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Sample records for preoperative care

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Preoperative Screening and Postoperative Care.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Robert M; Pomerantz, Jonathan; Miller, Deborah E; Weiss-Coleman, Rebecca; Solomonides, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has reached epidemic proportions, and it is an often unrecognized cause of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Profound hypoxic injury from apnea during the postoperative period is often misdiagnosed as cardiac arrest due to other causes. Almost a quarter of patients entering a hospital for elective surgery have OSA, and >80% of these cases are undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The perioperative period puts patients at high risk of apneic episodes because of drug effects from sedatives, narcotics, and general anesthesia, as well as from the effects of postoperative rapid eye movement sleep changes and postoperative positioning in the hospital bed. For adults, preoperative screening using the STOP or STOP-Bang questionnaires can help to identify adult patients at increased risk of OSA. In the pediatric setting, a question about snoring should be part of every preoperative examination. For patients with known OSA, continuous positive airway pressure should be continued postoperatively. Continuous pulse oximetry monitoring with an alarm system can help to prevent apneic catastrophes caused by OSA in the postoperative period. PMID:26957384

  2. Preoperative oral health care reduces postoperative inflammation and complications in oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Ohta, Kouji; Fujimoto, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mizuta, Kuniko; Ono, Shigehiro; Shimasue, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Yoshiaki; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Tada, Misato; Ishida, Fumi; Okui, Gaku; Okumura, Toshiya; Fukui, Akiko; Kubozono, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Yoko; Seino, Sayaka; Hashikata, Miho; Sasaki, Kazuki; Naruse, Takako; Rahman, Mohammad Zeshaan; Uetsuki, Ryo; Nimiya, Akiko; Takamoto, Megumi; Dainobu, Kana; Tokikazu, Tomoko; Nishi, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Takechi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The records of 70 patients with oral cancer who were treated at a single institution between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared between those who had received preoperative oral care (oral care group) and those who had not received any (non-oral care group). When the patients were divided into those who underwent minimally invasive surgery and those who underwent severely invasive surgery, the mean CRP level in the early postoperative period was lower in the oral care group as compared with the non-oral care group in those who underwent minimally invasive surgery as well as those who underwent severely invasive surgery. However, the mean CRP level was most evidently reduced in the severely invasive group on days 1 and 3–5. However, no significant differences were observed with regard to the percentage of postoperative infectious complications (for example, surgical site infection, anastomotic leak and pneumonia) between the oral care (13.6%) and non-oral care (20.8%) groups, though a reduced prevalence of postoperative complications following preoperative oral care was noted. The results of the present study suggest that preoperative oral care can decrease inflammation during the early postoperative stage in patients with oral cancer who undergo severely invasive surgery. PMID:27588111

  3. Pre-Operative Assessment and Post-Operative Care in Elective Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Ahsan; MacFarlane, Robert J; Waseem, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Pre-operative assessment is required prior to the majority of elective surgical procedures, primarily to ensure that the patient is fit to undergo surgery, whilst identifying issues that may need to be dealt with by the surgical or anaesthetic teams. The post-operative management of elective surgical patients begins during the peri-operative period and involves several health professionals. Appropriate monitoring and repeated clinical assessments are required in order for the signs of surgical complications to be recognised swiftly and adequately. This article examines the literature regarding pre-operative assessment in elective orthopaedic surgery and shoulder surgery, whilst also reviewing the essentials of peri- and post-operative care. The need to recognise common post-operative complications early and promptly is also evaluated, along with discussing thromboprophylaxis and post-operative analgesia following shoulder surgery. PMID:24093051

  4. Effect of a preoperative instructional digital video disc on patient knowledge and preparedness for engaging in postoperative care activities.

    PubMed

    Ong, Joe; Miller, Pamela S; Appleby, Renee; Allegretto, Rebecca; Gawlinski, Anna

    2009-03-01

    This project determined the effects of developing and implementing a preoperative instructional digital video disc (DVD) on patients' level of knowledge, preparedness, and perceived ability to participate in postoperative care activities. Content areas that were incorporated into the preoperative instructional DVD included: pain management, surgical drainage, vital signs, incentive spirometry, cough and deep breathe, chest physiotherapy, anti-embolism stockings/sequential compression device, ambulation, diet/bowel activity/urine output, and discharge. A system was created to ensure that patients consistently received the preoperative instructional DVD prior to surgery. The instructional media product was found to be effective in increasing pre-operative knowledge and preparedness of patients and their families. Nurses reported higher levels of knowledge and engagement among patients and their families related to postoperative activities. PMID:19167553

  5. Preoperative calculation of risk for prolonged intensive care unit stay following coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Ghotkar, Sanjay V; Grayson, Antony D; Fabri, Brian M; Dihmis, Walid C; Pullan, D Mark

    2006-01-01

    Objective Patients who have prolonged stay in intensive care unit (ICU) are associated with adverse outcomes. Such patients have cost implications and can lead to shortage of ICU beds. We aimed to develop a preoperative risk prediction tool for prolonged ICU stay following coronary artery surgery (CABG). Methods 5,186 patients who underwent CABG between 1st April 1997 and 31st March 2002 were analysed in a development dataset. Logistic regression was used with forward stepwise technique to identify preoperative risk factors for prolonged ICU stay; defined as patients staying longer than 3 days on ICU. Variables examined included presentation history, co-morbidities, catheter and demographic details. The use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was also recorded. The prediction tool was tested on validation dataset (1197 CABG patients between 1st April 2003 and 31st March 2004). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated to assess the performance of the prediction tool. Results 475(9.2%) patients had a prolonged ICU stay in the development dataset. Variables identified as risk factors for a prolonged ICU stay included renal dysfunction, unstable angina, poor ejection fraction, peripheral vascular disease, obesity, increasing age, smoking, diabetes, priority, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, and use of CPB. In the validation dataset, 8.1% patients had a prolonged ICU stay compared to 8.7% expected. The ROC curve for the development and validation datasets was 0.72 and 0.74 respectively. Conclusion A prediction tool has been developed which is reliable and valid. The tool is being piloted at our institution to aid resource management. PMID:16737548

  6. Level of anxiety versus self-care in the preoperative and postoperative periods of total laryngectomy patients 1

    PubMed Central

    Almonacid, Clara Inés Flórez; Ramos, Alfredo Jurado; Rodríguez-Borrego, María-Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: estimate the prevalence of anxiety in laryngectomy patients in the pre and postoperative periods and its relation with the self-care level. Method: observational research of 40 patients with stage IV laryngeal cancer. Three observations took place: in the preoperative phase, at seven and at 14 days after the surgery; between June 2010 and December 2012. Two self-care levels were defined: self-sufficient and needing help for activities of daily living and treatment-related activities. To assess the anxiety levels, Zigmond's hospital anxiety scale (1983) was used. Results: in the preoperative and postoperative phases, the patients presented high levels of anxiety. Concerning self-care, on average, self-sufficient patients presented lower levels of anxiety than patients who needed help to accomplish activities of daily living and activities deriving from the surgery, without significant differences. Conclusion: anxiety is present at all times in laryngectomy patients and the reduction of the self-care deficit seems to decrease it, without putting a permanent end to it. PMID:27305181

  7. [Update on current care guidelines: acute respiratory failure--preoperative evaluation].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant diseases, the patient's general condition, exercise capacity and the extent of surgery are determinants of the operative risk. Increasing number of patients with endovascular stents and antithrombotic medication need special perioperative precautions as well as the eventual endocarditis prophylaxis. The risk of perioperative complications can probably be decreased by respiratory physiotherapy, correction of anaemia and smoking cessation. Severe liver or kidney insufficiency need be evaluated. Principles of preoperative fasting and perioperative strategies with concomitant medication are described, and use of preoperative carbohydrate drinks are encouraged. PMID:25272790

  8. Optimal Preoperative Evaluation and Perioperative Care of the Geriatric Patient: A Surgeon's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Susan E; Coleman, JoAnn; Katlic, Mark R

    2015-09-01

    The elderly preoperative patient benefits from an assessment that includes more than a routine physical examination and electrocardiogram. Such an assessment includes domains likely to affect the elderly: cognition, functionality, frailty, polypharmacy, nutrition, and social support. This fosters decisions based on functional age rather than chronologic age and on each patient as an individual. One such assessment is that promulgated by the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program/American Geriatrics Society Best Practice Guidelines. We should not miss any opportunity to improve results in this growing population of surgical patients. PMID:26315633

  9. [Pre-operative care for cardiac surgery patients with cold antibody disorder, cryoglobulinaemia and cryofibrinogenemia].

    PubMed

    Gumulec, J; Brát, R; Kolek, M; Chrástecký, B; Korístka, M; Cermáková, Z; Nováková, L; Sáchová, L; Chasáková, K; Ranochová, A; Ryzí, M; Návratová, P; Zuchnická, J; Bodzásová, C; Plonková, H; Slezák, P

    2009-03-01

    We present an example of a patient with confirmed cold agglutinin disease who underwent cardiac surgery in hypothermia to illustrate a known fact that, when exposed to cold, cold agglutinins induce haemolysis of erythrocytes and that cryoglobulins and cryofibrinogens may, upon exposition to cold during a surgery under hypothermia, precipitate or gelify and thus increase plasma viscosity and damage microcirculation. Detailed immunological and haematological investigations in all patients awaiting cardiac surgery with a risk of developing hypothermia is not advantageous considering the low number of patients with clinical and laboratory signs of cold agglutinin disease, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia or paroxysmal cold haemoglobinuria and considering that these investigations, in addition, might not detect cryoglobulinaemia and cryofibrinogenemia. Identification of in-risk patients from the warning signs in the medical history, physical or basal laboratory testing who would subsequently undergo confirmatory investigations to verify the presence of these entities and define them accurately might be a potential solution to this clinical issue. Cardiac surgery strategy and peri-operative care should be tailored to the results of these investigations. Well-structured, practiced and functional cooperation between clinicians and laboratory personnel is a prerequisite for success in these circumstances. PMID:19378854

  10. Effect of screen-based computer simulation on knowledge and skill in nursing students' learning of preoperative and postoperative care management: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Aylin; Dicle, Aklime; Cakan, Emre; Cakir, Şen

    2012-04-01

    Screen-based computer simulations are considered a method of skill teaching in health education. This study examined the effect of screen-based computer simulation on knowledge, skill, and the clinical decision-making process in teaching preoperative and postoperative care management to second-year students in an undergraduate school of nursing. It is a randomized controlled study. The study sample was composed of 82 students. They received education in screen-based computer simulation (n = 41) and skill laboratories (n = 41). Three instruments were used: a preoperative and postoperative care management cognitive level assessment test, skill control lists of preoperative and postoperative care management, and the Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale. There was not a significant difference between the students' posteducation knowledge levels (P = .421), practical deep breathing and coughing exercise education skills (P = .867), or clinical decision-making scale total and subscale scores (P = .065). However, a significant difference was found between the admission of the patient in the surgical clinic after surgery skill scores of the students (P = .04). Education provided in the screen-based computer simulation laboratory was equivalent to that provided in the skill laboratory. PMID:22228217

  11. The Relationship Between Preoperative and Primary Care Blood Pressure Among Veterans Presenting from Home for Surgery. Is There Evidence for Anesthesiologist-Initiated Blood Pressure Referral?

    PubMed Central

    Schonberger, Robert B.; Burg, Matthew M.; Holt, Natalie; Lukens, Carrie L.; Dai, Feng; Brandt, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Background American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines describe the perioperative evaluation as “a unique opportunity to identify patients with hypertension,” however factors such as anticipatory stress or medication noncompliance may induce a bias toward higher blood pressure, leaving clinicians unsure about how to interpret preoperative hypertension. Information describing the relationship between preoperative intake blood pressure and primary care measurements could help anesthesiologists make primary care referrals for improved blood pressure control in an evidence-based fashion. We hypothesized that the preoperative examination provides a useful basis for initiating primary care blood pressure referral. Methods We analyzed retrospective data on 2807 patients who arrived from home for surgery and who were subsequently evaluated within 6 months after surgery in the primary care center of the same institution. After descriptive analysis, we conducted multiple linear regression analysis to identify day-of-surgery (DOS) factors associated with subsequent primary care blood pressure. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of different blood pressure referral thresholds using both a single-measurement and a two-stage screen incorporating recent preoperative and DOS measurements for identifying patients with subsequently elevated primary care blood pressure. Results DOS systolic blood pressure (SBP) was higher than subsequent primary care SBP by a mean bias of 5.5mmHg (95% limits of agreement +43.8 to −32.8). DOS diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was higher than subsequent primary care DBP by a mean bias of 1.5mmHg (95% limits of agreement +13.0 to −10.0). Linear regression of DOS factors explained 19% of the variability in primary care SBP and 29% of the variability in DBP. Accounting for the observed bias, a two-stage SBP referral screen requiring preoperative clinic SBP≥140mmHg and DOS

  12. Patient and family satisfaction levels in the intensive care unit after elective cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a preoperative patient education intervention

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Patricia; Chiu, Chun Hung; Ho, Ka Man; Gomersall, Charles David; Underwood, Malcolm John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients and their families are understandably anxious about the risk of complications and unfamiliar experiences following cardiac surgery. Providing information about postoperative care in the intensive care unit (ICU) to patients and families may lead to lower anxiety levels, and increased satisfaction with healthcare. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative patient education provided for patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis 100 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft, with or without valve replacement surgery, will be recruited into a 2-group, parallel, superiority, double-blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to either preoperative patient education comprising of a video and ICU tour with standard care (intervention) or standard education (control). The primary outcome measures are the satisfaction levels of patients and family members with ICU care and decision-making in the ICU. The secondary outcome measures are patient anxiety and depression levels before and after surgery. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Joint Chinese University of Hong Kong—New Territories East Cluster Clinical Research Ethics Committee (reference number CREC 2015.308). The findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Study participants will receive a 1-page plain language summary of results. Trial registration number ChiCTR-IOR-15006971. PMID:27334883

  13. Effect of preoperative forced-air warming on postoperative temperature and postanesthesia care unit length of stay.

    PubMed

    Fettes, Sondra; Mulvaine, Mary; Van Doren, Elaine

    2013-03-01

    Unintended hypothermia in the surgical patient has been linked to numerous postoperative complications, including increased risk for surgical site infection, increased oxygen demands, and altered medication metabolism. The lack of literature on the subject was part of the impetus for perioperative nurses in one hospital to conduct a quality improvement project to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative warming on patients' postoperative temperatures. We randomly assigned 128 patients to either a group that received a forced-air warming blanket preoperatively or a group that did not. Our results showed that prewarming patients before surgery did not have an effect on patients' postoperative temperatures. PMID:23452697

  14. Preoperative Evaluation of the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Frederick T

    2016-01-01

    Primary care physicians and specialists are frequently involved in the care of surgical patients. Changes in reimbursement have prompted re-examination of preoperative testing and health care expenditures. Physicians have additional incentives to improve health care delivery and reduce costs. The perioperative surgical home concept involves coordinating all aspects of patient care, including behavioral modifications, during the perioperative period. Evidence-based guidelines on preoperative evaluation are available to assist practitioners in managing cardiovascular disease, and communicating surgical risks. Shared decision making in the preoperative period can improve surgical outcomes and patient satisfaction. PMID:27443045

  15. Adoption of Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer From 2000 to 2006: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Patterns-of-Care Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Raymond H.; McCarthy, Ellen P.; Das, Prajnan; Hong, Theodore S.; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The German rectal study determined that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) as a component of combined-modality therapy decreased local tumor recurrence, increased sphincter preservation, and decreased treatment toxicity compared with postoperative RT for rectal cancer. We evaluated the use of preoperative RT after the presentation of the landmark German rectal study results and examined the impact of tumor and sociodemographic factors on receiving preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: In total, 20,982 patients who underwent surgical resection for T3-T4 and/or node-positive rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2000 through 2006 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results tumor registries. We analyzed trends in preoperative RT use before and after publication of the findings from the German rectal study. We also performed multivariate logistic regression to identify factors associated with receiving preoperative RT. Results: Among those treated with RT, the proportion of patients treated with preoperative RT increased from 33.3% in 2000 to 63.8% in 2006. After adjustment for age; gender; race/ethnicity; marital status; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry; county-level education; T stage; N stage; tumor size; and tumor grade, there was a significant association between later year of diagnosis and an increase in preoperative RT use (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26/y increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.29). When we compared the years before and after publication of the German rectal study (2000-2003 vs. 2004-2006), patients were more likely to receive preoperative RT than postoperative RT in 2004-2006 (adjusted odds ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-2.59). On multivariate analysis, patients who were older, who were female, and who resided in counties with lower educational levels had significantly decreased odds of receiving preoperative RT. Conclusions: After the publication of the landmark German rectal

  16. The value of preoperative planning.

    PubMed

    Graves, Matt L

    2013-10-01

    "Better to throw your disasters into the waste paper basket than to consign your patients to the scrap heap" has been a proverb of Jeff Mast, one of the greatest fracture and deformity surgeons in the history of our specialty. Stated slightly more scientifically, one of the major values of simulation is that it allows one to make mistakes in a consequence-free environment. Preoperative planning is the focus of this article. The primary goal is not to provide you with a recipe of how to steps. Rather, the primary goal of this article is to explain why preoperative planning should be standard, to clarify what should be included, and to provide examples of what can happen when planning is ignored. At the end of this, we should all feel the need to approach fracture care more intellectually with forethought, both in our own practices and in our educational system. PMID:23880563

  17. Preoperative Evaluation: Estimation of Pulmonary Risk.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarasimhachar, Anand; Smetana, Gerald W

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are common after major non-thoracic surgery and associated with significant morbidity and high cost of care. A number of risk factors are strong predictors of PPCs. The overall goal of the preoperative pulmonary evaluation is to identify these potential, patient and procedure-related risks and optimize the health of the patients before surgery. A thorough clinical examination supported by appropriate laboratory tests will help guide the clinician to provide optimal perioperative care. PMID:26927740

  18. Avoiding Unnecessary Preoperative Testing.

    PubMed

    Rusk, Matthew H

    2016-09-01

    Given the low-risk nature of cataract surgery, no preoperative testing is indicated unless the patient needs it for another reason. Although electrocardiograms may have a role in preoperative testing in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, or if the procedure carries with it significant operative risks, they are often unnecessary. Urinalysis and coagulation studies not should be routine because they have not shown any value in predicting complications. Although these tests are not individually expensive, the aggregate cost is substantial. As good stewards of the medical system, physicians need to use these tests more judiciously. PMID:27542420

  19. Preoperative Laboratory Testing.

    PubMed

    Bock, Matthias; Fritsch, Gerhard; Hepner, David L

    2016-03-01

    Routine preoperative testing is not cost-effective, because it is unlikely to identify significant abnormalities. Abnormal findings from routine testing are more likely to be false positive, are costly to pursue, introduce a new risk, increase the patient's anxiety, and are inconvenient to the patient. Abnormal findings rarely alter the surgical or anesthetic plan, and there is usually no association between perioperative complications and abnormal laboratory results. Incidental findings and false positive results may lead to increased hospital visits and admissions. Preoperative testing needs to be done based on a targeted history and physical examination and the type of surgery. PMID:26927738

  20. The Preoperative Neurological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Probasco, John; Sahin, Bogachan; Tran, Tung; Chung, Tae Hwan; Rosenthal, Liana Shapiro; Mari, Zoltan; Levy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are prevalent in the general population, and the neurohospitalist has an important role to play in the preoperative planning for patients with and at risk for developing neurological disease. The neurohospitalist can provide patients and their families as well as anesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitalists, and other providers guidance in particular to the patient’s neurological disease and those he or she is at risk for. Here we present considerations and guidance for the neurohospitalist providing preoperative consultation for the neurological patient with or at risk of disturbances of consciousness, cerebrovascular and carotid disease, epilepsy, neuromuscular disease, and Parkinson disease. PMID:24198903

  1. [The preoperative anaesthetic visit].

    PubMed

    Harms, Christoph; Kindler, Christoph H

    2009-07-01

    Anaesthetists often visit their patients in exceptional situations characterised by preoperative anxiety or distress. Therefore, even brief contact with the patient can be considered intense and meaningful. The initial preoperative anaesthetic visit is the beginning of the relationship between patient and anaesthetist, and should help to explain the planned anaesthetic technique. Preoperative anaesthetic visits are intense and last for 20 minutes on average. They should assert a professional approach to the patient's emotions, particularly to preoperative anxiety, and a structured and clear collection of information including the past history of the patient. These visits should also provide information about the anaesthesia itself and instructions for the patient with respect to the perioperative period. Communication about the side effects and risks of anaesthetic techniques, and the discussion of potential alternatives are mandatory. Worldwide, courts of law increasingly require a documented discussion between the anaesthetist and patient based on risk-benefit evidence. Today, there is in general a shift away from decisions made solely by physicians, reflecting an increased respect for the autonomy of the patient towards a model of shared decision-making and informed choice. Ideally, the preoperative visit follows the four key habits of highly effective clinicians, i.e., to rapidly establish a rapport with the patient and provide an agenda for the visit, to explore the patient's perspectives and expectations, to demonstrate empathy, and to focus on the end of the visit with providing information and including the patient in the decision-making process. Visits are then concluded upon obtaining informed consent from the patient. PMID:19565444

  2. Preoperative biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Payal; Kumbhari, Vivek; Zein, Mohamad E L; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    The role of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with distal or proximal biliary obstruction secondary to resectable tumors has been a matter for debate. A review of the literature using Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases was undertaken for studies evaluating routes of drainage (endoscopic or percutaneous) and stent types (plastic or metal) in patients with resectable disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is indicated for relief of symptomatic jaundice, cholangitis, patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy or those patients where surgery may be delayed. Endoscopic methods are preferred over percutaneous methods because of lower complication rates. In patients with proximal biliary obstruction, PBD should be guided by imaging studies to aid in selective biliary cannulation for unilateral drainage in order to reduce the risk of cholangitis in undrained liver segments. PMID:25293587

  3. Preoperative assessment and optimization in periampullary and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Myatra, S; Divatia, J V; Jibhkate, B; Barreto, G S; Shrikhande, S V

    2011-01-01

    Perioperative management of pancreatic and periampullary cancer poses a considerable challenge to the pancreatic surgeon, anesthesiologist, and the intensive care team. The preoperative surgical evaluation of a pancreatic lesion aims to define the nature of the lesion (malignant or benign), stage the tumor, and to determine resectability or other non-surgical treatment options. Patients are often elderly and may have significant comorbidities and malnutrition. Obstructive jaundice may lead to coagulopathy, infection, renal dysfunction, and adverse outcomes. Routine preoperative biliary drainage can result in higher complication rates, and metal stents may be preferred over plastic stents in selected patients with resectable disease. Judicious use of antibiotics and maintaining fluid volume preoperatively can reduce the incidence of infection and renal dysfunction, respectively. Perioperative fluid therapy with hemodynamic optimization using minimally invasive monitoring may help improve outcomes. Careful patient selection, appropriate preoperative evaluation and optimization can greatly contribute to a favorable outcome after major pancreatic resections. PMID:21248439

  4. Computed Tomography Angiography for Preoperative Thoracoabdominal Flap Planning.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ryan B; Robinson, Tracy J; Kozlow, Jeffrey H; Liu, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Mastectomy rates have increased, coinciding with more advanced reconstruction options. Deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps decrease abdominal donor site morbidity, but require considerable technical expertise. Preoperative computed tomography angiography (CTA) can accurately demonstrate DIEA anatomy and perforator courses, facilitating preoperative planning and flap design, allowing for more targeted intraoperative microdissection. Patients who undergo CTA before DIEP flap have better clinical outcomes with shorter operative times and hospital length of stay, which can decrease overall associated health care costs. Future directions include selected imaging of the thoracic anatomy and recipient vasculature, allowing for additional preoperative planning and customization. PMID:26654396

  5. Which preoperative respiratory evaluation?

    PubMed

    Zraier, S; Haouache, H; Dhonneur, G

    2014-01-01

    The preoperative respiratory evaluation aims at predicting the occurrence of postoperative respiratory complications (PORC), such as: atelectasis, pulmonary infection (bronchitis and pneumonia), acute ventilatory distress, pleural effusion, prolonged mechanical ventilation, exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease and bronchospasm. The incidence of (PORC) all surgeries combined is 6.8%. Individual surgical and anesthetic factors are impacting on the occurrence of PORC. Simple scores, including anamnestic data, clinical examination and some biological parameters were validated to assess the risk of PORC depending on the type of surgery. Data from standard pulmonary function tests (PFT) is of little use to estimate the individual risk of PORC. Most of the time, PFT abnormal parameters only confirm the clinical assessment of the severity of the illness. PFT may however be useful to confirm an improvement in the clinical condition of the patient related to the preoperative preparation. Specialized EFR, including standardized testing efforts are sometimes required in the case of lung reduction surgery. These specialized explorations can predict lung function and post-interventional pulmonary oxygenation and ensure that these are viable. PMID:25168302

  6. Diversity in preoperative-assessment data collection, a literature review.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Leila; Cornet, Ronald; van Klei, Wilton A; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2008-01-01

    The appropriate anesthetic techniques and care during and after operation rely on data gathered during the preoperative assessment. Because various people are involved, standardization of this process is important. This paper provides a systematic literature review about which data items are collected in the preoperative assessment. Thirty-two relevant articles were found by PubMed search. To categorize data SNOMED CT concepts are used, resulting in 13 categories totaling 540 data items. The two largest categories of data were "past history of clinical finding", and "physical examination procedure" with 251 and 75 data items respectively. Our study showed a high diversity of data items in the preoperative assessment. Because of the diversity of patients and treatment options available one undisputed preoperative assessment data set is hard to define. However, to solve the problem of exchangeability of the information at least anesthesiologists should use a same core set of data. PMID:18487719

  7. Is there a case for selective, rather than routine, preoperative laryngoscopy in thyroid surgery?

    PubMed Central

    González-Sánchez, Carmen; Aguilera-Molina, Yari Yuritzi; Rozo-Coronel, Orlando; Estévez-Alonso, José Santiago; Muñoz-Herrera, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Background According to some authors, routine preoperative laryngoscopy should be the standard of care in all patients undergoing thyroid surgery. The rationale for this approach is (I) the risk that a patient has a preoperative vocal cord palsy (VCP) without symptoms; (II) the presence of VCP preoperatively is suggestive of invasive malignancy; (III) it is relevant for the use of intraoperative nerve monitoring; and (IV) surgical strategy may be better defined if a paralysed vocal cord is detected preoperatively. Methods This is a review of studies of patients who underwent routine preoperative laryngoscopy to anticipate preoperative VCP and that evaluated related risk factors, including previous surgery, voice function complaints, and a diagnosis of malignancy. The estimated risk of sustaining preoperative VCF in the absence of these factors was determined. The relevant current guidelines from different professional bodies are also addressed. Results The level of evidence that supports routine preoperative laryngoscopy is weak. The risk of harboring preoperative VCP in the absence of previous neck or other risk-related surgery, advanced malignancy or voice symptoms is very low (0.5% of cases). Conclusions Selective rather than routine use of preoperative laryngoscopy may be acceptable provided that the risk of undetected paralysis is as low as can be reasonably ascertained from the available literature. PMID:25713775

  8. Preoperative surgical marking: a case of seeing double.

    PubMed

    Rughani, Milap; Kokkinakis, Michail; Davison, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative marking is an integral part of the care of patients undergoing surgical procedures. It occurs on a daily basis in hospitals and involves all members of the healthcare staff and the patient. Incorrect marking or errors can lead to devastating consequences for the patient and staff involved. We present an unusual case of seeing double arrows on a patient undergoing emergency orthopaedic surgery, despite standard preoperative marking procedures. This was recognised in the anaesthetic room and the correct site was confirmed. We aim to highlight this specific problem and remind all involved in preoperative marking of the dangers of a mirror imprint, thereby avoiding seeing double in the anaesthetic or operating room. PMID:22315636

  9. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    PubMed

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. PMID:25443866

  10. [Artificial nutrition and preoperative fasting].

    PubMed

    Francq, B; Sohawon, S; Perlot, I; Sekkat, H; Noordally, S O

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative fasting is a currently adopted measure since Mendelson's report pertaining to aspiration pneumonia as a cause of death following general anesthesia. From a metabolic point of view fasting is detrimental because surgery in itself causes a state of hypercatabolism and hyperglycemia as a result of insulinresistance. Preoperative fasting has become almost obsolete in certain elective surgical procedures. In these cases the use of clear liquids is now well established and this paper focuses on the safe use of clear fluids, postoperative insulinresistance, patient comfort and postoperative outcome as well as its effect on the length of stay. PMID:22812052

  11. Preoperative Psychological Preparation of Children

    PubMed Central

    Güleç, Ersel; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Surgery and anaesthesia are significant sources of anxiety for children. In the preoperative period, reducing anxiety helps in preventing the negative consequences that may occur after surgery. The predetermined high-risk children in terms of the development of anxiety play an important role in reducing the negative consequences. Recently featured approaches are modelling and coping techniques, although many techniques are used in the preoperative psychological preparation. The use of computer programs in this area may facilitate important achievements, and it needs to support new studies to be performed. PMID:27366525

  12. Preoperative Oral Carbohydrate Loading in Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kum-Hee; Kim, So-Young; Cho, Yeong-Ah; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Overnight fasting before elective surgery has been the routine to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration. Recently, several international guidelines for preoperative fasting recommend to intake carbohydrate-containing fluids up to 2 to 3 hours before the induction of anesthesia to improve postoperative recovery. Based on the recommendations, we developed a "preoperative carbohydrate diet" provided for the preoperative patients. The purpose of this case report is to share our experience of applying preoperative carbohydrate loading prior to surgery. PMID:27482525

  13. FFTF preoperational survey. Program report

    SciTech Connect

    Twitty, B.L.; Bicehouse, H.J.

    1980-12-01

    The FFTF will become operational with criticality early in 1980. This facility is composed of the test reactor, fuel examination cells, expended fuel storage systems and fuel handling systems. The reactor and storage systems are sodium-cooled with the heat load dumped to the ambient air through heat exchangers. In order to assure that the operation of the FFTF has minimal impact on the environment, a monitoring program has been established. Prior to operation of a new facility, a preoperational environmental survey is required. It is the purpose of this report to briefly describe the environmental survey program and to provide the background data obtained during the preoperational phase of the survey program. Nine stations in the program of particular importance to FFTF are discussed in detail with results of monitoring given. No unexplained trends were noted.

  14. [Algorithm for treating preoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Hemoglobin optimization and treatment of preoperative anemia in surgery with a moderate to high risk of surgical bleeding reduces the rate of transfusions and improves hemoglobin levels at discharge and can also improve postoperative outcomes. To this end, we need to schedule preoperative visits sufficiently in advance to treat the anemia. The treatment algorithm we propose comes with a simple checklist to determine whether we should refer the patient to a specialist or if we can treat the patient during the same visit. With the blood count test and additional tests for iron metabolism, inflammation parameter and glomerular filtration rate, we can decide whether to start the treatment with intravenous iron alone or erythropoietin with or without iron. With significant anemia, a visit after 15 days might be necessary to observe the response and supplement the treatment if required. The hemoglobin objective will depend on the type of surgery and the patient's characteristics. PMID:26320341

  15. The activated coagulation time of whole blood as a routine pre-operative sceening test.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, P G

    1971-05-01

    Patients with disorders of hemostasis who undergo surgical procedures are in danger of hemorrhage. While the careful medical history remains the most sensitive test of a bleeding tendency, some such patients can give no suggestive history. In three patients with coagulopathy-one with mild classical hemophilia, one with Christmas disease, and one with warfarin toxicity-the abnormality was missed by routine preoperative history but promptly detected by the routine preoperative use of the activated coagulation time (act). Either this test or the activated partial thromboplastin time should be included in the routine preoperative work-up, along with appropriate additional tests of the hemostatic mechanism. PMID:5087876

  16. The Activated Coagulation Time of Whole Blood as a Routine Pre-Operative Screening Test

    PubMed Central

    Hattersley, Paul G.

    1971-01-01

    Patients with disorders of hemostasis who undergo surgical procedures are in danger of hemorrhage. While the careful medical history remains the most sensitive test of a bleeding tendency, some such patients can give no suggestive history. In three patients with coagulopathy—one with mild classical hemophilia, one with Christmas disease, and one with warfarin toxicity—the abnormality was missed by routine preoperative history but promptly detected by the routine preoperative use of the activated coagulation time (act). Either this test or the activated partial thromboplastin time should be included in the routine preoperative work-up, along with appropriate additional tests of the hemostatic mechanism. PMID:5087876

  17. Role of preoperative screening for adult patients for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Selim, Bernardo J; Surani, Salim R; Ramar, Kannan

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic disease with increasing prevalence. Underdiagnosed in the surgical population, OSA can reach a prevalence of up to 70% in bariatric surgery, and be associated with difficult airways and postoperative cardiopulmonary adverse events. Despite its association with escalation of care, increased health care resource utilization, and length of hospital stay, < 25% of health care institutions in the United States have OSA perioperative protocols to improve patient safety. This is explained in part by a lack of studies that support a widely accepted systematic approach to preoperative screening and risk stratification. This review evaluates the role of preoperative screening tools for adult patients with suspected OSA. PMID:25485922

  18. A Model for Better Leveraging the Point of Preoperative Assessment: Patients and Providers Look Beyond Operative Indications When Making Decisions.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Olivia; Quinn, Timothy D; Arriaga, Alexander F; Hepner, David L; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Cooper, Zara; Gawande, Atul A; Bader, Angela M

    2016-04-15

    Previous literature on preoperative evaluation focuses on the impact on the day of surgery cancellations and delays; however, the framework of cancellations and delays at the time of the elective outpatient preoperative anesthesia visit has not been categorized. We describe the current model in the preoperative clinic at Brigham and Women's Hospital, examining the pattern of cancellations at the time of this preoperative visit and the framework used for categorizing the issues involved. Looking at this broader framework is important in an era of patient-centered care; we seek to identify targets to modify the preoperative assessment and adequately assess and capture the spectrum of issues involved. Elective cases evaluated in the preoperative clinic were reviewed over 10 months. Characteristics of cancelled and noncancelled cases were compared. In-depth analysis of issues related to cancellation was done; 1-year follow-up was completed. Cancellation patterns included categories encompassing clinical, financial, alignment with patient values and goals, compliance, and social issues. The period of preoperative assessment can therefore be leveraged to review a number of domains that can adversely affect surgical outcomes and improve patient-centered care. Also, our framework allows the institution to benchmark these patterns over time; increases in cancellations at the time of the preoperative anesthesia clinic visit for specific categories can prompt an opportunity to examine and improve preoperative workflow. PMID:26669650

  19. Preoperative skin disinfection methodologies for reducing prosthetic joint infections.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Mont, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    Surgical site infections following lower extremity total joint arthroplasty procedures remain a substantial economic burden to the patient, the treating institution, and the health care system. The complexity of these surgical procedures creates the potential for various patient- or surgery-related risk factors for infection. Although there is much literature regarding the use of many preventative methods, a consensus regarding the true efficacy and application of such practices is generally not available. In this review, we reviewed the preoperative skin disinfection methodologies that have been used for reducing periprosthetic infections following lower extremity total joint arthroplasty. Currently, cumulative evidence suggests that preoperative chlorhexidine baths or chlorhexidine-impregnated wipes may reduce the colonization of pathogenic organisms on the skin. In addition, multiple showers or topical applications of chlorhexidine may lead to more substantial reduction in colony counts. Advanced preoperative whole-body cleaning with chlorhexidine-containing cloths rather than site-specific application may confer additional advantages. Further randomized controlled trials with carefully planned protocols and endpoints are needed to determine if this conclusively leads to reduction in the rate of surgical site infections. PMID:24622912

  20. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  1. The preoperative evaluation prevent the postoperative complications of thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Feng; Jeng, Yachung; Chen, Kuo-Dong; Yu, Ji-Kuen; Shih, Chao-Ming; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Chou, Fong-Fu; Shih, Ming-Lang; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Chang, Tzu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective Thyroid surgery is generally a safe surgery but its complications are still common. We wish to identify preoperative factors that predict postoperative complications. Methods A nationwide survey was conducted by senior surgeons from 16 medical centers and 5 regional hospitals in Taiwan to thyroid operations performed over 3 years. 3846 cases were retrospectively examined to identify factors influencing complications: indication for surgery, preoperative evaluation, such as ultrasonography, chest X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, isotope scanning, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and thyroid function test, and patient characteristics. Results Eighty-four percent of patients were female. Seven percent of the patients had immediate postoperative hypocalcemia (mild and severe) and 2.3%, hoarseness (recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury, temporary/permanent). Logistic regression analysis identified an association between hypocalcemia and RLN injury with age, hospital category, surgical procedure types (total thyroidectomy, unilateral, bilateral subtotal or total resection). A lower incidence of hypocalcemia was related to preoperative neck ultrasound and FNAC analysis (the odds ratio (OR) = 0.5 and 0.65, [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.331–0.768 and 0.459–0.911], P = 0.0014 and 0.0127, respectively), while RLN injury was not associated with any preoperative evaluation. The ORs of hypocalcemia and RLN injury for patients older than 50 years were 0.55 and 2.15, [0.393–0.763 and 1.356–3.4], P < 0.001 and 0.0012, respectively. Conclusions The success of thyroid surgery depends on careful preoperative planning, including a preoperative neck ultrasound to determine the proximity of the nodule to the recurrent laryngeal nerve course, and the consideration of the type of anesthesia, adjuvant devices for intra-op monitoring of the RLN, and surgical modalities. Our results suggest that preoperative evaluation implementations

  2. The Role of Preoperative Evaluation for Congenital Methemoglobinemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuş, Alparslan; Berk, Derya; Hoşten, Tülay; Gürkan, Yavuz; Solak, Mine; Toker, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative care includes a clinical examination before invasive or non-invasive interventions for anaesthesia/analgesia and is the responsibility of the anaesthesiologists. Methemoglobinemia should be considered, as well as cardiac, pulmonary, and peripheral circulatory disorders in patients with central cyanosis and low oxygen saturation despite treatment with sufficient oxygen during anaesthesia. Methemoglobinemia is a serious clinical condition, associated with increased blood methemoglobin levels characterized by clinical signs, such as cyanosis and hypoxia due to lack of oxygen-carrying capacity. Here, we present our anaesthesia management in a patient with unnoticed congenital methemoglobinemia during preoperative evaluation, in whom clinical signs of methemoglobinemia developed after local anaesthesia administration before the surgery. PMID:27366424

  3. Complication avoidance with pre-operative screening: insights from the Seattle spine team.

    PubMed

    Buchlak, Quinlan D; Yanamadala, Vijay; Leveque, Jean-Christophe; Sethi, Rajiv

    2016-09-01

    Complication rates for complex adult lumbar scoliosis surgery are unacceptably high. Standardized preoperative evaluation protocols have been shown to significantly reduce the likelihood of a spectrum of negative outcomes associated with complex adult lumbar scoliosis surgery. To increase patient safety and reduce complication risk, an entire medical and surgical team should work together to care for adult lumbar scoliosis patients. This article describes preoperative patient evaluation strategies with a particular focus on adult lumbar scoliosis surgery involving six or more levels of spinal fusion. Domains considered include recent preoperative evaluation literature, predictive risk modeling, the appropriate management of medical conditions, and the composition and activities of a multidisciplinary conference review team. An evidence-based comprehensive systematic preoperative surgical evaluation process is described. PMID:27260267

  4. Utility of Discography as a Preoperative Diagnostic Tool for Intradural Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Terai, Hidetomi; Dohzono, Sho; Hori, Yusuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative definitive diagnosis of intradural lumbar disc herniation (ILDH) is difficult despite the availability of various neuroradiological investigative tools. We present a case of ILDH diagnosed preoperatively by discography and computed tomography-discography (disco-CT).The patient was a 63-year-old man with acute excruciating right leg pain. Discography and disco-CT demonstrated leakage of the contrast medium into the intradural space. Based on these findings, a right L5 nerve root disturbance caused by ILDH was diagnosed. A right L5 hemi-laminectomy and a dorsal durotomy were performed. The herniated disc was carefully dissected and then completely removed. Three months after surgery, the patient had fully recovered. This report highlights the importance of making a definitive diagnosis of ILDH preoperatively for better surgical planning and improved clinical outcomes. Furthermore, discography and disco-CT are both useful preoperative diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of ILDH. PMID:27559461

  5. Utility of Discography as a Preoperative Diagnostic Tool for Intradural Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Terai, Hidetomi; Dohzono, Sho; Hori, Yusuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Preoperative definitive diagnosis of intradural lumbar disc herniation (ILDH) is difficult despite the availability of various neuroradiological investigative tools. We present a case of ILDH diagnosed preoperatively by discography and computed tomography-discography (disco-CT).The patient was a 63-year-old man with acute excruciating right leg pain. Discography and disco-CT demonstrated leakage of the contrast medium into the intradural space. Based on these findings, a right L5 nerve root disturbance caused by ILDH was diagnosed. A right L5 hemi-laminectomy and a dorsal durotomy were performed. The herniated disc was carefully dissected and then completely removed. Three months after surgery, the patient had fully recovered. This report highlights the importance of making a definitive diagnosis of ILDH preoperatively for better surgical planning and improved clinical outcomes. Furthermore, discography and disco-CT are both useful preoperative diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of ILDH. PMID:27559461

  6. Preoperative platelet transfusions and perioperative red blood cell requirements in patients with thrombocytopenia undergoing noncardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Matthew A.; Jia, Qing; Clifford, Leanne; Wilson, Gregory; Brown, Michael J.; Hanson, Andrew C.; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Kor, Daryl J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perioperative hemorrhage impacts patient outcomes and health care resource utilization, yet the risks of transfusion therapies are significant. In patients with preoperative thrombocytopenia, the effects of prophylactic preoperative platelet (PLT) transfusion on perioperative bleeding complications remain uncertain. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This is a retrospective cohort study of noncardiac surgical patients between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011. Propensity-adjusted analyses were used to evaluate associations between preoperative thrombocytopenia, preoperative PLT transfusion, and the outcomes of interest, with a primary outcome of perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. RESULTS A total of 13,978 study participants were included; 860 (6.2%) had a PLT count of not more than 100 × 109/L with 71 (8.3%) receiving PLTs preoperatively. Administration of PLTs was associated with higher rates of perioperative RBC transfusion (66.2% vs. 49.1%, p 0.0065); however, in propensity-adjusted analysis there was no significant difference between groups (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval {95% CI}], 1.68 [0.95–2.99]; p =0.0764]. Patients receiving PLTs had higher rates of intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR [95% CI], 1.95 [1.10–3.46]; p =0.0224) and longer hospital lengths of stay (estimate [95% bootstrap CI], 7.2 [0.8–13.9] days; p =0.0006) in propensity-adjusted analyses. CONCLUSION Preoperative PLT transfusion did not attenuate RBC requirements in patients with thrombocytopenia undergoing noncardiac surgery. Moreover, preoperative PLT transfusion was associated with increased ICU admission rates and hospital duration. These findings suggest that more conservative management of preoperative thrombocytopenia may be warranted. PMID:26559936

  7. Preoperative patient assessment: Identifying patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Boehm, O; Baumgarten, G; Hoeft, A

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative mortality remains alarmingly high with a mortality rate ranging between 0.4% and 4%. A small subgroup of multimorbid and/or elderly patients undergoing different surgical procedures naturally confers the highest risk of complications and perioperative death. Therefore, preoperative assessment should identify these high-risk patients and stratify them to individualized monitoring and treatment throughout all phases of perioperative care. A "tailored" perioperative approach might help further reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. This article aims to elucidate individual morbidity-specific risks. It further suggests approaches to detect patients at the risk of perioperative complications. PMID:27396802

  8. The effect of preoperative warming on patients' postoperative temperatures.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Shauna

    2006-05-01

    Many perioperative clinicians encounter difficulty in preventing hypothermia in surgical patients. One intervention to prevent perioperative hypothermia is the use of forced-air warming. Although forced-air warming is used most frequently in the intraoperative area, prewarming patients with forced-air warming systems before induction of anesthesia may be enough to prevent hypothermia throughout the surgical procedure, allowing patients to arrive in the postanesthesia care unit in a normothermic state. A review of the literature on preoperative forced-air warming is provided, and the effect of prewarming on postoperative patient temperatures is discussed. PMID:16722285

  9. Preoperative evaluation of the cardiac patient for noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, L. A.; Barash, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    Perioperative cardiac events continue to represent a significant cause of morbidity in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. The evaluation of the high risk patient should begin with an assessment of the probability of coronary artery disease and exercise tolerance. Decisions to undergo further evaluation, including noninvasive testing, should be based upon the perioperative morbidity and mortality rate for the planned surgical procedure. In patients with significant coronary artery stenoses and a high probability of perioperative cardiac morbidity, coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and preoperative optimization of hemodynamics in an intensive care unit have all been advocated as means of reducing risk. PMID:7825340

  10. Preoperative radiotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, G A; Conn, J H; Jordan, P H; Humphrey, E W; Roswit, B; Keehn, R J

    1975-01-01

    In a prospective randomized trial, 700 patients with a confirmed histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the rectum or rectosigmoid were randomized to receive radiotherapy prior to operation (2000 to 2500 rads in two weeks) or surgery alone. Five year observed survival in the 453 patients on whom "curative" resection was possible was 48.5% in the X-ray treated group compared with 38.8% in controls, while in the 305 having low lying lesions requiring abdominoperineal resection, survival in the treated group was 46.9% compared with 34.3% in controls. Although suggestive of a treatment benefit, neither is considered statistically significant. Histologically positive lymph nodes were found in 41.2% of the control group and in only 27.8% of the patients receiving radiotherapy. Reveiw of all patients who died during the study shows a consistently lower death rate from cancer in the radiotherapy group. Although this study suggests a treatment benefit from preoperative radiotherapy, further studies now in progress by this group and others are necessary to determine the optimal dose regimen. PMID:805571

  11. Effects of comfort warming on preoperative patients.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Doreen; Byrne, Michelle; Kolcaba, Katharine

    2006-09-01

    THERMAL COMFORT IS ONE DIMENSION of overall patient comfort, and it usually is addressed by covering the patient with warmed cotton blankets. WARMING HELPS A PATIENT maintain normothermia and appears to decrease patient anxiety. AN STUDY WAS CONDUCTED in a preoperative setting to compare the effects of preoperative warming with warmed cotton blankets versus patient-controlled warming gowns on patients' perceptions of thermal comfort and anxiety. BOTH WARMING INTERVENTIONS had a positive effect on patients' thermal comfort and sense of well-being. Patients who used the patient-controlled warming gown also experienced a significant reduction in preoperative anxiety. PMID:17004666

  12. [Preoperative assessment for extended hepatic resection].

    PubMed

    Martin, David; Roulin, Didier; Takamune, Yamaguchi; Demartines, Nicolas; Halkic, Nermin

    2016-06-15

    The number of major hepatectomy performed for the treatment of primary or secondary liver cancer has increased over the past two decades. By definition, a major hepatectomy includes the resection of at least three liversegments. Advances in anesthesiology, surgical and radiological techniques and perioperative management allowed a broad patient selection with increased security. Every case must be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board, and preoperative assessment should include biological, volumetric and functional hepatic parameters. In case of preoperative insufficient liver volume, portal vein embolization allows increasing the size of liver remnant. This paper aims describing preoperative work-up. PMID:27487623

  13. The unfavorable nature of preoperative delirium in elderly hip fractured patients.

    PubMed

    Adunsky, Abraham; Levy, Rami; Heim, Michael; Mizrahi, Eliyahu; Arad, M

    2003-01-01

    The onset of delirium is frequent in elderly patients who sustain hip fractures. The purpose of this study was to characterize different patterns of preoperative and postoperative delirium, to study factors associated with preoperative delirium and to evaluate the possible different outcome of these patients. This retrospective study comprised 281 elderly patients with hip fractures undergoing surgical fixation. Data collection included age, sex, length of stay, type of fracture, cognitive status by mini mental state examination (MMSE), assessment of possible delirium by the confusion assessment method (CAM) and functional outcome assessed by functional independence measure (FIM). A database search was conducted to identify whether delirium onset occurred prior to or following surgery. About 31% of the total sample developed delirium. Delirious patients tended to be more disabled (P = 0.03) and cognitively impaired (P = 0.018), compared with non-delirious patients. Most delirious cases (53%) had their onset in the preoperative period. Patients with preoperative delirium were older (P = 0.03), had a lower prefracture mobility (P < 0.01), impaired cognition (P = 0.04) and showed an adverse functional outcome in terms of FIM score. Regression analysis showed that prefracture dementia, prefracture mobility and low MMSE scores were strongly associated with higher probability of having preoperative delirium, with no additional effect of other variables. It is concluded that preoperative delirium should be viewed as a separate entity with unfavorable nature and adverse outcome. Careful preventive measures and better treating strategies should be employed to avoid this clinical condition. PMID:12849100

  14. Ten Years Experiences With Preoperative Evaluation Clinic for Day Admission Cardiac and Major Vascular Surgical Patients: Model for "Perioperative Anesthesia and Surgical Home".

    PubMed

    Silvay, George; Zafirova, Zdravka

    2016-06-01

    Admission on the day of surgery for elective cardiac and noncardiac surgery is the prevalent practice in North America and Canada. This approach realizes medical, psychological and logistical benefits, and its success is predicated on an effective outpatient preoperative evaluation. The establishment of a highly functional preoperative clinic with a comprehensive set up and efficient logistical pathways is invaluable. This notion in recent years has included the entire perioperative period, and the concept of a perioperative anesthesia/surgical home (PASH) is gaining popularity. The anesthesiologists as perioperative physicians can organize and lead the entire process from the preoperative evaluation, through the hosptial discharge. The functions of the PASH include preoperative optimization of medical conditions and psychological preparation of the patients and their support system; the care in the operating room and intensive care unit; pain management; respiratory therapy; cardiac rehabilitation; and specialized nutrition. Along with oversight of the medical issues, the preoperative visit is an opportune time for counseling, clarification of expectations and discussion of research, as well as for utilization of various informatics systems to consolidate the pertinent information and distribute it to relevant health care providers. We review the scientific foundation and practical applications of a preoperative visit and share our experience with the development of the preoperative evaluation clinic, designed specifically for cardiac and major vascular patients scheduled for day admission surgery. The ultimate goal of preoperative evaluation clinic is to ensure a safe, efficient, and cost-effective perioperative care for patients undergoing a complex type of surgery. PMID:26620138

  15. 'Fit to fly': overcoming barriers to preoperative haemoglobin optimization in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Gómez-Ramírez, S; Kozek-Langeneker, S; Shander, A; Richards, T; Pavía, J; Kehlet, H; Acheson, A G; Evans, C; Raobaikady, R; Javidroozi, M; Auerbach, M

    2015-07-01

    In major surgery, the implementation of multidisciplinary, multimodal and individualized strategies, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, aims to identify modifiable risks and optimise patients' own physiology with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes. Among the various strategies utilized in Patient Blood Management, timely detection and management of preoperative anaemia is most important, as it is in itself a risk factor for worse clinical outcome, but also one of the strongest predisposing factors for perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion, which in turn increases postoperative morbidity, mortality and costs. However, preoperative anaemia is still frequently ignored, with indiscriminate allogeneic blood transfusion used as a 'quick fix'. Consistent with reported evidence from other medical specialties, this imprudent practice continues to be endorsed by non-evidence based misconceptions, which constitute serious barriers for a wider implementation of preoperative haemoglobin optimisation. We have reviewed a number of these misconceptions, which we unanimously consider should be promptly abandoned by health care providers and replaced by evidence-based strategies such as detection, diagnosis and proper treatment of preoperative anaemia. We believe that this approach to preoperative anaemia management may be a viable, cost-effective strategy that is beneficial both for patients, with improved clinical outcomes, and for health systems, with more efficient use of finite health care resources. PMID:26089443

  16. Preoperative Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: Assets and Drawbacks of Short Course and Long Course in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Samuel Y

    2016-07-01

    Preoperative short-course radiotherapy and preoperative long-course chemoradiotherapy are the standards of care for high-risk rectal cancer in different parts of the world. Both treatments are effective in local control and carry a low morbidity. The advantage of short course is its simplicity, whereas long course has the advantage of downsizing tumors thus increasing the chance of sphincter preservation. Although 2 randomized trials comparing short course and long course have been performed, the better form of preoperative treatment remains a subject of discussion. This article reviews the evidence supporting each approach, and it discusses their relative merits and future directions. PMID:27238469

  17. Preoperative assessment and planning of haemodialysis vascular access.

    PubMed

    Lomonte, Carlo; Basile, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Effective haemodialysis (HD) requires a reliable vascular access (VA). Clinical practice guidelines strongly recommend the arteriovenous fistula (AVF) as the preferred VA in HD patients. The creation of an AVF should be promoted in all eligible patients who choose HD, as it improves outcomes and reduces costs when compared with central venous catheters. Fistula eligibility is a 'work in progress'. Three steps in order to increase the pool of eligible patients can be individualized: (i) process of care, which includes three fundamental items: the VA team, early VA education and timely VA surgery referral; (ii) preoperative evaluation; (iii) surgical strategy. Nephrologists should be able to play a leading and coordinating role of the VA team. They should design a plan that identifies a sequence of options that can be used to provide adequate renal replacement therapy throughout the life span of every end-stage renal disease patient. The main points of this strategy are (i) early vascular education, in which a 'save the vein program' should always be implemented; (ii) timely VA surgery referral and preoperative evaluation: careful examination of arterial and venous beds is mandatory before VA placement; physical examination in addition to colour Doppler ultrasound mapping improves AVF outcomes; (iii) surgical strategy: a successful VA strategy must take into account vascular anatomy, clinical factors and prognosis. PMID:26034588

  18. An Overview of Preoperative Glucose Evaluation, Management, and Perioperative Impact

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Ann M.; Gabbay, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia is a common phenomenon affecting patients both with and without a known prior history of diabetes. Despite an exponential rise in publications and studies of inpatient hyperglycemia over the last decade, many questions still exist as to what defines optimal care of these patients. Initial enthusiasm for tight glycemic control has waned as the unanticipated reality of hypoglycemia and mortality has been realized in some prospective studies. The recent dramatic modification of national practice guidelines to endorse more modest inpatient glycemic targets highlights the dynamic nature of current knowledge as the next decade approaches. This review discusses perioperative hyperglycemia and the categories of patients affected by it. It reviews current recommendations for ambulatory diabetes screening and its importance in preoperative patient care. Finally, it concludes with a review of current practice guidelines, as well as a discussion of future direction and goals for inpatient perioperative glycemic control. PMID:20144379

  19. Preoperative Antibiotics and Mortality in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Silber, Jeffrey H.; Rosenbaum, Paul R.; Trudeau, Martha E.; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Xuemei; Lorch, Scott A.; Kelz, Rachel Rapaport; Mosher, Rachel E.; Even-Shoshan, Orit

    2005-01-01

    Objective and Background: It is generally thought that the use of preoperative antibiotics reduces the risk of postoperative infection, yet few studies have described the association between preoperative antibiotics and the risk of dying. The objective of this study was to determine whether preoperative antibiotics are associated with a reduced risk of death. Methods: We performed a multivariate matched, population-based, case-control study of death following surgery on 1362 Pennsylvania Medicare patients between 65 and 85 years of age undergoing general and orthopedic surgery. Cases (681 deaths within 60 days from hospital admission) were randomly selected throughout Pennsylvania using claims from 1995 and 1996. Models were developed to scan Medicare claims, looking for controls who did not die and who were the closest matches to the previously selected cases based on preoperative characteristics. Cases and their controls were identified, and charts were abstracted to define antibiotic use and obtain baseline severity adjustment data. Results: For general surgery, the odds of dying within 60 days were less than half in those treated with preoperative antibiotics within 2 hours of incision as compared with those without such treatment: (odds ratio = 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.32–0.60), P < 0.0001). For orthopedic surgery, no significant mortality reduction was observed (OR = 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.54–1.32; P < 0.464). Interpretation: Preoperative antibiotics are associated with a substantially lower 60-day mortality rate in elderly patients undergoing general surgery. In patients who appear to be comparable, the risk of death was half as large among those who received preoperative antibiotics. PMID:15973108

  20. Preoperative telemedicine evaluation of surgical mission patients: should we use it routinely?

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat; Mora, Francisco; Bekteshi, Flamur; Rivera, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Low-cost telemedicine is a viable and secure tool for preoperative evaluation of surgical mission patients. It increases efficiency and optimizes the use of existing resources. More specifically, it helps ensure an accurate assessment of patients before the surgical team arrives, reduces on-site prescreening time, and decreases the number of surgical candidates on the waiting list. Routine use of telemedicine in surgical missions most likely would reduce preoperative times and the number of operations canceled at the last minute. Moreover, it may be effectively used for long-term follow-up care, including the management of any postoperative complications. PMID:24552027

  1. Preoperative weight gain might increase risk of gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Istfan, Nawfal W.; Anderson, Wendy A.; Apovian, Caroline M.; Hess, Donald T.; Forse, Armour R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Weight loss improves the cardiovascular and metabolic risk associated with obesity. However, insufficient data are available about the health effects of weight gain, separate from the obesity itself. We sought to determine whether the changes in body weight before open gastric bypass surgery (OGB) would have a significant effect on the immediate perioperative hospital course. Methods A retrospective chart review of 100 consecutive patients was performed to examine the effects of co-morbidities and body weight changes in the immediate preoperative period on the hospital length of stay and the rate of admission to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Results Of our class III obese patients undergoing OGB, 95% had ≥1 co-morbid condition and an overall SICU admission rate of 18%. Compared with the patients with no perioperative SICU admission, the patients admitted to the SICU had a greater degree of insulin resistance (homeostatic model analysis–insulin resistance 10.8 ± 1.3 versus 5.9 ± 0.5, P = .001), greater serum triglyceride levels (225 ± 47 versus 143 ± 8 mg/dL, P = .003), and had gained more weight preoperatively (.52 ± .13 versus .06 ± .06 lb/wk, P = .003). The multivariate analyses showed that preoperative weight gain was a risk factor for a longer length of stay and more SICU admissions lasting ≥3 days, as were a diagnosis of sleep apnea and an elevated serum triglyceride concentration. Conclusion The results of the present retrospective study suggest that weight gain increases the risk of perioperative SICU admission associated with OGB, independent of the body mass index. Sleep apnea and elevated serum triglyceride levels were also important determinants of perioperative morbidity. In view of the increasing epidemic of obesity and the popularity of bariatric surgical procedures, we propose that additional clinical and metabolic research focusing on the understanding of the complex relationship among obesity, positive energy

  2. Preoperative teaching and hysterectomy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oetker-Black, Sharon L; Jones, Susan; Estok, Patricia; Ryan, Marian; Gale, Nancy; Parker, Carla

    2003-06-01

    This study used a theoretical model to determine whether an efficacy-enhancing teaching protocol was effective in improving immediate postoperative behaviors and selected short- and long-term health outcomes in women who underwent abdominal hysterectomies. The model used was the self-efficacy theory of Albert Bandura, PhD. One hundred eight patients in a 486-bed teaching hospital in the Midwest who underwent hysterectomies participated. The participation rate was 85%, and the attrition rate was 17% during the six-month study. The major finding was that participants in the efficacy-enhancing teaching group ambulated significantly longer than participants in the usual care group. This is an important finding because the most prevalent postoperative complications after hysterectomy are atelectasis, pneumonia, paralytic ileus, and deep vein thrombosis, and postoperative ambulation has been shown to decrease or prevent all of these complications. This finding could affect the overall health status of women undergoing hysterectomies. PMID:12817743

  3. Preoperative Pulmonary Rehabilitation before Lung Cancer Resection: Results from two Randomized Studies

    PubMed Central

    Benzo, Roberto; Wigle, Dennis; Novotny, Paul; Wetzstein, Marnie; Nichols, Francis; Shen, Robert K; Cassivi, Steve; Deschamps, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Complete surgical resection is the most effective curative treatment for lung cancer. However, many patients with lung cancer also have severe COPD which increases their risk of postoperative complications and their likelihood of being considered “inoperable.” Preoperative Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) has been proposed as an intervention to decrease surgical morbidity but there is no established protocol and no randomized study has been published to date. We tested two preoperative PR interventions in patients undergoing Lung Cancer resection and with moderate-severe COPD in a randomized single blinded design. Outcomes were length of hospital stay and postoperative complications. The first study tested 4 weeks of guideline-based PR vs.usual care: that study proved to be very difficult to recruit as patients and providers were reluctant to delay surgery. Nine patients were randomized and no differences were found between arms. The second study tested ten preoperative PR sessions using a customized protocol with nonstandard components (exercise prescription based on self efficacy, inspiratory muscle training, and the practice of slow breathing) (n=10) vs.usual care (N=9). The PR arm had shorter length of hospital stay by 3 days (p=0.058), fewer prolonged chest tubes (11% vs. 63%, p=0.03) and fewer days needing a chest tube (8.8vs.4.3 days p=0.04) compared to the controlled arm. A ten-session preoperative PR intervention may improve post operative lung reexpansion evidenced by shorter chest tube times and decrease the length of hospital stay, a crude estimator of post operative morbidity and costs. Our results suggest the potential for short term preoperative Pulmonary Rehabilitation interventions in patients with moderate-severe COPD undergoing curative lung resection. 4 weeks of conventional preoperative PR seems non feasible. PMID:21663994

  4. [Present status of preoperative staging and contemplation on preoperative precision staging for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenggang

    2016-02-25

    The aim of the preoperative staging of gastric cancer was to evaluate the depth of tumor infiltration (T-stage), the extent or number of metastasized lymph nodes (N-stage), and distant metastasis (M-stage) before surgery, to develop an optimal therapeutic scheme for the patients with gastric cancer. Traditional methods of preoperative staging for gastric cancer are usually imaging diagnostic techniques, such as endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and laparoscopic exploration. At present, the accuracy of preoperative TNM staging of gastric cancer can generally reach 70% to 85% with significant clinical benefit. The accurate preoperative staging for cancer patients can have a major role in determining the final clinical outcome and in predicting the prognosis. According to the concept of "precision medicine", to achieve "preoperative precision staging of gastric cancer", the application of imaging diagnostic techniques must be combined with the analysis of individual genetic information or tumor molecular pathological classification, which should be based on research of the disease genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. In this article, we provide a review of results on preoperative staging of gastric cancer in recent years, and we also discuss how to think about the "preoperative precision staging of gastric cancer", with special emphasis on the potential of molecular imaging techniques, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), molecular targets for tumor targeting therapy and molecular pathological classification, etc. in judging bio-molecular behavior of gastric cancer before surgery. PMID:26831874

  5. The Impact of Race/Ethnicity on Preoperative Time to Hip Stabilization Procedure after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Oghalai, Tracy U.; Kuo, Yong-fang; Wu, Helen; Shokar, Navkiran K.; Grecula, Michael; Tincher, Steven; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    Background We sought to examine the preoperative time for hip stabilization procedure among Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks (blacks) and non-Hispanic whites (whites). Methods This was a secondary data analysis using Medicare claims data. Our analysis included 40,321 patients admitted for hip fracture hospitalization from 2001-2005. Our primary analysis was generalized linear modeling, and our dependent variable was preoperative time. Our independent variable was race/ethnicity (Hispanics, blacks versus whites), and covariates were age, gender, income, type of hip fracture and comorbidities. Results Bivariate analyses showed that both Hispanics and blacks experienced a longer preoperative time (P<0.01). The average (mean) of days to surgery was 1.2 for whites, 1.6 for blacks and 1.7 for Hispanics. The delayed preoperative time among Hispanics and blacks persisted after adjusting for covariates. Conclusions The delayed preoperative time among minorities suggests the need to closely monitor care among minorities with hip fracture to determine how to best address their developing needs. PMID:20375948

  6. Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye Care: Preoperative Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ...

  7. Current status of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sakai, Yuji; Mikata, Rintaro; Yasui, Shin; Watanabe, Yuto; Sakamoto, Dai; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Senoo, Jun-Ichi; Kusakabe, Yuko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-08-28

    Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) was developed to improve obstructive jaundice, which affects a number of organs and physiological mechanisms in patients waiting for surgery. However, its role in patients who will undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy for biliary obstruction remains controversial. This article aims to review the current status of the use of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction. Relevant articles published from 1980 to 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed using the keywords "PBD", "pancreaticoduodenectomy", and "obstructive jaundice". Additional papers were identified by a manual search of the references from key articles. Current studies have demonstrated that PBD should not be routinely performed because of the postoperative complications. PBD should only be considered in carefully selected patients, particularly in cases where surgery had to be delayed. PBD may be needed in patients with severe jaundice, concomitant cholangitis, or severe malnutrition. The optimal method of biliary drainage has yet to be confirmed. PBD should be performed by endoscopic routes rather than by percutaneous routes to avoid metastatic tumor seeding. Endoscopic stenting or nasobiliary drainage can be selected. Although more expensive, the use of metallic stents remains a viable option to achieve effective drainage without cholangitis and reintervention. PMID:26328029

  8. Current status of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sakai, Yuji; Mikata, Rintaro; Yasui, Shin; Watanabe, Yuto; Sakamoto, Dai; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Senoo, Jun-ichi; Kusakabe, Yuko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) was developed to improve obstructive jaundice, which affects a number of organs and physiological mechanisms in patients waiting for surgery. However, its role in patients who will undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy for biliary obstruction remains controversial. This article aims to review the current status of the use of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction. Relevant articles published from 1980 to 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed using the keywords “PBD”, “pancreaticoduodenectomy”, and “obstructive jaundice”. Additional papers were identified by a manual search of the references from key articles. Current studies have demonstrated that PBD should not be routinely performed because of the postoperative complications. PBD should only be considered in carefully selected patients, particularly in cases where surgery had to be delayed. PBD may be needed in patients with severe jaundice, concomitant cholangitis, or severe malnutrition. The optimal method of biliary drainage has yet to be confirmed. PBD should be performed by endoscopic routes rather than by percutaneous routes to avoid metastatic tumor seeding. Endoscopic stenting or nasobiliary drainage can be selected. Although more expensive, the use of metallic stents remains a viable option to achieve effective drainage without cholangitis and reintervention. PMID:26328029

  9. [Preoperative management to reduce morbidity and mortality of hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Ferré, F; Minville, V

    2011-10-01

    Hip femur is extremely common in the elderly and is one of the most common reasons for admission in trauma care. The main reported causes of death after hip fracture were cardiovascular (29%), neurological (20%) and pulmonary. Large epidemiological studies have shown a relatively small decrease in mortality for 20 years despite an active approach to medical and surgical management. Yet 57% of deaths occurring within 30 days post-surgery are preventable because they are not related to a pre-existing disease. Preoperative management to optimize these patients could help to reduce morbidity and mortality and is thus a crucial issue. The anesthesia consultation is used to evaluate the perioperative risk, treat pain, manage treatment and stabilize the patient. An operative delay of more than 48hours after admission increases mortality. This period should not be prolonged by unnecessary investigations that will not change the perioperative management. The preoperative period is a key moment because it allows to choose the anesthetic technique. Even if this choice is controversial, continuous spinal anesthesia (titrated) do not modify the cardiovascular and neurological physiological balance of these precarious patients. PMID:21945704

  10. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  11. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  12. Preparation of patients for anaesthesia - achieving quality care.

    PubMed

    Lau, L; Jan, G; Chan, T F

    2002-04-01

    Implementation of anaesthesia begins with a preoperative assessment of the surgical patient and development of an anaesthetic plan. Preparation of the patient includes the preoperative assessment, review of preoperative tests, optimisation of medical conditions, adequate preoperative fasting, appropriate premedication, and the explanation of anaesthetic risk to patients. The goals of preoperative preparation are to reduce the morbidity of surgery, to increase the quality while decreasing the cost of perioperative care, and to return the patient to desirable functioning as quickly as possible. A knowledgeable anaesthesiologist is the 'final clinical gatekeeper', who coordinates perioperative management and ensures that the patient is in the optimal state for anaesthesia and surgery. PMID:11937664

  13. Effectiveness of preoperative analgesics on postoperative dental pain: a study.

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, M.; Hunter, K. M.; Baker, A. B.

    1996-01-01

    Patients undergoing extractions of third molar teeth under general anesthesia were given a placebo, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) 100 mg, or methadone (an opiate) 10 mg 60 to 90 min prior to surgery, and their pain scores and postoperative medication requirements were measured for 3 days. All patients received local anesthetic blocks and analgesic drugs during the perioperative period. There were no significant differences between the three groups in the pain scores and medication requirements during the period of study. It was concluded that preoperative use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates may not offer a preemptive analgesic effect in patients who have had adequate analgesia during the surgery. Continued use of analgesic drugs during the postoperative period is perhaps more useful for this purpose. There appears to be a higher incidence of vomiting following opiates (methadone), precluding its clinical use in day-care patients. PMID:10323113

  14. [Evaluation of a preoperative virtual tour for parents and children].

    PubMed

    Tourigny, Jocelyne; Chartrand, Julie

    2009-03-01

    A Canadian pediatric center has set a preoperative virtual tour on its website. This tour was evaluated by a descriptive study, in terms of utilization, efficacy and usefulness. The tour was utilized by 49.6% of the 123 families. Children of these families had a significant increase in knowledge from Time I (preop clinic) to Time 2 (day of surgery). Children and youth who did not use the tour reported themselves as more anxious the day of surgery but not significantly. There was no significant change in parents. The internet is a useful tool in families' preparation but cannot replace a direct interaction. Other researches are necessary in order to evaluate the impact of this type of preparation on the quality of care and on the child's recovery. PMID:19388414

  15. Preoperative Low Serum Bicarbonate Levels Predict Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Jung, Su-Young; Park, Jung Tak; Kwon, Young Eun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Ryu, Geun Woo; Lee, Sul A; Park, Seohyun; Jhee, Jong Hyun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is a common and serious complication. Although lower than normal serum bicarbonate levels are known to be associated with consecutive renal function deterioration in patients with chronic kidney injury, it is not well-known whether preoperative low serum bicarbonate levels are associated with the development of AKI in patients who undergo cardiac surgery. Therefore, the clinical implication of preoperative serum bicarbonate levels on AKI occurrence after cardiac surgery was investigated. Patients who underwent coronary artery bypass or valve surgery at Yonsei University Health System from January 2013 to December 2014 were enrolled. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on preoperative serum bicarbonate levels, which represented group 1 (below normal levels) <23 mEq/L; group 2 (normal levels) 23 to 24 mEq/L; and group 3 (elevated levels) >24 mEq/L. The primary outcome was the predicated incidence of AKI 48 hours after cardiac surgery. AKI was defined according to Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria. Among 875 patients, 228 (26.1%) developed AKI within 48 hours after cardiac surgery. The incidence of AKI was higher in group 1 (40.9%) than in group 2 (26.5%) and group 3 (19.5%) (P < 0.001). In addition, the duration of postoperative stay in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU) was longer for AKI patients and for those in the low-preoperative-serum-bicarbonate-level groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that low preoperative serum bicarbonate levels were significantly associated with AKI even after adjustment for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, operation type, preoperative hemoglobin, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. In conclusion, low serum bicarbonate levels were associated with higher incidence of AKI and prolonged ICU stay. Further studies are needed to clarify whether strict correction of bicarbonate levels close to normal limits may have a protective

  16. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Truong, Adam; Hanna, Mark H; Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Stamos, Michael J

    2016-05-27

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient's nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorectal surgical patients, hypoalbuminemia significantly increases the length of hospital stay, rates of surgical site infections, enterocutaneous fistula risk, and deep vein thrombosis formation. The delay of surgical procedures to allow for preoperative correction of albumin levels in hypoalbuminemic patients has been shown to improve the morbidity and mortality in patients with severe nutritional risk. The importance of preoperative albumin levels and the patient's chronic inflammatory state on the postoperative morbidity and mortality has led to the development of a variety of surgical scoring systems to predict outcomes efficiently. This review attempts to provide a systematic overview of albumin and its role and implications in colorectal surgery. PMID:27231513

  17. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Adam; Hanna, Mark H; Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Stamos, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient’s nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorectal surgical patients, hypoalbuminemia significantly increases the length of hospital stay, rates of surgical site infections, enterocutaneous fistula risk, and deep vein thrombosis formation. The delay of surgical procedures to allow for preoperative correction of albumin levels in hypoalbuminemic patients has been shown to improve the morbidity and mortality in patients with severe nutritional risk. The importance of preoperative albumin levels and the patient’s chronic inflammatory state on the postoperative morbidity and mortality has led to the development of a variety of surgical scoring systems to predict outcomes efficiently. This review attempts to provide a systematic overview of albumin and its role and implications in colorectal surgery. PMID:27231513

  18. A Clinical Process Change and Educational Intervention to Reduce the Use of Unnecessary Preoperative Tests

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Sarah E.; Shiffermiller, Jason F.; Wells, Adam D.; May, Sara M.; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Caverzagie, Kelly J.; Beachy, Micah W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Internal medicine residents receive limited training on how to be good stewards of health care dollars while preserving high-quality care. Intervention We implemented a clinical process change and an educational intervention focused on the appropriate use of preoperative diagnostic testing by residents at a Veterans Administration (VA) medical center. Methods The clinical process change consisted of reducing routine ordering of preoperative tests in the absence of specific indications. Residents received a short didactic session, which included algorithms for determining the appropriate use of perioperative diagnostic testing. One outcome was the average cost savings on preoperative testing for a continuous cohort of patients referred for elective knee or hip surgery. Resident knowledge and confidence prior to and after the intervention was measured by pre- and posttest. Results The mean cost of preoperative testing decreased from $74 to $28 per patient after the dual intervention (P < .001). The bulk of cost savings came from elimination of unnecessary blood and urine tests, as well as reduced numbers of electrocardiograms and chest radiographs. Among residents who completed the pretest and posttest, the mean score on the pretest was 54%, compared with 80% on the posttest (P  =  .027). Following the educational intervention, 70% of residents stated they felt “very comfortable” ordering appropriate preoperative testing (P  =  .006). Conclusions This initiative required few resources, and it simultaneously improved the educational experience for residents and reduced costs. Other institutions may be able to adopt or adapt this intervention to reduce unnecessary diagnostic expenditures. PMID:26140127

  19. Preoperative diagnosis and intraoperative protection of nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve: A review of 5 cases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Ping; He, Liang; Dong, Wenwu

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN) is a risk factor for nerve injury during thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy. It is usually associated with abnormal vasculature that can be identified by several imaging methods. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the preoperative diagnosis and intraoperative protection of NRLN. Material/Methods Of the 7169 patients who underwent thyroid surgery at our hospital between August 2008 and January 2013, 5 patients with NRLN were identified. Preoperative chest X-rays, neck ultrasonography (US), and computed tomography (CT) findings were reviewed. NRLNs were carefully and systematically searched for in surgery. Results Preoperative CT predicted NRLN in all 5 cases (100% accuracy). The detection rate of NRLN by CT was 0.4% (5/1170). NRLNs were confirmed in surgery. All of them were right-sided NRLN with type IIA variant. The CT scans clearly revealed the vascular anomalies. The review of US images suggested that vascular anomalies could be identified on the images in 1 patient. No postoperative complications occurred in any patient. Conclusions The preoperative CT scan was a reliable and effective method for identifying abnormal vasculature to indirectly predict NRLN. Combining the CT and US findings with adequate surgical technique may help to reduce the risk of nerve damage, in addition to preventing nerve palsy. PMID:24518037

  20. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage With Postoperative Outcome Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Karpeh, Martin S.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Pancreaticoduodenectomy is accompanied by a considerable rate of postoperative complications and potential death. Controversy exists regarding the impact of preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage on morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods Two hundred forty consecutive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed between January 1994 and January 1997 were analyzed. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were examined. Pearson chi square analysis or Fisher’s exact test, when appropriate, was used for univariate comparison of all variables. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results One hundred seventy-five patients (73%) underwent preoperative biliary instrumentation (endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical instrumentation). One hundred twenty-six patients (53%) underwent preoperative biliary drainage (endoscopic stents, percutaneous drains/stents, or surgical drainage). The overall postoperative morbidity rate after pancreaticoduodenectomy was 48% (114/240). Infectious complications occurred in 34% (81/240) of patients. Intraabdominal abscess occurred in 14% (33/240) of patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 5% (12/240). Preoperative biliary drainage was determined to be the only statistically significant variable associated with complications (p = 0.025), infectious complications (p = 0.014), intraabdominal abscess (p = 0.022), and postoperative death (p = 0.037). Preoperative biliary instrumentation alone was not associated with complications, infectious complications, intraabdominal abscess, or postoperative death. Conclusions Preoperative biliary drainage, but not preoperative biliary instrumentation alone, is associated with increased

  1. Preoperative breast marking in reduction mammaplasty.

    PubMed

    Gasperoni, C; Salgarello, M

    1987-10-01

    A simple method of preoperative marking for reduction mammaplasty is described. This method may be used in macromastias when the technique chosen implies a postoperative scar with the shape of an inverted T. The marking sequence follows standard steps, but the drawing is always different because it is a consequence of the shape of the breast. This marking method reduces the chance of making mistakes due to excessive personal evaluations or to the use of standard drawing patterns that may be not suitable for all breast shapes. PMID:3688776

  2. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-11

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  3. [Intestinal stoma: preoperative and postoperative management].

    PubMed

    Soravia, C; Beyeler, S; Lataillade, L

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this review is to present the management and indications of intestinal stomas. A stoma induces a body image alteration with important familial and social consequences. A preoperative visit to the stoma nurse prevents technical and/or psychological complications. Stoma nurses, surgeons and general practionners work together to help the patient in his/her new life. New stoma devices have also contributed to improve quality of life. Social and sexual activity can be maintain despite intestinal stoma with appropriate education. PMID:15828375

  4. Preoperative carbohydrate nutrition reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting compared to preoperative fasting

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Neslihan; Çekmen, Nedim; Bilgin, Ferruh; Erten, Ela; Özhan, Mehmet Özhan; Coşar, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective, randomized, single-blinded study was to compare the effects of a carbohydrate drink 400 mL given 2 h before the surgery with preoperative overnight fasting on the gastric pH and residual volume, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and antiemetic consumption in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials And Methods: Forty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II patients who underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Randomized, prospective, controlled study, Gulhane Medical Faculty and Guven Hospital Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: Pre-operative carbohydrate drink group (group C, n = 20) and preoperative fasting group (group F, n = 20). Group C was given a 400 mL carbohydrate drink 2 h before to the surgery. The patients of group F were fasted 8 h before the surgery. Both groups were operated under general anesthesia with volatile anesthetics. Results: Hemodynamic parameters, demographic data, gastric acidity and residual volumes were similar for both groups. No complications were observed. PONV and antiemetic consumption was lower in group C compared to group F (P = 0.001). Patient's satisfaction was higher in group C (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study showed that pre-operative carbohydrate drink may be used safely and also improves patient's satisfaction and comfort in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:24497851

  5. Preoperative Imaging for Clinical Staging Prior to Radical Cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Hugen, Cory M; Duddalwar, Vinay; Daneshmand, Siamak

    2016-09-01

    The importance of patient selection for quality outcomes following radical cystectomy is critical. Clinical staging is one of the key elements necessary for patient selection, and staging relies on accurate preoperative imaging. Many imaging modalities are available and have been utilized for preoperative staging with published operating characteristics. In this update, we review recently published literature for advances in preoperative imaging prior to radical cystectomy. PMID:27432379

  6. Preoperative Preparation and Anesthesia for Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preoperative preparation should improve the likelihood of successful trabeculectomy surgery. The team can reconsider the appropriateness of the proposed surgery, and steps can be taken to maximize the chance of a good outcome. For example, adjustments to anti-hypertensive or anti-coagulant medications may be made, and topical ocular medications adjusted. Choice of anesthesia technique is of particular relevance to the trabeculectomy patient. Some anesthesia techniques are more likely to have serious complications, and glaucoma patients may be at higher risk of some sight-threatening complications, because the optic nerve is already damaged and vulnerable. Posterior placement of local anesthesia (retrobulbar, peribulbar, posterior sub-Tenon’s techniques) could potentially damage the optic nerve, and thereby cause “wipe-out” of vision. Anesthesia technique may influence the likelihood of vitreous bulge and surgical difficulty. Regarding long-term control of intraocular pressure, there is no good evidence to indicate that any particular anesthesia technique is better than another. There is little high-quality evidence on this topic. The author’s preferred technique for trabeculectomy is subconjunctival-intracameral anesthesia without sedation. How to cite this article: Eke T. Preoperative Preparation and Anesthesia for Trabeculectomy. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2016; 10(1):21-35. PMID:27231416

  7. Preoperative transarterial Embolisation in bone tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2012-01-01

    Bone tumors include a variety of lesions, both primary and metastatic. The treatment modalities for bone tumors vary with the individual lesion, but in general surgical excision is the treatment of choice with other adjunctive therapies. However, surgery for many bone tumors is complex due to several factors including tumor bulk, vascularity, vicinity to vital structures and potentially inaccessible location of the lesion. Transarterial Embolisation (TAE) is one of the important adjuvant treatment modalities and in some cases it may be the primary and curative treatment. Preoperative TAE has proved to be effective in both primary and metastatic bone tumors. It reduces tumor vascularity and intraoperative blood loss, the need for blood transfusion and associated complications, allows better definition of tissue planes at surgery affording more complete excision, and hence reduced recurrence. Preoperative chemoEmbolisation has also been shown to increase the sensitivity of some tumors to subsequent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There are several techniques and embolic agents available for this purpose, but the ultimate aim is to achieve tumor devascularization. In this review, we discuss the techniques including the choice of embolic agent, application to individual lesions and potential complications. PMID:22761978

  8. [Preoperative oral hydration for pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Rie

    2011-07-01

    Preoperative oral hydration is an important component of "enhanced recovery after surgery" strategies. This was originally developed for patients undergoing colon surgery. The Obstetric Anesthesia Practice Guideline issued by American Society of Anesthesiologists states that intake of minimum amount of clear fluid 2 hours prior to surgery may be safe. However, anesthesiologists have to consider physiological changes that parturients undergo during pregnancy, such as increased risk of aspiration and impaired glucose tolerance. We also have to consider the potential effect of glucose loading on neonates. Mothers are more likely to develop ketosis by glucose loading. It also stimulates insulin release in the fetus, which can result in neonatal hypoglycemia. In addition, sodium overloading may deteriorate intra-vascular dehydration and cause lung edema to mothers. On the other hand, oral hydration can alleviate a sense of thirst and increase maternal satisfaction. Our data showed that maternal urinal ketone body at delivery tended to decrease with oral hydration during labor. Moreover, some articles suggest that oral hydration may improve utero-placental perfusion. Therefore, we have to balance risks and benefits of oral hydration in parturients. Further investigations are needed among this specific subgroup of patients in order to establish the safe application of preoperative oral hydration. PMID:21800658

  9. [Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for resectable lower rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takase, Shiro; Kamigaki, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishimura, Hideki; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2009-11-01

    To suppress local recurrence and preserve sphincter function, we performed preoperative chemoradiotherapy( CRT) of rectal cancer. Sixteen patients with lower advanced rectal cancer received tegafur/uracil/calcium folinate+RT followed by curative resection with lateral lymph node dissection 2-8 weeks later. The male/female ratio was found to be 11:5 (41-75 years old) and the CRT was feasible for all patients. There were 11-PR and 5-SD according to RECIST criteria, and lower isotope accumulation was observed for all primary tumors in FDG-PET study. After CRT, all patients received R0 curative resection (11 APR, 2 LAR, 1 Hartmann and 1 ISR). On pathological study, 3 patients showed complete response. Surgical complications including pelvic infection, delayed a wound healing and deep venous thrombosis, etc. In conclusion, preoperative CRT of advanced rectal cancer could potentially be useful for local control and sphincter saving, however, it is necessary to manage specific surgical complications due to radiation. PMID:20037306

  10. Bevacizumab with preoperative chemotherapy versus preoperative chemotherapy alone for colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhen-Hai; Peng, Jian-Hong; Wang, Fu-Long; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Wu; Li, Yu-Hong; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Gong; Ding, Pei-Rong; Li, Li-Ren; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lin, Jun-Zhong; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Wan, De-Sen; Pan, Zhi-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus preoperative chemotherapy as first-line treatment for liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer in Chinese patients compared with those of preoperative chemotherapy alone. Patients with histologically confirmed liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer were sequentially reviewed, and received either preoperative chemotherapy plus bevacizumab (bevacizumab group, n = 32) or preoperative chemotherapy alone (chemotherapy group, n = 57). Progression-free survival, response rate, liver resection rate, conversion rate, and safety were analyzed. With median follow-up of 28.7 months, progression-free survival was 10.9 months (95% confidence interval: 8.7–13.1 months) in bevacizumab group and 9.9 months (95% confidence interval: 6.8–13.1 months) in chemotherapy group (P = 0.472). Response rates were 59.4% in bevacizumab group and 38.6% in chemotherapy group (P = 0.059). Overall liver resection (R0, R1, and R2) rate was 68.8% in bevacizumab group and 54.4% in chemotherapy group (P = 0.185). Conversion rate was 51.9% in bevacizumab group and 40.4% in chemotherapy group (P = 0.341). No postoperative complication was observed in all patients. Bevacizumab plus preoperative chemotherapy as first-line treatment for liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer tends to achieve better clinical benefit with controllable safety in Chinese patients. PMID:27583930

  11. Jejunioleal Bypass Procedures in Morbid Obesity: Preoperative Psychological Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Warren W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Seventy patients who averaged 155 percent overweight and requested jejunioleal bypass surgery as a treatment intervention for morbid obesity were studied preoperatively for prominent psychological characteristics. (Author)

  12. Preoperative psychological assessment of patients seeking weight-loss surgery: identifying challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Edwards-Hampton, Shenelle A; Wedin, Sharlene

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative psychosocial assessment is the standard of care for patients seeking weight-loss surgery (WLS). However, the assessment procedure varies widely by surgery site. Comprehensive assessments can provide a wealth of information that assists both the patient and the treatment team, anticipate and prepare for challenges associated with extensive behavioral and lifestyle changes that are required postsurgery. In this review, we provide an overview of the purpose of the preoperative psychosocial assessment and domains to be included. Challenges commonly identified in the assessment are discussed, including maladaptive eating behaviors, psychiatric comorbidities, and alcohol use. Potential solutions and approaches to these challenges are provided. Additionally, patient populations requiring special consideration are presented to include adolescents, those with cognitive vulnerabilities, and aging adults. PMID:26604844

  13. Use Of Pre-operative Testing And Physicians’ Response To Professional Society Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Sigmund, Alana E.; Stevens, Elizabeth R.; Blitz, Jeanna; Ladapo, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The value of routine pre-operative testing prior to most surgical procedures is widely considered to be low. To improve the quality of pre-operative care and reduce waste, two professional societies released guidance in 2002, but researchers and policymakers remain concerned about the health and cost burden of low-value care in the pre-operative setting. Objective To examine the long-term, national impact of 2002 professional guidance from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), on physicians’ use of routine pre-operative testing. Design, Setting, Participants U.S. adults evaluated in pre-operative visits in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) between 1997-2010. A quasi-experimental, differences-in-differences (DID) approach evaluated whether professional guidance in 2002 was associated with changes in pre-operative testing patterns, while adjusting for temporal trends in routine testing, as captured by testing patterns in general medical exams. Main Measures Physician orders for outpatient plain radiography, hematocrit, urinalysis, electrocardiogram (ECG), and cardiac stress testing. Results Over the 14-year period, the average annual number of pre-operative visits in the US increased from 6.8 million in 1997-1999, to 9.8 million in 2002-2004, to 14.3 million in 2008-2010. After accounting for temporal trends in routine testing, we found no statistically significant overall changes in the use of plain radiography (11.3% in 1997-2002 to 9.9% in 2003-2010, DID=−1.0-per-100-visits 95% CI-4.1,2.2), hematocrit (9.4% in 1997-2002 to 4.1% in 2003-2010, DID=+1.2-per-100-visits 95% CI-2.2,4.7), urinalysis (12.2% in 1997-2002 to 8.9% in 2003-2010, DID=+2.7-per-100-visits 95% CI-1.7,7.1), or cardiac stress testing (1.0% in 1997-2002 to 2.0% in 2003-2010, DID=+0.7-per-100-visits 95% CI-0.1,1.5) after

  14. Preoperative Steroid Treatment Does Not Improve Markers of Inflammation Following Cardiac Surgery in Neonates: Results from a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Eric M.; Atz, Andrew M.; McHugh, Kimberly E.; Butts, Ryan J.; Baker, Nathaniel L.; Stroud, Robert E.; Reeves, Scott T.; Bradley, Scott M.; McGowan, Francis X.; Spinale, Francis G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neonatal cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass results in a heightened inflammatory response. Perioperative glucocorticoid administration is commonly utilized in attempt to reduce the inflammatory cascade, although characterization of the cytokine response to steroids in neonatal cardiac surgery remains elusive due to highly variable approaches in administration. This randomized trial was designed to prospectively evaluate the effect of specific glucocorticoid dosing protocols on inflammatory markers in neonatal cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Neonates scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomly assigned to receive either two-dose (8 hours preoperatively and operatively, n=36) or single dose (operatively, n=32) methylprednisolone at 30mg/kg/dose in a prospective double-blind trial. The primary outcome was the effect of these steroid regimens on markers of inflammation. Secondary analyses evaluated the association of specific cytokine profiles with postoperative clinical outcomes. Results Patient demographics, perioperative variables and preoperative indices of inflammation were similar between the single and two-dose groups. Preoperative cytokine response after the two-dose methylprednisolone protocol was consistent with an anti-inflammatory effect, although this did not persist into the postoperative period. Pre-medication baseline levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha were predictive of postoperative intensive care unit and hospital length of stay. Only interleukin-8 demonstrated a postoperative response associated with duration of intensive care unit and hospital stay. Conclusions The addition of a preoperative dose of methylprednisolone to a standard intraoperative methylprednisolone dose does not improve markers of inflammation following neonatal cardiac surgery. The routine administration of preoperative glucocorticoids in neonatal cardiac surgery should be

  15. A Preoperative, Nurse-Led Intervention Program Reduces Acute Postoperative Delirium.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Fan, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a preoperative, multidisciplinary intervention program for the prevention of acute postoperative delirium on the incidence and severity in patients who were treated in the intensive care unit after surgery. We studied 122 patients who had been transferred into intensive care unit after surgery at a teaching general hospital in China. The intervention consisted of standardized protocols for the management of risk factors for delirium: education of nursing staff, systematic cognitive caring, maintaining a safe environment, social support, and improving sleep quality. All patients were monitored for signs of delirium after surgery, as measured by the Delirium Detection Score. The Delirium Detection Scores of patients in the intervention cohort after surgery on different time points were less than the scores of patients in the control group on the same point-in-time (p < .01). The severity degree of delirium for patients was less (p < .01) in the intervention group within 24 hours than that in the usual care cohort. This study showed the beneficial effects of a preoperative intervention program focusing on early prevention of delirium in patients before surgery. Systematic and comprehensive interventions could reduce the incidence and severity of delirium. PMID:27224685

  16. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  17. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Naheed

    2015-01-01

    The anaesthetic management of patients with pre-existing pulmonary disease is a challenging task. It is associated with increased morbidity in the form of post-operative pulmonary complications. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function helps in reducing these complications. Patients are advised to stop smoking for a period of 4–6 weeks. This reduces airway reactivity, improves mucociliary function and decreases carboxy-haemoglobin. The widely used incentive spirometry may be useful only when combined with other respiratory muscle exercises. Volume-based inspiratory devices have the best results. Pharmacotherapy of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease must be optimised before considering the patient for elective surgery. Beta 2 agonists, inhaled corticosteroids and systemic corticosteroids, are the main drugs used for this and several drugs play an adjunctive role in medical therapy. A graded approach has been suggested to manage these patients for elective surgery with an aim to achieve optimal pulmonary function. PMID:26556913

  18. Pancoast tumors: characteristics and preoperative assessment

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Nikolaos; Leivaditis, Vasilios; Koletsis, Efstratios; Prokakis, Christos; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Hatzimichalis, Antonios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Kesisis, Georgios; Siminelakis, Stavros; Madesis, Athanasios; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Superior sulcus tumors (SSTs), or as otherwise known Pancoast tumors, make up a clinically unique and challenging subset of non-small cell carcinoma of the lung (NSCLC). Although the outcome of patients with this disease has traditionally been poor, recent developments have contributed to a significant improvement in prognosis of SST patients. The combination of severe and unrelenting shoulder and arm pain along the distribution of the eighth cervical and first and second thoracic nerve trunks, Horner’s syndrome (ptosis, miosis, and anhidrosis) and atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles comprises a clinical entity named as “Pancoast-Tobias syndrome”. Apart NSCLC, other lesions may, although less frequently, result in Pancoast syndrome. In the current review we will present the main characteristics of the disease and focus on the preoperative assessment. PMID:24672686

  19. Pre-operative nutrition and carbohydrate loading.

    PubMed

    Kratzing, Caroline

    2011-08-01

    An optimal nutritional state is an important consideration in providing successful operative outcomes. Unfortunately, many aspects of surgery are not constructive to providing this. In addition, the metabolic and immune response to injury induces a catabolic state and insulin resistance, a known risk factor of post-operative complications. Aggressive insulin therapy post-operatively has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality but similar results can be achieved when insulin resistance is lessened by the use of pre-operative carbohydrate loading. Consuming carbohydrate-containing drinks up to 2 h before surgery has been found to be an effective way to attenuate insulin resistance, minimise protein losses, reduce hospital stays and improve patient comfort without adversely affecting gastric emptying. Enhanced recovery programmes have employed carbohydrate loading as one of several strategies aimed at reducing post-operative stress and improving the recovery process. Studies examining the benefits of these programmes have demonstrated significantly shorter post-operative hospital stays, faster return to normal functions and lower occurrences of surgical complications. As a consequence of the favourable evidence they are now being implemented in many surgical units. Further benefit to post-operative recovery may be found with the use of immune-enhancing diets, i.e. supplementation with n-3 fatty acids, arginine, glutamine and/or nucleotides. These have the potential to boost the immune system, improve wound healing and reduce inflammatory markers. Research exploring the benefits of immunonutrition and solidifying the use of carbohydrate loading is ongoing; however, there is strong evidence to link good pre-operative nutrition and improved surgical outcomes. PMID:21781358

  20. Background parenchymal enhancement in preoperative breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, Satoko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Satake, Hiroko; Kawamura, Akiko; Kawai, Hisashi; Kikumori, Toyone; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We aimed to assess the influence of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on surgical planning performed using preoperative MRI for breast cancer evaluation. Between January 2009 and December 2010, 91 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (mean age, 55.5 years; range, 30−88 years) who underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI followed by planned breast conservation therapy were retrospectively enrolled. MRI was performed to assess the tumor extent in addition to mammography and breast ultrasonography. BPE in the contralateral normal breast MRI at the early dynamic phase was visually classified as follows: minimal (n=49), mild (n=27), moderate (n=7), and marked (n=8). The correlations between the BPE grade and age, menopausal status, index tumor size, changes in surgical management based on MRI results, positive predictive value (PPV) of MRI, and surgical margins were assessed. Patients in the strong BPE groups were significantly younger (p=0.002) and generally premenopausal (p<0.001). Surgical treatment was not changed in 67 cases (73.6%), while extended excision and mastectomy were performed in 12 cases (13.2%), each based on additional lesions on MRI. Six of 79 (7.6%) patients who underwent breast conservation therapy had tumor-positive resection margins. In cases where surgical management was changed, the PPV for MRI-detected foci was high in the minimal (91.7%) and mild groups (66.7%), and 0% in the moderate and marked groups (p=0.002). Strong BPE causes false-positive MRI findings and may lead to overly extensive surgery, whereas MRI may be beneficial in select patients with weak BPE. PMID:26412883

  1. An analysis of a preoperative pediatric autologous blood donation program

    PubMed Central

    Letts, Merv; Perng, Richard; Luke, Brian; Jarvis, James; Lawton, Louis; Hoey, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a pediatric autologous blood donation program. Design A retrospective study of patient charts and blood-bank records. Setting The Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, a tertiary care, pediatric centre. Patients One hundred and seventy-three children who received blood transfusions for a total of 182 procedures between June 1987 and June 1997. Interventions Autologous and homologous blood transfusion required for major surgical intervention, primarily spinal fusion. Main outcome measures Surgeons’ accuracy in predicting the number of autologous blood units required for a given procedure, compliance rate (children’s ability to donate the requested volume of blood), utilization rate of autologous units and rate of allogeneic transfusion. Results The surgeons’ accuracy in predicting the number of autologous units required for a given procedure was 53.8%. The compliance rate of children to donate the requested amount of blood was 80.3%. In children below the standard age and weight criteria for blood donation the compliance rate was 75.5%. The utilization rate of autologous units obtained was 84.4% and the incidence of allogeneic transfusion was 26.6%. Conclusions There was a high rate of compliance and utilization of predonated autologous blood in the children in the study. Preoperative blood donation programs are safe and effective in children, even in those below the standard age and weight criteria of 10 years and 40 kg. PMID:10812347

  2. Pre-operative drilling simulation method for dental implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Arataki, Tomohiko; Furuya, Yoshitaka; Ito, Taichi; Miyashita, Yuko; Shimamura, Ichiro; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2007-02-01

    The position, depth and direction of implant placement are often planned based on evaluation of radiographs and study casts. Insertion planned in such a manner may not be adequate for precise and safe surgery in some cases due to inadequate working clearance in the oral cavity. In order to obtain high initial stability and ensure osseointegration at the implant-bone interface, careful and precise drilling must be performed at the implant placement site. Therefore, we propose the necessity of evaluating the operability of implant treatment-devices prior to surgery. The amount of handling space needed during implant placement surgery was determined. The results showed that for implants with a length of 7-18 mm, a vertical distance of as much as 50-60 mm was required, depending on the implant platform. These results suggest the necessity of pre-operative drilling simulation in each individual. Handling space was measured with angled heads and probes fabricated on a trial basis for pre-surgical drilling simulation in the oral cavity. We believe that these instruments may be clinically useful in estimating the amount of handling space required prior to surgery and ensuring precise implant placement. Evaluation of the intra-oral environment for handling of treatment devices should be included in the pre-surgical intra-oral evaluation of dental implant cases to avoid changes in treatment planning due to intra-oral interference during the course of surgery. PMID:17721064

  3. Prevention and Intervention Strategies to Alleviate Preoperative Anxiety in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Kristi D.; Stewart, Sherry H.; Finley, G. Allen; Buffett-Jerrott, Susan E.

    2007-01-01

    Preoperative anxiety (anxiety regarding impending surgical experience) in children is a common phenomenon that has been associated with a number of negative behaviors during the surgery experience (e.g., agitation, crying, spontaneous urination, and the need for physical restraint during anesthetic induction). Preoperative anxiety has also been…

  4. Preoperative diagnosis of double gallbladder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Buluş, Hakan; Koyuncu, Ahmet; Coşkun, Ali

    2012-04-01

    Gallbladder duplication is a rare congenital anomaly of the biliary system. There are no specific symptoms for diagnosis. We present the case of a double gallbladder, which was diagnosed preoperatively. A laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed successfully. We discuss that the preoperative diagnosis of this anomaly is especially important to prevent possible surgical complications and repeated laparotomies. PMID:22706748

  5. Preoperative discussion with patients about delirium risk: are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Judith H; Partridge, Judith S L

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative delirium is a common complication in the older surgical population, occurring in 10-50 % of cases. It is thought to be more common if an individual is identified as frail. Postoperative delirium is associated with poor outcome including higher mortality rates, prolonged length of hospital stay, increased care needs on discharge and longer term post-traumatic stress disorder. Guidelines from the American Geriatric Society and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence highlight the importance of risk assessment at the time of the preoperative visit. This enables the perioperative team to plan a care pathway that minimises the risk of delirium occurring postoperatively. Risk assessment also informs a discussion with patient and family regarding their risk, as part of a process of informed patient consent. This is an essential step in conforming to current legal and General Medical Council guidance on the process of consent. PMID:27594990

  6. Liver surgery perspective: from pre-operative surgery planning to intra-operative image guided operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Senhu; Lennon, Brian T.; Waite, Jon M.; Clements, Logan W.; Scherer, Mike A.; Stefansic, Jim D.

    2009-10-01

    Liver cancer represents a major health care problem in the world, especially in China and several countries in Southeast Asia. The most effective treatment is through tumor resection. To improve the outcome of surgery, a combination of preoperative planning and intra operative image guided liver surgery (IGLS) system has been developed at Pathfinder Therapeutics, Inc. The preoperative planning subsystem (Linasys® PlaniSight®) is user-oriented and applies several novel algorithms on image segmentation and modeling, which allows the user to build various organ and tumor models with anticipated resection planes in less than 30 minutes. The surgeons can analyze the patient-specific case and set up surgical protocols. This information in image space can then be transferred into physical space through our intra operative image guided liver surgery system (Linasys® SurgSight®) based on modifications of existing surface registration algorithms, allowing surgeons to perform more accurate resections after preoperative planning. This tool gives surgeons a better understanding of vessel structure and tumor locations within the liver parenchyma during the surgery. Our ongoing clinical trial shows that it greatly facilitates liver resection operation and it is expected to improve the surgery outcome and create more candidates for surgery.

  7. Optimising the Pre-Operative Investigative Work Up for Elective Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hack-Adams, Nadine; king, natalie; Ahuja, Manisha; M Higgs, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Effective pre-operative assessment of patients awaiting elective surgery should entail appropriate use of scarce NHS resources, as well as underpin patient safety. The pre-operative admissions service in district general hospitals is often junior doctor led, with a new cohort of clinicians taking over its running every four months. Lack of familiarity on the part of these clinicians with the investigative work up required for certain surgical procedures often results in over investigation of patients in the pre-admission setting, wasting time and NHS resources. A retrospective audit of 53 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy over a representative two month period demonstrated that 33% of patients received unnecessary pre-admission blood tests, including clotting screen and ‘group and save’. Design and implementation of a “Pre-Admission Handbook”, for use by junior doctors and nurse practitioners in the pre-operative setting, reduced the rate of over investigation to 12% in a subsequent, prospective audit cycle of 50 patients, and has improved patient care by standardising the pre-admissions process for elective surgery at Gloucester Royal Hospital. PMID:26734393

  8. Reducing unnecessary preoperative testing in elective ENT surgery: clinical and financial implications.

    PubMed

    Leung, B C; Nazeer, S; Smith, M; McRae, D

    2015-11-01

    Guidelines on appropriate preoperative testing in elective surgery were published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in 2003. However, compliance has been poor, with frequent unnecessary tests being performed. We aimed to assess our trust's guideline compliance and to implement changes to optimise adherence. Preoperative investigations performed for elective ENT surgery during a three-month period were retrospectively audited. Unnecessary investigations were identified and costs calculated. A staff-training program was implemented and targeted written information was provided for clinics. A second audit cycle was conducted subsequently. Overall, 69.2% of blood tests were unnecessary (FBC 44.9%, U&Es 63.5%, clotting 99.2%), which equated to £1955.77 with an annual estimate of £7,823.08. None of the test results affected the management of the patient. Post-intervention, full compliance was achieved. It was concluded that preoperative investigations are overused in elective surgery, with obvious financial implications and causing unnecessary anxiety to patients. Through basic training and guideline dissemination, complete compliance can be achieved. PMID:26721128

  9. Preoperative Low Serum Bicarbonate Levels Predict Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su-Young; Park, Jung Tak; Kwon, Young Eun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Ryu, Geun Woo; Lee, Sul A.; Park, Seohyun; Jhee, Jong Hyun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is a common and serious complication. Although lower than normal serum bicarbonate levels are known to be associated with consecutive renal function deterioration in patients with chronic kidney injury, it is not well-known whether preoperative low serum bicarbonate levels are associated with the development of AKI in patients who undergo cardiac surgery. Therefore, the clinical implication of preoperative serum bicarbonate levels on AKI occurrence after cardiac surgery was investigated. Patients who underwent coronary artery bypass or valve surgery at Yonsei University Health System from January 2013 to December 2014 were enrolled. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on preoperative serum bicarbonate levels, which represented group 1 (below normal levels) <23 mEq/L; group 2 (normal levels) 23 to 24 mEq/L; and group 3 (elevated levels) >24 mEq/L. The primary outcome was the predicated incidence of AKI 48 hours after cardiac surgery. AKI was defined according to Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria. Among 875 patients, 228 (26.1%) developed AKI within 48 hours after cardiac surgery. The incidence of AKI was higher in group 1 (40.9%) than in group 2 (26.5%) and group 3 (19.5%) (P < 0.001). In addition, the duration of postoperative stay in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU) was longer for AKI patients and for those in the low-preoperative-serum-bicarbonate-level groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that low preoperative serum bicarbonate levels were significantly associated with AKI even after adjustment for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, operation type, preoperative hemoglobin, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. In conclusion, low serum bicarbonate levels were associated with higher incidence of AKI and prolonged ICU stay. Further studies are needed to clarify whether strict correction of bicarbonate levels close to normal limits may have a

  10. A pen-based system to support pre-operative data collection within an anaesthesia department.

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, M. F.; Gómez, E. J.; Trueba, I.; Cano, P.; Arredondo, M. T.; del Pozo, F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a pen-based computer system for remote preoperative data collection. The system is envisaged to be used by anaesthesia staff at different hospital scenarios where pre-operative data are generated. Pen-based technology offers important advantages in terms of portability and human-computer interaction, as direct manipulation interfaces by direct pointing, and "notebook user interfaces metaphors". Being the human factors analysis and user interface design a vital stage to achieve the appropriate user acceptability, a methodology that integrates the "usability" evaluation from the earlier development stages was used. Additionally, the selection of a pen-based computer system as a portable device to be used by health care personnel allows to evaluate the appropriateness of this new technology for remote data collection within the hospital environment. The work presented is currently being realised under the Research Project "TANIT: Telematics in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care", within the "A.I.M.--Telematics in Health CARE" European Research Program. PMID:8130488

  11. Donor preoperative oxygen delivery and post-extubation hypoxia impact donation after circulatory death hypoxic cholangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chirichella, Thomas J; Dunham, C Michael; Zimmerman, Michael A; Phelan, Elise M; Mandell, M Susan; Conzen, Kendra D; Kelley, Stephen E; Nydam, Trevor L; Bak, Thomas E; Kam, Igal; Wachs, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate donation after circulatory death (DCD) orthotopic liver transplant outcomes [hypoxic cholangiopathy (HC) and patient/graft survival] and donor risk-conditions. METHODS: From 2003-2013, 45 DCD donor transplants were performed. Predonation physiologic data from UNOS DonorNet included preoperative systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, pH, SpO2, PaO2, FiO2, and hemoglobin. Mean arterial blood pressure was computed from the systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Donor preoperative arterial O2 content was computed as [hemoglobin (gm/dL) × 1.37 (mL O2/gm) × SpO2%) + (0.003 × PaO2)]. The amount of preoperative donor red blood cell transfusions given and vasopressor use during the intensive care unit stay were documented. Donors who were transfused ≥ 1 unit of red-cells or received ≥ 2 vasopressors in the preoperative period were categorized as the red-cell/multi-pressor group. Following withdrawal of life support, donor ischemia time was computed as the number-of-minutes from onset of diastolic blood pressure < 60 mmHg until aortic cross clamping. Donor hypoxemia time was the number-of-minutes from onset of pulse oximetry < 80% until clamping. Donor hypoxia score was (ischemia time + hypoxemia time) ÷ donor preoperative hemoglobin. RESULTS: The 1, 3, and 5 year graft and patient survival rates were 83%, 77%, 60%; and 92%, 84%, and 72%, respectively. HC occurred in 49% with 16% requiring retransplant. HC occurred in donors with increased age (33.0 ± 10.6 years vs 25.6 ± 8.4 years, P = 0.014), less preoperative multiple vasopressors or red-cell transfusion (9.5% vs 54.6%, P = 0.002), lower preoperative hemoglobin (10.7 ± 2.2 gm/dL vs 12.3 ± 2.1 gm/dL, P = 0.017), lower preoperative arterial oxygen content (14.8 ± 2.8 mL O2/100 mL blood vs 16.8 ± 3.3 mL O2/100 mL blood, P = 0.049), greater hypoxia score >2.0 (69.6% vs 25.0%, P = 0.006), and increased preoperative mean arterial pressure (92.7 ± 16.2 mmHg vs 83.8 ± 18.5 mmHg, P = 0

  12. Brachial artery reactivity and vascular reactive hyperemia for preoperative anaesthesia risk assessment – an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-invasive measures of vascular reactivity have emerged to refine cardiovascular risk. However, limited data exists investigating vascular reactivity as a preoperative diagnostic tool for anesthesiologists. In this study, we compare the utility of two non-invasive techniques, Brachial Artery Reactivity Testing (BART) and Digital Thermal Monitoring (DTM), as surrogates for measuring vascular reactivity. Methods Following IRB approval, 26 patients scheduled for major thoracic surgery (e.g. esophagectomy and pneumonectomy) were studied prospectively. BART [Flow mediated dilation (FMD) and Peak flow velocity (PFV)] and DTM [Temperature rebound (TR%)] were performed preoperatively at baseline using 5 minute blood pressure cuff occlusion of the upper arm. Statistical summaries were provided for the comparison of BART and DTM with select patient characteristics, and correlations were used to investigate the strength of the relationship between BART and DTM measurements. Results Patients preoperatively diagnosed with hyperlipidemia were associated with lower FMD% values {Median (Range): 14.8 (2.3, 38.1) vs. 6.2 (0.0, 14.3); p = 0.006}. There were no significant associations between BART and DTM techniques in relation to cardiovascular risk factors or postoperative complications. Conclusion Our study suggests that impaired vascular reactivity as measured by BART is associated with the incidence of hyperlipidemia. Also, using a novel technique such as DTM may provide a simpler and more accessible point of care testing for vascular reactivity in a perioperative setting. Both non-invasive techniques assessing vascular function warrant further refinement to better assist preoperative optimization strategies aimed at improving perioperative vascular function. PMID:24971042

  13. Preoperative optimization of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Henry T; Purcell, Seth T; Bush, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that patients who suffer from peripheral (noncardiac) vascular disease often have coexisting atherosclerotic diseases of the heart. This may leave the patients susceptible to major adverse cardiac events, including death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and pulmonary edema, during the perioperative time period, in addition to the many other complications they may sustain as they undergo vascular surgery procedures, regardless of whether the procedure is performed as an open or endovascular modality. As these patients are at particularly high risk, up to 16% in published studies, for postoperative cardiac complications, many proposals and algorithms for perioperative optimization have been suggested and studied in the literature. Moreover, in patients with recent coronary stents, the risk of non-cardiac surgery on adverse cardiac events is incremental in the first 6 months following stent implantation. Just as postoperative management of patients is vital to the outcome of a patient, preoperative assessment and optimization may reduce, and possibly completely alleviate, the risks of major postoperative complications, as well as assist in the decision-making process regarding the appropriate surgical and anesthetic management. This review article addresses several tools and therapies that treating physicians may employ to medically optimize a patient before they undergo noncardiac vascular surgery. PMID:26170688

  14. The Preoperative Patient With a Systolic Murmur

    PubMed Central

    Cowie, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patients with undifferentiated systolic murmurs present commonly during the perioperative period. Traditional bedside assessment and auscultation has not changed significantly in almost 200 years and relies on interpreting indirect acoustic events as a means of evaluating underlying cardiac pathology. This is notoriously inaccurate, even in expert cardiology hands, since many different valvular and cardiac diseases present with a similar auditory signal. Evidence Acquisition: The data on systolic murmurs, physical examination, perioperative valvular disease in the setting of non-cardiac surgery is reviewed. Results: Significant valvular heart disease increases perioperative risk in major non-cardiac surgery and increases long term patient morbidity and mortality. We propose a more modern approach to physical examination that incorporates the use of focused echocardiography to allow direct visualization of cardiac structure and function. This improves the diagnostic accuracy of clinical assessment, allows rational planning of surgery and anaesthesia technique, risk stratification, postoperative monitoring and appropriate referral to physicians and cardiologists. Conclusions: With a thorough preoperative assessment incorporating focused echocardiography, anaesthetists are in the unique position to enhance their role as perioperative physicians and influence short and long term outcomes of their patients. PMID:26705529

  15. Reducing preoperative fasting time: A trend based on evidence

    PubMed Central

    de Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Dock-Nascimento, Diana Borges

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative fasting is mandatory before anesthesia to reduce the risk of aspiration. However, the prescribed 6-8 h of fasting is usually prolonged to 12-16 h for various reasons. Prolonged fasting triggers a metabolic response that precipitates gluconeogenesis and increases the organic response to trauma. Various randomized trials and meta-analyses have consistently shown that is safe to reduce the preoperative fasting time with a carbohydrate-rich drink up to 2 h before surgery. Benefits related to this shorter preoperative fasting include the reduction of postoperative gastrointestinal discomfort and insulin resistance. New formulas containing amino acids such as glutamine and other peptides are being studied and are promising candidates to be used to reduce preoperative fasting time. PMID:21160851

  16. Preoperative patient assessment: a review of the literature and recommendations.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, N. A.; Williams, R. W.; Spencer, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    The aims of preoperative assessment of patients are outlined, and the role of clinical and laboratory testing is defined. Following a review of the literature, guidelines for requesting such investigations are suggested. PMID:7979066

  17. Appraisal of guidelines for pre-operative body wash.

    PubMed

    Edström, Elisabet; Westerberg, Lisa; Henricson, Maria

    The pre-operative body wash is a strategy for reducing post-operative infection. However, there is a lack of knowledge about its importance. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the quality of guidelines for the pre-operative body wash using the AGREE instrument--35 guidelines containing instructions for the pre-operative body wash or preparation were included. The AGREE instrument was employed to establish a quality assessment framework that facilitated a comparison of the guidelines. The results were based on the six domains of the AGREE instrument, all of which were found to have low adherence. Descriptive statistics were used to present the assessment score. The AGREE instrument is useful for evaluating the quality of clinical guidelines. The development of evidence-based guidelines must include clinical activities. Further research is required to clarify the pre-operative body wash process and how it should be performed to reduce post-operative infection. PMID:25426523

  18. Improving pre-operative medicines reconciliation

    PubMed Central

    Brunswicker, Annemarie; Yogarajah, Amieth

    2014-01-01

    An audit of 143 surgical admissions showed that only 30% of general surgery and urology patients have complete medication charts on the day of surgery prior to going to theatre, compared to 94% of orthopaedic patients. This was despite having been seen previously in the pre-operative assessment clinic (POAC). These patients went to the wards post-operatively, where many then missed doses of their life-sustaining medications. Orthopaedic patients see a prescribing pharmacist in POAC who undertakes medicines reconciliation; this is performed by junior doctors for surgical patients. We designed three interventions to improve drug chart completion by junior doctors, and gathered prospective data for 22 weeks in the POAC. We also recorded attendance of junior doctors in the POAC and reasons for absence. Daily and weekly percentages of drug chart completion were plotted on a run chart. The baseline completion rate was 43%. This rose to 45% after the first and second interventions, and 51% after the third intervention. However, the completion rate remained markedly below our target of 94%. Junior doctors attended only 44% of POACs. They reported being “too busy to attend” 41% of the time, and could not be contacted on 11% of occasions. Junior doctors reported that they were unable to attend to both unwell inpatients and the POAC, the latter seeming less of a priority. This was despite a rota allocating doctors to attend POAC sessions free from clinical or teaching commitments. We were unable to increase the rate of drug chart completion with the resources available. We therefore recommend the employment of prescribing pharmacists in the POAC for general surgery and urology patients.

  19. Preoperative Planning of Orthopedic Procedures using Digitalized Software Systems.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Ely L; Segev, Eitan; Drexler, Michael; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Nimrod, Snir

    2016-06-01

    The progression from standard celluloid films to digitalized technology led to the development of new software programs to fulfill the needs of preoperative planning. We describe here preoperative digitalized programs and the variety of conditions for which those programs can be used to facilitate preparation for surgery. A PubMed search using the keywords "digitalized software programs," "preoperative planning" and "total joint arthroplasty" was performed for all studies regarding preoperative planning of orthopedic procedures that were published from 1989 to 2014 in English. Digitalized software programs are enabled to import and export all picture archiving communication system (PACS) files (i.e., X-rays, computerized tomograms, magnetic resonance images) from either the local working station or from any remote PACS. Two-dimension (2D) and 3D CT scans were found to be reliable tools with a high preoperative predicting accuracy for implants. The short learning curve, user-friendly features, accurate prediction of implant size, decreased implant stocks and low-cost maintenance makes digitalized software programs an attractive tool in preoperative planning of total joint replacement, fracture fixation, limb deformity repair and pediatric skeletal disorders. PMID:27468530

  20. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure. PMID:26420473

  1. Mastectomy following preoperative chemotherapy. Strict operative criteria control operative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, J R; Edwards, M J; Kuglen, C; Hortobagyi, G N; Ames, F C; Balch, C M

    1991-02-01

    The surgical morbidity associated with aggressive preoperative chemotherapy in 106 patients with advanced primary breast cancer who had chemotherapy followed by mastectomy was examined. These patients were compared with a group of 91 consecutive patients who had mastectomy without preoperative chemotherapy. Strict operative criteria were used to determine the timing of mastectomy following chemotherapy. Wound infection rates were no different in the preoperative chemotherapy group compared to the mastectomy-alone groups (7% versus 4%; p = 0.62). The incidence of wound necrosis was similar (11% versus 6%; p = 0.29). Seroma formation was decreased significantly in the preoperative chemotherapy group compared to the mastectomy-alone group (15% versus 28%; p = 0.04). Intensive preoperative chemotherapy did not delay the reinstitution of postoperative treatment (30% versus 20%; p = 0.27). However, when delay in instituting postoperative chemotherapy was more than 30 days, there was a significant decrease in overall survival rate (p = 0.04). This study provides evidence that intensive preoperative chemotherapy and mastectomy can be performed without increased morbidity. Furthermore it is important to institute systemic chemotherapy within 30 days of mastectomy to achieve maximum survival. PMID:1992938

  2. Effect of preoperative statin therapy on early postoperative memory impairment after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sambhunath; Nanda, Sunil K.; Bisoi, Akshya K.; Wadhawan, Ashima N.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Frequent incidence of early postoperative memory impairment (POMI) after cardiac surgery remains a concern because of associated morbidity, impaired quality of life, and increased health care cost. Aim: To assess the effect of preoperative statin therapy on POMI in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study in a tertiary level hospital. Methods: Sixty patients aged 45–65 years undergoing OPCAB surgery were allocated into two groups of 30 each. Group A patients were receiving statin and Group B patients were not receiving statins. All patients underwent memory function assessment preoperatively after admission to hospital and on the 6th postoperative day using postgraduate institute memory scale. Statistical Analysis: Appropriate tests were applied with SPSS 20 to compare both groups. The value P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Multiple regression analysis was performed with confounding factors to determine the effect on memory impairment. Results: Patients in Group A showed significant postoperative deterioration in 6 of the 10 functions and in Group B showed deterioration in 9 of 10 functions tested compared to preoperative scores. Intergroup comparison detected less POMI in Group A compared to Group B and was statistically significant in 8 memory functions. Multiple regression analysis detected statin as an independent factor in preventing memory impairment. Conclusions: Preoperative statin therapy attenuates the early POMI in patients undergoing OPCAB. Future long-term studies will define the efficacy of statin on POMI. PMID:26750672

  3. Preoperative Preparation and Patient Selection for Cytoreductive Surgery and HIPEC.

    PubMed

    Ashvin, Rangole; Nikhilesh, Jain

    2016-06-01

    . Patients undergoing HIPEC surgery face the usual physiological insults of a major surgery in addition to the thermal stress secondary to intraperitoneal administration of heated chemotherapy agent. A team approach of everyone involved in care of these patients is known to improve patient outcomes. It has also been observed that with the necessary preoperative & perioperative steps, the morbidity and mortality for this treatment can be brought down as comparable to any other major abdominal surgeries. PMID:27065711

  4. The value of routine preoperative chest roentgenograms in infants and children

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, P.B.; Steiner, E.; Klein, R.M.; SanFilippo, J.A.

    1980-08-01

    The charts and routine preoperative roentgenograms of 350 children admitted for elective pediatric surgery were analyzed to evaluate the clinical importance of routine preoperative chest roentgenograms. This analysis, and a review of the literature, should indicate that routine preoperative roentgenograms for elective pediatric surgery are unnecessary. Indications for selected preoperative roentgenograms based on patients' history and clinical findings are enumerated.

  5. Preoperative indicators of clinical outcome following stereotaxic pallidotomy.

    PubMed

    Kazumata, K; Antonini, A; Dhawan, V; Moeller, J R; Alterman, R L; Kelly, P; Sterio, D; Fazzini, E; Beric, A; Eidelberg, D

    1997-10-01

    We assessed the utility of preoperative clinical assessment and functional brain imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) in predicting the clinical outcome of stereotaxic pallidotomy for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty-two PD patients undergoing posteroventral pallidotomy were assessed preoperatively with the Core Assessment Program for Intracerebral Transplantation (CAPIT) ratings measured on and off levodopa; quantitative FDG/PET was also performed before surgery. Preoperative clinical and metabolic measurements were correlated with changes in off-state CAPIT ratings determined 3 months after surgery. Clinical outcome following pallidotomy was also correlated with intraoperative measures of spontaneous pallidal single-unit activity as well as postoperative MRI measurements of lesion volume and location. We found that unilateral pallidotomy resulted in variable clinical improvement in off-state CAPIT scores for the contralateral limbs (mean change 30.9 +/- 15.5%). Postoperative MRI revealed that pallidotomy lesions were comparable in location and volume across the patients. Clinical outcome following surgery correlated significantly with preoperative measures of CAPIT score change with levodopa administration (r = 0.60, p < 0.005) and with preoperative FDG/PET measurements of lentiform glucose metabolism (r = 0.71, p < 0.0005). Operative outcome did not correlate with intraoperative measures of spontaneous pallidal neuronal firing rate. We conclude that preoperative measurements of lentiform glucose metabolism and levodopa responsiveness may be useful indicators of motor improvement following pallidotomy. Both preoperative quantitative measures, either singly or in combination, may be helpful in selecting optimal candidates for surgery. PMID:9339694

  6. Preoperative teaching in the preadmission clinic.

    PubMed

    Posel, N

    1998-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes that instructional design be used as a foundation for a teaching model in the preadmission clinic and that the educational process be based on theories developed within the fields of health care and adult education. Furthermore, the author suggests that the process of patient education, as conducted within the preadmission setting, should necessitate an assessment of the general characteristics of the adult as a learner, of the specific characteristics of the adult as a presurgical patient, and of the unique individual cognitive processes distinctive to each patient. This information should be integrated in a new framework to create a comprehensive and personalized patient teaching model. PMID:9661407

  7. Effect of Preoperative Pain on Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Vivekanandhan, Paramasivam; Sharma, Vikram; Sharma, Ritu; Prakash, Venkatachalam; Geethapriya, Nagarajan

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the amount and severity of preoperative pain will affect the anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One-hundred seventy-seven adult volunteer subjects, actively experiencing pain in a mandibular molar, participated in this prospective double-blind study carried out at 2 different centers. The patients were classified into 3 groups on the basis of severity of preoperative pain: mild, 1–54 mm on the Heft-Parker visual analog scale (HP VAS); moderate, 55–114 mm; and severe, greater than 114 mm. After IANB with 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine, endodontic access preparation was initiated. Pain during treatment was recorded using the HP VAS. The primary outcome measure was the ability to undertake pulp access and canal instrumentation with no or mild pain. The success rates were statistically analyzed by multiple logistic regression test. There was a significant difference between the mild and severe preoperative pain group (P = .03). There was a positive correlation between the values of preoperative and intraoperative pain (r = .2 and .4 at 2 centers). The amount of preoperative pain can affect the anesthetic success rates of IANB in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. PMID:26650491

  8. Role of preoperative embolization for intradural spinal hemangioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Ampie, Leonel; Choy, Winward; Khanna, Ryan; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Parsa, Andrew T; Bloch, Orin

    2016-02-01

    Spinal hemangioblastomas (HB) are relatively rare neoplasms with a high degree of vascularity. Therapy for symptomatic tumors involves total resection when possible. Due to the enriched blood supply of these neoplasms, there is a high risk of significant intraoperative blood loss, which can lead to perioperative complications. Preoperative embolization of HB has been suggested to reduce blood loss and operative morbidity, but its use remains controversial. Data on the risks and benefits of preoperative embolization for this tumor remains limited. We identified and analyzed all 29 reported cases of preoperative embolization of intradural spinal HB within the literature. There were 18 men and nine women, and patients ranged from 24 to 61 years of age. Mean tumor size was 3.5 cm. Cervical and thoracic location was most common, accounting for 48.3% and 20% of cases, respectively. Complications from embolization and surgery were minimal, with no deaths or permanent neurological morbidity. Minimal intraoperative bleeding and excellent rates of gross total resection were reported with preoperative embolization. However, outcomes from microsurgery alone from historical series have similarly reported excellent outcomes. While there is no established standard, preoperative embolization should be reserved for particularly high risk patients with risk of intraoperative bleeding. PMID:26585384

  9. Effect of Preoperative Pain on Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Vivekanandhan, Paramasivam; Sharma, Vikram; Sharma, Ritu; Prakash, Venkatachalam; Geethapriya, Nagarajan

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the amount and severity of preoperative pain will affect the anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One-hundred seventy-seven adult volunteer subjects, actively experiencing pain in a mandibular molar, participated in this prospective double-blind study carried out at 2 different centers. The patients were classified into 3 groups on the basis of severity of preoperative pain: mild, 1-54 mm on the Heft-Parker visual analog scale (HP VAS); moderate, 55-114 mm; and severe, greater than 114 mm. After IANB with 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine, endodontic access preparation was initiated. Pain during treatment was recorded using the HP VAS. The primary outcome measure was the ability to undertake pulp access and canal instrumentation with no or mild pain. The success rates were statistically analyzed by multiple logistic regression test. There was a significant difference between the mild and severe preoperative pain group (P = .03). There was a positive correlation between the values of preoperative and intraoperative pain (r = .2 and .4 at 2 centers). The amount of preoperative pain can affect the anesthetic success rates of IANB in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. PMID:26650491

  10. Preoperative myocardial ischaemia: its relation to perioperative infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, H; Davies, G; Westaby, S; Prendiville, O F; Sapsford, R N; Oakley, C M

    1987-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were randomly allocated to a preoperative (24 h) intravenous infusion of isosorbide dinitrate (1.5-15 mg/hr) (50 patients) or to placebo (50 patients). The characteristics of the two groups were similar. Evidence of acute myocardial ischaemia was sought by continuous electrocardiographic Holter recordings and acute myocardial infarction by the appearance of new Q waves and increased activity of the creatine kinase MB isoenzyme. Episodes of acute myocardial ischaemia were found in 18% of patients in the control group and in none of those who received isosorbide dinitrate. None the less, the frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction was similar (22% and 18% respectively) in the two groups. Perioperative infarction was significantly more common in women, in patients with unstable angina or poor left ventricular function, in those who had coronary endarterectomy, and in those in whom the aortic clamping time was greater than 50 minutes. These factors may have obscured any effect that prevention of preoperative ischaemia had on perioperative infarction. Preoperative infusion of isosorbide dinitrate eliminated preoperative ischaemia but did not influence the occurrence of perioperative infarction. The probable benefits of prevention of preoperative ischaemia on postoperative left ventricular function, which is a determinant of long term survival, remain to be established. PMID:3304371

  11. Preoperative Anxiety as a Predictor of Mortality and Major Morbidity in Patients >70 Years of Age Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Judson B.; Alexander, Karen P.; Morin, Jean-François; Langlois, Yves; Noiseux, Nicolas; Perrault, Louis P.; Smolderen, Kim; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Eisenberg, Mark J.; Pilote, Louise; Monette, Johanne; Bergman, Howard; Smith, Peter K.; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the association between patient-reported anxiety and post-cardiac surgery mortality and major morbidity. Frailty ABC'S was a prospective multicenter cohort study of elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery (coronary artery bypass surgery and/or valve repair or replacement) at 4 tertiary care hospitals between 2008 and 2009. Patients were evaluated a mean of 2 days preoperatively with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), a validated questionnaire assessing depression and anxiety in hospitalized patients. The primary predictor variable was high levels of anxiety, defined by HADS score ≥11. The main outcome measure was all-cause mortality or major morbidity (stroke, renal failure, prolonged ventilation, deep sternal wound infection, or reoperation) occurring during the index hospitalization. Multivariable logistic regression examined the association between high preoperative anxiety and all-cause mortality/major morbidity, adjusting for Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) predicted risk, age, gender, and depression symptoms. A total of 148 patients (mean age 75.8 ± 4.4 years; 34% women) completed the HADS-A. High levels of preoperative anxiety were present in 7% of patients. There were no differences in type of surgery and STS predicted risk across preoperative levels of anxiety. After adjusting for Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk, age, gender, and symptoms of depression, preoperative anxiety remained independently predictive of postoperative mortality or major morbidity (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.3, 20.2; p=0.02). In conclusion, although high levels of anxiety were present in a minority of patients anticipating cardiac surgery, this conferred a strong and independent heightened risk of mortality or major morbidity. PMID:23245838

  12. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Myerson, Robert J.; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A. Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-03-15

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  13. Quality improvement in preoperative assessment by implementation of an electronic decision support tool

    PubMed Central

    Flamm, Maria; Fritsch, Gerhard; Hysek, Martin; Klausner, Sabine; Entacher, Karl; Panisch, Sigrid; Soennichsen, Andreas C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of the electronic decision support (eDS) tool ‘PReOPerative evaluation’ (PROP) on guideline adherence in preoperative assessment in statutory health care in Salzburg, Austria. Materials and methods The evaluation was designed as a non-randomized controlled trial with a historical control group (CG). In 2007, we consecutively recruited 1363 patients admitted for elective surgery, and evaluated the preoperative assessment. In 2008, PROP was implemented and available online. In 2009 we recruited 1148 patients preoperatively assessed using PROP (294 outpatients, 854 hospital sector). Our analysis includes full blood count, liver function tests, coagulation parameters, electrolytes, ECG, and chest x-ray. Results The number of tests/patient without indication was 3.39 in the CG vs 0.60 in the intervention group (IG) (p<0.001). 97.8% (CG) vs 31.5% (IG) received at least one unnecessary test. However, we also observed an increase in recommended tests not performed/patient (0.05±0.27 (CG) vs 0.55±1.00 (IG), p<0.001). 4.2% (CG) vs 30.1% (IG) missed at least one necessary test. The guideline adherence (correctly tested/not tested) improved distinctively for all tests (1.6% (CG) vs 49.3% (IG), p<0.001). Discussion PROP reduced the number of unnecessary tests/patient by 2.79 which implied a reduction of patients’ burden, and a relevant cut in unnecessary costs. However, the advantage in specificity caused an increase in the number of patients incorrectly not tested. Further research is required regarding the impact of PROP on perioperative outcomes. PMID:23599223

  14. Correlation between nipple elevation and breast resection weight: How to preoperatively plan breast reduction.

    PubMed

    Moio, Mariagrazia; Schonauer, Fabrizio

    2015-08-01

    Breast hypertrophy is often associated with functional limitations. Beyond the aesthetic concerns, breast reduction can improve symptoms and self-esteem. In different countries, health-care system regulations have fixed the threshold for reimbursement in 500 g of predicted tissue resection for each breast. Different preoperative measurements have been proposed to predict breast-tissue weight to be removed, showing a variable correlation with post-operative evaluation. We describe a reliable, simple measurement to predict the quantity of breast reduction in grams, which can be applicable to any surgical technique. A total of 128 patients undergoing bilateral breast reduction were evaluated. The correlation between the preoperative nipple-areola complex (NAC) lift distance and the weight of removed breast tissue was tested with linear regression and Pearson's test. Other anthropometric measurements were tested as a control. The ratio between resected grams and lift distance was explored to find a multiplication coefficient to be used at preoperative planning. The mean resection weight was 686.65 g. The mean NAC-lift distance was 7.6 cm. Positive correlation between the NAC-lift distance and the weight of breast tissue removed was found (r: 0.87; p < 0.001). The mean weight of the removed breast tissue (g) per centimetre of NAC lift was 81 g/cm in the group between 6 and 12 cm and 70 g/cm in the group with >12 cm of lift distance. The NAC-lift distance is a single, objective, repeatable measure that can provide a reliable prediction of breast-tissue grams to be removed; it helps in classifying breast-reduction indications. PMID:25997557

  15. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  16. Does preoperative transarterial embolization decrease blood loss during spine tumor surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Zhihong; He, Qian

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to evaluate the effect of preoperative transarterial embolization (TAE) on estimated blood loss (EBL) during surgical excision of the vertebral tumors. Three hundred and forty-eight patients with spinal tumors were retrospectively analyzed. The preoperative TAE group consisted of 190 patients and the control group consisted of 158 patients. Gelatin sponge particles mixed withy contrast agent were used in the TAE group to embolize the tumor-feeding artery. The factors evaluated included: the time interval between embolism and surgery; the number of vertebrae involved by the tumor; pathological type of tumor; surgical approach; extent of excision and instrumental fixation. The time interval (P = 0.4669)between embolism and surgery had no significant correlation with EBL during surgery. The pathological diagnosis of vertebral tumor such as plasma cell myeloma, giant cell tumor, chondrosarcoma, hemangioma and metastasis had no significant correlation with EBL between the TAE group and control group during surgery, while the EBL of chordoma in the TAE group was significantly higher than that in the control group (p = 0.0254). The number of vertebrae involved (p = 0.4669, 0.6804, 0.6677), posterior approach (p = 0.3015), anterior approach (p = 0.2446), partial excision (p = 0.1911) and instrumental fixation (p = 0.1789) had no significant correlation with EBL during surgery between the TAE group and the control group. This study showed that preoperative TAE of the spinal tumor had no significant effect on intra-operative blood loss during surgical excision of the spinal tumor. In view of the risk of embolism, this method should be carefully considered. PMID:25934787

  17. [Research hotspot and progress of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianhong; Pan, Zhizhong

    2016-06-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become an important component of comprehensive treatment for rectal cancer. Although local recurrent risk has been remarkably reduced by CRT, distant metastasis remains the main cause of therapeutic failure. Therefore, more and more studies focused on controlling distant metastasis in order to prolong long-term survival. Recently, CRT has achieved certain progression in rectal cancer: (1)Patients with stage T3 should be classified into specific subgroups to formulate individualized treatment regimen. For stage T3a, it is feasible to perform surgery alone or administrate low intensity preoperative CRT; for stage T3b and T3c, conventional preoperative CRT should be performed in order to reduce the risk of recurrence postoperatively. (2)With regard to combined regimen for chemotherapy, oral capecitabine superiors to intravenous bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and is comparable to continuous intravenous infusion 5-FU with a better safety. Therefore, capecitabine is recommended for older patients and those with poor tolerance to chemotherapy. Compared to single 5-FU concurrent CRT, addition of oxaliplatin into preoperative CRT may result in a higher survival benefit in Chinese patients. As to the application of irinotecan, bevacizumab or cetuximab, unless there are more evidence to confirm their efficacy and safety from randomized controlled trial, they should not be recommended for adding to preoperative CRT routinely. (3)On the optimization in CRT pattern, the application values of induction chemotherapy before concurrent CRT, consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent CRT, neoadjuvant sandwich CRT, neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone and short-course preoperative radiotherapy remain further exploration. (4)On the treatment strategy for clinical complete response (cCR) after CRT, whether "wait and see" strategy is able to be adopted, it is still a hot topic with controversy. PMID:27353093

  18. Post-operative acute kidney injury in non-suprainguinal vascular surgery patients with a pre-operative history of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Yoshan; Biccard, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is an independent predictor of acute kidney injury (AKI) in non-cardiac surgery patients. There are a few published studies which report AKI following non-suprainguinal vascular procedures, but these studies have not investigated predictors of AKI, including anti-hypertensive medications and other comorbidities, in the hypertensive population alone. We sought to identify independent predictors of post-operative AKI in non-suprainguinal vascular surgery patients with a pre-operative history of hypertension. We performed univariate (chi-squared, or Fisher's exact testing) and multivariate (binary logistic regression) statistical analysis of prospectively collected data from 243 adult hypertensive patients who underwent non-suprainguinal vascular surgery (lower limb amputation or peripheral artery bypass surgery) at a tertiary hospital between 2008 and 2011 in an attempt to identify possible associations between comorbidity, acute pre-operative antihypertensive medication administration, and post-operative AKI (a post-operative increase in serum creatinine of ≥ 25 % above the pre-operative measurement) in these patients. The incidence of post-operative AKI in this study was 5.3 % (95 % Confidence Interval: 3.2-8.9 %). Acute pre-operative β-blocker administration was independently associated with post-operative AKI in non-suprainguinal vascular surgery patients with a pre-operative history of hypertension (Odds Ratio: 3.24; 95 % Confidence Interval: 1.03-10.25). The acute pre-operative administration of β-blockers should be carefully considered in non-suprainguinal vascular surgery patients with a pre-operative history of hypertension, in lieu of an increased risk of potentially poor post-operative renal outcomes. PMID:26966428

  19. Improving patient flow in pre-operative assessment

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Cameron; Gent, Anne; Kirkland, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Annual patient attendances at a pre-operative assessment department increased by 24.8% from 5659 in 2009, to 7062 in 2012. The unit was staffed by administrative staff, nurses, and health care assistants (HCA). Medical review was accessed via on call medical staff, or notes were sent to anaesthetists for further review. With rising demand, patient waits increased. The average lead time for a patient (time from entering the department to leaving) was 79 minutes. 9.3% of patients attended within two weeks of their scheduled surgery date. 10% of patients were asked to return on a later day, as there was not sufficient capacity to undertake their assessment. There were nine routes of referral in to the department. Patients moved between different clinic rooms and the waiting area several times. Work patterns were uneven, as many attendances were from out-patient clinics which meant peak attendance times were linked to clinic times. There were substantial differences in the approaches of different nurses, making the HCA role difficult. Patients reported dissatisfaction with waits. Using a Lean quality improvement process with rapid PDSA cycles, the service changed to one in which patients were placed in a room, and remained there for the duration of their assessment. Standard work was developed for HCWs and nurses. Rooms were standardised using 5S processes, and set up improved to reduce time spent looking for supplies. A co-ordinator role was introduced using existing staff to monitor flow and to organise the required medical assessments and ECGs. Timing of booked appointments were altered to take account of clinic times. Routes in to the department were reduced from nine to one. Ten months after the work began, the average lead time had reduced to 59 minutes. The proportion of people attending within two weeks of their surgery decreased from 9.3% to 5.3%. Referrals for an anaesthetic opinion decreased from 30% to 20%, and in the month reviewed no one had to return to

  20. Improving patient flow in pre-operative assessment.

    PubMed

    Stark, Cameron; Gent, Anne; Kirkland, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Annual patient attendances at a pre-operative assessment department increased by 24.8% from 5659 in 2009, to 7062 in 2012. The unit was staffed by administrative staff, nurses, and health care assistants (HCA). Medical review was accessed via on call medical staff, or notes were sent to anaesthetists for further review. With rising demand, patient waits increased. The average lead time for a patient (time from entering the department to leaving) was 79 minutes. 9.3% of patients attended within two weeks of their scheduled surgery date. 10% of patients were asked to return on a later day, as there was not sufficient capacity to undertake their assessment. There were nine routes of referral in to the department. Patients moved between different clinic rooms and the waiting area several times. Work patterns were uneven, as many attendances were from out-patient clinics which meant peak attendance times were linked to clinic times. There were substantial differences in the approaches of different nurses, making the HCA role difficult. Patients reported dissatisfaction with waits. Using a Lean quality improvement process with rapid PDSA cycles, the service changed to one in which patients were placed in a room, and remained there for the duration of their assessment. Standard work was developed for HCWs and nurses. Rooms were standardised using 5S processes, and set up improved to reduce time spent looking for supplies. A co-ordinator role was introduced using existing staff to monitor flow and to organise the required medical assessments and ECGs. Timing of booked appointments were altered to take account of clinic times. Routes in to the department were reduced from nine to one. Ten months after the work began, the average lead time had reduced to 59 minutes. The proportion of people attending within two weeks of their surgery decreased from 9.3% to 5.3%. Referrals for an anaesthetic opinion decreased from 30% to 20%, and in the month reviewed no one had to return to

  1. Effect of preoperative irradiation on healing of low colorectal anastomoses

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenstern, L.; Sanders, G.; Wahlstrom, E.; Yadegar, J.; Amodeo, P.

    1984-02-01

    The effect of preoperative irradiation on the healing of low colorectal anastomoses was studied experimentally. In 12 dogs in whom preoperative irradiation of 4,000 rads was given before low colorectal stapled anastomosis was performed, anastomotic leakage occurred in 66 percent. More than half of the anastomotic leaks were associated with either severe sepsis or death. In a matched group of control animals that underwent stapled anastomoses without irradiation, no anastomotic complications occurred. The clinical implications of this study are that stapled anastomoses in irradiated colon are at serious risk of anastomotic dehiscence and, therefore, should be protected with a proximal colostomy.

  2. [Importance of preoperative and intraoperative imaging for operative strategies].

    PubMed

    Nitschke, P; Bork, U; Plodeck, V; Podlesek, D; Sobottka, S B; Schackert, G; Weitz, J; Kirsch, M

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in preoperative and postoperative imaging have an increasing influence on surgical decision-making and make more complex surgical interventions possible. This improves the possibilities for frequently occurring challenges and promoting improved functional and oncological outcome. This manuscript reviews the role of preoperative and intraoperative imaging in surgery. Various techniques are explained based on examples from hepatobiliary surgery and neurosurgery, in particular real-time procedures, such as the online use of augmented reality and in vivo fluorescence, as well as new and promising optical techniques including imaging of intrinsic signals and vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:26939896

  3. Prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen in patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Na; Wang, Hai-Jiang; Tang, Yong; Zhao, Ze-Liang; Qu, Yan-Li; Xu, Rui-Wei; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yu, Xian-Bo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen levels in colon cancer patients. METHODS: A total of 255 colon cancer patients treated at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from June 1st 2005 to June 1st 2008 were enrolled in the study. All patients received radical surgery as their primary treatment method. Preoperative fibrinogen was detected by the Clauss method, and all patients were followed up after surgery. Preoperative fibrinogen measurements were correlated with a number of clinicopathological parameters using the Student t test and analysis of variance. Survival analyses were performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: The mean preoperative fibrinogen concentration of all colon cancer patients was 3.17 ± 0.88 g/L. Statistically significant differences were found between preoperative fibrinogen levels and the clinicopathological parameters of age, smoking status, tumor size, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, modified Glasgow prognostic scores (mGPS), white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Univariate survival analysis showed that TNM stage, tumor cell differentiation grade, vascular invasion, mGPS score, preoperative fibrinogen, WBC, NLR, PLR and CEA all correlated with both OS and DFS. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and body mass index correlated only with OS. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that both OS and DFS of the total cohort, as well as of the stage II and III patients, were higher in the hypofibrinogen group compared to the hyperfibrinogen group (all P < 0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference between OS and DFS in stage I patients with low or high fibrinogen levels. Cox regression analysis indicated preoperative fibrinogen levels, TNM stage, mGPS score, CEA, and

  4. Prenatal Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our ePublications > Prenatal care fact sheet ePublications Prenatal care fact sheet Print this fact sheet Health Care ... More information on prenatal care What is prenatal care? Prenatal care is the health care you get ...

  5. Effect of preoperative oral midazolam sedation on separation anxiety and emergence delirium among children undergoing dental treatment under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    El Batawi, Hisham Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the possible effects of preoperative oral Midazolam on parental separation anxiety, emergence delirium, and post-anesthesia care unit time on children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia. Methods: Randomized, prospective, double-blind study. Seventy-eight American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) I children were divided into two groups of 39 each. Children of the first group were premedicated with oral Midazolam 0.5 mg/kg, while children of the control group were premedicated with a placebo. Scores for parental separation, mask acceptance, postoperative emergence delirium, and time spent in the post-anesthesia care unit were compared statistically. Results: The test group showed significantly lower parental separation scores and high acceptance rate for anesthetic mask. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding emergence delirium and time spent in post-anesthesia care unit. Conclusions: Preoperative oral Midazolam could be a useful adjunct in anxiety management for children suffering dental anxiety. The drug may not reduce the incidence of postoperative emergence delirium. The suggested dose does not seem to affect the post-anesthesia care unit time. PMID:25992332

  6. Morbidity and Mortality Following Short Course Preoperative Radiotherapy in Rectal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Farshid; Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Samiei, Farhad; Aghili, Mahdi; Haddad, Peiman; Gholami, Somayeh; Nabavi, Mansoureh

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morbidity and mortality in patients with operable stage II and III rectal cancers within one or two months after surgery, who has been treated pre-operatively with short course radiotherapy. Twenty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, consecutively referred to the Cancer Institute of Imam Khomeini Hospital from March 2009 to March 2010, were selected for the study after staging by endorectal ultrasound and CT of abdomen, pelvis, and chest; and if they had inclusion criteria for short course schedule, they were treated with radiotherapy alone at 2500 cGy for 5 sessions, and then they were referred to the surgical service for operation one week later. They were visited there by a surgeon unaware of the research who completed a questionnaire about pre-operative, operative, and post-operative complications. Of 28 patients, 25 patients underwent either APR or LAR surgery with TME. One patient developed transient anal pain grade I and one patient had dysuria grade I; they were improved in subsequent follow-up. Short course schedule can be performed carefully in patients with staged rectal cancer without concerning about serious complications. This shorter treatment schedule is cost-effective and would be more convenient for patients due to fewer trips to the hospital and the main treatment, i.e. operating the patient, will be done with the shortest time the following diagnosis. PMID:26615375

  7. Impact of Preoperative Counselling on Early Postoperative Mobilization and Its Role in Smooth Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Samnani, Sunil Sadruddin; Umer, Muhammad Farooq; Mehdi, Syed Hussain; Farid, Farah Naz

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Preoperative counseling is effective to foster early postoperative mobilization that reduces pulmonary complications following abdominal surgery. This study aims at evaluating the effect of preoperative counseling regarding postoperative mobilization and its impact on reducing pulmonary complications. Design and Setting. Randomized control trial was conducted at the Department of Surgery of a tertiary care hospital, Karachi. Patients and Materials. Patients who underwent abdominal surgery and met inclusion criteria were recruited. All participants were randomly divided into two groups. Both groups received information about the surgery and Group I received additional counseling for postoperative mobilization. All patients were encouraged for postoperative mobilization. Scholes et al. criteria were used to evaluate postoperative pulmonary complications. Results. In total 232 participants were recruited and divided into two groups. There was no significant difference in participants' age (P = 0.79), duration of surgery (P = 0.5), and pain score (P = 0.1) of both groups. However, significant difference was identified in mobilization from bed to chair and mobilization for >10 minutes. Patients in Group I experienced less pulmonary complications in comparison with Group II.

  8. [Complete resection of a posterior mediastinal tumor after preoperative identification of artery of Adamkiewicz].

    PubMed

    Shiiya, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Akihiko; Sakuraba, Motoki; Nakamura, Masanori; Shibayama, Yui; Tsuji, Takahiro; Fukasawa, Yuichiro

    2014-05-01

    The thoracolumbar spinal cord receives its blood supply primarily from the artery of Adamkiewicz (AA), a branch of thoracolumbar intercostal arteries. Aortic cross-clamping during operation for descending aortic aneurysms can cause paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia secondary to low blood flow through the AA. A 69-year-old woman was diagnosed with a left posterior mediastinal tumor measuring 66 mm. The tumor was adjacent to the thoracic aorta between Th10 to Th12 vertebral levels. Preoperative 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) imaging revealed 2 AAs originated from the 10th and 11th left intercostal arteries just near the tumor. The patient underwent a left thoracotomy and the 2 intercostal arteries were carefully dissected from the encapsulated tumor. Complete resection was safely achieved with preservation of the AAs. Pathology revealed a schwannoma. There were no complications. In performing thoracic surgery for posterior mediastinal tumors, it is important to identify the AAs preoperatively and preserve them. PMID:24917281

  9. Day Care Programs: A Part of the Educational Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Jacqueline; Leeper, Sarah H.

    In order to determine the effect of day care center sponsorship on children's development, the authors examined the ways in which programs, objects and materials, and teacher/child interactions affected the preoperational behavior of 4-year-old black children in publicly and privately supported day care centers. A total of 120 4-year-olds (30 from…

  10. Patterns of Response After Preoperative Treatment in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose L.; Ciervide, Raquel; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Miguel, Inigo; Arbea, Leire; Aristu, J. Javier; Chopitea, Ana; Martinez-Regueira, Fernando; Valenti, Victor; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Sola, Jesus J.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the rate of pathologic response in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer treated with preoperative chemotherapy with and without chemoradiation at our institution. Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2007 patients were retrospectively identified who received preoperative treatment for gastric cancer (cT3-4/ N+) with induction chemotherapy (Ch) or with Ch followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy in 5 weeks) (ChRT). Surgery was planned 4-6 weeks after the completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Pathologic assessment was used to investigate the patterns of pathologic response after neoadjuvant treatment. Results: Sixty-one patients were analyzed. Of 61 patients, 58 (95%) underwent surgery. The R0 resection rate was 87%. Pathologic complete response was achieved in 12% of the patients. A major pathologic response (<10% of residual tumor) was observed in 53% of patients, and T downstaging was observed in 75%. Median follow-up was 38.7 months. Median disease-free survival (DFS) was 36.5 months. The only patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factor associated with pathologic response was the use of preoperative ChRT. Patients achieving major pathologic response had a 3-year actuarial DFS rate of 63%. Conclusions: The patterns of pathologic response after preoperative ChRT suggest encouraging intervals of DFS. Such a strategy may be of interest to be explored in gastric cancer.

  11. Preoperative digital mammography imaging in conservative mastectomy and immediate reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Hammond, Dennis; Nava, Maurizio; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Rostagno, Roman; Gercovich, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital mammography clearly distinguishes gland tissue density from the overlying non-glandular breast tissue coverage, which corresponds to the existing tissue between the skin and the Cooper’s ligaments surrounding the gland (i.e., dermis and subcutaneous fat). Preoperative digital imaging can determine the thickness of this breast tissue coverage, thus facilitating planning of the most adequate surgical techniques and reconstructive procedures for each case. Methods This study aimed to describe the results of a retrospective study of 352 digital mammograms in 176 patients with different breast volumes who underwent preoperative conservative mastectomies. The breast tissue coverage thickness and its relationship with the breast volume were evaluated. Results The breast tissue coverage thickness ranged from 0.233 to 4.423 cm, with a mean value of 1.952 cm. A comparison of tissue coverage and breast volume revealed a non-direct relationship between these factors. Conclusions Preoperative planning should not depend only on breast volume. Flap evaluations based on preoperative imaging measurements might be helpful when planning a conservative mastectomy. Accordingly, we propose a breast tissue coverage classification (BTCC). PMID:26855903

  12. Preoperative evaluation of a patient for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed Central

    Chonchubhair, A. N.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Coexistent cardiovascular disease is common in patients presenting for repair of aortic aneurysms. However, preoperative cardiac evaluation prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery remains contentious with significant variations in practice between countries, institutions and individual anesthetists. The following case report raises some everyday issues confronting clinical anesthetists. PMID:10604782

  13. The Role of Preoperative TIPSS to Facilitate Curative Gastric Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.A.; Vickers, J.; Callaway, M.P. Alderson, D.

    2003-08-15

    The use of TIPSS to facilitate radical curative upper gastrointestinal surgery has not been reported. We describe a case in which curative gastric resection was performed for carcinoma of the stomach after a preoperative TIPSS and embolization of a large gastric varix in a patient with portal hypertension.

  14. Overview of anesthesia for primary care physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Potyk, D K; Raudaskoski, P

    1998-01-01

    Primary care physicians are frequently asked to evaluate patients before elective surgery. Familiarity with anesthetic technique and physiologic processes can help primary care physicians identify risk factors for perioperative complications, optimize patient care, and enhance communication with surgeons and anesthesiologists. To this end, we review the physiologic processes accompanying tracheal intubation and general and regional anesthesia. There is no convincing evidence that regional anesthesia is safer than general anesthesia. In addition to replacing fluid losses from the surgical field and insensible losses, intraoperative fluid administration may attenuate the cardiovascular and renal effects of anesthesia. Therefore, recommendations to limit fluids should be made with caution and should be tempered with an understanding of intraoperative fluid requirements. An understanding of the physiologic processes of anesthesia, combined with preoperative risk stratification strategies, will enhance a primary care physician's ability to provide meaningful preoperative evaluations. PMID:9655993

  15. Preoperative chemotherapy and corticosteroids: independent predictors of cranial surgical-site infections.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Bryan A; Appelboom, Geoffrey; Taylor, Blake E; Lowy, Franklin D; Bruce, Eliza M; Sonabend, Adam M; Kellner, Christopher; Connolly, E Sander; Bruce, Jeffrey N

    2016-07-01

    .04), but neither was a predictor of superficial or deep-incisional SSIs. Other independent predictors of organ-space SSIs were longer duration of operation (OR 1.16), wound class of ≥ 2 (clean-contaminated and further contaminated) (OR 3.17), and morbid obesity (body mass index ≥ 40 kg/m(2)) (OR 3.05). Among superficial SSIs, wound class of 3 (contaminated) (OR 6.89), operative duration (OR 1.13), and infratentorial surgical approach (OR 2.20) were predictors. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative chemotherapy and corticosteroid use are independent predictors of organ-space SSIs, even when data are controlled for leukopenia. This indicates that the disease process in organ-space SSIs may differ from that in superficial SSIs. In effect, this study provides one of the largest analyses of risk factors for SSIs after cranial surgery. The results suggest that, in certain circumstances, modulation of preoperative chemotherapy or steroid regimens may reduce the risk of organ-space SSIs and should be considered in the preoperative care of this population. Future studies are needed to determine optimal timing and dosing of these medications. PMID:26544775

  16. Colorectal Stenting: An Effective Therapy for Preoperative and Palliative Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Rahel S. Jost, Res; Schoch, Erich; Brunner, Brigit; Decurtins, Marco; Zollikofer, Christoph L.

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. To demonstrate the effectiveness of preoperative and palliative colorectal stent placement in acute colonic obstruction. Methods. Sixty-seven consecutive patients (mean age 67.3 years, range 25-93 years) with clinical and radiological signs of colonic obstruction were treated: 45 (67%) preoperatively and 22 (33%) with a palliative intent. In 59 patients (88%) the obstruction was malignant, while in 8 (12%) it was benign. A total of 73 enteric Wallstents were implanted under combined fluoroscopic/endoscopic guidance. Results. Forty-five patients were treated preoperatively with a technical success rate of 84%, a clinical success rate of 83%, and a complication rate of 16%. Of the 38 patients who were successfully stented preoperatively, 36 (95%) underwent surgery 2-22 days (mean 7.2 days) after stent insertion. The improved general condition and adequate bowel cleansing allowed single-stage tumor resection and primary end-to-end anastomosis without complications in 31 cases (86% of all operations), while only 5 patients had colostomies. Stent placement was used as the final palliative treatment in 22 patients. The technical success rate was 95%, the clinical success rate 72%, and the complication rate relatively high at 67%, caused by reocclusion in most cases. After noninvasive secondary interventions (e.g., tube placement, second stenting, balloon dilatation) the secondary patency of stents was 71% and mean reported survival time after stent insertion was 92 days (range 10-285 days). Conclusion. Preoperative stent placement in acute colonic obstruction is minimally invasive and allows an elective one-stage surgery in most cases. Stent placement also proved a valuable alternative to avoid colostomy in palliation.

  17. [The randomized study of efficiency of preoperative photodynamic].

    PubMed

    Akopov, A L; Rusanov, A A; Molodtsova, V P; Gerasin, A V; Kazakov, N V; Urtenova, M A; Chistiakov, I V

    2013-01-01

    The authors made a prospective randomized comparison of results of preoperative photodynamic therapy (PhT) with chemotherapy, preoperative chemotherapy in initial unresectable central non-small cell lung cancer in stage III. The efficiency and safety of preoperative therapy were estimated as well as the possibility of subsequent surgical treatment. The research included patients in stage IIIA and IIIB of central non-small cell lung cancer with lesions of primary bronchi and lower section of the trachea, which initially were unresectable, but potentially the patients could be operated on after preoperative treatment. The photodynamic therapy was performed using chlorine E6 and the light of wave length 662 nm. Since January 2008 till December 2011,42 patients were included in the research, 21 patients were randomized in the group for photodynamic therapy and 21--in group without PhT. These groups were compared according to their sex, age, stage of the disease and histological findings. After nonadjuvant treatment the remissions were reached in 19 (90%) patients of the group with PhT and in 16 (76%) patients without PhT and all the patients were operated on. The explorative operations were made on 3 patients out of 16 operated on in the group without PhT (19%). In the group PhT 14 pneumonectomies and 5 lobectomies were perfomed opposite 10 pneumonectomies and 3 lobectomies in group without PhT. The degree of radicalism of resection appears to be reliably higher in the group PhT (RO-89%, R1-11% as against RO-54%, R1-46% in group without PhT), p = 0.038. The preoperative endobronchial PhT conducted with chemotherapy was characterized by efficiency and safety, allowed the surgical treatment and elevated the degree of radicalism of this treatment in selected patients, initially assessed as unresectable. PMID:23808222

  18. Is systematic preoperative screening for muscle relaxant and latex allergy advisable?

    PubMed

    Porri, F; Pradal, M; Rud, C; Charpin, D; Alazia, M; Gouin, F; Vervloet, D

    1995-04-01

    We investigated a female population prior to general anaesthesia, using skin prick tests with latex and muscle relaxants to appraise the validity and feasibility of a systematic preoperative screening for these substances. Anaesthetists performed skin tests, and positive and doubtful tests were checked in our allergy department. Of 114 patients, 42 had uninterpretable tests because of dermographism (28 patients) or suppression of skin reactivity (14 patients). Among the other 72, nine had a positive or doubtful test to latex, and seven a positive or doubtful test to one or more muscle relaxants. After checking, only four sensitizations to latex and one to muscle relaxant were confirmed. In conclusion, a systematic screening for latex and muscle relaxant allergy is not advisable. In contrast, screening for latex allergy in selected high-risk groups (spina bifida, health-care workers) is necessary. PMID:7573824

  19. Current practice in the preoperative evaluation of patients undergoing major vascular surgery: a survey of cardiovascular anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, L A; Beattie, C

    1993-12-01

    Various cardiovascular testing modalities have been proposed as a means of reducing perioperative risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery. It is currently unknown with what frequency and under what conditions these tests are used in clinical practice. In an attempt to determine the spectrum of current clinical practice, the authors surveyed anesthesiologists who attended the 1992 Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting. A total of 77 of 100 surveys were returned, representing 58 institutions in the United States: 26 university hospitals, 29 private hospitals, 2 Veterans Administration hospitals, and 1 military hospital. The incidence of preoperative testing was not significantly different between private and university institutions, and ranged from a mean of 54% of patients undergoing lower extremity procedures to 73% of patients undergoing aortic surgery, with a wide disparity among institutions. Dipyridamole or exercise thallium imaging was the most common test used, and Holter monitoring was the least common. The testing led to revascularization in 52% of university and 72% of private hospitals. Testing was thought to result in modification of perioperative monitoring in 85% of the institutions and in modification of other aspects of care in a significant percentage of institutions. In conclusion, in this random population, preoperative testing was reported to be used in a significant percentage of patients, and similar practices were found between university and private institutions. The practices at the individual institutions and types of tests ordered varied greatly, and suggest the need for further research to determine optimal preoperative strategies. PMID:8305653

  20. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  1. 77 FR 70484 - Preoperational Testing of Onsite Electric Power Systems To Verify Proper Load Group Assignments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... COMMISSION Preoperational Testing of Onsite Electric Power Systems To Verify Proper Load Group Assignments... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1294, ``Preoperational Testing of On-Site Electric... encompass preoperational testing of electrical power systems used to meet current Station...

  2. The Prognostic Importance of Patient Pre-Operative Expectations of Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iversen, Maura D.; Daltroy, Lawren H.; Fossel, Anne H.; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    1998-01-01

    Examines patients (N=257) with lumbar spinal stenosis preoperatively and at six months to relate patient expectation to baseline function and pain and to determine how patient expectations and preoperative function interact to predict postoperative outcomes. Results show that patients with many preoperative expectations, particularly those with…

  3. Preoperative multidisciplinary treatment with hyperthermia for soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Makihata, E; Kuroda, M; Kawai, A; Ozaki, T; Sugihara, S; Inoue, H; Joja, I; Asaumi, J; Kawasaki, S; Hiraki, Y

    1997-04-01

    We report the results of phase I/II studies of preoperative multidisciplinary treatment of 14 patients with soft tissue sarcoma using hyperthermia from November 1990 to April 1995. The preoperative treatment was conducted with thermo-radio-chemotherapy in 11 cases of stage III, and with thermo-radiotherapy as well as thermo-chemotherapy in three cases of stages I and II. Hyperthermia was carried out twice a week with totals ranging from 4 to 14 times (average: 8.4 times); each session lasted 60 min. Radiotherapy was administered four or five times per week, and the dose was 1.8 2Gy/fraction, with a total of 30-40 Gy in a four week period. Chemotherapy was mainly in the form of MAID regimen (2-mercaptoethanesulphonic acid (mesna), adriamycin, ifosfamide and dacarbazine). The tumors were surgically resected in all patients after completing the preoperative treatment. The efficacy rate, as expressed by the percentage of either tumors in which reduction rate was 50% or more, or tumors for which post-treatment contrast enhanced CT image revealed low density volumes occupying 50% or more of the total mass, was 71% (ten of the 14 tumors). The mean tumor necrosis rate in the resected specimens was 78%. The tumor necrosis rate was significantly high (P < 0.05) in patients whose Time > or = 42 degrees C was of long duration. Postoperative complications were observed in six patients; among these, two patients developed wound infection that required surgical treatment as a complication of surgery performed in the early stage following the preoperative treatment. After a mean postoperative follow-up of 27 months, distant metastasis occurred in four patients resulting in three fatalities. The three-year cumulative survival rate was 64.3%. No local recurrence was observed in any patient during the follow-up, thus confirming our hypothesis that preoperative multidisciplinary treatment has an excellent local efficacy. We think that it would be valuable to conduct, at many

  4. Preoperative Predictors of Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Noiseux, Nicolas O.; Callaghan, John J.; Clark, Charles R.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Rakel, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty has provided dramatic improvements in function and pain for the majority of patients with knee arthritis, yet a significant proportion of patients remain dissatisfied with their results. We performed a prospective analysis of 215 patients undergoing TKA who underwent a comprehensive array of evaluations to discover whether any preoperative assessment could predict high pain scores and functional limitations postoperatively. Patients with severe pain with a simple knee range-of-motion test prior to TKA had a 10x higher likelihood of moderate to severe pain at 6 months. A simple test of pain intensity with active flexion and extension preoperatively was a significant predictor of postoperative pain at 6 months after surgery. Strategies to address this particular patient group may improve satisfaction rates of TKA. PMID:24630598

  5. Preoperative cardiovascular investigations in liver transplant candidate: An update

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Lalit; Srivastava, Piyush; Pandey, Chandra Kant; Jha, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) undergoing liver transplantation. Identifying candidates at the highest risk of postoperative cardiovascular complications is the cornerstone for optimizing the outcome. Ischaemic heart disease contributes to major portion of cardiovascular complications and therefore warrants evaluation in the preoperative period. Patients of ESLD usually demonstrate increased cardiac output, compromised ventricular response to stress, low systemic vascular resistance and occasionally bradycardia. Despite various recommendations for preoperative evaluation of cardiovascular disease in liver transplant candidates, a considerable controversy on screening methodology persists. This review critically focuses on the rapidly expanding body of evidence for diagnosis and risk stratification of cardiovascular disorder in liver transplant candidates. PMID:26962249

  6. The concept of death in preoperational retarded children.

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, M

    1980-12-01

    Fourteen preoperational retarded boys and girls (mean MA = 6-4), as classified by the failure to pass three conservation tasks, were interviewed for their concepts of death, with Koocher's (1973) study used as a model. Each S was asked, "What makes things die?" "How can you make dead things come back to life?" "When will you die?" and "What will happen then?" It was found that the preoperational retarded Ss did not have realistic concepts of when they will die, or of the permanence of death. They did, however, have realistic notions of how things die. It was also found that the types of replies made to these questions were related to their cognitive level (p less than .01). PMID:7205203

  7. Essential elements of the preoperative breast reconstruction evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Angela; Losken, Albert

    2015-04-01

    A plethora of options exist for breast reconstruction and preoperative evaluation must be thorough to lead to a successful outcome. We review multiple components of the preoperative assessment including the patient's history, goals, imaging, and key elements of the physical exam. Consideration for tumor biology, staging, need or response to chemotherapy or radiation therapy is important in deciding on immediate versus delayed reconstruction. It is also important to consider the patient's anatomy, breast size and whether the reconstruction will be unilateral or bilateral. The reconstructive surgeon must accommodate all these factors to consider partial or complete mastectomy defects and guide the patient to the most appropriate reconstructive technique whether it be an oncoplastic reduction mammoplasty, expander-based reconstruction, immediate implant reconstruction, or immediate versus delayed autologous tissue reconstruction such as the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP)/transverse rectus abdominis muscle (TRAM), latissimus, transverse upper gracilis (TUG)/profunda femoris artery perforator (PAP), or gluteal artery perforator (GAP) flaps. PMID:26005641

  8. Preoperative easily misdiagnosed telangiectatic osteosarcoma: clinical–radiologic–pathologic correlations

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhen-Hua; Yin, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Da-Wei; Meng, Quan-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To describe the clinical, imaging, and pathologic characteristics and diagnostic methods of telangiectatic osteosarcoma (TOS) for improving the diagnostic level. Materials and methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed patient demographics, serum alkaline phosphatase (AKP) levels, preoperative biopsy pathologic reports, pathologic materials, imaging findings, and treatment outcomes from 26 patients with TOS. Patient images from radiography (26 cases) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (22 cases) were evaluated by 3 authors in consensus for intrinsic characteristics. There were 15 male and 11 female patients in the study, with an age of 9–32 years (mean age 15.9 years). Results: Eighteen of 26 patients died of lung metastases within 5 years of follow-up. The distal femur was affected more commonly (14 cases, 53.8%). Regarding serum AKP, normal (8 cases) or mildly elevated (18 cases) levels were found before preoperative chemotherapy. Radiographs showed geographic bone lysis without sclerotic margin (26 cases), cortical destruction (26 cases), periosteal new bone formation (24 cases), soft-tissue mass (23 cases), and matrix mineralization (4 cases). The aggressive radiographic features of TOS simulated the appearance of conventional high-grade intramedullary osteosarcoma, though different from aneurysmal bone cyst. MR images demonstrated multiple big (16 cases) or small (6 cases) cystic spaces, fluid-fluid levels (14 cases), soft-tissue mass (22 cases), and thick peripheral and septal enhancement (22 cases). Nine of 26 cases were misdiagnosed as aneurysmal bone cysts by preoperative core-needle biopsy, owing to the absence of viable high-grade sarcomatous cells in the small tissue samples. Conclusion: The aggressive growth pattern with occasional matrix mineralization, and multiple big or small fluid-filled cavities with thick peripheral, septal, and nodular tissue surrounding the fluid-filled cavities are characteristic imaging features of

  9. Preoperative embolization of primary bone tumors: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Roushan; Sharma, Raju; Rastogi, Shishir; Khan, Shah Alam; Jayaswal, Arvind; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety and effectiveness of preoperative embolization of primary bone tumors in relation to intraoperative blood loss, intraoperative blood transfusion volume and surgical time. METHODS: Thirty-three patients underwent preoperative embolization of primary tumors of extremities, hip or vertebrae before resection and stabilization. The primary osseous tumors included giant cell tumors, aneurysmal bone cyst, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma and chondrosarcoma. Twenty-six patients were included for the statistical analysis (embolization group) as they were operated within 0-48 h within preoperative embolization. A control group (non-embolization group, n = 28) with bone tumor having similar histological diagnosis and operated without embolization was retrieved from hospital record for statistical comparison. RESULTS: The mean intraoperative blood loss was 1300 mL (250-2900 mL), the mean intraoperative blood transfusion was 700 mL (0-1400 mL) and the mean surgical time was 221 ± 76.7 min for embolization group (group I, n = 26). Non-embolization group (group II, n = 28), the mean intraoperative blood loss was 1800 mL (800-6000 mL), the mean intraoperative blood transfusion was 1400 mL (700-8400 mL) and the mean surgical time was 250 ± 69.7 min. On comparison, statistically significant (P < 0.001) difference was found between embolisation group and non-embolisation group for the amount of blood loss and requirement of blood transfusion. There was no statistical difference between the two groups for the surgical time. No patients developed any angiography or embolization related complications. CONCLUSION: Preoperative embolization of bone tumors is a safe and effective adjunct to the surgical management of primary bone tumors that leads to reduction in intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion volume. PMID:27158424

  10. Preoperative risk factors in recurrent endometrioma after primary conservative surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Seung Joo; Lee, Seung Hyeong; Choi, Joo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endometriosis is a common gynecological disorder caused by ectopic implantation of endometrial glandular and stromal cells outside the uterine cavity. Among several types of endometriosis, endometrioma is the only subtype that could be determined preoperatively using pelvic ultrasonography, and guidelines recommend pathologic confirmation of endometrioma greater than 3 cm in diameter. However, although surgery is performed in cases of endometrioma, endometrioma has a high cumulative rate of recurrence. Therefore, because determining the possibility of recurrence before performance of initial surgery is important, we examined preoperative factors associated with recurrent endometrioma. Methods This was a retrospective, comparative study including 236 patients who visited the outpatient clinic between January 2009 and December 2011. Patients who were pathologically diagnosed with endometrioma were included in this study. They were followed up postoperatively and were divided into two groups according to presence of recurrent endometrioma. Results We examined associations between baseline factors and recurrent endometrioma. In multivariate analysis, dysmenorrhea and cyst septation were statistically significant after adjusting with age, parity, surgical staging and postoperative management. We examined cumulative recurrence free survival within cases of recurrent endometriosis, based on the presence of inner cyst septation. The cumulative recurrence free survival was lower in cases with septation. Conclusion Our study found that recurrent endometrioma is more likely in patients with inner cyst septation and the recurrence occurred within a shorter duration of time than in patients without inner cyst septation on preoperative ultrasonography. Therefore intensive caution and postoperative long term medical therapy would be appropriate in patients with inner cyst septation on preoperative ultrasonography before undergoing primary surgery for endometrioma. PMID

  11. Total ankle arthroplasty with severe preoperative varus deformity.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Andrew E; Powell, Brian D; Santrock, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    Advancements in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) over the past several decades have led to improved patient outcomes and implant survivorship. Despite these innovations, many implant manufacturers still consider a preoperative coronal plane deformity greater than 10° a relative contraindication to TAA. Without proper intraoperative alignment, these implants may experience abnormal wear and hardware failure. Correcting these deformities, often through the use of soft tissue procedures and/or osteotomies, not only increases the difficulty of a case, but also the intraoperative time and radiation exposure. The authors report a case in which a 54-year-old man with a severe right ankle varus deformity of 29° underwent successful TAA using the INBONE II Prophecy total ankle system (Wright Medical Technology, Inc, Memphis, Tennessee) and additional soft tissue reconstruction. Intraoperatively, the patient's coronal deformity was corrected to 1.8°. At 8 months postoperatively, the patient ambulated without restriction and had substantial improvement in validated patient outcome scores, specifically the Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Foot and Ankle Module and the Short Form Health Survey-12 This unique report documents the first time that this particular implant, with an exclusive preoperative computed tomography-derived patient-specific guide, has been used effectively for a severe preoperative varus deformity greater than 20° without the need for an osteotomy. Future studies should be directed toward the prospective evaluation of different total ankle implant systems and their outcomes with severe coronal plane deformity, specifically computed tomography-derived patient-specific guided implants. PMID:25901630

  12. [Tonsillectomy in children: preoperative evaluation of risk factors].

    PubMed

    Stuck, B A; Genzwürker, H V

    2008-05-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures in children and is associated with a relatively high risk of postoperative complications. The question often arises whether paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea should be diagnosed with preoperative sleep testing and whether preoperative coagulation tests should be performed in every child undergoing tonsillectomy. In order to answer these questions, the relevant German and English literature was analysed. Adenotonsillectomy in childhood usually resolves the underlying sleep-related breathing disorder. Nevertheless, especially in children with clinical risk factors such as severe sleep apnoea, obesity or craniofacial malformation, respiratory complications should be expected in the postoperative phase. Routine sleep tests prior to tonsillectomy are neither necessary nor practical for preoperative evaluation. Inherited coagulation disorders have only a limited effect on the occurrence of postoperative bleeding and the predictive value of routine coagulation tests is limited. As long as a thorough clinical history is negative, routine coagulation tests are not helpful or necessary prior to tonsillectomy in children. PMID:18311551

  13. Evolution of Preoperative Rhinoplasty Consult by Computer Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lekakis, Garyfalia; Claes, Peter; Hamilton, Grant S; Hellings, P W

    2016-02-01

    The preoperative consultation in rhinoplasty involves a multitude of actions that are mandatory for the decision-making process: history taking with attention to the symptoms and specific requests of the patient, clinical evaluation of the aesthetics, the functional status of the nose and the patients' motivation for surgery, and acquisition of standardized preoperative photographs. During the last decade, computer imaging or morphing of the preoperative pictures of the nose has become much more common. This part of the consultation allows the surgeon and patient to reach a mutually agreeable set of expectations by demonstrating the planned outcome of rhinoplasty and describing the objectives of surgery. The evolving literature on computer imaging supports that the benefits for both the patients and surgeons seem to outweigh the risks. Indeed, morphing enables the surgeon to precisely explain to the patients the goal of surgery, and to postpone or even cancel surgery in the group of patients that do not appear satisfied with the proposed changes. In addition, patients may feel more prepared for surgery and have a more realistic view of the outcome of the intervention. Presently, computer imaging is progressing from 2D to 3D models, optimizing the surgeons' capacity to perform morphing in the most advantageous manner for both parties. The current review provides a state-of-the art analysis on morphing in rhinoplasty, putting morphing into a historic and relevant perspective in clinical practice. PMID:26862968

  14. [The evaluation of preoperative anesthetic visit in our hospital].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Y; Watanabe, K; Satoh, T

    1999-09-01

    The preoperative visit by an anesthetist has been thought to be important for the assessment of patient and to communicate with them. However, there are few reports on the visit in Japan until now. The effect of preoperative anesthetic visit in our hospital was estimated by interviewing patients just before surgery who had received a visit by their anesthetist. The answers from sequential 346 scheduled surgical patients for 8 weeks were obtained. Only 72 patients were able to recall the name of their anesthetists. About half of patients believed that anesthetist just had put the patient to sleep and relieved them from pain. We measured the number of treatments each patient could remember that had been explained by the anesthetist on the visit, and found it was unexpectedly small at the interview. These data suggest that our preoperative visit may not be satisfying in view of making good relationship between patients and anesthetists, and educating patients for recent anesthesia. We should make an effort to educate the patients about up-to-date and reasonable anesthesia. PMID:10513187

  15. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer: the MERCURY research project.

    PubMed

    Brown, G; Daniels, I R

    2005-01-01

    The development of a surgical technique that removes the tumour and all local draining nodes in an intact package, namely total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery, has provided the impetus for a more selective approach to the administration of preoperative therapy. One of the most important factors that governs the success of TME surgery is the relationship of tumour to the circumferential resection margin (CRM). Tumour involves the CRM in up to 20% of patients undergoing TME surgery, and results in both poor survival and local recurrence. It is therefore clear that the importance of the decision regarding the use of pre-operative therapy lies with the relationship of the tumour to the mesorectal fascia. In addition, a high-spatial-resolution MRI technique will identify tumours exhibiting other poor prognostic features, namely, extramural spread >5 mm, extramural venous invasion by tumour, nodal involvement, and peritoneal infiltration. The potential benefits of a selective approach using MRI-based selection criteria are evident. That is, over 50% of patients can be treated successfully with primary surgery alone without significant risk of local recurrence or systemic failure. Of the remainder, potentially dramatic improvements may be achieved through the use of intensive and targeted preoperative therapy aimed not only at reducing the size of the primary tumour and rendering potentially irresectable tumour resectable with tumour-free circumferential margins, but also at enabling patients at high risk of systemic failure to benefit from intensive combined modality therapy aimed at eliminating micrometastatic disease. PMID:15865021

  16. Psychologists in preoperative programmes for children undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Cuzzocrea, Francesca; Costa, Sebastiano; Gugliandolo, Maria Cristina; Larcan, Rosalba

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to verify whether psychologists and game activities could reduce preoperative anxiety and promote compliance in paediatric patients. More specifically, we sought to evaluate whether it would be better to propose contextualized games or just distracting activities. A total of 104 children undergoing surgery were assigned to the following 4 conditions of treatment: (1) contextual games and psychological accompaniment, (2) only contextual games, (3) distracting activities, and (4) only psychological accompaniment. Observed children's anxiety was assessed using modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale and compliant behaviours with modified form of Induction Compliance Checklist. Children in the first condition (complete intervention - contextual games and psychological accompaniment) were less anxious and more cooperative in the preoperative period and during the induction of anaesthesia than in the other three conditions. In particular, contextual activities (second condition) were found to be more efficient than psychological accompaniment (fourth condition), whereas the worst condition was proposing only distracting activities (third condition). In order to help young hospitalized patients in paediatric surgery structures, it is necessary to propose games that can prepare them for what will happen as well as the support of a psychologist. PMID:25469004

  17. Intensive care of conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Kobylarz, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Conjoined twinning is one of the most uncommon congenital anomalies. Maintenance in an intensive care setting during this time allows for close monitoring, stabilisation, and nutritional supplementation of the infants as necessary to optimise preoperative growth and development. The birth of conjoined twins is a very difficult and dramatic moment for parents. It is also a very difficult situation for the team of physicians, nurses and other required hospital staff to carry out treatment and care of these specific developmental anomalies. The diagnostics and treatment in this extraordinary situation requires close cooperation of the multidisciplinary medical team, which includes their personal experience and medical knowledge, with a team of intensive care unit nurses. This report presents the rules in cease of conjoined twins during their intensive care unit stay with special reference to the proceedings before and after complete separation. PMID:24858974

  18. Preoperative serum markers for individual patient prognosis in stage I-III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Giessen-Jung, Clemens; Nagel, Dorothea; Glas, Maria; Spelsberg, Fritz; Lau-Werner, Ulla; Modest, Dominik Paul; Schulz, Christoph; Heinemann, Volker; Di Gioia, Dorit; Stieber, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) remains the only recommended biomarker for follow-up care of colorectal cancer (CRC), but besides CEA, several other serological parameters have been proposed as prognostic markers for CRC. The present retrospective analysis investigates a comprehensive set of serum markers with regard to cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). A total of 472 patients with colon cancer underwent surgery for curative intent between January 1988 and June 2007. Preoperative serum was analyzed for the following parameters: albumin, alkaline phosphatase (aP), beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG), bilirubin, cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), CA 72-4, CEA, C-reactive protein (CRP), cytokeratin-19 soluble fragment (CYFRA 21-1), ferritin, gamma-glutamyltransferase (γGT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), hemoglobin, haptoglobin, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum amyloid A (SAA), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. After a median follow-up period of 5.9 years, the overall 3- and 5-year CSS was 91.7 and 84.9 % and DFS rates were 82.7 % (3 years) and 77.6 % (5 years). Multivariate analyses confirmed preoperative CEA as an independent prognostic factor with regard to CSS and DFS. CA 19-9 and γGT also provided prognostic value for CSS and DFS, respectively. Younger age was negatively associated with DFS. According to UICC stage, CEA provided significant prognostic value with regard to CSS and DFS, while CA 19-9 was only prognostic for CSS. Combined analysis is able to identify patients with favorable prognosis. In addition to tumor baseline parameters, preoperative CEA could be confirmed as prognostic marker in colon cancer. CA 19-9 and γGT also provide additional prognostic value with regard to survival and recurrence in stage III and stage I disease, respectively. The combined use of CEA together with CA 19-9 and γGT improve

  19. Is preoperative physiotherapy/pulmonary rehabilitation beneficial in lung resection patients?

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Kumaresan; Bennett, Ashley; Agostini, Paula; Naidu, Babu

    2011-09-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether preoperative physiotherapy/pulmonary rehabilitation is beneficial for patients undergoing lung resection. Ten papers were identified using the reported search, of which five represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. In 2007 a report showed in 13 subjects receiving a preoperative rehabilitation programme (PRP) an improvement of maximum oxygen uptake consumption (VO(2) max) of an average 2.4 ml/kg/min (95% confidence interval 1-3.8; P=0.002). A report in 2008 showed in 12 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and VO(2) max <15 ml/kg/min that PRP could effect a mean improvement in VO(2) max of 2.8 ml/kg/min (P<0.001). An earlier report in 2005 demonstrated a reduced length of hospital stay (21±7 days vs. 29±9 days; P=0.0003) in 22 subjects who underwent PRP for two weeks compared with a historical control of 60 patients with COPD. It was shown in 2006 that by using a cross-sectional design with historical controls that one day of chest physiotherapy comprising inspiratory and peripheral muscle training compared with routine nursing care was associated with a lower atelectasis rate (2% vs. 7.7%) and a median length of stay that was 5.73 days vs. 8.33 days (P<0.0001). A prospective randomised controlled study in 1997, showed that two weeks of PRP followed by two months of postoperative rehabilitation produced a better predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second in the study group than in the control group at three months (lobectomy + 570 ml vs. -70 ml; pneumonectomy + 680 ml vs. -110 ml). We conclude that preoperative physiotherapy improves exercise capacity and preserves pulmonary function following surgery. Whether these benefits translate into a reduction in postoperative pulmonary complication is uncertain. PMID:21586476

  20. Providing Preoperative Information for Children Undergoing Surgery: A Randomized Study Testing Different Types of Educational Material to Reduce Children's Preoperative Worries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, S. C.; Arriaga, P.; Esteves, F.

    2014-01-01

    This study developed three types of educational preoperative materials and examined their efficacy in preparing children for surgery by analysing children's preoperative worries and parental anxiety. The sample was recruited from three hospitals in Lisbon and consisted of 125 children, aged 8-12 years, scheduled to undergo outpatient surgery.…

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Individualized Preoperative Education Intervention for Symptom Management After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rosemary A; Watt-Watson, Judith; Hodnett, Ellen; Tranmer, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Pain and nausea limit recovery after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a preoperative educational intervention on postsurgical pain-related interference in activities, pain, and nausea. Participants (n = 143) were randomized to intervention or standard care. The standard care group received the usual teaching. The intervention group received the usual teaching, a booklet containing symptom management after TKA, an individual teaching session, and a follow-up support call. Outcome measures assessed pain, pain interference, and nausea. There were no differences between groups in patient outcomes. There were no group differences for pain at any time point. Respondents had severe postoperative pain and nausea and received inadequate doses of analgesia and antiemetics. Individualizing education content was insufficient to produce a change in symptoms for patients. Further research involving the modification of system factors affecting the provision of symptom management interventions is warranted. PMID:26814004

  2. Effectiveness of endoscopic clipping and computed tomography gastroscopy for the preoperative localization of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sang-Ho; Bae, Kyungsoo; Ha, Chang-Youn; Lee, Ok-Jae; Jung, Woon-Tae; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Chan; Jung, Eun-Jung; Ju, Young-Tae; Jeong, Chi-Young; Ha, Woo-Song

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Before laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer can be planned, it is very important to know the precise location of the tumor. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3 methods of predicting the exact location of the tumor: preoperative gastrofibroscopy (GFS), preoperative computed tomography gastroscopy (CT), and intraoperative gastroscopy-guided laparoscopy (Lap). Methods In this study, 15 patients were prospectively identified, and endoscopic clips were preoperatively placed on the proximal 1 cm of the tumor, at the angle on the greater curvature and opposite the angle on the greater curvature. The distances between the pylorus and the proximal tumor clip (PT), the angle clip (PA), the greater curvature clip (PG), and the gastroesophageal junction were measured by preoperative GFS, preoperative CT, intraoperative Lap, and visual inspection (Vis). Results PT, PA, and PG values measured by preoperative GFS differed significantly from the Vis values (P < 0.01). However, preoperative CT measurements of PT, PA, and PG did not differ from the Vis values (P = 0.78, P = 0.48, and P = 0.53, respectively). Intraoperative Lap and Vis PT values differed by only 1.1 cm on an average (P = 0.10), but PA and PG values varied by 1.9 and 3.4 cm, respectively (P = 0.01 for both). Conclusion Endoscopic clipping combined with preoperative CT gastroscopy is more useful than preoperative GFS for preoperatively predicting the location of early gastric cancers and will be helpful for planning laparoscopic gastrectomy. PMID:23396626

  3. Perioperative Care of the Liver Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Mark T; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    With the evolution of surgical and anesthetic techniques, liver transplantation has become "routine," allowing for modifications of practice to decrease perioperative complications and costs. There is debate over the necessity for intensive care unit admission for patients with satisfactory preoperative status and a smooth intraoperative course. Postoperative care is made easier when the liver graft performs optimally. Assessment of graft function, vigilance for complications after the major surgical insult, and optimization of multiple systems affected by liver disease are essential aspects of postoperative care. The intensivist plays a vital role in an integrated multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:27339683

  4. Preoperative defining system for pancreatic head cancer considering surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seok Jeong; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provide appropriate treatment, it is crucial to share the clinical status of pancreas head cancer among multidisciplinary treatment members. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the medical records of 113 patients who underwent surgery for pancreas head cancer from January 2008 to December 2012 was performed. We developed preoperative defining system of pancreatic head cancer by describing “resectability - tumor location - vascular relationship - adjacent organ involvement - preoperative CA19-9 (initial bilirubin level) - vascular anomaly”. The oncologic correlations with this reporting system were evaluated. RESULTS: Among 113 patients, there were 75 patients (66.4%) with resectable, 34 patients (30.1%) with borderline resectable, and 4 patients (3.5%) with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Mean disease-free survival was 24.8 mo (95%CI: 19.6-30.1) with a 5-year disease-free survival rate of 13.5%. Pretreatment tumor size ≥ 2.4 cm [Exp(B) = 3.608, 95%CI: 1.512-8.609, P = 0.044] and radiologic vascular invasion [Exp(B) = 5.553, 95%CI: 2.269-14.589, P = 0.002] were independent predictive factors for neoadjuvant treatment. Borderline resectability [Exp(B) = 0.222, P = 0.008], pancreatic head cancer involving the pancreatic neck [Exp(B) = 9.461, P = 0.001] and arterial invasion [Exp(B) = 6.208, P = 0.010], and adjusted CA19-9 ≥ 50 [Exp(B) = 1.972 P = 0.019] were identified as prognostic clinical factors to predict tumor recurrence. CONCLUSION: The suggested preoperative defining system can help with designing treatment plans and also predict oncologic outcomes. PMID:27468199

  5. The value of preoperative functional cortical mapping using navigated TMS.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Picht, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The surgical removal of brain tumours in so-called eloquent regions is frequently associated with a high risk of causing disabling postoperative deficits. Among the preoperative techniques proposed to help neurosurgical planning and procedure, navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is increasingly performed. A high level of evidence is now available in the literature regarding the anatomical and functional accuracy of this mapping technique. This article presents the principles and facts demonstrating the value of using nTMS in clinical practice to preserve motor or language functions from deleterious lesions secondary to brain tumour resection or epilepsy surgery. PMID:27229765

  6. Rhinoplasty: clinical categorization as a practical preoperative guide.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J R; McKinney, J

    1985-12-01

    As progressively more individuals desire rhinoplasty, facial surgeons are experiencing a wider spectrum of potential patients. The young woman in her late teens and 20s once made up the majority of the rhinoplasty case load. Now, the patients desiring aesthetic and reconstructive nasal surgery represent all stages of life. We have divided the patient population into five categories based principally on the special requirements of inherent chronologic differences. This typing system guides rhinoplastic surgeons in dealing with a variety of age groups of both sexes. These categories are useful in defining differences in technique and as an adjunct to preoperative evaluation. PMID:4071177

  7. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing ... care at the end of life, always includes palliative care. But you may receive palliative care at any ...

  8. Preconception Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... should speak with your healthcare provider about preconception care. Preconception care is care you receive before you get pregnant. It involves finding and taking care of any problems that might affect you and ...

  9. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Palliative Care KidsHealth > For Parents > Palliative Care Print A A ... decisions about their child's care. Who Needs Palliative Care? Any child who has a serious, complex, or ...

  10. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Hospice Care What is Hospice Care? When is Hospice Care ... Family Counseling and Support Services What is Hospice Care? Hospice programs are available to help terminally ill ...

  11. Effects of 4 weeks preoperative exercise on knee extensor strength after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Won Hah

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] After an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction, quadriceps muscle weakness and disruption of proprioceptive function are common. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 4 weeks preoperative exercise intervention on knee strength power and function post-surgery. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty male patients (27.8±5.7 age), scheduled for reconstruction surgery, were randomly assigned to two groups, the preoperative exercise group (n=40) and a no preoperative exercise group (n=40). The preoperative exercise group participated in a 4-week preoperative and 12-week post-operative programs, while the no preoperative exercise group participated only in the 12-week postoperative exercise program. Isokinetic measured of quadriceps strength were obtained at 4 weeks before and 3 months after surgery. [Results] The knee extensor strength deficits measured at 60°/s and 180°/s was significantly lower in the preoperative exercise group compared with the no preoperative exercise group. At 3 months after surgery, the extensor strength deficit was 28.5±9.0% at 60°/sec and 23.3±9.0% at 180°/sec in the preoperative exercise group, whereas the no preoperative exercise group showed extensor strength deficits of 36.5±10.7% and 27.9±12.6% at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, respectively. The preoperative exercise group demonstrated significant improvement the single-leg hop distance. [Conclusion] Four week preoperative exercise may produce many positive effects post reconstruction surgery, including faster recovery of knee extensor strength and function, as measured by single-leg hop ability. PMID:26504270

  12. Preoperative Prediction of Aortic Insufficiency During Ventricular Assist Device Treatment.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Survival rate in patients with stage D heart failure has improved significantly owing to the development of continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD), but aortic insufficiency (AI) still remains one of the major unsolved complications that impairs patient quality of life. There are no established treatments for AI, and preoperative prediction and prevention of AI is needed. The opening of a native aortic valve (AV) is a sufficient condition for prevention of AI, and improvement of LV ejection fraction due to LV reverse remodeling (LVRR) is essential to open a native AV. Preoperative insufficient β-blocker treatment and pulsatile flow LVAD usage are keys for LVRR, opening of an AV, and prevention of AI. The second mechanism that leads to AI is remodeling of the aortic root and degeneration of a native AV, which results from reduced pulse pressure during LVAD support. Centrifugal or pulsatile flow LVAD usage has an advantage in terms of preserving pulsatility, and may prevent AI compared with an axial pump. There is less probability of avoiding AI with sufficient β-blocker treatment, and these patients may be good candidates for concomitant surgical intervention to a native AV at the time of LVAD implantation. PMID:26742702

  13. Motion of the kidney between preoperative and intraoperative positioning.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Caitlin; Nguan, Christopher; Longpre, Michelle; Rohling, Robert; Salcudean, Septimiu

    2013-06-01

    For many laparoscopic surgical procedures, the preoperative images are taken with the patient in a different position than that in which the surgery is performed. The organ shift between positions can affect surgical image guidance, as the organ shifts can complicate image registration. In particular, for partial nephrectomy, the standard clinical approach requires supine preoperative computed tomography, while the surgery is performed in the flank position. We studied ten subjects in both supine and flank positions. Rigid registration was used to determine the relative motion of the kidneys, using the spine as a pose-independent landmark. Our results showed that the kidney can move as much as 46.5 mm as a result of a supine-to-flank change in patient position, and rotate as much as 25°. From the results, significant kidney motion occurs due to the change of patient position from supine to flank. These changes warrant further study to understand and model the patient specific motion. PMID:23322758

  14. Preoperative prediction of reversible myocardial asynergy by postexercise radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Rozanski, A.; Berman, D.; Gray, R.; Diamond, G.; Raymond, M.; Prause, J.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Matloff, J.

    1982-07-22

    Myocardial asynergy is sometimes reversed by coronary bypass, and a noninvasive method of predicting which assess are reversible would be desirable. To assess whether changes in myocardial wall motion observed immediately after exercise can differentiate reversible from nonreversible myocardial asynergy, we evaluated 53 patients by radionuclide ventriculography before and after exercise and again at rest after coronary bypass surgery. Preoperative improvement in wall motion immediately after exercise was highly predictive of the surgical outcome (average chance-corrected agreement, 91 per cent). At surgery the asynergic segments that had improved after exercise were free of grossly apparent epicardial scarring. The accuracy of these predictions for postoperative improvement was significantly greater (P less than 0.01) than that of analysis of Q waves on resting electrocardiography (average chance-corrected agreement, 40 per cent). In contrast, preoperative changes in left ventricular ejection fraction after exercise were not predictive of postoperative resting ejection fraction. We conclude that postexercise radionuclide ventriculography can be used to identify reversible resting myocardial asynergy. This test should prove effective in predicting which patients with myocardial asynergy are most likely to benefit from aortocoronary revascularization.

  15. Preoperative Embolization of Extra-axial Hypervascular Tumors with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Matthew R.; Salem, Mohamed M.; Reddy, Arra S.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Thomas, Ajith J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preoperative endovascular embolization of intracranial tumors is performed to mitigate anticipated intraoperative blood loss. Although the usage of a wide array of embolic agents, particularly polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), has been described for a variety of tumors, literature detailing the efficacy, safety and complication rates for the usage of Onyx is relatively sparse. Materials and Methods We reviewed our single institutional experience with pre-surgical Onyx embolization of extra-axial tumors to evaluate its efficacy and safety and highlight nuances of individualized cases. Results Five patients underwent pre-surgical Onyx embolization of large or giant extra-axial tumors within 24 hours of surgical resection. Four patients harbored falcine or convexity meningiomas (grade I in 2 patients, grade II in 1 patient and grade III in one patient), and one patient had a grade II hemangiopericytoma. Embolization proceeded uneventfully in all cases and there were no complications. Conclusion This series augments the expanding literature confirming the safety and efficacy of Onyx in the preoperative embolization of extra-axial tumors, underscoring its advantage of being able to attain extensive devascularization via only one supplying pedicle. PMID:27114961

  16. Essential elements of the preoperative breast reconstruction evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Angela

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of options exist for breast reconstruction and preoperative evaluation must be thorough to lead to a successful outcome. We review multiple components of the preoperative assessment including the patient’s history, goals, imaging, and key elements of the physical exam. Consideration for tumor biology, staging, need or response to chemotherapy or radiation therapy is important in deciding on immediate versus delayed reconstruction. It is also important to consider the patient’s anatomy, breast size and whether the reconstruction will be unilateral or bilateral. The reconstructive surgeon must accommodate all these factors to consider partial or complete mastectomy defects and guide the patient to the most appropriate reconstructive technique whether it be an oncoplastic reduction mammoplasty, expander-based reconstruction, immediate implant reconstruction, or immediate versus delayed autologous tissue reconstruction such as the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP)/transverse rectus abdominis muscle (TRAM), latissimus, transverse upper gracilis (TUG)/profunda femoris artery perforator (PAP), or gluteal artery perforator (GAP) flaps. PMID:26005641

  17. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage with Postoperative Morbidity after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Lu, Jian-Wen; Du, Zhao-Qing; Liu, Xue-Min; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Xu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background. The advantages or disadvantages of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) prior to pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) remain unclear. Methods. A prospectively maintained database was queried for 335 consecutive patients undergoing standard PD surgery between 2009 and 2013. Clinical data and postoperative complications of the 47 patients receiving PBD and 288 patients with early surgery were compared. A matching analysis was also performed between patients receiving or not receiving PBD (no-PBD). Results. The indication for PBD was severe obstructive jaundice (81%) and cholangitis (26%) at the time of PBD. 47 PBD patients had higher bilirubin level than 288 no-PBD patients preoperatively (363.2 μmol/L versus 136.0 μmol/L, p < 0.001). Although no significant difference of any complications could be observed between the two groups, positive intraoperative bile culture and wound infection seemed to be moderately increased in PBD compared to no-PBD patients (p = 0.084 and 0.183, resp.). In the matched-pair comparison, the incidence of wound infection was three times higher in PBD than no-PBD patients (14.9% versus 4.3%, p = 0.080). Conclusions. PBD seems to moderately increase the risk of postoperative wound and bile duct infection. Therefore, PBD should be selectively performed prior to PD. PMID:26798333

  18. Preoperative mechanical preparation of the colon: the patient's experience

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Barbel; Lannerstad, Olof; Påhlman, Lars; Arodell, Malin; Unosson, Mitra; Nilsson, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Background Preoperative mechanical bowel preparation can be questioned as standard procedure in colon surgery, based on the result from several randomised trials. Methods As part of a large multicenter trial, 105 patients planned for elective colon surgery for cancer, adenoma, or diverticulitis in three hospitals were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding perceived health including experience with bowel preparation. There were 39 questions, each having 3 – 10 answer alternatives, dealing with food intake, pain, discomfort, nausea/vomiting, gas distension, anxiety, tiredness, need of assistance with bowel preparation, and willingness to undergo the procedure again if necessary. Results 60 patients received mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) and 45 patients did not (No-MBP). In the MBP group 52% needed assistance with bowel preparation and 30% would consider undergoing the same preoperative procedure again. In the No-MBP group 65 % of the patients were positive to no bowel preparation. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to postoperative pain and nausea. On Day 4 (but not on Days 1 and 7 postoperatively) patients in the No-MBP group perceived more discomfort than patients in the MBP group, p = 0.02. Time to intake of fluid and solid food did not differ between the two groups. Bowel emptying occurred significantly earlier in the No-MBP group than in the MBP group, p = 0.03. Conclusion Mechanical bowel preparation is distressing for the patient and associated with a prolonged time to first bowel emptying. PMID:17480223

  19. Preoperative Uterine Artery Embolization (PUAE) Before Uterine Fibroid Myomectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Dumousset, E.; Chabrot, P.; Rabischong, B.; Mazet, N.; Nasser, S.; Darcha, C.; Garcier, J.M.; Mage, G.; Boyer, L.

    2008-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the potential of uterine artery embolization to minimize blood loss and facilitate easier removal of fibroids during subsequent myomectomy. Methods. This retrospective study included 22 patients (median age 37 years), of whom at least 15 wished to preserve their fertility. They presented with at least one fibroid (mean diameter 85.6 mm) and had undergone preoperative uterine artery embolization (PUAE) with resorbable gelatin sponge. Results. No complication or technical failure of embolization was identified. Myomectomies were performed during laparoscopy (12 cases) and laparotomy (9 cases). One hysterectomy was performed. The following were noted: easier dissection of fibroids (mean 5.6 per patient, range 1-30); mean intervention time 113 min (range 25-210 min); almost bloodless surgery, with a mean peroperative blood loss of 90 ml (range 0-806 ml); mean hemoglobin pretherapeutically 12.3 g/dl (range 5.9-15.2 g/dl) and post-therapeutically 10.3 g/dl (range 5.6-13.3 g/dl), with no blood transfusion needed. Patients were discharged on day 4 on average and the mean sick leave was 1 month. Conclusion. Preoperative embolization is associated with minimal intraoperative blood loss. It does not increase the complication rate or impair operative dissection, and improves the chances of performing conservative surgery.

  20. Preoperative thrombocytosis predicts prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Sun; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Thrombocytosis is known to be a poor prognostic factor in several types of solid tumors. The prognostic role of preoperative thrombocytosis in colorectal cancer remains limited. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic role of preoperative thrombocytosis in stage II colorectal cancer. Methods Two hundred eighty-four patients with stage II colorectal cancer who underwent surgical resection between December 2003 and December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Thrombocytosis was defined as platelet > 450 × 109/L. We compared patients with thrombocytosis and those without thrombocytosis in terms of survival. Results The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were lower in patients with thrombocytosis compared to those without thrombocytosis in stage II colorectal cancer (73.3% vs. 89.6%, P = 0.021). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that thrombocytosis (hazard ratio, 2.945; 95% confidence interval, 1.127–7.697; P = 0.028) was independently associated with DFS in patients with stage II colorectal cancer. Conclusion This study showed that thrombocytosis is a prognostic factor predicting DFS in stage II colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27274508

  1. Histological differences between preoperative chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy for rectal cancer: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Sakuyama, Naoki; Kojima, Motohiro; Kawano, Shingo; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Saito, Norio; Ito, Masaaki; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    Pathological studies on the different histological effects between neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and preoperative chemoradiation therapy (preoperative CRT) have not been performed. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the histological differences in tissue received from NAC and preoperative CRT for rectal cancer to evaluate whether a pathological assessment method used after CRT can be applied for NAC. One hundred and thirty-eight patients were enrolled in this study; 88 patients underwent their operations after preoperative CRT or NAC, and 50 patients underwent surgery only. Residual tumor area was measured using morphometry software and we compared the stromal component of myofibroblasts, immune cells, and vasculature to elucidate the difference of therapeutic effect between them. The grade of reduction after preoperative CRT was more prominent than that seen in NAC. Also, ypT downstaging was more prominent in preoperative CRT than in NAC, and ypN downstaging was more frequent in NAC than in preoperative CRT. Preoperative CRT showed more marked myofibroblasts and fewer immune cells than did NAC, which indicates different effects on the cancer microenvironment. Our histological results suggest different effects between NAC and preoperative CRT on tumor tissue. The best assessment method available for a variable therapeutic protocol should be further investigated. PMID:27112135

  2. Preoperative single-dose methylprednisolone versus placebo after major liver resection in adults: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Alexsander K; Roberts, Derek J; Bhatti, Sana U; Dixon, Elijah; Sutherland, Francis R; Bathe, Oliver F; Ball, Chad G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although randomised controlled trials have demonstrated that preoperative glucocorticoids may improve postoperative surrogate outcomes among patients undergoing major liver resection, evidence supporting improved patient-important outcomes is lacking. This superiority trial aims to evaluate the effect of administration of a bolus of the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone versus placebo during induction of anaesthesia on postoperative morbidity among adults undergoing elective major liver resection. Methods and analysis This will be a randomised, dual-arm, parallel-group, superiority trial. All consecutive adults presenting to a large Canadian tertiary care hospital who consent to undergo major liver resection will be included. Patients aged <18 years and those currently receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy will be excluded. We will randomly allocate participants to a preoperative 500 mg intravenous bolus of methylprednisolone versus placebo. Surgical team members and outcome assessors will be blinded to treatment allocation status. The primary outcome measure will be postoperative complications. Secondary outcome measures will include mortality, the incidence of several specific postoperative complications, and blood levels of select proinflammatory cytokines, acute-phase proteins, and laboratory liver enzymes or function tests on postoperative days 0, 1, 2 and 5. The incidence of postoperative complications and mortality will be compared using Fisher's exact test, while the above laboratory measures will be compared using mixed-effects models with a subject-specific random intercept. Ethics and dissemination This trial will evaluate the protective effect of a single preoperative dose of methylprednisolone on the hazard of postoperative complications. A report releasing study results will be submitted for publication in an appropriate journal, approximately 3 months after finishing the data collection. Trial registration number NCT01997658

  3. Preoperative airway assessment - experience gained from a multicentre cluster randomised trial and the Danish Anaesthesia Database.

    PubMed

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet

    2016-05-01

    Difficulties with airway management in relation to general anaesthesia have been a challenge for the anaesthesiologist since the birth of anaesthesia. Massive landmark improvements have been made and general anaesthesia is now regarded as a safe procedure. However, rare, difficult airway management still occurs and it prompts increased risk of morbidity and mortality - especially when not anticipated. Several preoperative risk factors for airway difficulties have been identified, yet none have convincing diagnostic accuracy as stand alone tests. Combining several risk factors increase the predictive value of the test and multivariable risk models have been developed. The Simplified Airway Risk Index (SARI) is a predictive model developed for anticipation of a difficult direct laryngoscopy. However, neither the diagnostic accuracy of the SARI nor of any other model has been tested prospectively and compared with existing practice for airway assessment in a randomised trial setting. The first objective of this thesis was to quantify the proportion of unanticipated difficult intubation and difficult mask ventilation in Denmark. The second objective was to design a cluster randomised trial, using state of the art methodology, in order to test the clinical impact of using the SARI for preoperative airway assessment compared with a clinical judgement based on usual practice for airway assessment. Finally, to test if implementation of the SARI would reduce the proportion of unanticipated difficult intubation compared with usual care for airway assessment. This thesis is based on data from the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD). Paper 1 presents an observational cohort study on 188,064 patients who underwent tracheal intubation from 2008 to 2011. Data on the anaesthesiologists' preoperative anticipations of airway difficulties was compared with actual airway management conditions, thus enabling an estimation of the proportion of unanticipated difficulties with intubation

  4. Saturation biopsy improves preoperative Gleason scoring of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Philip; Wolf, Susanne; Adam, Alexander; Heukamp, Lukas Carl; Ellinger, Jörg; Vorreuther, Roland; Solleder, Gerold; Buettner, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the differences between conventional needle biopsy (CB) and saturation biopsy (SB) techniques with regard to the prediction of Gleason score, tumor stage, and insignificant prostate cancer. Data from a total number of 240 patients were analyzed. The main group, consisting of 185 patients, was diagnosed according to a saturation prostate needle biopsy protocol (SB), by which more than 12 cores were taken per biopsy. The control group was diagnosed using CB, by which 12 or less than 12 cores were taken per biopsy (n=55). In the main group, the Gleason score of the biopsy was confirmed in 19.5%, in the control group in 23.5% according to the prostatectomy specimen (p=0.50). Upgrading after the operation was found in 56.7% in the main group and in 60% in the control group (p=0.24). Downgrading after the operation was found in 23.9% in the main group and in 16.3% in the control group (p=0.24). If the Gleason score of the postoperative specimens differed by only one point from the biopsy, we considered this a minor deviation. In the main group, 59% of the carcinomas were preoperatively classified correctly or revealed minor deviation in Gleason scores. In contrast, only 47% of the carcinomas in the control group were assessed correctly or with minor deviation in Gleason scores. Thus, the main group demonstrated a better rate of preoperative prediction in tumor grading assessed by Gleason score (p=0.05). In addition, the Gleason scores of both protocols were assigned to three groups (Gleason <7; Gleason 7; Gleason >7), and the group changes from the biopsy to the prostatectomy specimen were found to be significantly more frequent in the CB group (p=0.04). There was no significant difference between the two types of biopsy techniques regarding tumor stage or the detection of insignificant carcinomas. The advantage of the extensive prostate needle biopsy technique (SB) is a better preoperative prediction of the Gleason score as well as the risk groups with

  5. One-stop outpatient and pre-operative assessment.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jane

    2009-02-01

    The introduction of the 18-week pathway has provided an opportunity for interprofessional teams at West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust to achieve their ultimate goal of more successful patient-led care, and their achievements are now being replicated throughout the country in NHS trusts. Improved communication and awareness of each other's roles and listening skills are key to understanding and negotiating changes in the delivery of care. In addition, there must be a willingness to listen and to change current practice. Changes of care must be interprofessional, and must have at their centre, demonstrable improvements to providing patients with the care that is determined by their individual needs. PMID:19248325

  6. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-10-29

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  7. Preoperative Localization and Surgical Margins in Conservative Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, F.; Sorrentino, L.; Bossi, D.; Sartani, A.; Foschi, D.

    2013-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. The adequacy of surgical margins (SM) is a crucial issue for adjusting the volume of excision and for avoiding local recurrences, although the precise definition of an adequate margins width remains controversial. Moreover, other factors such as the biological behaviour of the tumor and subsequent proper systemic therapies may influence the local recurrence rate (LRR). However, a successful BCS requires preoperative localization techniques or margin assessment techniques. Carbon marking, wire-guided, biopsy clips, radio-guided, ultrasound-guided, frozen section analysis, imprint cytology, and cavity shave margins are commonly used, but from the literature review, no single technique proved to be better among the various ones. Thus, an association of two or more methods could result in a decrease in rates of involved margins. Each institute should adopt its most congenial techniques, based on the senologic equipe experience, skills, and technologies. PMID:23986868

  8. Different preoperative approaches for acute lumber spinal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lu-Feng; Yuan, Yan-Sheng; Li, En-Hui; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    To compare the long and short term effectiveness of different preoperative approaches for lumber spinal fractures and finds a better surgical method for the disease. Follow up records of 144 patients received hyperbaric oxygen therapy or methylprednisolone infusion within 8 hours after the lubmer spinal injury were analyzed. Postoperative outcome immediately and 3, 6, 12, 36 months after the surgery were compared to evaluate the effectiveness two different approaches. The results indicated that there are no significant differences regarding age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), visual analogue scale of pain (VAS) score as well as Frankel scores before the surgery, and significant differences VAS score as well as Frankel scores immediately after the surgery. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen therapy within 8 hours after the injury can be more effective than methylprednisolone infusion in patients with lumber spinal injury. PMID:26309686

  9. C-018H Pre-Operational Baseline Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Guzek, S.J.

    1993-08-20

    The objective of this task is to field characterize and sample the soil at selected locations along the proposed effluent line routes for Project C-018H. The overall purpose of this effort is to meet the proposed plan to discontinue the disposal of contaminated liquids into the Hanford soil column as described by DOE (1987). Detailed information describing proposed transport pipeline route and associated Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company (KEH) preliminary drawings (H288746...755) all inclusive, have been prepared by KEH (1992). The information developed from field monitoring and sampling will be utilized to characterize surface and subsurface soil along the proposed C-018H effluent pipeline and it`s associated facilities. Potentially existing contaminant levels may be encountered therefore, soil characterization will provide a construction preoperational baseline reference, develop personnel safety requirements, and determine the need for any changes in the proposed routes prior to construction of the pipeline.

  10. Klatskin tumor: Diagnosis, preoperative evaluation and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Molina, Víctor; Sampson, Jaime; Ferrer, Joana; Sanchez-Cabus, Santiago; Calatayud, David; Pavel, Mihai Calin; Fondevila, Constantino; Fuster, Jose; García-Valdecasas, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Hiliar cholangiocarcinoma is the most common type of cholangiocarcinoma, an represent around 10% of all hepatobiliary tumors. It is an aggressive malignancy, resectable in around 47% of the patients at diagnosis. Complete resection is the most effective and only potentially curative therapy, with a survival rate of less than 12 months in unresectable cases. Axial computerized tomography and magnetic resonance are the most useful image techniques to determine the surgical resectability. Clinically, jaundice and pruritus are the most common symptoms at diagnosis;preoperative biliary drainage is recommended using endoscopic retrograde cholangiography or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Surgery using extended liver resections with an en bloc resection of the liver with vascular reconstruction is the technique with the highest survival. Complete resection with histologically negative resection margins (R0), nodal involvement and metastases are the most important prognostic factors. PMID:26298684

  11. [Preoperative evaluation and perioperative prevention of infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kiyoshi

    2010-09-01

    Preoperative evaluation of infectious diseases in patients for elective and non-elective surgery is important for the anesthesiologists not only to rule out the patient's state of illness, but also to prevent transmission of infectious diseases in healthcare settings. To prevent transmission of infectious diseases in healthcare settings, Center for Disease Control published guidelines that consist of standard precaution and transmission-based precautions. In the face of exposure to known infectious diseases, certain post exposure prophylaxis has been established, especially against exposure to human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus. There are also growing interests in perioperative prevention of surgical site infection, since World Health Organization has published surgical safety checklist with the slogan "Safe surgery saves life". Anesthesiologists need to have knowledge on the prevention of surgical site infection especially on antibiotic prophylaxis, because it starts in the operating room. PMID:20857671

  12. Ultrasound in preoperative evaluation for dialysis-access placement.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicole A; Shenoy, Surendra

    2014-01-01

    US vessel mapping for vascular access creation has evolved as standard practice in the preoperative evaluation of an ESRD patient. The best yield from this technology is when it is used to compliment physical examination and viewed in realtime by the operating physician. It is important to evaluate both arterial and venous systems during vessel mapping. While minimum diameters have been associated with an increased chance of maturation of an AV access, the quality of the vessel wall also plays an important role in maturation. US has a distinct advantage of being a noninvasive modality that can evaluate both structural and functional aspects of vessels that play an important role in access maturation. PMID:25040792

  13. The use of Sentinel satellite data in the MACC-II Copernicus pre-operational atmosphere service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, Richard; Flemming, Johannes; Benedetti, Angela; Inness, Antje; Massart, Sebastien; Parrington, Mark; Peuch, Vincent-Henri

    2014-05-01

    The Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC-II) project is the current pre-operational atmosphere service of the European Copernicus programme. MACC-II provides data records on atmospheric composition for recent years, data for monitoring present conditions and forecasts of the distribution of key constituents for a few days ahead. MACC-II combines state-of-the-art atmospheric modelling with Earth observation data to provide information services covering European Air Quality, Global Atmospheric Composition, Climate, and UV and Solar Energy. MACC-II uses a wide array of satellite and in-situ data observing both meteorological and atmospheric composition variables to provide a best estimate of the current state of the atmosphere on a daily basis. These analyses are then used as initial conditions for 5-day global forecasts of atmospheric composition and 4-day European air quality forecasts. This presentation will provide an overview of the MACC-II pre-operational monitoring/forecasting system focusing on the use of current and future satellite data. The Sentinel missions will provide crucial new information on atmospheric composition, both for operational and research purposes, and we will show how MACC-II is preparing for these new observations and how MACC-II can provide important feedback about the data quality through careful data monitoring in the comprehensive data assimilation system. The latter information will be very beneficial for the scientific community to make more optimal use of the Sentinel data.

  14. Preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    El-Bared, Nancy; Taussky, Daniel; Mehiri, Selma; Patocskai, Erika; Roberge, David; Donath, David

    2014-06-01

    The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has allowed for the administration of high doses to retroperitoneal sarcomas (RSTS) while limiting toxicity to adjacent organs. The purpose of our study is to assess the outcome and toxicities of patients with RSTS treated with neo-adjuvant external beam radiation (EBRT) therapy using IMRT. This is a retrospective study of 21 patients treated with preoperative IMRT for primary or recurrent RSTS between 2005 and 2011. Overall survival (OS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method (log-rank test). Acute and chronic toxicities were assessed using the CTCAE v. 3 criteria. The actuarial 2 and 3-year OS was 66% for both and the 5-year OS was 51%. As for LRFS it was 57% at 2 and 3-year and 51% for the 5-year LRFS. Factors predictive for local control were microscopically negative margins (p = 0.022), a median tumor diameter <15 cm (p = 0.007) and pathology of liposarcoma (p = 0.021). Furthermore, patients treated for recurrent disease fared worse (p = 0.04) in local control than patients treated for primary disease. As for OS, patients treated for Grade 1 histology had a better outcome (p 5 0.05). EBRT was generally well tolerated. Acute gastrointestinal (GI) Grade 1 or 2 toxicities occurred in 33% of patients and one patient had unexplained post-radiation Grade 2 fever that resolved after tumor resection. As for chronic toxicities 24% of our patients presented Grade 1 GI toxicity and one patient presented Grade 3 small bowel stenosis not clearly due to radiation toxicity. Despite the location and volume of the tumors treated, preoperative IMRT was very well tolerated in our patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma. Unfortunately local recurrences remain common and dose escalation is to be considered. PMID:23919397

  15. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A.

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Preoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    El-Bared, Nancy; Taussky, Daniel; Mehiri, Selma; Patocskai, Erika; Roberge, David; Donath, David

    2014-01-01

    The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has allowed for the administration of high doses to retroperitoneal sarcomas (RSTS) while limiting toxicity to adjacent organs. The purpose of our study is to assess the outcome and toxicities of patients with RSTS treated with neo-adjuvant external beam radiation (EBRT) therapy using IMRT. This is a retrospective study of 21 patients treated with preoperative IMRT for primary or recurrent RSTS between 2005 and 2011. Overall survival (OS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method (log-rank test). Acute and chronic toxicities were assessed using the CTCAE v. 3 criteria. The actuarial 2 and 3-year OS was 66% for both and the 5-year OS was 51%. As for LRFS it was 57% at 2 and 3-year and 51% for the 5-year LRFS. Factors predictive for local control were microscopically negative margins (p = 0.022), a median tumor diameter <5 cm (p = 0.007) and pathology of liposarcoma (p = 0.021). Furthermore, patients treated for recurrent disease fared worse (p = 0.04) in local control than patients treated for primary disease. As for OS, patients treated for Grade 1 histology had a better outcome (p = 0.05). EBRT was generally well tolerated. Acute gastrointestinal (GI) Grade 1 or 2 toxicities occurred in 33% of patients and one patient had unexplained post-radiation Grade 2 fever that resolved after tumor resection. As for chronic toxicities 24% of our patients presented Grade 1 GI toxicity and one patient presented Grade 3 small bowel stenosis not clearly due to radiation toxicity. Despite the location and volume of the tumors treated, preoperative IMRT was very well tolerated in our patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma. Unfortunately local recurrences remain common and dose escalation is to be considered. PMID:23919397

  17. [Subjective verbal methods in preoperative measurement of anxiety].

    PubMed

    Höfling, S; Hutner, G; Ott, H; Fichte, K; Doenicke, A

    1988-06-01

    The role of preoperative anxiety in perioperative adaptation is viewed in two different ways. Janis suggested that anxiety is a drive that evokes the cognitive work of worrying. Leventhal stresses the importance of coping behavior for adaptation, while anxiety may or may not accompany this coping process. Both theories have empirical support. The aim of this study was to determine whether both theories could show empirical support because the scientists chose different methods: Janis used interviews, Leventhal and Lazarus anxiety scales. The study analyzed the pre- and postoperative emotional reactions of surgical patients with three different methods of anxiety measurement: an anxiety scale, a fear thermometer, and a psychoanalytic interview (Gottschalk-Gleser content analysis method). The different methods were compared and related to the adaptation behavior (Table 3). The data showed a clear interaction between the selected methods and respective theories about the effects of preoperative anxiety on intra- and postoperative adaptation. The anxiety scales showed no correlation with adaptation behavior (blood pressure and heart rate during surgery; postoperative pain medication) and were not related to the anxiety scores obtained from the interview (content analysis). On the other hand, the interview anxiety measurements showed a clear relationship between separation anxiety (and also shame anxiety), physiological excitement during surgery (increase in heart rate), and postoperative medication (increased analgesics and tranquilizers). The patients who worried about the risks of surgery (Verletzungsangst, see Fig. 3) had very good perioperative adjustment, so that the quality of anxiety measured in the interview was very important for the prediction of adaptation. PMID:3407901

  18. Effects of Preoperative Clarithromycin Administration in Patients with Nasal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Perić, A; Baletić, N; Milojević, M; Sotirović, J; Živić, L; Perić, AV; Vojvodić, D

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: In recent years, various investigators have shown considerable interest in the use of macrolide antibiotics for treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effects of preoperative long-term, low-dose clarithromycin administration in patients with nasal polyposis. Methods: Eighty nasal polyp patients (42 non-atopic and 38 atopic) were included in this prospective, non-placebo controlled investigation and randomized equally to either the combined clarithromycin-surgical or surgical group. Forty patients received 500 mg of clarithromycin daily for eight weeks, and, after evaluation, they were treated by functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). The other 40 patients were treated only surgically. The nasal symptom scores and endoscopic scores after macrolide treatment/surgical treatment, and after six and 12 months of follow-up were evaluated. Results: After clarithromycin therapy, we found improvement in symptom scores in 25/40, and improvement in endoscopic scores in 19/40 patients. We found no significant difference in nasal symptom score between allergic and non-allergic patients regarding the outcome to macrolide (p = 0.352) or surgical treatment (p = 0.396). When we compared differences between endoscopic scores at the time points of 12 months and six months postoperatively (ESt12 minus ESt6), we found statistically lower differences in the clarithromycin-surgery group than in the surgery group (p = 0.006). Conclusion: Preoperative clarithromycin administration postponed nasal polyp relapse after FESS. Allergies have no influence on the clinical efficacy of clarithromycin therapy and on the efficacy of FESS. PMID:25867579

  19. Physics-based simulation of surgical fields for preoperative strategic planning.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Megumi; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Oyama, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Genichi; Komeda, Masashi

    2006-10-01

    Although careful planning of surgical approach is a key for success of surgery, conventional planning and simulation tools cannot support detailed discussion. This issue is derived from the difficulty of estimating complex physical behavior of soft tissues provided by a series of surgical procedures like cutting and deformation. This paper proposes an adaptive physics-based framework that simulates both interactive cutting and accurate deformation on virtual bodies, and performs preoperative planning for supporting strategic discussion. We focus on limited use of the two models: A particle-based model and an FEM-based model considering required quality and performance in different situations. FEM-based deformation of incision accurately produces estimated surgical fields. Based on the framework, a strategic planning system was developed for supporting decision of surgical approach using 3D representation of the surgical fields. We applied clinical CT dataset of an aortic aneurysm case to the system. Some experiments and usability tests confirmed that the system contributes to grasping 3D shape and location of the target organs and performs detailed discussion on patient-specific surgical approaches. PMID:17069000

  20. Preoperative distraction in children: hand-held videogames vs clown therapy.

    PubMed

    Messina, M; Molinaro, F; Meucci, D; Angotti, R; Giuntini, L; Cerchia, E; Bulotta, A L; Brandigi, E

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety in children undergoing surgery is characterized by feelings of tension, apprehension, nervousness and fear which may manifest differently. Postoperative behavioural changes such as nocturnal enuresis, feeding disorders, apathy, and sleep disturbances may stem from postoperative anxiety. Some Authors pointed out that over 60% of children undergoing surgery are prone to developing behavioural alterations 2 weeks after surgery. Variables such as age, temperament and anxiety both in children and parents are considered predictors of such changes.1 Studies were published describing how psycho-behavioural interventions based on play, learning and entertainment in preparing children for surgery, may reduce preoperative anxiety. Clown-therapy is applied in the most important paediatric facilities and has proved to diminish children's emotional distress and sufferance, as well as consumption of both analgesics and sedatives and to facilitate the achievement of therapeutic goals. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of clown-therapy during the child's hospital stay, with a view to optimizing treatment and care, preventing behavioural alterations and enhancing the child's overall life quality. PMID:25669889

  1. Evaluation of Stress Intensity and Anxiety Level in Preoperative Period of Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosiek, Anna; Kornatowski, Tomasz; Rosiek-Kryszewska, Aleksandra; Leksowski, Łukasz; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The stress related to patient's stay in a hospital increases when it is necessary to perform a surgery. Therefore, the study of the phenomenon of stress intensity in hospitalized patients has become an important issue for public health. Material and Method. The study was conducted in University Hospital No. 1 in the cardiosurgery clinic. The study involved 58 patients who were admitted as planned to the hospital. The study used a standardized questionnaire measuring intensity of the stress and also deepened interviews with patients about stress and anxiety felt before the surgery. Results. The greater the patient's anxiety resulting from his state of health, the greater the intensity of stress in the preoperative period. This relationship is linear. The results of the study also made it possible to see intrapersonal factors (pain, illness, and suffering) and extrapersonal factors (anesthesia, surgery, and complications after surgery), which are causes of anxiety before surgery. Conclusion. The research showed high (negative) results of anxiety and stress associated with the disease, surgery, and complications after cardiac surgery. Active involvement in hospitalization elements, such as patient education before surgery, psychological support, and medical care organization taking into account patient's preferences, reduces the impact of stressors. PMID:27042655

  2. Evaluation of Stress Intensity and Anxiety Level in Preoperative Period of Cardiac Patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Kornatowski, Tomasz; Rosiek-Kryszewska, Aleksandra; Leksowski, Łukasz; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The stress related to patient's stay in a hospital increases when it is necessary to perform a surgery. Therefore, the study of the phenomenon of stress intensity in hospitalized patients has become an important issue for public health. Material and Method. The study was conducted in University Hospital No. 1 in the cardiosurgery clinic. The study involved 58 patients who were admitted as planned to the hospital. The study used a standardized questionnaire measuring intensity of the stress and also deepened interviews with patients about stress and anxiety felt before the surgery. Results. The greater the patient's anxiety resulting from his state of health, the greater the intensity of stress in the preoperative period. This relationship is linear. The results of the study also made it possible to see intrapersonal factors (pain, illness, and suffering) and extrapersonal factors (anesthesia, surgery, and complications after surgery), which are causes of anxiety before surgery. Conclusion. The research showed high (negative) results of anxiety and stress associated with the disease, surgery, and complications after cardiac surgery. Active involvement in hospitalization elements, such as patient education before surgery, psychological support, and medical care organization taking into account patient's preferences, reduces the impact of stressors. PMID:27042655

  3. Incarcerated femoral hernia containing the right uterine tube. A pre-operative diagnosis is possible.

    PubMed

    Engin, Omer; Cicek, Ebru; Oner, Soner Recai; Yildirim, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    The incarcerated femoral hernia containing the right uterine tube is very rare to see. The case report is important to accumulate knowledge of very rare cases. The diagnosis of the case was established pre-operatively with abdominal computerized tomography (CT) On CT examination, the mass in the hernia sac was not connected with the intestines and a tubal structure on the right side of the uterus was shown to extend out of the abdomen. In the operation, the right uterine tube(RUT) was reduced into the abdomen after its blood supply was shown to be normal. A hernia repair was performed. Sometimes in obese patients, incarcerated femoral or inguinal hernias may not been noted. Ultrasonography, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used frequently to diagnose abdominal wall hernias. The organs in the incarcerated sac must be examined carefully and the viability must be checked. The surgeon must decide whether or not to resect the organs. In our case, strangulation was not found and polypropylene mesh was not used for hernia repair due to a fear of infection of the prosthesis. Incarceration of the uterine tube in the sac is traumatic and this condition may lead to infection. Such conditions may lead to ectopic pregnancy. The patient must be informed about ectopic pregnancy due to a previous incarceration of the tube because ectopic pregnancy may be fatal. PMID:21988051

  4. Patient and Caregiver Perspectives of Preoperative Teaching for Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lanier-Bohan, Elaine M; Heath, Susan L

    2016-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has developed into an important therapy for Parkinson disease, essential tremor, and dystonia with more nurses in varied settings often preparing patients and families for this type of surgery. This exploratory study sought to obtain patient and caregiver perspectives of the current DBS teaching for Parkinson disease, essential tremor, and dystonia; to improve the teaching; and to standardize the education. Using survey methodology, 41 patients with movement disorder and 32 caregivers completed surveys about the preoperative instructions they received. Data analysis calculated frequencies for response rate, demographic information, multiple-choice questions, and Likert scale responses. Fill-in questions were summarized. Results overall showed that, because of the teaching, two thirds of patients and nearly two thirds of caregivers felt fully prepared for the DBS surgery. Patients' and caregivers' suggested recommendations for nurses and surgeons included requests for specific information such as attention to delivery of the education, more individualized care during the education, attention to pain during and after procedure, and postdischarge follow-up. The study identified unmet patient and caregiver needs, resulted in changes in practice, and serves as a guide toward standardization of educational approach and/or content. PMID:27579958

  5. Value of routine preoperative chest x-rays: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Archer, C; Levy, A R; McGregor, M

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency with which routine postoperative chest x-rays lead to clinically relevant new information. All articles in English, French and Spanish relating to routine chest radiography in North American or European populations were reviewed, using the Medline database and references listed in reviews and periodicals published from 1966 to 1992, inclusive. Twenty-one reports which supplied sufficient information were included for meta-analysis. On average, abnormalities were found in 10% of routine preoperative chest films. In only 1.3% of films were the abnormalities unexpected, i.e., were not already known or would not otherwise have been detected (95% CI: 0 to 2.8%). These findings were of sufficient importance to cause modification of management in only 0.1% (95% CI: 0 to 0.6%). The frequency with which the new information influenced health could not be estimated. Assuming only the direct cost to the health care system of each radiograph ($23), each finding which influenced management in any way would cost $23,000. It is concluded that in North American or European populations when a reliable history and a clinical examination are carried out, the cost of this test is so high relation to the clinical information provided that it is no longer justifiable. PMID:8269561

  6. Preoperative inspiratory muscle training to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection (PREPARE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal resection is associated with a high incidence of postoperative pneumonia. Respiratory complications account for almost half of the readmissions to the critical care unit. Postoperative complications can result in prolonged hospital stay and consequently increase healthcare costs. In cardiac surgery a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program has shown to prevent postoperative pneumonia and reduce length of hospital stay. While in some surgical centers inspiratory muscle training is already used in the preoperative phase in patients undergoing esophageal resection, the added value of this intervention on the reduction of pulmonary complications has not yet been investigated in large surgical populations other than cardiac surgery in a randomized and controlled study design. Methods/Design The effect of a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program on the incidence of postoperative pneumonia in patients undergoing esophageal resection will be studied in a single blind multicenter randomized controlled trial (the PREPARE study). In total 248 patients (age >18 years) undergoing esophageal resection for esophageal cancer will be included in this study. They are randomized to either usual care or usual care with an additional inspiratory muscle training intervention according to a high-intensity protocol which is performed with a tapered flow resistive inspiratory loading device. Patients have to complete 30 dynamic inspiratory efforts twice daily for 7 days a week until surgery with a minimum of 2 weeks. The starting training load will be aimed to be 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure and will be increased based on the rate of perceived exertion. The main study endpoint is the incidence of postoperative pneumonia. Secondary objectives are to evaluate the effect of preoperative inspiratory muscle training on length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, incidence of other postoperative (pulmonary) complications

  7. Factors Associated with Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Use among Medicare Beneficiaries with Nonmetastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Louise M; Weiss, Julie; Hubbard, Rebecca A; O'Donoghue, Cristina; DeMartini, Wendy B; Buist, Diana S M; Kerlikowske, Karla; Goodrich, Martha; Virnig, Beth; Tosteson, Anna N A; Lehman, Constance D; Onega, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) use among Medicare beneficiaries with breast cancer has substantially increased from 2005 to 2009. We sought to identify factors associated with preoperative breast MRI use among women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or stage I-III invasive breast cancer (IBC). Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results and Medicare data from 2005 to 2009 we identified women ages 66 and older with DCIS or stage I-III IBC who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. We compared preoperative breast MRI use by patient, tumor and hospital characteristics stratified by DCIS and IBC using multivariable logistic regression. From 2005 to 2009, preoperative breast MRI use increased from 5.9% to 22.4% of women diagnosed with DCIS and 7.0% to 24.3% of women diagnosed with IBC. Preoperative breast MRI use was more common among women who were younger, married, lived in higher median income zip codes and had no comorbidities. Among women with IBC, those with lobular disease, smaller tumors (<1 cm) and those with estrogen receptor negative tumors were more likely to receive preoperative breast MRI. Women with DCIS were more likely to receive preoperative MRI if tumors were larger (>2 cm). The likelihood of receiving preoperative breast MRI is similar for women diagnosed with DCIS and IBC. Use of MRI is more common in women with IBC for tumors that are lobular and smaller while for DCIS MRI is used for evaluation of larger lesions. PMID:26511204

  8. The Analgesic Efficacy of Preoperative Oral Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen in Children Undergoing Adenotonsillectomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahgoobifard, Maziar; Mirmesdagh, Yalda; Imani, Farsad; Najafi, Atabak; Nataj-Majd, Masoomeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adenotonsillectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures in children. Several complications and morbidities are common after nasal surgeries and the most common is pain. Several techniques have been employed to reduce the severity of postoperative pain. One of the preoperative techniques is pre-emptive analgesia through preventive central hypersensitization. This technique is performed by applying analgesic methods before the onset of nociceptive stimuli, consequently decreasing postoperative analgesics requirements. Objectives: Preoperative oral drug administration for pain analgesia is performed in several methods. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effects of preoperatively administration of oral acetaminophen and ibuprofen. Patients and Methods: In a double-blinded, randomized placebo-controlled study, sixty 4-12 years old ASA I or II children scheduled for elective adenotonsillectomy, were assigned to receive either acetaminophen 15 mg/kg, ibuprofen 10 mg/kg or placebo 30 minutes before the operation. Postoperative pain was assessed using the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (CHEOPS), upon arrival to the post anesthetic care unit (PACU) and ward. Findings were analyzed by SPSS version 17 using variance analysis and Tukey’s test. Results: The average pain intensities were significantly lower in acetaminophen group based on the CHEOPS in both PACU and ward compared to ibuprofen or placebo groups; but there was no difference in pain intensity between the ibuprofen and placebo groups. Pain intensity in PACU in Acetaminophen group was 7.05 ± 0.64 vs. 8.38 ± 1.20 in placebo group and 8.14 ± 0.85 in ibuprofen group, pain intensity in ward in the acetaminophen group was 6.0.87 ± 0.85in the acetaminophen group, vs. 8.04 ± 1.02 in placebo group, and 7.78 ± 0.78 in ibuprofen group. Conclusions: This study showed that administration of oral acetaminophen 30 minutes preoperatively, resulted in significantly lower

  9. Correlation of Preoperative Renal Insufficiency With Mortality and Morbidity After Aortic Valve Replacement: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Chen, Yung-Chang; Lee, Hsiu-An; Chen, Shao-Wei; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative end-stage renal disease carries a high mortality and morbidity risk after aortic valve replacement (AVR), but the effect of renal insufficiency remains to be clarified. Through propensity score analysis, we compared the preoperative demographics, perioperative profiles, and outcomes between patients with and without renal insufficiency. From August 2005 to November 2014, 770 adult patients underwent AVR in a single institution. Patients were classified according to their estimated glomerular infiltration rate (eGFR) as renal insufficiency (eGFR: 30–89 mL/min/1.73 m2) or normal (eGFR, ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2). Propensity scoring was performed with a 1:1 ratio, resulting in a matched cohort of 88 patients per group. Demographics, comorbidities, and surgical procedures were well balanced between the 2 groups, except for diabetes mellitus and eGFR. Patients with renal insufficiency had higher in-hospital mortality (19.3% versus 3.4%, P < 0.001), a greater need for postoperative hemodialysis (14.8% versus 3.1%, P = 0.009), and prolonged intubation times (>72 hour; 25% versus 9.1%, P = .008), intensive care unit stays (8.9 ± 9.9 versus 4.9 ± 7.5 days, P = .046), and hospital stays (35.3 ± 31.7 versus 24.1 ± 20.3 days, P = .008), compared with those with normal renal function. Multivariate analysis confirmed that preoperative renal insufficiency was an in-hospital mortality predictor (odds ratio, 2.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.343–4.043; P = .003), as were prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time, intraaortic balloon pump support, and postoperative hemodialysis. The 1-year survival significantly differed between the 2 groups including (normal 87.5% versus renal insufficiency 67.9%, P < .001) or excluding in-hospital mortality (normal 90.7% versus renal insufficiency 82.1%, P = .05). Patients with preoperative renal insufficiency who underwent AVR had higher in-hospital mortality rates and

  10. Preoperative opioid strength may not affect outcomes of anterior cervical procedures: a post hoc analysis of 2 prospective, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Anderson, Paul A.; Sasso, Rick C.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Object The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between preoperative opioid strength and outcomes of anterior cervical decompressive surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1004 patients enrolled in 1 of 2 investigational device exemption studies comparing cervical total disc arthroplasty (TDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for single-level cervical disease causing radiculopathy or myelopathy was selected. At a preoperative visit, opioid use data, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, 36-ltem Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores, and numeric rating scale scores for neck and arm pain were collected. Patients were divided into strong (oxycodone/morphine/meperidine), weak (codeine/propoxyphene/ hydrocodone), and opioid-naïve groups. Preoperative and postoperative (24 months) outcomes scores were compared within and between groups using the paired t-test and ANCOVA, respectively. Results Patients were categorized as follows: 226 strong, 762 weak, and 16 opioid naïve. The strong and weak groups were similar with respect to age, sex, race, marital status, education level, Worker's Compensation status, litigation status, and alcohol use. At 24-month follow-up, no differences in change in arm or neck pain scores (arm: strong –52.3, weak –50.6, naïve –54.0, p = 0.244; neck: strong –52.7, weak –50.8, naïve –44.6, p = 0.355); NDI scores (strong –36.0, weak –33.3, naïve –32.3, p = 0.181); or SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores (strong: 14.1, weak 13.3, naïve 21.7, p = 0.317) were present. Using a 15-point improvement in NDI to determine success, the authors found no between-groups difference in success rates (strong 80.6%, weak 82.7%, naïve 73.3%, p = 0.134). No difference existed between treatment arms (TDA vs ACDF) for any outcome at any time point. Conclusions Preoperative opioid strength did not adversely affect outcomes in this analysis. Careful patient selection can yield good results in this patient

  11. Bari-Active: A randomized controlled trial of a preoperative intervention to increase physical activity in bariatric surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Thomas, J. Graham; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Unick, Jessica L.; Jakicic, John M.; Pohl, Dieter; Ryder, Beth A.; Roye, G. Dean; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Habitual physical activity (PA) may help to optimize bariatric surgery outcomes; however objective PA measures show that most patients have low PA preoperatively and make only modest PA changes postoperatively. Patients require additional support to adopt habitual PA. Objectives: Test the efficacy of a preoperative PA intervention (PAI) versus standard pre-surgical care (SC) for increasing daily moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) in bariatric surgery patients. Setting: University Hospital, United States. Methods: Outcomes analysis included 75 participants (86.7% women; 46.0±8.9 years; Body Mass Index [BMI]=45.0±6.5 kg/m2) who were randomly assigned preoperatively to 6 weeks of PAI (n=40) or SC (n=35). PAI received weekly individual face-to-face sessions with tailored instruction in behavioral strategies (e.g., self-monitoring, goal-setting) to increase home-based walking exercise. The primary outcome, pre- to post-intervention change in daily bout-related (≥10-min bouts) and total (≥1-minute bouts) MVPA minutes, was assessed objectively via a multi-sensor monitor worn for 7 days at baseline- and post-intervention. Results: Retention was 84% at the post-intervention primary end point. In intent-to-treat analyses with baseline value carried forward for missing data and adjusted for baseline MVPA, PAI achieved a mean increase of 16.6±20.6 minutes/day in bout-related MVPA (baseline: 4.4±5.5 to post-intervention: 21.0±21.4 minutes/day) compared to no change (−0.3±12.7 minutes/day; baseline: 7.9±16.6 to post-intervention: 7.6±11.5 minutes/day) for SC (p=0.001). Similarly, PAI achieved a mean increase of 21.0±26.9 minutes/day in total MVPA (baseline: 30.9±21.2 to post-intervention: 51.9±30.0 minutes/day), whereas SC demonstrated no change (− 0.1±16.3 minutes/day; baseline: 33.7±33.2 to post-intervention: 33.6±28.5 minutes/day) (p=0.001). Conclusions: With behavioral intervention, patients can significantly increase MVPA before bariatric

  12. Beyond Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedge, Nicki; Mackenzie, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Care is a feature of all of our lives, all of the time. An analysis of Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence reveals that care and caring permeate complex dimensions of life in and after school and we ask here, if, on some accounts, care can do the work required of it. Acknowledging the significance of her contribution to care, we focus on the work…

  13. Does preoperative psychological status of patients affect postoperative pain? A prospective study from the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Prisca; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Chen, Deryk

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with high anxiety states in the preoperative period often have more intense postoperative pain, despite adequate pain control during the intraoperative period. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the preoperative psychological status and the pain experienced postoperatively in a sample of Caribbean patients. Design and methods: A prospective study was conducted in elective surgical adult patients at a teaching hospital in the Caribbean. Patients’ preoperative psychological status was assessed using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and a preoperative ‘expected’ pain score was recorded. Postoperatively, ‘observed’ pain scores at 4 and 24 hours and the maximum pain score during 24 hours were recorded. Demographic data and clinical details including data regarding postoperative analgesia were collected. Expected and observed pain scores were compared between patients with and without anxiety and depression. Results: A total of 304 patients were enrolled. The overall prevalence of anxiety and depression was 43% and 27%, respectively, based on the HADS scores. There were significant associations between the postoperative pain scores and factors such as preoperative anxiety and depression (HADS) scores, preoperative expected pain scores, patient educational level, presence of preoperative pain and surgical duration. Age, gender, ethnicity and type of anaesthesia did not impact postoperative pain scores. Conclusion: The presence of preoperative anxiety and depression as indicated by HADS score may significantly influence postoperative pain. Other factors such as educational level, presence of preoperative pain and surgical duration may also impact postoperative pain. Some of these factors may be modifiable and must be addressed in the preoperative period. PMID:27551421

  14. Postoperative Care of the Transplanted Patient

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Gajarski, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The successful delivery of optimal peri-operative care to pediatric heart transplant recipients is a vital determinant of their overall outcomes. The practitioner caring for these patients must be familiar with and treat multiple simultaneous issues in a patient who may have been critically ill preoperatively. In addition to the complexities involved in treating any child following cardiac surgery, caretakers of newly transplanted patients encounter multiple transplant-specific issues. This chapter details peri-operative management strategies, frequently encountered early morbidities, initiation of immunosuppression including induction, and short-term outcomes. PMID:22548034

  15. Managed Care

    MedlinePlus

    Managed care plans are a type of health insurance. They have contracts with health care providers and medical ... probably cost more. There are three types of managed care plans: Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO) usually only pay ...

  16. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... you with all of these questions and discussions. Making Decisions About End-of-Life Care DNR/DNI/AND ... Experience Positive Growth? Grieving and Palliative Care Overview Making Decisions About End-of-Life Care DNR/DNI/AND ...

  17. Critical Care

    MedlinePlus

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  18. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing symptoms ... of the medical treatments you're receiving. Hospice care, care at the end of life, always includes ...

  19. Hospice care

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care - hospice; End-of-life care - hospice; Dying - hospice; Cancer - hospice ... Hospice care helps people with illnesses that cannot be cured and who are nearing death. The goal is to ...

  20. Self Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Beth Israel Heart Disease Diabetes Chronic Pain New Approaches to Chronic Disease Self Assessment Self Care Connections Experiences Research Learning Evaluation Print Email Self Care If you are ...

  1. Effect of preoperative intravenous methocarbamol and intravenous acetaminophen on opioid use after primary total hip and knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Looke, Thomas D; Kluth, Cameron T

    2013-02-01

    Between 2010 and 2011, a perioperative pain protocol for primary total hip and knee replacement at one Florida medical center replaced preoperative oral analgesics with intravenous methocarbamol and intravenous acetaminophen. This is a retrospective cohort study of 300 patients, with 150 patients using the new pain protocol and 150 patients using a 2008 pain protocol that did not include these medications. The 2 cohorts were similar in patient gender, age, and body mass index. Opioid consumption was evaluated for a period of 48 hours after incision and was divided into 3 separate time intervals, as well as total 48-hour consumption. Mean opiate use decreased significantly from 2008 to 2011 in all time intervals and total consumption (7.5±3.4 mg to 6.1±3.0 mg; P<.01). Subgroup analysis suggested that changes to the hip protocol were responsible for decreased opioid use in the operating room and the postanesthesia care unit, and changes to the knee protocol were responsible for decreased opioid use on the hospital floor and total consumption. The difference between the 2 protocol groups was not due to differences in individual surgeon practice patterns. Physical therapy progress of knee flexion, average walking distance, and maximum walking distance were significantly improved. Hospital discharge was shorter in the 2011 group (4.0±1.1 days in 2008 group and 3.6±1.0 days in 2011 group). This study shows significant improvement in patient care from 2008 to 2011 that is at least partially due to the change to the use of preoperative intravenous methocarbamol and intravenous acetaminophen. PMID:23379573

  2. Hemoglobin and B-type natriuretic peptide preoperative values but not inflammatory markers, are associated with postoperative morbidity in cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort analytic study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Risk stratification in cardiac surgery significantly impacts outcome. This study seeks to define whether there is an independent association between the preoperative serum level of hemoglobin (Hb), leukocyte count (LEUCO), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), or B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and postoperative morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery. Methods Prospective, analytic cohort study, with 554 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in a tertiary cardiovascular hospital and followed up for 12 months. The cohort was distributed according to preoperative values of Hb, LEUCO, hsCRP, and BNP in independent quintiles for each of these variables. Results After adjustment for all covariates, a significant association was found between elevated preoperative BNP and the occurrence of low postoperative cardiac output (OR 3.46, 95% CI 1.53–7.80, p = 0.003) or postoperative atrial fibrillation (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.45–10.38). For the combined outcome (death/acute coronary syndrome/rehospitalization within 12 months), we observed an OR of 1.93 (95% CI 1.00–3.74). An interaction was found between BNP level and the presence or absence of diabetes mellitus. The OR for non-diabetics was 1.26 (95% CI 0.61–2.60) and for diabetics was 18.82 (95% CI 16.2–20.5). Preoperative Hb was also significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of postoperative low cardiac output (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13–0.81, p = 0.016). Both Hb and BNP were significantly associated with the lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stays and the number of transfused red blood cells (p < 0.002). Inflammatory markers, although associated with adverse outcomes, lost statistical significance when adjusted for covariates. Conclusions High preoperative BNP or low Hb shows an association of independent risk with postoperative outcomes, and their measurement could help to stratify surgical risk. The ability to predict the onset of atrial fibrillation or

  3. YouTube Videos to Create a “Virtual Hospital Experience” for Hip and Knee Replacement Patients to Decrease Preoperative Anxiety: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Katharyn; Kazmerchak, Shari; Pratt, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background With declining reimbursement to health care systems, face-to-face time between patients and providers to optimize preoperative education and counseling may be challenging. Objective Because high patient anxiety prior to surgery has been linked to more severe and persistent pain after joint replacement surgery, the Orthopedic Surgery Department at Mayo Clinic in Florida created a playlist of 16 YouTube videos aimed at creating a virtual hospital experience for primary total hip and knee joint replacement patients. A randomized trial was then performed to evaluate the potential impact of viewing this playlist on preoperative anxiety. Methods Each patient completed a Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) score assessment at the time of the routine preoperative clinic visit and then randomized based on his/her gender, type of surgery, and initial GAD score to either the control group of standard education (education at face-to-face clinical visits as well as printed educational materials) or the treatment group (standard education plus access to the YouTube playlist). On the morning of the patient’s surgery, the same survey was repeated. Of the 65 patients who consented to participate in the study, 53 completed the study (82%) with 28 of 29 (97% completed) in the control group and 25 of 36 (69% completed) in the treatment group. Results Overall, the results showed a trend toward less anxiety in patients who viewed the YouTube videos; this was exhibited by a reduction in the median GAD score by 1 point. This trend is more clearly present in patients with high preoperative anxiety (predominantly women), as seen in the reduction of the median GAD score by 6 points in the treatment group. Conclusions Although our experience is limited, our results indicate that a series of tailored videos may decrease patient anxiety preoperatively. We recommend further exploration of both this concept and the use of social media tools in preoperative patient education. Trial

  4. Reviewing Cancer Care Team Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, Stephen H.; Weaver, Sallie; Salas, Eduardo; Chollette, Veronica; Edwards, Heather M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kosty, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The management of cancer varies across its type, stage, and natural history. This necessitates involvement of a variety of individuals and groups across a number of provider types. Evidence from other fields suggests that a team-based approach helps organize and optimize tasks that involve individuals and groups, but team effectiveness has not been fully evaluated in oncology-related care. Methods: We undertook a systematic review of literature published between 2009 and 2014 to identify studies of all teams with clear membership, a comparator group, and patient-level metrics of cancer care. When those teams included two or more people with specialty training relevant to the care of patients with cancer, we called them multidisciplinary care teams (MDTs). After reviews and exclusions, 16 studies were thoroughly evaluated: two addressing screening and diagnosis, 11 addressing treatment, two addressing palliative care, and one addressing end-of-life care. The studies included a variety of end points (eg, adherence to quality indicators, patient satisfaction with care, mortality). Results: Teams for screening and its follow-up improved screening use and reduced time to follow-up colonoscopy after an abnormal screen. Discussion of cases within MDTs improved the planning of therapy, adherence to recommended preoperative assessment, pain control, and adherence to medications. We did not see convincing evidence that MDTs affect patient survival or cost of care, or studies of how or which MDT processes and structures were associated with success. Conclusion: Further research should focus on the association between team processes and structures, efficiency in delivery of care, and mortality. PMID:25873056

  5. Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guidelines on Preoperative Screening and Assessment of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Frances; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Nagappa, Mahesh; Opperer, Mathias; Cozowicz, Crispiana; Patrawala, Sara; Lam, David; Kumar, Anjana; Joshi, Girish P; Fleetham, John; Ayas, Najib; Collop, Nancy; Doufas, Anthony G; Eikermann, Matthias; Englesakis, Marina; Gali, Bhargavi; Gay, Peter; Hernandez, Adrian V; Kaw, Roop; Kezirian, Eric J; Malhotra, Atul; Mokhlesi, Babak; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Stierer, Tracey; Wappler, Frank; Hillman, David R; Auckley, Dennis

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine guideline on preoperative screening and assessment of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on the available clinical evidence on the topic where possible. As very few well-performed randomized studies in this field of perioperative care are available, most of the recommendations were developed by experts in the field through consensus processes involving utilization of evidence grading to indicate the level of evidence upon which recommendations were based. This guideline may not be appropriate for all clinical situations and all patients. The decision whether to follow these recommendations must be made by a responsible physician on an individual basis. Protocols should be developed by individual institutions taking into account the patients' conditions, extent of interventions and available resources. This practice guideline is not intended to define standards of care or represent absolute requirements for patient care. The adherence to these guidelines cannot in any way guarantee successful outcomes and is rather meant to help individuals and institutions formulate plans to better deal with the challenges posed by perioperative patients with OSA. These recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts in the field at the time of publication. While these guidelines will be periodically updated, new information that becomes available between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from guidelines may be justifiable and such deviations should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence. PMID:27442772

  6. Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guidelines on Preoperative Screening and Assessment of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Memtsoudis, Stavros G.; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Nagappa, Mahesh; Opperer, Mathias; Cozowicz, Crispiana; Patrawala, Sara; Lam, David; Kumar, Anjana; Joshi, Girish P.; Fleetham, John; Ayas, Najib; Collop, Nancy; Doufas, Anthony G.; Eikermann, Matthias; Englesakis, Marina; Gali, Bhargavi; Gay, Peter; Hernandez, Adrian V.; Kaw, Roop; Kezirian, Eric J.; Malhotra, Atul; Mokhlesi, Babak; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Stierer, Tracey; Wappler, Frank; Hillman, David R.; Auckley, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine guideline on preoperative screening and assessment of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on the available clinical evidence on the topic where possible. As very few well-performed randomized studies in this field of perioperative care are available, most of the recommendations were developed by experts in the field through consensus processes involving utilization of evidence grading to indicate the level of evidence upon which recommendations were based. This guideline may not be appropriate for all clinical situations and all patients. The decision whether to follow these recommendations must be made by a responsible physician on an individual basis. Protocols should be developed by individual institutions taking into account the patients’ conditions, extent of interventions and available resources. This practice guideline is not intended to define standards of care or represent absolute requirements for patient care. The adherence to these guidelines cannot in any way guarantee successful outcomes and is rather meant to help individuals and institutions formulate plans to better deal with the challenges posed by perioperative patients with OSA. These recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts in the field at the time of publication. While these guidelines will be periodically updated, new information that becomes available between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from guidelines may be justifiable and such deviations should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence. PMID:27442772

  7. Prognostic Implication of Preoperative Behavior Changes in Patients with Primary High-Grade Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High-grade meningiomas are rare extra-axial tumors, frequently causing brain invasion and prominent brain edema. Patients harboring high-grade meningiomas occasionally present with behavior changes. Data about frequency and prognostic importance of preoperative behavior changes in patients with high-grade meningiomas is missing. 86 patients with primary high-grade meningiomas were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed to determine correlation of preoperative behavior changes with tumor location, preoperative brain edema, tumor cleavability, tumor grade, Ki67 proliferation index, and microscopic brain invasion. Survival analysis was performed. 30 (34.9%) patients presented with preoperative behavior changes. These changes were more frequent with male patients (P = 0.066) and patients older than 55 years (P = 0.018). They correlated with frontal location (P = 0.013), tumor size (P = 0.023), microscopic brain invasion (P = 0.015), and brain edema (P = 0.006). Preoperative behavior changes did not correlate with duration of symptoms, tumor cleavability, tumor malignancy grade, and Ki67 proliferation index. They were not significantly related to overall survival or recurrence-free survival of patients with primary high-grade meningiomas. Preoperative behavior changes are frequent in patients harboring primary high-grade meningiomas. They correlate with tumor size, microscopic brain invasion, and brain edema. Preoperative behavior changes do not predict prognosis in patients with primary high-grade meningiomas. PMID:24578632

  8. Prevalence and factors associated with preoperative anxiety in children aged 5-12 years 1

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Louise Amália; Dias, Iohanna Maria Guimarães; Pereira, Lilian Varanda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to estimate the prevalence and factors associated with preoperative anxiety in children who wait for outpatient surgery. Method: cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of a prospective cohort study that investigates the predictors of postoperative pain in children aged 5-12 years submitted to inguinal and umbilical hernia repair. It was selected 210 children, which were interviewed in the preoperative holding area of a general hospital. Anxiety was evaluated using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS). Sociodemographic and clinical variables were analyzed as exposure and anxiety (mYPAS final score>30) as outcome. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with preoperative anxiety. Results: forty-two percent (42.0%) of children presented preoperative anxiety (CI95%: 35.7%-48.6%), with mean scores equal to 30.1 (SD=8.4). Factors associated with preoperative anxiety were: age group of 5-6 years (OR=2.28; p=0.007) and socioeconomic status classified as class C (OR=2.39; p=0.016). Conclusion: the evaluation of children who wait for outpatient surgery should be multidimensional and comprise information on age and socioeconomic status, in order to help in the identification and early treatment of preoperative anxiety. PMID:27305179

  9. Clinical significance of preoperative thrombocytosis in patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Young; Ko, Young Hwii

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the association of preoperative thrombocytosis with the prognosis of patients with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 187 patients who underwent a radical nephrectomy for nonmetastatic RCC between July 1997 and June 2009. Thrombocytosis was defined as a platelet count≥400,000 µL, and patients were divided into 2 groups according to presence of preoperative thrombocytosis, and the cancer-specific survival rates and overall survival rates of the 2 groups after radical nephrectomy were compared. Results The mean age of the patients was 56.0±11.7 years and the mean follow-up period was 59.3±42.1 months; there were 20 patients with preoperative thrombocytosis. Thirty patients developed metastases and 9 patients died during the follow-up period. In Kaplan-Meier analysis using a univariate log-rank test, both cancer-specific survival rate (p=0.013) and overall survival rate (p=0.012) showed significant association with preoperative thrombocytosis. Controlling for pathological TNM stage, Fuhrman grade and tumor diameter, the Cox proportional hazards model for cancer-specific survival rates showed that preoperative thrombocytosis was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.025). Conclusions Preoperative thrombocytosis was associated with poorer prognosis in patients with nonmetastatic RCC. Thus, preoperative platelet count may be clinically useful for risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for nonmetastatic RCC.

  10. Does Preoperative Weight Change Predict Postoperative Weight Loss After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Aaron E.; Mangieri, Christopher W.; Choi, Yong U.; Faler, Byron J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Some institutions and insurance companies mandate a preoperative weight loss regimen prior to bariatric surgery. Previous studies suggest little to no correlation between preoperative and postoperative weight loss for laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RNYGB). This study examined the impact of preoperative weight change for patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients undergoing LSG at the authors' institution from 2010 to 2012. Patients were grouped based on preoperative weight gain or loss. The correlation between preoperative BMI change and postoperative BMI change was studied, as well as length of surgery. Results: Of 141 patients with 1-year follow-up, 72 lost, six maintained, and 64 gained weight preoperatively. Percentage of excess BMI loss at 1 year was not statistically different between those who lost weight and those who gained weight. Percent change in BMI from initial visit to surgery does not correlate with change in BMI at 1 year postoperatively or with length of surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative weight loss is not a reliable predictor of postoperative weight loss or shorter operative time after LSG. Potential patients who otherwise meet indications for LSG should not be denied based on inability to lose weight. PMID:26421248

  11. Associations between preoperative functional status and functional outcomes of total joint replacement in the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Jamie E.; Ghazinouri, Roya; Alcantara, Luis; Thornhill, Thomas S.; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. In developed countries, the functional status scores of patients with poor preoperative scores undergoing total joint replacement (TJR) improve more following TJR than those for patients with better preoperative scores. However, those with better preoperative scores achieve the best postoperative functional outcomes. We determined whether similar associations exist in a developing country. Methods. Dominican patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement completed WOMAC and SF-36 surveys preoperatively and at 12-month follow-up. Patients were stratified into low-, medium- and high-scoring preoperative groups based on their preoperative WOMAC function scores. We examined the associations between the baseline functional status of these groups and two outcomes—improvement in functional status over 12 months and functional status at 12 months—using analysis of variance with multivariable linear regression. Results. Patients who scored the lowest preoperatively made the greatest gains in function and pain relief following their TJRs. However, there were no significant differences in pain or function at 12-month follow-up between patients who scored low and those who scored high on preoperative WOMAC and SF-36 surveys. Conclusion. Patients with poor preoperative functional status had greater improvement but similar 12-month functional outcomes compared with patients who had a higher level of function before surgery. These results suggest that a policy of focusing scarce resources on patients with worse functional status in developing countries may optimize improvement following TJR without threatening functional outcome. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings in other developing countries and to understand why these associations vary between patients in the Dominican Republic and patients from developed countries. PMID:23748412

  12. Prenatal Care

    MedlinePlus

    Prenatal care is the health care you get while you are pregnant. It includes your checkups and prenatal testing. Prenatal care can help keep you and your baby healthy. It lets your health care provider spot health problems early. Early treatment ...

  13. Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Related Topics Assisted Living Community-Based Care Nursing Homes Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Home Care Basic Facts & Information Role of Health Care Professionals in Home Care Your physician is the leader ...

  14. Initially unresectable rectal adenocarcinoma treated with preoperative irradiation and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Million, R.R.; Bland, K.I.; Pfaff, W.W.; Copeland, E.M. 3d.

    1987-01-01

    This is an analysis of 23 patients with clinically and/or surgically unresectable adenocarcinoma of the rectum on initial evaluation who were treated with preoperative irradiation and surgery between March 1970 and April 1981. All patients have had follow-up for at least 5 years. Five patients (22%) had exploratory laparotomy and diverting colostomy before irradiation. All patients were irradiated with megavoltage equipment to the pelvis at 180 rad/fraction, continuous-course technique. Total doses ranged from 3500 to 6000 rad with a mean of 4800 rad and a median of 5000 rad. All patients had surgery 2-11 weeks (mean: 4.9 weeks; median: 4 weeks) after radiation therapy. Twelve patients (52%) had lesions that were incompletely resected because of positive margins (7 patients), distant metastasis (1 patient), or both (4 patients). All of these patients died of cancer within 5 years of treatment. Eleven patients had an apparent complete excision of their rectal cancer; six patients (55%) subsequently had a local recurrence. The 5-year absolute survival rate for patients who had complete resection was 18% (2 of 11 patients). The 5-year absolute and determinate survival rates for the entire study were 9% (2 of 23 patients) and 9% (2 of 22 patients), respectively. One patient (in the incomplete resection group) died after operation secondary to sepsis and diffuse intravascular coagulation.

  15. Effect of preoperative mastoid ventilation on tympanoplasty success.

    PubMed

    Metin, Mehmet; Kaptan, Zeynep Kizilkaya; Dogan, Sedat; Yazici, Hasmet; Bayraktar, Cem; Gocmen, Hakan; Samim, Etem Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This study was conducted with the aim of investigating the relationship between mastoid air cell volumes and graft success after tympanoplasty. Material and Methods. This study was performed retrospectively with patients undergoing type I tympanoplasty and antrostomy. A total of 57 patients (20-35.09% female and 37-64.91% male) with a mean age of 29.69 ± SD (range 12-56 years) were included in the study. The patients were invited for a control at the 1st, 3rd, and 12th months, and otoscopic examinations and audiometric tests were performed. The temporal bone computed tomography images were screened with the 4800 Dpi optic resolution scanner and transferred to the computer environment in JPG format in order to calculate the mastoid air cell volume, and the volumes were calculated using the Autocad 2007 program. Results. Although, the graft success was determined to be better in the well-ventilated group, no significant difference could be found between the groups in terms of graft success at the 1st, 3rd, and 12th months (P > 0.05). No statistically significant difference could be found between the three groups in terms of the preoperative and postoperative hearing gains (P > 0.05). PMID:25374605

  16. Effect of Preoperative Mastoid Ventilation on Tympanoplasty Success

    PubMed Central

    Metin, Mehmet; Kaptan, Zeynep Kizilkaya; Dogan, Sedat; Yazici, Hasmet; Bayraktar, Cem; Gocmen, Hakan; Samim, Etem Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This study was conducted with the aim of investigating the relationship between mastoid air cell volumes and graft success after tympanoplasty. Material and Methods. This study was performed retrospectively with patients undergoing type I tympanoplasty and antrostomy. A total of 57 patients (20–35.09% female and 37–64.91% male) with a mean age of 29.69 ± SD (range 12–56 years) were included in the study. The patients were invited for a control at the 1st, 3rd, and 12th months, and otoscopic examinations and audiometric tests were performed. The temporal bone computed tomography images were screened with the 4800 Dpi optic resolution scanner and transferred to the computer environment in JPG format in order to calculate the mastoid air cell volume, and the volumes were calculated using the Autocad 2007 program. Results. Although, the graft success was determined to be better in the well-ventilated group, no significant difference could be found between the groups in terms of graft success at the 1st, 3rd, and 12th months (P > 0.05). No statistically significant difference could be found between the three groups in terms of the preoperative and postoperative hearing gains (P > 0.05). PMID:25374605

  17. Meniscal allograft transplantation: preoperative assessment, surgical considerations, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; Yanke, Adam B; Frank, Rachel M; Butty, Davietta C; Cole, Brian J

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to characterize the preoperative assessment of meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) candidates, to detail MAT surgical techniques, and to evaluate current clinical outcome data on MAT. The MAT candidate is typically less than 50 years old and has a history of knee injury, previous meniscus surgery, and persistent pain. Physical exam generally reveals knee pain with joint line tenderness with normal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating the postmeniscectomized state. There are several common surgical techniques used for transplantation, with fixation achieved through sutures, bony fixation, or a combination of the two. Concomitant procedures such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, osteotomy, and other cartilage procedures are commonly performed. The available short- and long-term studies of clinical outcomes of MAT are variable and difficult to effectively compare due to heterogeneity of the study population and available treatment techniques. In addition, there are no published randomized controlled trials. However, recent reviews and cohort studies of clinical outcomes following MAT have shown that whether performed in isolation or performed with concomitant articular cartilage, realignment, or soft tissue reconstruction procedures MAT outcomes have been acceptable with the majority of studies reporting improved clinical outcomes regardless of the scoring system employed. MAT has proven to be a safe and effective technique in reducing knee pain and improving function in the symptomatic meniscal deficient knee. Evaluation of long-term clinical outcomes is necessary as is evaluation of meniscal replacement alternatives. PMID:24951950

  18. Preoperative glucose abnormalities in patients with pancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Durlik, Marek; Kałuża, Bernadetta; Milczarczyk, Alicja; Franek, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is a neoplasm characterised by poor prognosis. The only effective, possible treatment is radical surgery, but most patients do not qualify for surgery because of delayed diagnosis. Aim To determine if assessment of endocrine pancreatic function could serve as a means of screening for pancreatic cancer. Material and methods This prospective study was conducted on a group of 50 patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumour, who were qualified for surgery. Results From 1.07.2010 to 4.07.2011 a further 50 patients were added to the study group. They had been admitted to the hospital with pancreatic tumours. During the preoperative period, nine of these people had been treated for diabetes, 14 were newly diagnosed with diabetes and 15 had been diagnosed with impaired glucose tolerance, but only 12 had a normal glucose profile. Afterwards, patients underwent the surgical treatment. Histopathological examination revealed that out of the 50 operated patients, 36 suffered from malignant disease, and of these only four had no impaired glucose tolerance before treatment. Conclusions In most cases, patients with pancreatic tumours have impaired glucose tolerance. Screening patients over 50 years of age could speed up diagnosis and surgical treatment. PMID:25061491

  19. MRI for the preoperative evaluation of femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Li, Angela E; Jawetz, Shari T; Greditzer, Harry G; Burge, Alissa J; Nawabi, Danyal H; Potter, Hollis G

    2016-04-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) refers to a condition characterized by impingement of the femoral head-neck junction against the acetabular rim, often due to underlying osseous and/or soft tissue morphological abnormalities. It is a common cause of hip pain and limited range of motion in young and middle-aged adults. Hip preservation surgery aims to correct the morphological variants seen in FAI, thereby relieving pain and improving function, and potentially preventing early osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to review the mechanisms of chondral and labral injury in FAI to facilitate an understanding of patterns of chondrolabral injury seen on MRI. Preoperative MRI evaluation of FAI should include assessment of osseous morphologic abnormalities, labral tears, cartilage status, and other associated compensatory injuries of the pelvis. As advanced chondral wear is the major relative contraindication for hip preservation surgery, MRI is useful in the selection of patients likely to benefit from surgery. Teaching points • The most common anatomical osseous abnormalities predisposing to FAI include cam and pincer lesions. • Morphological abnormalities, labral lesions, and cartilage status should be assessed. • In cam impingement, chondral wear most commonly occurs anterosuperiorly.• Pre-existing advanced osteoarthritis is the strongest predictor of poor outcomes after FAI surgery. • Injury to muscles and tendons or other pelvic structures can coexist with FAI. PMID:26715128

  20. Effect of preoperative suggestion on postoperative gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed Central

    Disbrow, E A; Bennett, H L; Owings, J T

    1993-01-01

    Autonomic behavior is subject to direct suggestion. We found that patients undergoing major operations benefit more from instruction than from information and reassurance. We compared the return of intestinal function after intra-abdominal operations in 2 groups of patients: the suggestion group received specific instructions for the early return of gastrointestinal motility, and the control group received an equal-length interview offering reassurance and nonspecific instructions. The suggestion group had a significantly shorter average time to the return of intestinal motility, 2.6 versus 4.1 days. Time to discharge was 6.5 versus 8.1 days. Covariates including duration of operation, amount of intraoperative bowel manipulation, and amount of postoperative narcotics were also examined using the statistical model analysis of covariance. An average savings of $1,200 per patient resulted from this simple 5-minute intervention. In summary, the use of specific physiologically active suggestions given preoperatively in a beleivable manner can reduce the morbidity associated with an intra-abdominal operation by reducing the duration of ileus. PMID:8342264

  1. Preoperative gastric emptying. Effects of anxiety and oral carbohydrate administration.

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, J; Thorell, A; Jacobsson, H; Larsson, S; Schnell, P O; Hylén, L; Ljungqvist, O

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Overnight fasting is routine before elective surgery. This may not be the optimal way to prepare for surgical stress, however, because intravenous carbohydrate supplementation instead of fasting has recently been shown to reduce postoperative insulin resistance. In the current study, gastric emptying of a carbohydrate-rich drink was investigated before elective surgery and in a control situation. METHODS: Twelve patients scheduled for elective surgery were randomly given 400 mL of either a carbohydrate-rich drink (285 mOsm/kg, 12.0% carbohydrates, n = 6) or water 4 hours before being anesthetized. Gastric emptying was measured (gamma camera, 99Tcm). Each patient repeated the protocol postoperatively as a control. All values were presented as the mean +/- SEM by means of a nonparametric statistical evaluation. RESULTS: Despite the increased anxiety experienced by patients before surgery (p < 0.005), gastric emptying did not differ between the experimental and control situations. Initially, water emptied more rapidly than carbohydrate. However, after 90 minutes, the stomach was emptied regardless of the solution administered (3.2 +/- 1.1% [mean +/- SEM] remaining in the stomach in the carbohydrate group versus 2.3 +/- 1.2% remaining in the stomach in the water group). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative anxiety does not prolong gastric emptying. The stomach had been emptied 90 minutes after ingestion of both the carbohydrate-rick drink and water, thereby indicating the possibility of allowing an intake of iso-osmolar carbohydrate-rich fluids before surgery. PMID:8526579

  2. Preoperative portal vein embolization for hepatocellular carcinoma: Consensus and controversy

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Taku; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years have passed since the first report of portal vein embolization (PVE), and this procedure is widely adopted as a preoperative treatment procedure for patients with a small future liver remnant (FLR). PVE has been shown to be useful in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease. However, special caution is needed when PVE is applied prior to subsequent major hepatic resection in cases with cirrhotic livers, and volumetric analysis of the liver segments in addition to evaluation of the liver functional reserve before PVE is mandatory in such cases. Advances in the embolic material and selection of the treatment approach, and combined use of PVE and transcatheter arterial embolization/chemoembolization have yielded improved outcomes after PVE and major hepatic resections. A novel procedure termed the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy has been gaining attention because of the rapid hypertrophy of the FLR observed in patients undergoing this procedure, however, application of this technique in HCC patients requires special caution, as it has been shown to be associated with a high morbidity and mortality even in cases with essentially healthy livers. PMID:27028706

  3. Inverted Meckel's diverticulum preoperatively diagnosed using double-balloon enteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Kosuke; Osawa, Satoshi; Ito, Tatsuhiro; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Hamaya, Yasushi; Tsukui, Hiroe; Furuta, Takahisa; Wada, Hidetoshi; Baba, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Ken

    2016-05-01

    An inverted Meckel's diverticulum is a rare gastrointestinal congenital anomaly that is difficult to diagnose prior to surgery and presents with anemia, abdominal pain, or intussusception. Here, we report the case of 57-year-old men with an inverted Meckel's diverticulum, who was preoperatively diagnosed using double-balloon enteroscopy. He had repeatedly experienced epigastric pain for 2 mo. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed intestinal wall thickening in the pelvis. Double-balloon enteroscopy via the anal route was performed for further examination, which demonstrated an approximately 8-cm, sausage-shaped, submucosal tumor located approximately 80 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve. A small depressed erosion was observed at the tip of this lesion. Forceps biopsy revealed heterotopic gastric mucosa. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with an inverted Meckel's diverticulum, and single-incision laparoscopic surgery was performed. This case suggests that an inverted Meckel's diverticulum should be considered as a differential diagnosis for a submucosal tumor in the ileum. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy with forceps biopsy facilitate a precise diagnosis of this condition. PMID:27158212

  4. Drug Combinations in Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Carvalho, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy has an accepted role in reducing the risk of local recurrence in locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, particularly when the circumferential resection margin is breached or threatened, according to magnetic resonance imaging. Fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation can obtain a significant down-sizing response and a curative resection can then be achieved. Approximately, 20% of the patients can also obtain a pathological complete response, which is associated with less local recurrences and increased survival. Patients who achieve a sustained complete clinical response may also avoid radical surgery. In unresectable or borderline resectable tumors, around 20% of the patients still fail to achieve a sufficient down-staging response with the current chemoradiation schedules. Hence, investigators have aspired to increase pathological complete response rates, aiming to improve curative resection rates, enhance survival, and potentially avoid mutilating surgery. However, adding additional cytotoxic or biological agents have not produced dramatic improvements in outcome and often led to excess surgical morbidity and higher levels of acute toxicity, which effects on compliance and in the global efficacy of chemoradiation. PMID:27238473

  5. Cardiac Transplant Postoperative Management and Care.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Regi; Koerner, Erika; Clark, Courtney; Halabicky, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure impacts a multitude of individuals each year. Treatment is based on the progression of the disease and severity of symptoms. Cardiac transplant is the gold standard treatment of advanced heart failure, although the availability of organs limits the number of transplants received each year. Postoperative care and monitoring for cardiac transplant is complex and requires specialized nurses and providers at transplant centers for successful outcomes. This article outlines cardiac transplant from preoperative care through transplant, as well as posttransplant monitoring and care including discharge. Special attention is focused on management in the intensive care unit setting and potential complications that can occur in the immediate postoperative period. Interventions for potential complications are also highlighted. PMID:27254638

  6. "I feel your pain": a research study addressing perianesthesia health care providers' knowledge and attitudes toward pain.

    PubMed

    Burns, Julie; Magee, Kerstin T; Cooley, Hayley; Hensler, Anne; Montana, Joanne; Shumaker, Daria; Snyder, Jane; Polk, Artisha R

    2010-02-01

    Patients' feedback about their perianesthesia experience at an acute care 609-bed teaching hospital in Washington, DC, indicated that pain management was an area in need of improvement. A nonexperimental descriptive study related to pain management was conducted in the perianesthesia areas to assess the knowledge and attitudes of health care providers. McCaffrey and Ferrell's 38-item self-report questionnaire was given to anesthesia providers, preoperative nurses, Phase I nurses, and Phase II nurses (N=138). Seventy-two participants responded, yielding a 52% response rate. Results showed a statistically significant difference between the scores of the anesthesia care providers and the preoperative area nurses and between the Phase I nurses and the preoperative nurses. No statistically significant differences were found between the anesthesia providers, and Phase I and Phase II nurses, indicating that at this hospital, nurses who provide postoperative care have similar knowledge and attitudes regarding pain as the anesthesia providers. PMID:20159531

  7. Preoperative usages of levosimendan in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Eris, Cuneyt; Yavuz, Senol; Toktas, Faruk; Turk, Tamer; Gucu, Arif; Erdolu, Burak; Goncu, M Tugrul

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Levosimendan (LS) is a new inotropic drug which belongs to the group of drugs known as calcium sensitizers. It is different from other inotropic agents by its inotropic and vasodilatory actions without an increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and considered as a good choice in high-risk patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We aimed to investigate the proper time of the administration and the effect of prophylactic usage of LS in patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods: Forty patients who underwent isolated CABG with LVEF) less than 30% were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the induction time of LS during different phases of the operation and compared to a non-LS control group. LS infusion (0.2 μg/kg/min) was applied 12 hours before the operation in Group 1 (G1) (n=10), after the induction of anaesthesia in Group 2 (G2) (n=10) and during the pump removal period in Group 3 (G3) (n=10) and non-LS control group 4 (G4) (n=10). Demographic data, operative characteristics, hemodynamic parameters and serum lactate, troponin, creatinine levels were compared between groups before and after LS treatment during pre and postoperative period. Data were evaluated by Fisher exact, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank tests. Results: We found that the duration of tracheal intubation, the intensive care unit stay and the hospital stay were significantly decreased in G1 and G2 when compared to the patients in G3 and G4. During postoperative period, in G1 and G2 one (10%) patient from each required intraaortic balloon pump (IABP), while in G3 two (20%) patients and in G4 five (50%) patients required IABP. Cardiac index (CI) was significantly increased in all groups from baseline to intensive care unit (ICU)1h and ICU24h. When groups compared each other significant increase was found in G1-G4 (p=0.001) and G2-G4 (p=0.007) at

  8. Preoperational Environmental Survey for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    MITCHELL, R.M.

    2000-09-28

    This document represents the report for environmental sampling of soil, vegetation, litter, cryptograms, and small mammals at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities located in 100 K and 200 East Areas in support of the preoperational environmental survey.

  9. Preoperational Environmental Survey for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    MITCHELL, R.M.

    2000-10-12

    This document represents the report for environmental sampling of soil, vegetation, litter, cryptograms, and small mammals at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities located in 100 K and 200 East Areas in support of the preoperational environmental survey.

  10. Prevention and intervention strategies to alleviate preoperative anxiety in children: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kristi D; Stewart, Sherry H; Finley, G Allen; Buffett-Jerrott, Susan E

    2007-01-01

    Preoperative anxiety (anxiety regarding impending surgical experience) in children is a common phenomenon that has been associated with a number of negative behaviors during the surgery experience (e.g., agitation, crying, spontaneous urination, and the need for physical restraint during anesthetic induction). Preoperative anxiety has also been associated with the display of a number of maladaptive behaviors postsurgery, including postoperative pain, sleeping disturbances, parent-child conflict, and separation anxiety. For these reasons, researchers have sought out interventions to treat or prevent childhood preoperative anxiety and possibly decrease the development of negative behaviors postsurgery. Such interventions include sedative premedication, parental presence during anesthetic induction, behavioral preparation programs, music therapy, and acupuncture. The present article reviews the existing research on the various modes of intervention for preoperative anxiety in children. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:17179531

  11. Use of pre-operative steroids in liver resection: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Arthur J; Laurence, Jerome M; Lam, Vincent WT

    2014-01-01

    Background By attenuating the systemic inflammatory response to major surgery, the pre-operative administration of steroids may reduce the incidence of complications. Methods A systematic review was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing pre-operative steroid administration with placebo during a liver resection. Meta-analyses were performed. Results Five RCTs were identified including a total of 379 patients. Pre-operative steroids were associated with statistically significant reductions in the levels of serum bilirubin and interleukin 6 (IL-6) on post-operative day one. There was a trend towards a lower incidence of post-operative complications and prothrombin time (PT), but this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion Pre-operative steroids may be associated with a clinically significant benefit in liver resection. PMID:23461716

  12. Differential Network Analysis Applied to Preoperative Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Warsow, Gregor; Struckmann, Stephan; Kerkhoff, Claus; Reimer, Toralf; Engel, Nadja; Fuellen, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In silico approaches are increasingly considered to improve breast cancer treatment. One of these treatments, neoadjuvant TFAC chemotherapy, is used in cases where application of preoperative systemic therapy is indicated. Estimating response to treatment allows or improves clinical decision-making and this, in turn, may be based on a good understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Ever increasing amounts of high throughput data become available for integration into functional networks. In this study, we applied our software tool ExprEssence to identify specific mechanisms relevant for TFAC therapy response, from a gene/protein interaction network. We contrasted the resulting active subnetwork to the subnetworks of two other such methods, OptDis and KeyPathwayMiner. We could show that the ExprEssence subnetwork is more related to the mechanistic functional principles of TFAC therapy than the subnetworks of the other two methods despite the simplicity of ExprEssence. We were able to validate our method by recovering known mechanisms and as an application example of our method, we identified a mechanism that may further explain the synergism between paclitaxel and doxorubicin in TFAC treatment: Paclitaxel may attenuate MELK gene expression, resulting in lower levels of its target MYBL2, already associated with doxorubicin synergism in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. We tested our hypothesis in three breast cancer cell lines, confirming it in part. In particular, the predicted effect on MYBL2 could be validated, and a synergistic effect of paclitaxel and doxorubicin could be demonstrated in the breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and MCF-7. PMID:24349128

  13. Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma: Which are strong prognostic factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier . E-mail: ochapet@med.umich.edu; Romestaing, Pascale; Mornex, Francoise; Souquet, Jean-Christophe; Favrel, Veronique; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; D'Hombres, Anne; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: This retrospective 12-year study evaluated the prognostic value of initial and postoperative staging of rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1996, 297 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (39 Gy in 13 fractions) and surgery for Stage T2-T4N0-N1M0 rectal adenocarcinoma. Pretreatment staging included a clinical examination and endorectal ultrasonography (EUS) since 1988. Clinical staging was performed by digital rectal examination and rigid proctoscopy. EUS was performed in 236 patients. Postoperative staging was performed by examination of the pathologic specimen. Results: The median follow-up was 49 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 67%, with a local failure rate of 9%. The rate of sphincter preservation was 65%. The clinical examination findings were strong prognostic factor for both cT stage (p < 0.001) and cN stage (p < 0.006) but had poor specificity for cN stage (only 25 lymph nodes detected). In both univariate and multivariate analyses, EUS had a statistically significant prognostic value for uT (p < 0.014) but not for uN (p < 0.47) stage. In contrast, pT and pN stages were strong prognostic factors (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Pretreatment staging, including clinical examination and EUS, seemed accurate enough to present a high prognostic value for the T stage. EUS was insufficient to stage lymph node involvement. Owing to its lack of specificity, uN stage was not a reliable prognostic factor. An improvement in N staging is necessary and essential. Despite downstaging, postoperative staging remained a very strong prognostic factor for both T and N stages.

  14. Differential network analysis applied to preoperative breast cancer chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Warsow, Gregor; Struckmann, Stephan; Kerkhoff, Claus; Reimer, Toralf; Engel, Nadja; Fuellen, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In silico approaches are increasingly considered to improve breast cancer treatment. One of these treatments, neoadjuvant TFAC chemotherapy, is used in cases where application of preoperative systemic therapy is indicated. Estimating response to treatment allows or improves clinical decision-making and this, in turn, may be based on a good understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Ever increasing amounts of high throughput data become available for integration into functional networks. In this study, we applied our software tool ExprEssence to identify specific mechanisms relevant for TFAC therapy response, from a gene/protein interaction network. We contrasted the resulting active subnetwork to the subnetworks of two other such methods, OptDis and KeyPathwayMiner. We could show that the ExprEssence subnetwork is more related to the mechanistic functional principles of TFAC therapy than the subnetworks of the other two methods despite the simplicity of ExprEssence. We were able to validate our method by recovering known mechanisms and as an application example of our method, we identified a mechanism that may further explain the synergism between paclitaxel and doxorubicin in TFAC treatment: Paclitaxel may attenuate MELK gene expression, resulting in lower levels of its target MYBL2, already associated with doxorubicin synergism in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. We tested our hypothesis in three breast cancer cell lines, confirming it in part. In particular, the predicted effect on MYBL2 could be validated, and a synergistic effect of paclitaxel and doxorubicin could be demonstrated in the breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and MCF-7. PMID:24349128

  15. Preoperative interscalene brachial plexus block aids in perioperative temperature management during arthroscopic shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Se Hun; Lee, Wonjin; Park, JaeGwan; Kim, Myoung-hun; Cho, Kwangrae; Lee, Jeong Han; Cheong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothermia is common during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia, and anesthetic-impaired thermoregulation is thought to be the major cause of hypothermia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare perioperative temperature during arthroscopic shoulder surgery with interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) followed by general anesthesia vs. general anesthesia alone. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were randomly allocated to receive IBPB followed by general anesthesia (group GB, n = 20) or general anesthesia alone (group GO, n = 20), and intraoperative and postoperative body temperatures were measured. Results The initial body temperatures were 36.5 ± 0.3℃ vs. 36.4 ± 0.4℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P = 0.215). The body temperature at 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia was significantly higher in group GB than in group GO (35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 34.9 ± 0.3℃; P < 0.001). The body temperatures at 60 minutes after admission to the post-anesthesia care unit were 35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 35.2 ± 0.2℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P < 0.001). The concentrations of desflurane at 0, 15, and 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia were 6.0 vs. 6.0% (P = 0.330), 5.0 ± 0.8% vs. 5.8 ± 0.4% (P = 0.001), and 3.4 ± 0.4% vs. 7.1 ± 0.9% (P < 0.001) in group GB vs. GO, respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that preoperative IBPB could reduce both the intraoperative concentration of desflurane and the reduction in body temperature during and after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. PMID:27482313

  16. The role of targeted agents in preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wadlow, Raymond C; Ryan, David P

    2010-08-01

    In the United States, randomized trials have established preoperative chemoradiation as the standard of care for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Pathologic complete response (pCR) rates occur in 10% to 16% of patients and have been shown to be correlated with both disease-free and overall survival. Therefore, recent efforts incorporating newer cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents into chemoradiotherapy regimens have reported the pCR rate to be a surrogate marker of clinical outcomes. Substitution of oral fluoropyrimidines, including capecitabine, for infusional 5-fluorouracil reportedly generated pCR rates of up to 32% in phase 2 studies, but definitive evaluation awaits results from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) R-04 trial. Similarly, regimens incorporating irinotecan generated pCR rates as high as 38%, but to the authors' knowledge have not been evaluated in randomized trials. In contrast, 2 large randomized trials reported that the addition of weekly oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation led to an increase in grade 3/4 toxicity but no difference in pCR rates. Early phase trials evaluating the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab in combination with chemoradiation reported modest pCR rates of 5% to 12%, and efforts have focused on identifying biomarkers of response including EGFR copy number, k-ras mutational status, and both serum and tumor-specific expression of EGFR ligands. Finally, incorporation of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab into chemoradiation appears to be safe and feasible, with initial studies reporting a beneficial effect on vascular normalization and correlations between circulating biomarkers of angiogenesis and pathologic response. Future efforts should include prospective studies of these agents in biomarker-defined subpopulations, as well as studies of novel agents that target angiogenesis, tumor-stromal interaction

  17. Beyond caring.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Rita

    2007-01-01

    "Can caring be taught?" is a question that spurs an emotional debate among nurses and leads to further questions: Is nursing science overshadowed by caring in nursing practice? Is the scientific basis of the nursing profession overlooked as a result of the emphasis of caring in nursing? Is it a logical fallacy to assume a correlation between nursing science and caring? Can nursing science or caring alone provide the basis of nursing practice? Further investigation is necessary into the depth of caring and its impact on nursing science and practice. PMID:17413510

  18. Preoperative Steroid Use and the Risk of Infectious Complications After Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Merkler, Alexander E.; Saini, Vaishali; Kamel, Hooman; Stieg, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The association between preoperative corticosteroid use and infectious complications after neurosurgical procedures is unclear. We aim to determine whether corticosteroids increase the risk of infectious complications after neurosurgery. Methods: We examined the association between preoperative corticosteroid use and postoperative infectious complications in a cohort of adults who underwent a neurosurgical procedure between 2005 and 2010 at centers participating in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Corticosteroid use was defined as at least 10 days of oral or parental therapy in the 30 days prior to surgery. Our primary outcome was a composite of any infectious complications occurring within 30 days of surgery. We used propensity score analysis to examine the independent association between preoperative corticosteroid use and postoperative infections. Results: Among 26 634 neurosurgical procedures, 1228 (4.61%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.36-4.86) were preceded by preoperative corticosteroid use and 1469 (5.52%; 95% CI, 5.24-5.79) were followed by postoperative infections. In a propensity score analysis controlling for comorbidities, illness severity, and preexisting preoperative infections, corticosteroid use was independently associated with subsequent postoperative infections (odds ratio, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.11-1.70). Our results were unchanged in sensitivity analyses controlling for central nervous system tumors or active treatment with chemotherapy. Conclusion: Our results suggest that preoperative corticosteroid use is associated with an increased risk of infectious complications after neurosurgery. These findings may aid physicians with preoperative treatment decisions and risk stratification. Future randomized trials are needed to guide preoperative use of corticosteroids in this population. PMID:24707336

  19. Preoperative Nutritional Status and The Impact on Radical Cystectomy Recovery: An International Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bente Thoft; Dalbagni, Guido; Borre, Michael; Love-Retinger, Nora

    2016-01-01

    In radical cystectomy, under-nutrition is common and has detrimental physiological and clinical effects, which can lead to increased complications and prolonged recovery. This article compares measurements and outcomes across continents in this patient population with advanced bladder cancer. The association of preoperative nutritional risk, nutritional status, and length of stay is equal across continents, and the results promote increased clinical awareness that women at severe risk should be identified preoperatively. PMID:27501594

  20. Preoperative hypnotherapy in the management of a child with anticipatory nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, A; Frawley, G P

    2007-10-01

    A six-year-old boy with oesophageal strictures secondary to neonatal repair of oesophageal atresia and requiring six to eight weekly oesophageal dilatations by bouginage developed anticipatory nausea and vomiting. This was effectively managed by a course of preoperative hypnotherapy over four sessions. Resolution of anticipatory nausea and vomiting occurred along with cessation of postoperative nausea and vomiting. This case supports early intervention with preoperative hypnotherapy in children with anticipatory nausea and vomiting that has not responded to other measures. PMID:17933170

  1. Efficacy of Acupuncture in Reducing Preoperative Anxiety: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyojeong; Bae, Hyunsu; Min, Byung-Il; Cho, Seunghun

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture has been shown to reduce preoperative anxiety in several previous randomized controlled trials (RCTs). In order to assess the preoperative anxiolytic efficacy of acupuncture therapy, this study conducted a meta-analysis of an array of appropriate studies. Methods. Four electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and CINAHL) were searched up to February 2014. In the meta-analysis data were included from RCT studies in which groups receiving preoperative acupuncture treatment were compared with control groups receiving a placebo for anxiety. Results. Fourteen publications (N = 1,034) were included. Six publications, using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State (STAI-S), reported that acupuncture interventions led to greater reductions in preoperative anxiety relative to sham acupuncture (mean difference = 5.63, P < .00001, 95% CI [4.14, 7.11]). Further eight publications, employing visual analogue scales (VAS), also indicated significant differences in preoperative anxiety amelioration between acupuncture and sham acupuncture (mean difference = 19.23, P < .00001, 95% CI [16.34, 22.12]). Conclusions. Acupuncture therapy aiming at reducing preoperative anxiety has a statistically significant effect relative to placebo or nontreatment conditions. Well-designed and rigorous studies that employ large sample sizes are necessary to corroborate this finding. PMID:25254059

  2. Preoperative drainage for malignant biliary strictures: is it time for self-expanding metallic stents?

    PubMed

    Roque, Jason; Ho, Shiaw-Hooi; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-01-01

    Palliation of jaundice improves the general health of the patient and, therefore, surgical outcomes. Because of the complexity and location of strictures, especially proximally, drainage has been accompanied by increased morbidity due to sepsis. Another concern is the provocation of an inflammatory and fibrotic reaction around the area of stent placement. Preoperative biliary drainage with self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) insertion can be achieved via a percutaneous method or through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A recently published multicenter randomized Dutch study has shown increased morbidity with preoperative biliary drainage. A Cochrane meta-analysis has also shown a significantly increased complication rate with preoperative drainage. However, few of these studies have used a SEMS, which allows better biliary drainage. No randomized controlled trials have compared preoperative deployment of SEMS versus conventional plastic stents. The outcomes of biliary drainage also depend on the location of the obstruction, namely the difficulty with proximal compared to distal strictures. Pathophysiologically, palliation of jaundice will benefit all patients awaiting surgery. However, preoperative drainage often results in increased morbidity because of procedure-related sepsis. The use of SEMS may change the outcome of preoperative biliary drainage dramatically. PMID:25674520

  3. Transthoracic echocardiography may be useful for preoperative cardiac evaluation of gynaecological patients undergoing routine surgery.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B; Pradhan, P; Shakya, G R; Giri, A; Regmi, R; Dhungel, S

    2012-12-01

    Echocardiography has been an integral noninvasive tool for [preoperative] cardiac evaluation that provides with echocardiographic details which may also be useful to perioperative clinicians to tailor their anesthetic deliberation while dealing with preoperative patients. The objective of this study is preoperative evaluation of routine gynecological patients echocardiographically after being referred from respective internists or anesthesiologists. This was a prospective, nonrandomized study of elective 68 cases who underwent echocardiographic evaluation preoperatively from 15th July 2009 to 14th July 2012. The mean age of the patients was 52.1 +/- 10.3 years with the age range of 30-79 years. Valvular heart disease was the most common echocardiographic finding (129.4%) followed by left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, LVDD (48.5%) and left ventricular hypertrophy (22.1%). Systolic dysfunction was detected in 2.9% of patients and pulmonary arterial hypertension in 2.9% patients. Amongst patients referred after preoperative anaesthetic evaluation, patients had different cardiac lesions echocardiographically. Preoperative echocardiographic evaluation may provide important cardiac informations and values which might be employed by perioperative physicians to tailor their treatment. PMID:24579536

  4. Residential Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... dementia care Programs and Services Appropriate services and programming based on specific health and behavioral care needs ... of Alzheimer's Treatments Contact us 24/7 Helpline: 1-800-272-3900 Find Your Local Chapter Get ...

  5. CARES Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... can get involved! TWO ways YOU can support CARES NOW! 1. Join a CAH Awareness Walk There ... idea for a fundraiser? Email Dina@CARESFoundation.org CARES has partnered with Lauren’s Hope Medical I.D. ...

  6. Tracheostomy care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000076.htm Tracheostomy care To use the sharing features on this ... through your nose and mouth. Caring for Your Tracheostomy Once the hole in your neck is not ...

  7. Hair Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Hair care Hair care Short, long, curly, straight, up, down. Hair options can seem endless! Not all of what makes your hair look good comes from the outside, though. Good ...

  8. Hospice care

    MedlinePlus

    Hospice care helps people with illnesses that cannot be cured and who are nearing death. The goal ... give comfort and peace instead of a cure. Hospice care provides: Support for the patient and the ...

  9. Daily Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know Online Tools Enhancing Daily Life Daily Plan Activities Communication Food & Eating Music & Art Personal Care Incontinence Bathing ... Tweet Email | Print Create a Daily Routine Daily Plan Activities Communication Food/Eating Get Tips on Personal Care Bathing ...

  10. Kangaroo care.

    PubMed

    Hamelin, K; Ramachandran, C

    1993-06-01

    Kangaroo care is the practice of holding a small, premature infant, naked except for a diaper and hat, against a parent's chest. This skin-to-skin contact resembles how marsupials such as kangaroos and koalas care for their young. Initially established in overcrowded nurseries in developing countries as a substitute for incubators and monitors, kangaroo care is now practised in the neonatal intensive care units of developed countries. PMID:8508434

  11. Incidence and Risk Factors of Acute Kidney Injury after Radical Cystectomy: Importance of Preoperative Serum Uric Acid Level

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Kyoung-Woon; Choi, Seong-Soo; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Yu, Jihion; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after surgery and increases costs, morbidity, and mortality of hospitalized patients. While radical cystectomy associates significantly with an increased risk of serious complications, including AKI, risk factors of AKI after radical cystectomy has not been reported. This study was performed to determine the incidence and independent predictors of AKI after radical cystectomy. Methods: All consecutive patients who underwent radical cystectomy in 2001-2013 in a single tertiary-care center were identified. Their demographics, laboratory values, and intraoperative data were recorded. Postoperative AKI was defined and staged according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria on the basis of postoperative changes in creatinine levels. Independent predictors of AKI were identified by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 238 patients who met the eligibility criteria, 91 (38.2%) developed AKI. Univariate logistic regression analyses showed that male gender, high serum uric acid level, and long operation time associated with the development of AKI. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, preoperative serum uric acid concentration (odds ratio [OR] = 1.251; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.048-1.493; P = 0.013) and operation time (OR = 1.005; 95% CI = 1.002-1.008; P = 0.003) remained as independent predictors of AKI after radical cystectomy. Conclusions: AKI after radical cystectomy was a relatively common complication. Its independent risk factors were high preoperative serum uric acid concentration and long operation time. These observations can help to prevent AKI after radical cystectomy. PMID:26283877

  12. Preoperative evaluation of the adult patient undergoing non-cardiac surgery: guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology.

    PubMed

    De Hert, Stefan; Imberger, Georgina; Carlisle, John; Diemunsch, Pierre; Fritsch, Gerhard; Moppett, Iain; Solca, Maurizio; Staender, Sven; Wappler, Frank; Smith, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of these guidelines on the preoperative evaluation of the adult non-cardiac surgery patient is to present recommendations based on available relevant clinical evidence. The ultimate aims of preoperative evaluation are two-fold. First, we aim to identify those patients for whom the perioperative period may constitute an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, aside from the risks associated with the underlying disease. Second, this should help us to design perioperative strategies that aim to reduce additional perioperative risks. Very few well performed randomised studies on the topic are available and many recommendations rely heavily on expert opinion and are adapted specifically to the healthcare systems in individual countries. This report aims to provide an overview of current knowledge on the subject with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthetists all over Europe to integrate - wherever possible - this knowledge into daily patient care. The Guidelines Committee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) formed a task force with members of subcommittees of scientific subcommittees and individual members of the ESA. Electronic databases were searched from the year 2000 until July 2010 without language restrictions. These searches produced 15 425 abstracts. Relevant systematic reviews with meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional surveys were selected. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system was used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. The final draft guideline was posted on the ESA website for 4 weeks and the link was sent to all ESA members, individual or national (thus including most European national anaesthesia societies). Comments were collated and the guidelines amended as appropriate. When the final draft was complete, the Guidelines Committee and ESA Board ratified the guidelines. PMID

  13. Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic Referral for Elevated Hba1c Reduces Complication Rate in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Peter J.; Nolan, Jenea; Olsen, Amy C.; Breakwell, Susan; Topp, Richard; Pagel, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is risk factor for complications after orthopedic surgery. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that anesthesia preoperative clinic (APC) referral for elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduces complication rate after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Patients and Methods: Patients (n = 203) with and without DM were chosen from 1,237 patients undergoing TJA during 2006 - 12. Patients evaluated in the APC had surgery in 2006 - 8 regardless of HbA1c (uncontrolled). Those evaluated between in subsequent two-year intervals were referred to primary care for HbA1c ≥ 10% and ≥ 8%, respectively, to improve DM control before surgery. Complications and mortality were quantified postoperatively and at three, six, and twelve months. Length of stay (LOS) and patients requiring a prolonged LOS (> 5 days) were recorded. Results: Patients (197 men, 6 women) underwent 71, 131, and 1 total hip, knee, and shoulder replacements, respectively. Patients undergoing TJA with uncontrolled HbA1c and those with HbA1c < 10%, but not those with HbA1c < 8%, had a higher incidence of coronary disease and hypercholesterolemia than patients without DM. An increase in complication rate was observed in DM patients with uncontrolled HbA1c versus patients without DM (P < 0.001); the complication rate progressively decreased with tighter HbA1c control. More DM patients with preoperative HbA1c that was uncontrolled or ≥ 10% required prolonged LOS versus those without DM (P < 0.001 and P = 0.0404, respectively). Conclusions: APC referral for elevated HbA1c reduces complication rate and the incidence of prolonged hospitalization during the first year after surgery in diabetics undergoing TJA. PMID:26161323

  14. Clinical value of multidetector CT coronary angiography as a preoperative screening test before non‐coronary cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Vincenzo; Gostoli, Valentina; Lovato, Luigi; Montalti, Maurizio; Marzocchi, Antonio; Gavelli, Giampaolo; Branzi, Angelo; Bartolomeo, Roberto Di; Fattori, Rossella

    2007-01-01

    Objective Myocardial scintigraphy and/or conventional angiography (CA) are often performed before cardiac surgery in an attempt to identify unsuspected coronary artery disease which might result in significant cardiac morbidity and mortality. Multidetector CT coronary angiography (MDCTCA) has a recognised high negative predictive value and may provide a non‐invasive alternative in this subset of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of MDCTCA as a preoperative screening test in candidates for non‐coronary cardiac surgery. Methods 132 patients underwent MDCTCA (Somatom Sensation 16 Cardiac, Siemens) in the assessment of the cardiac risk profile before surgery. Coronary arteries were screened for ⩾50% stenosis. Patients without significant stenosis (Group 1) underwent surgery without any adjunctive screening tests while all patients with coronary lesions ⩾50% at MDCTCA (Group 2) underwent CA. Results 16 patients (12.1%) were excluded due to poor image quality. 72 patients without significant coronary stenosis at MDCTCA were submitted to surgery. 30 out of 36 patients with significant (⩾50%) coronary stenosis at MDCTCA and CA underwent adjunctive bypass surgery or coronary angioplasty. In 8 patients, MDCTCA overestimated the severity of the coronary lesions (>50% MDCTCA, <50% CA). No severe cardiovascular perioperative events such as myocardial ischaemia, myocardial infarction or cardiac failure occurred in any patient in Group 1. Conclusions MDCTCA seems to be effective as a preoperative screening test prior to non‐coronary cardiac surgery. In this era of cost containment and optimal care of patients, MDCTCA is able to provide coronary vessel and ventricular function evaluation and may become the method of choice for the assessment of a cardiovascular risk profile prior to major surgery. PMID:17164488

  15. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... provide more information about hospice. National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization 1–800–658–8898 (helpline) 1–877– ... http://www.caringinfo.org The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s Caring Connections website offers information and publications ...

  16. Prenatal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Initially published by the Children's Bureau in 1913, this pamphlet has been revised frequently. Its purpose is to point out the importance of medical care during pregnancy. Comfortable pregnancies, easy labor, and better care for their new infants are the usual concerns of prospective mothers. Consequently, this 1962 edition of "Prenatal Care"…

  17. Sagittal synostosis: I. Preoperative morphology of the skull.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Ferreira, José; Gewalli, Fredrik; David, Lisa; Darvann, Tron A; Hermann, Nuno V; Kreiborg, Sven; Friede, Hans; Lauritzen, Claes G K

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the preoperative morphology of the skull in sagittal synostosis in an objective and quantified way. The shapes of the skulls of 105 patients with isolated premature synostosis of the sagittal suture (SS group) were studied and compared with those of a control group of 72 children with unilateral incomplete cleft lip (UICL). A standardised radiocephalometric technique was used to obtain the images. A modification of a method developed by Kreiborg was used to analyse the radiocephalograms, which included the digitisation of 88 landmarks in the calvaria, skull base, and orbit (42 in the lateral and 46 in the frontal projections), the production of plots of mean shape for each group, and the intergroup comparison of a series of 81 variables (linear distance between selected landmarks, and angles defined by groups of three landmarks). Data from a subgroup of 66 patients aged 5 to 8 months were further compared to age-matched normative data in terms of seven angular and linear calvarial, cranial base and orbital variables. In a comparative analysis of the mean lateral plots, the foreheads of the study group (SS) had a more pronounced anterior slope and were also more convex. The vertex area was located more anteriorly, and was less convex. The occipital curvature was more prominent. Analysis of the mean frontal plots revealed a lack in convexity and lateral projection of the upper parietal regions, as well as a lower location of the line of maximum skull width. Comparison of the mean values of an SS subgroup to age-matched normative data showed a longer (p<0.001) and narrower skull (p<0.001) and a greater interorbital distance (p<0.001). The cranial base angle, the sella to nasion, and sella to basion lengths did not differ significantly. Sagittal synostosis is characterised by an extensive deformity of the cranial vault, with an essentially normal cranial base. The widened interorbital distance is probably related to

  18. Nonpalpable thyroid carcinoma: clinical controversies on preoperative selection.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Angelo; Nicolini, Andrea; Casara, Dario; Rubello, Domenico; Rosa Pelizzo, Maria

    2003-06-01

    This article emphasizes some controversies concerning the preoperative selection of nonpalpable thyroid tumors. The prevalence of occult thyroid carcinoma in surgical series (1.8-10%) is not higher than in autopsy thyroid series (2.7-24%). The prevalence of occult thyroid carcinoma in thyroid glands examined in the same institution by ultrasound, for a clinical thyroid abnormality or for investigation of other neck structures without clinically evident or suspected thyroid disease, varies from 3% to 8% and is very similar independent of the fact that a thyroid abnormality is or is not the indication for ultrasonography. These data suggest that the presence of a thyroid disease is not a risk factor for harboring an occult thyroid carcinoma (except for C-cell hyperplasia in the rare case of MEN 2 syndromes). As it is not cost effective to examine all the nonpalpable lesions with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) guided by ultrasounds, it is necessary to define to which extent ultrasound is useful in selecting those lesions to be examined cytologically by FNA. The use of ultrasound to select these lesions is very controversial. Ultrasound-guided cytologic diagnosis of nonpalpable nodules is not as accurate as in the case of palpable nodules. Sampling of material adequate for cytologic analysis depends on the lesion size; it is 64% for a 0.7-cm lesion and it increases to 86.7% for a mean size of 1.1 cm. For the diagnosis of occult thyroid carcinomas (< or =1 cm), sensitivity is 35.8% and false-negative results are 49.3%. Nonpalpable nodules with a size of 1.5 cm represent an absolute indication to perform an ultrasound-guided FNA because this is the size limit for dividing thyroid nodules in probably innocuous or potentially dangerous categories and because the cytologic diagnosis of nodules of this size is sufficiently reliable. For the smaller incidentally discovered thyroid nodules following ultrasound, physicians should discuss with the patient whether and when to

  19. Preoperative Medical Evaluation: Part 1: General Principles and Cardiovascular Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    A thorough assessment of a patient's medical status is standard practice when dental care is provided. Although this is true for procedures performed under local anesthesia alone, the information gathered may be viewed somewhat differently if the dentist is planning to use sedation or general anesthesia as an adjunct to dental treatment. This article is the first of a 2-part sequence and will address general principles and cardiovascular considerations. A second article will address pulmonary, metabolic, and miscellaneous disorders. PMID:19769423

  20. Kangaroo care.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J; Ridpath-Parker, J

    1993-01-01

    Kangaroo Care--skin-to-skin contact between parent and baby--is becoming a popular adjunct to the routine, technology-driven care provided to premature babies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the country. Research suggests that Kangaroo Care is safe and that it is therapeutic for the infant and parent alike. The purpose of this article is to review the Kangaroo Care Program at Brigham and Women's Hospital and to illustrate how it meets the needs of parents of premature infants. PMID:10131016

  1. Preoperative education for lumbar radiculopathy: A survey of US spine surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Butler, David S.; Diener, Ina; Puentedura, Emilio J.

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to determine current utilization, importance, content, and delivery methods of preoperative education by spine surgeons in the United States for patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was used to study a random sample of spine surgeons in the United States. The Spinal Surgery Education Questionnaire (SSEQ) was developed based on previous related surveys and assessed for face and content validity by an expert panel. The SSEQ captured information on demographics, content, delivery methods, utilization, and importance of preoperative education as rated by surgeons. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the current utilization, importance, content, and delivery methods of preoperative education by spine surgeons in the United States for patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Results Of 200 surgeons, 89 (45% response rate) responded to the online survey. The majority (64.2%) provide preoperative education informally during the course of clinical consultation versus a formal preoperative education session. The mean time from the decision to undergo surgery to the date of surgery was 33.65 days. The highest rated educational topics are surgical procedure (96.3%), complications (96.3%), outcomes/expectations (93.8%), anatomy (92.6%), amount of postoperative pain expected (90.1%), and hospital stay (90.1%). Surgeons estimated spending approximately 20% of the preoperative education time specifically addressing pain. Seventy-five percent of the surgeons personally provide the education, and nearly all surgeons (96.3%) use verbal communication with the use of a spine model. Conclusions Spine surgeons believe that preoperative education is important and use a predominantly biomedical approach in preparing patients for surgery. Larger studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:25694882

  2. Treatment Guidelines for Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma: Preliminary Consensus of an International Expert Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Wang, Dian; Haas, Rick L.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Kirsch, David G.; Roberge, David; Salerno, Kilian; Deville, Curtiland; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; O'Sullivan, Brian; Petersen, Ivy A.; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Abrams, Ross A.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Evidence for external beam radiation therapy (RT) as part of treatment for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) is limited. Preoperative RT is the subject of a current randomized trial, but the results will not be available for many years. In the meantime, many practitioners use preoperative RT for RPS, and although this approach is used in practice, there are no radiation treatment guidelines. An international expert panel was convened to develop consensus treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 15 academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of sarcoma was assembled. A systematic review of reports related to RT for RPS, RT for extremity sarcoma, and RT-related toxicities for organs at risk was performed. Due to the paucity of high-quality published data on the subject of RT for RPS, consensus recommendations were based largely on expert opinion derived from clinical experience and extrapolation of relevant published reports. It is intended that these clinical practice guidelines be updated as pertinent data become available. Results: Treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS are presented. Conclusions: An international panel of radiation oncologists who specialize in sarcoma reached consensus guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Many of the recommendations are based on expert opinion because of the absence of higher level evidence and, thus, are best regarded as preliminary. We emphasize that the role of preoperative RT for RPS has not been proven, and we await data from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study of preoperative radiotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for patients with RPS. Further data are also anticipated pertaining to normal tissue dose constraints, particularly for bowel tolerance. Nonetheless, as we await these data, the guidelines herein can be used to establish treatment uniformity to aid future assessments of efficacy

  3. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  4. The effect of preoperative keratometry on visual outcomes after moderate myopic LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Steven M; Neuffer, Marcus C; Sikder, Shameema; Semnani, Rodmehr T; Moshirfar, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate visual outcomes in moderately myopic eyes with flat and steep corneas (preoperatively) that have been treated with laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Patients and methods Records of ninety-six eyes with average preoperative keratometry (K) values between 39.9 and 42.0 diopters (D) (flat) were matched with 103 eyes with preoperative K values between 46.0 and 47.2 D (steep) that underwent LASIK between March 2007 and March 2010 for moderate myopia, and were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome measures used to determine the effect of preoperative keratometry on visual prognosis were refraction, visual acuity, change in keratometry (ΔK), and change in spherical equivalent (ΔSE), measured at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results Significant differences were found at 6 months postoperatively between the flat group and steep group in SE (P = 0.029), sphere (P = 0.018), ΔK (P = 0.002), percentage of eyes achieving SE of −0.25 to + 0.25 D (P = 0.0125), −0.26 to −0.50 D (P = 0.003), −0.51 to −1.00 D (P = 0.044), and the percentage of eyes achieving uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/15 or better (P = 0.0006). Conclusion Moderately myopic eyes with flatter corneas preoperatively have better visual prognosis following LASIK compared with moderately myopic eyes with steeper corneas. PMID:22536037

  5. Estimation of operative line of resection using preoperative image and nonrigid registration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Ha; Won, Chang-Hee; Kong, Seong-Gon

    2008-01-01

    Even though accurate diagnosis of organs is done using preoperative images such as CT or MRI, these information are not directly used in the operating room, because organs are nonrigid and their shapes change with time. In this paper, we propose to obtain an intraoperative image of an open organ and fuse the image with a preoperative image. The intraoperative image is obtained from a three-dimensional laser scanner. The registration of preoperative image to the intraoperative image can relate the information from the preoperative image to the open organ in the operating room. We do this by registering preoperative images to intraoperative images. An algorithm based on Robust Point Matching method is developed for this nonrigid image registration problem. We also propose a new metric called Non Overlapping Ratio to determine the registration error. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is capable of achieving region of interest estimation within 1.51 mm mean distance error and 0.66% Non Overlapping Ratio. PMID:19163585

  6. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Czyżewska, Anna; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Material and methods Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Results Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Conclusions Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery. PMID:25395951

  7. Three-Dimensional Surface Imaging and the Continuous Evolution of Preoperative and Postoperative Assessment in Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Lekakis, Garyfalia; Claes, Peter; Hamilton, Grant S; Hellings, P W

    2016-02-01

    During the preoperative assessment in rhinoplasty, the surgeon takes a thorough history, performs a complete examination by assessing functional and aesthetic aspects of the nose, obtains a clear understanding of the patient's wishes, conducts facial analysis based on standardized photography, and communicates to the patient the goals and pitfalls of surgery. Computer imaging or morphing of the preoperative pictures of the nose has drawn a lot of interest in the last decade, and it is a sign of evolution of the preoperative consultation. Technological advances, also in the context of rhinoplasty, have led to the development of three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques, and have completely revolutionized the way that surgeons manage their patients preoperatively and evaluate postoperative results today. The accurate 3D surface imaging aids the surgeon to communicate with the patient adequately before surgery, to set an appropriate surgical plan, and to measure the shape and volume changes of the patient's nose that result from the intervention. The present review provides an analysis on the current knowledge of 3D surface imaging in rhinoplasty derived from the literature, and highlights future directions of preoperative and postoperative assessment in the field. PMID:26862969

  8. Dipyridamole-thallium scanning in patients undergoing vascular surgery. Optimizing preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk

    SciTech Connect

    Eagle, K.A.; Singer, D.E.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Mulley, A.G.; Boucher, C.A.

    1987-04-24

    Dipyridamole-thallium imaging has been suggested as a method of preoperatively assessing cardiac risk in patients undergoing major surgery. To define more clearly its proper role in preoperative assessment, we prospectively evaluated 111 patients undergoing vascular surgery. In the first set of 61 patients, our data confirmed the value of preoperative dipyridamole-thallium scanning in identifying the patients who suffered postoperative ischemic events. Events occurred in eight of 18 patients with reversible defects on preoperative imaging, compared with no events in 43 patients with no thallium redistribution (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.624, 0.256). The results also suggested that clinical factors might allow identification of a low-risk subset of patients. To test the hypothesis that patients with no evidence of congestive heart failure, angina, prior myocardial infarction, or diabetes do not require further preoperative testing, we evaluated an additional 50 patients having vascular procedures. None of the 23 without the clinical markers had untoward outcomes, while ten of 27 patients with one or more of these clinical markers suffered postoperative ischemic events (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.592, 0.148). In the clinical high-risk subset, further risk stratification is achieved with dipyridamole-thallium scanning.

  9. An evaluation of preoperative computed tomography on patients with chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Yildirim-Baylan, Muzeyyen; Ozmen, Cihan Akgul; Gun, Ramazan; Yorgancilar, Ediz; Akkuş, Zeki; Topcu, Ismail

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the veracity of computed tomography findings on patients undergoing surgery for chronic otitis media (COM) with the surgical findings, and to determine to what extent the preoperative computerized tomography (CT) findings are useful to the surgeon. A series of 56 patients with COM undergoing preoperative CT scanning followed by surgical exploration of the middle ear and mastoid. Operative notes were recorded and data collected on the nature of soft tissue masses, the status of the ossicles, presence or absence of facial canal dehiscence and semicircular canal (SCC) dehiscence and the presence or absence of dural plate erosion, and sigmoid sinus thrombosis. Fifty-six patients were recruited in the study, 30 males and 26 females. The age range was from 16 to 67 years with a mean of 26.51 ± 1.4 years. The preoperative CT scan imaging in cases of cholesteatoma, ossicular chain erosion and SCC dehiscence have good correlation with the intraoperative findings. The specificity of preoperative CT scan in detecting facial canal dehiscence, dural plate erosion and sigmoid sinus thrombosis in patient of COM were weak. Preoperative computed tomography evaluation is fairly useful especially in cases of cholesteatoma. According to the results of this study, CT is of value particularly in the definition of cholesteatoma, and in determining ossicular chain erosion and semicircular canal fistula. PMID:23449285

  10. Total Versus Hemiarthroplasty for Glenohumeral Arthritis According to Preoperative Glenoid Erosion

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Marc-Frederic; Kaufmann, Melena; Gettmann, Andre; Wellmann, Mathias; Smith, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies on primary osteoarthritis have shown better results of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) compared to hemiarthroplasty (HA) regarding the function, revision rate and postoperative pain relief. However, a clear recommendation for implantation of TSA or HA, depending on the glenoid type of erosion, does not exist. The aim of the study was to compare the results of TSA and HA with respect to the preoperative glenoid type. In this study, 41 patients were examined retrospectively; among them, 25 patients were treated with stemmed anatomic TSA and 16 with stemmed anatomic HA. The degree of osteoarthritis was determined according to Samilson and the glenoid erosion was classified according to Walch. The clinical outcome of the patients was determined by using the Constant Score (CS) and the Simple Shoulder Test at final follow-up. Patients after TSA demonstrated a significantly improved internal rotation compared to HA patients. Patients with preoperative B1 glenoid showed better pain relief after TSA compared to HA. For patients with preoperative type A2 glenoid a significantly higher CS was found after TSA compared to HA. We were able to show good short-term results after TSA and HA. Our findings suggest a better internal rotation for TSA compared to HA, superior clinical outcome for patients with preoperative A2 glenoid and lower pain level for patients with a preoperative B1 glenoid. However, these results need to be confirmed by further studies. PMID:26330995

  11. Critical Care

    MedlinePlus

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, accidents, infections, and severe breathing problems. It involves ...

  12. A review of the evidence for active preoperative warming of adults undergoing general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Michael C; Dieckmann, Loraine S; Rodriguez, Ricardo E; Austin, Paul N

    2013-10-01

    Inadvertent perioperative hypothermia, a common occurrence in the operating suite, is associated with many adverse outcomes. It is the nurse anesthetist's goal to attenuate the incidence of this problem. Although active intraoperative warming is a widely accepted practice, active preoperative warming may be a less explored option for temperature maintenance. A search strategy to identify systematic reviews and investigations in peer-reviewed journals was undertaken to identify evidence examining the efficacy of preoperative warming. Evidence sources meeting the search criteria were randomized controlled trials and a cohort study using historical controls. Most of the studies support the implementation of active preoperative warming by demonstrating that subjects were warmer during the perioperative period. Overall, these differences were statistically significant and likely clinically significant. Future clinical trials should examine shorter warming times and lower warming unit settings, should include appropriate sample sizes, and should consistently employ trained staff using calibrated biometric instruments to measure temperature. PMID:24354070

  13. Endovascular Preoperative Embolization of Orbital Hemangiopericytoma With n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate Glue

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Kaitlyn M.; Alaraj, Ali; Aakalu, Vinay K.; Aletich, Victor; Setabutr, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon neoplasm that may present in myriad locations, including the lower extremities, pelvic area, and the head and neck area, including the orbit.1 Orbital hemangiopericytoma is often described as synonymous with orbital solitary fibrous tumor, giant cell angiofibroma, and fibrous histiocytoma, as they all belong to a spectrum of collagen-rich fibroblastic tumors that are often CD34-positive and have overlapping histopathologic features.2 Many cases of orbital hemangiopericytoma have been reported in the literature along with various surgical approaches, long-term outcomes, and techniques to manage recurrence; however, few have discussed preoperative embolization.1,3-5 Intraoperative hemorrhage is a concern in both the congenital and the adult form of these cases6,7 and may be an indication for preoperative embolization. A unique case of preoperative embolization was presented with n-butyl cyanoacrylate for surgical resection of a large orbital hemangiopericytoma in a 58-year-old woman. PMID:24317100

  14. Use of preoperative hypnosis to reduce postoperative pain and anesthesia-related side effects.

    PubMed

    Lew, Michael W; Kravits, Kathy; Garberoglio, Carlos; Williams, Anna Cathy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot project was to test the feasibility of hypnosis as a preoperative intervention. The unique features of this study were: (a) use of a standardized nurse-delivered hypnosis protocol, (b) intervention administration immediately prior to surgery in the preoperative holding area, and (c) provision of hypnosis to breast cancer surgery patients receiving general anesthesia. A mixed-method design was used. Data collected from the intervention group and historical control group included demographics, symptom assessments, medication administration, and surgical, anesthesia, and recovery minutes. A semi-structured interview was conducted with the intervention group. A reduction in anxiety, worry, nervousness, sadness, irritability, and distress was found from baseline to postintervention while pain and nausea increased. The results support further exploration of the use of nurse-led preoperative hypnosis. PMID:21867377

  15. A computerized morphometric evaluation of x-ray films for preoperative planning of hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Baruffaldi, F; Cianci, R; Fabbri, F; Mulazzani, M; Fanton, F; Toni, A; Affatato, S; Giunti, A

    1994-01-01

    Methods for measuring metric size on radiograms constitute an instrument of proven utility. For example, when preoperatively evaluating hip arthroplasty the diameter of the medullary canal and the cervicodiaphyseal angle, must be measured in order to determine the center of rotation of the femoral head, and to establish the flare index of the diaphyseal canal. These results may be obtained by using a computer-controlled graphic table to place the coordinates for the areas of greater anatomical and physiological importance on the radiologic image. Thus, a calculation of distances, anatomical axes and angles is obtained immediately, accurately defining the morphometry of the joint. In this study, the anteroposterior preoperative radiographic views of 87 femurs in 84 patients were evaluated by this method. The values provided by the morphometric analysis were then related to sex, age and weight. The diaphyseal canal was classified by typology for the preoperative planning of hip arthroplasty. PMID:7842840

  16. Selection of patients for preoperative coronary angiography: use of dipyridamole-stress--thallium myocardial imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, D.C.; Okada, R.D.; Strauss, H.W.; Abbott, W.M.; Darling, R.C.; Boucher, C.A.

    1985-05-01

    To identify patients likely to benefit from preoperative coronary angiography, a method utilizing pharmacologically induced coronary vasodilatation in conjunction with serial thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging was investigated. Fifty-four patients admitted for elective aortic or femoropopliteal procedures were studied. There were no cardiac ischemic complications in 32 patients with normal scans or persistent defects (scar). In contrast, 7 of 15 patients with thallium redistribution (ischemia) on pre-operative scanning had perioperative ischemic events, including one death and two acute infarcts. An additional seven patients with positive scans (redistribution) underwent coronary angiography prior to vascular surgery; surgically important two- or three-vessel disease was confirmed in all. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging facilitates selection of the subset of truly high-risk patients in whom preoperative coronary angiography may be warranted.

  17. Advantages of the Papillon protocol in the preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Klimberg, V S; Langston, J D; Maners, A; Gocio, J C; Hutchins, L F; Lang, N P; Westbrook, K C; Broadwater, J R

    1992-11-01

    Standard treatment for advanced rectal carcinoma currently includes surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Although there are theoretic advantages to preoperative irradiation, it is often not performed because of the prolonged delay of surgery and the purported increase in perioperative complications. A pilot study was undertaken at our institution to evaluate a treatment protocol advocated by Dr. Papillon that offers a shorter treatment time and less patient morbidity than conventional preoperative therapy for rectal carcinoma. Twenty patients with rectal cancer underwent the preoperative regimen that consisted of 3,000 cGy delivered in 10 fractions over 12 days with concomitant 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin-C. Complications were acceptable. Local recurrence was lower than in most reported trials, and survival rates were comparable. Additional benefits of the protocol include lower radiation morbidity to the patient and a decreased delay between diagnosis and surgery. PMID:1443366

  18. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  19. The role of preoperative ultrasonography, computed tomography, and sestamibi scintigraphy localization in secondary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Bok; Kim, Woo Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The role of preoperative localization studies is controversial in surgery of secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT). The aim of study was to evaluate the accuracy of preoperative ultrasonography (USG), CT, and 99mTc sestamibi scintigraphy (MIBI) in localizing enlarged parathyroid glands and to find the impact of correct localization in successful parathyroidectomy. Methods We compared operative findings with the preoperative localization of ultrasonography, computerized tomography and sestamibi scintigraphy in 109 patients with sHPT and identified well-visualized locations of abnormal parathyroid glands by evaluating the sensitivity of each imaging study with regard to typical locations of glands. We investigated the effect of preoperative imaging localization on the surgical outcomes by measuring the intraoperative parathyroid hormone (ioPTH) decrement for positive or negative imaging localization. Results USG (91.5%) had the highest sensitivity and MIBI (56.1%) had the lowest among 3 modalities. The sensitivity of combined USG and CT (95.0%) was the highest among combined 2 modalities. The combination of all 3 modalities (95.4%) had the highest sensitivity among the combinations of modalities. The reduction of ioPTH in patients with positive imaging localization (86.6%) was greater than negative imaging localization (84.2%), with no significant difference (P = 0.586). The recurrence or persistence of sHPT was not correlated with preoperative imaging localization (19 patients in negative, 16 in positive; P = 0.14). Conclusion Preoperative imaging localization contributed to surgical success but not to surgical outcomes. The combination of ioPTH measurement with imaging localization might be valuable for better surgical results in sHPT. PMID:26665124

  20. Is preoperative hepatic arterial chemoembolization safe and effective for hepatocellular carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Harada, T; Matsuo, K; Inoue, T; Tamesue, S; Inoue, T; Nakamura, H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The value of preoperative transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not been duly appreciated. The authors assessed the advantages and disadvantages of preoperative TACE by reviewing their experience with the procedure. METHODS. A total of 140 patients who underwent hepatectomy for HCC were entered into the study (105 received preoperative TACE and 35 did not). The authors investigated the reduction of tumor size and the complications after TACE, as well as the relationship between the interval from TACE to resection and the occurrence of complications. They compared postoperative morbidity and mortality between the TACE and non-TACE groups. They also compared survival and disease-free survival between the two groups, as well as between subgroups, defined by the extent of tumor necrosis achieved with TACE. RESULTS. A distinct reduction of tumor size was observed in approximately half of the TACE group. However, there were 68 appreciable complications of TACE in 56 patients (53.3%), and the interval between TACE and resection was significantly prolonged in the patients with complications. The postoperative morbidity and mortality rates of the TACE group were not different from those of the non-TACE group. Preoperative TACE did not improve the survival or disease-free survival of the whole patient group after hepatectomy. In addition, the survival and disease-free survival rates of the three TACE subgroups were not different from those of the non-TACE group. CONCLUSIONS. Preoperative TACE should only be performed to reduce tumor bulk in patients with HCC with borderline resectability. In such patients, increased tumor resectability appears to improve the survival rate. Preoperative TACE does not promote tumor recurrence. PMID:8678616

  1. Effects of Clown Doctors on Child and Caregiver Anxiety at the Entrance to the Surgery Care Unit and Separation from Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriaga, Patrícia; Pacheco, Catarina

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hospital Clown Doctors intervention on child and caregiver preoperative anxiety at the entrance to the surgery care unit and separation from caregivers. A total of 88 children (aged 4-12 years) were assigned to one of the following two groups: Clown Doctors intervention or control group (standard care).…

  2. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... a medical director, a home health aide, a social worker, a spiritual care coordinator, a volunteer and your attending physician, if he or she remains involved in your care. Other team members may include a music therapist, physical therapist, speech therapist or occupational therapist. ...

  3. Caregiver care.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren G; Swartz, Kristine

    2011-06-01

    In 2009, nearly 66 million Americans (three in 10 U.S. households) reported at least one person providing unpaid care as a family caregiver. More adults with chronic conditions and disabilities are living at home than ever before, and family caregivers have an even higher level of responsibility. Caring for loved ones is associated with several benefits, including personal fulfillment. However, caregiving is also associated with physical, psychological, and financial burdens. Primary care physicians can aid in the identification, support, and treatment of caregivers by offering caregiver assessments-interviews directed at identifying high levels of burden-as soon as caregivers are identified. Repeat assessments may be considered when there is a change in the status of caregiver or care recipient. Caregivers should be directed to appropriate resources for support, including national caregiving organizations, local area agencies on aging, Web sites, and respite care. Psychoeducational, skills-training, and therapeutic counseling interventions for caregivers of patients with chronic conditions such as dementia, cancer, stroke, and heart failure have shown small to moderate success in decreasing caregiver burden and increasing caregiver quality of life. Further research is needed to further identify strategies to offset caregiver stress, depression, and poor health outcomes. Additional support and anticipatory guidance for the care recipient and caregiver are particularly helpful during care transitions and at the care recipient's end of life. PMID:21661713

  4. Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merro, John; And Others

    Interviews on the quality of day care in the United States are presented in this transcript of a program broadcast in the National Public Radio weekly series, "Options in Education." Writers, day care center personnel and others describe and evaluate the current situation. Federal legislation concerning children is examined, and researchers…

  5. Complications associated with preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 brachytherapy for localized prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, R.C.; Patterson, J.; Mendiondo, O.A.; Gee, W.F.; Lucas, B.A.; McRoberts, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-five consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with 1,050 rad preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy are reviewed. Significant long-term postoperative complications included radiation cystitis (12%), radiation proctitis (4%), genital and leg edema (12%), stress incontinence (8%), total incontinence (4%), and impotence (26%). Complications occurred in 75 per cent of patients who received additional postoperative radiation. Improved staging with CT scan, lymphangiography, and Chiba needle biopsy of any possibly abnormal lymph nodes provided excellent preoperative staging with only 1 patient (6%) upstaged at surgery to Stage D1.

  6. Computed tomography evaluation of the adrenal gland in the preoperative assessment of bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.; Madrazo, B.L.; Gitschlag, K.F.; Gross, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    One hundred ten patients with proved bronchogenic carcinoma who were undergoing computed tomography (CT) of the thorax also underwent CT of the adrenals to determine the value of routine preoperative assessement of this gland. Sixteen adrenal masses were found in 11 patients. In five patients the adrenals were the only site of metastasis. CT of the adrenals should be performed routinely when the thorax is examined pre-operatively in patients with non-oat-cell bronchogenic carcinoma to improve patient selection for thoractomy.

  7. Respiratory physiotherapy and its application in preoperative period of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Regina Coeli Vasques de; Padulla, Susimary Aparecida Trevizan; Bortolatto, Carolina Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac surgical procedures change respiratory mechanics, defecting in lung dysfunction. The physical therapists play an important role in the preparation and rehabilitation of individuals who are undergoing cardiac surgery, as they have a large quantity of techniques. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of breathing exercises with and without the use of devices, and respiratory muscle training in preoperative period of cardiac surgery in reducing postoperative pulmonary complications. Although there are controversies as to which technique to use, studies show the effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy in the prevention and reduction of postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:22358282

  8. Stage I carcinoma of the endometrium: a 5-year experience utilizing preoperative cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Belinson, J.L.; Spirou, B.; McClure, M.; Badger, G.; Pretorius, R.G.; Roland, T.A.

    1985-03-01

    A treatment protocol for the management of stage I endometrial carcinoma utilizing preoperative cesium is evaluated. One hundred and twelve consecutive patients were treated according to this protocol over a 5-year period. Based on this experience and a literature review a new protocol is recommended. The significant changes include primary surgery without preoperative cesium, primary treatment based on grade without regard to uterine size, modified radical hysterectomy for G3 tumors, pelvic radiotherapy for clear cell carcinoma confined to the pelvis regardless of depth of invasion, cytoxan, adriamycin, and cis-platinum for papillary serous tumors, and postoperative vaginal cuff cesium for G2 and G3 tumors not requiring pelvic radiotherapy.

  9. Routine use of preoperative breast MRI for patients considered for intraoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Small, William; Emami, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    This editorial comments on the study by Tallet et al. which reported on the incidence of ipsilateral second breast cancers (BC) detected by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients being considered for intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Any second BC was detected in 7% of patients; an ipsilateral BC was detected in 4% of patients, precluding them from IORT. The authors comment that in view of detection of a substantial rate of ipsilateral BCs by preoperative MRI, this exam should be used routinely for staging patients being considered for IORT. PMID:27162648

  10. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. Methods and analysis This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). Trial registration number 2013-004313-41; Pre

  11. Supportive Care.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Pia Riis; Lorenzo, Rosalía

    2016-01-01

    This chapter takes its point of departure in psychosocial aspects of supportive care in adolescent and young adult cancer care. The purpose is to describe some of the challenges that these young people face following a cancer diagnosis and guide healthcare professionals in how to provide care that improves the quality of life. In most hospitals and healthcare systems, adolescents and young adults are cared for and treated in settings for children or adults. Accordingly, healthcare professionals may lack attention to and knowledge about what characterize young peoples' life situation, their special needs and how to meet them. The topics we include in the chapter are the following: the youth friendly environment, social support and social network, parents, information during a psychosocial crisis event, the use of HEADSS, peer support, fertility, body image and self-esteem, after treatment and future challenges and palliative and end of life care. PMID:27595353

  12. Posttraumatic stress symptoms after solid-organ transplantation: preoperative risk factors and the impact on health-related quality of life and life satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Solid-organ transplantations (SOT) are usually life-saving high-tech medical procedures. The transplantation itself and the intensive care unit stay could be traumatic stressors triggering posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Our retrospective follow-up study aimed to explore preoperative risk factors of PTSS in a cohort of SOT recipients, and we investigated how PTSS are associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and life satisfaction. Methods 126 SOT recipients were enrolled in this investigation. Psychiatric examination of all SOT candidates based on the Transplant Evaluation Rating Scale was carried out before SOT, and after SOT, recipients completed the PTSS-10, the SF-36 and the FLZ. Results After the surgical intervention 19 (15.1%) SOT recipients had clinical significant PTSS. Preoperative risk factors for developing postoperative PTSS were: 1.) preexisting psychiatric morbidity, 2.) history of retransplantation, 3.) chronic benzodiazepine consumption, 4.) age, and 5.) type of transplantation. SOT-related PTSS were associated with maximal decrements in HRQOL and life satisfaction. The following HRQOL and life satisfaction domains were affected: Physical Functioning, Role Physical, Pain, General Health, Vitality, Social Functioning, Role Emotional, Mental Health, Occupation/Work and Character/Own Skills. Conclusion SOT recipients may face a major risk of transplantation- and treatment-related PTSS and the development of impairments to HRQOL and life satisfaction. PMID:23822659

  13. Is Pre-Operative Axillary Staging with Ultrasound and Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Reliable in Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast?

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-06-01

    Axillary ultrasound (US) with US-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-FNA) for suspicious lymph nodes is important for pre-operative staging and planning of surgical management. Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) metastases were previously thought to be difficult to detect, but with a limited amount of evidence. This study investigated the ability of US and US-FNA to detect ILC metastases by assessing 142 patients with ILC. The sensitivity of US in detection of metastasis was 52.3%, and US was able to exclude 96% of N2 and N3 axillary metastases. The false-negative rate of US-FNA in detection of metastasis for suspicious lymph nodes on US was 34.8%, and lymph nodes with longer maximal dimensions were associated with false-negative US-FNA results. Multiplicity of breast lesions and maximal cortical thickness ≥3.1 mm of lymph nodes were independently associated with metastasis. Although pre-operative US in ILC can reliably exclude advanced axillary nodal disease, US-FNA results should be carefully interpreted. PMID:26988417

  14. Diagnostic Laparoscopy in the Pre-operative Assessment of Patients Undergoing Cytoreductive Surgery and HIPEC for Peritoneal Surface Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Ramakrishnan Ayloor; Hemanth Raj E

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has led to an improvement in the survival of select patients with peritoneal surface malignancies (PSM). However, it is important to carefully identify patients who will benefit from this procedure and to avoid an unnecessary laparotomy in those who will not. The currently available imaging modalities are unable to accurately predict the peritoneal cancer index (PCI) score or the completeness of cytoreduction. In this article, we review the current status of staging laparoscopy in the assessment of patients with PSM who are planned for CRS & HIPEC. We discuss the patient selection, techniques, complications and efficacy of staging laparoscopy. To summarise, staging laparoscopy is a safe and feasible method of pre-operative assessment of patients with PSM. It has a high sensitivity and positive predictive value in identifying patients who can undergo a complete cytoreduction, thereby preventing many patients from undergoing an unnecessary laparotomy. With the exception of pseudomyxoma peritonei, it should be considered as a part of the routine assessment of patients with PSM who are being considered for CRS & HIPEC. PMID:27065714

  15. Is the Preoperative Administration of Amiodarone or Metoprolol More Effective in Reducing Atrial Fibrillation: After Coronary Bypass Surgery?

    PubMed

    Onk, Oruc Alper; Erkut, Bilgehan

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the influence of preoperative administration of amiodarone and metoprolol in preventing postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery.The study comprised 251 patients who underwent CABG surgery at our hospital between January 2012 and May 2014. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: amiodarone therapy group (n = 122 patients) and metoprolol therapy group (n = 129 patients).In the amiodarone group, the patients received amiodarone tablet orally 1 week before coronary bypass surgery and during the postoperative period. In the metoprolol group, the patients received metoprolol tablet orally 1 week before surgery and during the postoperative period. The AF development rate was retrospectively evaluated between the first 3 days and 4 weeks after surgery.AF developed in 14 patients in the amiodarone group and 16 patients in the metoprolol group 4 weeks after the operation (P = 0.612).No significant difference was observed between the groups in terms of intensive care unit and hospital stay. Furthermore, hospital charges were similar in both groups (P = 0.741).The results of the logistic regression analysis showed age, left ventricular ejection fraction, left atrial diameter, and aortic cross-clamping time to be predictors for postoperative AF.This study demonstrates that amiodarone and metoprolol have similar effects in prevention of AF after cardiac surgery. However, larger-scale studies need to be conducted to substantiate these findings. PMID:26469896

  16. Professional oral health care reduces the duration of hospital stay in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, HIDEO; RAHMAN, MOHAMMAD ZESHAAN; OHTA, KOUJI; ONO, SHIGEHIRO; SUGIYAMA, MASARU; TAKECHI, MASAAKI

    2016-01-01

    The present study reviewed the records of 58 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery [sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO), Le Fort I osteotomy, genioplasty, anterior maxillary alveolar osteotomy] between 2010 and 2015. To investigate the influence of preoperative oral health care on postoperative inflammation, infection and length of hospital stay in those patients, white blood cell (WBC) count and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared between patients who received and did not receive preoperative oral care. The mean CRP level throughout the postoperative term was lower in the oral care group as compared to the non-oral care group. By contrast, the oral care group had a lower occurrence of postoperative infectious complications (surgical site infection, anastomotic leak) (13.6 vs. 20.8%) and a shorter average length of hospital stay (16.2±3.8 vs. 21.2±7.4 days). These results suggest that preoperative professional oral health care decreases the duration of hospital stay following orthognathic surgery by inhibiting inflammation and infectious complications during the postoperative stage. PMID:26870334

  17. Chewing gum in the preoperative fasting period: an analysis of de-identified incidents reported to webAIRS.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, S; Goulding, G; Gibbs, N M; Taraporewalla, K; Culwick, M

    2016-03-01

    The role of preoperative fasting is well established in current anaesthetic practice with different guidelines for clear fluids and food. However, chewing gum may not be categorised as either food or drink by some patients, and may not always be specified in instructions given to patients about preoperative fasting. The aim of this paper was to review anaesthesia incidents involving gum chewing reported to webAIRS to obtain information on the risks, if any, of gum chewing during the preoperative fasting period. There were nine incidents involving chewing gum reported between late 2009 and early 2015. There were no adverse outcomes from the nine incidents other than postponement of surgery in three cases and cancellation in one. In particular, there were no reports of aspiration or airway obstruction. Nevertheless, there were five cases in which the gum was not detected preoperatively and was found in the patient's mouth either intraoperatively or postoperatively. These cases of undetected gum occurred despite patient and staff compliance with their current preoperative checklists. While the risk of increased gastric secretions related to chewing gum preoperatively are not known, the potential for airway obstruction if the gum is not detected and removed preoperatively is very real. We recommend that patients should be specifically advised to avoid gum chewing once fasting from clear fluids is commenced, and that a specific question regarding the presence of chewing gum should be added to all preoperative checklists. PMID:27029662

  18. Preoperative Preparation for Cardiac Surgery Facilitates Recovery, Reduces Psychological Distress, and Reduces the Incidence of Acute Postoperative Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Erling A.

    1987-01-01

    Cardiac surgery patients were assigned to information-only, information-plus-coping, or control preoperative preparation groups. Preoperatively, both experimental groups were significantly less anxious than were controls. Both experimental groups increased patients' belief in control over recovery. Postoperatively, experimental patients were less…

  19. The Effect of Preoperative Subcutaneous Fat Thickness on Surgical Site Infection Risk in Patients Undergoing Colorectal Surgery: Results of a Multisite, Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiromi; Ohno, Kaori; Ikeda, Shunya; Muto, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is one of the most frequent postoperative complications among patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. A multisite, prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate whether the thickness of subcutaneous fat (TSF) influences the occurrence of SSI in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Participants included patients scheduled to receive colorectal laparotomy for colorectal cancer and who were under the care of a wound ostomy continence nurse at 17 participating general hospitals in Japan. Patients were not eligible to participate if they had undergone emergency surgery, reoperation, or laparoscopic surgery. Demographic, wound, and surgical data and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scale scores were collected and assessed, along with nutritional status, TSF, body mass index, and risk factors for SSI (ie, length of surgery and wound classification). The incidence of SSI and nutritional conditions was assessed weekly for 30 days after surgery. Of the 155 participants (mean age 68.9 ± 10.8 years, 53 [34.2%] of whom were women), 90 (58.1%) underwent rectal surgery, and the remaining 65 underwent colon surgery. Seventy-two (72, 46.5%) of the 155 patients underwent colostomy surgery; 24 (15.5%) developed a SSI. The mean onset of SSI was 7.3 ± 2.9 days after surgery and commonly observed in the stoma group when the ASA score was 3 or higher (P = 0.02). Patients who developed SSI resumed oral dietary intake later than those without SSI (7.4 days versus 4.6 days, P = 0.02). Multivariate analysis indicated TSF >15 mm (P = 0.01), Alb level <3.5 g/dL at postoperative days 14 (P = 0.03) and 21 (P = 0.02), and total protein level <6.8 g/dL at postoperative day 7 (P = 0.02) were statistically significantly correlated with SSI occurrence. These results suggest preoperative TSF and preoperative and postoperative serum albumin levels are independent risk factors for SSI in patients undergoing colorectal surgery, confirming

  20. Case Relationships in the Creative Oral Language of Preoperational and Concrete Operational First Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Patrick P.

    The creative oral language elicited from 45 preoperational and 40 concrete operational first grade students was analyzed to study the relationship between cognitive development and the types of case relationships produced. Each child's language was analyzed for eight noun/verb relationships, including state, process, action, experience, location,…

  1. Short-term preoperative octreotide treatment for TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Noriaki; Horiguchi, Kentaro; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hisanori; Takeshita, Akira; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Inoshita, Naoko; Yamada, Shozo

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative control of hyperthyroidism in patients with TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas (TSHoma) may avoid perioperative thyroid storm. Perioperative administration of octreotide may control hyperthyroidism, as well as shrink tumor size. The effects of preoperative octreotide treatment were assessed in a large number of patients with TSHomas. Of 81 patients who underwent surgery for TSHoma at Toranomon Hospital between January 2001 and May 2013, 44 received preoperative short-term octreotide. After excluding one patient because of side effects, 19 received octreotide as a subcutaneous injection, and 24 as a long-acting release (LAR) injection. Median duration between initiation of octreotide treatment and surgery was 33.5 days. Octreotide normalized free T4 in 36 of 43 patients (84%) and shrank tumors in 23 of 38 (61%). Length of octreotide treatment did not differ significantly in patients with and without hormonal normalization (p=0.09) and with and without tumor shrinkage (p=0.84). Serum TSH and free T4 concentrations, duration of treatment, incidence of growth hormone (GH) co-secretion, results of octreotide loading tests, form of administration (subcutaneous injection or LAR), tumor volume, and tumor consistency did not differ significantly in patients with and without hormonal normalization and with and without tumor shrinkage. Short-term preoperative octreotide administration was highly effective for TSHoma shrinkage and normalization of excess hormone concentrations, with tolerable side effects. PMID:25273395

  2. Preoperative fasting times in elective surgical patients at a referral Hospital in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Worknehe Agegnehu; Rukewe, Ambrose; Bekele, Negussie Alula; Stoffel, Moeng; Dichabeng, Mompelegi Nicoh; Shifa, Jemal Zeberga

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adults and children are required to fast before anaesthesia to reduce the risk of regurgitation and aspiration of gastric contents. However, prolonged periods of fasting are unnecessary and may cause complications. This study was conducted to evaluate preoperative fasting period in our centre and compare it with the ASA recommendations and factors that influence fasting periods. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of preoperative fasting times among elective surgical patients. A total numbers of 260 patients were interviewed as they arrived at the reception area of operating theatre using questionnaire. Results Majority of patients (98.1%) were instructed to fast from midnight. Fifteen patients (5.8%) reported that they were told the importance of preoperative fasting. The mean fasting period were 15.9±2.5 h (range 12.0-25.3 h) for solids and 15.3±2.3 h (range 12.0-22.0 h) for liquids. The mean duration of fasting was significantly longer for patients operated after midday compared to those operated before midday, p<0.001. Conclusion The mean fasting periods were 7.65 times longer for clear liquid and 2.5 times for solids than the ASA guidelines. It is imperative that the Hospital should establish Preoperative fasting policies and teach the staff who should ensure compliance with guidelines. PMID:27222691

  3. VALUE OF PREOPERATIVE RADIOGRAPHIC EVALUATIONS ON KNEE BONE DEFECTS FOR REVISION ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Iamaguchi, Mauricio Masasi; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Tirico, Luiz Eduardo Passarelli; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of preoperative radiographic evaluations for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision. Methods: Thirty-one knees that were operated between 2006 and 2008, in a consecutive series of cases of TKA revision surgery were analyzed retrospectively. The following criteria were evaluated: number of wedges or structured bone grafts used for filling the bone defects; locations of the wedges and bone grafts used; and mean thickness of the polyethylene used. The AORI classification was previously established based on preoperative radiographs, using preestablished criteria. After the analysis, the knees were divided into four groups (I, IIA, IIB and III). Results: The mean number of wedges or grafts used in each knee progressively increased among the groups (group I: 1.33; group IIA: 2; group IIB: 4.33; and group III: 4.83) (P = 0.0012). The commonest locations were medial in the tibia and posteromedial in the femur. There were no statistically significant differences in the thickness of the polyethylene used. Conclusion: The AORI classification for bone defects in the knee, based on preoperative radiographs, showed a correlation with increasing need to use wedges and/or structured grafts in TKA revisions. However, up to 46% of the knees in groups I and IIA presented bone defects of up to 5 mm that were not diagnosed by means of preoperative radiographs. PMID:27047889

  4. Preoperative predictors for noncopers to pass return to sports criteria after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hartigan, Erin H; Zeni, Joseph; Di Stasi, Stephanie; Axe, Michael J; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2012-08-01

    Less than 50% of athletes pass criteria to return to sports (RTS) 6 months after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Using data on 38 noncopers, we hypothesized that preoperative age, quadriceps strength index (QI), and knee flexion moments (KFM) during gait would predict the ability to pass/fail RTS criteria and that preoperative quadriceps strength gains would be predictive of passing RTS criteria. Gait analysis and strength data were collected before and after a preoperative intervention and 6 months after ACLR. Age, QI, and KFM each contributed to the predictability to pass or fail RTS criteria 6 months after ACLR. Collectively, the variables predict 69% who would pass and 82% who would fail RTS criteria 6 months after ACLR. Younger athletes who have symmetrical quadriceps strength and greater KFM were more likely to pass RTS criteria. Further, 63% of those who increased preoperative quadriceps strength passed RTS criteria, whereas 73% who did not failed. Increasing quadriceps strength in noncopers before ACLR seems warranted. PMID:22983930

  5. The Effect of Performing Preoperative Preparation Program on School Age Children's Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Vaezzadeh, Nazanin; Douki, Zahra Esmaeeli; Hadipour, Abbas; Osia, Soheil; Shahmohammadi, Soheila; Sadeghi, Roghieh

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine effects of performing preoperative preparation program on children's anxiety. Methods This study was performed in Amirkola Pediatrics Hospital, Mazandaran. A randomized controlled trail was performed on 122 children (7–12 years of age) admitted for elective surgery during 15 months. The researcher randomly assigned eligible participants in to the experimental and control groups, after pre-test baseline measurement had been taken. Analyzing was performed through independent t-test and χ2 test. P<0.005 was considered statistically significant. The experimental group received therapeutic play and the control group received routine preoperative information preparation. Findings The mean and standard deviation of the state anxiety scores of children in experimental and control groups before intervention were 35.52±6.99 and 34.98±6.78, after intervention 31.44±5.87 and 38.31±7.44 respectively. The state anxiety score was lower significantly in the experimental group prior to preoperative surgery than in the control group (P=0.000). Conclusion Performing preoperative program with using therapeutic play intervention is effective for preparing children before surgery and decreases their anxiety. PMID:23056832

  6. Preoperative and Intraoperative Evaluation of the Eustachian Tube in Chronic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tarabichi, Muaaz; Kapadia, Mustafa

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the authors' approach to the assessment of the eustachian tube using opening pressure measurement, endoscopic assessment of the protympanic segment of the eustachian tube, and Valsalva computed tomography. A possible algorithm for the evaluation of eustachian tube obstructive disorders is detailed both preoperatively and intraoperatively. PMID:27468635

  7. Regional Alterations in Cerebral Growth Exist Pre-operatively in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortinau, Cynthia; Beca, John; Lambeth, Jennifer; Ferdman, Barbara; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Shimony, Joshua S.; Wallendorf, Michael; Neil, Jeffrey; Inder, Terrie

    2011-01-01

    Objective Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has defined neurologic abnormalities in infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) including pre-operative injury and delayed brain maturation. This study utilized qualitative scoring, cerebral biometry, and diffusion imaging to characterize pre-operative brain abnormalities in infants with CHD, including the identification of regions of greater vulnerability. Methods Sixty-seven infants with CHD had pre-operative MRI with analysis for brain injury by qualitative scoring and brain development by qualitative scoring, metrics and diffusion imaging. Results Qualitative abnormalities were common, with 42% of infants having pre-operative focal white matter lesions. Infants with CHD had smaller brain measures in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, cerebellum and brainstem (p<.001); with the frontal lobe and brainstem displaying the greatest alterations (p<.001). Smaller brain size in the frontal and parietal lobes correlated with delayed white matter microstructure reflected by diffusion imaging. Conclusion Infants with CHD commonly display brain injury and delayed brain development. Regional alterations in brain size are present, with the frontal lobe and brainstem demonstrating the greatest alterations, which may reflect a combination of developmental vulnerability and regional differences in cerebral circulation. PMID:22143100

  8. 77 FR 71804 - Antiseptic Patient Preoperative Skin Preparation Products; Public Hearing; Request for Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is correcting a document that appeared in the Federal Register of November 21, 2012 (77 FR 69863). The document announced a public hearing entitled ``Antiseptic Patient Preoperative Skin Preparation Products.'' The document was published with an incorrect email address. This document corrects that error. Due to this error, FDA is extending the Requests......

  9. 77 FR 69863 - Antiseptic Patient Preoperative Skin Preparation Products; Public Hearing; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... be sterile. Bacteria can contaminate these products at the time of manufacture or during product use... reduce the number of bacteria on the skin prior to medical procedures or injections. Although they are... activity, patient preoperative skin preparations may become contaminated with bacteria. A number of...

  10. Effect of preoperative autologous blood donation on patients undergoing bimaxillary orthognathic surgery: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, A Y; Seo, K S; Lee, G E; Kim, H J

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy of preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) was evaluated according to preoperative haemoglobin (Hb) values. The records of 295 patients who underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery between July 2007 and August 2008 were reviewed. The records for autologous blood donation, intraoperative transfusion, and related laboratory studies were also evaluated. The transfusion trigger used during this period was Hb <10g/dl. A total of 189 patients (64.1%) made a PABD and 106 patients (35.9%) did not. The incidence of allogeneic blood transfusion was significantly lower in the PABD group than in the no PABD group (15.9% vs. 29.2%, P=0.007). This difference was greater in patients with a preoperative Hb <14g/dl (20.3% vs. 62.5%, P<0.0001), and no difference was found in patients with Hb ≥14g/dl (13.3% vs. 14.9%, P=0.83). PABD reduced the incidence of allogeneic blood transfusion in patients undergoing bimaxillary orthognathic surgery, particularly in patients with a preoperative Hb <14g/dl. PABD could be used to reduce the frequency of intraoperative allogeneic blood transfusion in these patients. PMID:26678802

  11. The role of endoscopic ultrasound on the preoperative T staging of gastric cancer: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Shi, Huiying; Liu, Jun; Qian, Wei; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is used for preoperative assessment of gastric cancer. However, recent studies suggested that EUS staging accuracy is lower than previously thought. We aimed to assess EUS efficacy and image characteristics in preoperative gastric cancer T staging.A retrospective review of clinical and imaging features of 232 gastric carcinoma patients who underwent preoperative EUS assessment of T stage was performed. Only cases with tumor-free resection margin status and no metastases were enrolled. Comparisons of preoperative EUS and postoperative histopathological stagings were also performed to identify vital EUS image features for evaluating gastric carcinoma.EUS accuracy for T staging was 64.2% (149/232) with the highest accuracy for T3 (75.0%). Enlarged lymph nodes, well differentiated histological type and Borrmann IV type were associated with diagnostic accuracy in predicting tumor invasion. Although no factors were associated with overstaging, circumferential lesions ≥1/2, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma, and Borrmann IV type had significantly higher risks of understaging. Gastric wall outer edge irregularity was also an indicator of serosal involvement with a sensitivity of 82.0%. The pancreas and colon were more frequent disease extension sites than previously predicted.Although EUS is likely the best and most accurate option that we have used to stage gastric cancer, the finding that factors including circumferential lesions, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma, and Borrmann IV type carcinoma were more frequently related to incorrect staging warrants attention. PMID:27603347

  12. Preoperative embolization of cerebellar hemangioblastoma with onyx: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Shin, Gi Won; Jeong, Hae Woong; Seo, Jeong Hwa; Kim, Sung Tae; Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo

    2014-02-01

    Hemangioblastoma is a benign and highly vascular tumor. Complete surgical resection of highly vascular tumor such as hemangioblastoma may be challenging due to excessive bleeding. Preoperative embolization of these lesions may decrease the intraoperative blood loss and facilitate excision. We report three cases of cerebellar hemangioblastomas that were embolized using Onyx. PMID:24644530

  13. The effect of the kampo medicine yokukansan on preoperative anxiety and sedation levels.

    PubMed

    Arai, Young-Chang; Kawanishi, Jun; Sakakima, Yoshikazu; Sueoka, Satoshi; Ito, Akihiro; Tawada, Yusuke; Maruyama, Yuki; Banno, Shinya; Takayama, Hitomi; Nishihara, Makoto; Kawai, Takashi; Ikemoto, Tatsunori

    2014-01-01

    Background. Preoperative anxiety can lead to unfavorable physiological response such as tachycardia and hypertension. Prevention of preoperative anxiety improves surgical outcome and decreases inpatient stay. Yokukansan is one of prescriptions in Kampo, traditional Japanese herbal medicine, and is known to exert anxiolytic effects. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of diazepam and Yokukansan on preoperative anxiety, salivary amylase activity, and sedation levels. Methods. Seventy American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II patients presenting for hemicolectomy under general anesthesia combined with epidural anesthesia were enrolled. The Diazepam group received diazepam 5 mg orally and the Yokukansan group received Yokukansan 2.5 g orally. Results. Although levels of anxiety and salivary amylase activity were not different between the two groups, the modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale of the Yokukansan group was significantly higher compared to that of the Diazepam group. Conclusion. Yokukansan alleviated preoperative anxiety without undesirable sedation, when compared with diazepam. PMID:24799947

  14. [Postoperatively conformed effectiveness of preoperative radio therapy, combined with chemotherapy - cysplatin].

    PubMed

    Lazarov, N; Lazarov, L; Lazarov, S

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a case of a 35 years old female patient with spinocellular carcinoma of the cervix, diagnosed after byopsy and treated with radiotherapy 30 Gray, combined with Cisplatin 50 mg. per square meter, per week, 6 months before radical histerectomy and lymphonodulectomy was performed. The postoperative histology shows only traces of dysplastic epithelia, which proves preoperative therapy effective. PMID:22639781

  15. Possibilities of Preoperative Medical Models Made by 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most of the 3D printing applications of preoperative models have been focused on dental and craniomaxillofacial area. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibilities in other application areas and give examples of the current possibilities. The approach was to communicate with the surgeons with different fields about their needs related preoperative models and try to produce preoperative models that satisfy those needs. Ten different kinds of examples of possibilities were selected to be shown in this paper and aspects related imaging, 3D model reconstruction, 3D modeling, and 3D printing were presented. Examples were heart, ankle, backbone, knee, and pelvis with different processes and materials. Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros. Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion. This paper presents a wide range of possibilities related to 3D printing of preoperative models. Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed. PMID:27433470

  16. Usefulness of routine preoperative testing in a developing country: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Julien; Cungi, Pierre-Julien; Savoie, Pierre-Henry; Bonnet, Stéphane; Kaiser, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The assessment of anesthetic risks is an essential component of preoperative evaluation. In developing world, preanesthesia evaluation may be challenging because patient's medical history and records are scare, and language barrier limits physical examination. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of routine preoperative testing in a low-resources setting. Methods Prospective observational study performed in a French forward surgical unit in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. 201 patients who were scheduled for non urgent surgery were screened with routine laboratory exams during preoperative evaluation. Changes in surgery were assessed (delayed or scheduled). Results Abnormal hemoglobin findings were reported in 35% of patients, abnormal WBC count in 11,1% of patients, abnormal platelets in 15,3% of patients. Positive HIV results were found in 8,3% of cases. Routine tests represented 43,6% of changes causes. Conclusion Our study showed that in a developing country, routine preoperative tests showed abnormal results up to 35% of cases, and represented 43,5% of delayed surgery causes. The rate of tests leading to management changes varied widely, from 0% to 8,3%. These results suggested that selected tests would be useful to diagnose diseases that required treatment before non urgent surgery. However, larger studies are needeed to evaluate the cost/benefit ratio and the clinical impact of such a strategy. PMID:26516395

  17. Preoperative radiotherapy in gastric cancer: CTV definition for conformal therapy according to tumor location.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Pacelli, Fabio; D'Ugo, Domenico; Mantini, Giovanna; Balducci, Mario; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Nori, Stefania

    2003-01-01

    In the past radiation oncologists had not a major interest in the treatment of gastric cancer, but the positive outcomes of the Intergroup Study (INT-0116) supported the role of locoregional control in promoting better survival. To reduce the toxicity and the risk of residual disease in locally advanced tumors after surgery,a preoperative approach was tentatively considered. The aim of this manuscript is to define the location of nodal area at risk for cancer involvement according to the tumor location (cardias, corpus, antrum) on CT images to help the radiotherapist in the contouring process of the CTV for preoperative conformal treatment of gastric cancer. The analysis of both the percentage of nodal involvement detected at surgery and of the site of recurrence after radical surgery can direct to the areas to be considered at risk with its contouring on CT. Preoperative conformal-three dimensional radiotherapy of gastric cancer requires clear and well defined contouring guide-lines to allow the evaluation of clinical outcomes and the analysis if the area at risk for recurrence has changed after the preoperative approach. PMID:15018320

  18. Comparison of preoperative fine-needle aspiration cytology diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis of salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Mihashi, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Kojiro, Masamichi; Nakashima, Tadashi; Umeno, Hirohito; Sakamoto, Kikuo; Chiziwa, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    We investigated 115 patients with salivary gland epithelial tumors who had undergone preoperative fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of salivary glands and had been diagnosed by postoperative histopathological examination. We compared the findings of preoperative FNAC with their histopathological types in salivary gland tumors, and discuss the results and problems. The diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of preoperative FNAC of salivary glands were 98.2%, 88.2%, and 100%, respectively. The percentage of inadequate specimens was 6.1%. The rates of agreement in the diagnosis of pleomorphic adenoma, Warthin tumor, and basal cell adenoma were 96%, 92.9%, and 55.5%, respectively. The rate of agreement of histopathological types in the malignant tumors was 30%. We realized again not only that the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative FNAC for salivary gland tumors was high, but also that it was a safe, easy-to-perform, clinically very useful diagnostic procedure. However, this study exposed several problems which are the inadequate sampling rate and the difficulty in diagnosing malignant tumors. We have been making efforts to take appropriate specimens by writing comments on the cytological report indicating a re-examination, or by the presence of the clinical laboratory technician at the FNAC procedure. We consider it necessary to adequately re-aspirate the solid portion after cyst fluid aspiration, or to re-perform FNAC at a later date, and to improve the diagnostic accuracy by further experience with more patients. PMID:17043392

  19. Preoperative Nutritional Therapy Reduces the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage in Patients with Crohn's Disease Requiring Resections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen; Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Zuo, Lugen; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background. The rate of anastomotic leakage is high in surgeries for Crohn's disease, and therefore a temporary diverting stoma is often needed. We conducted this study to investigate whether preoperative nutritional therapy could reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage while decreasing the frequency of temporary stoma formation. Methods. This was a retrospective study. Patients requiring bowel resections due to Crohn's disease were reviewed. The rate of anastomotic leakage and temporary diverting stoma was compared between patients who received preoperative nutritional therapy and those on a normal diet before surgery. Possible predictive factors for anastomotic leakage were also analyzed. Results. One hundred and fourteen patients undergoing 123 surgeries were included. Patients in nutritional therapy (NT) group had a significantly lower level of C-reactive protein on the day before surgery. Patients in NT group suffered less anastomotic leakage (2.3% versus 17.9%, P = 0.023) and less temporary diverting stoma (22.8% versus 40.9%, P = 0.036). Serum albumin of the day before surgery ≤35 g/L and preoperative nutritional therapy were identified as factors which independently affected the rate of anastomotic leakage. Conclusion. Preoperative nutritional therapy reduced the risk of anastomotic leakage and the frequency of temporary diverting stoma formation in patients with Crohn's disease requiring resections. PMID:26858749

  20. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M. A.; Buckley, D.; Henson, D. B.; Armitage, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value. PMID:9823977

  1. Reliability and validity of Korean version of modified: Yale preoperative anxiety scale

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyuwhan; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Oh, Ah-Young; Park, Moon Seok; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Kim, Seong-Chan; Jung, Sun-Woo; Sohn, Hyejin; Yoon, Mi-Ok; Jang, Mi-Suk; Moon, Suk-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS) was developed for evaluating the level of preoperative anxiety in children. The purpose of this study was to develop a Korean version of the mYPAS (K-mYPAS) and to establish its validity and reliability based on the Korean preoperative pediatric patients. Methods K-mYPAS was made through stringent back-translation procedure. Total enrolled 102 patients answered questionnaires of Korean version of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (K-STAIC), and were videotaped for 2 to 5 minutes before induction of anesthesia. Three observers of experienced psychiatrist, surgeon, and nurse analyzed videotape with K-mYPAS comparing to K-STAIC. The inter- and intraobservers reliability, concurrent and construct validity, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value were analyzed. Results The value of Cronbach α for interobservers reliability was 0.939 and intraobserver reliability was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Concurrent and construct validity were also statistically significant (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 81.3%, 91.4%, 81.3%, 91.4%, and 88.2%, respectively. Conclusion The K-mYPAS had good psychometric properties and can be used as a reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of preoperative anxiety in children. PMID:26793692

  2. Possibilities of Preoperative Medical Models Made by 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Most of the 3D printing applications of preoperative models have been focused on dental and craniomaxillofacial area. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibilities in other application areas and give examples of the current possibilities. The approach was to communicate with the surgeons with different fields about their needs related preoperative models and try to produce preoperative models that satisfy those needs. Ten different kinds of examples of possibilities were selected to be shown in this paper and aspects related imaging, 3D model reconstruction, 3D modeling, and 3D printing were presented. Examples were heart, ankle, backbone, knee, and pelvis with different processes and materials. Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros. Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion. This paper presents a wide range of possibilities related to 3D printing of preoperative models. Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed. PMID:27433470

  3. Preoperative Biliary Drainage in Cases of Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Tomofumi; Sasaki, Tamito; Serikawa, Masahiro; Ishii, Yasutaka; Mouri, Teruo; Shimizu, Akinori; Kurihara, Keisuke; Tatsukawa, Yumiko; Miyaki, Eisuke; Kawamura, Ryota; Tsushima, Ken; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To elucidate the optimum preoperative biliary drainage method for patients with pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Material and Methods. From January 2010 through December 2014, 20 patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer underwent preoperative biliary drainage and NAC with a plastic or metallic stent and received NAC at Hiroshima University Hospital. We retrospectively analyzed delayed NAC and complication rates due to biliary drainage, effect of stent type on perioperative factors, and hospitalization costs from diagnosis to surgery. Results. There were 11 cases of preoperative biliary drainage with plastic stents and nine metallic stents. The median age was 64.5 years; delayed NAC occurred in 9 cases with plastic stent and 1 case with metallic stent (p = 0.01). The complication rates due to biliary drainage were 0% (0/9) with metallic stents and 72.7% (8/11) with plastic stents (p = 0.01). Cumulative rates of complications determined with the Kaplan-Meier method on day 90 were 60% with plastic stents and 0% with metallic stents (log-rank test, p = 0.012). There were no significant differences between group in perioperative factors or hospitalization costs from diagnosis to surgery. Conclusions. Metallic stent implantation may be effective for preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer treated with NAC. PMID:26880897

  4. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by transanal local excision for T3 distal rectal cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2016-01-01

    Local excision (LE) for rectal cancer is currently indicated for selected T1 stage tumors. However, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer not only improves local disease control, but also leads to a decrease in the stage and size of the primary mural tumor, along with a decrease in the risk of regional lymphadenopathy. The present study reports the outcome of a patient with T3N0M0 rectal cancer who was treated with LE following preoperative CRT. The distal pole of the tumor was located 2 cm from the anal verge. Preoperative pelvic radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy was administered in 28 fractions. Chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was administered during the first and last weeks of radiotherapy. The tumor response to CRT, was found to be marked at 7 weeks after CRT completion, and a complete response was presumed clinically. Transanal full-thickness LE was performed, and pathological examination revealed the absence of residual cancer cells. After 30 months of close follow-up, the patient was alive with no evidence of disease, and treatment-associated severe toxicities were not observed. Although a longer follow-up period is required, this case report suggests that LE may also be a feasible alternative treatment for T3 rectal cancer, which exhibits a marked response to preoperative CRT, particularly in elderly and comorbid patients contraindicated for radical surgery, or patients who are reluctant to undergo sphincter-ablation surgery. PMID:27073466

  5. Omental torsion with left-sided inguinal hernia: a rare preoperative diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kayan, Mustafa; Sabuncuoglu, Mehmet Zafer; Çetin, Meltem; Çetin, Recep; Benzin, Mehmet Fatih; Benzin, Şeyma; Yaşar, Selçuk; İbişoğlu, Seda

    2013-01-01

    Omental torsion is a rare disease. It can be difficult to identify if it is not clinically considered in the preoperative period, and this pathology may lead to an acute abdomen. We present the characteristic computed tomography findings and clinical particulars in a 34-year-old male patient with longstanding left inguinal hernia associated with an extraordinary diagnosis. PMID:23206629

  6. Fusion of intraoperative cortical images with preoperative models for neurosurgical planning and guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, An; Mirsattari, Seyed M.; Parrent, Andrew G.; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    During surgery for epilepsy it is important for the surgeon to correlate the preoperative cortical morphology (from preoperative images) with the intraoperative environment. We extend our visualization method presented earlier, to achieves this goal by fusing a direct (photographic) view of the surgical field with the 3D patient model. To correlate the preoperative plan with the intraoperative surgical scene, an intensity-based perspective 3D-2D registration was employed for camera pose estimation. The 2D photographic image was then texture-mapped onto the 3D preoperative model using the solved camera pose. In the proposed method, we employ direct volume rendering to obtain a perspective view of the brain image using GPU-accelerated ray-casting. This is advantageous compared to the point-based or other feature-based registration since no intermediate processing is required. To validate our registration algorithm, we used a point-based 3D-2D registration, that was validated using ground truth from simulated data, and then the intensity-based 3D-2D registration method was validated using the point-based registration result as the gold standard. The registration error of the intensity-based 3D- 2D method was around 3mm when the initial pose is close to the gold standard. Application of the proposed method for correlating fMRI maps with intraoperative cortical stimulation is shown for surgical planning in an epilepsy patient.

  7. Preoperative cognitive impairment and psychological distress in hospitalized elderly hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Daiello, Lori A; Lareau, Craig R; Robidoux, Kathryn A; Luo, Wylie; Ott, Brian; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-07-01

    We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the prevalence of cognitive impairment (CI) in elderly inpatients awaiting surgery for hip fracture, and to compare CI and normal cognition (NC) patients with respect to preoperative pain, fear, and anxiety. The study included patients who were older than 65 years when admitted to a hospital after acute hip fracture. Preoperative assessment involved use of Confusion Assessment Method-Short Form, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), visual analog scales for anxiety and fear, and Wong-Baker Faces Pain Scale. Patients with delirium were excluded from the study. Patients with CI and NC, as determined by MoCA score, were compared for each assessment. Of the 65 hip fracture patients enrolled, 62 had evaluable cognitive data. Of these 62 patients, 23 (37.1%) had NC (MoCA score, ≥ 23) and 39 (62.9%) had CI (MoCA score, < 23). Only 5 (7.7%) of the 65 patients had a documented diagnosis of CI or dementia at time of hospitalization. Mean preoperative pain scores were significantly (P < .001) higher for CI patients (5.3) than for NC patients (2.8). Our study results showed that many elderly hip fracture patients had unrecognized CI before surgery, and CI patients had significantly more pain than NC patients did. Appropriate identification of preoperative CI and treatment of pain are crucial in optimizing patient outcomes. PMID:25046191

  8. Preoperative and perioperative use of levosimendan in cardiac surgery: European expert opinion.

    PubMed

    Toller, W; Heringlake, M; Guarracino, F; Algotsson, L; Alvarez, J; Argyriadou, H; Ben-Gal, T; Černý, V; Cholley, B; Eremenko, A; Guerrero-Orriach, J L; Järvelä, K; Karanovic, N; Kivikko, M; Lahtinen, P; Lomivorotov, V; Mehta, R H; Mušič, Š; Pollesello, P; Rex, S; Riha, H; Rudiger, A; Salmenperä, M; Szudi, L; Tritapepe, L; Wyncoll, D; Öwall, A

    2015-04-01

    In cardiac surgery, postoperative low cardiac output has been shown to correlate with increased rates of organ failure and mortality. Catecholamines have been the standard therapy for many years, although they carry substantial risk for adverse cardiac and systemic effects, and have been reported to be associated with increased mortality. On the other hand, the calcium sensitiser and potassium channel opener levosimendan has been shown to improve cardiac function with no imbalance in oxygen consumption, and to have protective effects in other organs. Numerous clinical trials have indicated favourable cardiac and non-cardiac effects of preoperative and perioperative administration of levosimendan. A panel of 27 experts from 18 countries has now reviewed the literature on the use of levosimendan in on-pump and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting and in heart valve surgery. This panel discussed the published evidence in these various settings, and agreed to vote on a set of questions related to the cardioprotective effects of levosimendan when administered preoperatively, with the purpose of reaching a consensus on which patients could benefit from the preoperative use of levosimendan and in which kind of procedures, and at which doses and timing should levosimendan be administered. Here, we present a systematic review of the literature to report on the completed and ongoing studies on levosimendan, including the newly commenced LEVO-CTS phase III study (NCT02025621), and on the consensus reached on the recommendations proposed for the use of preoperative levosimendan. PMID:25734940

  9. Child Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... go to the caregiver's home. Finally, there are child care centers. You need to choose the one that works for your family. It is important to get to know your child's caregivers. They will be a big part of ...

  10. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... term inpatient or respite care related to the terminal diagnosis. You can stop hospice at any time. ... http: / / www. hospicefoundation. org/ uploads/ hic_ fs_ hospice. pdf Additional Resource for Veterans: VA Guide to Long ...

  11. Integrated care

    PubMed Central

    Gröne, Oliver; Garcia-Barbero, Mila

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The WHO European Office for Integrated Health Care Services in Barcelona is an integral part of the World Health Organizations' Regional Office for Europe. The main purpose of the Barcelona office is within the integration of services to encourage and facilitate changes in health care services in order to promote health and improve management and patient satisfaction by working for quality, accessibility, cost-effectiveness and participation. This position paper outlines the need for Integrated Care from a European perspective, provides a theoretical framework for the meaning of Integrated Care and its strategies and summarizes the programmes of the office that will support countries in the WHO European Region to improve health services. PMID:16896400

  12. Multidisciplinary Care.

    PubMed

    Daly, Megan E; Riess, Jonathan W

    2016-01-01

    Optimal multidisciplinary care of the lung cancer patient at all stages should encompass integration of the key relevant medical specialties, including not only medical, surgical, and radiation oncology, but also pulmonology, interventional and diagnostic radiology, pathology, palliative care, and supportive services such as physical therapy, case management, smoking cessation, and nutrition. Multidisciplinary management starts at staging and tissue diagnosis with pathologic and molecular phenotyping, extends through selection of a treatment modality or modalities, management of treatment and cancer-related symptoms, and to survivorship and end-of-life care. Well-integrated multidisciplinary care may reduce treatment delays, improve cancer-specific outcomes, and enhance quality of life. We address key topics and areas of ongoing investigation in multidisciplinary decision making at each stage of the lung cancer treatment course for early-stage, locally advanced, and metastatic lung cancer patients. PMID:27535399

  13. Prenatal Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... you and your baby healthy. It lets your health care provider spot health problems early. Early treatment can cure ... you are over 35 years old or your pregnancy is high risk because of health problems like ...

  14. Pregnancy care

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy ( gestational diabetes ) High blood pressure during pregnancy ( preeclampsia ). Your doctor will talk with you about how to care for yourself if you have preeclampsia . Premature or preterm changes in the cervix Problems ...

  15. Observational study of patient and surgeon preoperative preparation in ten companion animal clinics in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a recognized risk of any surgical procedure in veterinary medicine. One of the keys to prevention of SSIs is reducing exposure of the surgical site to endogenous and exogenous microbes, beginning in the preoperative period. While guidelines are available for preoperative preparation procedures, there has been no objective investigation of compliance with these recommendations in veterinary practices. The objectives of this pilot study were to describe preoperative patient and surgeon preparation practices in a sample of non-equine companion animal veterinary clinics, and to determine if there were any areas that consistently did not meet current guidelines. Results Observation of preparation practices was performed in 10 clinics over 9–14 days each using up to 3 small wireless surveillance cameras. Data were coded for 148 surgical patients, and 31 surgeons performing 190 preoperative preparations. When patient hair removal was observed, it was most commonly done using clippers (117/133, 88%), and in only one case was it performed prior to anesthetic induction. Patient contact time with soap ranged from 10-462 s (average of clinic means 75 s, average of clinic medians 67 s), and with alcohol from 3-220 s (average of clinic means 44 s, average of clinic medians 37 s). Alcohol-based hand rub (AHR) was used preoperatively in 2/10 facilities, but soap-and-water hand scrub was most commonly used at all clinics. Proximal-to-distal scrubbing was noted in 95/142 (67%) of soap-and-water scrubs. Contact time during surgeon hand preparation ranged from 7-529 s (average mean 121 s, average median 122 s) for soap-and-water and from 4-123 s (average mean 25 s, average median 19 s) for AHR. No significant changes in practices were identified over time during the observation period. Practices that did not conform to guidelines available in major companion animal surgical textbooks were commonly observed. Conclusions Some

  16. Clinical impact of preoperative endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Hideharu; Hara, Kazuo; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hijioka, Susumu; Imaoka, Hiroshi; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasumasa; Sasaki, Yutaka; Yamao, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To reveal the impact of preoperative endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 242 patients who underwent surgery for PDAC at our institution between January 1996 and July 2012. Among them, there were three patients with R2 resection and 30 patients with a follow-up period of less than 1 year, who were excluded because they did not meet the conditions for evaluating recurrence. Consequently, 209 patients were enrolled in the present study. The patients were divided into two groups: 126 patients who underwent preoperative EUS-FNA (FNA group) and 83 patients who did not (non-FNA group) undergo preoperative EUS-FNA. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between FNA and non-FNA groups except mean age (66.6 ± 8.9 years vs. 63.5 ± 8.9 years, respectively, P = 0.02) and the administration rate of gemcitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy (42.9% vs. 18.1%, P < 0.01). Sampling adequacy of preoperative EUS-FNA was 99.2% (125/126) and sensitivity for diagnosis was 92.9% (117/126). The rate of complications related to EUS-FNA was 1.6% (2/126); two patients experienced reduction in hemoglobin (≥2.0 g/dL). These two patients did not have any apparent bleeding and could be managed conservatively. No severe complications were seen. We evaluated long-term outcomes of preoperative EUS-FNA, especially disease-free survival, needle-track seeding and recurrence. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated no significant difference in disease-free survival between the two groups (P = 0.12). The site of recurrence was not significantly different between groups. Needle-track seeding was not observed in this study. Multivariate analysis of recurrence factors showed that preoperative EUS-FNA did not affect postoperative recurrence. Conclusion: Preoperative EUS-FNA for PDAC was shown to be a safe procedure with high diagnostic ability, and not a risk

  17. Discordance Between Preoperative and Postoperative Bladder Cancer Location: Implications for Partial-Bladder Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Tucker, Kai; Conway, Robert Greg; He, Jiwei; Guzzo, Thomas; Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: There is strong interest in partial-bladder radiation whether as a boost or definitive therapy to limit long-term toxicity. It is unclear that a standard preoperative examination can accurately identify all sites of disease within the bladder. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between preoperative localization of bladder tumors with postoperative findings to facilitate partial-bladder radiation techniques when appropriate. Methods and Materials: We examined patients with clinically staged T1-T4 invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) or TCC with variant histology with no history of radiation or partial cystectomy undergoing radical cystectomy. Patients were scored as “under-detected” if a bladder site was involved with invasive disease (≥T1) at the time of cystectomy, but not identified preoperatively. Patients were additionally scored as “widely under-detected” if they had postoperative lesions that were not identified preoperatively in a given site, nor in any adjacent site. Rates of under-detected and widely under-detected lesions, as well as univariate and multivariate association between clinical variables and under-detection, were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: Among 222 patients, 96% (213/222) had at least 1 area of discordance. Fifty-eight percent of patients were under-detected in at least 1 location, whereas 12% were widely under-detected. Among 24 patients with a single site of disease on preoperative evaluation, 21/24 (88%) had at least 1 under-detected lesion and 14/24 (58%) were widely under-detected. On multivariate analysis, only solitary site of preoperative disease was associated with increased levels of under-detection of invasive disease (OR = 4.161, 95% CI, 1.368-12.657). Conclusion: Our study shows a stark discordance between preoperative and postoperative localization of bladder tumors. From a clinical perspective, incomplete localization of all sites of disease within the bladder

  18. Caring Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism may seem to not care about things or have the same range of emotions as those of us who see them and care for them. But they do have empathy and they can be taught how to communicate it, says the author, a teacher of children with autism. We simply need to listen to them, watch them, and be with them in their moment.

  19. [Preconception care].

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chao-Hua; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2008-12-01

    Healthy mothers and children are the hope and dream of every country. Evidence shows that promoting health in women and couples before pregnancy can promote the health of their offspring. Hence, comprehensive healthcare for women should start before pregnancy (i.e., preconception care). Such represents an effective strategy to lessen adverse maternal and infant health outcomes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States established in 2004 a working group to convene conferences addressing preconception care issues, which has since held two summit conferences (in 2005 and 2007) to develop recommendations and guidelines for improving preconception health and care. A new consensus on reproductive health promotion and protection as emerged. Preconception care, the primary preventive approach for women of reproductive age, works to identify and modify biomedical, behavioral, and social risks through preventive and management interventions. No national policy for preconception care currently exists in Taiwan. Hence, it is important to coordinate different resources related to preconception care available through schools, workplaces, outpatient service centers, families and the community in order to establish a uniform national policy and intervention programs that will further enhance the health of women and children in Taiwan. PMID:19051168

  20. Clinical and prognostic value of preoperative hydronephrosis in upper tract urothelial carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Background. Epidemiological studies have reported various results relating preoperative hydronephrosis to upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). However, the clinical significance and prognostic value of preoperative hydronephrosis in UTUC remains controversial. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of the extent of the possible association between preoperative hydronephrosis and the risk of UTUC. Methods. We searched PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Embase to identify eligible studies written in English. Summary odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using fixed-effects or random-effects models. Results. Nineteen relevant studies, which had a total of 5,782 UTUC patients enrolled, were selected for statistical analysis. The clinicopathological and prognostic relevance of preoperative hydronephrosis was evaluated in the UTUC patients. The results showed that all tumor stages, lymph node status and tumor location, as well as the risk of cancer-specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS) and metastasis-free survival (MFS) were significantly different between UTUC patients with elevated preoperative hydronephrosis and those with low preoperative hydronephrosis. High preoperative hydronephrosis indicated a poor prognosis. Additionally, significant correlations between preoperative hydronephrosis and tumor grade (high grade vs. low grade) were observed in UTUC patients; however, no significant difference was observed for tumor grading (G1 vs. G2 + G3 and G1 + G2 vs. G3). In contrast, no such correlations were evident for recurrence status or gender in UTUC patients. Conclusions. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that preoperative hydronephrosis is associated with increased risk and poor survival in UTUC patients. The presence of preoperative hydronephrosis plays an important role in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of UTUC. PMID:27366646

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase CB association with preoperative radiotherapy response in rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Dong; Peng, Yi-Fan; Pan, Hong-Da; Wang, Lin; Li, Kun; Gu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine the correlation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PIK3) CB expression with preoperative radiotherapy response in patients with stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: PIK3CB immunoexpression was retrospectively assessed in pretreatment biopsies from 208 patients with clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma, who underwent radical surgery after 30-Gy/10-fraction preoperative radiotherapy. The relation between PIK3CB expression and tumor regression grade, clinicopathological characteristics, and survival time was statistically analyzed. Western blotting and in vitro clonogenic formation assay were used to detect PIK3CB expression in four colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT116, HT29, LoVo, and LS174T) treated with 6-Gy ionizing radiation. Pharmacological assays were used to evaluate the therapeutic relevance of TGX-221 (a PIK3CB-specific inhibitor) in the four colorectal cancer cell lines. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical staining indicated that PIK3CB was more abundant in rectal adenocarcinoma tissues with poor response to preoperative radiotherapy. High expression of PIK3CB was closely correlated with tumor height (P < 0.05), ypT stage (P < 0.05), and high-degree tumor regression grade (P < 0.001). High expression of PIK3CB was a potential prognostic factor for local recurrence-free survival (P < 0.05) and metastasis-free survival (P < 0.05). High expression of PIK3CB was also associated with poor therapeutic response and adverse outcomes in rectal adenocarcinoma patients treated with 30-Gy/10-fraction preoperative radiotherapy. In vitro, PIK3CB expression was upregulated in all four colorectal cancer cell lines concurrently treated with 6-Gy ionizing radiation, and the PIK3CB-specific inhibitor TGX-221 effectively inhibited the clonogenic formation of these four colorectal cancer cell lines. CONCLUSION: PIK3CB is critically involved in response to preoperative radiotherapy and may serve as a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25473181

  2. Preoperative planning of primary total hip arthroplasty using conventional radiographs☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Miashiro, Edson Hidenori; Fujiki, Edson Noboru; Yamaguchi, Eduardo Nagashigue; Chikude, Takeshi; Rodrigues, Luiz Henrique Silveira; Fontes, Gustavo Martins; Rosa, Fausto Boccatto

    2014-01-01

    Objective the objective of this study was to present an analog method for preoperative planning of primary total hip arthroplasty procedures based on measuring the components by overlaying the transparencies of the prosthesis on the preoperative radiographs and checking the accuracy, both for predicting the size of the acetabular and femoral components used and for restoring the offset and correcting the dysmetria. Methods between March 2005 and July 2009, 56 primary total hip arthroplasty procedures performed on 56 patients at the Mario Covas State Hospital in Santo André were analyzed. The measurements on the femoral and acetabular components obtained through planning were compared with those that were used in the surgery. The offsets measured through the preoperative planning were compared with those measured on the postoperative radiographs. Dysmetria was evaluated before and after the operation. Results accuracy of 78.6% (p < 0.001) in predicting the size of the acetabular component and 82.2% (p < 0.001) in predicting the femoral nail was observed. The offsets measured through preoperative planning were statistically similar to the offsets measured on the postoperative radiographs. After the operation, we observed absolute equalization in 48.2% of the cases. In 87.5%, the dysmetria was less than or equal to 1 cm and in 69.6%, it was less than or equal to 0.5 cm. Conclusions the accuracy was 78.6% and 82.2%, respectively, for the acetabular and femoral components. The offsets that were planned preoperatively were statistically similar to those measured on postoperative radiographs. We found absolute equalization in 48.2% of the cases. PMID:26229790

  3. The effect of skin surface warming on pre-operative anxiety in neurosurgery patients.

    PubMed

    Kimberger, O; Illievich, U; Lenhardt, R

    2007-02-01

    Skin surface warming of patients not only improves thermal comfort, but has been shown to reduce anxiety in a pre-hospital setting. We tested the hypothesis that pre-operative warming can reduce pre-operative anxiety as effectively as a conventional dose of intravenous midazolam in patients undergoing neurosurgery. We randomly allocated 80 patients to four groups in the pre-operative holding area. Treatment was applied for 30-45 min with (1) passive insulation and placebo; (2) passive insulation and intravenous midazolam (30 microg.kg-1); (3) warming with forced-air and placebo; and (4) warming with forced-air and intravenous midazolam (30 microg.kg-1). Thermal comfort levels (VAS 0-100 mm) and anxiety levels (VAS 0-100 mm, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) were assessed twice: before the designated treatment was started and before induction of anaesthesia. In the midazolam and the midazolam/warming groups, anxiety VAS and Spielberger state anxiety scores decreased by -19 (95% CI: -29 to -9, p<0.01) and -10 (95% CI: -14 to -6, p<0.01), respectively. In the warming and the combined groups, thermal VAS increased by +26 (95% CI: 17-34, p<0.01). Pre-operative warming did not reduce anxiety VAS (p=0.11) or Spielberger state anxiety (p=0.19). The results of our study indicate that pre-operative warming can be recommended solely to improve thermal comfort, not to replace anxiolytic premedication regimens. PMID:17223806

  4. Texture Analysis of Preoperative CT Images for Prediction of Postoperative Hepatic Insufficiency: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Amber L; Adams, Lauryn B; Allen, Peter J; D’Angelica, Michael I; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Fong, Yuman; Kingham, T Peter; Leung, Universe; Miga, Michael I; Parada, E Patricia; Jarnagin, William R; Do, Richard K G

    2015-01-01

    Background Texture analysis is a promising method of analyzing imaging data to potentially enhance diagnostic capability. This approach involves automated measurement of pixel intensity variation that may offer further insight into disease progression than standard imaging techniques alone. We postulate that postoperative liver insufficiency, a major source of morbidity and mortality, correlates with preoperative heterogeneous parenchymal enhancement that can be quantified with texture analysis of cross-sectional imaging. Study Design A retrospective case-matched study (waiver of informed consent and HIPAA authorization, approved by the institutional review board) was performed comparing patients who underwent major hepatic resection and developed liver insufficiency (n=12) to a matched group of patients with no postoperative liver insufficiency (n=24) by procedure, remnant volume, and year of procedure. Texture analysis (with gray-level co-occurrence matrices) was used to quantify the heterogeneity of liver parenchyma on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Statistical significance was evaluated using Wilcoxon’s signed rank and Pearson’s chi-squared tests. Results No statistically significant differences were found between study groups for preoperative patient demographics and clinical characteristics, with the exception of gender (p<0.05). Two texture features differed significantly between the groups: correlation (linear dependency of gray levels on neighboring pixels) and entropy (randomness of brightness variation) (p<0.05). Conclusions In this preliminary study, the texture of liver parenchyma on preoperative CT, was significantly more varied, less symmetric, and less homogeneous in patients with postoperative liver insufficiency; thus texture analysis has the potential to provide an additional means of preoperative risk stratification. PMID:25537305

  5. PRE-OPERATIVE HEALTH STATUS AND OUTCOMES FOLLOWING CONTINUOUS-FLOW LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE IMPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Kelsey M.; Matlock, Daniel D.; Sundareswaran, Kartik; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Spertus, John A.; Farrar, David J.; Allen, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Health status predicts adverse outcomes in heart failure and cardiac surgery patients, but its prognostic value in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) placement is unknown. Methods We examined the association of pre-operative health status, as measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ), with survival and hospitalization after LVAD using KCCQ as a continuous variable and stratified by KCCQ score quartile plus missing KCCQ in 1125 clinical trial participants receiving the HeartMate II as either destination therapy (n=635) or bridge to transplantation (n=490). Results Mean pre-operative KCCQ score was 29.4±18.7 among survivors (n=719), and 27.1±18.3 (n=406) in those who died. In time-to-event analysis for all available follow up using health status as a continuous variable, pre-operative KCCQ score did not correlate with overall mortality after LVAD implantation (p=0.178). Small absolute differences were seen between pre-operative KCCQ quartile and 30-day survival (Q4 95% vs. Q1 89% vs. missing 87%; p=0.0009 for trend), 180-day survival (Q4 83% vs. Q1 76% vs. missing 79%; p=0.060 for trend), and days hospitalized at 180 days (Q4 29.8±25.6 vs. Q1 34.1±27.1 vs. missing 36.5±29.9; p=0.009 for trend). Conclusion Our findings suggest that pre-operative health status has limited association with outcomes after LVAD implantation. Although these data require further study in a diverse population, mechanical circulatory support may represent a relatively unique clinical situation, distinct from heart failure and other cardiac surgeries, in which heart failure-specific health status measures may be largely reversed. PMID:24119729

  6. Preoperative therapy restores ventilatory parameters and reduces length of stay in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira Sobrinho, Moises; Guirado, Gabriel Negretti; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The frequency of surgical procedures has increased steadily in recent decades, including the myocardial revascularization. Objectives To demonstrate the importance of physiotherapy in the preoperative period of cardiac surgery in relation to the reduction of hospital stay, changes in lung volumes and respiratory muscle strength. Methods We conducted a prospective study with patients undergoing myocardial revascularization, the Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP)/Botucatu - SP. We evaluated 70 patients of both genders, aged between 40 and 75 years, subdivided into two groups: group I - 35 patients of both genders, who received a written protocol guidance, breathing exercises and respiratory muscle training in the preoperative period and group II - 35 patients of both genders, who received only orientation of the ward on the day of surgery. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of UNESP / Botucatu - SP. Results Maximal inspiratory pressure in third postoperative day and fifth postoperative day and significant difference between groups, being better for the intervention group. Expiratory pressure was significant in fifth postoperative day in the intervention group compared to controls. The difference of length of hospital stay in the postoperative was found between the groups with shorter hospital stay in the group receiving preoperative therapy. Conclusion Physical therapy plays an important role in the preoperative period, so that individuals in the intervention group more readily restored the parameters evaluated before surgery, in addition, there was a decrease in the time of the postoperative hospital stay. Thus, it is thought the cost-effectiveness of a program of preoperative physiotherapy. PMID:25140472

  7. Positive Surgical Margins in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treated With Preoperative Radiation: Is a Postoperative Boost Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Al Yami, Ali; Griffin, Anthony M.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Catton, Charles N.; Chung, Peter W.M.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: For patients with an extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) treated with preoperative radiotherapy and surgically excised with positive margins, we retrospectively reviewed whether a postoperative radiation boost reduced the risk of local recurrence (LR). Methods and Materials: A total of 216 patients with positive margins after resection of an extremity STS treated between 1986 and 2003 were identified from our institution's prospectively collected database. Patient demographics, radiation therapy parameters including timing and dose, classification of positive margin status, reasons for not administering a postoperative boost, and oncologic outcome were collected and evaluated. Results: Of the 216 patients with a positive surgical margin, 52 patients were treated with preoperative radiation therapy alone (50 Gy), whereas 41 received preoperative radiation therapy plus a postoperative boost (80% received 16 Gy postoperatively for a total of 66 Gy). There was no difference in baseline tumor characteristics between the two groups. Six of 52 patients in the group receiving preoperative radiation alone developed a LR compared with 9 of 41 in the boost group. Five-year estimated LR-free survivals were 90.4% and 73.8%, respectively (p = 0.13). Conclusions: We found that including the postoperative radiation boost after preoperative radiation and a margin-positive excision did not provide an advantage in preventing LR for patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. Given that higher radiation doses placed patients at greater risk for late complications such as fracture, fibrosis, edema, and joint stiffness, judicious avoidance of the postoperative boost while maintaining an equivalent rate of local control can reduce the risk of these difficult-to-treat morbidities.

  8. [Preoperative management for malnourished patients in abdominal surgery. Practical treatment regimen for reduction of perioperative morbidity].

    PubMed

    Khatib-Chahidi, K; Troja, A; Kramer, M; Klompmaker, M; Raab, H-R; Antolovic, D

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of malnutrition in oncological and visceral surgical units can be high. The screening of malnourished patients is very important, especially in the preoperative setting. The available published literature provides crucial knowledge about the risks inherent to malnutrition and subsequent perioperative morbidity and mortality. The preoperative screening of malnourished patients followed by a subsequent renutrition is the key to decreasing rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. The data and guidelines given by the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN) in 2006 for the preoperative nutritional conditioning are clear and give no doubt regarding the necessity of preparation of malnourished patients for elective abdominal surgery. Despite this fact, the observance and application of these guidelines among German surgical units remain low. To fill this void a model of systematic screening and treatment of malnutrition in the preoperative setting for elective abdominal surgery was created and implemented at the university hospital of Oldenburg. A practical treatment regimen was designed to prepare malnourished patients within 2-3 weeks before elective surgery. Initial results regarding the feasibility of preoperative home renutrition therapy were moderate but encouraging. The success of such a conditioning process depends on cooperation between the surgical unit, the general practitioner (GP) and the homecare environment. In the German healthcare system the prescription of home nutrition (i.e. enteral feeding) can lead to the prescription limits of a GP being exceeded and has to be justified to the medical insurance company in each case. This article presents a simple yet applicable way of screening and preparing malnourished patients a few weeks prior to elective surgery. Therefore, simple tools which can be promptly used in daily clinical life, especially in the outpatient surgical consultations prior to elective visceral

  9. The preoperative intraocular pressure level predicts the amount of underestimated intraocular pressure after LASIK for myopia

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, E; Takahashi, H; Okazaki, K; Park, M; Tanito, M

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the statistical significance of the parameters that affect underestimation of intraocular pressure (IOP) after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia. Methods: In this prospective case series study, patient age, axial length, preoperative corneal curvature, preoperative central corneal thickness (CCT), preoperative IOP, and ablation depth were studied to determine whether they affect the underestimation of IOP in the right eyes of 100 consecutive patients who underwent LASIK. Results: The preoperative IOP was the most important parameter for an amount of underestimated Goldmann applanation tonometric IOP (GAT) and non-contact tonometric IOP (ncIOP) at 1 month (r = 0.654, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.427, and r = 0.694, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.481, respectively) and 3 months (r = 0.637, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.406, and r = 0.726, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.527, respectively). Patient age was statistically significant for underestimating the GAT at 1 month, and both the ablation depth and CCT were statistically significant parameters for underestimating the ncIOP at 1 month and at 3 months by stepwise multiple regression analysis (F>4.000). However, these parameters had small bivariate correlation coefficients, and were considered as minor parameters. Conclusion: Preoperative IOP is the most important parameter that affects an underestimation of IOP after LASIK for myopia. Eyes with a higher true IOP have a larger underestimation of the IOP after LASIK for myopia. From these results, the importance of the modulus of elasticity on IOP measurements was discussed. PMID:15665345

  10. Usefulness of Preoperative Assessment of Perigastric Vascular Anatomy by Dynamic Computed Tomography for Laparoscopic Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Tomohiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Murakami, Yuki; Miyatani, Kozo; Kuroda, Hirohiko; Matsunaga, Tomoyuki; Fukumoto, Youji; Ikeguchi, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic surgery requires a more detailed understanding of local anatomy than does conventional open surgery. The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of dynamic computed tomography (D-CT) for identification of the location of the left gastric vein (LGV) and existence of the aberrant left hepatic artery (ALHA) compared with conventional enhanced computed tomography (E-CT). Methods Sixty-eight patients underwent laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy (LAG). E-CT and D-CT were performed in 32 and 36 patients, respectively, and three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (3D-CTA) was performed in addition to D-CT. The location of the LGV and existence of the ALHA were confirmed during LAG, and these results were compared with those determined preoperatively by CT imaging. Results The location of the LGV as detected by preoperative E-CT and D-CT was consistent with that identified during LAG in 28 (87.5%) and 31 (88.9%) patients, respectively, with no statistical differences. The existence of the ALHA as detected by preoperative E-CT and D-CT was consistent with that identified during gastrectomy in 24 (75%) and 36 (100%) patients, respectively, with a statistical difference (P = 0.005). Furthermore, the type of ALHA could be identified in 10 of 12 patients (83.3%) by D-CT. Conclusion D-CT can produce excellent images of the vascular supply, and thus undoubtedly contributes to the preoperative planning of LAG. Preoperative D-CT might be an informative tool with which to help overcome the disadvantages of LAG. PMID:26740734

  11. Transcutaneous Oximetry May Predict Wound Healing Complications In Preoperatively Radiated Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nystrom, Lukas M; Miller, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Background Preoperative radiation is frequently used in management of soft tissue sarcoma. We hypothesize that anoxic tissue from preoperative radiation contributes to surgical wound complications and that transcutaneous oximetry (TcO2) measurements made preoperatively can predict wounds at risk. Methods Ten consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled. TcO2 was recorded at five time points. Wound complications (defined as major or minor) and healing outcomes were recorded out to 120 days postoperatively. Means between groups with and without wound complications were compared by use of a Student’s t-test (p < 0.05). Results There were three major and one minor wound complication. During the time from radiation to surgery, patients with wound complications had a 13.1 mmHg decrease in mean TcO2 while those who healed uneventfully had an increase of 2.3 mm Hg (p=0.09). Patients with complications had a low preoperative TcO2 of 18.7 mmHg compared to those without complications (18.7 vs. 33.4 mmHg; p=0.09). No patient with a TcO2 greater than 25 mmHg immediately preoperatively developed a wound complication. Conclusions This data suggests an earlier recovery of tissue oxygenation in patients that healed without complication. The TcO2 measurement immediately preceding surgery seems to be the most important in predicting wound complications. Larger scale investigation may determine if TcO2 measurement is a viable clinical tool to aid in risk assessment for potential wound complications. PMID:27528847

  12. Prognostic Significance of Preoperative Albumin-Globulin Ratio in Patients with Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li-Qun; He, Zhi-Song; Shen, Cheng; He, Qun; Li, Jun; Liu, Li-Bo; Wang, Cong; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Fan, Yu; Hu, Shuai; Zhang, Lei; Han, Wen-Ke; Jin, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative albumin-globulin ratio (AGR) reflects both malnutrition and systemic inflammation in cancer patients. In particular, systemic inflammation has been reported to contribute to tumor progression and poor oncological outcome in various malignancies. However, the prognostic value of preoperative AGR in upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) has not been examined. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical data of 187 operable UTUC patients in a Chinese cohort with a high incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). AGR was calculated as [AGR = albumin/(serum total protein—albumin)]. The associations of preoperative AGR with clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis were assessed. Multivariate analyses using Cox regression models were performed to determine the independent prognostic factors. Results The median (IQR) preoperative AGR was 1.50 (1.30–1.70), and the optimal cutoff value was determined to be 1.45 according to the receiver operating curve analysis. Low AGR was significantly associated with female gender, high CKD stage and tumor grade (P < 0.05). Eighty-three patients died before the follow-up endpoint. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that an AGR < 1.45 predicted significantly poorer overall and cancer-specific survivals compared to an AGR ≥ 1.45 (P < 0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively). Multivariate analyses showed that an AGR < 1.45 was an independent risk factor for poorer overall and cancer-specific survivals (P = 0.002 and P = 0.015, respectively). Conclusions Preoperative AGR can act as an effective biomarker with easy accessibility for evaluating the prognosis of patients with UTUC. AGR should be applied in UTUC patients for risk stratification and determination of optimal therapeutic regimens. PMID:26681341

  13. Preoperative physiotherapy and short-term functional outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Mohd Shukry Mat Eil @; Sharifudin, Mohd Ariff; Shokri, Amran Ahmed; Rahman, Shaifuzain Ab

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Physiotherapy is an important part of rehabilitation following arthroplasty, but the impact of preoperative physiotherapy on functional outcomes is still being studied. This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of preoperative physiotherapy on the short-term functional outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS 50 patients with primary knee osteoarthritis who underwent unilateral primary TKA were randomised into two groups: the physiotherapy group (n = 24), whose patients performed physical exercises for six weeks immediately prior to surgery, and the nonphysiotherapy group (n = 26). All patients went through a similar physiotherapy regime in the postoperative rehabilitation period. Functional outcome assessment using the algofunctional Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) scale and range of motion (ROM) evaluation was performed preoperatively, and postoperatively at six weeks and three months. RESULTS Both groups showed a significant difference in all algofunctional KOOS subscales (p < 0.001). The mean score difference at six weeks and three months was not significant in the sports and recreational activities subscale for both groups (p > 0.05). Significant differences were observed in the time-versus-treatment analysis between groups for the symptoms (p = 0.003) and activities of daily living (p = 0.025) subscales. No significant difference in ROM was found when comparing preoperative measurements and those at three months following surgery, as well as in time-versus-treatment analysis (p = 0.928). CONCLUSION Six-week preoperative physiotherapy showed no significant impact on short-term functional outcomes (KOOS subscales) and ROM of the knee following primary TKA. PMID:26996450

  14. Update on three-dimensional image reconstruction for preoperative simulation in thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) technologies have been developed and refined over time. Recently, high-speed and high-quality 3D-CT technologies have also been introduced to the field of thoracic surgery. The purpose of this manuscript is to demonstrate several examples of these 3D-CT technologies in various scenarios in thoracic surgery. Methods A newly-developed high-speed and high-quality 3D image analysis software system was used in Kyoto University Hospital. Simulation and/or navigation were performed using this 3D-CT technology in various thoracic surgeries. Results Preoperative 3D-CT simulation was performed in most patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Anatomical variation was frequently detected preoperatively, which was useful in performing VATS procedures when using only a monitor for vision. In sublobar resection, 3D-CT simulation was more helpful. In small lung lesions, which were supposedly neither visible nor palpable, preoperative marking of the lesions was performed using 3D-CT simulation, and wedge resection or segmentectomy was successfully performed with confidence. This technique also enabled virtual-reality endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS), which made the procedure more safe and reliable. Furthermore, in living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT), surgical procedures for donor lobectomy were simulated preoperatively by 3D-CT angiography, which also affected surgical procedures for recipient surgery. New surgical techniques such as right and left inverted LDLLT were also established using 3D models created with this technique. Conclusions After the introduction of 3D-CT technology to the field of thoracic surgery, preoperative simulation has been developed for various thoracic procedures. In the near future, this technique will become more common in thoracic surgery, and frequent use by thoracic surgeons will be seen in worldwide daily practice. PMID:27014477

  15. Preoperative Urinary Retention Increased the Risk of Urinary Retention after Photoselective Vaporization of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Yong; Ro, Yun Kwan; Kim, Hwanik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate preoperative acute urinary retention (AUR) as a factor affecting the outcomes of patients who underwent photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP), both in terms of overall effectiveness and the postoperative incidence of AUR. Materials and Methods Baseline prostate characteristics were obtained for patients who underwent PVP, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, transrectal ultrasound findings, voiding diary parameters, the International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), and uroflowmetry parameters. These parameters were assessed two weeks, one month, three months, six months, and three years postoperatively. Subjects were divided into AUR and non-AUR groups based on the preoperative occurrence of AUR. Results Of the 476 patients, 91 had at least one episode of preoperative AUR. The AUR group was found to be significantly older and to have significantly higher PSA levels, lower body mass indices, and larger prostates. At one year of follow-up, the total IPSS was 7.6±6.8 in the AUR group and 11.4±8.2 in the non-AUR group, with the AUR group showing a more significant improvement. In the non-AUR group, 17 of the 385 patients (4.4%) experienced postoperative retention, compared to 16 of the 91 patients (17.6%) patients in the AUR group. Conclusions Almost all patients exhibited improvements in subjective and objective voiding parameters following PVP, regardless of the presence of preoperative urinary retention. Patients with a preoperative history of AUR had a higher risk of postoperative retention. PMID:26770938

  16. Integrating Palliative Care into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Rosemary D

    2016-09-01

    Improved quality of life, care consistent with patient goals of care, and decreased health care spending are benefits of palliative care. Palliative care is appropriate for anyone with a serious illness. Advances in technology and pharmaceuticals have resulted in increasing numbers of seriously ill individuals, many with a high symptom burden. The numbers of individuals who could benefit from palliative care far outweighs the number of palliative care specialists. To integrate palliative care into primary care it is essential that resources are available to improve generalist palliative care skills, identify appropriate patients and refer complex patients to specialist palliative care providers. PMID:27497014

  17. Foster Care and Medicaid Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Kelleher, Kelly J.; Burns, Barbara J.; Landsverk, John; Rolls, Jennifer A.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews issues surrounding the delivery of managed health care services to children in foster care. Details the unique characteristics of children in foster care, including limited medical histories upon entry into foster care, multiple health care needs, lack of a clearly identified medical care coordinator, and frequent placement changes.…

  18. Preferences for health care involvement, perceived control and surgical recovery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mahler, H I; Kulik, J A

    1990-01-01

    In a sample (N = 75) of coronary bypass patients, we examined the manner in which preoperative perceptions of personal control over recovery, desires for behavioral involvement in health care, and desires for information about health care predicted recovery in the hospital. Results indicated that preoperative control beliefs and desires for health care involvement predicted independently several important indices of recovery. Specifically, patients who prior to their surgery expressed a greater desire for information tended to experience less surgical pain and more negative psychological reactions. Greater preferences for behavioral involvement were associated with greater pain behavior, more ambulation, and shorter hospital stays. Finally, greater perceived personal control over recovery was associated with a shorter hospital stay. PMID:2244216

  19. Influence of preoperative velar closing ratio and lateral wall movement on outcomes of Furlow palatoplasty for velopharyngeal incompetence

    PubMed Central

    Muzaffar, Arshad R; Rice, Gale; Hubbard, Bradley; Killion, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no consensus regarding how to determine the optimal surgical procedure for a patient with velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI) post-primary palate repair. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of preoperative velar closing ratio (VCR) and lateral wall movement (LWM) on nasal emission and hypernasality after Furlow double-opposing Z-plasty. A retrospective analysis involving patients with VPI post-primary palatoplasty whose VPI was treated with double-opposing Z-plasty by a single surgeon was performed. Ten consecutive patients with VPI postpalatoplasty were reviewed. Videonasendoscopy, videofluoroscopy and perceptual speech examinations were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. VCR improved from an mean of 0.5 preoperatively (range 0.1 to 0.95) to 0.9 postoperatively (range 0.55 to 1.0). Postoperative mean LWM was 0.5 (range 0.3 to 0.9), unchanged from preoperative ratings. A trend toward an inverse relationship between preoperative VCR and improvement in hypernasality and resolution of nasal emission was observed. No relationship was noted between the degree of preoperative LWM and mean improvement in hypernasality. However, patients with worse preoperative LWM experienced better resolution of nasal emission postoperatively. PMID:25535457

  20. Neurointensive care.

    PubMed

    Ralph, J K; Lowes, T

    2009-06-01

    The majority of neurological admissions to military Intensive Care will be for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). These injuries will be either penetrating from fragmentation or missiles or blunt due to blast or impact. Intensive Care management of TBI is focused on the prevention of secondary brain injury due to insults such as hypoxia, hypotension and low Cerebral Perfusion Pressure. This management is based largely on comprehensive evidence based guidelines produced by the Brain Trauma Foundation. The most significant dilemma faced by UK military intensivists is whether we should be measuring Intracranial Pressure in patient with severe TBI in the deployed setting; and if so what technique should be used. PMID:20095184

  1. Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve. PMID:26022525

  2. Pre- and Post-Operative Care With Associated Intra-Operative Techniques for Phalloplasty In Female-to-Male Patients.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shane D; Perez, Marcelina G; Carter, Cayden K; Crane, Curtis N

    2015-01-01

    Phalloplasty, or creation of the penis, is one of the steps in gender confirming surgery for a female-to-male patient and for males with absence or malformation of the penis. Here, the most common techniques for phalloplasty, along with the pre-operative and post-operative care are discussed. PMID:26298948

  3. Accelerated care versus standard care among patients with hip fracture: the HIP ATTACK pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: A hip fracture causes bleeding, pain and immobility, and initiates inflammatory, hypercoagulable, catabolic and stress states. Accelerated surgery may improve outcomes by reducing the duration of these states and immobility. We undertook a pilot trial to determine the feasibility of a trial comparing accelerated care (i.e., rapid medical clearance and surgery) and standard care among patients with a hip fracture. Methods: Patients aged 45 years or older who, during weekday, daytime working hours, received a diagnosis of a hip fracture requiring surgery were randomly assigned to receive accelerated or standard care. Our feasibility outcomes included the proportion of eligible patients randomly assigned, completeness of follow-up and timelines of accelerated surgery. The main clinical outcome, assessed by data collectors and adjudicators who were unaware of study group allocations, was a major perioperative complication (i.e., a composite of death, preoperative myocardial infarction, myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, stroke, and life-threatening or major bleeding) within 30 days of randomization. Results: Of patients eligible for inclusion, 80% consented and were randomly assigned to groups (30 to accelerated care and 30 to standard care) at 2 centres in Canada and 1 centre in India. All patients completed 30-day follow-up. The median time from diagnosis to surgery was 6.0 hours in the accelerated care group and 24.2 hours in the standard care group (p < 0.001). A major perioperative complication occurred in 9 (30%) of the patients in the accelerated care group and 14 (47%) of the patients in the standard care group (hazard ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.26–1.39). Interpretation: These results show the feasibility of a trial comparing accelerated and standard care among patients with hip fracture and support a definitive trial. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT01344343. PMID:24246589

  4. Infant Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, A. Frederick

    This new addition of a government pamphlet is a guide offering advice and information to new parents. Sections include: You and Your New Baby (handling the baby, care of the mother, feeding, etc.); First Weeks at Home (equipment, formula preparation, bathing, sleeping, crying, colic, etc.); After the First Weeks (temperament, "difficult" babies,…

  5. Respite Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Rachel; Cohen, Shirley

    1985-01-01

    The article traces the initial development of respite care in the 1970s to a variety of creative urban and rural program models found in the United States by the early 1980s. Implications for advocacy, funding, and further research indicate the growing need for and acceptance of this essential family support system. (Author/CL)

  6. Prenatal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Maternal and Child Health Services.

    This booklet is the first in a series of publications designed to provide parents with useful information about childrearing. Contents are organized into three parts. Part I focuses on the pregnancy, prenatal care, development of the baby, pregnant lifestyles, nutrition, common discomforts, and problems of pregnancy. Part II provides information…

  7. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... support. The goal of the care is to help people who are dying have peace, comfort, and dignity. The caregivers try to control pain and other symptoms so a person can remain as alert and comfortable as possible. Hospice programs also provide services to support a patient's family. Usually, a hospice ...

  8. Image guidance of intracardiac ultrasound with fusion of pre-operative images.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yiyong; Kadoury, Samuel; Li, Yong; John, Matthias; Resnick, Jeff; Plambeck, Gerry; Liao, Rui; Sauer, Frank; Xu, Chenyang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for registering 3D intracardiac echo (ICE) to pre-operative images. A magnetic tracking sensor is integrated on the ICE catheter tip to provide the 3D location and orientation. The user guides the catheter into the patient heart to acquire a series of ultrasound images covering the anatomy of the heart chambers. An automatic intensity-based registration algorithm is applied to align these ultrasound images with pre-operative images. One of the important applications is to help electrophysiology doctors to treat complicated atrial fibrillation cases. After registration, the doctor can see the position and orientation of the ICE catheter and other tracked catheters inside the heart anatomy in real time. The image guidance provided by this technique may increase the ablation accuracy and reduce the amount of time for the electrophysiology procedures. We show successful image registration results from animal experiments. PMID:18051044

  9. Preoperative Testosterone Therapy Prior to Surgical Correction of Hypospadias: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chagani, Sean; Rohl, Austin J

    2016-01-01

    Hypospadias is a congenital anomaly of the male urethra that causes significant morbidity in the pediatric male population. The mainstay of treatment is hypospadias repair surgery. However, given the common co-occurrence of microphallus in these patients, surgery remains difficult without adequate tissue for proper reconstruction of the urethra. The use of preoperative testosterone therapy, parenterally or topically, has been a topic of study for several years in urologic literature. This literature review aims to summarize the different studies that have been conducted to address whether preoperative testosterone therapy is beneficial, inconsequential, or detrimental to the surgical and cosmetic outcomes of hypospadias repair as well as to address the differences in routes of administration. PMID:27551655

  10. Preoperative Testosterone Therapy Prior to Surgical Correction of Hypospadias: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arvind; Chagani, Sean; Rohl, Austin J

    2016-01-01

    Hypospadias is a congenital anomaly of the male urethra that causes significant morbidity in the pediatric male population. The mainstay of treatment is hypospadias repair surgery. However, given the common co-occurrence of microphallus in these patients, surgery remains difficult without adequate tissue for proper reconstruction of the urethra. The use of preoperative testosterone therapy, parenterally or topically, has been a topic of study for several years in urologic literature. This literature review aims to summarize the different studies that have been conducted to address whether preoperative testosterone therapy is beneficial, inconsequential, or detrimental to the surgical and cosmetic outcomes of hypospadias repair as well as to address the differences in routes of administration. PMID:27551655

  11. Pre-operative Identification and Surgical Management of the Appendiceal Mucocele: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Kevin; Cho, Sung; Andres, Robert; Knight, Jennifer; Con, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    An appendiceal mucocele (AM) is an uncommon differential in the patient being evaluated for acute appendicitis. Although often asymptomatic, AMs can clinically mimic acute appendicitis, and preoperative distinction between these processes facilitates optimal management. We report the case of a 60-year-old male with an AM presenting with nausea and periumbilical pain radiating to the right lower quadrant. Literature relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of AMs is reviewed, with emphasis on diagnosis through radiographic imaging and surgical management. Abdominal CT scan or ultrasound are useful in identifying AMs preoperatively. A decision to perform a right hemicolectomy should be influenced by the criteria reported by Gonzalez-Moreno. The safety of the laparoscopic resection relative to an open appendectomy is debated. PMID:27491099

  12. Thallium-pertechnetate subtraction scanning in the preoperative localization of an ectopic undescended parathyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Frydman, James; Bianco, Jesus; Drezner, Marc; Chen, Herbert

    2004-09-01

    Although bilateral exploration is highly effective in the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism, minimally invasive parathyroidectomy has evolved into the procedure of choice when a single parathyroid lesion can be localized preoperatively. In this article, we discuss the utilization of thallium-pertechnetate subtraction scanning (TPSS) after technetium Tc-99m sestamibi scintigraphy failed to localize an ectopic parathyroid adenoma. Subsequently, radioguided resection of an undescended parathyroid adenoma inferior to the left submandibular gland was performed with surgical cure after a single procedure. This case report illustrates the importance of TPSS as a second-line modality in preoperative adenoma localization, thereby using minimally invasive techniques to successfully treat this patient's primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:15311119

  13. Correlating Preoperative Imaging with Histologic Subtypes of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Common Mimickers.

    PubMed

    Gordetsky, Jennifer; Zarzour, Jessica

    2016-07-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of distinct subtypes that have unique pathologic and imaging features as well as specific cytogenetic and molecular characteristics. As the prognosis and therapeutic strategies may differ for each subtype, correlation of the preoperative imaging with the pathologic findings is of great clinical relevance. In addition, differentiation of RCC from benign entities is ideal in order to prevent overtreatment. However, a noninvasive diagnosis with imaging alone is not always straightforward due to the overlapping appearance of RCC with benign lesions such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. With new imaging modalities, there have been significant improvements in correlating preoperative imaging with pathologic characteristics. These new discoveries are able to aid in a more specific, noninvasive, diagnosis that in turn helps direct patient management. PMID:27154238

  14. [The influence of anxiety in coping strategies used during the pre-operative period].

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Veronica Cecilia Calbo; Peniche, Aparecida de Cássia Giani

    2006-03-01

    This study aims at characterizing the population analyzed regarding socio-demographic aspects, identifying the anxiety level of patients undergoing surgery and the most used coping strategies during the pre-operative period, as well as observing the relation between anxiety level and coping strategies over the same period. The population was comprised of 40 patients undergoing surgery. For data collection, two self-applicable instruments were employed: Spielberger's anxiety level inventory and Lazarus, Folkman's coping strategies inventory. Data were collected over the pre-operative period. Most patients were women averaging 46-years old, with low level of schooling, previous surgery experience set before, and no previous intercurrence. The coping strategies more commonly used were social support and problem resolution. In regards to anxiety and coping strategies there was found a negative correlation between anxiety level, social support and problem resolution. PMID:16719132

  15. Effect of Smoking on Joint Replacement Outcomes: Opportunities for Improvement Through Preoperative Smoking Cessation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik; Tzeng, Tony H; Ginnetti, Michael; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Jamal K; Saleh, Jasmine; Lane, J M; Mihalko, William M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-01-01

    Because orthopaedic surgeons focus on identifying serious potential complications, such as heart attack, stroke, and deep vein thrombosis, during the preoperative assessment, correctable factors, such as smoking, may be overlooked. Chronic exposure to nicotine has been correlated with perioperative complications that lead to worse outcomes, including decreased patient satisfaction, longer hospitalization periods, and an increased rate of hospital readmission. It has been proven that smoking is a negative risk factor for decreased bone mineral density, which leads to increased fracture risk, heightened pain, postoperative wound and bone healing complications, decreased fusion rates, and postoperative tendon and ligament healing complications. Physician-led preoperative smoking cessation programs that include, but are not limited to, pharmacotherapy plans have been shown to improve primary surgical outcomes and smoking cessation rates. Smoking has detrimental effects on specialty-specific physiology; however, there are many effective options for intervention that can improve primary outcomes. PMID:27049216

  16. Preoperative Ambulatory Inspiratory Muscle Training in Patients Undergoing Esophagectomy. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Agrelli, Taciana Freitas; de Carvalho Ramos, Marisa; Guglielminetti, Rachel; Silva, Alex Augusto; Crema, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A major decline in pulmonary function is observed on the first day after upper abdominal surgery. This decline can reduce vital and inspiratory capacity and can culminate in restrictive lung diseases that cause atelectasis, reduced diaphragm movement, and respiratory insufficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative ambulatory respiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. The sample consisted of 20 adult patients (14 men [70%] and 6 women [30%]) with a diagnosis of advanced chagasic megaesophagus. A significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure was observed after inspiratory muscle training when compared with baseline values (from −55.059 ± 18.359 to −76.286 ± 16.786). Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training was effective in increasing respiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing esophagectomy and contributed to the prevention of postoperative complications. PMID:23113846

  17. Radical cystectomy at Roswell Park Memorial Institute. Preoperative and post operative observations.

    PubMed

    Eisenkraft, S; Pontes, J E

    1984-01-01

    Between January 1979 and March 1983, 63 consecutive patients underwent cystectomy and urinary diversion for primary carcinoma of the bladder at Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI). Fifty-five patients had transitional cell carcinoma, 6 squamous cell carcinoma and 2 adenocarcinoma of the bladder. Twelve patients with bladder cancer were found to have adenocarcinoma of the prostate on the pathological specimen. Preoperative radiation was given to 41 patients. Thirty-six patients received 4000 rads preoperatively followed by radical cystectomy, 5 patients received 2000 rads. Thirteen patients received 6000 rads as curative treatment and underwent salvage cystectomy and colon conduit because of failure. There was no operative mortality. Severe complications in the early postoperative period occurred in 19 instances, some patients having more than one complication. Late complications necessitating surgical correction occurred in 5 patients. Although radical cystectomy is effective in controlling the local disease, most patients still died of metastatic transitional cell carcinoma. PMID:6483919

  18. Evaluation of preoperative investigations in patients admitted for ovarian primary cytoreductive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Guidozzi, F.; Sonnendecker, E.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Consistent with universally established practice, it has been customary in our unit to subject patients with clinically suspected or biopsy proven ovarian cancer to a large number of preoperative investigations. This is in order to determine metastases, surgical strategy, and exclusion of pelvic kidney. This study presents a comparison of the preoperative ultrasonography, computerized tomography, intravenous pyelography, chest X-ray, liver and bone scintigraphy, and barium enema results performed in 100 cases with the operative findings. These investigations were found to have marginal value in determining extent of disease, upper gastrointestinal metastatic deposits, and the need for or extent of bowel resection. It is concluded that such a standard workup, which is time-consuming and distressing for an already anxious patient, is not cost effective for a surgical procedure which is ultimately determined at laparotomy.

  19. Lipoma and liposarcoma of the parotid gland: high-resolution preoperative imaging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Korentager, R; Noyek, A M; Chapnik, J S; Steinhardt, M; Luk, S C; Cooter, N

    1988-09-01

    Over the past 7 years, nine fatty tumors within the parotid gland have been managed (eight lipomas, one liposarcoma). High-resolution computed tomography examination was carried out in all cases; with correct preoperative diagnosis recorded each time. The computed tomography imaging characteristics of lipoma, liposarcoma, and the differential diagnosis from other fat density lesions, such as a fatty infiltration, appear quite specific. The liposarcoma and six of the lipomas were resected at formal parotidectomy with facial nerve preservation. Two patients with small intraglandular lipomas have elected to undergo long-term clinical and imaging observation. Our experience indicates that high-resolution, soft-tissue imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging permits consistent preoperative fatty tumor diagnosis. This imaging input facilitates rational treatment decision-making. PMID:3412095

  20. Use of 3-Dimensional Printing for Preoperative Planning in the Treatment of Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Ujash; Theodoropoulos, John; Abouali, Jihad

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder instability often results from large bony Bankart or Hill-Sachs lesions. Preoperative imaging is essential in guiding our surgical management of patients with these conditions. However, we are often limited to making an attempt to interpret a 3-dimensional (3D) structure using conventional 2-dimensional imaging. In cases in which complex anatomy or bony defects are encountered, this type of imaging is often inadequate. We used 3D printing to produce a solid 3D model of a glenohumeral joint from a young patient with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and complex Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. The 3D model from our patient was used in the preoperative planning stages of an arthroscopic Bankart repair and remplissage to determine the depth of the Hill-Sachs lesion and the degree of abduction and external rotation at which the Hill-Sachs lesion engaged. PMID:26759768

  1. Preoperative therapy for local-regional gastric cancer: rationale and review of trials.

    PubMed

    Ajani, J A; Yao, J C

    2000-05-01

    The standard approach for patients with local-regional gastric carcinoma is an attempted surgical resection to achieve a "curative resection" (also called an R0 resection) with adequate lymph node dissection. Western patients, who often get suboptimal surgery and have a high incidence of regional lymph node involvement, remain at higher risk of local and systemic relapse after an R0 resection than most Japanese patients. Numerous postoperative adjuvant therapy trials have not yet established an advantage for these patients. Thus in the West, the concept of preoperative therapy is appealing. The preoperative approach can potentially result in downstaging (or downsizing) of the primary tumor and, therefore, increasing the rate of R0 resection. Investigators are still refining the treatment strategies and defining ideal patient population for this approach. Undoubtedly, properly designed prospective randomized trials will be needed to establish any advantage with this approach. A number of newer agents hold a great deal of promise. PMID:10895184

  2. Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Agrelli, Taciana Freitas; de Carvalho Ramos, Marisa; Guglielminetti, Rachel; Silva, Alex Augusto; Crema, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A major decline in pulmonary function is observed on the first day after upper abdominal surgery. This decline can reduce vital and inspiratory capacity and can culminate in restrictive lung diseases that cause atelectasis, reduced diaphragm movement, and respiratory insufficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative ambulatory respiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. The sample consisted of 20 adult patients (14 men [70%] and 6 women [30%]) with a diagnosis of advanced chagasic megaesophagus. A significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure was observed after inspiratory muscle training when compared with baseline values (from -55.059 ± 18.359 to -76.286 ± 16.786). Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training was effective in increasing respiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing esophagectomy and contributed to the prevention of postoperative complications. PMID:23113846

  3. Preoperative risk stratification models fail to predict hospital cost of cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preoperative risk stratification models have previously been suggested to predict cardiac surgery unit costs. However, there is a lack of consistency in their reliability in this field. In this study we aim to test the correlation between the values of six commonly known preoperative scoring systems and evaluate their reliability at predicting unit costs of cardiac surgery patients. Methods Over a period of 14 months all consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively classified using six preoperative scoring models (EuroSCORE, Parsonnet, Ontario, French, Pons and CABDEAL). Transplantation patients were the only patients we excluded. Total hospital costs for each patient were calculated independently on a daily basis using the bottom up method. The full unit costs were calculated including preoperative diagnostic tests, operating room cost, disposable materials, drugs, blood components as well as costs for personnel and fixed hospital costs. The correlation between hospital cost and the six models was determined by linear regression analysis. Both Spearman’s and Pearson’s correlation coefficients were calculated from the regression lines. An analysis of residuals was performed to determine the quality of the regression. Results A total of 887 patients were operated on for CABG (n = 608), valve (n = 142), CABG plus valve (n = 100), thoracic aorta (n = 33) and ventricular assist devices (n = 4). Mean age of the patients was 68.3±9.9 years, 27.6% were female. 30-day mortality rate was 4.1%. Correlation between the six models and hospital cost was weak (Pearson’s: r < 0.30; Spearman’s: r < 0.40). Conclusion The risk stratification models in this study are not reliable at predicting total costs of cardiac surgical patients. We therefore do not recommend their use for this purpose. PMID:23659251

  4. PUREX environmental radiological surveillance - preoperational and operational support program conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Price, K.R.

    1983-10-01

    This report describes the radiological environmental sampling program that is being conducted at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in support of resumed operation of the PUREX fuel processing plant. The report also summarizes preoperational radiological environmental data collected to date. The activities described herein are part of the ongoing Hanford Environmental Surveillance Program, operated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the DOE.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  6. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae . E-mail: khjung@ncc.re.kr; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% {+-} 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% {+-} 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed.

  7. Preoperative treatment planning with intraoperative optimization can achieve consistent high-quality implants in prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Swanson, David A.; Bruno, Teresa L.; Bolukbasi, Yasemin; Frank, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in brachytherapy treatment planning systems have allowed the opportunity for brachytherapy to be planned intraoperatively as well as preoperatively. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each approach have been the subject of extensive debate, and some contend that the intraoperative approach is vital to the delivery of optimal therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether high-quality permanent prostate implants can be achieved consistently using a preoperative planning approach that allows for, but does not necessitate, intraoperative optimization. To achieve this purpose, we reviewed the records of 100 men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who had been prospectively treated with brachytherapy monotherapy between 2006 and 2009 at our institution. All patients were treated with iodine-125 stranded seeds; the planned target dose was 145 Gy. Only 8 patients required adjustments to the plan on the basis of intraoperative findings. Consistency and quality were assessed by calculating the correlation coefficient between the planned and implanted amounts of radioactivity and by examining the mean values of the dosimetric parameters obtained on preoperative and 30 days postoperative treatment planning. The amount of radioactivity implanted was essentially identical to that planned (mean planned radioactivity, 41.27 U vs. mean delivered radioactivity, 41.36 U; R{sup 2} = 0.99). The mean planned and day 30 prostate V100 values were 99.9% and 98.6%, respectively. The mean planned and day 30 prostate D90 values were 186.3 and 185.1 Gy, respectively. Consistent, high-quality prostate brachytherapy treatment plans can be achieved using a preoperative planning approach, mostly without the need for intraoperative optimization. Good quality assurance measures during simulation, treatment planning, implantation, and postimplant evaluation are paramount for achieving a high level of quality and consistency.

  8. Preoperative and surveillance MR imaging of patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    MR imaging provides considerable advantages for imaging patients with peritoneal tumor. Its inherently superior contrast resolution compared to CT allows MRI to more accurately depict small peritoneal tumors that are often missed on other imaging tests. Combining different contrast mechanisms including diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI and gadolinium-enhanced MRI provides a powerful tool for preoperative and surveillance imaging in patients being considered for cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). PMID:26941984

  9. Preoperative planning and postoperative evaluation of total hip arthroplasty that takes combined anteversion.

    PubMed

    Imai, Hiroshi; Miyawaki, Joji; Kamada, Tomomi; Takeba, Jun; Mashima, Naohiko; Miura, Hiromasa

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether postoperative combined anteversion (CA) can be kept within the safe zone while using cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) using the operative technique which prepares the socket first for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), by estimating the anteversion of the metaphyseal fit stem using preoperative three-dimensional (3D) computerized planning and by adjusting the anteversion of the socket using a navigation system that considers CA. Our subjects were 65 patients (65 hips) that had undergone cementless THA for DDH that could be observed for 1 year or more. Clinical assessments were made using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association's (JOA) hip score. For a radiological evaluation, we investigated 3D-planned stem versions, postoperative stem versions, preoperative and postoperative CA, and the relationship between CA and dislocation tendencies with temporary intraoperative reductions. JOA hip scores improved from 52.3 ± 11.4 points to 88.9 ± 8.6 points. CT evaluations revealed that 3D-planned stem versions were strongly correlated with postoperative stem versions (r = 0.80; p < 0.01). Preoperative CA was 50.5° ± 7.2°, and postoperative CA was 41.3° ± 8.6°. Postoperative CA was kept within the safe zone in 61 hips. No intraoperative dislocation tendencies were observed in any hips. By estimating the anteversion of the cementless metaphyseal fit stem using 3D planning preoperatively and adjusting the angle of anteversion of the socket using a navigation system that considers CA intraoperatively, postoperative CA can very frequently be kept within the safe zone, even with cementless THA using the operative technique which prepares the socket first for DDH. PMID:27154291

  10. Clinical significance of enlarged lateral pelvic lymph nodes before and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, YASUHIRO; SAIGUSA, SUSUMU; HIRO, JUNICHIRO; TOIYAMA, YUJI; ARAKI, TOSHIMITSU; TANAKA, KOJI; MOHRI, YAUSHIKO; KUSUNOKI, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with total mesorectal excision (TME) is the widely accepted treatment for rectal cancer (RC) in Western countries. However, there remains controversy as to whether preoperative CRT is useful in tumors that extend beyond the mesorectum, including metastasis to the lateral pelvic lymph nodes (LPLN). The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic significance of LPLN enlargement in patients with RC who receive preoperative CRT followed by TME without LPLN dissection. We evaluated the prognostic effect of radiographic LPLN enlargement before and after CRT, as well as the patients' clinicopathological and genetic profiles. Of the 104 patients investigated, pretreatment imaging identified 19 (18%) as LPLN-positive (>7 mm in diameter). Of these 19 patients, 7 (37%) exhibited LPLN downsizing to <7 mm following CRT. The median follow-up period was 52 months. The 5-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) or relapse-free survival (RFS) did not differ significantly between patients who did and those who did not have positive LPLN on pretreatment imaging. However, LPLN that remained positive after CRT were significantly associated with poorer 5-year CSS (73 vs. 84%, respectively; P=0.0052) and RFS (32 vs. 78%, respectively; P=0.0264). None of the patients whose LPLN were downsized to <7 mm following CRT developed recurrence; however, those with positive LPLN after CRT had a 55% higher recurrence rate, characterized by delayed local recurrence, a pattern that may be affected by certain chemokines. In conclusion, changes in initially positive LPLN (>7 mm) may predict the prognosis of patients with RC who receive preoperative CRT-TME. LPLN positivity after CRT was associated with shorter CSS and RFS. Strategies to improve patient survival may include selective LPLN dissection or more aggressive multimodality therapy. PMID:27313860

  11. Distribution of Glenoid Implant Options for Correcting Deformities Using a Preoperative Planning Tool.

    PubMed

    Greene, Alexander; Jones, Richard B; Wright, Thomas W; Parsons, Ira M; Saadi, Paul; Cheung, Emilie V; Polakovic, Sandrine; Hamilton, Matthew A

    2015-12-01

    Preoperative planning tools in shoulder arthroplasty are a recently developing technology with the advantage of being able to clearly assess patient anatomy and deformities before entering the OR. Addressing retroverted glenoids remains one of the most difficult aspects of primary shoulder arthroplasty. In this study, five surgeons were provided with a preoperative planning tool with posterior augmented glenoid implant options (0°, 8°, and 16°) to treat 10 cadaveric cases with a range of versions from 7.8° anteversion to 25.1° retroversion. Surgeons were able to remove less bone using 8° augmented implants over standard non-augmented implants (2.8° reamed vs. 6.4° reamed) and were able to correct each case on average within ± 1.8° of neutral version. Slight glenoid vault perforation was observed in 18% of the plans. Eight degrees posterior augmented implants were used in scans averaging 9.0° retroversion, and 16° posterior augmented implants were used in scans averaging 20.6° retroversion. Results were then compared to 14 preoperative CT scans provided by one of the surgeons in which both 8° and 16° posterior augmented glenoid implants were used in actual patients, showing 8° posterior augmented implants were used in cases averaging 12.3° retroversion, and 16° posterior augmented implants were used in cases averaging 20.7° retroversion. The study shows that surgeons can effectively and predictably use a preoperative planning tool to correct glenoid abnormalities using augmented implant solutions while minimizing both scapular bone removal and vault perforation and maximizing version correction. PMID:26631197

  12. Actual preoperative fasting time in Brazilian hospitals: the BIGFAST multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    de Aguilar-Nascimento, José E; de Almeida Dias, Ana L; Dock-Nascimento, Diana B; Correia, Maria Isabel TD; Campos, Antonio CL; Portari-Filho, Pedro Eder; Oliveira, Sergio S

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged fasting increases organic response to trauma. This multicenter study investigated the gap between the prescribed and the actual preoperative fasting times in Brazilian hospitals and factors associated with this gap. Methods Patients (18–90-years-old) who underwent elective operations between August 2011 and September 2012 were included in the study. The actual and prescribed times for fasting were collected and correlated with sex, age, surgical disease (malignancies or benign disease), operation type, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, type of hospital (public or private), and nutritional status. Results A total of 3,715 patients (58.1% females) with a median age of 49 (18–94) years from 16 Brazilian hospitals entered the study. The median (range) preoperative fasting time was 12 (2–216) hours, and fasting time was longer (P<0.001) in hospitals using a traditional fasting protocol (13 [6–216] hours) than in others that had adopted new guidelines (8 [2–48] hours). Almost 80% (n=2,962) of the patients were operated on after 8 or more hours of fasting and 46.2% (n=1,718) after more than 12 hours. Prolonged fasting was not associated with physical score, age, sex, type of surgery, or type of hospital. Patients operated on due to a benign disease had an extended duration of preoperative fasting. Conclusion Actual preoperative fasting time is significantly longer than prescribed fasting time in Brazilian hospitals. Most of these hospitals still adopt traditional rather than modern fasting guidelines. All patients are at risk of long periods of fasting, especially those in hospitals that follow traditional practices. PMID:24627636

  13. Impact of the number of resected lymph nodes on survival after preoperative radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhen-Yu; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Lin, Hui; Li, Qun

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of the number of resected lymph nodes (RLNs) for survival in esophageal cancer (EC) patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy and cancer-directed surgery. The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was queried to identify EC patients treated from 1988 to 2012 who had complete data on the number of positive lymph nodes and number of RLNs. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox regression proportional hazard methods were used to determine factors that significantly impact cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS). There were a total of 3,159 patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and cancer-directed surgery. The median number of RLNs was 10 in both patients who received and did not receive preoperative radiotherapy (P = 0.332). Cox regression univariate and multivariate analysis showed that RLN count was a significant prognostic factor for CSS and OS. Patients with 11–71 RLNs had better CSS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.694, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.603–0.799, P < 0.001) and OS (HR = 0.724, 95% CI: 0.636–0.824, P < 0.001) than patients with 1–10 RLNs. The 5-year CSS rates were 39.1% and 44.8% in patients with 1–10 RLNs and 11–71 RLNs, respectively (P < 0.001). The 5-year OS rates were 33.7% and 39.9% in patients with 1–10 RLNs and 11–71 RLNs, respectively (P < 0.001). A higher number of RLNs was associated with better survival by tumor stage and nodal stage (all P < 0.05). RLN count is an independent prognostic factor in EC patients who undergo preoperative radiotherapy and cancer-directed surgery. PMID:26992210

  14. Preoperative body mass index-to-prognostic nutritional index ratio predicts pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Toshihisa; Minagawa, Noritaka; Hirata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating or scoring the risk of post-operative pancreatic fistula (POPF) may help with selection of high-risk patients and individualized patient consent. However, there are no simple and reliable preoperative predictors of POPF used in daily clinical practice. Methods We investigated the utility of body mass index-to-prognostic nutritional index (BMI/PNI) ratio as a preoperative marker to predict the development of POPF in 87 patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. Results The overall incidence of clinical (grade B/C) POPF was 17% (15 of 87 patients). Among various pre-, intra-, and post-operative variables analyzed, higher BMI and lower PNI were identified as independent predictors for POPF by multivariate analysis. We therefore investigated BMI/PNI ratio as a preoperative predictor for POPF. BMI/PNI ratio was significantly higher in patients with POPF than in those without POPF (0.54 vs. 0.45, P=0.0007). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis demonstrated a fair capability of BMI/PNI ratio to predict the occurrence of POPF (area under the ROC curve 0.781). With a cut-off value of 0.5, the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of BMI/PNI ratio to predict POPF was 73%, 74%, and 74%, respectively. In particular, when restricted to a subgroup of elderly (≥75 years old) male patients, the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of BMI/PNI ratio was 100%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions The BMI/PNI ratio is a simple preoperative marker to predict the occurrence of POPF after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:27275468

  15. Preoperative Laboratory Testing in Patients Undergoing Elective, Low-Risk Ambulatory Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Duncan, Casey B.; Brown, Kimberly M.; Han, Yimei; Townsend, Courtney M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Routine preoperative laboratory testing for ambulatory surgery is not recommended. Methods Patients who underwent elective hernia repair (N = 73,596) were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database (2005–2010). Patterns of preoperative testing were examined. Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with testing and postoperative complications. Results A total of 46,977 (63.8%) patients underwent testing, with at least one abnormal test recorded in 61.6% of patients. In patients with no NSQIP comorbidities (N = 25,149) and no clear indication for testing, 54% received at least one test. In addition, 15.3% of tested patients underwent laboratory testing the day of the operation. In this group, surgery was done despite abnormal results in 61.6% of same day tests. In multivariate analyses, testing was associated with older age, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) class >1, hypertension, ascites, bleeding disorders, systemic steroids, and laparoscopic procedures. Major complications (reintubation, pulmonary embolus, stroke, renal failure, coma, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, septic shock, bleeding, or death) occurred in 0.3% of patients. After adjusting for patient and procedure characteristics, neither testing nor abnormal results were associated with postoperative complications. Conclusions Preoperative testing is overused in patients undergoing low-risk, ambulatory surgery. Neither testing nor abnormal results were associated with postoperative outcomes. On the basis of high rates of testing in healthy patients, physician and/or facility preference and not only patient condition currently dictate use. Involvement from surgical societies is necessary to establish guidelines for preoperative testing. PMID:22868362

  16. Impact of Preoperative Hematocrit Level on Length of Stay after Surgery on the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian; Karsy, Michael; Schmidt, Meic H; Bisson, Erica F

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective Recent studies suggest that baseline hematocrit (Hct) levels may affect the surgical outcomes after orthopedic procedures. The authors examined whether preoperative Hct values had a significant effect on the hospital length of stay (LoS) after lumbar spinal procedures. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent routine lumbar spine procedures from November 2012 through September 2013. Patients were included if they had both a baseline Hct and hospital LoS recorded. Patients were divided into two groups: those with an Hct ≥ 40% (nonanemic) and those with an Hct < 40% (anemic). LoS after surgery was evaluated for each group. Results One hundred seventeen patients underwent lumbar spine procedures for lumbar stenosis (n = 34), symptomatic lumbar disk herniation (n = 39), lumbar spondylolisthesis (n = 26), lumbar adjacent segment disease (n = 8), or symptomatic recurrent lumbar disk herniation (n = 10). Mean LoS was 3.3 and 2.4 days in anemic (27 patients) and nonanemic groups (90 patients), respectively (p = 0.02). The linear regression analysis demonstrated that a decrease in Hct was associated with a longer stay. A decrease from preoperative to postoperative day 1 Hct of 3.5 points resulted in an increased LoS of 1 day (R (2) = 0.145; p = 0.002). The correlation of Hct decrease with longer LoS remained (β = 0.167, p = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables with multivariate regression analysis. Conclusions Lower preoperative Hct or a substantial decrease in Hct may contribute to longer hospitalization after lumbar spine surgery. These findings should prompt an investigation into the strategies for optimizing Hct levels in patients with preoperative anemia prior to lumbar spine procedures. PMID:26430593

  17. Solitary hepatic granuloma preoperatively diagnosed as intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Daizo; Iwane, Takeru; Sato, Kazushige; Kawagishi, Naoki; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Satomi, Susumu

    2012-12-01

    We herein report the case of a 67-year-old female with a solitary hepatic granuloma preoperatively diagnosed as a mass-forming type of intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma. Magnetic resonance imaging using gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid as a contrast medium is expected to be useful for making a differential diagnosis between hepatic granuloma and other hypovascular liver tumors, such as the mass-forming type of intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver tumors. PMID:22678661

  18. Negative Impact of Preoperative Platelet-Lymphocyte Ratio on Outcome After Hepatic Resection for Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; Dai, Zhi; Yin, Dan; Yang, Liu-Xiao; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Yong-Sheng; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The elevated platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), determined using an easy blood test based on platelet and lymphocyte counts, is reported to be a predictor of poor survival in patients with several cancers. The prognostic role of preoperative PLR in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) has, until now, been rarely investigated. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of PLR in a large cohort of ICC patients after hepatic resection. We obtained data from 322 consecutive nonmetastatic ICC patients who underwent hepatectomy without preoperative therapy between 2005 and 2011. Clinicopathological parameters, including PLR, were evaluated. Overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were assessed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Using multivariate Cox regression models, the independent prognostic value of preoperative PLR was determined. Our results showed that PLR represents an independent adverse prognostic factor for OS and RFS in ICC patients using univariate and multivariate analyses. The optimal PLR cutoff value was 123 using receiver operating curve analyses. The 5-year OS and RFS rates after hepatectomy were 30.3% and 28.9% for the group with PLR 123 greater, compared with 46.2% and 39.4% for the group with PLR less than 123 (P = 0.0058 and 0.0153, respectively). In addition, high PLR values were associated with tumor size (P = 0.020). Our results suggest that preoperative PLR might represent a novel independent prognostic factor for OS and RFS in ICC patients with hepatic resection. PMID:25837750

  19. Standardized Preoperative Corticosteroid Treatment in Neonates Undergoing Cardiac Surgery- Results From a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Eric M.; Atz, Andrew M.; Butts, Ryan J.; Baker, Nathaniel L.; Zyblewski, Sinai C.; Deardorff, Rachael L.; DeSantis, Stacia M.; Reeves, Scott T.; Bradley, Scott M.; Spinale, Francis G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective A heightened inflammatory response occurs following cardiac surgery. The perioperative use of glucocorticoids has been advocated as a method to improve postoperative outcomes. Randomized prospective studies to quantify the effect of methylprednisolone on perioperative outcomes in neonatal cardiac surgery have not been performed. We sought to determine whether pre-operative methylprednisolone would improve postoperative recovery in neonates requiring cardiac surgery. Methods Neonates scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomly assigned to receive either Two Dose (8 hours preoperatively and operatively; n=39) or Single Dose (operatively; n=37) methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg/dose) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The primary outcome was the incidence of low cardiac output syndrome (standardized score) or death 36 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were death at 30 days, interlukin-6 levels, inotropic score, fluid balance, serum creatinine, and ICU and hospital stay. Results Preoperative plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokine interlukin-6 were reduced by 2-fold (p<0.001) in the Two Dose methylprednisolone group, consistent with the anti-inflammatory effects of methylprednisolone. However, the incidence of low cardiac output syndrome was 46% (17/37) in the Single Dose and 38% (15/39) in the Two Dose methylprednisolone groups (p=0.51). Two Dose methylprednisolone was associated with a higher serum creatinine (0.61±0.18 vs. 0.53±0.12 mg/dL, p=0.03), and poorer postoperative diuresis (−96±49 mL, p=0.05). Inotropic requirement, duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU, and hospital stay did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusions Combined preoperative and intraoperative use of glucocorticoids in neonatal cardiac surgery does not favorably affect early clinical outcomes, and may exacerbate perioperative renal dysfunction. PMID:21600592

  20. Preoperative detection of intrahepatic venovenous shunt treated by microwave precoagulation during right hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Delhorme, Jean-Baptiste; Méméo, Riccardo; Marescaux, Jacques; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    A 53-year-old woman underwent a 2-stage right hepatectomy for bilobar metastasis of an ileal neuroendocrine carcinoma. Preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction helped to diagnose an intrahepatic venovenous shunts from the right and middle hepatic veins to the left hepatic vein, which could cause a intraoperative bleeding. Hemostasis was performed by means of precoagulation with microwave-assisted coagulation. PMID:26558160

  1. Primary Paratracheal Leiomyoma: Increased Preoperative Diagnostic Specificity With Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Marie-Hélène; Aisagbonhi, Omonigho; Digumarthy, Subba; Wright, Cameron D; Ackman, Jeanne B

    2016-08-01

    We report the case of a 47-year-old woman whose primary mediastinal leiomyoma was incidentally found during evaluation of her persistent cough. The preoperative diagnosis of mediastinal leiomyoma is challenging because of its rarity and indeterminate features on chest radiography, computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography-CT. We highlight how magnetic resonance imaging can substantially contribute to mediastinal mass characterization and diagnostic specificity. PMID:27449453

  2. Prediction of Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer by Multiplex Kinase Activity Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Folkvord, Sigurd; Flatmark, Kjersti; Dueland, Svein

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Tumor response of rectal cancer to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) varies considerably. In experimental tumor models and clinical radiotherapy, activity of particular subsets of kinase signaling pathways seems to predict radiation response. This study aimed to determine whether tumor kinase activity profiles might predict tumor response to preoperative CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Sixty-seven LARC patients were treated with a CRT regimen consisting of radiotherapy, fluorouracil, and, where possible, oxaliplatin. Pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens were analyzed using microarrays with kinase substrates, and the resulting substrate phosphorylation patterns were correlated with tumor response to preoperative treatment as assessed by histomorphologic tumor regression grade (TRG). A predictive model for TRG scores from phosphosubstrate signatures was obtained by partial-least-squares discriminant analysis. Prediction performance was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation and use of an independent test set. Results: In the patient population, 73% and 15% were scored as good responders (TRG 1-2) or intermediate responders (TRG 3), whereas 12% were assessed as poor responders (TRG 4-5). In a subset of 7 poor responders and 12 good responders, treatment outcome was correctly predicted for 95%. Application of the prediction model on the remaining patient samples resulted in correct prediction for 85%. Phosphosubstrate signatures generated by poor-responding tumors indicated high kinase activity, which was inhibited by the kinase inhibitor sunitinib, and several discriminating phosphosubstrates represented proteins derived from signaling pathways implicated in radioresistance. Conclusions: Multiplex kinase activity profiling may identify functional biomarkers predictive of tumor response to preoperative CRT in LARC.

  3. The Chiari Severity Index: A Preoperative Grading System for Chiari Malformation Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jacob K; Yarbrough, Chester K; Radmanesh, Alireza; Godzik, Jakub; Yu, Megan; Jeffe, Donna B; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Piccirillo, Jay F; Limbrick, David D

    2014-01-01

    Background To develop evidence-based treatment guidelines for Chiari Malformation Type 1 (CM-1), preoperative prognostic indices capable of stratifying patients for comparative trials are needed. Objective To develop a preoperative Chiari Severity Index (CSI) integrating the clinical and neuroimaging features most predictive of long-term patient-defined improvement in quality of life (QOL) after CM-1 surgery. Methods We recorded preoperative clinical (e.g. headaches, myelopathic symptoms) and neuroimaging (e.g. syrinx size, tonsillar descent) characteristics. Brief follow-up surveys were administered to assess overall patient-defined improvement in QOL. We used sequential sequestration to develop clinical and neuroimaging grading systems and conjunctive consolidation to integrate these indices to form the CSI. We evaluated statistical significance using the Cochran-Armitage test and discrimination using the c-statistic. Results Our sample included 158 patients. Sequential sequestration identified headache characteristics and myelopathic symptoms as the most impactful clinical parameters, producing a clinical grading system with improvement rates ranging from 81% (grade 1) to 58% (grade 3) (p=0.01). Based on sequential sequestration, the neuroimaging grading system included only the presence (55% improvement) or absence (74% improvement) of a syrinx ≥ 6 mm (p=0.049). Integrating the clinical and neuroimaging indices, improvement rates for the CSI ranged from 83% (grade 1) to 45% (grade 3) (p=0.002). The combined CSI had moderately better discrimination (c=0.66) than the clinical (c=0.62) or neuroimaging (c=0.58) systems alone. Conclusion Integrating clinical and neuroimaging characteristics, the CSI is a novel tool that predicts patient-defined improvement following CM-1 surgery. The CSI may aid preoperative counseling and stratify patients in comparative effectiveness trials. PMID:25584956

  4. A practical concept for preoperative management of patients with impaired primary hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Koscielny, Juergen; von Tempelhoff, Georg-Friedrich; Ziemer, Sabine; Radtke, Hartmut; Schmutzler, Michael; Sinha, Pranav; Salama, Abdulgabar; Kiesewetter, Holger; Latza, Reinhard

    2004-04-01

    In a prospective study, 254 of 5649 unselected patients scheduled for surgery at our hospital were identified preoperatively as having either acquired (n=182) or inherited (n=72) impaired primary hemostasis (platelet dysfunction including von Willebrand disease). All patients were initially pretreated with desmopressin (DDAVP). Response to DDAVP or subsequent treatment(s) was defined as correction of any one of the abnormal PFA-100 platelet function tests. The non-responders were additionally treated with tranexamic acid or aprotinin; those with von Willebrand disease (vWD) received factor VIII concentrates with von Willebrand factor (vWF). Those still unresponsive to therapy received conjugated estrogens and, as a last attempt, a platelet transfusion. The administration of DDAVP led to a correction of platelet dysfunction in 229 of the 254 patients treated (90.2%). Tranexamic acid was effective in 12 of 16, aprotinin in 3 of 5, and factor VIII concentrates with vWF in all 4 patients with unresponsive to DDAVP. The remaining 6 patients were pretreated with conjugated estrogens, and 2 of these patients were additionally treated with platelet transfusion. The frequency of blood transfusion was lower, but not statistically significant (9.4% vs. 12.2%: p = 0.202) in preoperatively treated patients with impaired hemostasis than in patients without impaired hemostasis. In a retrospective group, the frequency of blood transfusion was statistically significant higher (89.3% vs. 11.3%: p < 0.001) in patients without preoperative correction of impaired hemostasis than in patients without impaired hemostasis. Preoperative correction of impaired primary hemostasis is possible in nearly all patients affected, and results in a reduction of homologous blood transfusions. PMID:15094936

  5. High preoperative blood levels of HE4 predicts poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of preoperative blood levels of HE4 as a predictor of overall survival in patients with ovarian cancer and to validate previous data of HE4 and the ROMA algorithm including HE4 and CA125 in discriminating benign and malignant ovarian tumors. Experimental design The preoperative plasma levels of HE4 and CA125 were analyzed with ELISA in 312 patients with adnexal lesions. Tumors were classified as benign (n= 206), borderline (i.e. low malignant potential tumors) (n= 25), and well (n= 14), moderately (n= 15), and poorly (n= 51) differentiated malignant. Results In univariate Cox regression analyses high levels (dichotomized at the median) of HE4, CA125, increased age (continuous variable), advanced-stage of disease 2–4, histological grade 3 and non-optimal tumor debulking at primary surgery were all significantly associated with shorter overall survival. A multivariate Cox regression model including pre-operative available covariates HE4 and CA125 both dichotomized at median in addition to age as continuous variable showed that high levels of HE4 was an independent prognostic marker for worse prognosis HR 2.02 (95% CI 1.1-3.8). In postmenopausal women the ROMA algorithm gave the highest AUC of 0.94 (95% CI, 0.90-0.97) which was higher than the separate markers HE4 AUC 0.91 (95% CI 0.86-0.95) and CA125 AUC 0.91(95% CI 0.87-0.96). Conclusions High concentration of plasma HE4 is an independent preoperative marker of poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. The algorithm ROMA discriminates in postmenopausal women between malignant and benign tumors with an AUC of 0.94. PMID:22909379

  6. Utility of preoperative imaging in evaluating colorectal liver metastases declines over time

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Simon; Hongjinda, Sermsak; Hanna, Sherif S; Gallinger, Steven; Wei, Alice C; Kiss, Alex; Law, Calvin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Reports on the sensitivity and accuracy of contrast-enhanced helical computed tomography (HCT) in the preoperative evaluation of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) have been conflicting. Few studies have controlled for and reported on the time interval between HCT and eventual surgery. Methods A multi-institution, retrospective review of consecutive patients who underwent hepatic resection for CLM from January 1999 to September 2004 was conducted. Data regarding lesion characteristics and resectability were extracted from radiology reports, operative findings and histopathological records. Findings in HCT were evaluated according to their sensitivity for detecting CLM and ability to predict resectability. Results A total of 217 consecutive patients who underwent hepatic resection for CLM were identified. The overall sensitivity of HCT for detection of CLM was 83.2%. Prolonged time between imaging and surgery was a negative predictor for HCT sensitivity in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.001). In predicting resectability, preoperative HCT was accurate 77.0% of the time. The time interval to surgery was negatively correlated with HCT prediction accuracy in univariate and multivariate analyses (P < 0.001). Conclusions The utility of HCT as a preoperative tool to evaluate CLM is inversely proportional to the time interval between imaging and surgery. This may explain conflicting reports of the accuracy of HCT in the current literature. PMID:20961368

  7. Pre-operative mediastinal evaluation in primary bronchial carcinoma--a review of staging investigations.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A review of staging investigations in the preoperative evaluation of mediastinal involvement in primary bronchial carcinoma is presented. The following conclusions are offered as guidelines for the use of mediastinal staging procedures in clinical practice: Surgical staging methods have the over-riding advantage of superior specificity over indirect imaging techniques. Where 67Ga-imaging or CT scanning are not available, routine pre-operative mediastinoscopy or, when appropriate, mediastinotomy will identify most patients with non-resectable disease but this approach entails a high proportion of true negative examinations. Radioisotope ventilation and perfusion lung imaging has no place in the pre-operative staging of lung cancer. Where the techniques are available, 67Ga-imaging and CT scanning have a use in selecting patients for mediastinal exploration. A negative mediastinal 67Ga scan or a negative CT examination suggest that mediastinal exploration will be unrewarding in the vast majority of cases and may be omitted prior to thoracotomy. A positive mediastinal 67Ga scan or the demonstration of abnormal mediastinal nodes by CT is an indication for mediastinal exploration which, if negative should be followed by thoracotomy. PMID:6369288

  8. Preoperative endoscopic diagnosis of superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumors, including magnifying endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Shigetsugu; Doyama, Hisashi; Tsuji, Kunihiro; Tsuyama, Sho; Tominaga, Kei; Yoshida, Naohiro; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Niwa, Hideki; Katayanagi, Kazuyoshi; Kurumaya, Hiroshi; Okada, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumor (SNADET) is defined as a sporadic tumor that is confined to the mucosa or submucosa that does not arise from Vater’s papilla, and it includes adenoma and adenocarcinoma. Recent developments in endoscopic technology, such as high-resolution endoscopy and image-enhanced endoscopy, may increase the chances of detecting SNADET lesions. However, because SNADET is rare, little is known about its preoperative endoscopic diagnosis. The use of endoscopic resection for SNADET, which has no risk of metastasis, is increasing, but the incidence of complications, such as perforation, is significantly higher than in any other part of the digestive tract. A preoperative diagnosis is required to distinguish between lesions that should be followed up and those that require treatment. Retrospective studies have revealed certain endoscopic findings that suggest malignancy. In recent years, several new imaging modalities have been developed and explored for real-time diagnosis of these lesion types. Establishing an endoscopic diagnostic tool to differentiate between adenoma and adenocarcinoma in SNADET lesions is required to select the most appropriate treatment. This review describes the current state of knowledge about preoperative endoscopic diagnosis of SNADETs, such as duodenal adenoma and duodenal adenocarcinoma. Newer endoscopic techniques, including magnifying endoscopy, may help to guide these diagnostics, but their additional advantages remain unclear, and further studies are required to clarify these issues. PMID:26557007

  9. Clinical Parameters Predicting Pathologic Tumor Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Dae Yong Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin; Koom, Woong Sub; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To identify pretreatment clinical parameters that could predict pathologic tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 351 patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery between October 2001 and July 2006. Tumor responses to preoperative CRT were assessed in terms of tumor downstaging and tumor regression. Statistical analyses were performed to identify clinical factors associated with pathologic tumor response. Results: Tumor downstaging (defined as ypT2 or less) was observed in 167 patients (47.6%), whereas tumor regression (defined as Dworak's Regression Grades 3 or 4) was observed in 103 patients (29.3%) and complete regression in 51 patients (14.5%). Multivariate analysis found that predictors of downstaging were pretreatment hemoglobin level (p = 0.045), cN0 classification (p < 0.001), and serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (p < 0.001), that predictors of tumor regression were cN0 classification (p = 0.044) and CEA level (p < 0.001), and that the predictor of complete regression was CEA level (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The data suggest that pretreatment CEA level is the most important clinical predictor of pathologic tumor response. It may be of benefit in the selection of treatment options as well as the assessment of individual prognosis.

  10. Hemostatic status in liver transplantation: association between preoperative procoagulants/anticoagulants and postoperative hemorrhaging/thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Nakazawa, Akiko; Nishioka, Yujiro; Kaneko, Junichi; Aoki, Taku; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-02-01

    The delicate rebalanced hemostatic status of liver transplant recipients may lead to both hemorrhagic and thrombotic tendencies in this population. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between pretransplant procoagulants/anticoagulants and posttransplant bleeding and thrombosis among living donor liver transplant recipients. The study subjects were 403 consecutive recipients with chronic liver disease. Perioperative variables, including preoperative values for procoagulants and anticoagulants, were assessed to determine their association with posttransplant hemorrhaging and thrombosis. There were 35 hemorrhagic complications (9%) and 21 thrombotic complications (5%). In logistic regression analyses, a higher Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score (P = 0.01) and a lower fibrinogen value (P < 0.001) were independently associated with hemorrhaging, whereas only a lower protein C value (P < 0.001) was independently associated with thrombosis. In a receiver operating characteristic analysis, a low preoperative protein C value (with the most accurate cutoff value being 25%) was a reliable predictor of thrombotic complications after liver transplantation (area under the curve = 0.921, P < 0.001, sensitivity = 0.9, specificity = 0.8). In conclusion, the decreases in both procoagulants and anticoagulants in liver transplant recipients may additively result in a delicate hemostatic balance and predispose patients to both hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications. A lower preoperative protein C value (<25%) was demonstrated to be a significant and reliable predictor of postoperative thrombotic complications in liver transplant recipients. PMID:25370801

  11. Efficacy of preoperative biliary tract decompression in patients with obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Gundry, S R; Strodel, W E; Knol, J A; Eckhauser, F E; Thompson, N W

    1984-06-01

    Fifty consecutive matched patients with benign or malignant biliary tract obstruction were compared to determine the efficacy of preoperative percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD). Twenty-five patients underwent PBD for an average of nine days before operation; 25 patients underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography ( PTHC ) followed immediately by operation. Serum bilirubin levels before PTHC were 16.5 +/- 7.6 mg/dL and 14.9 +/- 7.6 mg/dL in PBD and non-PBD groups, respectively. Serum bilirubin levels decreased to 6.5 +/- 6.2 mg/dL preoperatively in patients having PBD. One week after operation, bilirubin levels were 4.2 +/- 4.3 mg/dL and 9.0 +/- 5.2 mg/dL in the PBD and non-PBD groups, respectively. Major morbidity (sepsis, abscess, renal failure, or bleeding) occurred in two patients (8%) having PBD and in 13 patients (52%) without PBD. One patient (4%) with PBD, and five patients (20%) without PBD, died. The mean hospital stay was shorter for the PBD group. Preoperative PBD reduces operative mortality and morbidity and results in a more rapid resolution of hyperbilirubinemia during the postoperative period. PMID:6428380

  12. Preoperative Computed Tomography Findings for Patients with Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction or Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Chan; Lee, Saem; Choi, Hye Sun; Jang, Jae Woo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify and analyze the role of preoperative computed tomography (CT) in patients with tearing symptoms with nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and CT results on 218 patients who complained of tearing symptoms with NLDO between January 2014 and December 2014. All patients were recruited from Kim's Eye Hospital's outpatient clinic and assessed by clinical history, examination, and CT to evaluate periocular pathology and nasolacrimal drainage system. Patients with abnormal findings assessed by preoperative CT were further reviewed. Results CT was performed on 218 patients (average age, 58.2 ± 11.9 years). Of these, 196 (89.9%) had endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy, 14 (6.4%) declined surgery, and 8 (3.7%) were inoperable due to abnormal CT findings. Soft tissue opacity was the most common finding which 243 cases (85.9%) of 283 obstructed nasolacrimal duct and 89 cases (81.7%) of 109 non-obstructed nasolacrimal duct showed it. Thirty-nine (17.8%) of 218 patients showed either maxillary sinusitis or ethmoidal sinusitis and 32 (14.7%) of 218 patients presented with periocular inflammation. Other abnormal CT findings included septal deviations, previous fractures, masses, and structural abnormalities of nasal cavity. Conclusions Preoperative CT imaging is useful in the assessment of both nasolacrimal drainage and nearby anatomical structures. This information will be helpful in planning surgical interventions and management of NLDO. PMID:27478350

  13. Economic Value of Dispensing Home-Based Preoperative Chlorhexidine Bathing Cloths to Prevent Surgical Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Rachel R.; Stuckey, Dianna R.; Norman, Bryan A.; Duggan, Andrew P.; Bacon, Kristina M.; Connor, Diana L.; Lee, Ingi; Muder, Robert R.; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the economic value of dispensing preoperative home-based chlorhexidine bathing cloth kits to orthopedic patients to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). METHODS A stochastic decision-analytic computer simulation model was developed from the hospital’s perspective depicting the decision of whether to dispense the kits preoperatively to orthopedic patients. We varied patient age, cloth cost, SSI-attributable excess length of stay, cost per bed-day, patient compliance with the regimen, and cloth antimicrobial efficacy to determine which variables were the most significant drivers of the model’s outcomes. RESULTS When all other variables remained at baseline and cloth efficacy was at least 50%, patient compliance only had to be half of baseline (baseline mean, 15.3%; range, 8.23%–20.0%) for chlorhexidine cloths to remain the dominant strategy (ie, less costly and providing better health outcomes). When cloth efficacy fell to 10%, 1.5 times the baseline bathing compliance also afforded dominance of the preoperative bath. CONCLUSIONS The results of our study favor the routine distribution of bathing kits. Even with low patient compliance and cloth efficacy values, distribution of bathing kits is an economically beneficial strategy for the prevention of SSI. PMID:21515977

  14. A favorable impact of preoperative FPLC chemotherapy on patients with gastric cardia cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, X L; Wu, G X; Zhang, M D; Guo, M; Zhang, H; Sun, X F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of preoperative chemotherapy with fluorouracili polyphase liposome composita pro orale (FPLC) on the tumour cells and the survival rate of the patients with gastric cardia cancer. Sixty patients with gastric cardia cancer were randomly divided into two groups. Thirty patients were treated with FPLC prior to surgical resection, the other 30, as controls, did not receive the preoperative chemotherapy. Pathological responses of the tumours to the FPLC chemotherapy were determined by gross and microscopic assessments of tumour size, tumour emboli, cell degeneration and necrosis. Expressions of nm23 and CD44 were detected by flow cytometry. All patients were followed up to 5 years. In the FPLC-treated patients, the tumour size (p<0. 01), the number of tumour emboli (p=0.04) and the intensity of CD44 expression (p<0.001), were significantly reduced, while cell degeneration (p<0.001), necrosis (p<0.01) and the expression of nm23 (p<0.001) were increased, when compared with those observations seen in the controls. The postoperative 5-year survival rate was 40% in the FPLC-treated group and 23% in the controls (p=0.17). Preoperative FPLC chemotherapy might improve the survival rate of patients with gastric cardia cancer by inhibiting tumour proliferative, invasive and metastatic activities, and stimulating the patient's immune system. PMID:10671664

  15. A novel computational method for real-time preoperative assessment of primary dental implant stability.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Sigbjørn; Ferguson, Stephen J; Sigrist, Christian; Fritz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Nolte, Lutz P; Hallermann, Wock; Caversaccio, Marco

    2005-02-01

    A novel methodology which allows for fast and fully automatic structural analysis during preoperative planning for dental implant surgery is presented. This method integrates a fully automatic fast finite element solver within the framework of new concepts in computer-assisted preoperative planning for implant surgery. The planning system including optimized structural planning was validated by experimental results. Nine implants were placed in pig mandibles and mechanically loaded using a testing rig. The resulting displacements were measured and compared with those predicted by numerical analysis during planning. The results show that there were no statistically significant differences (P = 0.65) between the results of the models and the experiments. The results show that fast structural analysis can be integrated with surgical planning software allowing the initial axial implant stability to be predicted in real time during planning. It is believed that such a system could be used to select patients for immediate implant loading and, when further developed, be useful in other areas of preoperative surgical planning. PMID:15642031

  16. The Incidence of Rhegmatogenous Retinal Complications in Macular Surgery After Prophylactic Preoperative Laser Retinopexy

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Gian Marco; Esposti, Pierluigi; Romeo, Napoleone; Marigliani, Davide; Cevenini, Gabriele; Massimo, Patrizio; Nuti, Elisabetta; Esposti, Giulia; Ripandelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical characteristics of intraoperative retinal breaks (RBs) and postoperative retinal detachment (RRD) in patients undergoing pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for macular disorders, who were treated preoperatively with prophylactic peripheral laser retinopexy. This observational cohort study comprised of 254 patients who underwent macular surgery and were preoperatively subjected to prophylactic laser retinopexy anterior to the equator. The main outcome measures were the incidence and characteristics of intraoperative RBs and postoperative RRD. Intraoperative RBs occurred in 14 patients (5.5%). Ten patients presented a sclerotomy-related RB (3.9%) and 4 patients a nonsclerotomy-related RB (1.6%). Two patients showed postoperative RRD (0.7%). Neither of the 2 patients with postoperative RRD was macula-off at presentation: one of them was successfully operated on with scleral buckling and the other was managed by observation alone. A significantly increased risk for the intraoperative development of sclerotomy-related RB was found in 20-gauge PPV compared with 23/25-gauge PPV. Preoperative prophylactic peripheral laser retinopexy does not guarantee the prevention of intraopertaive RBs or postoperative RRD. However, it might prevent the involvement of the macula when RRD occurs postoperatively. PMID:27057893

  17. Outcome of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in patients with disordered preoperative peristalsis.

    PubMed Central

    Baigrie, R J; Watson, D I; Myers, J C; Jamieson, G G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A 360 degrees or Nissen fundoplication remains controversial in patients with disordered peristalsis, some surgeons preferring a partial wrap to minimise postoperative dysphagia. AIM: To evaluate symptoms and manometric outcome in patients with disordered peristalsis after Nissen fundoplication. PATIENTS: In an initial series of 345 patients studied prospectively, 31 patients who had undergone a Nissen fundoplication had disordered peristalsis. Using preoperative manometry, patients were classified as: equivocal primary peristalsis (eight patients); abnormal primary peristalsis (four patients); abnormal maximal contraction pressure (13 patients); abnormal primary peristalsis and maximal contraction pressure (six patients). METHODS: Postoperatively, patients underwent a barium meal, oesophageal manometry and standardised clinical review by a blinded scientific officer. RESULTS: Twenty eight (90%) patients had satisfaction scores of at least 8 out of a maximum of 10 and all would undergo surgery again. Whereas 15 (48%) patients had dysphagia scores greater than 4/10 preoperatively, only two (6%) had these scores at one year. Improved peristalsis was seen in 78% of postoperative manometric studies, and mean preoperative lower oesophageal sphincter pressure increased from 6.6 (range 0-21) mm Hg to 19 (4-50) mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: These results are similar to the overall group of 345 patients and suggest that disordered peristalsis, and possibly even absent peristalsis, is not a contraindication to Nissen fundoplication as performed in these patients. PMID:9135529

  18. The role of ultrasound and nuclear medicine methods in the preoperative diagnostics of primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Cacko, Marek; Królicki, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PH) represents one of the most common endocrine diseases. In most cases, the disorder is caused by parathyroid adenomas. Bilateral neck exploration has been a widely used treatment method for adenomas since the 20's of the twentieth century. In the last decade, however, it has been increasingly replaced by a minimally invasive surgical treatment. Smaller extent, shorter duration and lower complication rate of such a procedure are emphasized. Its efficacy depends on a precise location of parathyroid tissue during the preoperative imaging. Scintigraphy and ultrasound play a major role in the diagnostic algorithms. The efficacy of both methods has been repeatedly verified and compared. The still-current guidelines of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (2009) emphasize the complementary role of scintigraphy and ultrasonography in the preoperative diagnostics in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. At the same time, attempts are made to improve both these techniques by implementing new study protocols or innovative technologies. Publications have emerged in the recent years in the field of ultrasonography, whose authors pointed out the usefulness of elastography and contrast media. Nuclear medicine studies, on the other hand, focus mainly on the assessment of new radiotracers used in the positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of this article is to present, based on literature data, the possibilities of ultrasound and scintigraphy in the preoperative diagnostics in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Furthermore, the main directions in the development of imaging techniques in PH patients were evaluated. PMID:26807297

  19. The role of ultrasound and nuclear medicine methods in the preoperative diagnostics of primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nieciecki, Michał; Cacko, Marek; Królicki, Leszek

    2015-12-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PH) represents one of the most common endocrine diseases. In most cases, the disorder is caused by parathyroid adenomas. Bilateral neck exploration has been a widely used treatment method for adenomas since the 20's of the twentieth century. In the last decade, however, it has been increasingly replaced by a minimally invasive surgical treatment. Smaller extent, shorter duration and lower complication rate of such a procedure are emphasized. Its efficacy depends on a precise location of parathyroid tissue during the preoperative imaging. Scintigraphy and ultrasound play a major role in the diagnostic algorithms. The efficacy of both methods has been repeatedly verified and compared. The still-current guidelines of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (2009) emphasize the complementary role of scintigraphy and ultrasonography in the preoperative diagnostics in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. At the same time, attempts are made to improve both these techniques by implementing new study protocols or innovative technologies. Publications have emerged in the recent years in the field of ultrasonography, whose authors pointed out the usefulness of elastography and contrast media. Nuclear medicine studies, on the other hand, focus mainly on the assessment of new radiotracers used in the positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of this article is to present, based on literature data, the possibilities of ultrasound and scintigraphy in the preoperative diagnostics in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Furthermore, the main directions in the development of imaging techniques in PH patients were evaluated. PMID:26807297

  20. Prognostic value of preoperative lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang-Jun; Xu, Hong-Wei; Ji, Juan-Juan; Yang, Fang; Gao, Bao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation and immunity have an important role in the development of cancer. The lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) has been shown to be of prognostic value in several malignant forms. The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic significance of preoperative LMR in post-curative resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods A total of 144 patients with primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent curative operation were enrolled in this retrospective study. The correlation between preoperative LMR and survival was analyzed using Kaplan–Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results In the univariate analysis, an elevated preoperative LMR was significantly associated with an increased overall survival (OS) (19 months vs 12 months, P=0.000), and this result remained significant in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.148; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.085–0.252; P=0.000). Furthermore, patients with high LMR also had higher median recurrence-free survival (RFS) than patients with low LMR in univariate (18 months vs 10 months, P=0.000) and multivariate analyses (HR: 0.148; 95% CI: 0.085–0.252; P=0.000). Subgroup analyses showed that both patients with stage III cancer and patients with stage I+II cancer can obtain OS and RFS benefits from high LMR. Conclusion LMR can be considered as an independent prognostic biomarker for operable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27042101

  1. Preoperative imaging of liver metastases. Comparison of angiography, CT scan, and ultrasonography.

    PubMed Central

    Gunvén, P; Makuuchi, M; Takayasu, K; Moriyama, N; Yamasaki, S; Hasegawa, H

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with mostly colorectal cancer metastases to the liver had preoperative selective/superselective angiograms (24 cases), computed tomography (CT) [26 cases, mostly enhanced by contrast administered by a peripheral vein (9), the common hepatic artery (9), or the portal vein (5)], and ultrasonography (26 cases). Intraoperative ultrasonography and palpation and examination of the resected specimens revealed 113 tumors. CT detected almost half of the masses smaller than 1 cm, and ultrasonography and angiography about one-third of lesions 1-2 cm in size. Ultrasonography was less powerful for examination of the posterior segment of the liver. CT and ultrasonography placed the tumors into subsegments more accurately than did angiography. Almost 40% of the preoperative plans had to be changed: in two-thirds by extended resections and in one-third by a change from curative to palliative intent. Most changes were due to extrahepatic tumor growth, often within areas screened before surgery. The use of all three imaging modalities for liver metastases is recommended for preoperative planning. PMID:3901943

  2. Comparison of Preoperative Temporal Bone CT with Intraoperative Findings in Patients with Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Rogha, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Sayyed Mostafa; Mokhtarinejad, Farhad; Eshaghian, Afrooz; Dadgostar, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cholesteatoma is traditionally diagnosed by otoscopic examination and treated by surgery. The necessity for imaging in an uncomplicated case is controversial. This study was planned to investigate the usefulness of a preoperative high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan in depicting the status of middle ear structures in the presence of cholesteatoma and also to compare the correspondence between pre- and intraoperative CT findings in patients with cholesteatoma. Materials and Methods: This prospective descriptive study was performed from January 2009 to May 2011 in 36 patients with cholesteatoma who were referred to the Kashani and Al-Zahra Clinics of Otolaryngology. Preoperative high-resolution temporal bone CT scans (axial and coronal views) were carried out and compared with intraoperative findings. Results: Evaluation of 36 patients and their CT scans revealed excellent correlation for sigmoid plate erosion, widening of aditus, and erosion of scutum; good correlation for erosion of malleus and tegmen; moderate correlation for lateral canal fistula (LCF) and erosion of mastoid air cells; and poor correlation for facial nerve dehiscence (FND), incus, and stapes erosion. Conclusion: A preoperative CT scan may be helpful in relation to diagnosis and decision making for surgery in cases of cholesteatoma and ossicular erosion. The CT scan can accurately predict the extent of disease and is helpful for detection of lateral canal fistula, erosions of dural plate, and ossicular erosions. However it is not able to distinguish between cholesteatoma and mucosal disease, facial nerve dehiscency, incus, and stapes erosion. PMID:24505568

  3. The effect of music on preoperative sedation and the bispectral index.

    PubMed

    Ganidagli, Suleyman; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yanik, Medaim; Becerik, Cevdet; Unal, Bahriye

    2005-07-01

    We assessed the effect of music on the level of sedation and the electroencephalograph bispectral index (BIS) during the preoperative period. Fifty-four ASA physical status I-II patients, scheduled for elective septo-rhinoplastic surgery, were included in the study. Subjects were assigned to receive either music (music group; n = 28) or no music (control group; n = 26) during the preoperative period. Sedative premedication was provided with midazolam 0.08 mg/kg IM. Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scales (OAAS) scores and BIS values were recorded at specific time intervals. In the control group, there were more patients with an OAAS score of 1 than in the music group at 30 min after midazolam injection. In addition, there were more patients with an OAAS score of 2 in the control group than in the music group at 30-50 min. However, there were significantly more patients with an OAAS score of 3 in the music group than in the control group at 20-50 min. BIS values of the music group were also smaller than the control group at 30 and 40 min. BIS values were significantly decreased from baseline values at 10-50 min in the music group, whereas BIS values decreased at 30-50 min in the control group. In conclusion, listening to music during midazolam premedication is associated with an increase in sedation level in the preoperative period as reflected by a lower BIS value. PMID:15976214

  4. Preoperative Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Biochemical Recurrence in Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    George, Arvin K.; Frye, Thomas; Kilchevsky, Amichai; Fascelli, Michele; Shakir, Nabeel A.; Chelluri, Raju; Abboud, Steven F.; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Sankineni, Sandeep; Merino, Maria J.; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the utility of preoperative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) in predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) following radical prostatectomy (RP). Materials/Methods From March 2007 to January 2015, 421 consecutive patients with prostate cancer (PCa) underwent preoperative MP-MRI and RP. BCR-free survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify clinical and imaging variables predictive of BCR. Logistic regression was performed to generate a nomogram to predict three-year BCR probability. Results Of the total cohort, 370 patients met inclusion criteria with 39 (10.5%) patients experiencing BCR. On multivariate analysis, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (p = 0.01), biopsy Gleason score (p = 0.0008), MP-MRI suspicion score (p = 0.03), and extracapsular extension on MP-MRI (p = 0.03) were significantly associated with time to BCR. A nomogram integrating these factors to predict BCR at three years after RP demonstrated a c-index of 0.84, outperforming the predictive value of Gleason score and PSA alone (c-index 0.74, p = 0.02). Conclusion The addition of MP-MRI to standard clinical factors significantly improves prediction of BCR in a post-prostatectomy PCa cohort. This could serve as a valuable tool to support clinical decision-making in patients with moderate and high-risk cancers. PMID:27336392

  5. Sphincter-preserving surgery after preoperative radiochemotherapy for T3 low rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    BAI, XUE; LI, SHIYONG; YU, BO; SU, HONG; JIN, WEISEN; CHEN, GANG; DU, JUNFENG; ZUO, FUYI

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of preoperative radiochemotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) and sphincter-preserving procedures for T3 low rectal cancer. Patients with rectal cancer and T3 tumors located within 1–6 cm of the dentate line received preoperative radiochemotherapy. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based radiochemotherapy was used. Radical resection with TME and sphincter-preserving procedures were performed during the six to eight weeks following radiotherapy. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The anal function was evaluated using the Wexner score. The clinical response rate was 83.5%, overall downstaging of T classification was 75.3% and pathological complete response was 15.3%. The anastomotic fistula rate was 4.7%. A median follow-up of 30 months showed the local recurrence rate to be 4.7% and the distant metastasis rate to be 5.9%. The three-year overall survival rate was 87%. The degree of anal incontinence as measured using the Wexner score decreased over time, and the anal sphincter function in the majority of patients gradually improved. Preoperative radiochemotherapy was found to improve tumor downstaging, reduces local recurrence, increase the sphincter preservation rate, and is therefore of benefit to patients with T3 low rectal cancer. PMID:22783445

  6. Computer assisted 3D pre-operative planning tool for femur fracture orthopedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Pavan; Xie, Sheng Quan; Delmas, Patrice; Xu, Wei Liang

    2010-02-01

    Femur shaft fractures are caused by high impact injuries and can affect gait functionality if not treated correctly. Until recently, the pre-operative planning for femur fractures has relied on two-dimensional (2D) radiographs, light boxes, tracing paper, and transparent bone templates. The recent availability of digital radiographic equipment has to some extent improved the workflow for preoperative planning. Nevertheless, imaging is still in 2D X-rays and planning/simulation tools to support fragment manipulation and implant selection are still not available. Direct three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) are also still restricted to a minority of complex orthopedic procedures. This paper proposes a software tool which allows orthopedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose, plan and simulate femur shaft fracture reduction procedures in 3D. The tool utilizes frontal and lateral 2D radiographs to model the fracture surface, separate a generic bone into the two fractured fragments, identify the pose of each fragment, and automatically customize the shape of the bone. The use of 3D imaging allows full spatial inspection of the fracture providing different views through the manipulation of the interactively reconstructed 3D model, and ultimately better pre-operative planning.

  7. Pre-operatively misdiagnosed undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver: analysis of 16 cases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanzhuo; Cai, Quanyu; Jia, Ningyang; Chen, Dong; Lu, Lun

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the clinical features of undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) to improve its preoperative diagnostic accuracy. Methods The clinical, imaging, and histopathologic findings of 16 UESL patients whose disease was pathologically confirmed but preoperatively misdiagnosed were retrospectively analyzed. Results Among these 16 patients, 9 were clinically misdiagnosed as primary liver cancer, 3 as hepatoblastoma, and 4 as malignant hepatic mass. In 12 patients who were presented due to abdominal discomfort, ultrasound showed that predominantly solid lesions, whereas computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated predominantly cystic masses within irregular soft tissue. Contrast-enhanced imaging showed enhancement intralesional foci, multiple internal septations, and edges. The postoperative pathology showed the cutting surface of tumors was variegated, with solid and cystic gelatinous areas, hemorrhage, and necrosis. Intracytoplasmic hyaline globules were commonly present among cancer cells. Conclusions UESL is a rare clinical condition without specific clinical manifestations. The inconsistencies between ultrasound and CT/MRI findings may be helpful to improve the preoperative diagnosis accuracy. PMID:26807408

  8. Preoperative Very Low-Calorie Diet Reduces Technical Difficulty During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy in Obese Patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexander D; Waterland, Peter W; Powell-Brett, Sarah; Super, Paul; Richardson, Martin; Bowley, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of preoperative very low-calorie diet (VLCD) in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A prospective observational study of consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy was undertaken. At the preoperative visit, all patients were advised to adhere to VLCD for 2 weeks before surgery (<800 kcal/d). Patients were judged to have complied with the VLCD if weight loss >2 kg. Technical difficulty was assessed using questionnaires. A total of 38 patients met the inclusion criteria. Difficulty of visualization and dissection of Calot's triangle in obese patients was twice that of nonobese patients (P=0.01). In 62% of procedures involving obese VLCD noncompliant patients, the surgeon experienced ≥1 area of technical difficulty, compared with 0% of procedures on obese, compliant patients (P=0.018). Difficulty of dissection of the gallbladder bed was 3 times higher in obese, noncompliant patients, compared with obese, compliant patients (P=0.07). Adherence to a 2-week preoperative VLCD may reduce technical difficulty of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in obese patients. PMID:27258913

  9. A Giant Ovarian Tumor Causing Anasarca and Dyspnea Successfully Managed after Preoperative Drainage.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Munekage; Tashiro, Hironori; Takaishi, Kiyomi; Honda, Ritsuo; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2015-01-01

    Serious complications are likely to accompany the treatment of giant ovarian tumors, and resection with or without preoperative drainage has been previously reported. Here, we report the case of a 27-year-old Japanese woman with a significant weight gain of 50 kg, who was referred to the Kumamoto University Hospital because of gait impairment and dyspnea. Imaging tests revealed an ovarian tumor, 37 cm in diameter, with two solid components. The patient's condition improved after the removal of 31.5 l tumor fluid by using a suprapubic urinary catheter for 3 days. The tumor was subsequently resected without complications, and was diagnosed as a left mucinous ovarian tumor with malignant components, weighing 37 kg (81.5 lb). The patient was discharged after her anasarca improved, and her body weight decreased from 100 to 50 kg with accompanying considerable urination within two weeks. She was in good condition with no evidence of recurrence at 15 months after surgery. Tumor resection after preoperative drainage was effective in the management of a patient with dyspnea induced by a giant ovarian tumor. We suggest the use of a suprapubic urinary catheter for preoperative drainage because of its ease of use in preventing fluid leakage from the possibly malignant tumor. PMID:25661539

  10. Resource allocation in integrated preoperational and operational management of natural hazards.

    PubMed

    Minciardi, Riccardo; Sacile, Roberto; Trasforini, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The management of natural hazards occurring over a territory entails two main phases: a preoperational-or pre-event-phase, whose objective is to relocate resources closer to sites characterized by the highest hazard, and an operational-during the event-phase, whose objective is to manage in real time the available resources by allocating them to sites where their intervention is needed. Obviously, the two phases are closely related, and demand a unified and integrated treatment. This work presents a unifying framework that integrates various decisional problems arising in the management of different kinds of natural hazards. The proposed approach, which is based on a mathematical programming formulation, can support the decisionmakers in the optimal resource allocation before (preoperational phase) and during (operational phase) an emergency due to natural hazard events. Different alternatives of modeling the resources and the territory are proposed and discussed according to their appropriateness in the preoperational and operational phases. The proposed approach can be applied to the management of any natural hazard and, from an integration perspective, may be particularly useful for risk management in civil protection operations. An application related to the management of wildfire hazard is presented. PMID:19000073

  11. Predictive value of fine needle aspiration biopsy of axillary lymph nodes in preoperative breast cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    Akıncı, Muzaffer; Bulut, Serap Pamak; Erözgen, Fazilet; Gürbüzel, Mihriban; Gülşen, Gökçe; Kocakuşak, Ahmet; Gülen, Mehmet; Kaplan, Rafet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diagnosis of axillary nodal involvement is significant in the management of breast cancer as well as in predicting prognosis. In this prospective study, we evaluated the efficiency of US-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) in preoperative axillary staging of early breast cancer. Material and Methods Between January 2011 and July 2013, 46 women were prospectively enrolled in the study. Ultrasound guided-FNABs for axillary assessment were performed preoperatively. Cytology results were compared with histopathology reports to determine its sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value and accuracy. Results Nineteen cases that had malignant cytology on FNAB also had axillary involvement in axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) without any false-positive results. The sensitivity and specificity of US-guided FNAB were 63.3% and 100%, respectively. US-guided FNAB was accurate in predicting the status of the axilla in 76.1% of patients. Conclusion Although this technique is favorable due to its minimally invasive nature, it is not as effective as sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in terms of detecting axillary metastasis preoperatively. The low sensitivity and low accuracy rates decrease the usefulness of the technique. Therefore, it seems that US-guided FNAB alone could not replace SLNB. Nevertheless, combining some other molecular studies may be useful in increasing the technique’s sensitivity. These issues should be determined by comprehensive clinical trials. PMID:27528822

  12. Extrahepatic biliary atresia: preoperative assessment and surgical results in 47 consecutive cases.

    PubMed Central

    Psacharopoulos, H T; Howard, E R; Portmann, B; Mowat, A P

    1980-01-01

    Of 47 consecutive infants with extrahepatic biliary atresia, effective bile drainage with the return of the serum bilirubin concentration to normal, was achieved in 17 (38%). Direct bile duct-to-bowl anastomosis, attempted in 15 infants, produced bile drainage in only those 4 (9%) in whom bile could be seen within the bile duct remnants at laparotomy. 13 (45%) of 29 infants subjected to portoenterostomy (direct liver-to-bowel anastomosis) had satisfactory prolonged bile drainage with normal serum bilirubin values. Although a correct preoperative diagnosis was made in each case, in 3 (6%) the 72-hour faecal rose bengal 131I excretion was greater than 10% of the injected dose, and in 5 (11%) the hepatic histology did not indicate bile duct obstruction, showing that both investigations are necessary for preoperative diagnosis. Preoperative clinical, laboratory, and hepatic histological features in the 16 jaundice-free survivors showed no significant difference when compared with the 31 infants in whom surgery was successful. Cholangitis occurred in only 7 (43%) of 16 infants with satisfactory bile drainage and was easily controlled with antibiotic treatment. No cutaneous enterostomies were performed. In most survivors liver function tests remain abnormal, but the patients are symptom-free. While it is too early to predict a long-term prognosis for these children, our eldest survivors are healthy and show normal development. PMID:7436455

  13. Interaction of palliative care and primary care.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amrita; Dzeng, Elizabeth; Cheng, M Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Primary care physicians are often the first medical providers patients seek out, and are in an excellent position to provide primary palliative care. Primary palliative care encompasses basic skills including basic evaluation and management of symptoms and discussions about goals of care and advance care planning. Specialty palliative care consultation complements primary care by assisting with complex psychosocial-spiritual patient and family situations. This article reviews primary palliative care skill sets and criteria for when to consider referring patients to specialty palliative care and hospice services. PMID:25920056

  14. Preoperative estimation of run off in patients with multiple level arterial obstructions as a guide to partial reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Noer, I; Tønnesen, K H; Sager, P

    1978-11-01

    Preoperative measurements of direct femoral artery systolic pressure, indirect ankle systolic pressure and direct brachial artery systolic pressure were carried out in nine patients with severe ischemia and arterial occlusions both proximal and distal to the ingvinal ligament. The pressure-rise at the ankle was estimated preoperatively by assuming that the ankle pressure would rise in proportion to the rise in femoral artery pressure. Thus it was predicted that reconstruction of the iliac obstruction with aorta-femoral pressure gradients from 44 to 96 mm Hg would result in a rise in ankle pressure of 16--54 mm Hg. The actual rise in ankle pressure one month after reconstruction of the iliac arteries ranged from 10 to 46 mm Hg and was well correlated to the preoperative estimations. In conclusion, by proper pressure measurements the run-off problem of multiple level arterial occlusions can be evaluated. Thus the result of successful partial reconstruction can be assessed preoperatively. PMID:718291

  15. Sampling and analysis plan for the preoperational environmental survey for the immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) project W-465

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.M.

    1998-09-28

    This document provides a detailed description of the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Preoperational Survey to be conducted at the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Project Site in the 200 East Area.

  16. Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy and Megavoltage Computed Tomography for Rectal Cancer: Impact on the Irradiated Volume of Small Bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; De Ridder, Mark Tournel, Koen; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Coninck, Peter; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy A.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy is considered to be standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer, but is associated with significant small-bowel toxicity. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent helical tomotherapy and daily megavolt (MV) CT imaging may reduce the irradiated volume of small bowel. Methods and Materials: A 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan with CTV-PTV margins adjusted for laser-skin marks (15, 15, and 10 mm for X, Y, and Z directions, respectively) was compared with helical tomotherapy (IMRT) using the same CTV-PTV margins, and to helical tomotherapy with margins adapted to daily MV-CT imaging (IMRT/IGRT; 8, 11, 7, and 10 mm for X, Y{sub ant}, Y{sub post} and Z resp.) for 11 consecutive patients. The planning goals were to prescribe 43.7 Gy to 95% of the PTV, while minimizing the volume of small bowel receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15} {sub SB}). Results: The mean PTV was reduced from 1857.4 {+-} 256.6 cc to 1462.0 {+-} 222.3 cc, when the CTV-PTV margins were adapted from laser-skin marks to daily MV-CT imaging (p < 0.01). The V{sub 15} {sub SB} decreased from 160.7 {+-} 102.9 cc to 110.9 {+-} 74.0 cc with IMRT and to 81.4 {+-} 53.9 cc with IMRT/IGRT (p < 0.01). The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for developing Grade 2+ diarrhea was reduced from 39.5% to 26.5% with IMRT and to 18.0% with IMRT/IGRT (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The combination of helical tomotherapy and daily MV-CT imaging significantly decreases the irradiated volume of small bowel and its NTCP.

  17. Not all total joint replacement patients are created equal: preoperative factors and length of stay in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Winemaker, Mitch; Petruccelli, Danielle; Kabali, Conrad; de Beer, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted a cross-sectional study of primary total joint replacement (TJR) patients to determine predictors for prolonged length of stay (LOS) in hospital to identify patient characteristics that may inform resource allocation, accounting for patient complexity. Methods Preoperative demographics, medical comorbidities and acute hospital LOS from a consecutive series of primary TJR patients from an academic arthroplasty centre were abstracted. We categorized patients as LOS of 3 or fewer days, 4 days, or 5 or more days to align results with varying LOS benchmarks. To identify predictors for LOS, we used a generalized logistic regression model fitted on an LOS ternary outcome, using LOS of 3 or fewer days as a reference category. Results The sample included 1459 patients: 61.7% total knee and 38.3% total hip. Male sex was predictive of an LOS of 3 or fewer days (4 d: odds ratio [OR] 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.364–0.631; ≥ 5 d: OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.435–0.758), as was current smoking status (4 d: OR 0.425, 95% CI 0.274–0.659; ≥ 5 d: OR 0.489, 95% CI 0.314–0.762). Strong predictors of prolonged LOS included total hip versus total knee arthroplasty, age 75 years or older, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification of 3 and 4 and number of cardiovascular comorbidities. Conclusion Not all patients undergoing TJR are equal. The goal should be individual patient-focused care rather than a predetermined LOS that is not achievable for all patients. Hospital resource planning must account for patient complexity when planning future bed management. PMID:25799128

  18. [Preoperative evaluation of surgery for intractable aspiration based on the prognostic nutritional index].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masaya; Hashimoto, Keiko; Mukudai, Shigeyuki; Ushijima, Chihisa; Dejima, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Because there is no absolute indicator of the nutritional status and prognosis in patients with severe aspiration problems, it is quite difficult to arrive at a true long-time prognosis. By performing surgery for intractable aspiration on such patients, both the prognosis and QOL of the patients could be expected to improve. In our department, we have experienced patients dying within 6 months after surgery. In these cases, the patient's preoperative nutritional status was not good. Therefore, we consider that, when we adopt this procedure, there should be some indicators we should use which could have an effect on the prognosis of such nutritionally-challenged patients. In patients who underwent surgery for intractable aspiration; we examined the relationship between their survival and the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) which is an indicator of the risk of complications such as post-operative events in the surgical field. We investigated the relationship between the prognosis and the postoperative indicators of each of the following: WBC, CRP, serum albumin level, and PNI. Out of a total of 31 cases, the average O-PNI of eight cases in which death occurred was 29.45, and the average of six cases in which death occurred within 6 months after surgery was 28.26. The average O-PNI of the survivors was 36.01. A significant association was noted between the early postoperative deaths and some of the four indicators namely that serum albumin level and O-PNI. Based on the ROC curve, the O-PNI offered higher precision than the albumin level. The cut-off value of the O-PNI value for early postoperative mortality rate was 32. The early postoperative mortality rate was 44.4% in patients with less than 32 O-PNI in the preoperative examination, but if it were O-PNI 32 or more, the early postoperative mortality rate was 9.1%, significantly lower. Therefore, O-PNI could be useful as one of the prognostic evaluation factors in the case of preoperative surgery for intractable

  19. Preoperative characteristics predicting intraoperative hypotension and hypertension among hypertensives and diabetics undergoing noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, M E; MacKenzie, C R; Gold, J P; Ales, K L; Topkins, M; Shires, G T

    1990-01-01

    We prospectively studied patients with hypertension and diabetes undergoing elective noncardiac surgery with general anesthesia to test the hypothesis that patients at high risk for prognostically significant intraoperative hemodynamic instability could be identified by their preoperative characteristics. Specifically we hypothesized that patients with a low functional capacity, decreased plasma volume, or significant cardiac comorbidity would be at high risk for intraoperative hypotension and those with a history of severe hypertension would be at risk for intraoperative hypertension. Patients who had a preoperative mean arterial pressure (MAP) greater than or equal to 110, a walking distance of less than 400 m, or a plasma volume less than 3000 cc were at increased risk of intraoperative hypotension (i.e., more than 1 hour of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg decreases in the MAP). Hypotension was also more common among patients having intra-abdominal or vascular surgery, and among those who had operations longer than 2 hours. Patients older than 70 years or with a decreased plasma volume were at increased risk of having more than 15 minutes of intraoperative elevations of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg over the preoperative MAP in combination with intraoperative hypotension; this was also more common when surgery lasted more than 2 hours. Patients who had intraoperative hypotension tended to have an immediate decrease in MAP at the onset of anesthesia and were often purposefully maintained at MAPs less than their usual level during surgery with fentanyl and neuromuscular blocking agents. Patients who had intraoperative hyper/hypotension tended to have repeated elevations in MAP above their preoperative levels during the course of surgery, and such elevations precipitated interventions with neuromuscular blocking agents and/or fentanyl. Neither pattern was more common among patients who developed net intraoperative negative fluid balances. Both hypotension and

  20. Preoperative Patient Reported Mental Health is Associated with High Grade Complications after Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pranav; Henriksen, Carl H.; Zargar-Shoshtari, Kamran; Xin, Ren; Poch, Michael A.; Pow-Sang, Julio M.; Sexton, Wade J.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Gilbert, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Psychological distress has been associated with an impaired immune response and poor wound healing. We hypothesized that preoperative patient reported mental health would be associated with high grade 30-day complications after radical cystectomy. Materials and Methods We retrospectively identified patients who underwent radical cystectomy for bladder cancer who completed Short Form 12 (SF-12) surveys for self-assessment of health status less than 6 months before surgery. Median physical and mental composite scores were calculated. An expert model including known predictors of postoperative high grade complications was developed, and SF-12 physical composite score and mental composite score were added to determine their association with this end point. Results From January 2010 to August 2014, 472 patients underwent radical cystectomy for bladder cancer, of whom 274 (58.1%) completed preoperative SF-12 questionnaires. Responders were more likely to be white (p=0.024), have higher preoperative albumin (p=0.037), receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy (p=0.002), have pT3/T4 disease (p=0.044) and have positive soft tissue surgical margins (p=0.006). Median SF-12 physical composite score was 43.1 (IQR 33.0–51.5) and mental composite score was 48.5 (IQR 39.5–54.7) in responders. Overall 46 (16.8%) responders experienced a high grade 30-day complication. Patients with a high grade complication had a lower preoperative median SF-12 mental composite score (44.8 vs 49.8, p=0.004) but no difference in physical composite score (39.2 vs 43.8, p=0.06). SF-12 mental composite score was also a significant predictive variable when added to our expert model (p=0.01). Conclusions Preoperative patient reported mental health was independently associated with high grade complications after radical cystectomy. Therefore, patient self-assessment of health status before surgery through validated questionnaires may provide additional information useful in predicting short

  1. Preoperative Body Mass Index, Blood Albumin and Triglycerides Predict Survival for Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin Zheng; Tao, Lin; Chen, Yun Zhao; Li, Xu Zhe; Dong, Yu Ling; Ma, Ya Jing; Li, Shu Gang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer (GC) is common and its prognosis is often poor due to difficulties in early diagnosis and optimal treatment strategies. TNM staging system is useful in predicting prognosis but only possible after surgery. Therefore, it is desirable to investigate prognostic factors/markers that may predict prognosis before surgery by which helps appropriate management decisions preoperatively. Methods A total of 320 GC patients were consecutively recruited from 2004 to 2013 and followed up for 127 months (10.6 years) after surgery. These patients’ were examined for body mass index (BMI) and blood levels of albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test were used to analyze long-term survival using the above potential risk markers. We first employed medians of these variables to reveal maximal potentials of the above prognostic predictors. Results Three major findings were obtained: (1) Preoperative BMI was positively correlated with albumin (r = 0.144, P<0.05) and triglyceride (r = 0.365, P<0.01), but negatively correlated with TNM staging (r = -0.265, P<0.05). Preoperative albumin levels were positively correlated with triglyceride (r = 0.173, P<0.05) but again, negatively correlated with TNM staging (r = -0.137, P<0.05); (2) Poor survival was observed in GC patients with lower levels of BMI (P = 0.028), albumin (P = 0.004), and triglyceride (P = 0.043), respectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses suggested BMI, albumin and triglyceride to have survival-predictor powers similar to TNM system; and (3) Cox multi-factorial analyses demonstrated that age (P = 0.049), BMI (P = 0.016), cell differentiation (P = 0.001), and TNM staging (P = 0.011) were independent overall survival-predictors for GC patients. Conclusions Preoperative BMI, albumin, and triglyceride levels are capable of predicting survival for

  2. The Impact of Preoperative Depression and Health State on Quality-of-Life Outcomes after Anterior Cervical Diskectomy and Fusion.

    PubMed

    Alvin, Matthew D; Miller, Jacob A; Lubelski, Daniel; Nowacki, Amy S; Scheman, Judith; Mathews, Manu; McGirt, Matthew J; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective We sought to assess the predictive value of preoperative depression and health state on 1-year quality-of-life outcomes after anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods We analyzed 106 patients who underwent ACDF. All patients had either bilateral or unilateral cervical radiculopathy. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative health outcomes were assessed based on the visual analog scale, Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. Univariable and multivariate regression analyses were performed to assess for preoperative predictors of 1-year change in health status according to the EQ-5D. Results Compared with preoperative health states, the ACDF cohort showed statistically significant improved PDQ (78.5 versus 57.9), PHQ-9 (9.7 versus 5.3), and EQ-5D (0.55 versus 0.68) scores at 1 year postoperatively and surpassed the minimum clinically important difference for the EQ-5D of 0.1 units (all p ≤ 0.01). Multivariate linear regression indicated that anxiolytic use and higher EQ-5D preoperative scores were associated with less 1-year postoperative improvement in health status. Although not statistically significant, clinically important effects of preoperative depression, as measured by the PHQ-9, were observed on postoperative QOL outcome (-0.006, 95% confidence interval -0.014 to 0.001). Conclusions Of patients who undergo ACDF with similar preoperative QOL health states, those with a greater degree of depression may have lower improvements in postoperative QOL compared with those with less depression. Patients with anxiety and better preoperative health states also attain less 1-year QOL improvements. PMID:27190731

  3. The Affordable Care Act and emergency care.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Mark; Asplin, Brent; Epstein, Stephen K; Kocher, Keith Eric; Pilgrim, Randy; Pines, Jesse; Rabin, Elaine Judith; Rathlev, Niels Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will have far-reaching effects on the way health care is designed and delivered. Several elements of the ACA will directly affect both demand for ED care and expectations for its role in providing coordinated care. Hospitals will need to employ strategies to reduce ED crowding as the ACA expands insurance coverage. Discussions between EDs and primary care physicians about their respective roles providing acute unscheduled care would promote the goals of the ACA. PMID:25121814

  4. Investigating the Impacts of Preoperative Steroid Treatment on Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and Duration of Extubation Time underwent Ventricular Septal Defect Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Poyrazoğlu, H. Hakan; Duman, Zeynel; Demir, Şerafettin; Avşar, M. Kemal; Atalay, Atakan; Çiftçi, Bahattin; Bayraktar, İhsan; Tor, Funda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiopulmonary bypass is known to cause inflammatory events. Inflammation occurs due to many known important biological processes. Numerous mechanisms are known to be responsible for the development of inflammatory processes. Currently, there are many defined mediators as a tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) playing an active role in this process. Aims: This research was to investigate the effects of pre-operative steroid use on inflammatory mediator TNF-α and on time to extubation postoperatively in ventricular septal defect patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Study Design: Controlled clinical study. Methods: This study included 30 patients. These patients were assigned into two groups, each containing 15 patients. 5 micrograms/kg methylprednisolone was injected intravenously 2 hours before the surgery to Group I, whereas there was no application to the patients in Group II. TNF-α (pg/mL) level was measured in arterial blood samples obtained at four periods including: the preoperative period (Pre TNF); at the 5th minute of cross-clamping (Per TNF); 2 hours after termination of cardiopulmonary bypass (Post TNF); and at the postoperative 24th hours in cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit (Post 24 h TNF). Results: The mean cross-clamp time was 66±40 and 55±27 minutes in Group I and Group II respectively. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of cross-clamp time (p>0.05). The mean time to extubation was 6.1±2.3 hours in Group I and 10.6±3.4 hours in Group II. Group I extubation time was significantly shorter than Group II. Group I TNF-α levels at Post TNF and Post24h TNF was lower than Group II. These differences are also statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: There is a strong indication that preoperative steroid treatment reduced the TNF-α level together with shortens duration of postoperative intubation and positively contributes to extubation in ventricular septal defect patients operated

  5. Preoperative Standardized Uptake Value of Metastatic Lymph Nodes Measured by 18F-FDG PET/CT Improves the Prediction of Prognosis in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bong-Il; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Ryu, Seung Wan; Sohn, Soo Sang; Kang, Yu Na

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study assessed whether preoperative maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) measured by 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) could improve the prediction of prognosis in gastric cancer. One hundred fifty-one patients with gastric cancer and pathologically confirmed LN involvement who had undergone preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT prior to curative surgical resection were retrospectively enrolled. To obtain nodal SUVmax, a transaxial image representing the highest 18F-FDG uptake was carefully selected, and a region of interest was manually drawn on the highest 18F-FDG accumulating LN. Conventional prognostic parameters and PET findings (primary tumor and nodal SUVmax) were analyzed for prediction of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Furthermore, prognostic accuracy of survival models was assessed using c-statistics. Of the 151 patients, 38 (25%) experienced recurrence and 34 (23%) died during follow-up (median follow-up, 48 months; range, 5–74 months). Twenty-seven patients (18%) showed positive 18F-FDG nodal uptake (range, 2.0–22.6). In these 27 patients, a receiver-operating characteristic curve demonstrated a nodal SUVmax of 2.8 to be the optimal cutoff for predicting RFS and OS. The univariate and multivariate analyses showed that nodal SUVmax (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.71, P < 0.0001), pathologic N (pN) stage (HR = 2.58, P = 0.0058), and pathologic T (pT) stage (HR = 1.77, P = 0.0191) were independent prognostic factors for RFS. Also, nodal SUVmax (HR = 2.80, P < 0.0001) and pN stage (HR = 2.28, P = 0.0222) were independent prognostic factors for OS. A predictive survival model incorporating conventional risk factors (pT/pN stage) gave a c-statistic of 0.833 for RFS and 0.827 for OS, whereas a model combination of nodal SUVmax with pT/pN stage gave a c-statistic of 0.871 for RFS (P = 0

  6. What is palliative care?

    MedlinePlus

    Comfort care; End of life - palliative care; Hospice - palliative care ... The goal of palliative care is to help patients with serious illnesses feel better. It prevents or treats symptoms and side effects of disease ...

  7. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  8. Home Care Services

    MedlinePlus

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help with ...

  9. Enlarged prostate - after care

    MedlinePlus

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help ...

  10. What is palliative care?

    MedlinePlus

    Comfort care; End of life - palliative care; Hospice - palliative care ... The goal of palliative care is to help people with serious illnesses feel better. It prevents or treats symptoms and side effects of disease and ...

  11. Ibuprofen timing for hand surgery in ambulatory care

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Enrico; Bianchi, Anna; Marcuzzi, Augusto; Landi, Antonio; Barbieri, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of pre-operative administration of ibuprofen on post-operative pain control vs. early post-operative administration for hand surgery procedures performed under local anaesthesia in ambulatory care. METHODS: Candidates to trigger finger release by De Quervain tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel operation under local anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Group A received 400 mg ibuprofen before the operation and placebo after the procedure; group B received placebo before the operation and ibuprofen 400 mg at the end of the procedure; both groups received ibuprofen 400 mg every 6h thereafter. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was measured at fixed times before and every 6h after surgery, for a total follow-up of 18h. RESULTS: Groups were similar according to age, gender and type of surgery. Median VAS values did not produce any statistical significance, while there was a statistically significant difference on pre-operative and early post-operative VAS values between groups (A -8.53 mm vs. B 3.36 mm, p=0.0085). CONCLUSION: Average pain levels were well controlled by local anesthesia and post-operative ibuprofen analgesia. Pre-operative ibuprofen administration can contribute to improve early pain management. Level of Evidence II, Therapeutic Studies. PMID:26327799

  12. Preoperative treatment with radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastroesophageal junction cancer and unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ratosa, Ivica; Oblak, Irena; Anderluh, Franc; Velenik, Vaneja; But-Hadzic, Jasna; Ermenc, Ajra Secerov; Jeromen, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background. To purpose of the study was to analyze the results of preoperative radiochemotherapy in patients with unresectable gastric or locoregionally advanced gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer treated at a single institution. Patients and methods. Between 1/2004 and 6/2012, 90 patients with locoregionally advanced GEJ or unresectable gastric cancer were treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. Planned treatment schedule consisted of induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin, followed by concomitant radiochemotherapy four weeks later. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy was delivered by dual energy (6 and 15 MV) linear accelerator in 25 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy in 5 weeks with two additional cycles of chemotherapy repeated every 28 days. Surgery was performed 4–6 weeks after completing radiochemotherapy. Following the surgery, multidisciplinary advisory team reassessed patients for the need of adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary endpoints were histopathological R0 resection rate and pathological response rate. The secondary endpoints were toxicity of preoperative radiochemotherapy and survival. Results. Treatment with preoperative radiochemotherapy was completed according to the protocol in 84 of 90 patients (93.3%). Twenty patients (22.2%) did not undergo the surgery because of the disease progression, serious comorbidity, poor performance status or still unresectable tumour. In 13 patients (14.4%) only exploration was performed because the tumour was assessed as unresectable or diffuse peritoneal carcinomatosis was established. Fifty-seven patients (63.4%) underwent surgery with the aim of complete removal of the tumour. Radical resection was achieved in 50 (55.6%) patients and the remaining seven (7.8%) patients underwent non-radical surgery (R1 in five and R2 in two patients). In this group of patients (n = 57), pathological complete response of tumour was achieved in five

  13. Review article: Perioperative care in enhanced recovery for total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Marinus D J; Lemanu, Daniel P; Coleman, Brendan; Hill, Andrew G; Munro, Jacob T

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced recovery pathways for total hip and knee arthroplasty can reduce length of hospital stay and perioperative morbidity. 22 studies were reviewed for identification of perioperative care interventions, including preoperative (n=4), intra-operative (n=8), and postoperative (n=4) care interventions. Factors that improve outcomes included use of pre-emptive and multimodal analgesia regimens to reduce opioid consumption, identification of patients with poor nutritional status and provision of supplements preoperatively to improve wound healing and reduce length of hospital stay, use of warming systems and tranexamic acid, avoidance of drains to reduce operative blood loss and subsequent transfusion, and early ambulation with pharmacological and mechanical prophylaxis to reduce venous thromboembolism and to speed recovery. PMID:25550024

  14. Elevated Preoperative Serum Gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase Predicts Poor Prognosis for Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shun-Jun; Zhao, Qiang; Ji, Fei; Chen, Mao-Gen; Wu, Lin-Wei; Ren, Qing-Qi; Guo, Zhi-Yong; He, Xiao-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyltransferase (γ-GGT) is a membrane-bound enzyme that is involved in biotransformation, nucleic acid metabolism, and tumourigenesis. Elevated serum γ-GGT levels are related to an increased cancer risk and worse prognosis in many cancers. In the present study, we evaluated the prognostic value of preoperative serum γ-GGT in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who underwent liver transplantation (LT). A total of 130 HCC patients after LT were included in the study. The optimal cut-off value of γ-GGT was 128U/L by receiver operating characteristic analysis, with a sensitivity and specificity of 60.0% and 72.9%, respectively. Elevated preoperative serum γ-GGT was significantly associated with high alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), large tumor size, and macro- and micro-vascular invasion. The 1-, 3-, 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates of HCC patients in the γ-GGT > 128U/L group were poorer than those in the γ-GGT ≤ 128U/L group. Stratification analysis revealed that γ-GGT exhibited a greater predictive value for DFS and OS in HCC patients beyond the Milan criteria and no macro-vascular invasion. In conclusion, elevated preoperative serum γ-GGT was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage and aggressive tumor behaviors, and serum γ-GGT can be considered as a prognostic factor for HCC patients after LT, especially for patients beyond the Milan criteria or without macro-vascular invasion. PMID:27381639

  15. Preoperative retrolisthesis as a risk factor of postdecompression lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shota; Tateishi, Kosuke; Hosono, Noboru; Mukai, Yoshihiro; Fuji, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT In this study, the authors aimed to identify specific risk factors for postdecompression lumbar disc herniation (PDLDH) in patients who have not undergone discectomy and/or fusion. METHODS Between 2007 and 2012, 493 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent bilateral partial laminectomy without discectomy and/or fusion in a single hospital. Eighteen patients (herniation group [H group]: 15 men, 3 women; mean age 65.1 years) developed acute sciatica as a result of PDLDH within 2 years after surgery. Ninety patients who did not develop postoperative acute sciatica were selected as a control group (C group: 75 men, 15 women; mean age 65.4 years). Patients in the C group were age and sex matched with those in the H group. The patients in the groups were also matched for decompression level, number of decompression levels, and surgery date. The radiographic variables measured included percentage of slippage, intervertebral angle, range of motion, lumbar lordosis, disc height, facet angle, extent of facet removal, facet degeneration, disc degeneration, and vertebral endplate degeneration. The threshold for PDLDH risk factors was evaluated using a continuous numerical variable and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The area under the curve was used to determine the diagnostic performance, and values greater than 0.75 were considered to represent good performance. RESULTS Multivariate analysis revealed that preoperative retrolisthesis during extension was the sole significant independent risk factor for PDLDH. The area under the curve for preoperative retrolisthesis during extension was 0.849; the cutoff value was estimated to be a retrolisthesis of 7.2% during extension. CONCLUSIONS The authors observed that bilateral partial laminectomy, performed along with the removal of the posterior support ligament, may not be suitable for lumbar spinal stenosis patients with preoperative retrolisthesis greater than 7.2% during extension. PMID:26654340

  16. Preoperative assessment for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: feasibility of using spiral computed tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, A H; Inui, H; Imamura, A; Uetsuji, S; Kamiyama, Y

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the preoperative feasibility of using spiral computed tomography (SCT) after intravenous infusion cholangiography (IVC-SCT) for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: In laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the aberrant or unusual anatomy of the bile duct and severe inflammation or adhesions around the gallbladder sometimes require a conversion to open surgery. METHODS: Laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC's) were attempted on 440 patients, and preoperative IVC-SCT also was attempted in all of these patients. Using this spiral scanning technique, the bile ducts, cystic duct, and gallbladder were assessed for contour abnormalities, relative position, and filling defects. Forty-seven patients were diagnosed with having stones in their common bile duct or common hepatic duct. RESULTS: Three-hundred eighty-seven patients out of the 440 patients (88.0%) who were subjected to IVC-SCT had the length and course of their cystic duct successfully determined. Anomalous unions of the cystic duct were seen in 59 (15.2%) of 387 patients with respect to the operative findings, and 48 of 440 patients (10.9%) had severe adhesions to Calot's triangle and the surrounding tissues. In these 48 patients, 45 patients (94%) had a nonvisualized cystic duct on IVC-SCT. The preoperative assessment of the feasibility (dense adhesions obscuring Calot's triangle) of using IVC-SCT demonstrated that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 93%, 98%, and 94%, respectively. Five patients had to be converted to open surgery, and the overall morbidity rates for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy was 0.9% (4 of 440). CONCLUSIONS: The most important factor in assessing the feasibility of using laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not the nonvisualized gallbladder, but the nonvisualized cystic duct on IVC-SCT. IVC-SCT may be of benefit to those patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  17. Superior parietal lobule approach for choroid plexus papillomas without preoperative embolization in very young children.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Benjamin C; Cloney, Michael B; Anderson, Richard C E; Feldstein, Neil A

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT Choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs) are rare neoplasms, often found in the atrium of the lateral ventricle of infants, and cause overproduction hydrocephalus. The extensive vascularity and medially located blood supply of these tumors, coupled with the young age of the patients, can make prevention of blood loss challenging. Preoperative embolization has been advocated to reduce blood loss and prevent the need for transfusion, but this mandates radiation exposure and the additional risks of vessel injury and stroke. For these reasons, the authors present their experience using the superior parietal lobule approach to CPPs of the atrium without adjunct therapy. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted of all children who presented to Columbia University/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York with a CPP in the atrium of the lateral ventricle and who underwent surgery using a superior parietal lobule approach without preoperative embolization. RESULTS Nine children were included, with a median age of 7 months. There were no perioperative complications or new neurological deficits. All patients had intraoperative blood loss of less than 100 ml, with a mean minimum hematocrit of 26.9% (range 19.6%-36.2%). No patients required a blood transfusion. The median follow-up was 39 months, during which time no patient demonstrated residual or recurrent tumor on MRI, nor did any have an increase in ventricular size or require CSF diversion. CONCLUSIONS The superior parietal lobule approach is safe and effective for very young children with CPPs in the atrium of the lateral ventricle. The results suggest that preoperative embolization is not essential to avoid transfusion or achieve overall good outcomes in these patients. This management strategy avoids radiation exposure and the additional risks associated with embolization. PMID:25860983

  18. The effects of Pycnogenol(®) on colon anastomotic healing in rats given preoperative irradiation.

    PubMed

    Değer, K Cumhur; Şeker, Ahmet; Özer, Ilter; Bostancı, E Birol; Dalgıç, Tahsin; Akmansu, Müge; Ekinci, Özgür; Erçin, Uğur; Bilgihan, Ayşe; Akoğlu, Musa

    2013-01-01

    Pycnogenol(®) has excellent radical scavenging properties and enhances the production of antioxidative enzymes which contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of the extract. Irradiation delivered to the abdominal region, typically results in severe damage to the intestinal mucosa. The effects of ionizing radiation are mediated by the formation of free radicals through radiolysis. Irradiation has local effects on tissues. These local effects of irradiation on the bowel are believed to involve a two-stage process which includes both short and long term components. In our study we aimed to investigate the short term effects of Pycnogenol(®) on the healing of colon anastomoses in irradiated bowel. Sixty male Wistar-Albino rats were used in this study. There were three groups: Group I, control group (n = 20); group II which received preoperative irradiation (n = 20); group III which received per oral Pycnogenol(®) before irradiation (n = 20). Only segmeter colonic resection and anastomosis was performed to the control group (Group I). The other groups (Group II, III) underwent surgery on the 5th day after pelvic irradiation. On postoperative days 3 and 7, half of the rats in each group were sacrificed and then relaparotomy was performed. There was no statistical difference between groups with respect to biochemical parameters. Bursting pressure was significantly higher in the Control and Group III compared with the Group II. In conclusion, the present study showed that preoperative irradiation effect negatively on colonic anastomoses in rats by means of mechanical parameters and administration of Pycnogenol(®) preoperatively ameliorates this unfavorable effect. PMID:23791893

  19. Planned preoperative radiation therapy for advanced laryngeal carcinoma. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Kazem, I.; van den Broek, P.; Huygen, P.L.M.

    1982-09-01

    One hundred ten patients with predominantly advanced laryngeal carcinoma were treated in the period 1969-1978 with planned preoperative radiation therapy followed by surgery. Site distribution was: 63 supraglottic, 26 glottic, 15 transglottic and 6 subglottic. There were 4 Stage II patients, 66 Stage III and 40 Stage IV. Preoperative radiation therapy consisted of Telecobalt irradiation to a total dose of 25 Gy given to a target volume encompassing the larynx and regional neck nodes, given in 5 equal daily fractions of 5 Gy in 5 consecutive days. Surgery was performed 2 days later. Total laryngectomy was performed on 48 patients, total laryngectomy with neck dissection on 55 patients, supraglottic laryngectomy on 5 and supraglottic laryngectomy with neck dissection on 2 patients. Crude actuarial 5 and 10 year survival probability for the whole group is 71 and 61%, respectively. The corrected 5 and 10 year survival is 75%. For patients with T/sub 3/-T/sub 4/-N/sub 0/ tumors 5 and 10 year survival probability is: crude 65 and 58%, and corrected 70% respectively. For T/sub 3/-T/sub 4/-N/sub +/ crude: 75 and 60% and corrected: 78%. Of 110 patients, one died postoperative, three died of intercurrent disease, five died as a result of second malignancy, and 23 died of their larynx carcinoma: 12/23 because of locoregional failure, and 11/23 because of distant metastasis. We concluded that short intensive preoperative radiation therapy and surgery offer a high cure rate in the treatment of advanced resectable laryngeal carcinoma. The merits of this technique are outlined in the text.

  20. Prognostic Value of Impaired Preoperative Ankle Reflex in Surgical Outcome of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; EG, Hasankhani; Zare, Atefe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several prognostic factors exist influencing the outcome of surgical discectomy in the patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between severity of preoperative impaired ankle reflex and outcomes of lumbar discectomy in the patients with L5-S1 LDH. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients (108 male and 73 female) who underwent simple discectomy in our orthopedic department from April 2009 to April 2013 and followed them up for more than one year. The mean age of the patients was 35.3±8.9 years old. Severity of reflex impairment was graded from 0 to 4+ and radicular pain and disability were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) questionnaires, respectively. Subjective satisfaction was also evaluated at the last follow-up visit. Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare qualitative variables. Results: Reflex impairment existed in 44.8% preoperatively that improved to 10% at the last follow-up visit. Statistical analyses could not find a significant relationship between the severity of impaired ankle reflex and sex or age (P=0.538 and P=0.709, respectively). There was a remarkable relationship between severity of reflex impairment and preoperative radicular pain or disability (P=0.012 and P=0.002, respectively). Kruskal-Wallis test showed that a more severity in ankle reflex impairment was associated with not only less improvement in postoperative pain and disability but also less satisfaction rate (P<0.001 in all three). Conclusions: In the patients with L5-S1 LDH, more severe ankle reflex impairment is associated with less improvement in postoperative pain, disability, and subjective satisfaction. PMID:26894219