically-different mouse strains, C57BL/6 and SNF1, were exposed to a mid-gestation dose of TCDD. The C57BL/6 mouse has a high-affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and is sensitive to TCDD. The SNF1 mouse has a low-affinity AhR but spontaneously develops autoimmune nephritis. Autoreactive Vβ+CD4+17a and Vβ+CD3+ T cells were increased at 24-weeks-of-age in offspring of C57BL/6 mice, more so in females than males. The cytokine IFN-γ was elevated in the females, while IL-10 was elevated in males. Phenotypic changes in B-lineage cells were present in bone marrow and spleen, and circulating autoantibodies were increased after prenatal TCDD. Kidneys of males showed significant anti-IgG and anti-C3 deposition, suggesting early-stage autoimmune disease. The SNF1 offspring similarly showed increased peripheral Vβ+ cells in the females, increased autoantibody production in both sexes, and increased IFN-γ production in females. Male SNF1 mice had increased anti-IgG and anti-C3 deposition in kidneys. Both mouse models therefore showed clear signatures of enhanced autoimmunity after prenatal TCDD. PMID:20728533

  3. Prenatal stress changes learning strategies in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Lars; Bohbot, Veronique D; Wolf, Oliver T

    2012-11-01

    It is well known that stressful experiences may shape hippocampus-dependent learning and memory processes. However, although most studies focused on the impact of stress at the time of learning or memory testing, very little is known about how stress during critical periods of brain development affects learning and memory later in life. In this study, we asked whether prenatal stress exposure may influence the engagement of hippocampus-dependent spatial learning strategies and caudate nucleus-dependent response learning strategies in later life. To this end, we tested healthy participants whose mothers had experienced major negative life events during their pregnancy in a virtual navigation task that can be solved by spatial and response strategies. We found that young adults with prenatal stress used rigid response learning strategies more often than flexible spatial learning strategies compared with participants whose mothers did not experience major negative life events during pregnancy. Individual differences in acute or chronic stress do not account for these findings. Our data suggest that the engagement of hippocampal and nonhippocampal learning strategies may be influenced by stress very early in life. PMID:22605683

  4. Neuroimaging of Children Following Prenatal Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Derauf, Chris; Kekatpure, Minal; Neyzi, Nurunisa; Lester, Barry; Kosofsky, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in MR-based brain imaging methods have provided unprecedented capabilities to visualize the brain. Application of these methods has allowed identification of brain structures and patterns of functional activation altered in offspring of mothers who used licit (e.g., alcohol and tobacco) and illicit (e.g., cocaine, methamphetamine, and marijuana) drugs during pregnancy. Here we review that literature, which though somewhat limited by the complexities of separating the specific effects of each drug from other confounding variables, points to sets of interconnected brain structures as being altered following prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse. In particular, dopamine-rich cortical (e.g., frontal cortex) and subcortical (e.g., basal ganglia) fetal brain structures show evidence of vulnerability to intrauterine drug exposure suggesting that during brain development drugs of abuse share a specific profile of developmental neurotoxicity. Such brain malformations may shed light on mechanisms underlying prenatal drug-induced brain injury, may serve as bio-markers of significant intrauterine drug exposure, and may additionally be predictors of subsequent neuro-developmental compromise. Wider clinical use of these research-based non-invasive methods will allow for improved diagnosis and allocation of therapeutic resources for affected infants, children, and young adults. PMID:19560049

  5. Genomic futures of prenatal screening: ethical reflection.

    PubMed

    Dondorp, W J; Page-Christiaens, G C M L; de Wert, G M W R

    2016-05-01

    The practice of prenatal screening is undergoing important changes as a result of the introduction of genomic testing technologies at different stages of the screening trajectory. It is expected that eventually it will become possible to routinely obtain a comprehensive 'genome scan' of all fetuses. Although this will still take several years, there are clear continuities between present developments and this future scenario. As this review shows, behind the still limited scope of screening for common aneuploidies, a rapid widening of the range of conditions tested for is already taking shape at the invasive testing stage. But the continuities are not just technical; they are also ethical. If screening for Down's syndrome is a matter of providing autonomous reproductive choice, then why would providing the choice to have a full fetal genome scan be something entirely different? There is a clear need for a sustainable normative framework that will have to answer three challenges: the indeterminateness of the autonomy paradigm, the need to acknowledge the future child as an interested stakeholder, and the prospect of broad-scope genomic prenatal screening with a double purpose: autonomy and prevention. PMID:26178686

  6. Noninvasive Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Ahmed; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Yau, Mabel; Barhan, Ariella; Zaidi, Mone; Lo, Y M Dennis; New, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    A major hallmark of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is genital ambiguity noted at birth in affected females, which leads to psychological and psychosexual issues in adult life. Attempts to correct genital ambiguity through surgical intervention have been partially successful. Fetal hyperandrogenemia and genital ambiguity have been shown to be preventable by prenatal administration of low-dose dexamethasone initiated before the 9th week of gestation. In 7 of 8 at-risk pregnancies, the unaffected fetus is unnecessarily exposed to dexamethasone for weeks until the diagnosis of classical CAH is ruled out by invasive procedures. This therapeutic dilemma calls for early prenatal diagnosis so that dexamethasone treatment can be directed to affected female fetuses only. We describe the utilization of cell-free fetal DNA in mothers carrying at-risk fetuses as early as 6 gestational weeks by targeted massively parallel sequencing of the genomic region including and flanking the CYP21A2 gene. Our highly personalized and innovative approach should permit the diagnosis of CAH before genital development begins, therefore restricting the purposeful administration of dexamethasone to mothers carrying affected females. PMID:26683339

  7. Reversibility of heme-nitric oxide reactions for use in an inhaled nitric oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Bhairavi R.; Soller, Babs R.; Rencus, Tal

    1997-06-01

    Nitric Oxide is a simple gaseous compound which serves as a regulatory molecule in a number of physiological processes. Due to its biological role as a potent local vasodilator,there has been widespread interest in the therapeutic use of gaseous nitric oxide a selective pulmonary vasodilator. Our goal is the development of a sensor for the direct and continuous measurement of inhaled nitric oxide concentrations. This study evaluated the reversibility of potential sensing compounds upon reaction with nitric oxide. Previously, absorption spectroscopy was used to study the sensitivity of the Fe II, Fe III and oxygenated forms of three biologically active hemes known to rapidly react with NO: hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c. This study focused on the photo-reversibility of the hem's reaction with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochrome-c in the Fe III state reversibly reacted with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin and myoglobin in the Fe II state non-reversibly reacted with nitric oxide to form an unstable product. Cytochrome-c (FeII) does not react with nitric oxide. The oxy forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin react with nitric oxide to form their respective met forms, unreversible via photolysis. For all reversible reactions, photolysis was gradual and complete within five minutes.

  8. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channel activity in brain cells of adult offspring mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Juan A.; Busso, Dolores; Ramírez, Gigliola; Campos, Marlys; Rigotti, Attilio; Eugenín, Jaime; von Bernhardi, Rommy

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine, the most important neuroteratogen of tobacco smoke, can reproduce brain and cognitive disturbances per se when administered prenatally. However, it is still unknown if paracrine signaling among brain cells participates in prenatal nicotine-induced brain impairment of adult offspring. Paracrine signaling is partly mediated by unopposed channels formed by connexins hemichannels (HCs) and pannexins serving as aqueous pores permeable to ions and small signaling molecules, allowing exchange between the intra- and extracellular milieus. Our aim was to address whether prenatal nicotine exposure changes the activity of those channels in adult mice offspring under control conditions or subjected to a second challenge during young ages: high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet. To induce prenatal exposure to nicotine, osmotic minipumps were implanted in CF1 pregnant mice at gestational day 5 to deliver nicotine bitartrate or saline (control) solutions. After weaning, offspring of nicotine-treated or untreated pregnant mice were fed ad libitum with chow or HFC diets for 8 weeks. The functional state of connexin 43 (Cx43) and pannexin 1 (Panx1) unopposed channels was evaluated by dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices from 11-week-old mice. We found that prenatal nicotine increased the opening of Cx43 HCs in astrocytes, and Panx1 channels in microglia and neurons only if offspring mice were fed with HFC diet. Blockade of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E receptor 1 (EP1), ionotropic ATP receptor type 7 (P2X7) and NMDA receptors, showed differential inhibition of prenatal nicotine-induced channel opening in glial cells and neurons. Importantly, inhibition of the above mentioned enzymes and receptors, or blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 unopposed channels greatly reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and glutamate release from hippocampal slices of prenatally nicotine-exposed offspring. We propose that unregulated gliotransmitter

  9. Effects of prenatal care on maternal postpartum behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Reichman, Nancy E.; Corman, Hope; Schwartz-Soicher, Ofira

    2010-01-01

    Most research on the effectiveness of prenatal care has focused on birth outcomes and has found small or no effects. It is possible, however, that prenatal care is “too little too late” to improve pregnancy outcomes in the aggregate, but that it increases the use of pediatric health care or improves maternal health-related parenting practices and, ultimately, child health. We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing birth cohort study that have been augmented with hospital medical record data to estimate effects of prenatal care timing on pediatric health care utilization and health-related parenting behaviors during the first year of the child’s life. We focus on maternal postpartum smoking, preventive health care visits for the child, and breastfeeding. We use a multi-pronged approach to address the potential endogeneity of the timing of prenatal care. We find that first trimester prenatal care appears to decrease maternal postpartum smoking by about 5 percentage points and increase the likelihood of 4 or more well-baby visits by about 1 percentage point, and that it may also have a positive effect on breastfeeding. These findings suggest that there are benefits to standard prenatal care that are generally not considered in evaluations of prenatal care programs and interventions. PMID:20582158

  10. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use

    PubMed Central

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M.; Hannigan, John H.; Greenwald, Mark K.; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Partridge, Robert T.; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n = 316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use. PMID:20609384

  11. Factors Affecting Improved Prenatal Screening: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Shahhosseini, Zohreh; Arabi, Hoda; Salehi, Azam; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prenatal screening deals with the detection of structural and functional abnormalities in the fetus. Health care providers can minimize unintended pregnancy outcomes by providing proper counseling and performing prenatal screening. The purpose of the present review study is to investigate factors affecting improved prenatal screening. Methods: The present study is a narrative review searching public databases such as Google Scholar and specialized databases such as Pubmed, Magiran, Scientific Information Database, Elsevier, Ovid and Science Direct as well. Using the keywords “prenatal screening”, “fetus health” and “prenatal counseling”, 70 relevant articles published from 1994 to 2014 were selected. After reviewing the abstracts, the full data from 26 articles were ultimately used for writing the present review study. Results: Three general themes emerged from reviewing the studies: health care providers’ skills, clients’ characteristics and ethical considerations, which were the main factors affecting improved prenatal screening. Conclusion: Prenatal screening can be successful if performed by a trained and experienced expert through techniques suitable for the mother’s age. Also simultaneously providing proper counseling and giving a full description of the risks and benefits of the procedures for clients is recommended. PMID:26652091

  12. Prenatal Exposure to Bisphenol A and Phthalates and Infant Neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Yolton, Kimberly; Xu, Yingying; Strauss, Donna; Altaye, Mekibib; Calafat, Antonia M.; Khoury, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and select common phthalates with infant neurobehavior measured at 5 weeks. Methods We compared the concentration of maternal urinary metabolites of bisphenol A and phthalates at two distinct time points in pregnancy (16w, 26w) with scores on the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) at 5 weeks of age in a cohort of 350 mother/infant pairs. Results Prenatal exposure to BPA was not significantly associated with neurobehavioral outcomes at 5 weeks. Significant associations between prenatal exposure to measured phthalates and infant neurobehavioral outcomes differed by type of phthalate and were only seen with exposure measured at 26 weeks. Higher total di-butyl phthalate (DBP) metabolites at 26w was associated with improved behavioral organization evidenced by decreased arousal (p=.04), increased self-regulation (p=.052), and decreased handling (p=.02). In males, higher total di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolites at 26w was associated with more nonoptimal reflexes (p=.02). Conclusion The association between prenatal phthalate exposure and infant neurobehavior differed by type of phthalate and was evident only with exposure measured at 26w. Prenatal exposure to DBP was associated with improved behavioral organization in 5-week-old infants. Prenatal exposure to DEHP was associated with nonoptimal reflexes in male infants. There was no evidence of an association between prenatal BPA exposure and infant neurobehavior. PMID:21854843

  13. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Arpita K; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30-90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells -c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess. PMID:27328820

  14. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Arpita K.; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30–90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells –c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess. PMID:27328820

  15. Making the most of uncertainty: Treasuring exceptions in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Throughout the 20th century, human genetics research was driven by the identification of new variants. As pioneering geneticist William Bateson put it, novel variants were "exceptions" to "treasure". With the rise of human chromosomal analysis in the postwar period, the identification of genetic variants became increasingly significant to clinical and prenatal diagnosis. Human geneticists had long sought a broader sampling of human genetic variation, from a largely "normal" population. The expansion of prenatal diagnosis in the late 20th century offered a new resource for identifying novel genetic variants. In the prenatal diagnostic setting however, many of the exceptions to be treasured were of uncertain clinical significance, which raised anxiety among parents. In the early 1990s, providers reported that specific uncertain results from chorionic villus sampling (CVS) facilitated prenatal diagnoses that were not previously possible. Based on this, some prenatal diagnostic providers began to embrace uncertainty, when properly managed to reduce anxiety, rather than prevent it. The potential to produce uncertainty in prenatal diagnosis grew with whole genome microarray in the 2000s. Rather than outcomes to avoid, or accept as inevitable, providers presented uncertain results as starting points for research to improve the scope prenatal diagnosis, and bring future certainty. PMID:27010571

  16. ELECTROLYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Alter, H.W.; Barney, D.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the treatment of radioactivc waste nitric acid solutions. The nitric acid solution is neutralized with an alkali metal hydroxide in an amount sufficient to precipitate insoluble hydroxides, and after separation of the precipitate the solution is electrolyzed to convert the alkali nitrate formed, to alkali hydroxide, gaseous ammonla and oxygen. The solution is then reusable after reducing the volume by evaporating the water and dissolved ammonia.

  17. Ambiguous genitalia: what prenatal genetic testing is practical?

    PubMed

    Adam, Margaret P; Fechner, Patricia Y; Ramsdell, Linda A; Badaru, Angela; Grady, Richard E; Pagon, Roberta A; McCauley, Elizabeth; Cheng, Edith Y; Parisi, Melissa A; Shnorhavorian, Margarett

    2012-06-01

    Concern for ambiguous genitalia or chromosome-phenotype discordance detected in a prenatal setting has increased over the last two decades. Practitioners faced with this prenatal finding have a variety of genetic tests available to them; however, it is unclear to what extent prenatal testing for disorders of sex development (DSD) is useful or practical. We undertook a retrospective review of the medical records of 140 individuals evaluated through the DSD clinic at Seattle Children's Hospital with birthdates from 01/01/1994 through 08/16/2011 to determine the rate of prenatal detection of ambiguous genitalia in individuals with DSD, what prenatal diagnostic workup was undertaken, and the postnatal outcome, including whether a postnatal genetic diagnosis was confirmed. Of all 140 subjects, 34 (24%) were identified prenatally. The most common postnatal diagnoses were penoscrotal hypospadias with transposition of the scrotum with no known genetic cause (24/140; 17%) and 21-hydroxylase deficiency (20/140; 14%). Apart from these, no single diagnosis comprised more than a few cases. Prenatal diagnostic testing varied widely, from no tests to multiple molecular tests with amniotic fluid hormone concentrations. In the absence of other fetal anomalies or growth retardation on ultrasound, prenatal karyotype with fluorescence in situ hybridization for the SRY gene is the most useful test when ambiguous genitalia is suspected. Further prenatal testing for Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome in 46,XY individuals and congenital adrenal hyperplasia in 46,XX individuals may be considered. However, targeted molecular testing for rare DSD conditions in the absence of a family history of DSD has a low yield. PMID:22581420

  18. Prenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis: contemporary practices in light of the past.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Ana S

    2016-06-01

    The 20th century eugenics movement in the USA and contemporary practices involving prenatal screening (PNS), prenatal diagnosis (PND), abortion and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) share important morally relevant similarities. I summarise some features of the 20th century eugenics movement; describe the contemporary standard of care in the USA regarding PNS, PND, abortion and PGD; and demonstrate that the 'old eugenics' the contemporary standard of care share the underlying view that social resources should be invested to prevent the birth of people with certain characteristics. This comparison makes evident the difficulty of crafting moral arguments that treat some uses of PNS, PND, abortion and PGD as licit and others as illicit. PMID:27161556

  19. Prenatal diagnsis of intracardiac hamartoma and Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gedikbasi, Ali; Oztarhan, Kazim; Yararbas, Kanay; Arslan, Oguz; Yildirim, Dogukan; Oztek, Ibrahim; Ceylan, Yavuz

    2010-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with a higher frequency of heart defects detected prenatally when compared to postnatal reports. The most common heart defects detected prenatally are hypoplastic left heart syndrome and coarctation of the aorta. We report a case involving a fetus at 16 gestational weeks with a septated cystic hygroma located on the neck and head, an interventricular septal mass, a hypoplastic left ventricle due to aortic stenosis, mitral stenosis, and a hypoplastic aortic arch with a karyotype of mos 45, X, [47 cells]/47, XXX [3 cells]. The autopsy findings confirmed our prenatal diagnosis with a final diagnosis of Turner syndrome and congenital cardiac vascular malformation. PMID:20704479

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital renal and urinary tract malformations.

    PubMed

    Hindryckx, A; De Catte, L

    2011-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and the urinary tract are the most common sonographically identified -malformations in the prenatal period. Obstructive uropathies account for the majority of cases. The aim of prenatal diagnosis and management is to detect those anomalies having impact on the prognosis of the affected child and -requiring early postnatal evaluation or treatment to minimize adverse outcomes. In this paper, we summarize the embryology of kidneys and urinary tract, the normal sonographic appearance through-out pregnancy and the prenatal diagnosis of their congenital malformations. PMID:24753862

  1. Recent advances in prenatal screening and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bozzette, Maryann

    2002-11-01

    In any pregnancy, there is an approximate 3% to 5% chance that a fetal complication will occur. The most familiar prenatal diagnostics cannot be performed until the fetus is well into gestation, and most involve invasive procedures along with their inherent risks. In light of these facts, many noninvasive prenatal screening and diagnostic tests have been developed, the newest using recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology in the examination of fetal cells. Through these procedures, genetic coding errors and chromosomal disruptions may be detected. This article discusses the currently available prenatal and screening diagnostic tests for genetic disorders with a focus on the latest technology. PMID:12473913

  2. [Prenatal care in the border city of Tijuana, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Zetina, M; Richardson, V; Avila, H; Caraveo, V E; Salomón, R E; Bacardí, M; Jiménez-Cruz, A

    2000-02-01

    This study was intended to explore the conditions under which prenatal care is delivered in the border city of Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, and to assess the possible associations between that care and neonatal results in terms of birthweight, health of the neonate, and prematurity. Seven hospitals serving persons from different socioeconomic strata were chosen, and between December 1993 and March 1994 interviews were conducted with 279 women who were in the first 24 to 48 hours of puerperium. During the interviews data were collected on socioeconomic level; the mothers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning obstetric health; the mothers' perceptions of access to prenatal care; the quality of prenatal care visits (evaluated in terms of having blood and urine tested and weight and blood pressure measured); and the gynecological and obstetric and health history of the mother. A database was created using the SPSS statistics software package. Possible associations were explored, with prenatal care as the independent variable and various dependent variables, by means of contingency tables and a two-tailed Fisher's exact test. None of the neonates was premature, ill, or had a birthweight of < or = 2,500 g. For this reason it was decided to divide the variable corresponding to birthweight into two groupings, < or = 3,000 g and > 3,000 g. A significant (P < 0.00038) relationship was found between a lack of prenatal care and low birthweight. In addition, a lack of prenatal care was associated with: low family income; the mother's financial dependence on the father; the mother being in an unmarried relationship; little communication with the partner; having no medical insurance; an unwanted pregnancy; and giving delivery at the General Hospital. Out of the total sample of 279 women, 15 (5.4%) had received no prenatal care. None of these 15 women reported they had encountered difficulties that prevented them from obtaining prenatal care, but only 7 of those

  3. Yoga and massage therapy reduce prenatal depression and prematurity.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Medina, Lissette; Delgado, Jeannette; Hernandez, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    Eighty-four prenatally depressed women were randomly assigned to yoga, massage therapy or standard prenatal care control groups to determine the relative effects of yoga and massage therapy on prenatal depression and neonatal outcomes. Following 12 weeks of twice weekly yoga or massage therapy sessions (20 min each) both therapy groups versus the control group had a greater decrease on depression, anxiety and back and leg pain scales and a greater increase on a relationship scale. In addition, the yoga and massage therapy groups did not differ on neonatal outcomes including gestational age and birthweight, and those groups, in turn, had greater gestational age and birthweight than the control group. PMID:22464118

  4. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  5. Hdm2 and Nitric Oxide Radicals Contribute to the P53-Dependent Radioadaptive Response

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Matsumoto, Hideki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to characterize the radioadaptive response at the molecular level. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53-containing cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53-null. Cellular radiation sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. The accumulations of p53, the human homolog of endogenous murine double minute 2 (Hdm2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase were analyzed with Western blotting. Quantification of chromosomal aberrations was estimated by scoring dicentrics per cell. Results: In wtp53 cells, it was demonstrated that the lack of p53 accumulation was coupled with the activation of Hdm2 after low-dose irradiation (0.02 Gy). Although NO radicals were only minimally induced in wtp53 cells irradiated with a challenging irradiation (6 Gy) alone, NO radicals were seen to increase about two- to fourfold after challenging irradiation subsequent to a priming irradiation (0.02 Gy). Under similar irradiation conditions with a priming and challenging irradiation in wtp53 cells, induction of radioresistance and a depression of chromosomal aberrations were observed only in the absence of 5, 5'-(2, 5-Furanidiyl)bis-2-thiophenemethanol (RITA) or Nutlin-3 (p53-Hdm2 interaction inhibitors), aminoguanidine (an inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). On the other hand, in p53 dysfunctional cells, a radioadaptive response was not observed in the presence or absence of those inhibitors. Moreover radioresistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with isosorbide dinitrate (an NO-generating agent) alone. Conclusions: These findings suggest that NO radicals are initiators of the radioadaptive response, acting through the activation of Hdm2 and the depression of p53 accumulations.

  6. Prenatal Screening, Reproductive Choice, and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    One widely held view of prenatal screening (PNS) is that its foremost aim is, or should be, to enable reproductive choice; this is the Pure Choice view. The article critiques this position by comparing it with an alternative: Public Health Pluralism. It is argued that there are good reasons to prefer the latter, including the following. (1) Public Health Pluralism does not, as is often supposed, render PNS more vulnerable to eugenics-objections. (2) The Pure Choice view, if followed through to its logical conclusions, may have unpalatable implications, such as extending choice well beyond health screening. (3) Any sensible version of Public Health Pluralism will be capable of taking on board the moral seriousness of abortion and will advocate, where practicable, alternative means of reducing the prevalence of disease and disability. (4) Public Health Pluralism is at least as well-equipped as the Pure Choice model to deal with autonomy and consent issues. PMID:25521971

  7. Prenatal screening, reproductive choice, and public health.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    One widely held view of prenatal screening (PNS) is that its foremost aim is, or should be, to enable reproductive choice; this is the Pure Choice view. The article critiques this position by comparing it with an alternative: Public Health Pluralism. It is argued that there are good reasons to prefer the latter, including the following. (1) Public Health Pluralism does not, as is often supposed, render PNS more vulnerable to eugenics-objections. (2) The Pure Choice view, if followed through to its logical conclusions, may have unpalatable implications, such as extending choice well beyond health screening. (3) Any sensible version of Public Health Pluralism will be capable of taking on board the moral seriousness of abortion and will advocate, where practicable, alternative means of reducing the prevalence of disease and disability. (4) Public Health Pluralism is at least as well-equipped as the Pure Choice model to deal with autonomy and consent issues. PMID:25521971

  8. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital mesoblastic nephroma.

    PubMed

    Do, A Young; Kim, Jung-Sun; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-Young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mesoblastic nephroma is a rare renal tumor that is diagnosed during pregnancy and is associated with polyhydramnios, prematurity, and neonatal hypertension. Differential diagnoses include Wilms tumor, adrenal neuroblastoma, and other abdominal tumors. We report a case of congenital mesoblastic nephroma detected by prenatal ultrasonography as a large fetal renal mass with polyhydramnios at 32 weeks of gestation. Ultrasonography showed a 6×6-cm complex, solid, hyperechoic, round mass in the right kidney. At 35 weeks of gestation, the patient was admitted with preterm premature rupture of membranes and the baby was delivered vaginally. Postnatal ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a heterogeneous solid mass on the right kidney. At the end of the first week of life, a right nephrectomy was performed and subsequent pathological examination confirmed a cellular variant of congenital mesoblastic nephroma with a high mitotic count. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy was administered. The newborn was discharged in good condition. PMID:26430667

  9. Prenatal development in fishers (Martes pennanti)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frost, H.C.; Krohn, W.B.; Bezembluk, E.A.; Lott, R.; Wallace, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated and quantified prenatal growth of fishers (Martes pennanti) using ultrasonography. Seven females gave birth to 21 kits. The first identifiable embryonic structures were seen 42 d prepartum; these appeared to be unimplanted blastocysts or gestational sacs, which subsequently implanted in the uterine horns. Maternal and fetal heart rates were monitored from first detection to birth. Maternal heart rates did not differ among sampling periods, while fetal hearts rates increased from first detection to birth. Head and body differentiation, visible limbs and skeletal ossification were visible by 30, 23 and 21 d prepartum, respectively. Mean diameter of gestational sacs and crown-rump lengths were linearly related to gestational age (P < 0.001). Biparietal and body diameters were also linearly related to gestational age (P < 0.001) and correctly predicted parturition dates within 1-2 d. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mosaicism and uniparental disomy in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Thomas; Soellner, Lukas; Buiting, Karin; Kotzot, Dieter

    2015-02-01

    Chromosomal mosaicism is the presence of numerous cell lines with different chromosomal complements in the same individual. Uniparental disomy (UPD) is the inheritance of two homologous chromosomes from the same parent. These genetic anomalies arise from errors in meiosis and/or mitosis and can occur independently or in combination. Due to the formation mechanisms of UPD, low-level or undetected mosaicisms are assumed for a significant number of UPD cases. The pre- and postnatal clinical consequences of mosaicism for chromosomal aberrations and/or UPD depend on the gene content of the involved chromosome. In prenatal evaluation of chromosomal mosaicism and UPD, genetic counseling should be offered before any laboratory testing. PMID:25547535

  11. Neural mechanisms in nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, M.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide is hypothesized to be an inhibitory modulator of central sympathetic nervous outflow, and deficient neuronal nitric oxide production to cause sympathetic overactivity, which then contributes to nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension. The biochemical and neuroanatomical basis for this concept revolves around nitric oxide modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission within brainstem vasomotor centers. The functional consequence of neuronal nitric oxide in blood pressure regulation is, however, marked by an apparent conflict in the literature. On one hand, conscious animal studies using sympathetic blockade suggest a significant role for neuronal nitric oxide deficiency in the development of nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension, and on the other hand, there is evidence against such a role derived from 'knock-out' mice lacking nitric-oxide synthase 1, the major source of neuronal nitric oxide.

  12. Prenatal drug exposure: infant and toddler outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bandstra, Emmalee S; Morrow, Connie E; Mansoor, Elana; Accornero, Veronica H

    2010-04-01

    This manuscript provides an overview of the current scientific literature on the impact of maternal drug use, specifically opioids and cocaine, during pregnancy on the acute and long-term outcomes of infants and toddlers from birth through age 3 years. Emphasis with regard to opioids is placed on heroin and opioid substitutes used to treat opioid addiction, including methadone, which has long been regarded as the standard of care in pregnancy, and buprenorphine, which is increasingly being investigated and prescribed as an alternative to methadone. Controlled studies comparing methadone at high and low doses, as well as those comparing methadone with buprenorphine, are highlighted and the diagnosis and management of neonatal abstinence syndrome is discussed. Over the past two decades, attention of the scientific and lay communities has also been focused on the potential adverse effects of cocaine and crack cocaine, especially during the height of the cocaine epidemic in the United States. Herein, the findings are summarized from prospective studies comparing cocaine-exposed with non-cocaine-exposed infants and toddlers with respect to anthropometric growth, infant neurobehavior, visual and auditory function, and cognitive, motor, and language development. The potentially stigmatizing label of the so-called "crack baby" preceded the evidence now accumulating from well-designed prospective investigations that have revealed less severe sequelae in the majority of prenatally exposed infants than originally anticipated. In contrast to opioids, which may produce neonatal abstinence syndrome and infant neurobehavioral deficits, prenatal cocaine exposure appears to be associated with what has been described as statistically significant but subtle decrements in neurobehavioral, cognitive, and language function, especially when viewed in the context of other exposures and the caregiving environment which may mediate or moderate the effects. Whether these early findings may

  13. The role of FISH in prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kulch, P.; Crandall, B.F.; Hsi, C.

    1994-09-01

    FISH provides a cytogenetic technique which is useful in defining de novo translocations, deletions, insertions, and marker chromosomes in prenatal diagnosis. While the cytogenetic interpretation may be improved with FISH, it may not resolve questions concerning prognosis and options which are genetic counseling issues. Two recent cases illustrate this. Case 1 involved a 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype from amniocentesis. 22/50 cells had 46,X/46,X+mar; 28/50 cells had 45,X. The marker was smaller than a G. C banding did not confirm this as a Y. The father`s peripheral blood study was normal and his Y did not resemble the marker. It appeared likely that the marker was a structurally abnormal Y since male external genitalia were detected by fetal ultrasound. FISH using alpha- and classical (DYZ1/DYZ3) satellite Y-specific probes did not identify the marker as a Y. Case 2 was a fetus which had a de novo translocation 46,XX,t(3;11)(q26.3;q21) by amniocentesis and confirmed by UBS. FISH for the number 3 and 11 chromosomes confirmed this rearrangement. The parents were advised of the risk associated with a de novo balanced translocation. The possible prognosis for these two different fetuses was not changed by the FISH analysis. FISH, while helpful, is only one aspect of the studies done to provide more accurate genetic counseling to parents; the pregnancy/family history, fetal ultrasound, other possible prenatal studies and pregnancy outcome from perspective studies compose other important aspects that are not mutually exclusive.

  14. Methodological Issues in Assessing the Impact of Prenatal Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Konijnenberg, Carolien

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal drug exposure is a common public health concern that can result in perinatal complications, birth defects, and developmental disorders. The growing literature regarding the effects of prenatal exposure to specific drugs such as tobacco, alcohol, cocaine, and heroin is often conflicting and constantly changing. This review discusses several reasons why the effects of prenatal drug exposure are so difficult to determine, including variations in dose, timing, duration of exposure, polydrug use, unreliable measures of drug exposure, latent or “sleeper” effects, genetic factors, and socioenvironmental influences. In addition to providing research guidelines, this review also aims to help clinicians and policy makers to identify the strengths and weaknesses in studies investigating the effects of prenatal drug exposure. This knowledge may be used to make better informed decisions regarding the appropriate treatment for pregnant, drug-dependent women and their children. PMID:26604776

  15. Methodological Issues in Assessing the Impact of Prenatal Drug Exposure.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, Carolien

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal drug exposure is a common public health concern that can result in perinatal complications, birth defects, and developmental disorders. The growing literature regarding the effects of prenatal exposure to specific drugs such as tobacco, alcohol, cocaine, and heroin is often conflicting and constantly changing. This review discusses several reasons why the effects of prenatal drug exposure are so difficult to determine, including variations in dose, timing, duration of exposure, polydrug use, unreliable measures of drug exposure, latent or "sleeper" effects, genetic factors, and socioenvironmental influences. In addition to providing research guidelines, this review also aims to help clinicians and policy makers to identify the strengths and weaknesses in studies investigating the effects of prenatal drug exposure. This knowledge may be used to make better informed decisions regarding the appropriate treatment for pregnant, drug-dependent women and their children. PMID:26604776

  16. Development of prenatal screening--A historical overview.

    PubMed

    Cuckle, Howard; Maymon, Ron

    2016-02-01

    The first prenatal screening test to be introduced was based on a single maternal serum marker of neural tube defects. Since then various prenatal screening concepts have been developed, the most successful being Down syndrome risk estimation using multiple serum and ultrasound markers. Today a completely new approach to aneuploidy screening is available based on maternal plasma cell-free DNA testing. This has the potential to markedly improve screening performance but routine testing is currently too expensive in a public health setting. However, it can be cost-effective when used in combination with existing multi-maker tests. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia that can be prevented using soluble low-dose aspirin treatment started before 16 weeks of gestation. Prenatal screening for cardiac abnormalities, fragile X syndrome and recessive genetic disorders is underutilized and public health planners should considered a more widespread application of available methods. PMID:26764253

  17. Prenatal stimulation and postnatal testosterone affects infanticide in female rats.

    PubMed

    Miley, W M; Blustein, J; Kennedy, K

    1982-04-01

    Prenatal handling, prenatal stress, and early postnatal exogeneous testosterone were examined in female rats for their effects on rat pup-killing and pup retrieval. During each of the last 5 days of pregnancy. Long-Evans rats received either 3 minutes of handling, 45 minutes of restraint and intense illumination or remained untouched. Half of the offspring of each group received testosterone from Day 1 after birth to Day 30. In adulthood, animals that received handling prenatally and testosterone postnatally killed pups more rapidly than any other group and a larger proportion did so than in the control groups. Animals not manipulated at any time retrieved pups more rapidly and a larger proportion did so than the combined other groups. The study suggests that prenatal handling interacts with testosterone presented immediately postnatally to increase infanticide in female rats. A variety of perinatal manipulations seem to suppress pup retrieval. PMID:7200619

  18. Impact of prenatal environmental stress on cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Seiji; Hashimoto-Torii, Kazue

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to various types of environmental stress increases susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Given that even subtle perturbations by prenatal environmental stress in the cerebral cortex impair the cognitive and memory functions, this review focuses on underlying molecular mechanisms of pathological cortical development. We especially highlight recent works that utilized animal exposure models, human specimens or/and induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells to demonstrate: (1) molecular mechanisms shared by various types of environmental stressors, (2) the mechanisms by which the affected extracortical tissues indirectly impact the cortical development and function, and (3) interaction between prenatal environmental stress and the genetic predisposition of neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, we discuss current challenges for achieving a comprehensive understanding of the role of environmentally disturbed molecular expressions in cortical maldevelopment, knowledge of which may eventually facilitate discovery of interventions for prenatal environment-linked neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26074774

  19. Prenatal music exposure induces long-term neural effects.

    PubMed

    Partanen, Eino; Kujala, Teija; Tervaniemi, Mari; Huotilainen, Minna

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the neural correlates induced by prenatal exposure to melodies using brains' event-related potentials (ERPs). During the last trimester of pregnancy, the mothers in the learning group played the 'Twinkle twinkle little star'-melody 5 times per week. After birth and again at the age of 4 months, we played the infants a modified melody in which some of the notes were changed while ERPs to unchanged and changed notes were recorded. The ERPs were also recorded from a control group, who received no prenatal stimulation. Both at birth and at the age of 4 months, infants in the learning group had stronger ERPs to the unchanged notes than the control group. Furthermore, the ERP amplitudes to the changed and unchanged notes at birth were correlated with the amount of prenatal exposure. Our results show that extensive prenatal exposure to a melody induces neural representations that last for several months. PMID:24205353

  20. Prenatal lactation advice and intention to breastfeed: selected maternal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sable, M R; Patton, C B

    1998-03-01

    This study uses data from the NICHD/MMIHS to examine the relationship among maternal characteristics and (a) whether mothers were asked by their prenatal providers to consider breastfeeding and (b) mothers' prenatal plans on how to feed their infants. Only 37% of the study population reported that their providers advised them to consider breastfeeding. Proportions of women who received prenatal advice to breastfeed and who intended to breastfeed were higher among married, Caucasian non-Hispanic, primiparous mothers, and women who were not enrolled in WIC. Women who received advice to breastfeed had significantly higher rates of planning to breastfeed (61.1%) than women who did not receive this advice (34.7%; p < 0.005). Efforts to meet the DHHS Healthy People 2000 objective for 75% of women to breastfeed in the early postpartum period will require a concentrated effort by prenatal providers to help women overcome their resistance to breastfeeding by offering support and encouragement. PMID:9543957

  1. Prenatal Music Exposure Induces Long-Term Neural Effects

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Eino; Kujala, Teija; Tervaniemi, Mari; Huotilainen, Minna

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the neural correlates induced by prenatal exposure to melodies using brains' event-related potentials (ERPs). During the last trimester of pregnancy, the mothers in the learning group played the ‘Twinkle twinkle little star’ -melody 5 times per week. After birth and again at the age of 4 months, we played the infants a modified melody in which some of the notes were changed while ERPs to unchanged and changed notes were recorded. The ERPs were also recorded from a control group, who received no prenatal stimulation. Both at birth and at the age of 4 months, infants in the learning group had stronger ERPs to the unchanged notes than the control group. Furthermore, the ERP amplitudes to the changed and unchanged notes at birth were correlated with the amount of prenatal exposure. Our results show that extensive prenatal exposure to a melody induces neural representations that last for several months. PMID:24205353

  2. The comparative effects of group prenatal care on psychosocial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Emily C; Picklesimer, Amy H; Billings, Deborah L; Covington-Kolb, Sarah; Farber, Naomi; Frongillo, Edward A

    2016-04-01

    To compare the psychosocial outcomes of the CenteringPregnancy (CP) model of group prenatal care to individual prenatal care, we conducted a prospective cohort study of women who chose CP group (N = 124) or individual prenatal care (N = 124). Study participants completed the first survey at study recruitment (mean gestational age 12.5 weeks), with 89% completing the second survey (mean gestational age 32.7 weeks) and 84% completing the third survey (6 weeks' postpartum). Multiple linear regression models compared changes by prenatal care model in pregnancy-specific distress, prenatal planning-preparation and avoidance coping, perceived stress, affect and depressive symptoms, pregnancy-related empowerment, and postpartum maternal-infant attachment and maternal functioning. Using intention-to-treat models, group prenatal care participants demonstrated a 3.2 point greater increase (p < 0.05) in their use of prenatal planning-preparation coping strategies. While group participants did not demonstrate significantly greater positive outcomes in other measures, women who were at greater psychosocial risk benefitted from participation in group prenatal care. Among women reporting inadequate social support in early pregnancy, group participants demonstrated a 2.9 point greater decrease (p = 0.03) in pregnancy-specific distress in late pregnancy and 5.6 point higher mean maternal functioning scores postpartum (p = 0.03). Among women with high pregnancy-specific distress in early pregnancy, group participants had an 8.3 point greater increase (p < 0.01) in prenatal planning-preparation coping strategies in late pregnancy and a 4.9 point greater decrease (p = 0.02) in postpartum depressive symptom scores. This study provides further evidence that group prenatal care positively impacts the psychosocial well-being of women with greater stress or lower personal coping resources. Large randomized studies are needed to establish conclusively the

  3. Invasive prenatal genetic testing: A Catholic healthcare provider's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bringman, Jay J.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive prenatal testing is performed for a variety of reasons, but the most common indication is for genetic testing of the fetus. Although many times the information obtained from this type of testing results in selective termination of fetuses with genetic diagnoses, the information itself may be morally neutral. Should a Catholic healthcare provider be willing to perform invasive prenatal testing in the setting of uncertainty with respect to the patient's plans following a diagnosis of a genetic abnormality? PMID:25473130

  4. Prenatal Diagnosis of Chromosome Abnormalities: A 13-Year Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Comas, Carmen; Echevarria, Mónica; Rodríguez, María Ángeles; Rodríguez, Ignacio; Serra, Bernat; Cirigliano, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze trends in screening and invasive prenatal diagnosis of chromosome abnormalities (CA) over a 13-year period and correlate them to changes in the national prenatal screening policy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed Down syndrome (DS) screening tests and fetal karyotypes obtained by prenatal invasive testing (IT) in our fetal medicine unit between January 1999 and December 2011. Results: A total of 24,226 prenatal screening tests for DS and 11,045 invasive procedures have been analyzed. Over a 13-year period, utilization of non-invasive screening methods has significantly increased from 57% to 89%. The percentage of invasive procedures has declined from 49% to 12%, although the percentage of IT performed for maternal anxiety has increased from 22% to 55%. The percentage of detected CA increased from 2.5% to 5.9%. Overall, 31 invasive procedures are needed to diagnose 1 abnormal case, being 23 procedures in medical indications and 241 procedures in non-medical indications. Conclusions: Our experience on screening and invasive prenatal diagnostic practice shows a decrease of the number of IT, with a parallel decline in medical indications. There is an increasing efficiency of prenatal screening program to detect CA. Despite the increasing screening policies, our population shows a growing request for prenatal IT. The a priori low risk population shows a not negligible residual risk for relevant CA. This observation challenges the current prenatal screening strategy focused on DS; showing that the residual risk is higher than the current cut-off used to indicate an invasive technique. PMID:26859399

  5. Prenatal and postnatal prevalence of Turner's syndrome: a registry study.

    PubMed Central

    Gravholt, C. H.; Juul, S.; Naeraa, R. W.; Hansen, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study prevalence of Turner's syndrome in Denmark and to assess validity of prenatal diagnosis. DESIGN--Study of data on prenatal and postnatal Turner's syndrome in Danish Cytogenetic Central Register. SUBJECTS--All registered Turner's syndrome karyotypes (100 prenatal cases and 215 postnatal cases) during 1970-93. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence of Turner's syndrome karyotypes among prenatally tested fetuses and Turner's syndrome among liveborn infants. RESULTS--Among infant girls, prevalence of Turner's syndrome was 32/100,000. Among female fetuses tested by amniocentesis, prevalence of Turner's syndrome karyotypes was 176/100,000 (relative risk of syndrome, 6.74 compared with prevalence among untested pregnancies). Among female fetuses tested by chorion villus sampling, prevalence of syndrome karyotypes was 392/100,000 (relative risk, 16.8). We excluded prenatal tests referred because of results of ultrasound scanning: among fetuses tested by amniocentesis revised relative risk was 5.68, while revised relative risk among fetuses tested by chorion villus sampling was 13.3. For 29 fetuses with prenatal diagnosis of possible Turner's syndrome, pregnancy was allowed to continue and 24 children were live born. Thirteen of these children were karyotyped postnatally, and diagnosis of Turner's syndrome had to be revised for eight, seven being normal girls and one boy. This gives tentative predictive value of amniocentesis in diagnosing Turner's syndrome of between 21% and 67%. There was no significant relation between mother's age and risk of Turner's syndrome. CONCLUSIONS--Discrepancy between prenatal and postnatal prevalence of Turner's syndrome challenges specificity of prenatal examination in diagnosing Turner's syndrome. PMID:8555850

  6. Endangering safe motherhood in Mozambique: prenatal care as pregnancy risk.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Rachel R

    2003-07-01

    Despite high infant and maternal mortality rates, many Mozambican women with access to prenatal services delay prenatal clinic consultations, limiting opportunity for prevention and treatment of preventable pregnancy complications. Ethnographic research, interviews with health providers and longitudinal pregnancy case studies with 83 women were conducted in Central Mozambique to examine pregnant women's underutilization of clinic-based prenatal services. The study found that pregnancy beliefs and prenatal practices reflect women's attempts to influence reproduction under conditions of vulnerability at multiple levels. Women reported high maternal reproductive morbidity, frequent pregnancy wastage, and immense pressure to bear children throughout their reproductive years. Reproductive vulnerability is intensified by poverty and an intense burden placed on poor, peri-urban women farmers for family subsistence and continuous fertility in a period of economic austerity, land shortages, and increasing social conflict and inequality. In this environment of economic insecurity exacerbated by congested living conditions, women report competing for scarce resources, including male support and income. This vulnerability heightens women's perceptions that they and their unborn infants will be targets of witchcraft or sorcery by jealous neighbors and kin. They respond by hiding pregnancy and delaying prenatal care. Within the context of women's perceived reproductive risks, delayed prenatal care can be seen as a strategy to protect pregnancy from purposeful human and spirit harm. Women mobilized limited resources to acquire prenatal care outside the formal clinic setting. It is concluded that provision of clinical prenatal services is insufficient to reduce reproductive risks for the most socially and economically marginal since it is their vulnerability that prevents women from using available services. Confidential maternity services and social safety nets for greater

  7. A Randomized Trial of Prenatal versus Postnatal Repair of Myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Adzick, N. Scott; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Brock, John W.; Burrows, Pamela K.; Johnson, Mark P.; Howell, Lori J.; Farrell, Jody A.; Dabrowiak, Mary E.; Sutton, Leslie N.; Gupta, Nalin; Tulipan, Noel B.; D'Alton, Mary E.; Farmer, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prenatal repair of myelomeningocele, the most common form of spina bifida, may result in better neurologic function than repair deferred until after delivery. We compared outcomes of in utero repair with standard postnatal repair. Methods We randomly assigned eligible women to undergo either prenatal surgery before 26 weeks of gestation or standard postnatal repair. One primary outcome was a composite of fetal or neonatal death or the need for placement of a cerebrospinal fluid shunt by the age of 12 months. Another primary outcome at 30 months was a composite of mental development and motor function. Results The trial was stopped for efficacy of prenatal surgery after the recruitment of 183 of a planned 200 patients. This report is based on results in 158 patients whose children were evaluated at 12 months. The first primary outcome occurred in 68% of the infants in the prenatal-surgery group and in 98% of those in the postnatal-surgery group (relative risk, 0.70; 97.7% confidence interval [CI], 0.58 to 0.84; P<0.001). Actual rates of shunt placement were 40% in the prenatal-surgery group and 82% in the postnatal-surgery group (relative risk, 0.48; 97.7% CI, 0.36 to 0.64; P<0.001). Prenatal surgery also resulted in improvement in the composite score for mental development and motor function at 30 months (P = 0.007) and in improvement in several secondary outcomes, including hindbrain herniation by 12 months and ambulation by 30 months. However, prenatal surgery was associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery and uterine dehiscence at delivery. Conclusions Prenatal surgery for myelomeningocele reduced the need for shunting and improved motor outcomes at 30 months but was associated with maternal and fetal risks. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00060606.) PMID:21306277

  8. FPEX gamma-Radiolysis in the Presence of Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    mincher

    2007-09-01

    Abstract: The solvent formulation known as FPEX (Fission Product Extraction) contains calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) for Cs extraction; 4,4’,(5’)-di-(t-butyldicyclohexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) for Sr extraction; 1-(2,2,3,3,-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) modifier and trioctylamine (TOA) to aid in Cs stripping, all in Isopar L diluent. This formulation has favorable extraction efficiency for Cs and Sr from acidic solution, and was investigated here for ?-radiation stability. When FPEX was irradiated in contact with aqueous nitric acid, extraction efficiency decreased only slightly when irradiated to absorbed doses as high as 200 kGy. The color of the organic phase changed to a deep yellow-orange, and several new peaks related to radiolysis of the Cs-7SB modifier were detected by GC-ECD analysis. This had little effect on solvent extraction distribution ratios. Possible reasons for this unexpected robustness under conditions of high radiation and acidity are discussed.

  9. Prenatal screening: an ethical agenda for the near future.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Antina; de Wert, Guido M W R

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal screening for foetal abnormalities such as Down's syndrome differs from other forms of population screening in that the usual aim of achieving health gains through treatment or prevention does not seem to apply. This type of screening leads to no other options but the choice between continuing or terminating the pregnancy and can only be morally justified if its aim is to provide meaningful options for reproductive choice to pregnant women and their partners. However, this aim should not be understood as maximizing reproductive choice per se. Only if understood as allowing prospective parents to avoid suffering related to living with (a child with) serious disorders and handicaps can prenatal screening be a publicly or collectively funded programme. The alternative of moving prenatal testing outside the healthcare system into the private sector is problematic, as it makes these tests accessible only to those who can afford to pay for it. New developments in prenatal screening will have to be assessed in terms of whether and to what extent they either contribute to or undermine the stated aim of providing meaningful options for reproductive choice. In the light of this criterion, this article discusses the introduction of the new non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT), the tendency to widen the scope of follow-up testing, as well as the possible future scenarios of genome-wide screening and 'prenatal personalised medicine'. The article ends with recommendations for further debate, research and analysis. PMID:25521973

  10. The Achievements of the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    The Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) completed nearly six years of continuous observation before it reentered the Earth's atmosphere on December 13, 2003. The primary goals of SNOE were to determine the magnitude and variability of nitric oxide in the lower thermosphere and to determine the relationship between NO and the energetic inputs to the atmosphere that create it. SNOE observations confirmed previously held suspicions that the solar soft X-ray irradiance was stronger than the prior sparsely available data and empirical models suggested. SNOE demonstrated that solar soft X-ray irradiance and auroral energy deposition control the abundance of NO over the globe, but provided the very surprising results that wintertime midlatitude NO is controlled by auroral energy while summertime polar NO is controlled by solar irradiance. The morphology of NO is also providing clues to the processes in the magnetospheric which lead to the auroral energy deposition. Serendipitous observations of polar mesospheric clouds by SNOE have provided an excellent database for climatological studies of these clouds, showing that there is a strong hemispheric asymmetry in their distribution and that they are strongly influenced by local dynamics. Many students contributed greatly toward SNOE's design, development, testing, launch, operations, and data analysis. SNOE was managed for NASA by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) under the Student Explorers Demonstration Initiative (STEDI). The goal of STEDI was to show that small relevant research satellite missions could be developed at low cost and with high educational benefit by giving students a large involvement. SNOE was developed and operated through its primary mission for under five million dollars (excluding only launch vehicle costs). The SNOE development team consisted primarily of students working closely with a small number of experienced professionals. Students had significant responsibilities in all areas