Science.gov

Sample records for present day situation

  1. How significant are Phaeocystis colony blooms in the present-day Southern North Sea compared to a reconstructed pristine situation: a model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancelot, Christiane; Passy, Paul; Gypens, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    We performed simulations with the existing MIRO&CO 3D ecological model to assess the present-day magnitude and geographical extent of undesirable Phaeocystis colony blooms in the Southern Bight of the North Sea (SNS) receiving nutrient inputs by large European rivers. The criterion of 4 106 Phaeocystis cells L-1 of Lancelot et al. (2009) is used to scale the presence of undesirable bloom. These simulations are compared with a reconstructed pristine SNS ecosystem making use of nutrient inputs calculated by the Seneque/Riverstrahler model of the river system when all human activities on the watershed have been erased. Interannual variability is considered by performing model runs for two contrasted meteorological years: wet (2001) and dry (2005). Results show a large excess of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) delivery to the SNS of i.e. respectively 12 and 5 times the pristine situation. In contrast the total silicon (Si) delivery is decreased with respect to natural conditions although not shown for every river. Qualitatively, pristine river inputs are shown a large excess Si for pristine but excess N for both 2001 and 2005, when compared to the agreed N, P and Si requirement of coastal diatoms. Responding to the river nutrient inputs, either natural or of anthropogenic origin, phytoplankton blooms are simulated in the vicinity of the river mouths, especially in the eastern SNS receiving 78-98% of the direct river inputs and where nutrients cumulate along a SW-NE gradient, allowing the bloom to form a wide ribbon parallel to the coast. A short time-delay is simulated between the western and eastern SNS due to light limitation imposed by the large sediment inputs discharged by the Thames. A spring diatom-Phaeocystis succession is simulated for both present-day and pristine. Pristine diatoms dominate the bulk of the phytoplankton community; Phaeocystis colonies develop in the whole domain, especially in the Thames and Scheldt river plume though their biomass remains

  2. [The present situation and subject].

    PubMed

    Mori, Hisazumi; Sakamoto, Kazunori; Tokonami, Norihito; Natsuaki, Toshikatsu; Takashima, Tsuneo; Shigenobu, Mitsunori

    2002-12-01

    Terumo Corporation has been supporting the regional medical network, developing new products for home health care and providing service through the Home-Joint system in the fields of HPN, HEN, and HOT. In the chain of servicing, we are carrying out call center operations that can receive inquiries regarding machine operation and machine trouble from the patients, for 24 hours a day, all year round. Most inquiries are settled then and there, but some cases need further treatment. The principal cases are, Lowness mastery degree of patients or tenders, wants of knowledge of the person in charge of answering inquiries, and coming under the medical treatment. It is indispensable to connect closely with Hospitals, the visiting nurse, and agencies. Today's Subject: Pursuit of simplicity and safety of equipment based on On-Call experience. Thorough, careful confirmation for several days from the start. Standardization of On-call information and sharing with the agency and hospital. Advancement of knowledge for answering inquiries. Making a system to cope with medical facilities. PMID:12536853

  3. Present-day plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. B.; Jordan, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    A data set comprising 110 spreading rates, 78 transform fault azimuths and 142 earthquake slip vectors was inverted to yield a new instantaneous plate motion model, designated RM2. The mean averaging interval for the relative motion data was reduced to less than 3 My. A detailed comparison of RM2 with angular velocity vectors which best fit the data along individual plate boundaries indicates that RM2 performs close to optimally in most regions, with several notable exceptions. On the other hand, a previous estimate (RM1) failed to satisfy an extensive set of new data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that RM1 incorrectly predicts the plate kinematics in the South Atlantic because the presently available data are inconsistent with the plate geometry assumed in deriving RM1. It is demonstrated that this inconsistency can be remedied by postulating the existence of internal deformation with the Indian plate, although alternate explanations are possible.

  4. The present situation of echinococcoses in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Budke, C M

    2015-11-01

    This review presents the historical and current situation of echinococcoses in Mongolia. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, Mongolia's health surveillance infrastructure has been very poor, especially as it pertains to chronic diseases, including neglected zoonotic diseases (NZDs). Although there is anecdotal evidence of people dying from hepatic disease due to infection with the larval stage of Echinococcus spp., there are very few published reports. All confirmed cases of echinococcoses in Mongolia are from hospitals located in the capital city of Ulaanbaatar. Cases of cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by either Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto or Echinococcus canadensis are believed to be relatively common throughout Mongolia. In contrast, cases of alveolar echinococcosis (AE), caused by Echinococcus multilocularis, are believed to be rare. Recent wild-animal surveys have revealed that wolves (Canis lupus) are the major definitive hosts of E. canadensis, whereas both wolves and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are the primary definitive hosts of E. multilocularis. Although wild-animal surveys have begun to elucidate the transmission of Echinococcus spp. in Mongolia, there have yet to be large-scale studies conducted in domestic dogs and livestock. Therefore, further epidemiological studies, in addition to education-based control campaigns, are needed to help combat this NZD. PMID:26234999

  5. Present situation and prospects of China's population.

    PubMed

    Zha, R

    1989-06-01

    For a very long time China has been the most populous country in the world. Throughout the last 15-16 years China has achieved great success in checking the excessively rapid growth of its population. However, due to historical reasons as well as current changes, China is still facing a serious situation. As a result of historical evolution, a great number of contradictions exist in China between population on the 1 hand and arable land, food, natural resources, the environment, employment, education, and support of the aged on the other hand. Per capita arable land is now only about .1 hectare. Restricted by the area of arable land, the food supply in China has always been a source of tension. People are reclaiming land on hills and from lakes in ways that are not good for the environment. With rapid population growth, large numbers of young people are reaching working age every year. The ultimate goal of modernization is to promote the well-being of the people. Although the achievements of economic development have been remarkable, the level of goods per person remains low. This has made people realize that population growth must be controlled. The main causes of the rapid fertility decline are 1) socioeconomic development, 2) state guidance, and 3) a strong government policy. Beginning in 1979 in China, the focal point of work has been shifted to economic construction. China's strategic goal of population control is to attain the stationary state through rapid fertility decline. Prospects for the 21st century include 1) an aging population, 2) a more abundant labor force, 3) the further development of cultural and educational undertakings, 4) rapid urbanization, and 5) environmental pollution and resource shortages. PMID:12316068

  6. Coal and the Present Energy Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Elburt F.

    1974-01-01

    Advocates an increase in the use of coal to alleviate the oil and gas shortage. Outlines present deterrents which limit the exploitation of coal, and discusses ways in which this energy source might be more effectively utilized. (JR)

  7. The Italian present-day stress map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montone, Paola; Mariucci, Maria Teresa; Pierdominici, Simona

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present a significant update of the Italian present-day stress data compilation not only to improve the knowledge on the tectonic setting of the region or to constrain future geodynamic models, but also to understand the mechanics of processes linked to faulting and earthquakes. In this paper, we have analysed, revised and collected new contemporary stress data from borehole breakouts and we have assembled earthquake and fault data. In total, 206 new quality-ranked entries complete the definition of the horizontal stress orientation and tectonic regime in some areas, and bring new information mainly in Sicily and along the Apenninic belt. Now the global Italian data set consists of 715 data points, including 499 of A-C quality, representing an increase of 37 per cent compared to the previous compilation. The alignment of horizontal stresses measured in some regions, closely matches the ˜N-S first-order stress field orientation of ongoing relative crustal motions between Eurasia and Africa plates. The Apenninic belt shows a diffuse extensional stress regime indicating a ˜NE-SW direction of extension, that we interpret as related to a second-order stress field. The horizontal stress rotations observed in peculiar areas reflect a complex interaction between first-order stress field and local effects revealing the importance of the tectonic structure orientations. In particular, in Sicily the new data delineate a more complete tectonic picture evidencing adjacent areas characterized by distinct stress regime: northern offshore of Sicily and in the Hyblean plateau the alignment of horizontal stresses is consistent with the crustal motions, whereas different directions have been observed along the belt and foredeep.

  8. Cosmology: from Pomeranchuk to the Present Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, A. D.

    A short and, due to lack of time (half a century of the science progress in half an hour), rather superficial review on the development of cosmology for scientists working on particle and nuclear physics is presented. The introductory historical part is mostly dedicated to the fundamental works done in Russia (USSR), but not always well known outside the country. Next, the key papers on theory and on astronomical observations, which determined the progress in cosmology during the last half-century or posed crucial problem, are discussed. Among them there are inflation, baryogenesis, dark matter, dark energy, the vacuum energy problem, modification of gravity at large scales, and angular fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The presentation is probably biased towards cosmology as it is seen from Russia (or from ITEP) and reflects personal prejudice of the author.

  9. Cosmology: from Pomeranchuk to the present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2014-02-01

    A review of half a century of cosmology is presented for an intended audience of elementary particle physicists. The review is based on a half-hour seminar talk (at the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, ITEP) and is therefore brief and superficial. The introductory historical section is mostly devoted to the fundamental work done in, but not always known outside, Russia (USSR). Foundational works and astronomical observations instrumental in shaping the field are discussed, as are inflation, baryosynthesis, dark matter and dark energy, vacuum energy, large-scale gravity modifications, and microwave background angular fluctuations. The presentation is admittedly not entirely objective but rather is given from the Russian (ITEP) perspective and is influenced by the author's personal views and biases.

  10. Self-Presentation in Task-Oriented Leadership Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, Mark R.; Schlenker, Barry R.

    To examine tactical self-presentations (images persons display publicly) in task-oriented leadership situations, 128 subjects (56 male and 72 female) were assigned leadership positions in groups that did very well or very poorly. The leaders learned that either they or the group-at-large were responsible for the performance and that the other…

  11. Assessment of the world food situation-present and future.

    PubMed

    Almeida, S; Baytelman, D; Chonchol, J; Collins, J; George, S; Vieira, L A; Marc von der Weid, J

    1975-01-01

    The widespread bad harvests of 1972 in various regions of the world, the consequent reduction in grain reserves, the rapid rise in food prices almost everywhere and its impact on inflation, all have served to draw renewed attention to the problem of hunger which affects millions of human beings in the world today. During the 1974 United Nations World Food Conference many important matters relating to this problem were debated: the creation of international grain reserves; problems concerning world trade of foodstuffs; the current difficulties with certain key agricultural production factors, such as fertilizers; the necessity for organizing a worldwide information system on the situation; and prospects of various harvests and threats of famine in underdeveloped countries. It is often the case that discussion of the hunger problem does not correspond to the gravity of the crisis; true causes of the present situation are not examined, and measures are not adopted that will once and for all--for the first time--abolish hunger. In view of the prospect that the real issues are often ignored, the Transnational Institute provides this analysis in an attempt to clarify what must be done to abolish hunger in the belief that this is within the reach of humanity when and if we are determined to end the irrationalities of the present economic system and the relations of domination which some individuals and countries seek to continue. PMID:1158536

  12. Taeniases and cysticercosis in Indonesia: past and present situations.

    PubMed

    Wandra, Toni; Ito, Akira; Swastika, Kadek; Dharmawan, Nyoman S; Sako, Yasuhito; Okamoto, Munehiro

    2013-11-01

    The main aim of this study is to overview the past and present situations of human taeniases and cysticercosis in Indonesia and including future perspectives. Through joint projects from 1996, we have confirmed the occurrence of Taenia saginata (beef tapeworm) in Bali, of Taenia solium (pork tapeworm) mainly in Papua and sporadically in Bali, and of Taenia asiatica in North Sumatra. These taeniases were caused through eating uncooked pork and pig viscera for T. solium and T. asiatica, respectively, and beef for T. saginata. The distribution of these tapeworms in Indonesia is basically highly restricted by the traditional cultural and religious backgrounds in each island. T. saginata is relatively common in Bali although people consume pork 'lawar' more than beef 'lawar'. Taeniases due to T. saginata or T. asiatica and T. solium and cysticercosis due to T. solium have also been sporadically reported in some other islands. Among these species, T. solium is exceptional since humans can be infected not only by larval stages (cysticerci) in pork but also by eggs released from human tapeworm carriers. Cysticercosis has been confirmed in Indonesia in humans, pigs and even dogs. PMID:23965293

  13. Presidents' Day in Second Grade with First-Person Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes how the second-graders of one school performed a first-person historical presentation using all of the presidents of the United States as their characters. In connection with Presidents' Day, students presented a one-minute overview of the president's life in first-person characterization including costumes. Rationale,…

  14. Swiss teleradiology survey: present situation and future trends.

    PubMed

    Lienemann, Bernhard; Hodler, Juerg; Luetolf, Marcus; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain a survey about the present situation including the usage pattern, technical characteristics and the anticipated future of teleradiology in Switzerland. An internet-based questionnaire was made available to all members of the Swiss Society of Radiology. Questions concerning current teleradiology usage, the type of transmitted modalities, the technology employed, security, billing issues and the anticipated future of teleradiology were addressed. One hundred and two (22.67%) of 450 radiologists responded to the survey. Of the total, 41.2% (42) were teleradiology users, 35.3% (36) planned to use teleradiology in the near future and 24.5% (25) did not use or plan to use teleradiology. The mean number of examinations transmitted per month was 198 (range 1-2,000) and the mean distance was 33 km (range 1,250 km). An emergency service was considered the most important purpose (mean score 6.90; minimum 1, maximum 10) for the use of teleradiology, followed by image distribution (mean 6.74) and expert consultation (mean 6.61). The most commonly transmitted modality was computed tomography (mean 8.80), followed by conventional X-rays (8.40) and magnetic resonance imaging (8.32). The most commonly transmitted format was Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) (66.7%), followed by bitmap/Joint Photographic Experts Group (jpg) (38.1%), using the DICOM send/receive protocol (52.4%), followed by the hypertext transfer protocol (26.2%) and e-mail (21.4%). For security a secure connection (54.8%) followed by encryption (14.3%) and anonymization (9.5%) was used. For the future, image distribution was rated the most important aspect of teleradiology (7.88), followed by emergency (7.22) and expert consultation (6.53). Development of legal regulations is considered most important (8.17), followed by data security guidelines (8.15). Most radiologists believe that insurance companies should pay for the costs of teleradiology (37

  15. Common Characteristics of Models in Present-Day Scientific Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Valk, Ton; Van Driel, Jan H.; De Vos, Wobbe

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the use of models in scientific research requires a description, in general terms, of how scientists actually use models in their research activities. This paper aims to arrive at defining common characteristics of models that are used in present-day scientific research. Initially, a list of common features of models and modelling, based…

  16. Present situation and future R&D at Nobelpharma AB.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, C

    1995-01-01

    Nobelpharma's long-term objectives are to reach many patients with implant treatment, to strengthen our position as the world's leading implant company and to become one of the world's leading companies in the dental field. We have defined a number of strategies and identified obstacles which need to be overcome in order to achieve these objectives. Research and development is of course one of the most important strategic fields for our company. For a leading research company, it is essential to be able to protect its innovations, so patents are very important. Our patent situation today is very strong and we now have more than 100 original patents or patent applications. We are continuously working on the development of new techniques and products. Our research areas include studying interface geometries, soft tissue integration, defining guidelines for treatment planning and increasing our knowledge about precision requirements in support of future product development. PMID:9063136

  17. Overcoming Present-Day Powerplant Limitations Via Unconventional Engine Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.

    2006-01-01

    The Army Research Laboratory s Vehicle Technology Directorate is sponsoring the prototype development of three unconventional engine concepts - two intermittent combustion (IC) engines and one turbine engine (via SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) contracts). The IC concepts are the Nutating Engine and the Bonner Engine, and the turbine concept is the POWER Engine. Each of the three engines offers unique and greatly improved capabilities (which cannot be achieved by present-day powerplants), while offering significant reductions in size and weight. This paper presents brief descriptions of the physical characteristics of the three engines, and discusses their performance potentials, as well as their development status.

  18. Nuclear Fusion Drives Present-Day Accelerated Cosmic Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Leong

    2010-09-30

    The widely accepted model of our cosmos is that it began from a Big Bang event some 13.7 billion years ago from a single point source. From a twin universe perspective, the standard stellar model of nuclear fusion can account for the Dark Energy needed to explain the mechanism for our present-day accelerated expansion. The same theories can also be used to account for the rapid inflationary expansion at the earliest time of creation, and predict the future cosmic expansion rate.

  19. Uncommon situation and presentation of chronic sclerosing sialadenitis.

    PubMed

    Adouly, T; Adnane, C; Housni, Y; Rouadi, S; Abada, R; Roubal, M; Mahtar, M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic sclerosing sialadenitis of the parotid gland is a very uncommon chronic inflammatory salivary gland disease. Clinically, it presents as a slow-growing painful. Histologically, it showed a chronic inflammation and fibrosis. This case report highlights the clinical, radiological and histological aspects of this disease. We report unusual case of chronic sclerosing sialadenitis of the parotid in a 12-year-old man. CT detected a mass of tissue density in the right parotid. The evolution was marked by spontaneous fistula allowing a surgical biopsy. The mass regressed after corticosteroids. The follow-up was normal. The location, age and presentation make our case very interesting. PMID:26968047

  20. Present-day dynamic and residual topography in central Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uluocak, Ebru Şengül; Pysklywec, Russell; Göğüş, Oğuz H.

    2016-06-01

    The Central Anatolian orogenic plateau is represented by young volcanism, rapid plateau uplift, and distinctive (past and active) tectonic deformation. In this study, we consider observational data in terms of regional present-day geodynamics in the region. The residual topography of Central Anatolia was derived to define the regional isostatic conditions according to Airy isostasy and infer the potential role of "dynamic topography". Two-dimensional thermo-mechanical forward models for coupled mantle-lithosphere flow/deformation were conducted along a N-S directional profile through the region (e.g. northern/Pontides, interior, and southern/Taurides). These models were based on seismic tomography data that provide estimates about the present-day mantle thermal structure beneath the Anatolian plate. We compare the modelling results with calculated residual topography and independent data sets of geological deformation, gravity, and high surface heat flow/widespread geothermal activity. Model results suggest that there is ˜1 km of mantle flow induced dynamic topography associated with the sub-lithospheric flow driven by the seismically-inferred mantle structure. The uprising mantle may have also driven the asthenospheric source of volcanism in the north (e.g. Galatia volcanic province) and the Cappadocia volcanic province in the south while elevating the surface in the last 10 Myrs. Our dynamic topography calculations emphasize the role of vertical forcing under other orogenic plateaux underlain by relatively thin crust and low-density asthenospheric mantle.

  1. Present-day Antarctic Ice Mass Changes and Crustal Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Thomas S.; Ivins, Erik R.

    1995-01-01

    The peak vertical velocities predicted by three realistic, but contrasting, present-day scenarios of Antarctic ice sheet mass balance are found to be of the order of several mm/a. One scenario predicts local uplift rates in excess of 5 mm/a. These rates are small compared to the peak Antarctic vertical velocities of the ICE-3G glacial rebound model, which are in excess of 20 mm/a. If the Holocene Antarctic deglaciation history portrayed in ICE-3G is realistic, and if regional upper mantle viscosity is not an order of magnitude below 10(exp 21) pa s, then a vast geographical region in West Antarctica is uplifting at a rate that could be detected by a future Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign. While present-day scenarios predict small vertical crustal velocities, their overall continent-ocean mass exchange is large enough to account for a substantial portion of the observed secular polar motion ((Omega)m(bar)) and time-varying zonal gravity field J(sub 1).

  2. Present-day Antarctic ice mass changes and crustal motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Thomas S.; Ivins, Erik R.

    1995-01-01

    The peak vertical velocities predicted by three realistic, but contrasting, present-day scenarios of Antarctic ice sheet mass balance are found to be of the order of several mm/a. One scenario predicts local uplift rates in excess of 5 mm/a. These rates are small compared to the peak Antarctic vertical velocities of the ICE-3G glacial rebound model, which are in excess of 20 mm/a. If the Holocene Antarctic deglaciation history protrayed in ICE-3G is realistic, and if regional upper mantle viscosity is not an order of magnitude below 10(exp 21) Pa(dot)s, then a vast geographical region in West Antarctica is uplifting at a rate that could be detected by a future Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign. While present-day scenarios predict small vertical crustal velocities, their overall continent-ocean mass exchange is large enough to account for a substantial portion of the observed secular polar motion (omega m(arrow dot)) and time-varying zonal gravity field.

  3. An Extremely Rare Situation - Subcutaneously Filariasis Presented at ED Craiova

    PubMed Central

    ROTARU, LUCIANA; ȘERBAN, C,

    2014-01-01

    A 32 year old male patient presented to the ED Craiova with migratory, burning pain, to the right cervical and left upper eyelid. Sudden, transient, bilateral knee swelling six months ago. An inflammatory trace and a renitent cord can feel at this level, with spontaneous mobility. A microfilaraemic parasite was surgically extracted from upper eyelid. Mobility of the parasite was the key element of an extremely quick and easy diagnosis for a very rare disease but the specific circumstances of the contamination remains unclear. Even uncommon, multiple determinations are possible requiring systematic and long term investigation and medical surveillance. PMID:25729596

  4. The present situation of human taeniases and cysticercosis in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Wandra, Toni; Li, Tiaoying; Dekumyoy, Paron; Nkouawa, Agathe; Okamoto, Munehiro; Budke, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Three human Taenia species, Taenia solium, Taenia saginata, and Taenia asiatica, are endemic in rural regions of Asia, with these species sympatrically distributed in parts of Thailand and China. The pork tapeworm, T. solium, is the most pathogenic to humans, causing cysticercosis and neurocysticercosis (NCC). Due to its public health impact, T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis is one of 17 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) prioritized by the World Health Organization. In this review, the current status of taeniasis and NCC in several Asian countries will be presented as will possible prevention and control strategies. Among the known T. solium endemic areas in Asia, Bali, Indonesia is of high importance due to the risk of tourists becoming infected. Therefore, special attention will be given to ongoing control initiatives in Bali. PMID:25858304

  5. Blindness in Africa: present situation and future needs

    PubMed Central

    Lewallen, S.; Courtright, P.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To review the prevalence and causes of blindness in sub-Saharan Africa, the existing services and limitations, and the Vision 2020 goals for the future.
METHODS—Methodologically sound population based surveys published in the past 20 years are reviewed and results for prevalence and causes of blindness are tabulated. The current resources and needs according to recent publications and international working groups are described.
CONCLUSIONS—Blindness prevalence rates vary widely but the evidence suggests that approximately 1% of Africans are blind. The major cause is cataract; trachoma and glaucoma are also important causes of blindness. The bulk of blindness in the region is preventable or curable. Efforts should focus on eye problems which are universally present and for which there are cost effective remedies, such as cataract and refractive problems and on those problems which occur focally and can be prevented by primary healthcare measures, such as trachoma, onchocerciasis, and vitamin A deficiency. Major development of staffing levels, infrastructure, and community programmes will be necessary to achieve Vision 2020 goals.

 PMID:11466240

  6. Phosphorus Necrosis of the Jaw: A Present-day Study

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J. P. W.; Baron, R.; Buckland, D. H.; Cooke, M. A.; Craig, J. D.; Duffield, D. P.; Grosart, A. W.; Parkes, P. W. J.; Porter, A.

    1962-01-01

    A historical note on the aetiology of phossy jaw shows that present-day knowledge is little greater than it was a century ago. The varied clinical course of the disease is described together with a report of 10 classical cases not previously reported. Six cases, not amounting to true necrosis but in which healing after dental extraction was delayed, and described, and mention is made of the noticeable differences in the oral state and appearances of tartar of healthy workmen exposed to phosphorus compared with healthy workmen not exposed. But no systematic differences of any kind were found in the incidence of general infections, fractures of bones, haematological findings, and biochemical studies of blood and urine in two groups of healthy men most exposed and least exposed to phosphorous in the same factory. An intensive study in hospital of a case of classical necrosis showed no departure from normal, except delayed healing following bone biopsy from the iliac crest, and a reversed polymorphonuclear/lymphocyte ratio. In the discussion the time of onset of necrosis after first exposure to phosphorus, clinical and radiological diagnosis, the organisms present, personal susceptibility, the appearance of the sequestra, and regeneration of bone are considered. An up-to-date note on prevention of the disease is given, although this has met with only partial success. Some persons are highly susceptible and, whilst complete protection is impossible in the light of our present knowledge, early diagnosis and modern treatment have robbed the disease of its terrible manifestations of Victorian times and turned it into a minor, although often uncomfortable complaint, with little or no resulting disability. Images PMID:14449812

  7. ADAPTION OF NONSTANDARD PIPING COMPONENTS INTO PRESENT DAY SEISMIC CODES

    SciTech Connect

    D. T. Clark; M. J. Russell; R. E. Spears; S. R. Jensen

    2009-07-01

    With spiraling energy demand and flat energy supply, there is a need to extend the life of older nuclear reactors. This sometimes requires that existing systems be evaluated to present day seismic codes. Older reactors built in the 1960s and early 1970s often used fabricated piping components that were code compliant during their initial construction time period, but are outside the standard parameters of present-day piping codes. There are several approaches available to the analyst in evaluating these non-standard components to modern codes. The simplest approach is to use the flexibility factors and stress indices for similar standard components with the assumption that the non-standard component’s flexibility factors and stress indices will be very similar. This approach can require significant engineering judgment. A more rational approach available in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which is the subject of this paper, involves calculation of flexibility factors using finite element analysis of the non-standard component. Such analysis allows modeling of geometric and material nonlinearities. Flexibility factors based on these analyses are sensitive to the load magnitudes used in their calculation, load magnitudes that need to be consistent with those produced by the linear system analyses where the flexibility factors are applied. This can lead to iteration, since the magnitude of the loads produced by the linear system analysis depend on the magnitude of the flexibility factors. After the loading applied to the nonstandard component finite element model has been matched to loads produced by the associated linear system model, the component finite element model can then be used to evaluate the performance of the component under the loads with the nonlinear analysis provisions of the Code, should the load levels lead to calculated stresses in excess of Allowable stresses. This paper details the application of component-level finite

  8. On the Stability of Liquid Water on Present Day Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The mean annual surface pressure and temperature on present day Mars do not allow for the long term stability of liquid water on the surface. However, theoretical arguments have been advanced that suggest liquid water could form in transient events even though it would not be in equilibrium with the environment. Using a Mars General Circulation Model, we calculate where and for how long the surface pressure and surface temperature meet the minimum requirements for this metastability of liquid water. These requirements are that the pressure and temperature must be above the triple point of water, but below its boiling point. We find that there are five regions on Mars where these requirements are periodically satisfied: in the near equatorial regions of Amazonis, Arabia, and Elysium, and in the Hellas and Argyre impact basins. Whether liquid water ever forms in these regions depends on the availability of ice and heat, and on the evaporation rate. The latter is poorly understood for low pressure CO2 environments, but is likely to be so high that melting occurs rarely, if at all. However, in the relatively recent past, surface pressures may have been higher than they are today perhaps by as much as a factor of 2 or 3. Under these circumstances melting would have been easier to achieve. We plan to undertake laboratory experiments to better understand the potential for melting in low pressure environments.

  9. The landscape of Neandertal ancestry in present-day humans

    PubMed Central

    Sankararaman, Sriram; Mallick, Swapan; Dannemann, Michael; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of Neandertal genomes have revealed that Neandertals have contributed genetic variants to modern humans1–2. The antiquity of Neandertal gene flow into modern humans means that regions that derive from Neandertals in any one human today are usually less than a hundred kilobases in size. However, Neandertal haplotypes are also distinctive enough that several studies have been able to detect Neandertal ancestry at specific loci1,3–8. Here, we have systematically inferred Neandertal haplotypes in the genomes of 1,004 present-day humans12. Regions that harbor a high frequency of Neandertal alleles in modern humans are enriched for genes affecting keratin filaments suggesting that Neandertal alleles may have helped modern humans adapt to non-African environments. Neandertal alleles also continue to shape human biology, as we identify multiple Neandertal-derived alleles that confer risk for disease. We also identify regions of millions of base pairs that are nearly devoid of Neandertal ancestry and enriched in genes, implying selection to remove genetic material derived from Neandertals. Neandertal ancestry is significantly reduced in genes specifically expressed in testis, and there is an approximately 5-fold reduction of Neandertal ancestry on chromosome X, which is known to harbor a disproportionate fraction of male hybrid sterility genes20–22. These results suggest that part of the reduction in Neandertal ancestry near genes is due to Neandertal alleles that reduced fertility in males when moved to a modern human genetic background. PMID:24476815

  10. A comparative study of prebiotic and present day translational models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rein, R.; Raghunathan, G.; Mcdonald, J.; Shibata, M.; Srinivasan, S.

    1986-01-01

    It is generally recognized that the understanding of the molecular basis of primitive translation is a fundamental step in developing a theory of the origin of life. However, even in modern molecular biology, the mechanism for the decoding of messenger RNA triplet codons into an amino acid sequence of a protein on the ribosome is understood incompletely. Most of the proposed models for prebiotic translation lack, not only experimental support, but also a careful theoretical scrutiny of their compatibility with well understood stereochemical and energetic principles of nucleic acid structure, molecular recognition principles, and the chemistry of peptide bond formation. Present studies are concerned with comparative structural modelling and mechanistic simulation of the decoding apparatus ranging from those proposed for prebiotic conditions to the ones involved in modern biology. Any primitive decoding machinery based on nucleic acids and proteins, and most likely the modern day system, has to satisfy certain geometrical constraints. The charged amino acyl and the peptidyl termini of successive adaptors have to be adjacent in space in order to satisfy the stereochemical requirements for amide bond formation. Simultaneously, the same adaptors have to recognize successive codons on the messenger. This translational complex has to be realized by components that obey nucleic acid conformational principles, stabilities, and specificities. This generalized condition greatly restricts the number of acceptable adaptor structures.

  11. The present-day number of tectonic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher G. A.

    2016-03-01

    The number of tectonic plates on Earth described in the literature has expanded greatly since the start of the plate tectonic era, when only about a dozen plates were considered in global models of present-day plate motions. With new techniques of more accurate earthquake epicenter locations, modern ways of measuring ocean bathymetry using swath mapping, and the use of space based geodetic techniques, there has been a huge growth in the number of plates thought to exist. The study by Bird (2003) proposed 52 plates, many of which were delineated on the basis of earthquake locations. Because of the pattern of areas of these plates, he suggested that there should be more small plates than he could identify. In this paper, I gather together publications that have proposed a total of 107 new plates, giving 159 plates in all. The largest plate (Pacific) is about 20 % of the Earth's area or 104 Mm2, and the smallest of which (Plate number 5 from Hammond et al. 2011) is only 273 km2 in area. Sorting the plates by size allows us to investigate how size varies as a function of order. There are several changes of slope in the plots of plate number organized by size against plate size order which are discussed. The sizes of the largest seven plates is constrained by the area of the Earth. A middle set of 73 plates down to an area of 97,563 km2 (the Danakil plate at number 80, is the plate of median size) follows a fairly regular pattern of plate size as a function of plate number. For smaller plates, there is a break in the slope of the plate size/plate number plot and the next 32 plates follow a pattern of plate size proposed by the models of Koehn et al. (2008) down to an area of 11,638 km2 (West Mojave plate # 112). Smaller plates do not follow any regular pattern of area as a function of plate number, probably because we have not sampled enough of these very small plates to reveal any clear pattern.

  12. Present Day Activity of South Polar Gullies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, J.; Reiss, D.; Ruesch, O.; Hiesinger, H.

    2012-04-01

    Here we report on clearly identified seasonal changes of gullies observed within the last two martian years (MY) on slopes of a south polar pit, which is located in a filled crater (diameter ~54 km) north of Sisyphi Cavi at ~68.5°S and ~1.5°E. Using new high-resolution imaging (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, HiRISE), temperature (Thermal Emission Spectrometer, TES) and spectral data (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, CRISM; Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité, OMEGA), we analyzed the exact timing of changes of gullies and detect the possible medium (CO2, H2O or dry) and mechanism which initiate present day gully activity. Two locations in the study region with clear modifications of gullies were identified in MY 29 between LS 226° and LS 247° and between LS 209° and LS 247°. In MY 30 changes occur in both locations between LS 218° and LS 249°. Modifications are the formation of a new small apron and new deposits within the channel, both associated with the deposition of dark material. Erosion in gully alcoves or channels was not observed. TES data show temperatures between ~180 and ~240 K within the period of gully modifications. Maximum temperatures in the region rise up to ~285 K between LS ~270° and ~310°. Spectral data show a CO2-cover of the study region until LS 227°. CO2-ice free surface are spectrally observed for the first time at LS 249°. H2O was not spectrally detected in the study region and a mixture of CO2 and H2O as presented in [1] cannot be clearly detected. Unfortunately, there are no spectral data available between LS 227° and 249°. Modifications of gullies imply seasonal volatile activity. The activity can be narrowed down to occur between LS 226° and 247° at mean temperatures between ~180 and ~240 K. This is in the range of temperatures where CO2 sublimates back into the atmosphere. Based on the temperature range, the most likely candidate for the observed new

  13. Augmented reality technology for day/night situational awareness for the dismounted Soldier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Eric; Roberts, David; Bennett, Matthew; Towles, Herman; Menozzi, Alberico; Cook, James; Sherrill, Todd

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes Applied Research Associates' (ARA) recent advances in Soldier augmented reality (AR) technology. Our AR technology, called ARC4, delivers heads-up situational awareness to the dismounted warfighter, enabling non-line-of-sight team coordination in distributed operations. ARC4 combines compact head tracking sensors with advanced pose estimation algorithms, network management software, and an intuitive AR visualization interface to overlay tactical iconic information accurately on the user's real-world view. The technology supports heads-up navigation, blue-force tracking, target handoff, image sharing, and tagging of features in the environment. It integrates seamlessly with established network protocols (e.g., Cursor-on-Target) and Command and Control software tools (e.g., Nett Warrior, Android Tactical Assault Kit) and interfaces with a wide range of daytime see-through displays and night vision goggles to deliver real-time actionable intelligence, day or night. We describe our pose estimation framework, which fuses inertial data, magnetometer data, GPS, DTED, and digital imagery to provide measurements of the operator's precise orientation. These measurements leverage mountainous terrain horizon geometry, known landmarks, and sun position, enabling ARC4 to achieve significant improvements in accuracy compared to conventional INS/GPS solutions of similar size, weight, and power. We detail current research and development efforts toward helmet-based and handheld AR systems for operational use cases and describe extensions to immersive training applications.

  14. Teaching with Social Media: Disrupting Present Day Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meabon Bartow, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Because social technologies present illuminating educational, ethical, economic, and structural challenges to existing constructions of public education, they catalyze a fundamental examination of what public education should look like and be like in a democracy. Given their performances in other arenas, mobile and electronic technologies have the…

  15. Dawn of a New Day. A WKCSC Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, Joyce; And Others

    This panel contains presentations by four members of the Western Kansas Community Services Consortium (WKCSC) who are involved in either teaching or administering college programs in Kansas in which part-time students are participating. Joyce Hartmann underscores the importance of part-time students as growing consumers of college programming in…

  16. Tracing galaxy evolution by their present-day luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, Elmo

    2011-04-01

    Galaxies, which are complex objects containing up to several tens of billions stars, as well as gas and dust, are remarkable objects. The Universe contains a very diverse "zoo" of galaxies: there are galaxies with a discy shape and spiral structure, elliptical galaxies, and even galaxies, which show no sign of structure. This variety of galaxies leads to the basic question: how the galaxies form and evolve and which processes shape the structure of galaxies? Due to the complexity of galaxy formation and evolution, this question is still an unresolved puzzle and it is one of the biggest challenges in modern cosmology. The present thesis is based on large galaxy surveys and concentrates on the large-scale structure: how galaxy evolution is related to the surrounding large-scale environment of superclusters and voids. To study the evolution of galaxies, we use the luminosity function, which is in this respect one of the most fundamental of all cosmological observables. One of the principal results of the present study was the conclusion that the evolution of spiral galaxies is almost independent of the global environment, especially for blue and red spirals separately, showing that the formation of spiral galaxies has to be similar in all environments. Meanwhile, the luminosity function of elliptical galaxies depends strongly on the environment. This shows that the global environmental density is an important factor (via merging history) in the formation of elliptical galaxies. The results of the present study show clearly, that besides the local/group environment, the global (supercluster-void) environment plays also an important role in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Accounting for the role of global environment can help to solve several problems in the present picture of galaxy formation and evolution.

  17. [Fungus patents: from Pasteur to the present day].

    PubMed

    Bernardo-Álvarez, María Ángela

    2012-01-01

    At the end of the 19(th) century, the American Patent Office granted the patent known as "Pasteur's application", claiming the protection of a yeast strain. Since that date, the debate around biotechnology patents, especially for those that affect living organisms or part of them, has grown exponentially. In the present article, the Patent Law is reviewed, pointing out the particular problems about fungi or parts of them. Also, some of the fungus patents are discussed from the perspective of the ethical, economical, social and environmental aspects of these kind of patents. PMID:22677466

  18. Evaluating some indicators for identifying mountain waves situations in snow days by means of numerical modeling and continuous data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Jose Luis; Posada, Rafael; Hierro, Rodrigo; García-Ortega, Eduardo; Lopez, Laura; Gascón, Estibaliz

    2013-04-01

    Madrid - Barajas airport is placed at 70 km away from the Central System and snow days and mountains waves are considered as risks days for landing operations. This motivated the study of mesoscale factors affecting this type of situations. The availability of observational data gathered during three consecutives winter campaigns in the Central System along with data from high-resolution numerical models, have allowed the evaluation of the environmental conditions necessary for mountain waves formations in snow days and were characterized from observational data and numerical simulations. By means of Meteosat Second Generation satellite images, lee clouds were observed in 25 days corresponding to the 2008-2011 winter seasons. Six of them, which also presented NW low level flow over the mountain range, were analyzed. Necessary conditions for oscillations as well as vertical wave propagation were studied from radiometer data and MM5 model simulations. From radiometer data the presence of stable environment in the six selected events is confirmed. From MM5 model, dynamic conditions allowing the flow to cross the mountain range were evaluated in three different locations around the mountain range. Simulations of vertical velocity show that MM5 model is able to detect mountain waves. The waves present in the six selected events are examined. Tropospheric were able to forecast energy release associated with the mountain waves. The vertical wavelength presented a high variability due to intense background winds at high tropospheric levels. The average values estimated for λz were between 3 and 12 km. The intrinsic period estimated was around 30 and 12 km. The simulations were able to forecast energy release associated with mountain waves. Acknowledgments: This study was supported by the Plan Nacional de I+D of Spain, through the grants CGL2010-15930, Micrometeo IPT-310000-2010-022 and the Junta de Castilla y León through the grant LE220A11-2.

  19. Present-day aeolian activity in Herschel Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinale, Marco; Silvestro, Simone; Vaz, David A.; Michaels, Timothy; Bourke, Mary C.; Komatsu, Goro; Marinangeli, Lucia

    2016-02-01

    In this report, we show evidence for ripple and dune migration in Herschel Crater on Mars. We estimate an average dune migration of 0.8 m and a minimum ripple migration of 1.1 m in a time span of 3.7 Earth-years. These dunes and ripples are mainly shaped by prevailing winds coming from the north, however we also report the presence of secondary winds which elongate the barchans' horns. Such a complex wind scenario is likely caused by the influence of winds blowing off the western crater rim as suggested by the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS), an atmospheric mesoscale model. A multi-directional wind regime at the local scale is also supported by the observed bimodal distribution of the ripple trends. For the first time, a survey integrating the assessment of dune and ripple migration is presented, showing how dune topography can influence the migration patterns of ripples and how underlying topography appears to control the rates of dune migration.

  20. Likelihood of nitrogen condensation in Titan's present-day atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    The temperature in Titan's upper troposphere measured by the Huygens Probe is relatively close to the nitrogen condensation point. This poses the question as to whether seasonal nitrogen condensation might occur on Titan analogously to seasonal carbon dioxide condensation on Mars. The likelihood of nitrogen condensation in Titan's atmosphere is investigated using tropospheric temperature data obtained by Cassini radio occultations and simulation with a general circulation model (GCM). The observed tropospheric temperature generally decreases towards both poles but does not reach the nitrogen condensation point anywhere. However, Cassini may not have sounded the coldest season and area in Titan's troposphere. The GCM simulation shows that in the upper troposphere the variable solar distance associated with Saturn's orbital eccentricity has a larger impact on the seasonal polar temperature variation than the variable solar declination associated with Saturn's obliquity. In the upper troposphere relevant for nitrogen condensation the annual minimum polar temperature is predicted to occur around the northern autumnal equinox, approximately one season after aphelion. This temperature is then 1-2 K lower than in the season of the Cassini/Huygens mission. It is possible if not certain that some nitrogen condensation with cloud formation occurs in the northern and southern polar region in the upper troposphere around the northern autumnal equinox. Under the present orbital parameters of Saturn and Titan nitrogen condensation may occur more frequently near the south pole than near the north pole.

  1. Tactical Self-Presentation and Sex Differences in Task-Oriented Leadership Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, Mark R.; Schlenker, Barry R.

    Through self-presentations, individuals claim a variety of public images that influence how others regard and treat them in social interactions. An examination of self-presentation in a leadership situation focused on three dimensions of leader behavior: competence, socioemotionality, and prominence. Subjects (N=128) were assigned leadership…

  2. Past- and present-day Madden-Julian Oscillation in CNRM-CM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eun-Ji; Seo, Kyong-Hwan

    2016-04-01

    Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the past (nineteenth century) and present day (twentieth century) is examined using preindustrial and historical experiments of Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques-Coupled Models, version 5 (CNRM-CM5) in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). The present-day MJO is stronger than the past MJO by 33% and it is ~10% more frequent. In particular, the MJO phases 4-7 signifying deep convection situated over the Maritime continent and western Pacific (WP) are considerably enhanced. These changes are due mainly to greenhouse gas forcing with little impact from nature forcing. Dynamical mechanisms for this change are investigated. A peculiar strengthening of MJO over WP comes from increased basic-state sea surface temperature (SST) over the Central Pacific (CP) and EP. The increase in precipitation over WP results from both the response to enhanced SST over CP and the inverted Walker circulation induced by the EP and CP SST increase. The latter causes a pair of anticyclonic Rossby waves straddling the equator, leading to moisture convergence over WP.

  3. The present situation and forecasts of semiconductor elements performance within the microwave range, 1970-1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B.

    1978-01-01

    The present situation and possible developments over the period 1970-1985 for active semiconductor elements in the microwave range are outlined. After a short historical survey of FT techniques, the following are discussed: Generation, power amplification, amplification of small signals, frequency conversion, detection, electronic signal control and integrated microwave circuits.

  4. Flight simulators. Part 1: Present situation and trends. Part 2: Implications for training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, D.; Volk, W.

    1977-01-01

    The present situation and developments in the technology of flight simulators based on digital computers are evaluated from the standpoint of training airline flight crews. Areas covered are minicomputers and their advantages in terms of cost, space and time savings, software data packets, motion simulation, visual simulation and instructor aids. The division of training time between aircraft and simulator training and the possible advantages from increased use of simulators are evaluated.

  5. THE PICNIC GAME: PRESENTATION OF A SITUATION OF OBSERVATION TO ASSESS FAMILY INTERACTIONS.

    PubMed

    Favez, Nicolas; Frascarolo, France; Grimard, Nathalie

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to present a situation of observation designed for the assessment of family interactions: The PicNic Game (PNG). In this situation, families are invited to play at having a picnic together. This can be done with any number of children, aged from a few weeks to adolescence. A companion assessment tool, the Revised-Picnic Assessment Scale (Re-PAS), allows evaluation of interactions in the family on several dimensions. This article presents the PNG and a preliminary study of the validation of the Re-PAS dimensions in a sample of families (N = 67) with 18-month-old infants and their siblings. The PNG was well-received by the families. Construct validity of the Re-PAS was tested, first against self-reported data by mothers and fathers regarding marital satisfaction, coparenting behavior, and division of household tasks, and then against observed maternal and paternal sensitivity and controlling behaviors assessed during free-play. Results show satisfactory preliminary reliability and validity. Two contrasting cases are presented to illustrate the different interactions highlighted in the PNG. This situation is useful for researchers and clinicians, particularly as a basis for video-feedback work with the family. PMID:27098206

  6. The history of time and frequency from antiquity to the present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Judah

    2016-04-01

    I will discuss the evolution of the definitions of time, time interval, and frequency from antiquity to the present day. The earliest definitions of these parameters were based on a time interval defined by widely observed apparent astronomical phenomena, so that techniques of time distribution were not necessary. With this definition, both time, as measured by clocks, and frequency, as realized by some device, were derived quantities. On the other hand, the fundamental parameter today is a frequency based on the properties of atoms, so that the situation is reversed and time and time interval are now derived quantities. I will discuss the evolution of this transition and its consequences. In addition, the international standards of both time and frequency are currently realized by combining the data from a large number of devices located at many different laboratories, and this combination depends on (and is often limited by) measurements of the times of clocks located at widely-separated laboratories. I will discuss how these measurements are performed and how the techniques have evolved over time.

  7. Present-day Mars' water cycle: new views and blind perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montmessin, F.; Smith, M. D.; Fedorova, A.; Langevin, Y.; Mellon, M.

    2012-09-01

    Addressing recent cimate changes on Mars necessarily requires a succesful representation of present-day Mars water cycle. Decades of observations and modeling efforts have been conducted that now allow to elaborate a new, yet incomplete, picture, of the seasonal activity of water on Mars. This presentation explores the various observational and theoretical studies that have been conducted to date, and attempts to present a clear and detailed explanation of the major physical mechanisms that command the seasonal and geographical variability of present-day Mars water cycle, as inferred from the combined analysis of measurements and climate model simulations. Remaining issues and enigmae will be presented as well.

  8. Present situation of the research and application of engineering multiwave seismic prospecting in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Hong-Ru

    1996-05-01

    In four aspects, which are the leading exploration of mine and tunnel; engineering geological hazard prospecting and engineering shock resistance; non-destructive testing of engineering quality; the measurement of rock physical properties, this paper gives a detailed summary and some comments on the present situation of the research and application of the ideas, theories and methods of engineering multiwave seismic prospecting. The content includes: the prospecting of coal field caved pillar, underground gallery, underground cavity and the fault ahead of tunnel; the exploration of earth surface Karst collapse, active fault, and shock resistance of underground lifeline engineering; the dynamic non-destructive testing of quality and bearing capacity of pile foundation, the non-destructive testing of strength, thickness and defects of concrete pavement, and the non-destructive testing of submarine tunnel engineering quality; the measurement of rock physical properties under high temperature and high pressure and the determination of physical properties of irregular rock samples. Some existing problems are discussed and the direction which should be developed in the future is proposed.

  9. Modelling microbiological water quality in the Seine river drainage network: past, present and future situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servais, P.; Billen, G.; Goncalves, A.; Garcia-Armisen, T.

    2007-09-01

    The Seine river watershed is characterized by a high population density and intense agricultural activities. Data show low microbiological water quality in the main rivers (Seine, Marne, Oise) of the watershed. Today, there is an increasing pressure from different social groups to restore microbiological water quality in order to both increase the safety of drinking water production and to restore the possible use of these rivers for bathing and rowing activities, as they were in the past. A model, appended to the hydro-ecological SENEQUE/Riverstrahler model describing the functioning of large river systems, was developed to describe the dynamics of faecal coliforms (FC), the most usual faecal contamination indicator. The model is able to calculate the distribution of FC concentrations in the whole drainage network resulting from land use and wastewater management in the watershed. The model was validated by comparing calculated FC concentrations with available field data for some well-documented situations in different river stretches of the Seine drainage network. Once validated, the model was used to test various predictive scenarios, as, for example, the impact of the modifications in wastewater treatment planned at the 2012 horizon in the Seine watershed in the scope of the implementation of the european water framework directive. The model was also used to investigate past situations. In particular, the variations of the microbiological water quality in the Parisian area due to population increase and modifications in wastewater management were estimated over the last century. It was shown that the present standards for bathing and other aquatic recreational activities are not met in the large tributaries upstream from Paris since the middle of the 1950's, and at least since the middle of the XIXth century in the main branch of the Seine river downstream from Paris. Efforts carried out for improving urban wastewater treatment in terms or organic matter and

  10. Modelling microbiological water quality in the Seine river drainage network: past, present and future situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servais, P.; Billen, G.; Goncalves, A.; Garcia-Armisen, T.

    2007-05-01

    The Seine river watershed is characterized by a high population density and intense agricultural activities. Data show low microbiological water quality in the main rivers (Seine, Marne, Oise) of the watershed. Today, there is an increasing pressure from different social groups to restore microbiological water quality in order to both increase the safety of drinking water production and to restore the possible use of these rivers for bathing and rowing activities, as they were in the past. A model, appended to the hydro-ecological SENEQUE/Riverstrahler model describing the functioning of large river systems, was developed to describe the dynamics of faecal coliforms (FC), the most usual faecal contamination indicator. The model is able to calculate the distribution of FC abundance in the whole drainage network resulting from land use and wastewater management in the watershed. The model was validated by comparing calculated FC concentrations with available field data for some well-documented situations in different river stretches of the Seine drainage network. Once validated, the model was used to test various predictive scenarios, as, for example, the impact of the modifications in wastewater treatment planned at the 2012 horizon in the Seine watershed in the scope of the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive. The model was also used to investigate past situations. In particular, the variations of the microbiological water quality in the Parisian area due to population increase and modifications in wastewater management were estimated over the last century. It was shown that the present standards for bathing and other aquatic recreational activities are not met in the large tributaries upstream from Paris since the middle of the 1950's, and at least since the middle of the XIXth century in the main branch of the Seine river downstream from Paris. Efforts carried out for improving urban wastewater treatment in terms or organic matter and

  11. Present-day secular variations in the zonal harmonics of earth's geopotential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitrovica, J. X.; Peltier, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    The mathematical formulation required for predicting secular variation in the geopotential is developed for the case of a spherically symmetric, self-gravitating, viscoelastic earth model and an arbitrary surface load which can include a gravitational self-consistent ocean loading component. The theory is specifically applied to predict the present-day secular variation in the zonal harmonics of the geopotenial arising from the surface mass loading associated with the late Pleistocene glacial cycles. A procedure is outlined in which predictions of the present-day geopotential signal due to the late Pleistocene glacial cycles may be used to derive bounds on the net present-day mass flux from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets to the local oceans.

  12. Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merro, John; And Others

    Interviews on the quality of day care in the United States are presented in this transcript of a program broadcast in the National Public Radio weekly series, "Options in Education." Writers, day care center personnel and others describe and evaluate the current situation. Federal legislation concerning children is examined, and researchers…

  13. Historical trauma as public narrative: A conceptual review of how history impacts present-day health

    PubMed Central

    Mohatt, Nathaniel Vincent; Thompson, Azure B.; Thai, Nghi D.; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2014-01-01

    Theories of historical trauma increasingly appear in the literature on individual and community health, especially in relation to racial and ethnic minority populations and groups that experience significant health disparities. As a consequence of this rapid growth, the literature on historical trauma comprises disparate terminology and research approaches. This critical review integrates this literature in order to specify theoretical mechanisms that explain how historical trauma influences the health of individuals and communities. We argue that historical trauma functions as a public narrative for particular groups or communities that connects present-day experiences and circumstances to the trauma so as to influence health. Treating historical trauma as a public narrative shifts the research discourse away from an exclusive search for past causal variables that influence health to identifying how present-day experiences, their corresponding narratives, and their health impacts are connected to public narratives of historical trauma for a particular group or community. We discuss how the connection between historical trauma and present-day experiences, related narratives, and health impacts may function as a source of present-day distress as well as resilience. PMID:24561774

  14. Ancient DNA reveals matrilineal continuity in present-day Poland over the last two millennia.

    PubMed

    Juras, Anna; Dabert, Miroslawa; Kushniarevich, Alena; Malmström, Helena; Raghavan, Maanasa; Kosicki, Jakub Z; Metspalu, Ene; Willerslev, Eske; Piontek, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    While numerous ancient human DNA datasets from across Europe have been published till date, modern-day Poland in particular, remains uninvestigated. Besides application in the reconstruction of continent-wide human history, data from this region would also contribute towards our understanding of the history of the Slavs, whose origin is hypothesized to be in East or Central Europe. Here, we present the first population-scale ancient human DNA study from the region of modern-day Poland by establishing mitochondrial DNA profiles for 23 samples dated to 200 BC - 500 AD (Roman Iron Age) and for 20 samples dated to 1000-1400 AD (Medieval Age). Our results show that mitochondrial DNA sequences from both periods belong to haplogroups that are characteristic of contemporary West Eurasia. Haplotype sharing analysis indicates that majority of the ancient haplotypes are widespread in some modern Europeans, including Poles. Notably, the Roman Iron Age samples share more rare haplotypes with Central and Northeast Europeans, whereas the Medieval Age samples share more rare haplotypes with East-Central and South-East Europeans, primarily Slavic populations. Our data demonstrates genetic continuity of certain matrilineages (H5a1 and N1a1a2) in the area of present-day Poland from at least the Roman Iron Age until present. As such, the maternal gene pool of present-day Poles, Czechs and Slovaks, categorized as Western Slavs, is likely to have descended from inhabitants of East-Central Europe during the Roman Iron Age. PMID:25337992

  15. Exploring Presentation Styles in Higher Education Teaching and Research Situations: Distance and Face-to-Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Kerry; Knightbridge, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Universities are increasingly using advanced video-conferencing environments to interact for teaching and research purposes at a distance and in situations that combine distant participants with those face-to-face. Those who use these technologies expect professional development support to do so but we do not yet have a comprehensive research…

  16. The Use of Informatics in Education. Present Situation, Trends and Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebenstreit, Jacques

    This overview of the use of computers in education begins by tracing the history of the development of computer programs for instruction in three developed countries, the United States, the United Kingdom, and France. Significant research and programs, general trends, the current situation, plans, and problems in each of the countries are…

  17. What is the present situation of vascular surgery? Considerations and reflections based on real practice.

    PubMed

    Sirignano, P; Setacci, F; Galzerano, G; Sirignano, A; Fineschi, V; Setacci, C

    2013-10-01

    "For the best vascular care to every patient, every day" is the goal of our practice, but is it a possible goal? Where are we now? The general idea is that we are pursuing the right way. The evolution of our discipline in the last two decades has been extraordinary and we reaffirm that we are the leaders in diagnose and treatment of the arterial pathology. Unfortunately, we can find some cases in which reality has to be faced as hardly as it can be, remembering us that we still have to go further with our job. The delay in the diagnose and treatment could lead to a permanent deficit and a money loss for the national health system due to prolonged hospitalization, multiple re-hospitalizations, loss of working capacity. This must be avoided. We strongly suggest that a vascular surgeon should be present in all the Emergency Room and should be routinely involved in the management of patients. The routine use of dedicated interdisciplinary protocols should be strongly advocated. Vascular surgery, as medical specialty, should be recognized as single specialty in all countries and as "peculiar" by the National Authority as well as Neurosurgery and Cardiac Surgery. PMID:24002393

  18. Present-day kinematics of the Rivera plate and implications for tectonics in southwestern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, Charles; Stein, Seth

    1990-12-01

    A model for the present-day motion of the Rivera plate relative to the North America, Cocos, and Pacific plates is derived using new data from the Pacific-Rivera rise and Rivera transform fault, together with new estimates of Pacific-Rivera motions. The results are combined with the closure-consistent NUVEL-1 global plate motion model of DeMets et al. (1990) to examine present-day deformation in southwestern Mexico. The analysis addresses several questions raised in previous studies of the Rivera plate. Namely, do plate motion data from the northern East Pacific rise require a distinct Rivera plate? Do plate kinematic data require the subduction of the Rivera plate along the seismically quiescent Acapulco trench? If so, what does the predicted subduction rate imply about the earthquake recurrence interval in the Jalisco region of southwestern Mexico?

  19. Idiopathic neonatal giant cell hepatitis presenting with acute hepatic failure on postnatal day one.

    PubMed

    Correa, Kimberley K; Nanjundiah, Prathiba; Wirtschafter, David D; Alshak, Najeeb S

    2002-01-01

    We report a term male infant presenting on postnatal day 1 with fulminant hepatic failure. Described congenital infection, metabolic disorders, and cardiovascular etiologies of acute neonatal liver failure were assessed and eliminated. A liver biopsy on postnatal day 10 showed neonatal giant cell hepatitis (NGCH) with an unusual degree of fibrosis for this early postnatal age. NGCH is a clinical diagnosis of cholestatic disorders of unknown etiology in the newborn, and, to our knowledge, has not been previously associated with immediate neonatal hepatic failure. The giant cell transformation is a common response to a variety of insults and only rarely occurs beyond the neonatal period. Most cases present with cholestatic jaundice and varying degrees of coagulopathy, and, many, as in this case, show progressive resolution. PMID:11948391

  20. Mantle rheology and satellite signatures from present-day glacial forcings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabadini, Roberto; Yuen, David A.; Gasperini, Paolo

    1988-01-01

    Changes in the long-wavelength region of the earth's gravity field resulting from both present-day glacial discharges and the possible growth of the Antarctic ice sheet are considered. Significant differences in the responses between the Maxell and Burger body rheologies are found for time spans of less than 100 years. The quantitative model for predicting the secular variations of the gravitational potential, and means for incorporating glacial forcings, are described. Results are given for the excitation of the degree two harmonics. It is suggested that detailed satellite monitoring of present-day ice movements in conjunction with geodetic satellite missions may provide a reasonable alternative for the esimation of deep mantle viscosity.

  1. Present-day kinematics of the Rivera plate and implications for tectonics in southwestern Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles; Stein, Seth

    1990-01-01

    A model for the present-day motion of the Rivera plate relative to the North America, Cocos, and Pacific plates is derived using new data from the Pacific-Rivera rise and Rivera transform fault, together with new estimates of Pacific-Rivera motions. The results are combined with the closure-consistent NUVEL-1 global plate motion model of DeMets et al. (1990) to examine present-day deformation in southwestern Mexico. The analysis addresses several questions raised in previous studies of the Rivera plate. Namely, do plate motion data from the northern East Pacific rise require a distinct Rivera plate? Do plate kinematic data require the subduction of the Rivera plate along the seismically quiescent Acapulco trench? If so, what does the predicted subduction rate imply about the earthquake recurrence interval in the Jalisco region of southwestern Mexico?

  2. Ancient DNA Reveals Matrilineal Continuity in Present-Day Poland over the Last Two Millennia

    PubMed Central

    Juras, Anna; Dabert, Miroslawa; Kushniarevich, Alena; Malmström, Helena; Raghavan, Maanasa; Kosicki, Jakub Z.; Metspalu, Ene; Willerslev, Eske; Piontek, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    While numerous ancient human DNA datasets from across Europe have been published till date, modern-day Poland in particular, remains uninvestigated. Besides application in the reconstruction of continent-wide human history, data from this region would also contribute towards our understanding of the history of the Slavs, whose origin is hypothesized to be in East or Central Europe. Here, we present the first population-scale ancient human DNA study from the region of modern-day Poland by establishing mitochondrial DNA profiles for 23 samples dated to 200 BC – 500 AD (Roman Iron Age) and for 20 samples dated to 1000–1400 AD (Medieval Age). Our results show that mitochondrial DNA sequences from both periods belong to haplogroups that are characteristic of contemporary West Eurasia. Haplotype sharing analysis indicates that majority of the ancient haplotypes are widespread in some modern Europeans, including Poles. Notably, the Roman Iron Age samples share more rare haplotypes with Central and Northeast Europeans, whereas the Medieval Age samples share more rare haplotypes with East-Central and South-East Europeans, primarily Slavic populations. Our data demonstrates genetic continuity of certain matrilineages (H5a1 and N1a1a2) in the area of present-day Poland from at least the Roman Iron Age until present. As such, the maternal gene pool of present-day Poles, Czechs and Slovaks, categorized as Western Slavs, is likely to have descended from inhabitants of East-Central Europe during the Roman Iron Age. PMID:25337992

  3. Convergence, divergence, and parallelism in marine biodiversity trends: Integrating present-day and fossil data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Roy, Kaustuv; Valentine, James W.; Jablonski, David

    2015-04-01

    Paleontological data provide essential insights into the processes shaping the spatial distribution of present-day biodiversity. Here, we combine biogeographic data with the fossil record to investigate the roles of parallelism (similar diversities reached via changes from similar starting points), convergence (similar diversities reached from different starting points), and divergence in shaping the present-day latitudinal diversity gradients of marine bivalves along the two North American coasts. Although both faunas show the expected overall poleward decline in species richness, the trends differ between the coasts, and the discrepancies are not explained simply by present-day temperature differences. Instead, the fossil record indicates that both coasts have declined in overall diversity over the past 3 My, but the western Atlantic fauna suffered more severe Pliocene-Pleistocene extinction than did the eastern Pacific. Tropical western Atlantic diversity remains lower than the eastern Pacific, but warm temperate western Atlantic diversity recovered to exceed that of the temperate eastern Pacific, either through immigration or in situ origination. At the clade level, bivalve families shared by the two coasts followed a variety of paths toward today's diversities. The drivers of these lineage-level differences remain unclear, but species with broad geographic ranges during the Pliocene were more likely than geographically restricted species to persist in the temperate zone, suggesting that past differences in geographic range sizes among clades may underlie between-coast contrasts. More detailed comparative work on regional extinction intensities and selectivities, and subsequent recoveries (by in situ speciation or immigration), is needed to better understand present-day diversity patterns and model future changes.

  4. Convergence, divergence, and parallelism in marine biodiversity trends: Integrating present-day and fossil data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shan; Roy, Kaustuv; Valentine, James W.; Jablonski, David

    2015-01-01

    Paleontological data provide essential insights into the processes shaping the spatial distribution of present-day biodiversity. Here, we combine biogeographic data with the fossil record to investigate the roles of parallelism (similar diversities reached via changes from similar starting points), convergence (similar diversities reached from different starting points), and divergence in shaping the present-day latitudinal diversity gradients of marine bivalves along the two North American coasts. Although both faunas show the expected overall poleward decline in species richness, the trends differ between the coasts, and the discrepancies are not explained simply by present-day temperature differences. Instead, the fossil record indicates that both coasts have declined in overall diversity over the past 3 My, but the western Atlantic fauna suffered more severe Pliocene−Pleistocene extinction than did the eastern Pacific. Tropical western Atlantic diversity remains lower than the eastern Pacific, but warm temperate western Atlantic diversity recovered to exceed that of the temperate eastern Pacific, either through immigration or in situ origination. At the clade level, bivalve families shared by the two coasts followed a variety of paths toward today’s diversities. The drivers of these lineage-level differences remain unclear, but species with broad geographic ranges during the Pliocene were more likely than geographically restricted species to persist in the temperate zone, suggesting that past differences in geographic range sizes among clades may underlie between-coast contrasts. More detailed comparative work on regional extinction intensities and selectivities, and subsequent recoveries (by in situ speciation or immigration), is needed to better understand present-day diversity patterns and model future changes. PMID:25901312

  5. Convergence, divergence, and parallelism in marine biodiversity trends: Integrating present-day and fossil data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Roy, Kaustuv; Valentine, James W; Jablonski, David

    2015-04-21

    Paleontological data provide essential insights into the processes shaping the spatial distribution of present-day biodiversity. Here, we combine biogeographic data with the fossil record to investigate the roles of parallelism (similar diversities reached via changes from similar starting points), convergence (similar diversities reached from different starting points), and divergence in shaping the present-day latitudinal diversity gradients of marine bivalves along the two North American coasts. Although both faunas show the expected overall poleward decline in species richness, the trends differ between the coasts, and the discrepancies are not explained simply by present-day temperature differences. Instead, the fossil record indicates that both coasts have declined in overall diversity over the past 3 My, but the western Atlantic fauna suffered more severe Pliocene-Pleistocene extinction than did the eastern Pacific. Tropical western Atlantic diversity remains lower than the eastern Pacific, but warm temperate western Atlantic diversity recovered to exceed that of the temperate eastern Pacific, either through immigration or in situ origination. At the clade level, bivalve families shared by the two coasts followed a variety of paths toward today's diversities. The drivers of these lineage-level differences remain unclear, but species with broad geographic ranges during the Pliocene were more likely than geographically restricted species to persist in the temperate zone, suggesting that past differences in geographic range sizes among clades may underlie between-coast contrasts. More detailed comparative work on regional extinction intensities and selectivities, and subsequent recoveries (by in situ speciation or immigration), is needed to better understand present-day diversity patterns and model future changes. PMID:25901312

  6. IMS/Satellite Situation Center report: Orbit plots and bar charts for Prognoz 4, days 1-91 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Orbit plots for the Prognoz 4 satellite for the time period January to March 1976 are given. This satellite was identified as a possible important contributor to the International Magnetospheric Study project. The orbits were based on an element epoch of December 26, 1975, 3h 8min and 17s. In view of the low perigee of this satellite, the Satellite Situation Center (SSC) considered that the effect of atmospheric drag precludes orbit predictions for the length of time normally used by the SSC for high-altitude satellites. Consequently, orbit data are shown for the first 3 months of 1976 only. The orbit generated for this report was based on the earlier epoch, and it positions the satellite within 30s of the ascending node at the later epoch. Therefore, within the accuracy of the plots shown in this report, the orbit used was regarded as an achieved orbit. The orbit information is displayed graphically in four ways: bar charts, geocentric solar ecliptic plots, boundary plots, and solar magnetic latitude versus local time plots. The most concise presentation is the bar charts. The bar charts give the crude three-dimensional position of the satellite for each magnetospheric region.

  7. Multimodel intercomparison of preindustrial, present-day and future tropospheric OH and methane lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgarakis, A.; Naik, V.; Archibald, A. T.; Collins, B.; Dentener, F. J.; Josse, B.; Lamarque, J.; Prather, M. J.; Shindell, D. T.; Stevenson, D. S.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Takemura, T.; Wild, O.; Williams, J.; Young, P. J.; Zeng, G.

    2011-12-01

    The oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere heavily depends on the levels of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and its geographical distribution. OH removes a wide range of pollutants and non-CO2 greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. It controls the atmospheric lifetime of methane, the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is key to the formation of tropospheric ozone and aerosols. Because of its crucial role, it is important to understand how OH has changed from preindustrial to present day, and how it may change in the future in response to different emission scenarios. Here, we analyze simulations performed for the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Modeling Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), in support of the IPCC AR5, to investigate the changes in global and regional OH and consequent changes in methane lifetime between 1850 and 2100. The ACCMIP project includes a variety of chemistry-climate models, which were run for the historical period (1850 to present-day) and for the future (present-day to 2100) following the different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). A wide range of chemical output from these simulations is expected to contribute to our understanding of chemistry-climate interactions. We identify changes in OH and methane lifetime, and also the key drivers of these changes, including the ratio between different emissions (NOx, CO, VOCs), changes in water vapor, as well as changes in the ozone photolysis rate and factors affecting it (stratospheric ozone, aerosols and clouds).

  8. Minimal effects of latitude on present-day speciation rates in New World birds.

    PubMed

    Rabosky, Daniel L; Title, Pascal O; Huang, Huateng

    2015-06-22

    The tropics contain far greater numbers of species than temperate regions, suggesting that rates of species formation might differ systematically between tropical and non-tropical areas. We tested this hypothesis by reconstructing the history of speciation in New World (NW) land birds using BAMM, a Bayesian framework for modelling complex evolutionary dynamics on phylogenetic trees. We estimated marginal distributions of present-day speciation rates for each of 2571 species of birds. The present-day rate of speciation varies approximately 30-fold across NW birds, but there is no difference in the rate distributions for tropical and temperate taxa. Using macroevolutionary cohort analysis, we demonstrate that clades with high tropical membership do not produce species more rapidly than temperate clades. For nearly any value of present-day speciation rate, there are far more species in the tropics than the temperate zone. Any effects of latitude on speciation rate are marginal in comparison to the dramatic variation in rates among clades. PMID:26019156

  9. Natural change and human impact in a present-day fluvial catchment: The Geul River, Southern Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, J.; de Moor, J. J. W.; Spanjaard, G.

    2012-07-01

    The Geul River has a long history of channel straightening and bank protection, but also has several natural meandering parts. In addition, some formerly 'fixed' or 'protected' stretches of the river have been allowed to meander freely since 1988. Therefore, it represents an ideal case for evaluating the contribution of human interference to the intrinsic evolution of the river. In this paper, we compare the response of selected (not protected) reaches of the present-day river to different human modifications. The river banks were labelled as "stable", "unstable" or "erosive". As might be expected, stretches with a high sinuosity have a high percentage of erosive and unstable bank length, while low-sinuosity stretches experience hardly any erosion. The amount of lateral erosion and sedimentation in natural situations is compared with that in situations with different bank protection and stabilization types. Erosion rates may locally attain up to 2 m per year. Detailed grain-size analysis of point-bar sections enable distinction of successive fining-up sequences. Vertical aggradation rates within the point-bars are up to 0.15 m yr- 1. The highest rates are found in the youngest point-bars. Collectively, the results of this study show that when bank protection is removed, the freely meandering river creates its own specific ecosystems and retention capacity increases. Such a return to natural environmental and ecological conditions is in accordance with the objectives of the European Water Framework Directive.

  10. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-02-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  11. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  12. Simulating present-day and future air quality as climate changes: Model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, John P.; Racherla, Pavan N.; Lynn, Barry H.; Adams, Peter J.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    The global-regional climate-air pollution modeling system (GRE-CAPS) has been developed, coupling an existing general circulation model/chemical transport model (GCM/CTM), a regional meteorological model, and a regional chemical transport model. This system is intended to enable studies of the effects of changes in climate, intercontinental transport, and emissions on regional and urban air quality. The GRE-CAPS system consists of the GISS II' GCM/CTM, the MM5 regional meteorological model, and the PMCAMx regional CTM. The modeling system is evaluated for the present day, with comparisons between model-predicted, measured ozone, and speciated PM 2.5 concentrations. The ability of the model to predict present-day concentrations of ozone and PM 2.5 is compared to that of PMCAMx when used for retrospective modeling. Comparisons between model-predicted temperatures and precipitation are also made. The model was used to simulate five present-day Januaries and six present-day Julys. The biases and errors in GRE-CAPS-predicted ozone concentrations were similar to those of PMCAMx when used for standard retrospective modeling. The fractional biases in mean daily peak ozone concentration and mean daily maximum 8-h average ozone concentration are both <10%. The model-predicted distribution of peak hourly and daily maximum 8-h average values agreed rather well with the measured distribution. There is less agreement between the model and measurements in the number of hours with ozone mixing ratios >70 or 80 ppb, though this is also the case with standard PMCAMx modeling. The predictions of PM 2.5 concentrations by GRE-CAPS were also of similar quality to those of PMCAMx driven by historical meteorology. The fractional biases in the predictions of total PM 2.5, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate were all <25% in both January and July. The model agrees well with organic PM 2.5 measurements from the IMPROVE network, though there is less agreement with measurements from the STN network

  13. The present situation of prophylactic vaccination in Japan for travel abroad.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takashi

    2008-11-01

    The current situation of vaccination in Japan is reviewed from a viewpoint of overseas travelers. Vaccinations before travel to developing countries, where the risk of infection is high, are recommended for two reasons: "individual protection" and "prevention of communicable disease importation". However, there are problems in Japan; some vaccines available commonly in foreign nations are not approved in Japan and the vaccination schedule is not convenient for travelers. Vaccination is sometimes needed also for travel to Europe and North America. This is because certain vaccinations are required for entering school or studying abroad. In Japan, there is no regulation which recommends vaccination as an entrance requirement. Compared with other nations, Japanese children receive fewer vaccines routinely. On the other hand, there are different features from other industrialized nations, such as routine childhood BCG vaccination and immunization against Japanese encephalitis in Japan. Compared with foreign nations, awareness as regards "travel medicine" is lower in Japan. Recognizing this situation will lead to improvement of vaccination of travelers. PMID:18984478

  14. Chemical interactions between the present-day Martian atmosphere and surface minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald; Fegley, Bruce

    1987-01-01

    Thermochemical and photochemical reactions between surface minerals and present-day atmospheric constituents are predicted to produce microscopic effects on the surfaces of mineral grains. Relevant reactions hypothesized in the literature include conversions of silicates and volcanic glasses to clay minerals, conversion of ferrous to ferric compounds, and formation of carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates. These types of surface-atmosphere interactions are important for addressing issues such as chemical weathering of minerals, biological potential of the surface environment, and atmospheric stability in both present and past Martian epochs. It is emphasized that the product of these reactions will be observable and interpretable on the microscopic surface layers of Martian surface rocks using modern techniques with obvious implications for sample return from Mars. Macroscopic products of chemical weathering reactions in past Martian epochs are also expected in Martian surface material. These products are expected not only as a result of reactions similar to those proceeding today but also due to aqueous reactions in past epochs in which liquid water was putatively present. It may prove very difficult or impossible however to determine definitively from the relic macroscopic product alone either the exact weathering process which led to its formation or the identity of its weathered parent mineral. The enormous advantages of studying Martian chemical weathering by investigating the microscopic products of present-day chemical reactions on sample surfaces are very apparent.

  15. Chemical interactions between the present-day Martian atmosphere and surface minerals: Implications for sample return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald; Fegley, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Thermochemical and photochemical reactions between surface minerals and present-day atmospheric constituents are predicted to produce microscopic effects on the surface of mineral grains. Relevant reactions hypothesized in the literature include conversions of silicates and volcanic glasses to clay minerals, conversion of ferrous to ferric compounds, and formation of carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates. These types of surface-atmosphere weathering of minerals, biological potential of the surface environment, and atmospheric stability in both present and past Martian epochs. It is emphasized that the product of these reactions will be observable and interpretable on the microscopic surface layers of Martian surface rocks using modern techniques with obvious implications for sample return from Mars. Macroscopic products of chemical weathering reactions in past Martian epochs are also expected in Martian surface materials. These products are expected not only as a result of reactions similar to those proceeding today but also due to aqueous reactions in past epochs in which liquid water was putatively present. It may prove very difficult or impossible, however, to determine definitively from the relic macroscopic product alone either the exact weathering process which led to its formation of the identity of its weathering parent mineral. The enormous advantages of studying the Martian chemical weathering by investigating the microscopic products of present-day chemical reactions on sample surfaces are very apparent.

  16. Evaluation of a wetland methane emission parameterization for present-day and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, A.; Schultz, M. G.; Francois, L.

    2012-04-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of atmospheric methane and presumably contribute ~25-40% to its annual budget (~500 Tg). However, there remain considerable uncertainties in estimation of global wetlands and their methane emissivity, given the large domain of their vegetation and hydrological characteristics. In this study, we describe the development of a wetland methane emission model in conjunction with global wetland parameterization at seasonal resolution. Contrary to most of the other modeling studies, our model is based on a simple parameterization and also readily adaptable to different paleo climatic scenarios, in which the role of methane is still largely unexplored. Wetlands with a strong climatic sensitivity are perceived to be a key factor in past changes of atmospheric methane concentration, e.g. the double fold increase since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The present parameterization is primarily based on CARAIB, a large scale dynamic vegetation model designed to study the role of vegetation in the global carbon cycle. Its hydrological module is adept at simulating soil water and several associated hydrological fluxes over various biome types. Our model parameterization uses three basic drivers from CARAIB: soil water, soil temperature and soil carbon content along with high resolution terrain slope data. The emission model is included in the chemistry climate model ECHAM5-MOZ for present day and also used in LGM methane simulations. The model results are evaluated in comparison with atmospheric methane observations from the NOAA-CMDL flask network and ice core records for LGM. We obtained the present day wetland methane source to be 153 Tg/year, which lies near the lower edge of model assumptions. We also discuss the uncertainties of the present day simulation and the impact of emission scaling on atmospheric concentration. The latitudinal distribution of other major methane sources, uncertainties in their budget and their potential role in

  17. Utilizing Present-Day Stable Water Isotopes to Improve Paleoclimate Records from the Southeast (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, K. K.; Lambert, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    Present-day water isotope data are used to help interpret climate (paleo-rainfall) proxies archived in the geologic record, which can then aid in the creation of General Circulation Models (GCM). The Southeast (USA) is under-represented with respect to present-day measurement of water isotopes and high-resolution paleoclimate records, thus GCMs must extrapolate data for the region. We will evaluate water isotope data (δ18O, δD) collected and analyzed at The University of Alabama (33°13'N, 87°33'W) since June 2005. The monitoring station, central to the Southeast, was established to provide long-term water isotope data needed for reconstructing paleo-rainfall records of the region. Proxy data (e.g., δ18Ocalcite) archived in speleothems have been demonstrated to provide trustworthy information about past climate conditions; however, present-day monitoring of both local rainfall and cave dripwater are crucial. The decade-long (June 2005 - May 2015) rainfall record allows for the establishment of the relationship between water isotopes (δ18O, δD) and monthly air temperature, rainfall amount, as well as the general differences between summer and winter rainfall. Dripwater from Cathedral Caverns (34°34'N, 86°13'W), located in northeastern Alabama, has been sampled at a monthly resolution since January 2015 to determine if the water chemistry in the cave represents an annual mean for the rainfall or if it is seasonally biased. The ultimate goal of this study is to better understand how atmospheric air currents (specifically the strength/position of the Polar Jet Stream, PJS), and hence rainfall in the Southeast, varied during past periods of relative warming (e.g., Dansgaard-Oeschger events) and cooling (e.g., Heinrich events) of the Northern Hemisphere atmosphere. Future GCMs will be improved if a reliable high-resolution paleo-rainfall record can be produced for the Southeast.

  18. Present-day strain rates and dynamics of the East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, D. S.; Flesch, L. M.; Calais, E.

    2009-04-01

    The forces and physical processes at work during continental rifting remain to be fully understood and quantified. We investigate the balance of large-scale forces affecting present-day rifting in East Africa using a thin sheet approach to quantify strain rates and deviatoric stresses. We develop a strain rate model constrained by a combination of GPS-derived kinematic models and seismic moment tensors (CMT catalog) for our region of interest. We estimate a total deviatoric stress field by combining (1) stresses caused by gravitational potential energy (GPE) gradients within the crust and (2) a buoyancy signal present in the topography that we use to compute stresses. To estimate internal body forces, we assume crustal thicknesses and lateral density variations modeled in Crust 2.0 (G. Laske and G. Masters, http://mahi.ucsd.edu/Gabi/sediment.html, 2000). In our preferred model of deviatoric stresses, we estimate and remove the dynamic topography buoyancy signal by allowing the mantle lithosphere density to vary, compensating the lithosphere to a given reference depth. To test the reliability of our total deviatoric stress field, we compare tensor patterns of deviatoric stresses, with and without contributions from the mantle, to tensor patterns from kinematic deformation indicators. Our results to date suggest that horizontal buoyancy forces arising from variable crustal thicknesses and lateral density variations within the lithosphere contribute significantly to the diverging plate boundary forces of the EAR but do not account for the entire budget of force needed to produce present-day deformation.

  19. Present-day crustal deformation along the El Salvador Fault Zone from ZFESNet GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staller, Alejandra; Martínez-Díaz, José Jesús; Benito, Belén; Alonso-Henar, Jorge; Hernández, Douglas; Hernández-Rey, Román; Díaz, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results and conclusions obtained from new GPS data compiled along the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ). We calculated a GPS-derived horizontal velocity field representing the present-day crustal deformation rates in the ESFZ based on the analysis of 30 GPS campaign stations of the ZFESNet network, measured over a 4.5 year period from 2007 to 2012. The velocity field and subsequent strain rate analysis clearly indicate dextral strike-slip tectonics with extensional component throughout the ESFZ. Our results suggest that the boundary between the Salvadoran forearc and Caribbean blocks is a deformation zone which varies along the fault zone. We estimate that the movement between the two blocks is at least ~ 12 mm yr- 1. From west to east, this movement is variably distributed between faults or segments of the ESFZ. We propose a kinematic model with three main blocks; the Western, Central and Eastern blocks delimited by major faults. For the first time, we were able to provide a quantitative measure of the present-day horizontal geodetic slip rate of the main segments of ESFZ, ranging from ~ 2 mm yr- 1 in the east segment to ~ 8 mm yr- 1, in the west and central segments. This study contributes new kinematic and slip rate data that should be used to update and improve the seismic hazard assessments in northern Central America.

  20. A non-tectonic origin for the present day stress field in the sedimentary Paris Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Francois; Magnenet, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    The large scale stress patterns observed in intraplate area is generally considered to result from far-field boundary forces that drive plate tectonics. However, no present day deformation has been detected in the Paris Basin, yet significant deviatoric stresses are measured in limestone formations observed above soft argillite layers encountered in this region at depths close to 500m. Further, the pore pressure measured in the argillite is larger than that measured in the surrounding permeable zones. These observations suggest a presently active source of stress in this sedimentary system. We propose that this stress is not related to tectonics but to pressure solution effects activated by pore pressure transients. These transients develop in the natural fracture system that affects the limestone formations. They are linked to climatic variations and involve periods that range from thousands to hundreds of thousands years. This mechanism generates time-dependent shear stresses in soft formations and explains overpressures observed in the very low permeability argillite. This mechanism may be modeled by different visco-elastic behaviors for the various formations. It outlines the influence of time dependent material properties on the present day stress field. These results imply that the viscoelastic properties of sedimentary formations raise a strong difficulty for extrapolating measured surface deformations to basement rocks in domains of very slow tectonics.

  1. Present-day and future global bottom-up ship emission inventories including polar routes.

    PubMed

    Paxian, Andreas; Eyring, Veronika; Beer, Winfried; Sausen, Robert; Wright, Claire

    2010-02-15

    We present a global bottom-up ship emission algorithm that calculates fuel consumption, emissions, and vessel traffic densities for present-day (2006) and two future scenarios (2050) considering the opening of Arctic polar routes due to projected sea ice decline. Ship movements and actual ship engine power per individual ship from Lloyd's Marine Intelligence Unit (LMIU) ship statistics for six months in 2006 and further mean engine data from literature serve as input. The developed SeaKLIM algorithm automatically finds the most probable shipping route for each combination of start and destination port of a certain ship movement by calculating the shortest path on a predefined model grid while considering land masses, sea ice, shipping canal sizes, and climatological mean wave heights. The resulting present-day ship activity agrees well with observations. The global fuel consumption of 221 Mt in 2006 lies in the range of previously published inventories when undercounting of ship numbers in the LMIU movement database (40,055 vessels) is considered. Extrapolated to 2007 and ship numbers per ship type of the recent International Maritime Organization (IMO) estimate (100,214 vessels), a fuel consumption of 349 Mt is calculated which is in good agreement with the IMO total of 333 Mt. The future scenarios show Arctic polar routes with regional fuel consumption on the Northeast and Northwest Passage increasing by factors of up to 9 and 13 until 2050, respectively. PMID:20088494

  2. Present-day Exposures of Water Ice in the Northern Mid-latitudes of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Kanner, Lisa C.

    2007-01-01

    Water ice is exposed in the martian north polar cap, but is rarely exposed beyond the cap boundary. Orbital gamma ray spectrometry data strongly imply the presence of water ice within meters of the surface at latitudes north of approximately 60deg. We have examined mid-latitude areas of the northern plains displaying residual ice-rich layers, and report evidence of present-day surface exposures of water ice. These exposures, if confirmed, could con-strain the latitudinal and temporal stability of surface ice on Mars.

  3. Mitogenomes from The 1000 Genome Project Reveal New Near Eastern Features in Present-Day Tuscans

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Amigo, Jorge; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic analyses have recently been carried out on present-day Tuscans (Central Italy) in order to investigate their presumable recent Near East ancestry in connection with the long-standing debate on the origins of the Etruscan civilization. We retrieved mitogenomes and genome-wide SNP data from 110 Tuscans analyzed within the context of The 1000 Genome Project. For phylogeographic and evolutionary analysis we made use of a large worldwide database of entire mitogenomes (>26,000) and partial control region sequences (>180,000). Results Different analyses reveal the presence of typical Near East haplotypes in Tuscans representing isolated members of various mtDNA phylogenetic branches. As a whole, the Near East component in Tuscan mitogenomes can be estimated at about 8%; a proportion that is comparable to previous estimates but significantly lower than admixture estimates obtained from autosomal SNP data (21%). Phylogeographic and evolutionary inter-population comparisons indicate that the main signal of Near Eastern Tuscan mitogenomes comes from Iran. Conclusions Mitogenomes of recent Near East origin in present-day Tuscans do not show local or regional variation. This points to a demographic scenario that is compatible with a recent arrival of Near Easterners to this region in Italy with no founder events or bottlenecks. PMID:25786119

  4. EXPECTED NUMBER OF MASSIVE GALAXY RELICS IN THE PRESENT DAY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2013-08-10

    The number of present day massive galaxies that have survived untouched since their formation at high-z is an important observational constraint to the hierarchical galaxy formation models. Using three different semianalytical models based on the Millenium simulation, we quantify the expected fraction and number densities of the massive galaxies that form at z > 2 and have evolved in stellar mass less than 10% and 30%. We find that only a small fraction of the massive galaxies that already formed at z {approx} 2 have remained almost unaltered since their formation (<2% with {Delta}M{sub *}/M{sub *} < 0.1 and <8% with {Delta}M{sub *}/M{sub *} < 0.3). These fractions correspond to the following number densities of massive relics in the present day universe: {approx}1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} Mpc{sup -3} for {Delta}M{sub *}/M{sub *} < 0.1 and {approx}5.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} Mpc{sup -3} for {Delta}M{sub *}/M{sub *} < 0.3. The observed number of relic candidates found in the nearby universe is rather uncertain today (with uncertainties up to a factor of {approx}100), preventing us from establishing firm conclusions about the ability of current theoretical expectations to predict such an important number.

  5. Pacific variability under present-day and Middle Miocene boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapp, Mario; Jungclaus, Johann H.

    2015-05-01

    We use the coupled climate model MPI-ESM to show that for higher CO2 levels the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) merge into a single mode of Pacific variability, regardless of present-day or Middle Miocene (~15 Ma) topographic boundary conditions. Hence, topographic differences—determining the landscape of past climates—play a smaller role for Pacific variability than previously thought. We attribute the single variability mode to resonance between these two oscillation patterns. In order to estimate the strength of the resonance we compute the spectral power of the ENSO and PDO time series and their coherence. We find that for both Middle Miocene and present-day topographic conditions, higher CO2 forcing leads to stronger resonance between ENSO and PDO. Our results show that (1) stronger CO2 forcing enhances Pacific variability resulting in stronger "atmospheric bridge" and that (2) past climates are likely to exhibit Pacific variability corresponding either to ENSO, PDO, or our proposed single mode.

  6. Future droughts in Global Climate Models and adaptation strategies from regional present-day analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowsky, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2012-04-01

    Droughts are among the most impacting phenomena of a changing climate, affecting agricultural productivity and human health. They can furthermore interact with and amplify other climatic extreme events such as heat waves. Our analysis of the CMIP5 ensemble of GCM simulations identifies several hot spots of aggravating droughts in coming decades, such as the Mediterranean, parts of the Southern US and North East Brazil, which also compare well with increasing stress from heat waves. However, as we show by a comparison of drought indices, the exact pattern can substantially depend on the index choice. In some regions of the developing world which are particularly vulnerable to droughts, e.g. Central Africa, this uncertainty is further increased by a high disagreement between the GCMs. In a second step, we perform an analogue search which, for a given target region, identifies regions which under present-day climate show drought conditions that are similar to the projected future drought conditions of the target region. For example, the future conditions in the Mediterranean are found to be analogue to the present-day conditions in parts of the US, Central Asia or Australia. Information from web resources on climate change adaptation and agricultural practices for the identified similar regions are then assessed in the context of the target region as potential guidelines for adaptation. Thus combining the temporal and spatial dimension helps to transfer local climate adaptation knowledge to other regions, where it is expected to become relevant in the future.

  7. Present-Day Surface Changes on Mars: Implications for Recent Climate Variability and Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Dundas, C. M.; Diniega, S.; Byrne, S.; Bridges, N. T.; Hansen, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    With the high-resolution and repeat-image capability of MRO/HiRISE, we have been documenting present-day surface activity. This activity includes seasonal defrosting (spots, fans, etc.), changes in polar deposits, new impacts, migrating sand dunes, enlargement of gullies, and a variety of slope flows. What does this tell us about possible environmental change and habitability? Perhaps the key result is that previous suggestions of recent climate change on Mars may have been somewhat exaggerated. One such suggestion is that the enlargement of pits in the south polar residual cap indicates present-day global warming. However, recent models of continuous sublimation and redeposition of the CO2 predict a suite of landforms that have been observed to exist today (Byrne, 2009, AREPS 37, 535). Another suggestion is that mid-latitude gullies formed by melting snow or shallow ice after a recent period of high obliquity, but HiRISE observations have shown rapid and widespread gully activity in the present climate (Diniega et al., 2010, Geology 38, 1047; Dundas et al., 2012, Icarus 220, 124; Dundas et al., this conference). Likewise, suggestions that Mars needed a significantly higher atmospheric density to explain the presence of well-preserved sand dunes have been countered by observations of widespread current activity (Bridges et al., 2012, Geology 40, 31; Bridges et al., 2012, Nature 485, 339). These observations do not rule out significantly different past climate conditions but do suggest that their effects were less pronounced, at least in recent times. There are features that do not appear active today; one example is the transverse aeolian ridges. Also, the mid-latitude icy lobate flows and ice-rich mantles have not shown current activity, appear to have partially sublimated, and are likely remnants of recent past climates. Ground ice excavated by new craters is observed closer to the equator than predicted for the present atmospheric water vapor content, but

  8. Three-dimensional instantaneous dynamics modeling of present-day Aegean subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Pranger, Casper; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Fraters, Menno; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    The Aegean region (Eastern Mediterranean) is exemplary of the interaction between crustal tectonics, plate motion, subduction and mantle flow: African subduction underneath the region has been continuous for at least the last 100 My, leading to about 2100-2500 km of subducted lithosphere residing in the mantle (van Hinsbergen et al., 2005). During this subduction, decoupled upper continental and oceanic crust accreted into a wedge of stacked nappes. In turn, these nappes have been significantly extended, predominantly during the last 25 My, due to the retreat of the African slab relative to Eurasia (van Hinsbergen and Schmid, 2012). As a first step to better understanding the coupling of the tectonic evolution of the crust and the underlying mantle dynamics, we are developing 3-D numerical models of the instantaneous dynamics of the present-day Aegean subduction system using the finite element code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012). The instantaneous models are set up with initial slab geometries derived from tomography and realistic plate boundary configurations and incorporate the major crustal weak zones of the overriding plate. Our modeling results in predictions of flow fields and stress, strain rate and rotation rate fields for the present-day tectonic setting of the Aegean region. By comparing our various model predictions to the widely available observations, such as focal mechanisms, GPS velocities and seismic anisotropy, we aim at an improved understanding of how mantle flow, subduction morphology and possibly slab segmentation, as well as the rheological behavior of the overriding plate, control present-day tectonic deformation. We expect to show preliminary results of this comparison. Kronbichler, M., Heister, T. and Bangerth, W. (2012), High Accuracy Mantle Convection Simulation through Modern Numerical Methods, Geophysical Journal International, 191, 12-29. Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J., Hafkenscheid, E., Spakman, W., Meulenkamp, J. E. and Wortel, R. (2005

  9. Cloud properties in the present-day tropical climate: EC-EARTH model biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacagnina, C.; Selten, F.

    2012-04-01

    Observations are compared with the observed SST forced and coupled simulation performed by the EC-EARTH climate model. We use different diagnostic tools to investigate model biases in simulating marine cloud properties at different spatial and time scales in the present-day (1985 to 2001) tropical climate. The model underestimates the thick low-cloud amount and their contribution to the reflection of the solar radiation. In general, most of the simulated cloud types are too bright. As a result, the net cloud cooling effect is often overestimated, except over the subsidence cold pools. Furthermore, our model fails to reproduce the correlations between low-cloud fraction and mid-tropospheric pressure velocity (ω500) and SST changes during El Niño. In addition, some indications lead to infer EC-EARTH does not properly reproduce the impact of the Walker circulation shifts on the CRF fluctuations in the interannual variability.

  10. Ancient human genomes suggest three ancestral populations for present-day Europeans.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Iosif; Patterson, Nick; Mittnik, Alissa; Renaud, Gabriel; Mallick, Swapan; Kirsanow, Karola; Sudmant, Peter H; Schraiber, Joshua G; Castellano, Sergi; Lipson, Mark; Berger, Bonnie; Economou, Christos; Bollongino, Ruth; Fu, Qiaomei; Bos, Kirsten I; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Li, Heng; de Filippo, Cesare; Prüfer, Kay; Sawyer, Susanna; Posth, Cosimo; Haak, Wolfgang; Hallgren, Fredrik; Fornander, Elin; Rohland, Nadin; Delsate, Dominique; Francken, Michael; Guinet, Jean-Michel; Wahl, Joachim; Ayodo, George; Babiker, Hamza A; Bailliet, Graciela; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Barrantes, Ramiro; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ben-Ami, Haim; Bene, Judit; Berrada, Fouad; Bravi, Claudio M; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B J; Cali, Francesco; Churnosov, Mikhail; Cole, David E C; Corach, Daniel; Damba, Larissa; van Driem, George; Dryomov, Stanislav; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Fedorova, Sardana A; Gallego Romero, Irene; Gubina, Marina; Hammer, Michael; Henn, Brenna M; Hervig, Tor; Hodoglugil, Ugur; Jha, Aashish R; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Khusainova, Rita; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kittles, Rick; Kivisild, Toomas; Klitz, William; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Kushniarevich, Alena; Laredj, Leila; Litvinov, Sergey; Loukidis, Theologos; Mahley, Robert W; Melegh, Béla; Metspalu, Ene; Molina, Julio; Mountain, Joanna; Näkkäläjärvi, Klemetti; Nesheva, Desislava; Nyambo, Thomas; Osipova, Ludmila; Parik, Jüri; Platonov, Fedor; Posukh, Olga; Romano, Valentino; Rothhammer, Francisco; Rudan, Igor; Ruizbakiev, Ruslan; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Sajantila, Antti; Salas, Antonio; Starikovskaya, Elena B; Tarekegn, Ayele; Toncheva, Draga; Turdikulova, Shahlo; Uktveryte, Ingrida; Utevska, Olga; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Voevoda, Mikhail; Winkler, Cheryl A; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Zalloua, Pierre; Zemunik, Tatijana; Cooper, Alan; Capelli, Cristian; Thomas, Mark G; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Villems, Richard; Comas, David; Sukernik, Rem; Metspalu, Mait; Meyer, Matthias; Eichler, Evan E; Burger, Joachim; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pääbo, Svante; Kelso, Janet; Reich, David; Krause, Johannes

    2014-09-18

    We sequenced the genomes of a ∼7,000-year-old farmer from Germany and eight ∼8,000-year-old hunter-gatherers from Luxembourg and Sweden. We analysed these and other ancient genomes with 2,345 contemporary humans to show that most present-day Europeans derive from at least three highly differentiated populations: west European hunter-gatherers, who contributed ancestry to all Europeans but not to Near Easterners; ancient north Eurasians related to Upper Palaeolithic Siberians, who contributed to both Europeans and Near Easterners; and early European farmers, who were mainly of Near Eastern origin but also harboured west European hunter-gatherer related ancestry. We model these populations' deep relationships and show that early European farmers had ∼44% ancestry from a 'basal Eurasian' population that split before the diversification of other non-African lineages. PMID:25230663

  11. Meteoritic parent bodies - Nature, number, size and relation to present-day asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipschutz, Michael E.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Pellas, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between meteoritic parent bodies and the present-day asteroids is discussed. Results on oxygen isotopic signatures and chemical distinctions among meteorite classes indicate that meteorites derive from a small number of parent bodies relative to the number of asteroids. The spectral properties of the ordinary chondrites and similar inclusions in meteoritic breccias differ from those of the abundant S asteroids (with no process known that can account for these differences); the closest spectral analogs of these chondrites are the rare near-earth Q-type asteroids. These facts lead to the question of why abundant meteorites have rare asteroidal analogs, while the abundant asteroids have rare meteoritic analogs. This question constitutes a prime topic for future studies.

  12. Modelling economic losses of historic and present-day high-impact winter storms in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welker, Christoph; Martius, Olivia; Stucki, Peter; Bresch, David; Dierer, Silke; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Windstorms can cause significant financial damage and they rank among the most hazardous meteorological hazards in Switzerland. Risk associated with windstorms involves the combination of hazardous weather conditions, such as high wind gust speeds, and socio-economic factors, such as the distribution of assets as well as their susceptibilities to damage. A sophisticated risk assessment is important in a wide range of areas and has benefits for e.g. the insurance industry. However, a sophisticated risk assessment needs a large sample of storm events for which high-resolution, quantitative meteorological and/or loss data are available. Latter is typically an aggravating factor. For present-day windstorms in Switzerland, the data basis is generally sufficient to describe the meteorological development and wind forces as well as the associated impacts. In contrast, historic windstorms are usually described by graphical depictions of the event and/or by weather and loss reports. The information on historic weather events is overall sparse and the available historic weather and loss reports mostly do not provide quantitative information. It has primarily been the field of activity of environmental historians to study historic weather extremes and their impacts. Furthermore, the scarce availability of atmospheric datasets reaching back sufficiently in time has so far limited the analysis of historic weather events. The Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR) ensemble dataset, a global atmospheric reanalysis currently spanning 1871 to 2012, offers potentially a very valuable resource for the analysis of historic weather events. However, the 2°×2° latitude-longitude grid of the 20CR is too coarse to realistically represent the complex orography of Switzerland, which has considerable ramifications for the representation of smaller-scale features of the surface wind field influenced by the local orography. Using the 20CR as a starting point, this study illustrates a method to

  13. Larval therapy from antiquity to the present day: mechanisms of action, clinical applications and future potential

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Iain S; Twine, Christopher; Whitaker, Michael J; Welck, Mathew; Brown, Charles S; Shandall, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    When modern medicine fails, it is often useful to draw ideas from ancient treatments. The therapeutic use of fly larvae to debride necrotic tissue, also known as larval therapy, maggot debridement therapy or biosurgery, dates back to the beginnings of civilisation. Despite repeatedly falling out of favour largely because of patient intolerance to the treatment, the practice of larval therapy is increasing around the world because of its efficacy, safety and simplicity. Clinical indications for larval treatment are varied, but, in particular, are wounds infected with multidrug‐resistant bacteria and the presence of significant co‐morbidities precluding surgical intervention. The flies most often used in larval therapy are the facultative calliphorids, with the greenbottle blowfly (Lucilia sericata) being the most widely used species. This review summarises the fascinating and turbulent history of larval therapy from its origin to the present day, including mechanisms of action and evidence for its clinical applications. It also explores future research directions. PMID:17551073

  14. Pole of rotating analysis of present-day Juan de Fuca plate motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, C.; Wilson, D. S.; Hey, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    Convergence rates between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates are calculated by means of their relative, present-day pole of rotation. A method of calculating the propagation of errors in addition to the instantaneous poles of rotation is also formulated and applied to determine the Euler pole for Pacific-Juan de Fuca. This pole is vectorially added to previously published poles for North America-Pacific and 'hot spot'-Pacific to obtain North America-Juan de Fuca and 'hot spot'-Juan de Fuca, respectively. The errors associated with these resultant poles are determined by propagating the errors of the two summed angular velocity vectors. Under the assumption that hot spots are fixed with respect to a mantle reference frame, the average absolute velocity of the Juan de Puca plate is computed at approximately 15 mm/yr, thereby making it the slowest-moving of the oceanic plates.

  15. Modelling economic losses of historic and present-day high-impact winter windstorms in Switzerland

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Welker, Christoph; Martius, Olivia; Stucki, Peter; Bresch, David; Dierer, Silke; Bronnimann, Stefan

    2016-03-30

    This study investigates the wind gusts and associated economic loss patterns of high-impact winter windstorms in Switzerland between 1871 and 2011. A novel approach for simulating windstorm-related gusts and losses at regional to local scales is applied to a sample of 84 windstorms. The approach involves the dynamical downscaling of the Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR) ensemble mean to 3-km horizontal grid size using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Economic losses are simulated at municipal level for present-day asset distribution based on the downscaled (parameterised) wind gusts at high spatiotemporal resolution using the open-source impact model climada. A comparisonmore » with insurance loss data for two recent windstorms ("Lothar'' in 1999, "Joachim'' in 2011) indicates that the loss simulation allows to realistically simulate the spatial patterns of windstorm losses. The loss amplitude is strongly underestimated for 'Lothar', while it is in reasonable agreement for 'Joachim'. Possible reasons are discussed. Uncertainties concerning the loss simulation arise from the wind gust estimation method applied; estimates can differ considerably among the different methods, in particular over high orography. Furthermore, the quality of the loss simulation is affected by the underlying simplified assumptions regarding the distribution of assets and their susceptibilities to damage. For the whole windstorm sample, composite averages of simulated wind gust speed and loss are computed. Both composites reveal high values for the densely populated Swiss Plateau and lower values for south-eastern Switzerland; metropolitan areas stand out in the loss composite. Eight of the top 10 events concerning the losses simulated for present-day asset distribution and summed over all Swiss municipalities occurred after 1950. Furthermore, it remains uncertain whether this is due to decadal-scale changes of winter windstorms in Switzerland or merely due to a possible

  16. The Combined Landscape of Denisovan and Neanderthal Ancestry in Present-Day Humans.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Sriram; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2016-05-01

    Some present-day humans derive up to ∼5% [1] of their ancestry from archaic Denisovans, an even larger proportion than the ∼2% from Neanderthals [2]. We developed methods that can disambiguate the locations of segments of Denisovan and Neanderthal ancestry in present-day humans and applied them to 257 high-coverage genomes from 120 diverse populations, among which were 20 individual Oceanians with high Denisovan ancestry [3]. In Oceanians, the average size of Denisovan fragments is larger than Neanderthal fragments, implying a more recent average date of Denisovan admixture in the history of these populations (p = 0.00004). We document more Denisovan ancestry in South Asia than is expected based on existing models of history, reflecting a previously undocumented mixture related to archaic humans (p = 0.0013). Denisovan ancestry, just like Neanderthal ancestry, has been deleterious on a modern human genetic background, as reflected by its depletion near genes. Finally, the reduction of both archaic ancestries is especially pronounced on chromosome X and near genes more highly expressed in testes than other tissues (p = 1.2 × 10(-7) to 3.2 × 10(-7) for Denisovan and 2.2 × 10(-3) to 2.9 × 10(-3) for Neanderthal ancestry even after controlling for differences in level of selective constraint across gene classes). This suggests that reduced male fertility may be a general feature of mixtures of human populations diverged by >500,000 years. PMID:27032491

  17. A novel GIS-based tool for estimating present-day ocean reference depth using automatically processed gridded bathymetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurecka, Mirosława; Niedzielski, Tomasz; Migoń, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new method for computing the present-day value of the reference depth (dr) which is an essential input information for assessment of past sea-level changes. The method applies a novel automatic geoprocessing tool developed using Python script and ArcGIS, and uses recent data about ocean floor depth, sediment thickness, and age of oceanic crust. The procedure is multi-step and involves creation of a bathymetric dataset corrected for sediment loading and isostasy, delineation of subduction zones, computation of perpendicular sea-floor profiles, and statistical analysis of these profiles versus crust age. The analysis of site-specific situations near the subduction zones all around the world shows a number of instances where the depth of the oceanic crust stabilizes at a certain level before reaching the subduction zone, and this occurs at depths much lower than proposed in previous approaches to the reference depth issue. An analysis of Jurassic and Cretaceous oceanic lithosphere shows that the most probable interval at which the reference depth occurs is 5300-5800 m. This interval is broadly consistent with dr estimates determined using the Global Depth-Heatflow model (GDH1), but is significantly lower than dr estimates calculated on a basis of the Parsons-Sclater Model (PSM).

  18. INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY. GENOTOXICITY AND CARCINOGENICITY DATA BASES: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE PRESENT SITUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is an introduction to the Proceedings of the Intl. Symp. on Data Bases of Genotoxicity and Carcinogenicity and their Usefulness for Hazard Evaluations, held in Genova, Italy, January 1991. he purpose of this meeting was to review the present status of genotoxicity and ...

  19. Risk Management in Companies -A Questionnaire as an Instrument for Analysing the Present Situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, Diana; Joehnk, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The topic risk management receives new impulses in the context of the financial and economic crisis in the years 2007 until 2011 as well as the question whether companies took consequences. The article briefly describes the importance of risk management and then explained the theoretical principles of empirical methods. Excerpts from developed questionnaire will be presented.

  20. From School Libraries to School Media Centres: Experiences, the Present Situation and Possible Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Educational Sciences, Contents & Methods of Educ.

    This report presents case studies of the role of school libraries and their transformation into school media centers in elementary and secondary schools in Serbia, Croatia, and Hungary. It is noted that the school media center is not conceived of as a simple mechanism for storing books and audiovisual aids, but as an active center for…

  1. [Strategies for Mycobacterium avium complex infection control in Japan: how do they improve the present situation?].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kenji; Sano, Chiaki

    2013-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) were the most frequently isolated (about 80%) and most common cause of lung nontuberculosis. Its rate of infection is globally increasing, especially in Japan. In this situation, it is urgently needed to provide scientific evidences and develop therapeutic interventions in MAC infections. Recently, more and more patients are elderly women with no history of smoking, and they have reticulonodular infiltrates and patchy bilateral bronchiectasis. However the prognostic and intractable factors of MAC infections are poorly known. In this symposium, we address five novel strategies for MAC infection, concerning the more accurate incidence and prevalence rates compared with other countries, host defense associated with Th1/Th17 balance, route of MAC infection related soil exposure, MAC IgA antibody as a diagnosis maker, and improved chemotherapy including aminoglycoside or new quinolone. Appropriate clinical intervention may help to reduce the prolongation of MAC infection or enhance the activity of chemotherapy for the improved control of MAC. Below are the abstracts for each of the five speakers. 1. Review of current epidemiological study of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in Japan and the rest of the world: Kozo MORIMOTO (Respiratory Center, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association) The studies on pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease prevalence were started in early 1970s in Japan by the Mycobacteriosis Research Group of National Chest Hospitals. They were followed by a questionnaire survey in 1990s, by the National Tuberculosis and NTM Survey in late 1990s, and recently by the questionnaire surveys conducted by the NTM Disease Research Committee. The latest data in Japan (from 2007) indicated a morbidity rate of 5.7 per 100,000 population. Deaths from NTM disease were reported for the first time in 1970 and showed a marked, steady increase until 2007, with 912 deaths in that year. We

  2. Land subsidence of coastal areas of Jiangsu Province, China: historical review and present situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. Q.; Yang, Y.; Yu, J.; Gong, X. L.

    2015-11-01

    Surface faults related to land subsidence have been observed in coastal cities, such as Nantong, Yancheng, and Lian Yungang, in Jiangsu Province (CAJS) since the early 1970s. Nowadays, increases flooding and rising sea levels are attributed to subsidence caused by groundwater pumping. In this work we present a brief description of land subsidence in CAJS, we examine the mechanisms of land subsidence induced mainly by groundwater pumping and its evolution and economic implications as well as the implemented measures by the local government to prevent new damage.

  3. Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine-needle aspiration: present situation and indications.

    PubMed

    Vila Costas, J J

    2005-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine-needle aspiration is a safe technique that allows the collection of tissue samples for histological diagnosis, as well as therapeutic maneuvers. It has better diagnostic accuracy versus other exploration techniques used for the staging of neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract as well as in other organs. The risk for complications is extremely low, and the procedure has been shown to be cost-effective in many studies. In this paper we attempt to review the main present indications of endoscopic ultrasonography with fine-needle aspiration. PMID:16454609

  4. Is Present Day Continental Deformation Nearly Plate-Like? If so, Why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W.

    2001-12-01

    Some indicators of deformation (seismicity, late Cenozoic faulting, regional topographic relief) suggest broad deformation zones. However, space geodetic mappings of current movements and Holocene fault distributions often show straining focussed in very narrow zones. Conventional wisdom has it that continental deformation is spread over broad regions while straining of oceanic lithosphere occurs in narrow zones. Here I present evidence, largely from recent GPS surveys, suggesting present day continental deformation is actually occurring in a largely plate-like manner through the relative motions of a small number of micro-plates within each deforming zone, sometimes perturbed by isolated zones of deformation driven by local lithospheric density gradients. How can this be so? I speculate that this behavior is caused by the inherent lateral heterogeneity of continental lithosphere and by frictional and ductile weakening and strengthening mechanisms that promote focussed deformation that migrates with time. Qualitative indications of active deformation can sometimes be misleading. In many active regions erosion and tectonism are in balance and very low rates of slip on inclined faults can generate significant steady-state topography. However, in currently inactive regions, erosion rates are very low, much less than rates of vertical movement in even moderately active deforming zones. Therefore landscape relief provides evidence for current activity but preserves it over long periods, millions to tens of millions of years (Ma) (e.g. Alps, Rocky Mountains). Secondly, background seismicity is a qualitative measure of tectonic activity and only the largest earthquakes contribute significantly to representative long term deformation rates, so the spatial distribution of all smaller events can be misleading. Finally, many mappings of `active' faults encompass features up to several Ma old that are not necessarily representative of current activity. In contrast, late

  5. Present-day stress-field in the Cooper basin of Australia: implications for petroleum exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backé, G.; King, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Cooper Basin is located in centre part of the Australian continent, 5000km away from the nearest plate boundary. This Late Carboniferous to Middle Triassic basin is the largest onshore sedimentary basin producing oil and gas in Australia - mostly by fraccing tight reservoirs. Thus, an extensive database is available for studying the in-situ stress field in the basin. Previous studies have shown a significant variability if the stress field across the basin. However, the development of the mostly tight prospects require a good understanding of the structure of the reservoirs, mechanical properties of the stratigraphy, fracture geometry and density, in-situ stress field and fracture stimulation strategies in order to maximise the production This study provides new in-situ stress data from borehole breakouts and drilling-induced tensile fractures, along with a description of the fractures present along the well trajectory. The geometry of the natural fault and fracture network is interpreted from 3D seismic data, and compared to the well data. Finally, we performed a series of numeric simulation to test the fault and fracture stability in the present-day stress field. These data and our interpretation are used to evaluate the geomechanical properties of the Cooper Basin. This method is reproducible to other oil-bearing basins around the world, but is also applicable to the development of engineered geothermal reservoir or evaluation of carbon dioxide storage site.

  6. Improved Present Day Euler Vector for the Sierra Nevada Block Using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psencik, K. O.; Dixon, T. H.; Schmalzle, G.; McQuarrie, N.; McCaffery, R.

    2006-12-01

    We present a new surface velocity field for California and Nevada (UM-CANVAS) and use it to solve for a new angular velocity for the rigid Sierra Nevada-Great Valley block. We use all publicly available GPS data for this region, from both continuous (CGPS) and episodic campaign (EGPS) sites. All data were re-processed to create a consistent velocity field. Site velocities are referenced to both stable North America and the central Basin and Range. The Sierra Nevada block is a relatively long, narrow block, bounded on the west by the San Andreas Fault, on the east by a complex fault system comprising the Eastern California Shear Zone and the Walker Lane Belt, and on the south by the Garlock fault. The northern extent of the block is not well defined. The new data along with a strain accumulation algorithm may help to define this boundary. Published estimates for the motion of Sierra Nevada block include clockwise, counter-clockwise, and no rotation relative to stable North America; the new velocity data may also help to resolve this discrepancy. To better understand the motion of the Sierra Nevada block over time, we compare our model of present day motion to a geologic model of block motion over the last 2-3 Ma (McQuarrie and Wernicke, 2005). McQuarrie, N. and B. Wernicke, An Animated tectonic reconstruction of southwestern North America since 36 Ma. Geosphere, V.1; no.3; 147-172; 2005.

  7. α-1,3-Glucanase: present situation and prospect of research.

    PubMed

    Suyotha, Wasana; Yano, Shigekazu; Wakayama, Mamoru

    2016-02-01

    α-1,3-Glucanases hydrolyze α-1,3-glucan which is an insoluble linear α-1,3-linked homopolymer of glucose and these enzymes are classified into two families of glycoside hydrolases on the basis of amino acid sequence similarity; type-71 α-1,3-glucanases found in fungi and type-87 enzymes in bacteria. α-1,3-Glucan (also called 'mutan') is a major component of dental plaque formed by oral Streptococci and has important physiological roles in various fungal species, including as a component of cell walls, an endogenous carbon source for sexual development, and a virulent factor. Considering these backgrounds, α-1,3-glucanases have been investigated from the perspectives of applications to dental care and development of cell-wall lytic enzymes. Compared with information regarding other glycoside hydrolases such as amylases, cellulases, chitinases, and β-glucanases, there is limited biochemical and structural information available regarding α-1,3-glucanase. Further research on α-1,3-glucanases on enzyme application to dental care and biological control of pathogenic fungi is expected. In this mini-review, we briefly describe how α-1,3-glucanases are categorized and characterized and present our study findings regarding α-1,3-glucanase from Bacillus circulans KA-304. Furthermore, we briefly discuss potential future applications of α-1,3-glucanases. PMID:26748807

  8. How large are present-day heat flow variations across Mars' surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Grott, Matthias; Breuer, Doris

    2015-04-01

    The upcoming InSight (Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) mission, to be launched in 2016, will carry the first in-situ Martian heat flow measurement and provide an important baseline to constrain the present-day heat budget of the planet and, in turn, the thermal and chemical evolution of its interior. Currently, the Earth and the Moon are the only bodies on which in-situ surface heat flow measurements have been performed. Here, strong spatial variations of the surface heat flow are primarily caused by plate tectonics and the heterogeneous distribution of heat producing elements over the surface (e.g., the so-called Procellarum KREEP Terrane PKT on the lunar nearside). In the absence of plate-tectonics and large-scale geochemical anomalies, on Mars, surface heat flow is expected to vary less with geological location, being mainly influenced by variations in the thickness and HPE content of the crust [1], and by mantle plumes [2]. We have tested this assumption by running thermal evolution models for Mars in 3D spherical geometry, using the mantle convection code Gaia [3]. In our calculations, we employ a crust of fixed thickness with a north-south dichotomy in crustal thickness, a low conductivity compared to the mantle and enriched in radiogenic heat producing elements. Our results show that including compressibility effects, phase transitions and different core sizes, surface heat flow variations are mainly dominated by the crust contribution, unless the mantle viscosity increases more than three orders of magnitude with depth. In the latter case, heat flow variations due to mantle upwellings are ~ 8 mW/m2 relative to surface average and remain confined to limited surface regions. Both surface heat flow variations on Mars obtained from numerical models and the heat flow measurement planned for the InSight mission will permit to address the question of a possible plume underneath Elysium and also to test the feasibility

  9. Present-day serpentinization in the Tablelands, Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland: a Mars Analogue Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szponar, N.; Morrill, P. L.; Brazelton, W. J.; Schrenk, M. O.; Bower, D. M.; Steele, A.

    2010-12-01

    Serpentinization - a reaction between water and ultramafic rock (derived from the mantle) - is suspected to be a source of hydrocarbons such as methane on Mars. Through the hydration of ultramafic rock, this reaction produces hydrogen (H2) gas and reducing conditions necessary for abiogenic hydrocarbon synthesis, while also producing conditions amendable for the production of methane through microbial chemoautotrophic pathways. Mars analogue sites of present-day serpentinization can be used to determine what geochemical measurements are required for determining the reactions responsible for the methane in the Martian atmosphere. On Earth few locations that are known to exhibit active serpentinization are easily accessible. One such location is found in the Tablelands at Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland. Peridotite rocks similar to those found on Mars dominate the Tablelands thus making the Tablelands an important analogue site for potential ecosystems on Mars. Present-day serpentinization is evidenced by fluid seeps characterized by highly alkaline (pH 11 to 12) and highly reducing (as low as -820 mV) conditions, travertine and the presence of dissolved methane. These fluids contain high concentrations of Ca2+ (~5.00x104ppb) compared to freshwater inputs (~ 1.00x103) and react at the surface with atmospheric CO2 producing travertine deposits (as CaCO3 precipitate). Dissolved H2 gas produced abiogenically through the serpentinization reaction also provides copious geofuels, which can be used for chemosynthesis. Preliminary data has shown that microbial life lives in the high pH springs of the Tablelands. Ongoing studies of targeted compounds including phospholipid fatty acids and ether-linked lipids are being used to determine the microbial community compositions and verify the occurrence of Bacteria and Archaea in these fluids. An important question is also the source of the serpentinized fluid seeps. Hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes of these

  10. Do power lines and protected areas present a catch-22 situation for Cape vultures (Gyps coprotheres)?

    PubMed

    Phipps, W Louis; Wolter, Kerri; Michael, Michael D; MacTavish, Lynne M; Yarnell, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    Cape vulture Gyps coprotheres populations have declined across their range due to multiple anthropogenic threats. Their susceptibility to fatal collisions with the expanding power line network and the prevalence of carcasses contaminated with illegal poisons and other threats outside protected areas are thought to be the primary drivers of declines in southern Africa. We used GPS-GSM units to track the movements and delineate the home ranges of five adult (mean ±SD minimum convex polygon area = 121,655±90,845 km(2)) and four immature (mean ±SD minimum convex polygon area = 492,300±259,427 km(2)) Cape vultures to investigate the influence of power lines and their use of protected areas. The vultures travelled more than 1,000 km from the capture site and collectively entered five different countries in southern Africa. Their movement patterns and core foraging ranges were closely associated with the spatial distribution of transmission power lines and we present evidence that the construction of power lines has allowed the species to extend its range to areas previously devoid of suitable perches. The distribution of locations of known Cape vulture mortalities caused by interactions with power lines corresponded to the core ranges of the tracked vultures. Although some of the vultures regularly roosted at breeding colonies located inside protected areas the majority of foraging activity took place on unprotected farmland. Their ability to travel vast distances very quickly and the high proportion of time they spend in the vicinity of power lines and outside protected areas make Cape vultures especially vulnerable to negative interactions with the expanding power line network and the full range of threats across the region. Co-ordinated cross-border conservation strategies beyond the protected area network will therefore be necessary to ensure the future survival of threatened vultures in Africa. PMID:24137496

  11. Do Power Lines and Protected Areas Present a Catch-22 Situation for Cape Vultures (Gyps coprotheres)?

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, W. Louis; Wolter, Kerri; Michael, Michael D.; MacTavish, Lynne M.; Yarnell, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Cape vulture Gyps coprotheres populations have declined across their range due to multiple anthropogenic threats. Their susceptibility to fatal collisions with the expanding power line network and the prevalence of carcasses contaminated with illegal poisons and other threats outside protected areas are thought to be the primary drivers of declines in southern Africa. We used GPS-GSM units to track the movements and delineate the home ranges of five adult (mean ±SD minimum convex polygon area  =  121,655±90,845 km2) and four immature (mean ±SD minimum convex polygon area  =  492,300±259,427 km2) Cape vultures to investigate the influence of power lines and their use of protected areas. The vultures travelled more than 1,000 km from the capture site and collectively entered five different countries in southern Africa. Their movement patterns and core foraging ranges were closely associated with the spatial distribution of transmission power lines and we present evidence that the construction of power lines has allowed the species to extend its range to areas previously devoid of suitable perches. The distribution of locations of known Cape vulture mortalities caused by interactions with power lines corresponded to the core ranges of the tracked vultures. Although some of the vultures regularly roosted at breeding colonies located inside protected areas the majority of foraging activity took place on unprotected farmland. Their ability to travel vast distances very quickly and the high proportion of time they spend in the vicinity of power lines and outside protected areas make Cape vultures especially vulnerable to negative interactions with the expanding power line network and the full range of threats across the region. Co-ordinated cross-border conservation strategies beyond the protected area network will therefore be necessary to ensure the future survival of threatened vultures in Africa. PMID:24137496

  12. Global hotspots in the present-day distribution of ancient animal and plant lineages.

    PubMed

    Procheş, Şerban; Ramdhani, Syd; Perera, Sandun J; Ali, Jason R; Gairola, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The current distribution of biotic lineages that emerged in the deep time has both theoretical and practical implications, in particular for understanding the processes that have forged present-day biodiversity and informing local and regional-scale conservation efforts. To date however, there has been no examination of such patterns globally across taxa and geological time. Here we map the diversity of selected extant seed plant and tetrapod vertebrate lineages that were already in existence either in the latest Triassic or latest Cretaceous. For Triassic-age lineages, we find concentrations in several regions - both tropical and temperate - parts of North America, Europe, East and South-east Asia, northern South America, and New Zealand. With Cretaceous-age lineages, high values are relatively uniformly distributed across the tropics, with peak the values along the Andes, in South-east Asia and Queensland, but also in the temperate Cape Mountains. These patterns result from a combination of factors, including land area, geographic isolation, climate stability and mass extinction survival ability. While the need to protect many of these lineages has been long recognised, a spatially-explicit approach is critical for understanding and maintaining the factors responsible for their persistence, and this will need to be taken forward across finer scales. PMID:26498226

  13. Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates

    SciTech Connect

    D. Levitt

    2004-11-09

    The purpose of this model report is to document the infiltration model used to estimate upper-bound, mean, and lower-bound spatially-distributed average annual net infiltration rates for present-day and potential future climates at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Net infiltration is the component of infiltrated precipitation, snowmelt, or surface water run-on that has percolated below the zone of evapotranspiration as defined by the depth of the effective root zone. The estimates of net infiltration are primarily used for defining the upper boundary condition for the site-scale three-dimensional unsaturated zone (UZ) model. The UZ flow model is one of several process models abstracted by the total system performance assessment (TSPA) model used to evaluate performance of the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The net-infiltration model is important for assessing repository-system performance because output from this model provides the upper boundary condition for the UZ flow model used to generate flow fields; water percolating downward from the UZ will be the principal means by which radionuclides are potentially released to the saturated zone (SZ). The SZ is the principal pathway to the biosphere where the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) is exposed to radionuclides.

  14. Present-day deformation of northern Pakistan from Salt Ranges to Karakorum Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouanne, F.; Awan, A.; Pêcher, A.; Kausar, A.; Mugnier, J. L.; Khan, I.; Khan, N. A.; Van Melle, J.

    2014-03-01

    Episodic GPS measurements are used to quantify the present-day velocity field in the northwestern Himalaya from the southern Pamir to the Himalayan foreland. We report large postseismic displacements following the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and several mm/yr thrusting of the central segment of the Salt Ranges and Potwar Plateau over the foreland, westward thrusting of Nanga Parbat above the Kohistan Plateau, and ~12 mm/yr SSE velocities of the Karakorum Ranges and of the Deosai and Kohistan Plateaus relative to the Indian Plate. Numerical simulations allow to determine a first approximation of slip along active faults: (1) substantial creep of ~87 mm/yr between 2006 and 2012 along the flat northeast of the Balakot-Bagh Thrust affected by the 2005 earthquake; (2) ~5 mm/yr slip of the central segment of the Salt Ranges and Potwar Plateau, whereas their western boundaries are clearly inactive over the time span covered by our measurements; (3) 13 mm/yr ductile slip along the Main Himalayan Thrust modeled by a dislocation dipping 7° northward, locked at a depth of 15 km; and (4) ~20 mm/yr slip along the shear zone forming the western boundary of Nanga Parbat, between depths of 1.6 and 6.5 km. Residuals velocities suggest the existence of left-lateral strike slip along the Jhelum Fault.

  15. Recovery of a geocentric reference frame using the present-day GPS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, Rajendra P.; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1990-01-01

    A geocentric reference frame adopts the center of mass of the earth as the origin of the coordinate axes. The center of mass of the earth is the natural and unambiguous origin of a geocentric satellite dynamical system. But in practice a kinematically obtained terrestrial reference frame may assume an origin other than the geocenter. The establishment of a geocentric reference frame, to which all relevant observations and results can be referred and in which geodynamic theories or models for the dynamic behavior of earth can be formulated, requires the ability to accurately recover a given coordinate frame origin offset from the geocenter. GPS measurements, because of their abundance and broad distribution, provide a powerful tool to obtain this origin offset in a short period of time. Two effective strategies have been devised. Data from the First Central And South America (Casa Uno) geodynamics experiment has been studied, in order to demonstrate the ability of recovering the geocenter location with present day GPS satellites and receivers.

  16. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-05-01

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing.

  17. Global hotspots in the present-day distribution of ancient animal and plant lineages

    PubMed Central

    Procheş, Şerban; Ramdhani, Syd; Perera, Sandun J.; Ali, Jason R.; Gairola, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The current distribution of biotic lineages that emerged in the deep time has both theoretical and practical implications, in particular for understanding the processes that have forged present-day biodiversity and informing local and regional-scale conservation efforts. To date however, there has been no examination of such patterns globally across taxa and geological time. Here we map the diversity of selected extant seed plant and tetrapod vertebrate lineages that were already in existence either in the latest Triassic or latest Cretaceous. For Triassic-age linages, we find concentrations in several regions – both tropical and temperate – parts of North America, Europe, East and South-east Asia, northern South America, and New Zealand. With Cretaceous-age lineages, high values are relatively uniformly distributed across the tropics, with peak the values along the Andes, in South-east Asia and Queensland, but also in the temperate Cape Mountains. These patterns result from a combination of factors, including land area, geographic isolation, climate stability and mass extinction survival ability. While the need to protect many of these lineages has been long recognised, a spatially-explicit approach is critical for understanding and maintaining the factors responsible for their persistence, and this will need to be taken forward across finer scales. PMID:26498226

  18. The evolution of galaxies from primeval irregulars to present-day ellipticals.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masao; Umemura, Masayuki

    2006-03-30

    Galaxy formation is believed to proceed in a 'bottom up' manner, starting with the formation of small clumps of gas and stars that then merge hierarchically into giant systems. The baryonic gas loses thermal energy by radiative cooling and falls towards the centres of the new galaxies, while supernovae blow gas out. Any realistic model therefore requires a proper treatment of these processes, but hitherto this has been far from satisfactory. Here we report a simulation that follows evolution from the earliest stages of galaxy formation through the period of dynamical relaxation, at which point the resulting galaxy is in its final form. The bubble structures of gas revealed in our simulation (for times of less than 3 x 10(8) years) resemble closely high-redshift Lyman-alpha emitters. After 10(9) years, these bodies are dominated by stellar continuum radiation and then resemble the Lyman break galaxies, which are high-redshift star-forming galaxies. At this point, the abundance of elements heavier than helium ('metallicity') appears to be solar. After 1.3 x 10(10) years, these galaxies resemble present-day ellipticals. PMID:16572164

  19. Status of Day Care in Canada: A Review of the Major Findings of the National Day Care Study, 1974. (Situation De La Garde De Jour Au Canada: Une Revue des Principales Constatations Sur La Garde De Jour, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet presents (in both French and English) the results of a 1974 survey which assessed the growth of day care services in Canada. Similar national surveys had been conducted in 1971 and 1973. Results indicated that the number of day care spaces and the number of children of working mothers in day care increased substantially from 1973 to…

  20. Present-day climate of Antarctica : A study with a regional atmospheric climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Berg, W. J.

    2008-02-01

    The present-day climate of Antarctica is studied with a regional climate model. In this research, foci are the surface mass balance, i.e. the accumulation of snow on the ice cap, and the heat budget of the atmosphere above Antarctica. Insight in the surface mass balance of the Antarctic ice cap is gained by explanation, evaluation and subsequently calibration of model-simulated surface mass balance patterns using more than 1900 in situ observations. Furthermore, a method is developed to quantify the uncertainty in the local and spatially integrated surface mass balance estimate. In our study, a good correlation between the observations and model results is found, giving reliability to the results presented. The final surface mass balance estimate primarily deviates in the coastal zones of Antarctica from earlier estimates. Our results strongly suggest much higher accumulation rates than previously assumed, leading to a 15% higher overall accumulation. Unfortunately, the coastal zone is poorly covered by observations, which makes a final assessment difficult. Analysis of the heat budget of the Antarctic atmosphere clarifies the dynamics of the Antarctic boundary layer and shows the coupling to the global climate. Our results show how the boundary layer develops from the interior of Antarctica to the coast; from shallow and extremely stable to deeper, mixed but still stable. Furthermore, the effect of surface undulations on the local near surface temperature is explained. Domes and ridges have a weakening effect on the surface inversion of the temperature through enhanced divergence of the near-surface wind field. Oppositely, valleys strengthen the surface inversion. This coupling of topography and temperature causes the spatial variability of surface temperatures on scales of typical a few hundred kilometers.

  1. Liquid Water Lakes on Mars Under Present-Day Conditions: Sustainability and Effects on the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldspiel, Jules M.

    2015-11-01

    Decades of Mars exploration have produced ample evidence that aqueous environments once existed on the surface. Much evidence supports groundwater emergence as the source of liquid water on Mars [1-4]. However, cases have also been made for rainfall [5] and snow pack melts [6].Whatever the mechanism by which liquid water is emplaced on the surface of Mars, whether from groundwater seeps, atmospheric precipitation, or some combination of sources, this water would have collected in local topographic lows, and at least temporarily, would have created a local surface water system with dynamic thermal and hydrologic properties. Understanding the physical details of such aqueous systems is important for interpreting the past and present surface environments of Mars. It is also important for evaluating potential habitable zones on or near the surface.In conjunction with analysis of surface and core samples, valuable insight into likely past aqueous sites on Mars can be gained through modeling their formation and evolution. Toward that end, we built a 1D numerical model to follow the evolution of small bodies of liquid water on the surface of Mars. In the model, liquid water at different temperatures is supplied to the surface at different rates while the system is subjected to diurnally and seasonally varying environmental conditions. We recently simulated cases of cold (275 K) and warm (350 K) water collecting in a small depression on the floor of a mid southern latitude impact crater. When inflows create an initial pool > 3 m deep and infiltration can be neglected, we find that the interior of the pool can remain liquid over a full Mars year under the present cold and dry climate as an ice cover slowly thickens [7]. Here we present new results for the thermal and hydrologic evolution of surface water and the associated subsurface region for present-day conditions when infiltration of surface water into the subsurface is considered.[1] Pieri (1980) Science 210.[2] Carr

  2. Simulation of present-day precipitation over India using a regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Rajesh Kumar Singh; Singh, G. P.

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the present paper is to examine the capability of the regional climate model version 3 (RegCM3) to simulate the annual as well as seasonal precipitation variability over the Indian subcontinent. RegCM3 has been run at 40 km horizontal resolution for the period of 1982-2006 continuously and model results were compared to the observed precipitation datasets of India Meteorological Department (IMD) and CPC Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP). Model evaluation has been done using different statistical methods like mean bias error (MBE), root mean square error, mean percentage error (MPE) and studied the spatial pattern of annual and seasonal variability and trend. Daily precipitation data at 1° × 1° grids of IMD have been used to study observed climatological means (both annual and seasonal), regression trends, interannual and intraseasonal variability over India from 1951 to 2007. The spatial distribution of annual precipitation shows a decreasing trend over west coast of India, central India, hilly region of India and an increasing trend is found over the northwest India, peninsular India and northeast India. The temporal distribution of daily precipitation shows highest rainfall of 18 mm/day in mid July (in composite flood cases only) and 12 mm/day during August (in composite drought cases only). The RegCM3 simulated annual and seasonal precipitation variability is close to the observed IMD and CMAP over all India (AI). During winter and pre-monsoon season, the model has overestimated the mean precipitation while underestimated in summer and post-monsoon season. Overall, annual precipitation showed the deficiency of -22.44 % compared to IMD and -1.41 % compared to CMAP over India. To understand the possible cause of annual and seasonal precipitation biases over India and its six homogeneous regions, the vertical difference (model mines National Centre for Environmental Prediction; NCEP) fields of water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) and air

  3. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-03-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  4. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-07-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  5. Effects of Present-Day Ice Melting on the Geodetic Measurements in Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Larsen, C. F.; Miura, S.; Ohta, Y.; Fujimoto, H.; Sun, W.; Sugano, T.; Kaufman, A. M.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    It is known that the southeast Alaska (SE-AK) is undergoing a rapid land uplift, which is considered to be mainly due to the effect of melting of past ice, especially in the last two hundred years after the little ice age (LIA). The crustal deformation caused by the post-glacial rebound (PGR) has been clearly detected by GPS and tidal gauge measurements and modeled (Larsen et al., 2004 and 2005). On the other hand, it is considered also that the observed uplift rate is affected by the present-day ice melting (PDIM), which is considered to be the effect of recent global warming (Larsen et al., 2005; Sato et al., 2006). The displacement measurements provide us useful information to evaluate the ice-melting rate and to discuss the viscosity of the earth. However, usually, it is difficult to separate the uplift rate due to the long- term viscous response of the earth by only using displacement observations, because the two effects (i.e. the elastic and viscous deformations) are mixed in the observed data. Related to this problem, Wahr et al. (1995) demonstrated a method to separate the viscous contribution from the observed data by collocating position and gravity measurements. Considered this, since 2006, we, a joint team of Japanese and U.S. researchers are carrying out the absolute gravity (AG) measurements once a year adding to the temporal and continuous GPS observations in SE-AK. Combining the AG measurements and GPS measurements is useful because the attraction part of gravity measurement is sensitive to a mass change of the present-day ice melting, while the past-ices should have no effect to the attraction part of the observed gravity change. In this context of the discussion, precise numerical estimation of the PDIM effect is important (Sato et al., 2007). Based on the two kinds of DEM (Digital Elevation Model), i.e. one is from the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and other is that from air photo dating data which were obtained in the period of

  6. Uncovering the genetic history of the present-day Greenlandic population.

    PubMed

    Moltke, Ida; Fumagalli, Matteo; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Crawford, Jacob E; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit E; Grarup, Niels; Gulløv, Hans Christian; Linneberg, Allan; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Nielsen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Because of past limitations in samples and genotyping technologies, important questions about the history of the present-day Greenlandic population remain unanswered. In an effort to answer these questions and in general investigate the genetic history of the Greenlandic population, we analyzed ∼200,000 SNPs from more than 10% of the adult Greenlandic population (n = 4,674). We found that recent gene flow from Europe has had a substantial impact on the population: more than 80% of the Greenlanders have some European ancestry (on average ∼25% of their genome). However, we also found that the amount of recent European gene flow varies across Greenland and is far smaller in the more historically isolated areas in the north and east and in the small villages in the south. Furthermore, we found that there is substantial population structure in the Inuit genetic component of the Greenlanders and that individuals from the east, west, and north can be distinguished from each other. Moreover, the genetic differences in the Inuit ancestry are consistent with a single colonization wave of the island from north to west to south to east. Although it has been speculated that there has been historical admixture between the Norse Vikings who lived in Greenland for a limited period ∼600-1,000 years ago and the Inuit, we found no evidence supporting this hypothesis. Similarly, we found no evidence supporting a previously hypothesized admixture event between the Inuit in East Greenland and the Dorset people, who lived in Greenland before the Inuit. PMID:25557782

  7. Uncovering the Genetic History of the Present-Day Greenlandic Population

    PubMed Central

    Moltke, Ida; Fumagalli, Matteo; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S.; Crawford, Jacob E.; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Grarup, Niels; Gulløv, Hans Christian; Linneberg, Allan; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Nielsen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Because of past limitations in samples and genotyping technologies, important questions about the history of the present-day Greenlandic population remain unanswered. In an effort to answer these questions and in general investigate the genetic history of the Greenlandic population, we analyzed ∼200,000 SNPs from more than 10% of the adult Greenlandic population (n = 4,674). We found that recent gene flow from Europe has had a substantial impact on the population: more than 80% of the Greenlanders have some European ancestry (on average ∼25% of their genome). However, we also found that the amount of recent European gene flow varies across Greenland and is far smaller in the more historically isolated areas in the north and east and in the small villages in the south. Furthermore, we found that there is substantial population structure in the Inuit genetic component of the Greenlanders and that individuals from the east, west, and north can be distinguished from each other. Moreover, the genetic differences in the Inuit ancestry are consistent with a single colonization wave of the island from north to west to south to east. Although it has been speculated that there has been historical admixture between the Norse Vikings who lived in Greenland for a limited period ∼600–1,000 years ago and the Inuit, we found no evidence supporting this hypothesis. Similarly, we found no evidence supporting a previously hypothesized admixture event between the Inuit in East Greenland and the Dorset people, who lived in Greenland before the Inuit. PMID:25557782

  8. Present-day deformation of the intra-Eurasian plate regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Sancho, Candela; Govers, Rob; Tesauro, Magdala

    2015-04-01

    , and paleomagnetic observations, which capture present-day and long-term deformation. We discuss various causes for differences.

  9. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability

    PubMed Central

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing. PMID:26921324

  10. Present-day antarctic climatology of the NCAR community climate model version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, Renyow; Bromwich, D.H. ); Parish, T.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Five-year seasonal cycle output produced by the NCAR Community Climate Model Version 1 (CCM 1) with R15 resolution is used to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate the present-day climate of Antarctica. The model results are compared with observed horizontal syntheses and point data. Katabatic winds, surface temperatures over the continent, the circumpolar trough, the vertical motion field, the split jet stream over the Pacific Ocean, and the snowfall accumulation are analyzed. The results show that the CCM1 with R15 resolution can simulate to some extent the dynamics of Antarctic climate not only for the synoptic scale, but also for some mesoscale features. This is reflected in the zonal-mean pattern of vertical motion by the presence of two convergence centers. The finding suggests that the CCM I might also capture the split jet stream over New Zealand in winter, but the evidence is mixed. This is inferred to be due to inadequate simulation of the thermal forcing over high southern latitudes. The CCM I can also capture the phase and amplitude of the annual and semiannual variation of temperature, sea level pressure, and zonally averaged zonal (E-W) wind. That the CCM 1 can simulate some characteristics of the semiannual variation may be due to the improved radiation treatment compared to the earlier CCMO. The most dramatic shortcomings were associated with the model's anomalously large precipitation amounts at high latitudes. The simulations of cloudiness and the atmospheric heat balance are adversely affected. A greatly refined moisture budget scheme is needed to eliminate these problems and may allow the split jet-stream feature over the New Zealand area in winter to be accurately reproduced. A coupled mesoscale-CCM 1 model may be needed to simulate the feedback from mesoscale cyclones to synoptic-scale weather systems, and the katabatic wind circulation.

  11. Quantifying present-day and long-term shale weathering rates across a latitudinal climosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dere, A. L. D.; Andrews, E.; White, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    A transect of shale sites was established across the Northern Hemisphere as part of the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO) to investigate the role of climate in shale weathering. Mean annual temperature and precipitation vary across sites located in Wales, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama and Puerto Rico. Long-term weathering rates were quantified by comparing bulk soil geochemistry with original parent shale composition and cosmogenic 10Be inventories to estimate weathering duration. Present-day weathering rates were obtained by burying approximately 2 cm by 1 cm shale chips at multiple depths in soil pit walls. Shale chip samples were exhumed after two and five years of burial, washed and mass loss measured. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to determine surface chemistry and physical alteration of the recovered shale. Long-term weathering rates increase with increasing temperature across the transect. Similarly, after two years of burial, exhumed shale chip weathering rates increased from 2.9 ± 0.9 in Wales to 11.2 ± 3.7 m Ma-1 in Puerto Rico. Average weathering rates after two years of burial were similar in Virginia, Tennessee and Alabama (8.6 - 10.6 m Ma-1). Many shale chips in Alabama and Puerto Rico, however, retained soil particles even after washing, therefore total mass loss, and thus weathering rates, at these sites could be even greater. After five years of burial, mass loss across the Appalachian sites was greatest in Tennessee while weathering rates were overall generally similar to two year rates (3.0 to 12.6 m Ma-1). Evidence of physical and chemical changes, especially Na and Mg loss, from shale chip surfaces was greater on shale chips buried at warmer and wetter sites. Quantifying weathering rates as a function of climate at multiple scales will contribute to understanding the effects of global climate change on soil formation rates in the Critical

  12. Diversity and biogeography of present-day magnetotactic bacteria in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W.; Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2012-12-01

    A number of microorganisms are able to biomineralize iron minerals. Among them, magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) mineralize intracellular membrane-enveloped magnetite and/or greigite, known as magnetosomes that help cells to swim along the Earth's magnetic field. In recent years, MTB have become an attractive model system for investigating the biogeomagnetism. The occurrence of MTB has been reported in aquatic environments from freshwater to marine ecosystems. And, fossil magnetosomes are found to be potential carriers of natural remanent magnetization and indicators of paleoenvironmental changes. However, their distribution across heterogeneous habitats remains unclear. Here we report the diversity and biogeography of MTB from more than 20 locations from freshwater to saline habitats in eastern China. Great morphological variability was observed in MTB communities through light and transmission electron microscope observation. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA genes has revealed that identified MTB belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and the phylum Nitrospirae. The overall composition of MTB communities was compared, and we found a restricted distribution of MTB communities across a large spatial scale with pronounced endemicity. Variation partitioning analyses indicated that the biogeography of MTB is relatively more influenced by environmental factors (e.g., salinity, sulfate, total iron, Eh, and temperature) than geographic distance. More interestingly, we found, for the first time, that the strength of the Earth's magnetic field appears to influence the biogeography of MTB, implying an impact of geophysical effects on these microorganisms. Our results infer that MTB community represents a biogeographic distribution across the studied heterogeneous environments. Knowledge of the present-day MTB biogeography may be applied towards the reconstruction of paleo-environments and assessment of contribution of bacterial

  13. A test of present-day plate geometries for northeast Asia and Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Alternative geometries for the present-day configuration of plate boundaries in northeast Asia and Japan are tested using NUVEL-1 and 256 horizontal earthquake slip vectors from the Japan and northern Kuril trenches. Statistical analysis of the slip vectors is used to determine whether the North American, Eurasian, or Okhotsk plate overlies the trench. Along the northern Kuril trench, slip vectors are well-fit by the NUVEL-1 Pacific-North America Euler pole, but are poorly fit by the Pacific-Eurasia Euler pole. Results for the Japan trench are less conclusive, but suggest that much of Honshu and Hokkaido are also part of the North American plate. The simplest geometry consistent with the trench slip vectors is a geometry in which the North American plate extends south to 41 deg N, and possibly includes northern Honshu and southern Hokkaido. Although these results imply that the diffuse seismicity that connects the Lena River delta to Sakhalin Island and the eastern Sea of Japan records motion between Eurasia and North America, onshore geologic and seismic data define an additional belt of seismicity in Siberia that cannot be explained with this geometry. Assuming that these two seismic belts constitute evidence for an Okhotsk block, two published kinematic models for motion of the Okhotsk block are tested. The first model, which predicts motion of up to 15 mm/yr relative to North America, is rejected because Kuril and Japan trench slip vectors are fit more poorly than for the simpler geometry described above. The second model gives a good fit to the trench slip vectors, but only if Okhotsk-North America motion is slower than 5 mm/yr.

  14. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability.

    PubMed

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-05-24

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing. PMID:26921324

  15. Generation of harmonic frequencies and their effects in present day ICRF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durodié, F.; Vervier, M.

    1999-09-01

    The whole TEXTOR-94 ICRF system [1,2] circuit has been analyzed, partially modelled and studied at the fundamental operating frequency and, more important, at harmonic frequencies thereof. It has been found that without appropriate measures, present day systems and especially the TEXTOR ICRF system are prone to spurious generation of power at the second harmonic frequency. This leads either to erroneous activation of the reflected power safety protection or to highly increased (in some cases doubled) voltages in the transmission lines and antennas. As the voltage standing waves at the second harmonic displace the total voltage maxima in the transmission lines and antennas, this also explains why arcs are not always found at the expected voltage maxima for the fundamental frequency. The model is also able to give additional explanations why the ASDEX-Upgrade ICRF system has dramatically improved its power handling capabilities after the introduction of the ``3dB coupler reflection compensation scheme'' [3,4]. The output of one of the TEXTOR transmitters has been fitted with a quarter wave length shorted stub which has no effect on the operation at the fundamental frequency but which effectively shorts out the second harmonic. It has to be noted that eg. the Tore Supra RDL [5] antennas are fitted with such a stub in the feeding transmission line whose function is to enter cooling water into the transmission line system. Hence, this could be the explanation of the apparent higher than average power handling capabilities of the TS antenna system. Experimental results clearly indicate a much improved operational power handling capability on plasma and an increased voltage stand-off when conditioning this antenna pair on vacuum. Limits have yet to be explored but already remarkable is the fact that since the installation of the quarter wavelength stub the reflected power safety system has been activated only once and furthermore so in poorly matched conditions.

  16. Estimating hypothetical present-day insured losses for past intense hurricanes in the French Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, James; Desarthe, Jérémy; Naulin, Jean-Philippe; Garnier, Emmanuel; Liu, Ye; Moncoulon, David

    2015-04-01

    On the islands of the French Antilles, the period for which systematic meteorological measurements and historic event loss data are available is short relative to the recurrence intervals of very intense, damaging hurricanes. Additionally, the value of property at risk changes through time. As such, the recent past can only provide limited insight into potential losses from extreme storms in coming years. Here we present some research that seeks to overcome, as far as is possible, the limitations of record length in assessing the possible impacts of near-future hurricanes on insured properties. First, using the archives of the French overseas departments (which included administrative and weather reports, inventories of damage to houses, crops and trees, as well as some meteorological observations after 1950) we reconstructed the spatial patterns of hazard intensity associated with three historical events. They are: i) the 1928 Hurricane (Guadeloupe), ii) Hurricane Betsy (1956, Guadeloupe) and iii) Hurricane David (1979, Martinique). These events were selected because all were damaging, and the information available on each is rich. Then, using a recently developed catastrophe model for hurricanes affecting Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint-Barthélemy and Saint-Martin, we simulated the hypothetical losses to insured properties that the reconstructed events might cause if they were to reoccur today. The model simulated damage due to wind, rainfall-induced flooding and storm surge flooding. These 'what if' scenarios provided an initial indication of the potential present-day exposure of the insurance industry to intense hurricanes. However, we acknowledge that historical events are unlikely to repeat exactly. We therefore extended the study by producing a stochastic event catalogue containing a large number of synthetic but plausible hurricane events. Instrumental data were used as a basis for event generation, but importantly the statistical methods we applied permit

  17. A No-Net-Rotation Model of Present-Day Surface Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, C.; Holt, W. E.

    2001-12-01

    A significant portion of the Earth's surface consists of zones of diffuse deformation. The interior regions of these diffuse zones of deformation move at distinctly different velocities from that of adjacent plates, and, because of their complexities, have been ignored in previous no-net-rotation (NNR) models (e.g., NNR-NUVEL1A). We have calculated a new NNR model from a continuous velocity field that incorporates both rigid plate motion and velocity gradients within plate boundary zones. The velocity field is obtained through a bi-cubic Bessel interpolation of almost 3000 geodetic velocities and strain rates inferred from Quaternary faults. The geodetic velocities are taken from about 50 different, mainly published, studies. For each study we have not adopted the original reference frame. Instead, we have solved for a rigid body rotation for each study that rotate the vectors of each study into a model reference frame in the process of satisfying a least-squares fit between model and observed velocities and model and observed strain rates. When compared with earlier NNR models we find significantly different angular velocities for many plates in our model. Differences between the NNR model presented here and earlier NNR models can be attributed to both the effect of including velocity gradients in diffuse plate boundary zones, as well as actual differences between geodetically derived, present-day, surface motions and geologic estimates. We find that for the Indian, Arabian, Nazca, Cocos, Philippine Sea, and the Caribbean plate the differences between our model and the NNR-NUVEL1A model are mainly due to differences between geodetic and geologic plate velocities. For the Eurasian plate the discrepancy that we find between our result and NNR-NUVEL1A model can not only be ascribed to the difference between geodetic and geologic velocities, but also to the significant effect of including plate boundary zones. The significantly different NNR rotation vectors that we

  18. Present-day Stress Pattern of Turkey from Inversion of Updated Earthquake Focal Mechanism Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özacar, A.

    2011-12-01

    Active tectonic setting of Turkey is characterized by different stress regimes. In order to analyze present-day tectonic stresses throughout the country, all available earthquake focal mechanisms with updated locations reported by the International Seismological Center (ISC) and national catalogues are compiled between 34° - 43° latitudes and 25° - 46° longitudes. Focal mechanisms of earthquakes with multiple solutions are chosen based on their reliability and consistency with the local tectonic setting. The resultant database which includes 1391 events occurred during the period 1909 - 2010 with magnitudes ranging from 2.0 to 8.0 and depths reaching up to 165 km, constitutes the base information for better active fault characterization in seismic hazard analyses. Using this catalogue, the pressure-tension axes, maximum-minimum horizontal stress axes, and tectonic stress regime of each earthquake are determined following the World Stress Map (WSM) project guidelines and analyzed separately for crustal and intermediate depth earthquakes. During stress inversion, crustal events are grouped in 36 and intermediate depth events in 2 distinct regions on the basis of their geographical proximity, kinematic homogeneity and tectonic setting to minimize the amount of heterogeneity and map the variations in the stress field. In the following stage, results of independent stress inversions including orientations of the three principal compressive stresses (σ1 = maximum, σ2 = intermediate, and σ3 = minimum), ratio of stress magnitudes (σ2 - σ3 / σ1 - σ3), and dominant stress regimes, are analyzed along with seismicity recorded by national seismic networks and previously mapped active faults. Our results reveal widespread strike-slip faulting in the crust throughout Turkey including North Anatolian Fault Zone, North Aegean Trough, Pliny-Strabo Trenches, Paphos Transform Fault, Tuzgölü Fault, East Anatolian Fault Zone, and East Anatolian Plateau. The regions

  19. Statistical dynamical downscaling of present day and future precipitation regimes in southern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, David; Reyers, Mark; Pinto, Joaquim; Fink, Andreas; Massmeyer, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Southeast Asia has been identified as one of the hot-spots of climate change. While the projected changes in annual precipitation are comparatively small, there is a clear tendency towards more rainfall in the dry season and an increase in extreme precipitation events. In this study, a statistical dynamical downscaling (SDD) approach is applied to obtain higher resolution and more robust regional climate change projections for tropical Southeast Asia with focus on Vietnam. First, a recent climate (RC) simulation with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM with a spatial resolution of ~50 km driven by ERA-Interim (1979-2008) is performed for the tropical region of Southeast Asia. For the SDD, six weather types (WTs) are selected for Vietnam during the wet season (April - October) using a k-means cluster analysis of daily zonal wind component in 850 hPa and 200 hPa from the RC run. For each calculated weather type, simulated representatives are selected from the RC run and are then further dynamically downscaled to a resolution of 0.0625° (7 km). By using historical WT frequencies, the simulated representatives are recombined to a high resolution rainfall climatology for the recent climate. It is shown that the SDD is generally able to capture the present day climatology and that the employment of the higher resolved simulated representatives enhances the performance of the SDD. However, an overestimation of rainfall at higher altitudes is found. To obtain future climate projections, an ensemble of eight CMIP5 model members are selected to study precipitation changes. For these projections, WT frequencies of future scenarios under two representative Concentration Pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) are taken into account for the mid-term scenario (2046-2065) and the long-term scenario (2081-2100). The strongest precipitation changes are found for the RCP8.5 scenario. Most of the models indicate a generally increase in precipitation amount in the wet period over Southeast

  20. Present-day loading rates of faults in the northern Mojave region, California, from GPS Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinler, J. C.; Bennett, R. A.; McGill, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed GPS data from 45 continuous sites along with 9 campaign sites within the northern Mojave region for the time period 2002.0-2013.0 to model the present-day crustal velocity field for the region. In addition to the 54 sites we analyzed, we included 21 site velocities from the USGS Fort Irwin network and 66 site velocities from the SCEC Crustal Motion Map 4 velocity field. We rotated the USGS and SCEC velocities into our Stable North America Reference Frame (SNARF) through a minimization of the differences amongst sites in common between the different solutions. We used our velocities to constrain an elastic block model in order to estimate fault-loading rates of crustal faults within the northern Mojave region. Each crustal block is allowed to both translate and rotate about a vertical axis. Results include new slip rate estimates for the NW-SE oriented right-lateral strike-slip faults within the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ), including model faults representing the Lenwood-Lockhart fault zone (4.5×0.2 mm/yr), Calico-Blackwater faults (1.0×0.4 mm/yr), and Goldstone Lake fault (1.2×0.5 mm/yr), with a total slip across the ECSZ of ~8-9 mm/yr, lower than some previous geodetic estimates, but slightly higher than geologic estimates. We estimate left-lateral slip rates of 4.4×0.2 and 4.9×0.3 mm/yr for the model faults representing the west-central and central segments of the Garlock fault, respectively, with rates decreasing to 0.5×0.4 mm/yr for the easternmost segment. We estimate clockwise rotation rates of the crustal blocks in the Northeast Mojave domain in the range of 3-5×0.7 °/Myr, consistent with paleomagnetic estimates of as much as 50° since 10 Ma.

  1. Present-day Tectonic Stress Regimes in Northern Iraq and Surrounding Regions from Focal Mechanism Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi, H. H.; Abdulnaby, W.; Al-Shukri, H. J.; Numan, N.

    2013-12-01

    The collision zone between the Arabian and the Eurasian plates is one of the most seismically active regions. Northern Iraq represents the northeastern part of the Arabian plate that has a suture zone with the Turkish and Iranian plates named Bitlis-Zagros suture zone. The present-day tectonic stress regimes can be estimated from focal mechanism data. The waveform moment tensor inversion method was used to derive the focal mechanism solution of 65 earthquakes with magnitudes of ≥3.5. Green's functions for the local and regional seismograms were generated in order to perform the moment tensor inversion using complete seismograms. From focal mechanism solutions, the direction of slip and the orientations of the moment tensor axes (P, N, and T) on the fault surface during an earthquake were determined. The tectonic stress regime of each focal mechanism was estimated based on Zoback (1992). The results show that all six categories of the stress regimes, which are normal faulting (NF), normal faulting with strike-slip component (NS), strike-slip faulting (SS), thrust faulting with strike-slip component (TS), thrust faulting (TF), and unknown or oblique faulting (UF), exist. However, the most common tectonic regimes in the study area are the SS (43.94%), UF (27.27%), and TF (13.64%). In most cases, the strike-slip movement on the fault surfaces consists of left-lateral movement. The NF regime, which is located in one small area near Diyala city at the Iraq-Iran border, might be a local tensional stress regime. The directions of the compressional stress axes show that the stress regime at the Zagros suture zone has two directions. One is perpendicular to the suture near the Iraq-Iran border, and the second is parallel to the suture near the Iraq-Turkey border. In addition, the compressional stress axes at the city of Sinjar, near the Iraq-Syria border, have E-W direction. These results are compatible with the tectonic setting of the Arabain-Eurasian continental

  2. Importance of Past Human and Natural Disturbance in Present-Day Net Ecosystem Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felzer, B. S.; Phelps, P.

    2014-12-01

    Gridded datasets of Net Ecosystem Exchange derived from eddy covariance and remote sensing measurements provide a means of validating Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP, opposite of NEE) from terrestrial ecosystem models. While most forested regions in the U.S. are observed to be moderate to strong carbon sinks, models not including human or natural disturbances will tend to be more carbon neutral, which is expected of mature ecosystems. We have developed the Terrestrial Ecosystems Model Hydro version (TEM-Hydro) to include both human and natural disturbances to compare against gridded NEP datasets. Human disturbances are based on the Hurtt et al. (2006) land use transition dataset and include transient agricultural (crops and pasture) conversion and abandonment and timber harvest. We include natural disturbances of storms and fires based on stochastic return intervals. Tropical storms and hurricane return intervals are based on Zheng et al. (2009) and occur only along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Fire return intervals are based on LANDFIRE Rapid Assessment Vegetation Models and vegetation types from the Hurtt dataset. We are running three experiments with TEM-Hydro from 1700-2011 for the conterminous U.S.: potential vegetation (POT), human disturbance only (agriculture and timber harvest, LULC), and human plus natural disturbance (agriculture, timber harvest, storms, and fire, DISTURB). The goal is to compare our NEP values to those obtained by FLUXNET-MTE (Jung et al. 2009) from 1982-2008 and ECMOD (Xiao et al., 2008) from 2000-2006 for different plant functional types (PFTs) within the conterminous U.S. Preliminary results show that, for the entire U.S., potential vegetation yields an NEP of 10.8 gCm-2yr-1 vs 128.1 gCm-2yr-1 for LULC and 89.8 gCm-2yr-1 for DISTURB from 1982-2008. The effect of regrowth following agricultural and timber harvest disturbance therefore contributes substantially to the present-day carbon sink, while stochastic storms and fires

  3. Children's Understanding of Night and Day: A Research Report Presented at NCSS, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazee, Bruce M.

    What advanced 4- and 5-year-old children know about night and day in relationship to the earth and sun was studied to test the hypothesis that two teaching activities would help children to understand the cause of the phenomenon. Participants were 21 middle to upper class boys and girls enrolled in a part-time early childhood enrichment program…

  4. Disaster Day! Integrating Speech Skills though Impromptu Group Research and Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruim, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    Courses: Disaster Day (DD) is a single-class activity designed for public speaking classrooms, but could also be applied to courses addressing small group communication. Objectives: DD integrates fundamental skills of the basic speech course, fosters participation through group work, and introduces new concepts and skills. By the end of the…

  5. Acceptance or refusal of convenience food in present-day prison.

    PubMed

    Vanhouche, An-Sofie

    2015-11-01

    Food in prison is an insufficiently researched topic. However, prisoners often highlight problems with and criticism of their prison meals. This article aims to further develop this topic by giving closer insight into the use and attitudes toward ready-made meals in the Tilburg prison. In this prison, prisoners receive ready-made meals. This is in contrast to Belgian prisons, from which they were transferred, where meals were made from scratch. This change in the food system led to commotion and complaints. To understand the situation, interviews with prisoners and staff were conducted and observations in the Tilburg prison were made. The results showed that a food system can have considerable influence on prison experiences. In addition, and contrary to what earlier reports have mentioned, the ready-made meals also have some advantages, especially for the organization of daily prison life. However, most prisoners had negative attitudes toward these meals. PMID:25891041

  6. IMS/Satellite Situation Center report. Daily summary for IMS high-altitude satellites, days 182-365 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The orbital positions of a number of high-altitude satellites, capable of making magnetospheric measurements in the second half of 1977, are described. The following satellites are considered: Vela 5A, Vela 5B, Vela 6A, Vela 6B, Solrad 11A, Solrad 11B, Hawkeye 1, Prognoz 5, Explorer 47, Explorer 50, and ISEE-A/-B. The orbit elements used for generating the satellite ephemeris are shown. Complete presentations of the positions of these satellites for the second half of 1977 are given, as well as the IMS/SSC special periods. Detailed plots illustrating these periods are provided. Time-ordered tables of magnetopause crossings, bow shock crossings, neutral sheet passes, midlatitude magnetotail passes, high-latitude magnetotail passes, and Hawkeye 1 northern cusp passes are presented. Bar charts covering the second half of 1977 are given which identify thirteen special periods (Nos. 10-22) based upon certain conjunctions of the high-altitude satellites.

  7. Potential autotrophic metabolisms in ultra-basic reducing springs associated with present-day continental serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, P. L.; Miles, S.; Kohl, L.; Kavanagh, H.; Ziegler, S. E.; Brazelton, W. J.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Ultra-basic reducing springs at continental sites of serpentinization act as windows into the biogeochemistry of this subsurface exothermic environment rich in H2 and CH4 gases. Biogeochemical carbon transformations in these systems are of interest because serpentinization creates conditions that are amenable to abiotic and biotic reduction of carbon. However, little is known about the metabolic capabilities of the microorganisms that live in this environment. To determine the potential for autotrophic metabolisms, bicarbonate and CO substrate addition microcosm experiments were performed using water and sediment from an ultra-basic reducing spring in the Tablelands, Newfoundland, Canada, a site of present-day continental serpentinization. CO was consistently observed to be utilized in the Live but not the Killed controlled replicates amended with 10% 13C labelled CO and non-labelled (natural C isotope abundance) CO. In the Live CO microcosms with natural C isotope abundance, the residual CO became enriched in 13C (~10 ‰) consistent with a decrease in the fraction of CO remaining. In the Killed CO controlled replicates with natural C isotope abundance the CO showed little 13C enrichment (~1.3 ‰). The data from the Live CO microcosms were well described by a Rayleigh isotopic distillation model, yielding an isotopic enrichment factor for microbial CO uptake of 15.7 ×0.5 ‰ n=2. These data suggest that there was microbial CO utilization in these experiments. The sediment and water from the 13C-labelled and non-labelled, Live and Killed microcosms were extracted for phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) to determine changes in community composition between treatments as well as to determine the microbial uptake of CO. The difference in community composition between the Live and Killed microcosms was not readily resolvable based on PLFA distributions. Additionally, the microbial uptake of 13CO had minimal to no affect on the δ13C of the cellular biomarkers, with the

  8. Influence of ocean tide dynamics on the climate system from the Cretaceous to present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    Global numerical ocean models used for paleo-climate reconstructions generally only consider the ocean's general circulation, but neglect tidal dynamics. However, it has been demonstrated that tidally induced friction at the ocean bottom alters the mean ocean circulation and energy fluxes on timescales larger than one tidal period and up to climate timescales. Thereby the mean ocean circulation and temperature advection is altered and can thus affect climate. We simultaneously modeled the ocean's general circulation and tidal dynamics for five time-slices from the Cretaceous to present day: the Albian (ca. 110 million years ago, Ma), the Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary (ca. 93 Ma, CTB), the early Eocene (ca. 55 Ma), the early Pliocene (ca. 3.5 Ma), and a pre-industrial period (ca. 1850 AD). These simulations show that the tectonic evolution of ocean basins changes the resonance conditions in the paleo-oceans over time and thus the position of amphydromic systems and the amplitudes of partial tides. Largest amplitudes of the M2 partial tide are obtained during the early Eocene when they are in the global mean by 150% larger than in the CTB, when amplitudes are smallest. The evolution of the tidal system leads to an individual interaction between tidal dynamics and the ocean general circulation for all time-slices. In the Albian a reduction of horizontal velocities of up to 50% is simulated in the deep Indo-Pacific Throughflow (IPT) below 1000m depth. This reduction is the product of tidal residual mean currents induced by tidal waves propagating from the Pacific Ocean into the Indian Ocean that oppose the prevailing eastward thermohaline currents. In all other time-slices mainly an increase in horizontal transports is simulated. In the CTB both tidal residual mean currents (less than 0.2cm/s in most of the ocean) and the general ocean circulation (less than 0.5cm/s) are small, thus leading to a tidally induced increase by 50% in horizontal velocities in almost half of

  9. Present-Day Seasonal Gully Activity in a South Polar Pit (Sisyphi Cavi) on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, Jan; Reiss, Dennis; Appéré, Thomas; Vincendon, Mathieu; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Hiesinger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal activity of gullies under current climatic conditions on Mars was observed by [1-7]. Dundas et al. [2] reviewed the present-day activity of classical gullies (including the gully presented in this work), dune gullies, and other mass wasting processes in the southern hemisphere on Mars. Recent polar gullies in Sisyphi Cavi were also analyzed by [8], who estimated ages of about 20 ka to 20 Ma for the gullies. In this study we focus on a single gully in Sisyphi Cavi, located in the south polar region at 1.44° E and 68.54° S. The gully occurs on the gullied equator-facing slope of an isolated polar pit within an infilled impact crater. Multi-temporal high-resolution image data analyses show new deposits at the terminus of the gully channel and on the gully apron within spring (after solar longitudes of 236°) of martian years (MY) 29 and 31. In MY 29 deposition of material shortens the channel by about 40 m; in MY 31 a new deposit at the western flank of the gully apron with approximately 300-600 m3 of material is visible [3]. Our morphological investigations show that the identified new deposits were formed by dark flows through the entire gully deposited on top of the apron between LS ~218° and ~226°. Thermal data show a temperature increase between solar longitudes (LS) ~218° and ~226°. Near-infrared spectral data show relatively constant band strengths of CO2 ice and H2O ice in this time range. After the formation of the dark flows (after LS ~226°), temperatures increase rapidly from ~180 K to >~270 K at LS ~250°. At this time, spectral data indicate that all volatiles on the surface sublimated. However, an earlier beginning of sublimation when the dark flows were observed (between LS ~218° and ~226°) is likely, due to the fact that the instruments can only show the last phase of sublimation (decrease of volatile band strengths) [3]. Spectral modeling shows that from winter to mid-spring, the surface of the studied area is covered by CO2 slab

  10. An unusual presentation of a Page kidney 24 days after transplantation: case report.

    PubMed

    Butt, F K; Seawright, A H; Kokko, K E; Hawxby, A M

    2010-12-01

    The Page kidney phenomenon is a well recognized entity where an extrinsically compressed kidney results in hypertension and loss of function. This compression is usually caused by a subcapsular hematoma secondary to blunt abdominal trauma or an invasive procedure such as a renal biopsy. We describe an unusual case involving the spontaneous development of a Page kidney 24 days after renal transplantation without any history of preceding trauma. The subcapsular hematoma was detected by a computerized tomographic scan performed as part of the work-up for acute allograft dysfunction. Prompt recognition and early intervention are essential if renal function is to be restored before irreversible damage occurs. PMID:21168685

  11. Present and future assessment of growing degree days over selected Greek areas with different climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, D. R.; Mohapatra, M.; Srivastava, A. K.; Kumar, Arun

    2016-06-01

    The determination of heat requirements in the first developing phases of plants has been expressed as Growing Degree Days (GDD). The current study focuses on three selected study areas in Greece that are characterised by different climatic conditions due to their location and aims to assess the future variation and spatial distribution of Growing Degree Days (GDD) and how these can affect the main cultivations in the study areas. Future temperature data were obtained and analysed by the ENSEMBLES project. The analysis was performed for the future periods 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 with the A1B and B1 scenarios. Spatial distribution was performed using a combination of dynamical and statistical downscaling technique through ArcGIS 10.2.1. The results indicated that for all the future periods and scenarios, the GDD are expected to increase. Furthermore, the increase in the Sperchios River basin will be the highest, followed by the Ardas and the Geropotamos River basins. Moreover, the cultivation period will be shifted from April-October to April-September which will have social, economical and environmental benefits. Additionally, the spatial distribution indicated that in the upcoming years the existing cultivations can find favourable conditions and can be expanded in mountainous areas as well. On the other hand, due to the rough topography that exists in the study areas, the wide expansion of the existing cultivations into higher altitudes is unaffordable. Nevertheless, new more profitable cultivations can be introduced which can find propitious conditions in terms of GDD.

  12. [Dental insurance systems in light of present-day prevention potentials].

    PubMed

    Marthaler, T; Zollinger, E

    1979-05-01

    The situation of public dental insurance systems of several countries in Western Europe was examined in the light of the fact that caries and periodontitis may be prevented. Available epidemiological data were discussed as to their relevance. In Switzerland, dental insurance systems are of minor importance. In voluntary insurance plans for adults, prevention is scarcely included. On the other hand, the communities provide subsidies for dental care of schoolchildren, and prevention is an integral part of this system. In the German Federal Republic, dental insurance costs have quadrupled during the period 1970-1977. Preventive measures are not subsidized, and in recent years, more than half of the insurance payments were used for prosthetic dentistry. The few dental statistics available show that dental treatment of children is unsatisfactory. In Sweden, preventive measures are refunded at 75%. Since the introduction of the public insurance system in 1974 prosthetic dental work has increased at the expense of conservative treatment. In France, the social security system pays for about three quarters of conservative and simple prosthetic work. Prevention has so far not been included. Despite liberal refunding of restorative work markedly higher prevalence of tooth loss was found in lower social levels as compared to higher levels. In Great Britain, the National Health Service was introduced in 1948. As in France, tooth loss is most frequent in lower social levels. The findings are discussed with respect to cost developments and oral health prospects in Switzerland. Attention is focused upon the observation that the insurance systems were conceived at a time when realistic preventive programs were unavailable and their success had not yet been demonstrated in large groups. PMID:293044

  13. Bulgarian singer Dyana presents PA Director Dickinson with her new CD on STS-90 launch day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    David Dickinson, the acting director of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Public Affairs Office at Kennedy Space Center, accepts a copy of Bulgarian singer Dyana Dafova's latest compact disc (CD) from her on behalf of NASA. The 525-foot tall Vehicle Assembly Building, where Space Shuttle orbiters are mated to their external tank/solid rocket booster stacks, looms in the background. Dyana is touring the United States to promote her CD, entitled 'Sounds of the Earth,' and was an invited guest of NASA for the launch of Columbia on STS-90, the Neurolab mission, earlier in the day. Columbia lifted off from Launch Pad 39B at 2:19 p.m. EDT. Dyana characterized the music on her CD as a new sound, incorporating jazz and new age classics, sung in a newly created language comprised of Bulgarian, English, Sanskrit, Aramski and Hebrew.

  14. Present-day radio-astronomical systems of aperture synthesis (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseitlin, N. M.

    The characteristics of a number of synthetic-aperture radio telescopes are presented. Particular consideration is given to cruciform and T-shaped radio telescopes consisting of 'linear' antennas (Mills crosses); multielement radio telescopes with immobile antennas; multielement radio telescopes with immobile and moving elements; and millimeter-wave interferometers.

  15. Present-day plate motions: Retrieval from the TOPEX/Poseidon orbitography network (DORIS system)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souriau, Annie; Cazenave, Anny; Biancale, R.; Balmino, G.; Dominh, K.; Mazzega, P.; Lemoine, J.-M.; Boucher, Claude; Willis, P.; Kasser, M.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the proposal is to determine the present motion of the main tectonic plates from the Doppler data of the Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) orbitography system, which includes in its final configuration about 50 tracking stations with a world-wide distribution.

  16. Present-day fluxes of coccolithophores and diatoms in the pelagic Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinverno, Elisa; Maffioli, Paola; Corselli, Cesare; De Lange, Gert J.

    2014-04-01

    Biogenic fluxes from two sediment traps in the Ionian sea (35°13‧N, 21°30‧E) at 500 and 2800 m water depth are discussed in relation with the main oceanographic and external forcing and compared with previous data from a nearby location. This study is part of a multi-year sediment trap deployment, aimed at assessing seasonality and interannual variability of biogenic and abiogenic fluxes. Here, we focus on fluxes related to two main phytoplankton groups: coccolithophores and diatoms. At our mooring site, high-coccolithophore and low-diatom fluxes confirm the oligotrophic character of the pelagic eastern Mediterranean year-round. Coccolithophore assemblages are dominated by the cosmopolitan species Emiliania huxleyi, followed by the deep-dwelling Florisphaera profunda and by several minor species. Diatom assemblages are dominated by Thalassionema bacillare and Nitzschia interruptestriata, with ~ 100 common and minor species. Overall, the combined flux pattern of coccolithophores and diatoms shows a clear seasonality throughout the study period, which can be related to changing oceanographic conditions and a different depth of production within the photic zone. Worth to note is the extremely high abundance, with respect to previous pelagic records, of species indicative of an intense deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM), which could indicate a shoaling of the nutricline. This feature can be related to the variability that affects surface hydrography and the deep water masses. Additionally, the occurrence of neritic, benthic and brackish to fresh-water diatom species, mainly in the deeper trap, could be linked to either lateral transport within the water column or the atmospheric input of Saharan dust, which is known to be common over the eastern Mediterranean especially during spring time. Finally, correlation of the flux pattern at different depths allowed sinking speeds for total and biogenic particles to be calculated, which ranged from 70 to > 200 m day- 1. Three

  17. Computational approach for investigation of thrust and acoustic performances of present-day nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, V.; Bosniakov, S.; Mikhailov, S.; Morozov, A.; Troshin, A.

    2010-05-01

    A computational viewpoint on the problems of design and numerical simulation for the nozzles of modern aircraft turbofan engines is presented. Modern concepts of noise-suppressing nozzles for civil aircraft are reviewed. Examples of application of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) methods to the analysis of nozzle flow structure and assessment of nozzle thrust characteristics are given. Errors of turbulence models in simulation of jets are analyzed. The authors’ experience in simulation of noise-suppressing nozzles for supersonic civil aircrafts is demonstrated. Insufficient accuracy of acoustic analogies for this class of tasks is shown, but a possible area of acoustic analogies application is noted. The essential elements of computational aeroacoustics (CAA) approach and numerical methods characteristic of CAA are reviewed. Numerical methodology for the simulation of nozzle acoustic performance is described in detail, including methods for simulation of near and far field of a nozzle, for generation of input perturbations and for the processing the far-field noise. Results of verification and methodical analysis of this acoustic methodology are presented.

  18. Discovery of Five Candidates for Present Day η Carinae Analogs in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Rubab M.

    2016-01-01

    Late-stage evolution of the most massive stars such as η Carinae is controlled by the effects of mass loss, possibly dominated by poorly understood episodic mass ejections. Through a systematic search utilizing archival Spitzer and HST data, we have discovered five objects in the nearby (<10 Mpc) massive star-forming galaxies M51, M83, M101 and NGC6946 that have optical through mid-infrared photometric properties consistent with their being analogs of the hitherto unique η Car as it is presently observed. Prior to this discovery there were no known analogs of η Car either in our or other galaxies. These objects are very luminous, with Lbol=3-6×106 L⊙. Their Spitzer mid-infrared spectral energy distributions rise steeply in the 3.6-8 μm bands, then turn over between 8 and 24 μm indicating the presence of warm (~400-600 K) circumstellar dust. Their optical counterparts, identified in deep HST images, are 1.5-2 dex fainter relative to mid-IR peaks and require the presence of ~5-10 M⊙ obscuring material. We present the properties of these five sources and discuss the implications of our discovery for understanding massive star evolution.

  19. Can You Tell Me Something about Yourself?: Self-Presentation in Children and Adolescents with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder in Hypothetical and Real Life Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheeren, Anke M.; Begeer, Sander; Banerjee, Robin; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Koot, Hans M.

    2010-01-01

    The self-presentation skills of children and adolescents with high-functioning autistic spectrum disorder (HFASD) and typically developing (TD) controls were compared, in response to both hypothetical and real life situations. In both situations, 26 HFASD and 26 TD participants were prompted to describe themselves twice, first in a baseline…

  20. Present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    If the primordial atmosphere was reducing, then the first microbial ecosystem was probably composed of anaerobic bacteria. However, despite the presence of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, anaerobic habitats are important, commonplace components of the Earth's present biosphere. The geochemical activities displayed by these anaerobes impact the global cycling of certain elements (e.g., C, N, S, Fe, Mn, etc.). Methane provides an obvious example of how human-enhanced activities on a global scale can influence the content of a "radiative" (i.e., infrared absorbing) trace gas in the atmosphere. Methane can be oxidized by anaerobic bacteria, but this does not appear to support their growth. Acetylene, however, does support such growth. This may form the basis for future exobiological investigations of the atmospheres of anoxic, hydrocarbon-rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the latter's satellite Titan. ?? 1989.

  1. Ancient human genomes suggest three ancestral populations for present-day Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Lazaridis, Iosif; Patterson, Nick; Mittnik, Alissa; Renaud, Gabriel; Mallick, Swapan; Kirsanow, Karola; Sudmant, Peter H.; Schraiber, Joshua G.; Castellano, Sergi; Lipson, Mark; Berger, Bonnie; Economou, Christos; Bollongino, Ruth; Fu, Qiaomei; Bos, Kirsten I.; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Li, Heng; de Filippo, Cesare; Prüfer, Kay; Sawyer, Susanna; Posth, Cosimo; Haak, Wolfgang; Hallgren, Fredrik; Fornander, Elin; Rohland, Nadin; Delsate, Dominique; Francken, Michael; Guinet, Jean-Michel; Wahl, Joachim; Ayodo, George; Babiker, Hamza A.; Bailliet, Graciela; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Barrantes, Ramiro; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ben-Ami, Haim; Bene, Judit; Berrada, Fouad; Bravi, Claudio M.; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B. J.; Cali, Francesco; Churnosov, Mikhail; Cole, David E. C.; Corach, Daniel; Damba, Larissa; van Driem, George; Dryomov, Stanislav; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Fedorova, Sardana A.; Romero, Irene Gallego; Gubina, Marina; Hammer, Michael; Henn, Brenna M.; Hervig, Tor; Hodoglugil, Ugur; Jha, Aashish R.; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Khusainova, Rita; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kittles, Rick; Kivisild, Toomas; Klitz, William; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Kushniarevich, Alena; Laredj, Leila; Litvinov, Sergey; Loukidis, Theologos; Mahley, Robert W.; Melegh, Béla; Metspalu, Ene; Molina, Julio; Mountain, Joanna; Näkkäläjärvi, Klemetti; Nesheva, Desislava; Nyambo, Thomas; Osipova, Ludmila; Parik, Jüri; Platonov, Fedor; Posukh, Olga; Romano, Valentino; Rothhammer, Francisco; Rudan, Igor; Ruizbakiev, Ruslan; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Sajantila, Antti; Salas, Antonio; Starikovskaya, Elena B.; Tarekegn, Ayele; Toncheva, Draga; Turdikulova, Shahlo; Uktveryte, Ingrida; Utevska, Olga; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Voevoda, Mikhail; Winkler, Cheryl; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Zalloua, Pierre; Zemunik, Tatijana; Cooper, Alan; Capelli, Cristian; Thomas, Mark G.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Villems, Richard; Comas, David; Sukernik, Rem; Metspalu, Mait; Meyer, Matthias; Eichler, Evan E.; Burger, Joachim; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pääbo, Svante; Kelso, Janet; Reich, David; Krause, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genomes of a ~7,000 year old farmer from Germany and eight ~8,000 year old hunter-gatherers from Luxembourg and Sweden. We analyzed these and other ancient genomes1–4 with 2,345 contemporary humans to show that most present Europeans derive from at least three highly differentiated populations: West European Hunter-Gatherers (WHG), who contributed ancestry to all Europeans but not to Near Easterners; Ancient North Eurasians (ANE) related to Upper Paleolithic Siberians3, who contributed to both Europeans and Near Easterners; and Early European Farmers (EEF), who were mainly of Near Eastern origin but also harbored WHG-related ancestry. We model these populations’ deep relationships and show that EEF had ~44% ancestry from a “Basal Eurasian” population that split prior to the diversification of other non-African lineages. PMID:25230663

  2. Competing bounds on the present-day time variation of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Dent, Thomas; Stern, Steffen; Wetterich, Christof

    2009-04-15

    We compare the sensitivity of a recent bound on time variation of the fine structure constant from optical clocks with bounds on time-varying fundamental constants from atomic clocks sensitive to the electron-to-proton mass ratio, from radioactive decay rates in meteorites, and from the Oklo natural reactor. Tests of the weak equivalence principle also lead to comparable bounds on present variations of constants. The 'winner in sensitivity' depends on what relations exist between the variations of different couplings in the standard model of particle physics, which may arise from the unification of gauge interactions. Weak equivalence principle tests are currently the most sensitive within unified scenarios. A detection of time variation in atomic clocks would favor dynamical dark energy and put strong constraints on the dynamics of a cosmological scalar field.

  3. Present day versus Temporal Heterogeneity of the Subridge Mantle in the Central Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, M.; Bonatti, E.; Brunelli, D.; Cipriani, A.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of MORB and of MORP (Mid Ocean Ridge Peridotite) show that the oceanic upper mantle is heterogeneous. Long and short wavelength chemical variability has been reported from the Mid Atlantic Ridge. The subridge mantle degree of melting, estimated from MORP mineral chemistry of mantle equilibrated spinel, opx and cpx, as well as from MORB glasses, decreases from the Azores swell at ~40ο N to the equator, in parallel to the decrease of crustal thickness inferred from the near zero-age Mantle Bouguer anomaly. The temporal evolution of this portion of a slow-spreading mid ocean ridge can be studied along seafloor spreading flowlines normal to ridge segments. A lithospheric section exposed between 10ο and 11ο N, south of the Vema Fracture Zone is giving us the opportunity to study how generation of lithosphere at a 80-km long ridge segment evolved since 25 Ma. Gravity data, and MORP-MORB chemistry correlations suggest a steady increase in crustal thickness and in mantle degree of melting from 20 Ma to Present, with superimposed 3-4 Ma oscillations. Variations of degree of melting, peridotite temperature of equilibration and crustal thickness are not proportional to spreading rate, suggesting variations in mantle source composition and a non-purely passive lithosphere formation at ridge axis. The combination of the zero-age axial ridge trend with the 20 Ma to Present trend could be explained by a subaxial hot/fertile mantle flow from the Azores swell toward an equatorial “cold” belt. The equatorial belt, characterized by long offset transforms, is magma starved and nearly free of basaltic crust. Small quantities of basalt, generated mostly in the garnet stability region by low degrees of partial melting, could not be expelled from the mantle, and froze to form a “constipated”, crust free lithosphere. Numerical calculations show a strong decrease of crustal production as a ridge approaches a transform, proportional to slip rate and offset length. When the

  4. An approach to modeling present-day deformation in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, J.B.

    1986-02-10

    This paper presents an approach to modeling the complete, time-dependent deformation in southern California. We make use of a variety of techniques to include the far-field plate motion, stress relaxation in the asthenosphere, aseismic fault slip within the elastic lithosphere, and the complex, three-dimensional nature of the faults within the southern California region. Among the conclusions of the work here are the following: (1) the data exhibit a marginal preference for a relatively thin lithosphere in southern California, (2) the most sensitive determinant for lithospheric thickness and viscosity of the asthenosphere is the rotation rate of the motion vectors toward or away from major faults, (3) major faults in southern California are slipping at depth, at or near their average Holocene rates, (4) a shallow, active decollement beneath the Transverse Ranges is apparently needed to realistically model the strain changes observed there, and (5) this modeling technique offers the best approach for understanding the complex deformation field in southern California.

  5. Monitoring in-vitro bovine embryo development during the first days after fertilization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Mikhail E.; Rubessa, Marcello; Fernandes, Daniel; Nguyen, Tan H.; Wheeler, Matthew B.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Conventional label-based contrast enhancement techniques (e.g., fluorescence) frequently modify the genetic makeup of tagged cells, making them poor candidates for use in in-vitro fertilization applications. Instead, we choose a label-free form of contrast, based on interferometric imaging, sensitive to optical path length differences. Compared to, single HeLa cells, typical mammalian ova and embryos are more than an order of magnitude thicker. As a result, regions of large phase variation lead to phase wrapping and an overall reduction in signal intensity occurs due to multiple scattering. These effects manifest themselves in low-spatial frequencies (blurs), with the desired details buried in the background. We present a phase shifting interferometer that yields the derivative of the phase, a quantity whose value is particularly sensitive to local variations and fine details. We demonstrate that our new real-time imaging platform is valuable in measuring the multiday development of bovine embryos. Reconstructing the derivative of the image phase and amplitude, we characterize the motion of previously low-contrast structures, which are relevant for embryo viability tests.

  6. Microbial Diversity Analysis of the Bacterial and Archaeal Population in Present Day Stromatolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Maya C.

    2011-01-01

    Stromatolites are layered sedimentary structures resulting from microbial mat communities that remove carbon dioxide from their environment and biomineralize it as calcium carbonate. Although prevalent in the fossil record, stromatolites are rare in the modem world and are only found in a few locations including Highbome Cay in the Bahamas. The stromatolites found at this shallow marine site are analogs to ancient microbial mat ecosystems abundant in the Precambrian period on ancient Earth. To understand how stromatolites form and develop, it is important to identify what microorganisms are present in these mats, and how these microbes contribute to geological structure. These results will provide insight into the molecular and geochemical processes of microbial communities that prevailed on ancient Earth. Since stromatolites are formed by lithifying microbial mats that are able to mineralize calcium carbonate, understanding the biological mechanisms involved may lead to the development of carbon sequestration technologies that will be applicable in human spaceflight, as well as improve our understanding of global climate and its sustainability. The objective of my project was to analyze the archaeal and bacterial dIversity in stromatolites from Highborn Cay in the Bahamas. The first step in studying the molecular processes that the microorganisms carry out is to ascertain the microbial complexity within the mats, which includes identifying and estimating the numbers of different microbes that comprise these mats.

  7. MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Research Presentation Day: Experience Mathematics and Science in the Real World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the summaries of the MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Technological areas discussed include: Mathematical curriculum development for real world problems; Rain effects on air-water gas exchange; multi-ring impact basins on mars; developing an interactive multimedia educational cd-rom on remote sensing; a pilot of an activity for for the globe program; fossils in maryland; developing children's programming for the american horticultural society at river farm; children's learning, educational programs of the national park service; a study of climate and student satisfaction in two summer programs for disadvantaged students interested in careers in mathematics and science; the maryland governor's academy, integrating technology into the classroom; stream sampling with the maryland biological stream survey (MBSS); the imaging system inspection software technology, the preparation and detection of nominal and faulted steel ingots; event-based science, the development of real-world science units; correlation between anxiety and past experiences; environmental education through summer nature camp; enhancing learning opportunities at the Salisbury zoo; plant growth experiment, a module for the middle school classroom; the effects of proxisome proliferators in Japanese medaka embryos; development of a chapter on birth control and contraceptive methodologies as part of an interactive computer-based education module on hiv and aids; excretion of gentamicin in toadfish and goldfish; the renaissance summer program; and Are field trips important to the regional math science center?

  8. An approach to modeling present-day deformation in southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rundle, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to modeling the complete, time-dependent deformation in southern California. A variety of techniques are used to include the far-field plate motion, stress relaxation in the asthenosphere, aseismic fault slip within the elastic lithosphere, and the complex, three-dimensional nature of the faults within the southern California region. Among the conclusions of the work here are the following: (1) the data exibit a marginal preference for a relatively thin lithosphere in southern California: (2) the most sensitive determinant for lithospheric thickness and viscosity of the asthenosphere is the rotation rate of the motion vectors toward or away from major faults; (3) the major faults in southern California are slipping at depth, at or near their average Holocene rates; (4) a shallow, active decollement beneath the Transverse Ranges is apparently needed to realistically model the strain changes observed there; and (5) this modeling technique offers the best approach for understanding the complex deformation field in southern California.

  9. Present-day groundwater recharge estimation in parts of the Indian Sub-Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanja, S. N.; Mukherjee, A.; Wada, Y.; Scanlon, B. R.; Taylor, R. G.; Rodell, M.; Malakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    Large part of global population has been dependent on groundwater as a source of fresh water. The demand would further increase with increasing population and stress associated with climate change. We tried to provide regional-scale groundwater recharge estimates in a large part of Indian Sub-Continent. A combination of ground-based, satellite-based and numerical model simulated recharge estimates were presented in the densely populated region. Three different methods: an intense network of observational wells (n>13,000 wells), a satellite (TRMM) and global land-surface model (CLM) outputs, and a global-scale hydrological model (PCR GLOBWB) were employed to calculate recharge estimates. Groundwater recharge values exhibit large spatial variations over the entire region on the basis of aquifer hydrogeology, precipitation and groundwater withdrawal patterns. Groundwater recharge estimates from all three estimation techniques were found to be higher (>300 mm/year) in fertile planes of Indus-Ganges-Brahmaputra (IGB) river basins. A combination of favorable hydrogeologic conditions (porosity, permeability etc.), comparatively higher rates of precipitation, and return flow from rapidly withdrawn irrigation water might influence occurrence of high recharge rates. However, central and southern study area experiences lower recharge rates (<200 mm/year), might be associated with unfavorable hydrogeologic conditions associated with cratonic provinces. Statistical analysis of inter-comparison between the three different recharge estimates show good matches in some of the areas. Recharge estimates indicate dynamic nature of groundwater recharge as a function of precipitation, land use pattern, and hydrogeologic parameters. On a first hand basis, the estimates will help policy makers to understand groundwater recharge process over the densely populated region and finally would facilitate to implement sustainable policy for securing water security.

  10. Climatology and temporal evolution of the atmospheric semidiurnal tide in present-day reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Argandoña, J.; Ezcurra, A.; Sáenz, J.; Ibarra-Berastegi, G.; Errasti, I.

    2016-05-01

    The solar semidiurnal atmospheric tide (S2) was extracted from seven reanalysis data sets, including current data sets, such as CFSR (Climate Forecast System Reanalysis), MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications), ERA-Interim (ECMWF Reanalysis), and 20CR (Twentieth Century Reanalysis), and older frozen products, such as NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research), ERA-40 (ECMWF Reanalysis), and JRA-25 (Japanese 25 year Reanalysis). In this calculation, we emphasized the temporal variation of the tide. We also calculated the tidal error, which was sizable at high latitudes and over short averaging periods and large for 20CR at all latitudes. Because of the four standard daily samples, the interpolation scheme of van den Dool et al. (1997) was used when necessary. We found this method to be accurate for zonally averaged tides only. Comparing the climatology from the MERRA and CFSR S2 with a recent empirical tide model showed that MERRA better represented the geographical structure of the tide, especially its phase. We found a bias in the phase in all of the reanalysis data sets except for MERRA. The temporal evolution of the tide was inconsistent between the different data sets, although similar seasonal variations were observed. The seasonal cycle was also better depicted in MERRA. The S2 calculated from MERRA and satellite precipitation measurements from TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) presented results that were inconsistent with the hypothesis in which rainfall latent heat release represents S2 forcing and functions as a source of S2 seasonal variability.

  11. Scandinavian postglacial faults and their physical connection to present day seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidsson, R.

    2015-12-01

    In Scandinavia large earthquakes up to M~8.2 occurred 9500 yBP due to rapid deglaciation leaving fault scarps with lengths up to 160km and vertical offsets of at least 10 m. Today a lion share of local earthquakes are located to the vicinity of the faults. I show here from Coulomb failure stress modeling a physical connection between clustering of recent earthquakes and high Coulomb failure stresses around the faults. This can be interpreted In such a fashion that the location of the current earthquakes resembles locations of aftershock sequences. The explanation is that when these faults where formed it was due to state of stress in the crust at time of deglaciation, different from today's conditions. The crust was heavily depressed at deglaciation about 250 m in the region and due of the receding icesheet the crust was subjected to high stresses resulting in fault motion. This fault motion occurred in order to minimize state of stress at deglaciation. However, this state of stress has since changed with the regional postglacial uplift and thus today these faults remain as perturbations in the crust with concentrations of high stresses. I elaborate on this mechanism. I also advocate that this correlation between high stressed fault areas and locations of earthquakes indicates that seismicity within stable continental regions like Scandinavia might be caused by previous crustal disturbances that show local perturbations of the stress field. Therefore if faults are favorably oriented in the present stress field they can be released by brittle earthquake faulting . Thus past transient tectonic events can explain part of the stable continental region's seismicity. This may be of large importance to assessment of seismic hazard within stable continental regions particularly for critical structures like e.g., nuclear waste deposits and hydroelectric dams.

  12. Kinematic interpretation of present-day crustal deformation in central Greece from continuous GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chousianitis, Konstantinos; Ganas, Athanassios; Gianniou, Michail

    2013-11-01

    We processed 30-s GPS data from continuous GPS stations in central Greece using the Kalman filtering approach and accounting for time-correlated noise content obtaining a velocity field in the ITRF2008 and the Eurasian-fixed reference frame. The station distribution allowed us to compute 1D strain through rates of baseline length changes as well as to construct the image of the 2D strain and rotation rate fields. The obtained baselines range in length from 11 to 132 km and show rates from -1.95 mm/yr up to 14.14 mm/yr (estimated uncertainties from 0.3 to 0.8 mm/yr), while the calculated 1D strain rate ranges from -27 ns/yr up to 226 ns/yr (average uncertainty ˜15 ns/yr). Largest extension (192-226 ns/yr) is observed in the western and central part of the Corinth rift while similar extension rates (80-120 ns/yr) are obtained for the eastern part of the Corinth rift and its continuation in the south Viotia-south of Evia region and across the Sperchios-Kammena Vourla rift. The coherent picture of the velocity pattern for Attica and north-eastern Peloponnese (Corinth) stations indicates that these areas belong to the same crustal block, separating by the Viotia region by a nearly E-W crustal discontinuity along the Kaparelli-Asopos valley faults. However, some internal strain is present within Attica's crust as well as across the Saronic Gulf resulting in extension rates of the order of 25 ns/yr. We also find extension (54-71 ns/yr) across "rigid" Peloponnese taken by normal faults in the greater Kalavryta region.

  13. Digitization of the human body in the present-day economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apuzzo, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we report on the historic development of human body digitization and on the actual state of commercially available technology. Complete systems for the digitization of the human body exist since more than ten years. One of the main users of this technology was the entertainment industry. Every new movie excited with attractive visual effects, but only few people knew that the most thrilling cuts were realized by using virtual persons. The faces and bodies of actors were digitized and the "virtual twin" replaced the actor in the movie. Nowadays, the state of the human body digitization is so high that it is not possible any more to distinguish the real actor from the virtual one. Indeed, for the rush technical development has to be thanked the movie industry, which was one of the strong economic motors for this technology. Today, with the possibility of a massive cost reduction given by new technologies, methods for digitization of the human body are used also in other fields of application, such as ergonomics, medical applications, computer games, biometry and anthropometrics. With the time, this technology becomes interesting also for sport, fitness, fashion and beauty. A large expansion of human body digitization is expected in the near future. To date, different technologies are used commercially for the measurement of the human body. They can be divided into three distinguished groups: laser-scanning, projection of light patterns, combination modeling and image processing. The different solutions have strengths and weaknesses that profile their suitability for specific applications. This paper gives an overview of their differences and characteristics and expresses clues for the selection of the adequate method. Practical examples of commercial exploitation of human body digitization are also presented and new interesting perspectives are introduced.

  14. Digitization of the human body in the present-day economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apuzzo, Nicola

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we report on the historic development of human body digitization and on the actual state of commercially available technology. Complete systems for the digitization of the human body exist since more than ten years. One of the main users of this technology was the entertainment industry. Every new movie excited with attractive visual effects, but only few people knew that the most thrilling cuts were realized by using virtual persons. The faces and bodies of actors were digitized and the "virtual twin" replaced the actor in the movie. Nowadays, the state of the human body digitization is so high that it is not possible any more to distinguish the real actor from the virtual one. Indeed, for the rush technical development has to be thanked the movie industry, which was one of the strong economic motors for this technology. Today, with the possibility of a massive cost reduction given by new technologies, methods for digitization of the human body are used also in other fields of application, such as ergonomics, medical applications, computer games, biometry and anthropometrics. With the time, this technology becomes interesting also for sport, fitness, fashion and beauty. A large expansion of human body digitization is expected in the near future. To date, different technologies are used commercially for the measurement of the human body. They can be divided into three distinguished groups: laser-scanning, projection of light patterns, combination modeling and image processing. The different solutions have strengths and weaknesses that profile their suitability for specific applications. This paper gives an overview of their differences and characteristics and expresses clues for the selection of the adequate method. Practical examples of commercial exploitation of human body digitization are also presented and new interesting perspectives are introduced.

  15. Modeling Greenland ice sheet present-day and near-future runoff contribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peano, Daniele; Colleoni, Florence; Masina, Simona

    2014-05-01

    The last IPCC report [AR5, IPCC] has shown an increasing contribution from Greenland melting to global sea-level over the last decade, increasing from 0.09 mm/year (period 1992-2001) to 0.59 mm/year (period 2002-2011). Given its strategic location, i.e. close to the main North Atlantic ocean convection sites, it is therefore of importance to better assess ice sheet melting and its impact on regional ocean processes. So far, runoff estimate from ice sheet has been poorly constrained (e.g. [Hanna et al., 2005], [Hanna et al., 2008]) and most of the time the few estimates comes from regional atmospheric models or general circulation models (e.g. [Edwards et al., 2013], [Fettweis et al., 2013]). Here, we present the results from the implementation of a routing scheme into the thermo-mechanical ice sheet-ice shelves model GRISLI [Ritz et al, 2001], applied to the Greenland ice sheet mass evolution over the 20th and 21st centuries. The routing scheme is based on the "multiple flow direction" developed by [Quinn et al., 1991]. We further improved this scheme by considering topographic depressions as possible "lakes" to be filled by meltwater. In this way, when a depression is filled, only the extra water is routed towards the Greenland coasts. This allow us to obtain an estimate of the total amount of freshwater reaching the ocean at each time step of the model integration, as well as a time-varying spatial distribution of the runoff along the coasts of Greenland. This routing scheme is applied in routing both surface and basal meltwater. Surface meltwater is computed by means of a PDD method [Fausto et al., 2007] on which only a fraction is considered for routing while the basal melting rate is part of the heat balance at the ice-bed interface. Runoff is simulated on a 5km x 5km horizontal grid and validation is performed over the 20th century using mean annual total precipitation and air temperature at 2 meters from Era-Interim reanalysis [Dee et al., 2011]. Near future

  16. Present-day formation and seasonal evolution of linear dune gullies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquon, Kelly; Gargani, Julien; Massé, Marion; Conway, Susan J.

    2016-08-01

    Linear dune gullies are a sub-type of martian gullies. As their name suggests they only occur on sandy substrates and comprise very long (compared to their width) straight or sinuous channels, with relatively small source areas and almost non-existent visible deposits. Linear dune gullies have never been observed on terrestrial dunes and their formation process on Mars is unclear. Here, we present the results of the first systematic survey of these features in Mars' southern hemisphere and an in-depth study of six dunefields where repeat-imaging allows us to monitor the changes in these gullies over time. This study was undertaken with HiRISE images at 25-30 cm/pix and 1 m/pix elevation data derived from HiRISE stereo images. We find the latitudinal distribution and orientation of linear dune gullies broadly consistent with the general population of martian gullies. They occur predominantly between 36.3°S and 54.3°S, and occasionally between 64.6°S and 70.4°S. They are generally oriented toward SSW (at bearings between 150° and 260°). We find that these gullies are extremely active over the most recent 5 Martian years of images. Activity comprises: (1) appearance of new channels, (2) lengthening of existing channels, (3) complete or partial reactivation, and (4) disappearance of gullies. We find that gully channels lengthen by ∼100 m per year. The intense activity and the progressive disappearance of linear dune gullies argues against the hypothesis that these are remnant morphologies left over from previous periods of high obliquity millions of years ago. The activity of linear dune gullies reoccurs every year between the end of winter and the beginning of spring (Ls 167.4°-216.6°), and coincides with the final stages of the sublimation of annual CO" ice deposit. This activity often coincides spatially and temporally with the appearance of recurrent diffusing flows (RDFs)-digitate-shaped, dark patches with low relative albedo (up to 48% lower than the

  17. How Many Hotspots are on Present-day Earth, and are all Plumes hot?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzberg, C.

    2004-12-01

    The petrological characteristics of primary magmas that exit the melting regime are sensitive indicators of mantle potential temperature. However, most primary magmas partially crystallize some olivine during transit to the surface, and erupted lavas are typically hybrid mixtures of olivine and solidified liquid. Primitive glass on the surface can have an MgO content that is lower than a parental magma from which it was derived, and a parental magma can differ from its primary magma by partial crystallization of olivine in a crustal magma chamber. However, the parental magma composition can be restored using a simple petrological procedure when olivine is the sole phenocryst phase. On Kilauea the most primitive magnesian glass has been reported to contain 15% MgO, and the most magnesian olivines contain Fo 90-91. The exchange coefficients (Kd) for FeO and MgO between these olivine and glass compositions are 0.25-0.28, much lower than 0.33-0.34 for olivine equilibrated with liquid in melting experiments. The only way to obtain the correct Kd is by computing the effects of dissolving olivine into a 15% MgO liquid composition. This procedure results in a crustal parental magma with 17-19% MgO and a mantle primary magma with 18-20% MgO. The potential crystallization temperature for Kilauea is 1400C, an estimate that includes the effects of 0.34% H2O. Hawaii is therefore a hotspot. This is the most fundamental geological constraint that all models are required to satisfy. It is independent of ongoing questions concerning the role of subducted crust and pyroxenite in the melting regime. A primary magma with 18-20% MgO is successfully reproduced by decompression melting in a hot plume with potential temperatures in excess of 1550C. Hawaii is the only hotspot Earth at the present time. The mantle below Iceland is comparatively cooler, warmer than oceanic ridges, but it was hotter during the early Tertiary. A preliminary analysis of volcanics in and around the African and

  18. Late Holocene and present-day fluvial morphodynamics in small catchment areas of Central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englhard, Michael; Damm, Bodo; Frechen, Manfred; Terhorst, Birgit

    2010-05-01

    During the past decades strong runoff events repeatedly occurred in small drainage basins of the European low mountains. In numerous events runoff was connected with erosion and transport of extensive bed load. Runoff events were predominantly triggered by rainstorms, which were limited to the catchment areas. They partly caused severe economic loss. The present study focuses on fluvial morphodynamics in northern Hesse and Lower Saxony. In this area runoff and transport of bed load occurred in small tributary catchment areas of the Fulda, Werra and Oberweser rivers. In general, the small drainage basins are used by agriculture and forestry. Drainage channels are developed as gullies and are incised into solid bedrock, Quaternary hillslope sediments, alluvial fills, and anthropogenic deposits. Vertical incision into the bedrock may amount to 1 meter per event. Furthermore, in single cases sediment discharge amounted to 16.000 m³ in addition to the suspension load. On the base of historical analyses about 50 severe runoff events with a maximum frequency of 10 events during 1965 are recorded during the past 150 years in the study area. Field survey, sedimentological analyses and dating reveal intensive runoff processes since the Neolithic age in a comparable catchment area. In this context potsherds could be dated to the Linear Pottery culture, which were detected in an alluvial cone of the "Rehgraben gully", close to the city of.Kassel. Furthermore, findings of fossil wood were recovered in the same alluvial cone. Radiocarbon dating reveals calibrated ages which are for the most parts younger than AD. In younger sediments we suppose the severe runoff event of 1342. Current studies in the catchment area of the Rehgraben aim to distinguish different processes of the fluvial morphodynamics on a temporal scale and to estimate potential Holocene erosional rates. References Damm, B., 2004. Geschiebe führende und murfähige Wildbäche in Mittelgebirgsr

  19. Present-day formation and seasonal evolution of linear dune gullies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquon, Kelly; Gargani, Julien; Massé, Marion; Conway, Susan J.

    2016-08-01

    Linear dune gullies are a sub-type of martian gullies. As their name suggests they only occur on sandy substrates and comprise very long (compared to their width) straight or sinuous channels, with relatively small source areas and almost non-existent visible deposits. Linear dune gullies have never been observed on terrestrial dunes and their formation process on Mars is unclear. Here, we present the results of the first systematic survey of these features in Mars' southern hemisphere and an in-depth study of six dunefields where repeat-imaging allows us to monitor the changes in these gullies over time. This study was undertaken with HiRISE images at 25-30 cm/pix and 1 m/pix elevation data derived from HiRISE stereo images. We find the latitudinal distribution and orientation of linear dune gullies broadly consistent with the general population of martian gullies. They occur predominantly between 36.3°S and 54.3°S, and occasionally between 64.6°S and 70.4°S. They are generally oriented toward SSW (at bearings between 150° and 260°). We find that these gullies are extremely active over the most recent 5 Martian years of images. Activity comprises: (1) appearance of new channels, (2) lengthening of existing channels, (3) complete or partial reactivation, and (4) disappearance of gullies. We find that gully channels lengthen by ∼100 m per year. The intense activity and the progressive disappearance of linear dune gullies argues against the hypothesis that these are remnant morphologies left over from previous periods of high obliquity millions of years ago. The activity of linear dune gullies reoccurs every year between the end of winter and the beginning of spring (Ls 167.4°-216.6°), and coincides with the final stages of the sublimation of annual CO₂ ice deposit. This activity often coincides spatially and temporally with the appearance of recurrent diffusing flows (RDFs)-digitate-shaped, dark patches with low relative albedo (up to 48% lower than the

  20. Sedimentological processes and environmental variability at Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, Albania) between 640 ka and present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, A.; Wagner, B.; Just, J.; Leicher, N.; Gromig, R.; Baumgarten, H.; Vogel, H.; Lacey, J. H.; Sadori, L.; Wonik, T.; Leng, M. J.; Zanchetta, G.; Sulpizio, R.; Giaccio, B.

    2015-09-01

    Lake Ohrid (FYROM, Albania) is thought to be more than 1.2 million years old and hosts more than 200 endemic species. As a target of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), a successful deep drilling campaign was carried out within the scope of the Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) project in 2013. Here, we present lithological, sedimentological, and (bio-)geochemical data from the upper 247.8 m of the overall 569 m long DEEP site sediment succession from the central part of the lake. According to an age model, which is based on nine tephra layers (1st order tie points), and on tuning of biogeochemical proxy data to orbital parameters (2nd order tie points) and to the global benthic isotope stack LR04 (3rd order tie points), respectively, the analyzed sediment sequence covers the last 640 ka. The DEEP site sediment succession consists of hemipelagic sediments, which are interspersed by several tephra layers and infrequent, thin (< 5 cm) mass wasting deposits. The hemipelagic sediments can be classified into three different lithotypes. Lithotype 1 and 2 deposits comprise calcareous and slightly calcareous silty clay and are predominantly attributed to interglacial periods with high primary productivity in the lake during summer and reduced mixing during winter. The data suggest that high ion and nutrient concentrations in the lake water promoted calcite precipitation and diatom growth in the epilmnion in during MIS15, 13, and 5. Following a strong primary productivity, highest interglacial temperatures can be reported for MIS11 and 5, whereas MIS15, 13, 9, and 7 were comparable cooler. Lithotype 3 deposits consist of clastic, silty clayey material and predominantly represent glacial periods with low primary productivity during summer and longer and intensified mixing during winter. The data imply that most severe glacial conditions at Lake Ohrid persisted during MIS16, 12, 10, and 6 whereas

  1. Present-day formation and seasonal evolution of linear dune gullies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquon, Kelly; Gargani, Julien; Massé, Marion; Conway, Susan

    2016-04-01

    Linear dune gullies are an enigmatic sub-type of martian gullies. As their name suggests they only occur on sandy substrates and comprise very long (compared to their width) straight or sinuous channels, with relatively small source areas and almost inexistent deposits. This specific morphology has never been observed on terrestrial dunes and its formation process on Mars is still unclear [e.g. 1, 2, 3]. Here, we present the results of the first systematic survey for these features in Mars' southern hemisphere and an in-depth study of six dune fields where repeat-imaging allows us to monitor the changes over time of these linear gullies. This study was performed with HiRISE images at 25-30 cm/pix and 1 m/pix elevation data derived from HiRISE stereo images. We find the latitudinal distribution and orientation of linear gullies is broadly consistent with the general population of martian gullies. They occur predominantly between 36.3°S and 54.3°S, and occasionally between 64.6°S and 70.4°S. They are oriented towards SSW (between 150°N and 260°N). In contrast with the general gully population, however, we find that these gullies are extremely active over the 5 Mars years of images. Activity comprises: (i) appearance of new channels, (ii) elongation of existing channels, (iii) complete or partial reactivation, and (iv) disappearance of gullies. Gully channels can elongate by an average ~100 m per year. Their intense activity and the progressive disappearance of linear gullies argues against the hypothesis that these are remnant morphologies left over from previous periods of high obliquity millions of years ago. The activity of linear dune gullies reoccurs every year between the end of winter and the beginning of spring (Ls 167.4° - 216.6°), coinciding with the final stages of the sublimation of annual CO₂ frosts. This activity often coincides spatially and temporally with the appearance of Recurrent Diffusing Flows (RDF) - dark patches which surround the

  2. A summary of present-day gully formation and activity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candice; McEwen, Alfred; Dundas, Colin; Byrne, Shane

    2016-07-01

    trends and variations in gully size, morphology, orientation, and location are additionally examined as indications of a seasonal (or other) control, as well as variations with latitude, dune type/size/orientation, or Mars year. This presentation will summarize the results of our monitoring campaigns, and will compare the data that are available about gullies of different morphologies and locations. Our aim is to identify possible similarities (and differences) in gully activity processes across Mars, and to estimate the rates of gully formation and modification processes (as has been done for gullies in the southern mid-latitudes [3]). Such estimates would aid interpretation of the likely ages of observed gullies, which have implications for whether records of past (and potential aqueous) gully formation processes are still observable. [1] Diniega et al. (2010) Geology, 38, 1047-1050. [2] Dundas et al. (2012) Icarus, 220, 124-143. [3] Dundas et al. (2015) Icarus, 251, 244-263. [4] Dundas et al. (2010) GRL, 37, L07202. [5] Vincendon (2015) JGR, 120, 1859-1879. [6] Harrison et al. (2015) Icarus, 252, 236-254. [7] Pilorget & Forget (2016) Nature Geosci. 9, 65-69. [8] Vincendon et al. (2010) JGR, 115, E10001. [9] Horgan & Bell (2012) Geophys. Res. Lett. 39, L09201. [10] Hansen et al., (2011) Science 331, 575-578. [11] Hansen et al. (2015) Icarus 251, 264-267.

  3. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — an assessment of the present situation in the world: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A consultative meeting was convened by the World Health Organization in Geneva on 22-25 November 1983 to assess the present situation of AIDS (the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) in the world and to encourage collaboration between the different nations affected by this disease. AIDS was first reported in the USA in 1981, but probably existed there as early as 1978. Soon after its recognition in the USA, similar cases were identified in other areas of the world. In most western European countries and Canada, the epidemiological pattern is very similar to that in the United States, the majority of cases being in homosexual men. In other areas such as equatorial Africa and the Caribbean, the pattern seems to be different with no identifiable risk factors for the majority of cases. The disease is manifested by opportunistic infections and/or selected malignancies, with apparent differences in the clinical presentation between the cases in North America and Europe, on the one hand, and those in the tropics. To date there is no treatment that has significantly improved the underlying cellular immune deficiency, and the mortality is very high. The etiology of AIDS is unknown, but the epidemiological pattern is most consistent with its being caused by a transmissible agent; retroviruses come on top of the list of candidate agents. Despite the unknown etiology and the lack of laboratory diagnostic tests, sufficient information is available to permit health authorities to make recommendations that may reduce appreciably the incidence of the disease. AIDS is an important health problem in a number of countries and has international implications. Collaborative laboratory, epidemiological and clinical research between countries is needed to accelerate control efforts. In the meantime, WHO will coordinate exchange of information among countries. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:6331905

  4. Situational Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimehaug, Tormod; Helmersberg, Ingunn

    2010-01-01

    Situational Consultation (SC) is presented as a framework for flexible integration of several models and methodologies in consultation practice by choosing an approach adapted to the specific situation. In SC, models and their characteristic role positions are considered interchangeable tools with qualitative differences in strengths and…

  5. Evolution of the stress field in the southern Scotia Arc from the late Mesozoic to the present-day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestro, Adolfo; López-Martínez, Jerónimo; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Bohoyo, Fernando; Mink, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    The geological evolution of the Scotia Arc, which developed between Antarctica and South America, has facilitated the connection between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and, has important global implications. To improve the knowledge of the late Mesozoic evolution of the southern Scotia Arc, over 6000 brittle mesostructures were measured over the last 20 years at different outcrops from the northern Antarctic Peninsula and the South Shetland Islands as well as the James Ross and South Orkney archipelagos. This dataset covers a length of more than 1000 km of the arc. Fault data were analysed using the Etchecopar, y-R, Right Dihedra, Stress Inversion and Search Grid Inversion Palaeostress Determination methods. A total of 275 stress tensors were obtained. The results showed that the maximum horizontal stress was in the ENE-WSW and the NW-SE orientations and that the horizontal extension tensors were oriented NE-SW and NW-SE. In addition, seismic activity and focal mechanism solutions were analysed using the Gephart method to establish the present-day stress field and characterise the active tectonics. The results obtained suggest that there is a regional NE-SW compression and a NW-SE extension regime at the present day. The Southern Scotia Arc has a complex geological history due to the different tectonic settings (transform, convergent and divergent) that have affected this sector during its geological evolution from the late Mesozoic until the present day. Six stress fields were obtained from the brittle mesostructure population analysis in the region. The NW-SE and N-S maximum horizontal stresses were related to a combination of Mesozoic oceanic subduction of the former Phoenix Plate under the Pacific margin of the Antarctic Plate, Mesozoic-Cenozoic subduction of the northern Weddell Sea and the Oligocene to the Middle Miocene dextral strike-slip movement between the Scotia and Antarctic plates along the South Scotia Ridge. The NE-SW compression was related to

  6. A Day in the Life of an Industrial Hearing Conservationist: A Template for Successful Career Education and Outreach Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    1997-01-01

    Whether in a classroom setting or at a local community meeting, opportunities for providing descriptive and positive information about our professions to an audience unfamiliar with acoustics, noise control or hearing conservation often call for alternatives to technical demonstrations that illustrate principles of acoustics or noise control. More importantly, successful outreach presentations must convey images of our day-to-day activities and the challenges we address, many of which are non-technical. One successful approach to career outreach presentations makes use of a collection of photo slides featuring the speaker, his colleagues, customers and workplaces to vividly illustrate the specific job tasks, people and environment of the speaker's job or career. Against this fluid and multi-dimensional visual backdrop, an accompanying script addresses the main theme. A comprehensive photo slide collection may be established gradually, often by making use of and adding to technical and personal slides already in the speaker's possession. Slide collections are portable, easily and quickly reconfigured for back-to-back or spontaneous engagements, and they are well suited to speaking opportunities where technical presentations or demonstrations are not practical or appropriate. A carefully chosen sequence of photo slides minimizes the need for speaker's notes, as each photo itself provides a visual prompt. Although photo slide presentations are appropriate to a variety of outreach and professional settings, the specific illustrative and explanatory material presented here illustrates their application in career education outreach activities, using industrial hearing conservation as an example.

  7. Present-day and future Antarctic ice sheet climate and surface mass balance in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Vizcaino, Miren; Fyke, Jeremy; van Kampenhout, Leo; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2016-02-01

    We present climate and surface mass balance (SMB) of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) as simulated by the global, coupled ocean-atmosphere-land Community Earth System Model (CESM) with a horizontal resolution of ˜1° in the past, present and future (1850-2100). CESM correctly simulates present-day Antarctic sea ice extent, large-scale atmospheric circulation and near-surface climate, but fails to simulate the recent expansion of Antarctic sea ice. The present-day Antarctic ice sheet SMB equals 2280 ± 131 {Gt year^{-1}} , which concurs with existing independent estimates of AIS SMB. When forced by two CMIP5 climate change scenarios (high mitigation scenario RCP2.6 and high-emission scenario RCP8.5), CESM projects an increase of Antarctic ice sheet SMB of about 70 {Gt year^{-1}} per degree warming. This increase is driven by enhanced snowfall, which is partially counteracted by more surface melt and runoff along the ice sheet's edges. This intensifying hydrological cycle is predominantly driven by atmospheric warming, which increases (1) the moisture-carrying capacity of the atmosphere, (2) oceanic source region evaporation, and (3) summer AIS cloud liquid water content.

  8. Past agricultural land use and present-day fire regimes can interact to determine the nature of seed predation.

    PubMed

    Stuhler, John D; Orrock, John L

    2016-06-01

    Historical agriculture and present-day fire regimes can have significant effects on contemporary ecosystems. Although past agricultural land use can lead to long-term changes in plant communities, it remains unclear whether these persistent land-use legacies alter plant-consumer interactions, such as seed predation, and whether contemporary disturbance (e.g., fire) alters the effects of historical agriculture on these interactions. We conducted a study at 27 sites distributed across 80,300 ha in post-agricultural and non-agricultural longleaf pine woodlands with different degrees of fire frequency to test the hypothesis that past and present-day disturbances that alter plant communities can subsequently alter seed predation. We quantified seed removal by arthropods and rodents for Tephrosia virginiana and Vernonia angustifolia, species of conservation interest. We found that the effects of land-use history and fire frequency on seed removal were contingent on granivore guild and microhabitat characteristics. Tephrosia virginiana removal was greater in low fire frequency sites, due to greater seed removal by rodents. Although overall removal of V. angustifolia did not differ among habitats, rodents removed more seeds than arthropods at post-agricultural sites and non-agricultural sites with low fire frequencies, but not at non-agricultural sites with high fire frequencies. Land-use history and fire frequency also affected the relationship between microhabitat characteristics and removal of V. angustifolia. Our results suggest that historical agriculture and present-day fire regimes may alter seed predation by shifting the impact of rodent and arthropod seed predators among habitats, with potential consequences for the establishment of rare plant species consumed by one or both predators. PMID:26905418

  9. Very high resolution modelling of the Surface Mass Balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet: Present day conditions and future prospects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, Ruth; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Boberg, Fredrik; Hesselbjerg Christensen, Jens; Bøssing Christensen, Ole; Langen, Peter; Rodehacke, Christian; Stendel, Martin; Yang, Shuting

    2014-05-01

    Recent experiments with the Regional Climate Model (RCM) HIRHAM5 have produced new surface mass balance (SMB) estimates at the unprecedented high horizontal resolution of 0.05 degrees (~5.5km). These simulations indicate a present day SMB of 347 ± 98 Gt/year over the whole ice sheet averaged over the period 1989 - 2012 driven by the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. We validate accumulation rates over the ice sheet using estimates from shallow firn cores to confirm the importance of resolution to accurate estimates of accumulation. Comparison with PROMICE and GC-Net automatic weather station observations shows the model represents present day climate and climate variability well when driven by the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. Comparison with a simulation at 0.25 degrees (~27km) resolution from the same model shows a significantly different calculated SMB over the whole ice sheet, largely due to changes in precipitation distribution over Greenland. The very high resolution requires a more sophisticated treatment of sub-grid scale processes in the snow pack including meltwater retention and refreezing and an enhanced albedo scheme. Our results indicate retention processes account for a significant proportion of the total surface budget based on a new parameterization scheme in the model. SMB projections, driven by the EC-Earth Global Climate Model (GCM) at the boundaries for the RCP 4.5 scenario indicate a declining surface mass balance over the 21st century with some compensation for warmer summer temperatures and enhanced melt in the form of increased precipitation. A cold bias in the driving GCM for present day conditions suggests that this simulation likely underestimates the change in SMB. However, the downscaled precipitation fields compare well with those in the reanalysis driven simulations. A soon-to-be complete simulation uses driving fields from the GCM running the RCP8.5 scenario.

  10. Isolation and prominent aboriginal maternal legacy in the present-day population of La Gomera (Canary Islands).

    PubMed

    Fregel, Rosa; Cabrera, Vicente M; Larruga, José M; Hernández, Juan C; Gámez, Alejandro; Pestano, Jose J; Arnay, Matilde; González, Ana M

    2015-09-01

    The present-day population structure of La Gomera is outstanding in its high aboriginal heritage, the greatest in the Canary Islands. This was earlier confirmed by both mitochondrial DNA and autosomal analyses, although genetic drift due to the fifteenth century European colonization could not be excluded as the main factor responsible. The present mtDNA study of aboriginal remains and extant samples from the six municipal districts of the island indeed demonstrates that the pre-Hispanic colonization of La Gomera by North African people involved a strong founder event, shown by the high frequency of the indigenous Canarian U6b1a lineage in the aboriginal samples (65%). This value is even greater than that observed in the extant population (44%), which in turn is the highest of all the seven Canary Islands. In contrast to previous results obtained for the aboriginal populations of Tenerife and La Palma, haplogroups related to secondary waves of migration were not detected in La Gomera aborigines, indicating that isolation also had an important role in shaping the current population. The rugged relief of La Gomera divided into several distinct valleys probably promoted subsequent aboriginal intra-insular differentiation that has continued after the European colonization, as seen in the present-day population structure observed on the island. PMID:25407001

  11. Isolation and prominent aboriginal maternal legacy in the present-day population of La Gomera (Canary Islands)

    PubMed Central

    Fregel, Rosa; Cabrera, Vicente M; Larruga, José M; Hernández, Juan C; Gámez, Alejandro; Pestano, Jose J; Arnay, Matilde; González, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    The present-day population structure of La Gomera is outstanding in its high aboriginal heritage, the greatest in the Canary Islands. This was earlier confirmed by both mitochondrial DNA and autosomal analyses, although genetic drift due to the fifteenth century European colonization could not be excluded as the main factor responsible. The present mtDNA study of aboriginal remains and extant samples from the six municipal districts of the island indeed demonstrates that the pre-Hispanic colonization of La Gomera by North African people involved a strong founder event, shown by the high frequency of the indigenous Canarian U6b1a lineage in the aboriginal samples (65%). This value is even greater than that observed in the extant population (44%), which in turn is the highest of all the seven Canary Islands. In contrast to previous results obtained for the aboriginal populations of Tenerife and La Palma, haplogroups related to secondary waves of migration were not detected in La Gomera aborigines, indicating that isolation also had an important role in shaping the current population. The rugged relief of La Gomera divided into several distinct valleys probably promoted subsequent aboriginal intra-insular differentiation that has continued after the European colonization, as seen in the present-day population structure observed on the island. PMID:25407001

  12. Assessment of present day geomorphological dynamics to decipher landscape evolution around the Paleolithic sites of Melka Kunture, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerker, Michael; Schillaci, Calogero; Melis, Rita; Mussi, Margherita

    2014-05-01

    The area of Melka Kunture (central Ethiopia) is one of the most important clusters of Paleolithic sites in Eastern Africa. The archaeological record spans from c. 1.7 Ma onwards, with a number of stratified occurrences of Oldowan, Acheulean, Middle Stone Age and Late Stone Age industries, together with faunal remains and human fossils. However, the archaeological sites are endangered by flooding and soil erosion. The main excavation area lies close to the convergence of the Awash river with the Atabella river, one of the main tributaries of the upper Awash catchment. In the semi-arid Ethiopian highlands, gully networks develop especially in the vicinity of the active and inactive river meanders. Various erosion processes are linked to specific driving factors such as the rainfall regime, the land use/cover changes and vertic soils with a specific hydrological behaviour. It was documented in the field and by previous research that the origin of most of the man made erosion channels is due to animal pathways and car tracks. However, paleolandscape features increase the general erosion risk. Former wetland areas and deposition zones are particularly affected by soil erosion processes. Hence, the spatial distribution and characteristics of present day geomorphic processes also reveal information on the paleolandscape. In order to assess landscape evolution and present day geomorphologic dynamics, we mapped the geomorphology describing in detail the present-day slope processes at a 10.000 scale. We performed a detailed terrain analysis based on high resolution DEMs such as SRTM-X with 25m resolution and ALOS/PRISM with 10m resolution to characterize the main erosion processes and surface runoff dynamics. The latter ones are simulated using a Soil Conservation Service Curve Number method. Landuse was delineated for a larger area using ASTER 25m multispectral data. Finally, using calibrated topographic indices and a simple hydrological model we were able to detect and

  13. The present-day strain partitioning of the Western Alps and its relationships with the crustal scale geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S.; Lardeaux, J. M.; Tricart, P.; Paul, A.; Béthoux, N.; Masson, F.

    2003-04-01

    In the orogenic belt, the combination of the geological data (tectonic, petrologic and kinematic analysis) with the geophysical imagery of the crust (regional seismicity, local earthquake tomography and gravimetry) allows to obtain crustal scale models coherent with the present-day deformation. In this way, the recent pluridisciplinary studies performed in the framework of " Geo-France 3D Alpes " show an important syn-convergence strain-partitioning at the scale of the western alpine belt. In the internal domain, this strain-partitioning, corresponds to extensional tectonics combinated with important strike-slip components while the external domain and the Po plain, located at the periphery, record an important shortening accomodated in surface by thrust and strike-slip faults. In order to understand the alpine present-day strain pattern, we propose and discuss a new crustal-scale cross-section performed along the Pelvoux-Dora Maira transect. The proeminent features of this crustal-scale geometry are : -the existence of a slice of cold and rigid mantle of Apulian origin beneath the Dora Maira massif. This rigid mantle is truncated in two distinct bodies by a system of deeply-rooted vertical faults related to the Insubric line. -these two main bodies of mantle acted as indenters driving the decoupling of the European crust and at least a part of the exhumation of the high-pressure metamorphic units. -the deep architecture is characterized by the stacking of crustal slices detached from the European lithosphere. Some of these slices represent tectonic extrusions within the overlying Piemont Schistes lustrés. -the Monviso eclogitized ophiolites are plunging up to 20 km depth below the Piemont schistes lustrés. In this geometrical model, the decoupling of the mantle identor drives the crustal-scale strain-partitioning of the western Alps. Indeed, the lower part of the rigid mantle transfers the compression onto the european foreland and is responsible for the present-day

  14. Day and night variation in chemical composition and toxicological responses of size segregated urban air PM samples in a high air pollution situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalava, P. I.; Wang, Q.; Kuuspalo, K.; Ruusunen, J.; Hao, L.; Fang, D.; Väisänen, O.; Ruuskanen, A.; Sippula, O.; Happo, M. S.; Uski, O.; Kasurinen, S.; Torvela, T.; Koponen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Komppula, M.; Gu, C.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hirvonen, M.-R.

    2015-11-01

    samples. Some of the day to night difference may have been caused also by differing wind directions transporting air masses from different emission sources during the day and the night. The present findings indicate the important role of the local particle sources and atmospheric processes on the health related toxicological properties of the PM. The varying toxicological responses evoked by the PM samples showed the importance of examining various particle sizes. Especially the detected considerable toxicological activity by PM0.2 size range suggests they're attributable to combustion sources, new particle formation and atmospheric processes.

  15. Iceland hotspot track in southeast Greenland causes huge present-day vertical viscoelastic motion of the bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Sasgen, Ingo; Bevis, Michael; van Dam, Tonie; Wahr, John; Bamber, Jonathan; Wouters, Bert; Helm, Veit; Willis, Michael; Csatho, Beata; Knudsen, Per; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Kjær, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    The process of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) represents the ongoing response of the solid Earth to past ice mass loss that occurred following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~21 ka B.P.). The magnitude of the GIA uplift depends on the temporal history of the ice load and is highly sensitive to variations in upper mantle viscosity. Greenland GIA is thought to be well contained and due to relative high viscosity, influence of more recent changes e.g. since the Little Ice Age have minor present-day effect (<2 mm/yr). Here we use data from the Greenland Global Positioning System (GPS) network to measure GIA. We identify an unexpected GIA anomaly of ~12 mm/yr in southeast Greenland, which we interpret as linked to a zone of warmer upper mantle caused by the Iceland hotspot track that would reduce the viscosity and produce greater viscoelastic uplift due to recent ice mass changes. We reconsider the evolution of the Greenland ice sheet since LGM and estimate a total ice mass loss equivalent to sea level rise of 4.9 m since LGM. Our observations suggest southeast and northwest Greenland, subject to present-day major ice loss, also contributed by significantly more mass loss on millennia scale than previously estimated.

  16. Oxidation of dissolved iron under warmer, wetter conditions on Mars: Transitions to present-day arid environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The copious deposits of ferric-iron assemblages littering the surface of bright regions of Mars indicate that efficient oxidative weathering reactions have taken place during the evolution of the planet. Because the kinetics of atmosphere-surface (gas-solid) reactions are considerably slower than chemical weathering reactions involving an aqueous medium, most of the oxidation products now present in the martian regolith probably formed when groundwater flowed near the surface. This paper examines how chemical weathering reactions were effected by climatic variations when warm, wet environments became arid on Mars. Analogies are drawn with hydrogeochemical and weathering environments on the Australian continent where present-day oxidation of iron is occurring in acidic ground water under arid conditions.

  17. Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Presenting 11 Days after Delivery in a Patient of Mixed Genetic Background.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shoko; Fujihara, Kazuya; Kumagai, Ryo; Isono, Momoko; Yagyu, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 25-year-old woman whose paternal family was Japanese, maternal grandfather was Filipino, and maternal grandmother was Chinese. Eleven days after delivery, she presented with excessive thirst and disturbed consciousness due to diabetic ketoacidosis. She was diagnosed as having fulminant type 1 diabetes associated with pregnancy (PF). The antibody concentration against glutamic acid decarboxylase was 1.2 (<1.5) U/mL, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II haplotypes were DRB1*04:10-DQB1*03:02 and DRB1*15:02-DQB1*05:01. The present case had unique HLA class II haplotypes that have not been previously reported in association with PF. PMID:27432097

  18. A High-resolution 3D Geodynamical Model of the Present-day India-Asia Collision System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Baumann, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-resolution, 3D geodynamic model of the present-day India-Asia collision system. The model is separated into multiple tectonic blocks, for which we estimate the first order rheological properties and the impact on the dynamics of the collision system. This is done by performing systematic simulations with different rheologies to minimize the misfit to observational constraints such as the GPS-velocity field. The simulations are performed with the parallel staggered grid FD code LaMEM using a numerical resolution of at least 512x512x256 cells to resolve dynamically important shear zones reasonably well. A fundamental part of this study is the reconstruction of the 3D present-day geometry of Tibet and the adjacent regions. Our interpretations of crust and mantle lithosphere geometry are jointly based on a globally available shear wave tomography (Schaeffer and Lebedev, 2013) and the Crust 1.0 model (Laske et al. http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust1.html). We regionally refined and modified our interpretations based on seismicity distributions and focal mechanisms and incorporated regional receiver function studies to improve the accuracy of the Moho in particular. Results suggest that we can identify at least one "best-fit" solution in terms of rheological model properties that reproduces the observed velocity field reasonably well, including the strong rotation of the GPS velocity around the eastern syntax of the Himalaya. We also present model co-variances to illustrate the trade-offs between the rheological model parameters, their respective uncertainties, and the model fit. Schaeffer, A.J., Lebedev, S., 2013. Global shear speed structure of the upper mantle and transition zone. Geophysical Journal International 194, 417-449. doi:10.1093/gji/ggt095

  19. Situated University, Situated Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that teaching as a situated, civic activity must be a core intellectual activity in the engaged metropolitan university. Situated writing provides the key pedagogy for the Chicago Civic Leadership Certificate Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, an engaged public research university. The role of writing, or…

  20. Unraveling the geochemistry of melts in exhumed mantle domains in present-day and fossil magma-poor rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Méderic; Ulrich, Marc; Autin, Julia; Manatschal, Gianreto; Epin, Marie-Eva; Müntener, Othmar; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Sauter, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The role of magmatic processes occurring during the continental break-up and the onset of steady-state seafloor spreading are still a matter of debate. Beside the tectonic processes like stretching, thinning and exhumation, magmatic processes also play a key role in the evolution and breakup of magma-poor rifted margins. To unravel the impact of such processes, Ocean-Continent-Transitions (OCTs) are of particular interest. OCTs are complex areas where hyper-extended continental crust, exhumed mantle and proto-oceanic crust occur. All these domains have been identified and sampled in both present-day (Iberia/Newfoundland margins) and fossil margins (Platta/Err nappes). In this study, we present preliminary results that enable to characterize the nature of the mantle rocks and the melts found in the OCTs of these paleo- and present-day margins with the aim to investigate how the mantle evolves from initial exhumation to final lithospheric breaks. In OCTs two types of mantle rocks can be observed: (i) a « sub-continental type » free of syn-exhumation melt imprint preserving the early geochemical evolution, and (ii) a « refertilized type » characterized by melt infiltration and mantle-melt interaction. Melts from these domains have different major, trace element and isotopic compositions and can therefore be used to constrain how melt interacts with the mantle and to understand the role of magmatic processes in the break-up. We therefore summarized whole-rock, in-situ and isotopic analysis available in the literature from the Iberia/Newfoundland present-day margin system and completed the existing database with new additional data from the Iberia margin. These new data have been obtained using in-situ technics mainly on clinopyroxenites, serpentinized peridotites and gabbros of ODP drill cores. Around 200 new data have been acquired using the LA-ICPMS technic. Preliminary results show that clinopyroxenes in serpentinized peridodite breccia from ODP site 637A and

  1. Simple models for late Holocene and present-day Patagonian glacier fluctuations and predictions of a geodetically detectable isostatic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivins, Erik R.; James, Thomas S.

    1999-09-01

    The late Holocene glacial moraine chronology in the southernmost South American Andes includes four ^1 ^4 C dated Neoglacial advances and retreats. These are used as proxy information to characterize mass fluctuation of the Patagonian icefields during the last 5000 years. Modelled ice loads force a phase-lagged viscoelastic gravitational deformation of the solid Earth. The ancient glacier fluctuations may, therefore, drive present-day crustal motion even in the absence of present-day ice mass imbalance. Numerical models show that such rates of present-day uplift and subsidence are larger than those driven by the viscous memory of late Pleistocene deglaciation. Both spherical and flat-earth models are employed, the latter being used to study exhaustively the effects of glacial load history on the predicted vertical crustal velocity. Recent assessment of net mass balance from 1944 to 1985 indicates that the Southern Patagonian icefield has significantly deteriorated due to snout retreat and thinning. Volume loss rates are estimated at about 3.4-9.3 km^3 yr^- ^1 . The predicted vertical isostatic response to this recession and to the modelled Holocene Neoglaciations is at a marginally detectable level (~1 mm yr^- ^1 ) if the mantle/asthenosphere beneath Patagonia has a viscosity of about 10^2 ^1 Pa s. However, for reduced mantle viscosities, the younger Holocene glacial load histories predict larger signatures. In fact, if the viscosity is about 2x10^2 ^0 Pa s, or lower, then geodetically detectable vertical motion may be driven by a regional Little Ice Age (LIA) (1400-1750 AD) glacier advance and subsequent 20th century retreat. Although this value for mantle viscosity is lower than thought typical of continental shield mantle (~10^2 ^1 Pa s), it is consistent with inversions for post-seismic relaxation time constants in island arc environments and in regions with significant Neogene continental tectonism. In the viscosity regime of 5x10^1 ^8 -2x10^1 ^9 Pa s, the

  2. Microphytobenthos and phytoplankton in the Severn estuary, UK: present situation and possible consequences of a tidal energy barrage.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Graham J C

    2010-01-01

    Information on the distribution of microphytobenthos (micro-algae forming biofilms on sediment surfaces) and phytoplankton in the Severn estuary is reviewed. Microphytobenthos (MPB) are widely distributed in salt marsh and mudflat environments, with biomass levels lower than in other estuaries (average 53 mg chl am(-2) on mud, 12 mg chl am(-2) on sand). Seasonal and spatial patterns occur in the species composition of biofilms. Large areas of the Severn have not been surveyed, but it is likely that MPB are abundant in these regions. Dissolved inorganic N, P and Si concentrations are high in the upper estuary (>400 microM nitrate, >10 microM phosphate, >140 microM silicate) and decrease seaward. Phytoplanktonic chl a concentrations are low in the main estuary (2.2 microg chl aL(-1)), but increase in the Bristol Channel and at the head of the estuary (>10 microg chl aL(-1)). High turbidity is the likely cause for low phytoplankton activity. Annual production of MPB was estimated at 33 g Cm(-2) of inter-tidal area y(-1) in the Severn estuary. This estimated benthic primary production would utilise 3.9% and 4.9% of the annual estuarine N and P loads. Construction of tidal energy barrages is estimated to significantly reduce annual estuarine MPB production (by 77% for the Cardiff-Weston barrage). It is unlikely that any potential increases in MPB biomass on remaining inter-tidal areas will be sufficient to compensate for these losses. In general, the data coverage for benthic and planktonic distribution, production and related nutrient cycles is extremely limited and significant new research work is needed to enable more definite predictions of the post-barrage situation to be made. PMID:20074756

  3. HLA Class I and Class II Alleles and Haplotypes Confirm the Berber Origin of the Present Day Tunisian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hajjej, Abdelhafidh; Almawi, Wassim Y.; Hattab, Lasmar; El-Gaaied, Amel; Hmida, Slama

    2015-01-01

    In view of its distinct geographical location and relatively small area, Tunisia witnessed the presence of many civilizations and ethnic groups throughout history, thereby questioning the origin of present-day Tunisian population. We investigated HLA class I and class II gene profiles in Tunisians, and compared this profile with those of Mediterranean and Sub-Sahara African populations. A total of 376 unrelated Tunisian individuals of both genders were genotyped for HLA class I (A, B) and class II (DRB1, DQB1), using reverse dot-blot hybridization (PCR-SSO) method. Statistical analysis was performed using Arlequin software. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by DISPAN software, and correspondence analysis was carried out by VISTA software. One hundred fifty-three HLA alleles were identified in the studied sample, which comprised 41, 50, 40 and 22 alleles at HLA-A,-B,-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci, respectively. The most frequent alleles were HLA-A*02:01 (16.76%), HLA-B*44:02/03 (17.82%), HLA-DRB1*07:01 (19.02%), and HLA-DQB1*03:01 (17.95%). Four-locus haplotype analysis identified HLA-A*02:01-B*50:01-DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:02 (2.2%) as the common haplotype in Tunisians. Compared to other nearby populations, Tunisians appear to be genetically related to Western Mediterranean population, in particular North Africans and Berbers. In conclusion, HLA genotype results indicate that Tunisians are related to present-day North Africans, Berbers and to Iberians, but not to Eastern Arabs (Palestinians, Jordanians and Lebanese). This suggests that the genetic contribution of Arab invasion of 7th-11th century A.D. had little impact of the North African gene pool. PMID:26317228

  4. HLA Class I and Class II Alleles and Haplotypes Confirm the Berber Origin of the Present Day Tunisian Population.

    PubMed

    Hajjej, Abdelhafidh; Almawi, Wassim Y; Hattab, Lasmar; El-Gaaied, Amel; Hmida, Slama

    2015-01-01

    In view of its distinct geographical location and relatively small area, Tunisia witnessed the presence of many civilizations and ethnic groups throughout history, thereby questioning the origin of present-day Tunisian population. We investigated HLA class I and class II gene profiles in Tunisians, and compared this profile with those of Mediterranean and Sub-Sahara African populations. A total of 376 unrelated Tunisian individuals of both genders were genotyped for HLA class I (A, B) and class II (DRB1, DQB1), using reverse dot-blot hybridization (PCR-SSO) method. Statistical analysis was performed using Arlequin software. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by DISPAN software, and correspondence analysis was carried out by VISTA software. One hundred fifty-three HLA alleles were identified in the studied sample, which comprised 41, 50, 40 and 22 alleles at HLA-A,-B,-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci, respectively. The most frequent alleles were HLA-A*02:01 (16.76%), HLA-B*44:02/03 (17.82%), HLA-DRB1*07:01 (19.02%), and HLA-DQB1*03:01 (17.95%). Four-locus haplotype analysis identified HLA-A*02:01-B*50:01-DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:02 (2.2%) as the common haplotype in Tunisians. Compared to other nearby populations, Tunisians appear to be genetically related to Western Mediterranean population, in particular North Africans and Berbers. In conclusion, HLA genotype results indicate that Tunisians are related to present-day North Africans, Berbers and to Iberians, but not to Eastern Arabs (Palestinians, Jordanians and Lebanese). This suggests that the genetic contribution of Arab invasion of 7th-11th century A.D. had little impact of the North African gene pool. PMID:26317228

  5. Present-day oxidative subsidence of organic soils and mitigation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deverel, Steven J.; Ingrum, Timothy; Leighton, David

    2016-05-01

    Subsidence of organic soils in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta threatens sustainability of the California (USA) water supply system and agriculture. Land-surface elevation data were collected to assess present-day subsidence rates and evaluate rice as a land use for subsidence mitigation. To depict Delta-wide present-day rates of subsidence, the previously developed SUBCALC model was refined and calibrated using recent data for CO2 emissions and land-surface elevation changes measured at extensometers. Land-surface elevation change data were evaluated relative to indirect estimates of subsidence and accretion using carbon and nitrogen flux data for rice cultivation. Extensometer and leveling data demonstrate seasonal variations in land-surface elevations associated with groundwater-level fluctuations and inelastic subsidence rates of 0.5-0.8 cm yr-1. Calibration of the SUBCALC model indicated accuracy of ±0.10 cm yr-1 where depth to groundwater, soil organic matter content and temperature are known. Regional estimates of subsidence range from <0.3 to >1.8 cm yr-1. The primary uncertainty is the distribution of soil organic matter content which results in spatial averaging in the mapping of subsidence rates. Analysis of leveling and extensometer data in rice fields resulted in an estimated accretion rate of 0.02-0.8 cm yr-1. These values generally agreed with indirect estimates based on carbon fluxes and nitrogen mineralization, thus preliminarily demonstrating that rice will stop or greatly reduce subsidence. Areas below elevations of -2 m are candidate areas for implementation of mitigation measures such as rice because there is active subsidence occurring at rates greater than 0.4 cm yr-1.

  6. Modeling of Present-Day Atmosphere and Ocean Non-Tidal De-Aliasing Errors for Future Gravity Mission Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann-Wolf, I.; Dobslaw, H.; Mayer-Gürr, T.

    2015-12-01

    A realistically perturbed synthetic de-aliasing model consistent with the updated Earth System Model of the European Space Agency (Dobslaw et al., 2015) is now available for the years 1995 -- 2006. The data-set contains realizations of (i) errors at large spatial scales assessed individually for periods between 10 -- 30, 3 -- 10, and 1 -- 3 days, the S1 atmospheric tide, and sub-diurnal periods; (ii) errors at small spatial scales typically not covered by global models of atmosphere and ocean variability; and (iii) errors due to physical processes not represented in currently available de-aliasing products. The error magnitudes for each of the different frequency bands are derived from a small ensemble of four atmospheric and oceanic models. In order to demonstrate the plausibility of the error magnitudes chosen, we perform a variance component estimation based on daily GRACE normal equations from the ITSG-Grace2014 global gravity field series recently published by the University of Graz. All 12 years of the error model are used to calculate empirical error variance-covariance matrices describing the systematic dependencies of the errors both in time and in space individually for five continental and four oceanic regions, and daily GRACE normal equations are subsequently employed to obtain pre-factors for each of those matrices. For the largest spatial scales up to d/o = 40 and periods longer than 24 h, errors prepared for the updated ESM are found to be largely consistent with noise of a similar stochastic character contained in present-day GRACE solutions. Differences and similarities identified for all of the nine regions considered will be discussed in detail during the presentation.Dobslaw, H., I. Bergmann-Wolf, R. Dill, E. Forootan, V. Klemann, J. Kusche, and I. Sasgen (2015), The updated ESA Earth System Model for future gravity mission simulation studies, J. Geod., doi:10.1007/s00190-014-0787-8.

  7. Present-day oxidative subsidence of organic soils and mitigation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deverel, Steven J.; Ingrum, Timothy; Leighton, David

    2016-03-01

    Subsidence of organic soils in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta threatens sustainability of the California (USA) water supply system and agriculture. Land-surface elevation data were collected to assess present-day subsidence rates and evaluate rice as a land use for subsidence mitigation. To depict Delta-wide present-day rates of subsidence, the previously developed SUBCALC model was refined and calibrated using recent data for CO2 emissions and land-surface elevation changes measured at extensometers. Land-surface elevation change data were evaluated relative to indirect estimates of subsidence and accretion using carbon and nitrogen flux data for rice cultivation. Extensometer and leveling data demonstrate seasonal variations in land-surface elevations associated with groundwater-level fluctuations and inelastic subsidence rates of 0.5-0.8 cm yr-1. Calibration of the SUBCALC model indicated accuracy of ±0.10 cm yr-1 where depth to groundwater, soil organic matter content and temperature are known. Regional estimates of subsidence range from <0.3 to >1.8 cm yr-1. The primary uncertainty is the distribution of soil organic matter content which results in spatial averaging in the mapping of subsidence rates. Analysis of leveling and extensometer data in rice fields resulted in an estimated accretion rate of 0.02-0.8 cm yr-1. These values generally agreed with indirect estimates based on carbon fluxes and nitrogen mineralization, thus preliminarily demonstrating that rice will stop or greatly reduce subsidence. Areas below elevations of -2 m are candidate areas for implementation of mitigation measures such as rice because there is active subsidence occurring at rates greater than 0.4 cm yr-1.

  8. Similarities in the Spatial Pattern of the Surface Flux Response to Present-Day Greenhouse Gases and Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persad, G.; Ming, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that present-day greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols can produce remarkably similar patterns of climate response in fully coupled general circulation model (GCM) simulations, despite having significantly different spatial patterns of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) forcing. However, there is little understanding of the mechanisms of ocean-atmosphere interaction that could lead to the response pattern formation. Surface flux perturbations are a crucial pathway by which TOA forcing is communicated to the ocean, and may be a vital link in explaining the spatial similarities in the fully coupled responses to disparate TOA forcing patterns—a phenomenon with implications for detection and attribution, as well as the climate sensitivity to different forcers. We analyze the surface energy budget response to present-day aerosols versus GHGs in single forcing, fixed SST, atmospheric GCM experiments to identify mechanisms for response pattern formation via surface flux perturbations. We find that, although the TOA forcing spatial patterns of GHGs and aerosols are largely uncorrelated, their surface radiative and heat flux patterns are significantly anti-correlated. Furthermore, this anti-correlation is largely explained by similar (but sign-reversed) spatial patterns of surface latent and sensible heat flux response to the two forcers, particularly over the winter-hemisphere extratropical oceans. These are, in turn, driven by spatially similar perturbations in surface winds from changes in mean tropical and midlatitude circulation. These results suggest that the mean atmospheric circulation, which has many anti-symmetric responses to GHG and aerosol forcings, is an efficient homogenizer of spatial patterns in the surface heat flux response to heterogeneous TOA forcings, creating an atmosphere-only pathway for similarities in the fully coupled response.

  9. Comparison of statistical and dynamical downscaling of extreme precipitations over France in present-day and future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, Jeanne; Déqué, Michel; Sanchez Gomez, Emila; Somot, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    We present a comparison of two downscaling methods of extreme precipitations over France at a climatic time scale : a dynamical one performed with the Regional Climate Model ALADIN-Climate used at a resolution of 12 km, and a statistical one based on the weather regime approach and using the analog methodology to reconstruct daily fields of precipitations at a 8 km resolution. We focus on the most heavy precipitations of the area of interest, which occur in southeastern France in Autumn. Those involve small-scale processes than can be explicitly resolved only with 2-1 km resolution non-hydrostatic models. However, such models can not be used for climate simulations because of their computational cost is still too high. Yet these extreme events cause rather heavy damages, so that their possible evolution in the context of climate change is of great concern. Thus, there is strong need in assessing downscaling methods' ability to represent them. First, we downscale the low-resolution ERA40 re-analysis over the 1958-2000 time period with ALADIN-Climate, and from the year 1980 to the year 2000 with the statistical method. Then, we apply a quantile-quantile correction to the daily precipitations of the last twenty years of the ALADIN-Climate simulation. The correction rates are computed over the first part of the simulation (1958-1979) using a high-resolution gridded database : the SAFRAN analysis, which provides series of hourly fields for the 1958-2008 period over the french territory at a 8 km resolution. We assess the performances of each downscaling method in present-day climate by comparing the simulated precipitations to the SAFRAN database. The use of the ERA40 re-analysis allows to reproduce the real chronology in both downscalings, which enables to analyze the results not only from a statistical point of view but also through day-to-day diagnosis such as time correlations or spatial patterns of rain for given extreme events. Secondly, we apply these downscaling

  10. Human reponses to historical eruptions of Etna (Sicily) from 1600 to present and their implications for present-day disaster planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, H.; Chester, D. K.; Duncan, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Mount Etna in northeastern Sicily (Italy) rises to over 3000 m, covers an area of ca.1750 km2 and is the most active volcano in Europe. Observations of Etna by literate observers stretch back to the classical era and one of the earliest references to an eruption of Etna was by Pindar in his Pythian Odes, to the event of ca. 474-479 B.C. The history of its activity has been reconstructed by scholars up to the present day and records of eruptions are reasonably complete from the early fifteenth century, reliable from 1669, and document the threats and destruction to human settlements and livelihoods. Effusive and explosive activity has occurred continually throughout the historical period and eruptions of Mount Etna have presented numerous eruption styles, from persistent central crater activity, to periodic flank eruptions. From 1600 to 1669 the activity of Etna was characterised by a high volumetric output of lava with a mean eruption rate of 1.19 m3s-1, this was followed by a pause from flank eruptions and the re-establishment of significant activity from the middle of the eighteenth century. After 1750 the output of lava by flank eruptions was lower than in the previous century, with the mean eruption rate falling to 0.18 m3s-1. This paper summarises: the characteristics of the eruptions that occurred between the period of 1600 to present; the particularities of the societal responses over time and the role of the authorities; and, the important lessons this history holds for the management of present-day civil defence planning in the region. People responded to the eruptions at three levels: as members of a family and extended family; as members of a community and, as citizens of the State. The State, however, was a minor player in responding to these eruptions until the early nineteenth century as the State then became more involved in each successive eruption as the responses moved to a more industrial nature rather than pre-industrial. Today emergencies are

  11. Chronic disease risk factors, healthy days and medical claims in South African employees presenting for health risk screening

    PubMed Central

    Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy L; Buckmaster, Chris; Nossel, Craig; Dreyer, Liezel; Bull, Fiona; Noakes, Timothy D; Lambert, Estelle V

    2008-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases (NCD) accounts for more than a third (37%) of all deaths in South Africa. However, this burden of disease can be reduced by addressing risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine the health and risk profile of South African employees presenting for health risk assessments and to measure their readiness to change and improve lifestyle behaviour. Methods Employees (n = 1954) from 18 companies were invited to take part in a wellness day, which included a health-risk assessment. Self-reported health behaviour and health status was recorded. Clinical measures included cholesterol finger-prick test, blood pressure and Body Mass Index (BMI). Health-related age was calculated using an algorithm incorporating the relative risk for all case mortality associated with smoking, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, BMI and cholesterol. Medical claims data were obtained from the health insurer. Results The mean percentage of participation was 26% (n = 1954) and ranged from 4% in transport to 81% in the consulting sector. Health-related age (38.5 ± 12.9 years) was significantly higher than chronological age (34.9 ± 10.3 yrs) (p < 0.001). Both chronological and risk-related age were significantly different between the sectors (P < 0.001), with the manufacturing sector being the oldest and finance having the youngest employees. Health-related age was significantly associated with number of days adversely affected by mental and physical health, days away from work and total annual medical costs (p < 0.001). Employees had higher rates of overweight, smoking among men, and physical inactivity (total sample) when compared the general SA population. Increased health-related expenditure was associated with increased number of risk factors, absenteeism and reduced physical activity. Conclusion SA employees' health and lifestyle habits are placing them at increased risk for NCD's, suggesting that they may develop NCD's earlier than

  12. Complex Bedforms and Complex Water Masses: A Case Study from the Tertiary to Present-day, Pelotas Basin, Offshore Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, P.; Badalini, G.; Wrigley, S.; Walker, R.; Argent, J.; Hernandez-Molina, J.; de Santa Ana, H.; Soto, M.; Tomasini, J.

    2015-12-01

    varied both spatially and temporally and operated at various water depths. This complexity continues Present-day and is spectacularly imaged by pseudo time-lapse seismic data from the Present-day water column. These data, which are commonly neglected, highlight the true complexity of ocean currents and show how discrete dynamic water masses mix and move over time.

  13. Model sensitivity of ice flux over the grounding line to present-day climatic forcing and geothermal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, Thomas; Humbert, Angelika

    2016-04-01

    Large uncertainties remain in the current and future contribution to sea level change from Antarctica from observations and numerical flow modelling. Within the SeaRISE project atmospheric, oceanic, and subglacial forcing scenarios were applied to different ice-sheet models to assess Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity over a 500 year timescale. The scenario results have been compared to the individual state of each model at the end of its spin-up. It has been shown, that the model results highly depend on the chosen climate forcing and spin-up strategy. Here we use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to perform spin-up simulations across different data sets for present-day boundary conditions for the Antarctic Ice Sheet (surface temperature, surface mass balance and geothermal flux). The utilized spin-up methods include free evolving and geometry constrained simulations. Here we present our analysis of the ice flux over the grounding line for each set-up and compare the fluxes from large drainage basin units with estimates derived from remote sensing.

  14. Intraoperative presentation of Bochdalek's hernia in an adult during robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy: An uncommon situation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cindolo, Luca; Berardinelli, Francesco; Manzi, Arianna; Spagnuolo, Francesca; Fabbri, Elisa; Castellan, Pietro; Petrini, Flavia; Schips, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Bochdalek's diaphragmatic hernia (BDH) is a congenital defect of the diaphragm that usually present during the neonatal period and rarely remain silent until adulthood. We present a 45-year-old-female case with diagnosis of double left kidney tumor prepared for robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RPN). During the preoperative procedure she had a reduction of inspiratory volumes and increased pulmonary pressures: the robotic camera revealed the incidental presence of the left diaphragmatic defect. We report a simultaneous nephron sparing surgery (NSS) and left posterolateral BDH correction done by the da Vinci Surgical Robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). PMID:26766808

  15. Estimating present day extreme water level exceedance probabilities around the coastline of Australia: tropical cyclone-induced storm surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, Ivan D.; MacPherson, Leigh R.; Mason, Matthew S.; Wijeratne, E. M. S.; Pattiaratchi, Charitha B.; Crompton, Ryan P.; George, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of major storm surges in the last decade have dramatically emphasized the immense destructive capabilities of extreme water level events, particularly when driven by severe tropical cyclones. Given this risk, it is vitally important that the exceedance probabilities of extreme water levels are accurately evaluated to inform risk-based flood and erosion management, engineering and for future land-use planning and to ensure the risk of catastrophic structural failures due to under-design or expensive wastes due to over-design are minimised. Australia has a long history of coastal flooding from tropical cyclones. Using a novel integration of two modeling techniques, this paper provides the first estimates of present day extreme water level exceedance probabilities around the whole coastline of Australia, and the first estimates that combine the influence of astronomical tides, storm surges generated by both extra-tropical and tropical cyclones, and seasonal and inter-annual variations in mean sea level. Initially, an analysis of tide gauge records has been used to assess the characteristics of tropical cyclone-induced surges around Australia. However, given the dearth (temporal and spatial) of information around much of the coastline, and therefore the inability of these gauge records to adequately describe the regional climatology, an observationally based stochastic tropical cyclone model has been developed to synthetically extend the tropical cyclone record to 10,000 years. Wind and pressure fields derived for these synthetically generated events have then been used to drive a hydrodynamic model of the Australian continental shelf region with annual maximum water levels extracted to estimate exceedance probabilities around the coastline. To validate this methodology, selected historic storm surge events have been simulated and resultant storm surges compared with gauge records. Tropical cyclone induced exceedance probabilities have been combined with

  16. Volcanoes and the environment: Lessons for understanding Earth's past and future from studies of present-day volcanic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, Tamsin A.

    2015-10-01

    Volcanism has affected the environment of our planet over a broad range of spatial (local to global) and temporal (< 1 yr to 100s Myr) scales and will continue to do so. As well as examining the Earth's geological record and using computer modelling to understand these effects, much of our knowledge of these processes comes from studying volcanism on the present-day planet. Understanding the full spectrum of possible routes and mechanisms by which volcanism can affect the environment is key to developing a realistic appreciation of possible past and potential future volcanic impact scenarios. This review paper seeks to give a synoptic overview of these potential mechanisms, focussing on those that we can seek to understand over human timescales by studying current volcanic activity. These effects are wide ranging from well-documented planetary-scale impacts (e.g., cooling by stratospheric aerosol veils) to more subtle or localised processes like ash fertilisation of ocean biota and impacts on cloud properties, atmospheric oxidant levels and terrestrial ecosystems. There is still much to be gained by studying present-day volcanic emissions. This review highlights the need for further work in three example areas. Firstly, to understand regional and arc-scale volcanic emissions, especially cycling of elements through subduction zones, more volatile measurements are needed to contribute to a fundamental and systematic understanding of these processes throughout geological time. Secondly, there is still uncertainty surrounding whether stratospheric ozone depletion following volcanic eruptions results solely from activation of anthropogenic halogen species. We should be poised to study future eruptions into the stratosphere with regard to their impacts and halogen load and work to improve our models and understanding of the relevant underlying processes within the Earth and the atmosphere. Thirdly, we lack a systematic understanding of trace metal volatility from magmas

  17. Global connections between aeolian dust, climate and ocean biogeochemistry at the present day and at the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, B. A.; Prospero, J. M.; Mackie, D.; Gaiero, D.; Hesse, P. P.; Balkanski, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Palaeo-dust records in sediments and ice cores show that wind-borne mineral aerosol ('dust') is strongly linked with climate state. During glacial climate stages, for example, the world was much dustier, with dust fluxes two to five times greater than in interglacial stages. However, the influence of dust on climate remains a poorly quantified and actively changing element of the Earth's climate system. Dust can influence climate directly, by the scattering and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly, by modifying cloud properties. Dust transported to the oceans can also affect climate via ocean fertilization in those regions of the world's oceans where macronutrients like nitrate are abundant but primary production and nitrogen fixation are limited by iron scarcity. Dust containing iron, as fine-grained iron oxides/oxyhydroxides and/or within clay minerals, and other essential micronutrients (e.g. silica) may modulate the uptake of carbon in marine ecosystems and, in turn, the atmospheric concentration of CO 2. Here, in order to critically examine past fluxes and possible climate impacts of dust in general and iron-bearing dust in particular, we consider present-day sources and properties of dust, synthesise available records of dust deposition at the last glacial maximum (LGM); evaluate the evidence for changes in ocean palaeo-productivity associated with, and possibly caused by, changes in aeolian flux to the oceans at the LGM; and consider the radiative forcing effects of increased LGM dust loadings.

  18. Atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to and from the Arctic under present-day and future climate.

    PubMed

    Octaviani, Mega; Stemmler, Irene; Lammel, Gerhard; Graf, Hans F

    2015-03-17

    The long-term atmospheric cycling and fate of persistent organic pollutants under the influence of a changing climate is a concern. A GCM's realization of present-day (1970-1999) and future (2070-2099) climate, the latter under a medium scenario of greenhouse gas emissions, is used to study meridional transports and their correlations with the Arctic and North Atlantic Oscillations (AO and NAO). Regions of import and export maxima into the Arctic are identified along the Arctic Circle. It is found that, under future climate conditions, the net export of PCB153 out of the Arctic will increase. The meridional net flux pattern of this substance is expected to become independent of AO and NAO. For DDT, a trend of decreasing net Arctic import will reverse to an increasing trend 100 years after peak emission, which is partly due to more frequent AO and NAO positive phases. It is concluded that the long-term accumulation trends in the Arctic of other persistent pollutants, including so-called emerging pollutants, are subject to the substances' specific behavior and fate in the environment and need to be studied specifically. PMID:25686012

  19. Evaluation of Present-day Aerosols over China Simulated from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, H.; Chang, W.

    2014-12-01

    High concentrations of aerosols over China lead to strong radiative forcing that is important for both regional and global climate. To understand the representation of aerosols in China in current global climate models, we evaluate extensively the simulated present-day aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) over China from the 12 models that participated in Atmospheric Chemistry & Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), by using ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing. Ground-based measurements of aerosol concentrations used in this work include those from the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) Atmosphere Watch Network (CAWNET) and the observed fine-mode aerosol concentrations collected from the literature. The ground-based measurements of AOD in China are taken from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), the sites with CIMEL sun photometer operated by Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and from Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET). We find that the ACCMIP models generally underestimate concentrations of all major aerosol species in China. On an annual mean basis, the multi-model mean concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon are underestimated by 63%, 73%, 54%, 53%, and 59%, respectively. The multi-model mean AOD values show low biases of 20-40% at studied sites in China. The ACCMIP models can reproduce seasonal variation of nitrate but cannot capture well the seasonal variations of other aerosol species. Our analyses indicate that current global models generally underestimate the role of aerosols in China in climate simulations.

  20. Present-Day Crustal Vertical Motion Around the Ordos Block Constrained by Precise Leveling and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Qingliang; Cui, Duxin; Liu, Liwei; Zhou, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Precise leveling data observed in the period of 1970-2014 around the Ordos block were collected and processed to estimate present-day crustal vertical movement. Vertical rates of 6 GPS sites were employed as a priori constraints to define the reference frame. The velocity field shows that the interior of the Ordos block moves upward at a rate of 3 mm/a as a stable block. With respect to the central Ordos, the grabens and rifts around the Ordos block are undergoing subsidence, while the northeastern and southwestern Ordos uplift at the average rates of 2 and 1 mm/a, respectively. To the southeastern margin of the Ordos block, the Weihe and southern Shanxi grabens are subsiding at the rates of 4-6 mm/a. The subsidence of the Shanxi graben indicates that the graben is experiencing extensional movement on a long timescale. To the northwestern margin of the Ordos block, the Hetao and Yinchuan rifts are subsiding at the rates of 2-3 mm/a. A 2-D buried faulting model is used to infer the normal or reverse dip-slip rates. Our solution shows that most of the normal slip rates along the faults in the grabens and rifts are ~2 mm/a.

  1. Present-Day Crustal Vertical Motion Around the Ordos Block Constrained by Precise Leveling and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Qingliang; Cui, Duxin; Liu, Liwei; Zhou, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Precise leveling data observed in the period of 1970-2014 around the Ordos block were collected and processed to estimate present-day crustal vertical movement. Vertical rates of 6 GPS sites were employed as a priori constraints to define the reference frame. The velocity field shows that the interior of the Ordos block moves upward at a rate of 3 mm/a as a stable block. With respect to the central Ordos, the grabens and rifts around the Ordos block are undergoing subsidence, while the northeastern and southwestern Ordos uplift at the average rates of 2 and 1 mm/a, respectively. To the southeastern margin of the Ordos block, the Weihe and southern Shanxi grabens are subsiding at the rates of 4-6 mm/a. The subsidence of the Shanxi graben indicates that the graben is experiencing extensional movement on a long timescale. To the northwestern margin of the Ordos block, the Hetao and Yinchuan rifts are subsiding at the rates of 2-3 mm/a. A 2-D buried faulting model is used to infer the normal or reverse dip-slip rates. Our solution shows that most of the normal slip rates along the faults in the grabens and rifts are ~2 mm/a.

  2. Present-Day Genetic Structure of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) in Icelandic Rivers and Ice-Cap Retreat Models

    PubMed Central

    Olafsson, Kristinn; Pampoulie, Christophe; Hjorleifsdottir, Sigridur; Gudjonsson, Sigurdur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O.

    2014-01-01

    Due to an improved understanding of past climatological conditions, it has now become possible to study the potential concordance between former climatological models and present-day genetic structure. Genetic variability was assessed in 26 samples from different rivers of Atlantic salmon in Iceland (total of 2,352 individuals), using 15 microsatellite loci. F-statistics revealed significant differences between the majority of the populations that were sampled. Bayesian cluster analyses using both prior information and no prior information on sampling location revealed the presence of two distinguishable genetic pools - namely, the Northern (Group 1) and Southern (Group 2) regions of Iceland. Furthermore, the random permutation of different allele sizes among allelic states revealed a significant mutational component to the genetic differentiation at four microsatellite loci (SsaD144, Ssa171, SSsp2201 and SsaF3), and supported the proposition of a historical origin behind the observed variation. The estimated time of divergence, using two different ABC methods, suggested that the observed genetic pattern originated from between the Last Glacial Maximum to the Younger Dryas, which serves as additional evidence of the relative immaturity of Icelandic fish populations, on account of the re-colonisation of this young environment following the Last Glacial Maximum. Additional analyses suggested the presence of several genetic entities which were likely to originate from the original groups detected. PMID:24498283

  3. Present-day deformation in NE Iran and the South Caspian constraint by Global Positioning System measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Z.; Walpersdorf, A.; Walker, R. T.; Tavakoli, F.; Pathier, E.; Nankali, H.; Nilfouroushan, F.; Aghamohammadi, A.; Djamour, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The continental collision between Arabia, the Eurasia and distribution of earthquake epicenters show that most of the deformation is accommodated within the political borders of Iran. In recent years, constraints from GPS, seismology and geological estimates of fault slip-rate have allowed considerable advances in understanding the rates and kinematics of faulting across many parts of Iran. However, until now, only little is known on the present-day distribution of strain across the eastern and northeastern parts of the country, such that it has been difficult to assess the rates of faulting, the related earthquake hazard, and the relationship between the active faults and the overall tectonic motions. This area is one of the most densely populated regions of Iran with almost 6.5 million habitants and a significant number of historical earthquakes like the Qumis 856 A.D earthquake with 200.000 victims. But while eastern Alborz and Kopeh Dagh are clearly regions of active faulting, a lack of instrumental earthquakes is presently observed, making this area particularly interesting for hazard assessment studies. The sparse GPS measurements in NE Iran provide only limited constraints on the applicability of different kinematic scenarios that have been proposed to explain the role of the observed faults. Here, we present a velocity field, composed from 47 GPS stations (20 campaign and 27 permanent), recording over up to 11 years, and covering the entire NE of Iran. This new GPS velocity field helps to investigate how northward directed Arabia-Eurasia shortening is accommodated at the northern boundary of the deforming zone. A regional deformation field for NE Iran has been estimated from the GPS measurements. It shows how the incoming ~7 mm/yr of NS shortening between Central Iran and Eurasia is accommodated in Alborz, Binalud and Kopeh Dagh. The shortening rate decreases toward the east and dies out at the Afghanistan border. The deformation pattern is contrasted along

  4. Spatial distribution of precipitation annual cycles over South Africa in 10 CORDEX regional climate model present-day simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, Alice; Philippon, Nathalie; Pohl, Benjamin; Kalognomou, Evangelia-Anna; Lennard, Christopher; Hewitson, Bruce; Nikulin, Grigori; Dosio, Alessandro; Panitz, Hans-Juergen; Cerezo-Mota, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the ability of 10 regional climate models (RCMs) participating in the COordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment-Africa to reproduce the present-day spatial distribution of annual cycles of precipitation over the South African region and its borders. As found in previous studies, annual mean precipitation is quasi-systematically overestimated by the RCMs over a large part of southern Africa south of about 20°S and more strongly over South Africa. The spatial analysis of precipitation over the studied region shows that in most models the distribution of biases appears to be linked to orography. Wet biases are quasi-systematic in regions with higher elevation with inversely neutral to dry biases particularly in the coastal fringes. This spatial pattern of biases is particularly obvious during summer and specifically at the beginning of the rainy season (November and December) when the wet biases are found to be the strongest across all models. Applying a k-means algorithm, a classification of annual cycles is performed using observed precipitation data, and is compared with those derived from modeled data. It is found that the in-homogeneity of the spatial and temporal distribution of biases tends to impact the modeled seasonality of precipitation. Generally, the pattern of rainfall seasonality in the ensemble mean of the 10 RCMs tends to be shifted to the southwest. This spatial shift is mainly linked to a strong overestimation of convective precipitation at the beginning of the rainy season over the plateau inducing an early annual peak and to an underestimation of stratiform rainfall in winter and spring over southwestern South Africa.

  5. Impact of the Yakutat indentor corner on present-day tectonics and fault activity in SE Alaska - SW Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotti, S.; Marechal, A.; Ritz, J. F.; Ferry, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present an active tectonic model of the SE Alaska - SW Yukon region based principally on the integration of recent GPS velocity data and new fault-slip rates derived from geomorphology. In this region, the Yakutat collision results in complex tectonics with patterns of strain localization and strain partitioning that strongly vary across the various mountain ranges and active faults. We propose that deformation and fault activity in the St. Elias and Chugach Mountains are primarily controlled by the eastern syntaxis of the Yakutat collision, which produces a semi-radial tectonic pattern: Velocities, principal horizontal shortening rates, and maximum horizontal stress orientations rotate by 60 - 80 ° around the syntaxis, from roughly parallel to the relative Pacific - North America motion at the front of the collision to roughly orthogonal southeast of the syntaxis. The interaction between this strain pattern and major inherited tectonic structures inland of the collision zone (i.e., Denali and Duke River Faults) results in various reactivation modes of these structures. Specifically, the Denali Fault shows a very pronounced lateral variations of activity from ~12 mm/a of dextral slip rate in its central section to ~1 mm/a of mostly shortening slip rate along its southern section. This marked change of activity is associated with a possible relay system where the Duke River and Totschunda Faults accommodate a major part (8 - 12 mm/a) of the inland strain transfer directly in front of the syntaxis. This new tectonic model retains some questions, in particular regarding the mechanisms of deformation and strain transfer (1) from the syntaxis to the Duke River - Totschunda system and (2) at the junction between Totschunda and Denali Faults. Numerical models of present-day deformation may help address these issues and provide information about relative strength of the various crustal and inherited fault elements of this system.

  6. Life detection at a Mars analogue site of present-day serpentinization in the Tablelands Ophiolite of Newfoundland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, P. L.; Szponar, N.; Brazelton, W. J.; Woodruff, Q.; Schrenk, M. O.; Bower, D. M.; Steele, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Tableland Ophiolite was created during the collision of Laurentia and Gondwana continents ca. 470 million years ago. Ultramafic mantle rocks, from the ancient sea bed that once separated these continents, were thrusted westward onto the old continental margin, which is now Western Newfoundland. Weathering due to recent glaciations has left large areas of ultramafic rock at the surface and created fissures for fluid flow. As a result serpentinization is occurring as fresh water penetrates the unaltered ultramafic rock. Serpentinization is of particular interest because, through hydration of ultramafic rock, this reaction produces H2 and the reducing conditions necessary for abiogenic hydrocarbon synthesis, while also producing conditions amenable for chemolithotrophic life. Therefore sites of active serpentinization can be the source of either abiogenic or biogenic organics, or both. Serpentinization is a suspected (past or present) source of (detected or putative) hydrocarbons on Mars, Titan and Europa, hence these astrobodies may be potentially habitable or once habitable environments. The Tablelands Ophiolite is an analogue site that is ideal for testing methods of life detection in an extreme environment of high pH and low microbial biomass characteristic of sites of serpentinization. Multiple ultrabasic reducing springs characteristic of present-day serpentinization have been identified and characterized based on their geochemistry and microbiology. Field-based instruments were deployed for the detection of microbial activity (ATP), microbial cell wall material, and mineralogy, in yet untested high pH and low biomass environment. In this talk I will give an overview of the in situ measurements of life detection and put these measurements in context of geochemistry, microbiology, carbon source and reaction pathways, and I will discuss what we have learned that will help us plan for future mission measurements.

  7. Arsenic present in the soil-vine-wine chain in vineyards situated in an old mining area in Trentino, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Daniela; Villegas, Tomás Román; Larcher, Roberto; Santato, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgio

    2013-04-01

    The present study follows arsenic (As) transfer through the chain of soil-vine-leaves-grapes-wine to assess the possible risk of arsenic intake related to consuming grapes and wines produced in 10 vineyards located in a mining area rich in this element. The results are compared with date from 18 uncontaminated areas. In the soil, the content of As extracted with acqua regia and that extracted with ammonium acetate, were analyzed. Leaves and berries were analyzed after washing with acidified aqueous solution and acid mineralization in a closed vessel, whereas wines were simply diluted before analysis. All analyses were performed using an inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometer. The aqua regia extractable As concentration in soil ranged from 3.7 to 283 mg/kg, whereas available As varied from 18 to 639 µg/kg, and As total concentration ranged from 16.3 to 579 µg/kg dry weight in leaves and from <0.1 to 36.8 µg/kg dry weight in grapes. Arsenic levels in wines were always below 1.62 µg/L, with higher concentration in red wines than in white wines. Significant and positive correlations between the As concentrations in soils, leaves, and berries are highlighted, with the samples collected near the mining area having significantly higher values. Nevertheless, As levels in wines were always well below the limit (200 µg/L) suggested by the International Organization of Vine and Wine. PMID:23322473

  8. The Herschel view of the dominant mode of galaxy growth from z = 4 to the present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, C.; Pannella, M.; Elbaz, D.; Béthermin, M.; Inami, H.; Dickinson, M.; Magnelli, B.; Wang, T.; Aussel, H.; Daddi, E.; Juneau, S.; Shu, X.; Sargent, M. T.; Buat, V.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giavalisco, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Magdis, G.; Morrison, G. E.; Papovich, C.; Santini, P.; Scott, D.

    2015-03-01

    our findings on the cosmic SFR history and on the origin of present-day stars: more than two-thirds of present-day stars must have formed in a regime dominated by the "main sequence" mode. As a consequence we conclude that, although omnipresent in the distant Universe, galaxy mergers had little impact in shaping the global star formation history over the last 12.5 billion years. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Modelling the contributions to marine acidification from deposited SOx, NOx, and NHx in the Baltic Sea: Past and present situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omstedt, Anders; Edman, Moa; Claremar, Björn; Rutgersson, Anna

    2015-12-01

    We have examined the effects of historical atmospheric depositions of sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium from land and shipping on the acid-base balance in the Baltic Sea. The modelling considers the 1750-2014 period, when land and ship emissions changed greatly, with increasing carbon dioxide concentrations, SOx, NOx, and NHx emissions, and nutrient loads. The present results indicate that Baltic Sea acidification due to the atmospheric deposition of acids peaked around 1980, with a pH cumulative decrease of approximately 10-2 in surface waters. This is one order of magnitude less than the cumulative acidification due to increased atmospheric CO2. The acidification contribution of shipping is one order of magnitude less than that of land emissions. However, the pH trend due to atmospheric acids has started to reverse due to reduced land emissions, though the effect of shipping is ongoing. The effect of strong atmospheric acids on Baltic Sea water depends on the region and period studied. The largest total alkalinity sink per surface area is in the south-western Baltic Sea where shipping is intense. Considering the entire Baltic Sea over the 2001-2010 period, the pH changes are approximately -3×10-3 to -11×10-3 and -4×10-4 to -16×10-4 pH units attributable to all emissions and ship emissions only, respectively. The corresponding changes in total alkalinity are approximately -10 to -30 μmol kg-1 and -1 to -4 μmol kg-1 attributable to all emissions and ship emissions only, respectively.

  10. Modelling the economic losses of historic and present-day high-impact winter storms in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welker, Christoph; Stucki, Peter; Bresch, David; Dierer, Silke; Martius, Olivia; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Severe winter storms such as "Vivian" in February 1990 and "Lothar" in December 1999 are among the most destructive meteorological hazards in Switzerland. Disaster severity resulting from such windstorms is attributable, on the one hand, to hazardous weather conditions such as high wind gust speeds; and on the other hand to socio-economic factors such as population density, distribution of values at risk, and damage susceptibility. For present-day winter storms, the data basis is generally good to describe the meteorological development and wind forces as well as the associated socio-economic impacts. In contrast, the information on historic windstorms is overall sparse and the available historic weather and loss reports mostly do not provide quantitative information. This study illustrates a promising technique to simulate the economic impacts of both historic and present winter storms in Switzerland since end of the 19th century. Our approach makes use of the novel Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR) spanning 1871-present. The 2-degree spatial resolution of the global 20CR dataset is relatively coarse. Thus, the complex orography of Switzerland is not realistically represented, which has considerable ramifications for the representation of wind systems that are strongly influenced by the local orography, such as Föhn winds. Therefore, a dynamical downscaling of the 20CR to 3 km resolution using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was performed, for in total 40 high-impact winter storms in Switzerland since 1871. Based on the downscaled wind gust speeds and the climada loss model, the estimated economic losses were calculated at municipality level for current economic and social conditions. With this approach, we find an answer to the question what would be the economic losses of e.g. a hazardous Föhn storm - which occurred in northern Switzerland in February 1925 - today, i.e. under current socio-economic conditions. Encouragingly, the pattern of

  11. Impact of urban emission on air-quality over central Europe: present day and future emissions perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huszar, Peter; Belda, Michal; Halenka, Tomas; Karlicky, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to quantify the impact of present-day and future urban emission from central European cities on the regional air-quality (AQ), based on a modeling couple of the regional climate model RegCM4.2 and the chemistry transport model CAMx, including two-way interactions. A series of simulations was carried out for the present (2001-2010) decade and two future decades (2026-2035 and 2046-2055) either with all urban emissions included (base case) or without considering urban emissions. As we are interested on the impact of emission changes only, the impact of different driving meteorological conditions in the future (due to climate change) are not considered. The emissions used is the TNO MEGAPOLI European emission database that includes country/sector based scenarios for years 2030 and 2050, which were used for the encompassing decades. Further, the sensitivity of ozone production to urban emissions was examined by performing reduction experiments with -20% emission perturbation of NOx and/or NMVOC. The model was also validated using surface measurements of key pollutants. Selected air-quality measures were used as metrics describing the cities emission impact on regional air pollution. Due to urban emissions, significant ozone titration occurs over cities while over rural areas further from, ozone production is modeled, mainly in terms of number of exceedances and accumulated exceedances over the threshold of 40 ppbv. Urban NOx, SO2 and PM2.5 emissions also significantly contribute to concentrations in the cities themselves (up to 50-70% for NOx and SO2 , and up to 55% for PM2.5), but the contribution is large over rural areas as well (10-20%). Although air pollution over cities is largely determined by the local urban emissions, considerable (often a few tens of %) fraction of the concentration is attributable to other sources from rural areas and minor cities. The future urban emission AQ fingerprint is, in general, slightly smaller than in

  12. The Secrets of the Nearest Starburst Cluster. II. The Present-Day Mass Function in NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolte, Andrea; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandl, Bernhard; Zinnecker, Hans

    2006-07-01

    Based on deep Very Large Telescope Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera JHK photometry, we have derived the present-day mass function (MF) of the central starburst cluster NGC 3603 YC (Young Cluster) in the giant H II region NGC 3603. The effects of field contamination, individual reddening, and a possible binary contribution are investigated. The MF slopes resulting from the different methods are compared and lead to a surprisingly consistent cluster MF with a slope of Γ=-0.9+/-0.15. Analyzing different radial annuli around the cluster core, no significant change in the slope of the MF is observed. However, mass segregation in the cluster is evidenced by the increasing depletion of the high-mass tail of the stellar mass distribution with increasing radius. We discuss the indications of mass segregation with respect to the changes observed in the binned and cumulative stellar MFs and argue that the cumulative function, as well as the fraction of high- to low-mass stars, provides better indicators for mass segregation than the MF slope alone. Finally, the observed MF and starburst morphology of NGC 3603 YC are discussed in the context of massive local star-forming regions such as the Galactic center Arches cluster, R136/30 Dor in the LMC, and the Orion Trapezium cluster, all providing resolved templates for extragalactic star formation. Despite the similarity in the observed MF slopes, dynamical considerations suggest that the starburst clusters do not form gravitationally bound systems over a Hubble time. Both the environment (gravitational potential of the Milky Way) and the concentration of stars in the cluster core determine the dynamical stability of a dense star cluster, such that the long-term evolution of a starburst is not exclusively determined by the stellar evolution of its members, as frequently assumed for globular cluster systems. Based on observations obtained at the ESO Very Large Telescope on Paranal, Chile, under programs 63.I-0015 and 65.I

  13. Lyman Alpha-emitting Galaxies at z = 2.1: Characterizing the Progenitors of Typical Present-day Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawiser, Eric J.; Guaita, L.; Padilla, N.; Francke, H.; Bond, N. A.; Gronwall, C.; Ciardullo, R.; Sinawa, S.; Feldmeier, J. J.; MUSYC Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    We discovered a sample of 261 Lyman alpha emitting (LAE) galaxies at z=2.1 in an ultra-deep 3727A narrow-band MUSYC image of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. LAEs were selected to have rest-frame equivalent widths >20A and emission line fluxes >3.7x10-17 ergs/cm2/s, corresponding to L_Lya>1.2x1042 ergs/s. 3% of the original candidates were detected in X-rays by Chandra, and 7% were detected in the rest-frame far-UV by GALEX; these objects were eliminated to minimize contamination by AGN and low-redshift galaxies. Our sample has median rest-frame EW=40A, and only a few galaxies have rest-frame EW bigger than 200A. Our results show that the luminosity function of LAEs at z=2.1 is consistent with that of LAEs at z=3.1 but with number density a factor of 1.8+-0.3 higher. We used the rest frame UV luminosity to estimate a median star formation rate of 4 Msun/yr. Clustering analysis reveals that LAEs at z=2.1 have r0=3+-0.5 Mpc, corresponding to b=1.0+-0.2, the lowest clustering bias of any high-redshift galaxy population. This implies that z=2.1 LAEs reside in dark matter halos with masses 1010 Msun, which are the lowest-mass halos yet probed at this redshift. We used the Sheth-Tormen conditional mass function to study the descendants of these LAEs and found that their typical present-day descendants are local galaxies with sub-L* and L* luminosities, like the Milky Way. We gratefully acknowledge grant support for this research from NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  14. Changing black carbon transport to the Arctic from present day to the end of 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Chaoyi; Flanner, Mark G.

    2016-05-01

    Here we explore how climate warming under the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) impacts Arctic aerosol distributions via changes in atmospheric transport and removal processes. We modify the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model to track distributions and fluxes of 200 black carbon-like tracers emitted from different locations, and we conduct idealized experiments with and without active aerosol deposition. Changing wind patterns, studied in isolation, cause the Arctic burdens of tracers emitted from East Asia and West Europe during winter to increase about 20% by the end of the century while decreasing the Arctic burdens of North American emissions by about 30%. These changes are caused by an altered winter polar dome structure that results from Arctic amplification and inhomogeneous sea ice loss and surface warming, both of which are enhanced in the Chukchi Sea region. The resulting geostrophic wind favors Arctic transport of East Asian emissions while inhibiting poleward transport of North American emissions. When active deposition is also considered, however, Arctic burdens of emissions from northern midlatitudes show near-universal decline. This is a consequence of increased precipitation and wet removal, particularly within the Arctic, leading to decreased Arctic residence time. Simulations with present-day emissions of black carbon indicate a 13.6% reduction in the Arctic annual mean burden by the end of the 21st century, due to warming-induced transport and deposition changes, while simulations with changing climate and emissions under RCP8.5 show a 61.0% reduction.

  15. Present-day crustal deformation along the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault System in Tierra del Fuego from repeated GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, L.; Perdomo, R.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Del Cogliano, D.; Fritsche, M.; Richter, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2011-03-01

    The present-day deformation of the earth crust in the Argentine part of Tierra del Fuego main island (southernmost South America) is here investigated based on repeated geodetic GPS observations. The island is traversed by the active transform boundary between the South American and Scotia tectonic plates, represented by the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system. Since 1993 a regional network comprising to date 29 GPS sites has been observed almost every year. The complete set of accumulated observations was processed using the Bernese GPS software and state-of-the-art processing strategies and models. The utilization of homogeneous GPS products resulting from a reprocessing of the global IGS network warrants a stable realization of a global reference frame. For each GPS site 3-D positions and linear velocities with error estimates were obtained. A strain analysis of the horizontal velocity components revealed the zones of major deformation activity. A 30-km-wide deformation belt centred on the main trace of the fault system was identified. This belt is bordered to the north (South America) and south (Scotia) by geodynamically stable zones, which move horizontally with a relative average velocity of 4.4 ± 0.6 (east) and -0.3 ± 0.4 (north) mm a-1. Within the deformation belt a maximum strain rate in the order of 0.25 μstrain per year has been detected. A pronounced change in the deformation style from transtension (east) to transpression (west) is observed. The area of predominating shortening of the crust coincides with a local rotation minimum and relative uplift. Throughout the period covered by the GPS observations the displacements and deformations occurred to be linear with time.

  16. Historical and Present Day Mercury Contamination From Gold Mining in Three Feeding Guilds of Bats From the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Divoll, T.

    2014-12-01

    Miners in many countries use mercury as an amalgam to separate gold from river sediments. In the last twenty years the price of gold has risen and the number of small-scale, artisanal gold mining operations in the Amazon basin have also increased. The influx of mercury into natural river systems has detrimental consequences for the surrounding ecosystem and for organisms, particularly those at higher trophic levels. Toxic mercury levels have been shown to impair reproductive, neurological and behavioral functioning of organisms. I used bats (Chiroptera) as a mammalian model system to study mercury contamination and accumulation due to gold mining from field caught and museum collection specimens in Amazonian Perú and showed that: (1) Total mercury concentrations in Amazonian bat species have increased over time since the 1920's; (2) Bat species from sites with current active mining have higher concentrations of mercury than non-mining sites, with some species having levels exceeding those considered toxic for mammals; (3) Higher trophic levels of bats (piscivores and insectivores) bioaccumulate more mercury than bats of lower trophic levels (frugivores); (4) Bats located in present day uncontaminated sites have the same mercury levels as bats collected in the 1920's from the Amazon basin. The variety of bat feeding guilds allowed for a comparison of how mercury accumulation is affected by diet within one taxonomic order. The novel use of museum specimens allowed for a look back into the historical timeline of mercury contamination in the Amazon basin. Bats represent a new and exciting study system since, like humans, they are mammals and should therefore show similar neurochemical and behavioral responses to this toxic element.

  17. Multivariate spatio-temporal modelling for assessing Antarctica's present-day contribution to sea-level rise

    PubMed Central

    Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Rougier, Jonathan; Schön, Nana; Lindgren, Finn; Bamber, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Antarctica is the world's largest fresh-water reservoir, with the potential to raise sea levels by about 60 m. An ice sheet contributes to sea-level rise (SLR) when its rate of ice discharge and/or surface melting exceeds accumulation through snowfall. Constraining the contribution of the ice sheets to present-day SLR is vital both for coastal development and planning, and climate projections. Information on various ice sheet processes is available from several remote sensing data sets, as well as in situ data such as global positioning system data. These data have differing coverage, spatial support, temporal sampling and sensing characteristics, and thus, it is advantageous to combine them all in a single framework for estimation of the SLR contribution and the assessment of processes controlling mass exchange with the ocean. In this paper, we predict the rate of height change due to salient geophysical processes in Antarctica and use these to provide estimates of SLR contribution with associated uncertainties. We employ a multivariate spatio-temporal model, approximated as a Gaussian Markov random field, to take advantage of differing spatio-temporal properties of the processes to separate the causes of the observed change. The process parameters are estimated from geophysical models, while the remaining parameters are estimated using a Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme, designed to operate in a high-performance computing environment across multiple nodes. We validate our methods against a separate data set and compare the results to those from studies that invariably employ numerical model outputs directly. We conclude that it is possible, and insightful, to assess Antarctica's contribution without explicit use of numerical models. Further, the results obtained here can be used to test the geophysical numerical models for which in situ data are hard to obtain. © 2015 The Authors. Environmetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25937792

  18. Mantle-circulation models with sequential data assimilation: inferring present-day mantle structure from plate-motion histories.

    PubMed

    Bunge, Hans-Peter; Richards, M A; Baumgardner, J R

    2002-11-15

    limited in age to the Cretaceous. This result implies that sequential assimilation of past plate-motion models is ineffective in studying the temporal evolution of core-mantle-boundary heterogeneity, and that a method for extrapolating present-day information backwards in time is required. For short time periods (of the order of perhaps a few tens of Myr) such a method exists in the form of crude 'backward' convection calculations. For longer time periods (of the order of a mantle overturn), a rigorous approach to extrapolating information back in time exists in the form of iterative nonlinear optimization methods that carry assimilated information into the past through the use of an adjoint mantle convection model. PMID:12460480

  19. High natural erosion rates are the backdrop for present-day soil erosion in the agricultural Middle Hills of Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A. J.; Arnold, M.; AumaItre, G.; Bourles, D. L.; Keddadouche, K.; Bickle, M.; Ojha, T.

    2015-07-01

    Although agriculturally accelerated soil erosion is implicated in the unsustainable environmental degradation of mountain environments, such as in the Himalaya, the effects of land use can be challenging to quantify in many mountain settings because of the high and variable natural background rates of erosion. In this study, we present new long-term denudation rates, derived from cosmogenic 10Be analysis of quartz in river sediment from the Likhu Khola, a small agricultural river basin in the Middle Hills of central Nepal. Calculated long-term denudation rates, which reflect background natural erosion processes over 1000+ years prior to agricultural intensification, are similar to present-day sediment yields and to soil loss rates from terraces that are well maintained. Similarity in short- and long-term catchment-wide erosion rates for the Likhu is consistent with data from elsewhere in the Nepal Middle Hills but contrasts with the very large increases in short-term erosion rates seen in agricultural catchments in other steep mountain settings. Our results suggest that the large sediment fluxes exported from the Likhu and other Middle Hills rivers in the Himalaya are derived in large part from natural processes, rather than from soil erosion as a result of agricultural activity. Catchment-scale erosional fluxes may be similar over short and long timescales if both are dominated by mass wasting sources such as gullies, landslides, and debris flows (e.g., as is evident in the landslide-dominated Khudi Khola of the Nepal High Himalaya, based on compiled data). As a consequence, simple comparison of catchment-scale fluxes will not necessarily pinpoint land use effects on soils where these are only a small part of the total erosion budget, unless rates of mass wasting are also considered. Estimates of the mass wasting contribution to erosion in the Likhu imply catchment-averaged soil production rates on the order of ~ 0.25-0.35 mm yr-1, though rates of mass wasting are

  20. Dusty wind of W Hydrae. Multi-wavelength modelling of the present-day and recent mass loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouri, T.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; de Koter, A.; Decin, L.; Min, M.; de Vries, B. L.; Lombaert, R.; Cox, N. L. J.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Low- and intermediate-mass stars go through a period of intense mass-loss at the end of their lives, during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. While on the AGB a significant part, or even most, of their initial mass is expelled in a stellar wind. This process controls the final stages of the evolution of these stars and contributes to the chemical evolution of galaxies. However, the wind-driving mechanism of AGB stars is not yet well understood, especially so for oxygen-rich sources. Characterizing both the present-day mass-loss rate and wind structure and the evolution of the mass-loss rate of such stars is paramount to advancing our understanding of this processes. Aims: We study the dusty wind of the oxygen-rich AGB star W Hya to understand its composition and structure and shed light on the mass-loss mechanism. Methods: We modelled the dust envelope of W Hya using an advanced radiative transfer code. We analysed our dust model in the light of a previously calculated gas-phase wind model and compared it with measurements available in the literature, such as infrared spectra, infrared images, and optical scattered light fractions. Results: We find that the dust spectrum of W Hya can partly be explained by a gravitationally bound dust shell that probably is responsible for most of the amorphous Al2O3 emission. The composition of the large (~0.3 μm) grains needed to explain the scattered light cannot be constrained, but probably is dominated by silicates. Silicate emission in the thermal infrared was found to originate from beyond 40 AU from the star. In our model, the silicates need to have substantial near-infrared opacities to be visible at such large distances. The increase in near-infrared opacity of the dust at these distances roughly coincides with a sudden increase in expansion velocity as deduced from the gas-phase CO lines. The dust envelope of W Hya probably contains an important amount of calcium but we were not able to obtain a dust

  1. Investigating the Present Day Cosmic Dust Flux at the Earth's Surface: Initial Results from the Kwajalein Micrometeorite Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Price, M. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D. E.; Russell, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Examination of impact craters on the Long Duration Exposure Facility satellite indicate a present day micrometeoroid flux of approx. 30,000 tonnes [1 after 2]. But what portion of this material arrives at the Earth's surface as micrometeorites? Studies of available micrometeorite collections from deep sea sediments [e.g. 3], Greenland blue ice [e.g. 4] and the South Pole water well [e.g. 1] may be complicated by terrestrial weathering and, in some cases, collection bias (magnetic separation for deep sea sediments) and poorly constrained ages. We have recently set up a micrometeorite collection station on Kwajalein Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean, using high volume air samplers to collect particles directly from the atmosphere. By collecting in this way, the terrestrial age of the particles is known, the weathering they experience is minimal, and we are able to constrain particle arrival times. Collecting at this location also exploits the considerably reduced anthropogenic background [5]. Method: High volume air samplers were installed on top of the two-story airport building on Kwajalein. These were fitted with polycarbonate membrane filters with 5µm diameter perforations. The flow rates were set to 0.5m3/min, and filters were changed once a week. After collection, filters were washed to remove salt and concentrate particles [see 5] in preparation for analysis by SEM. Results and Discussion: A selection of filters have been prepared and surveyed. Due to their ease of identification our initial investigations have focused on particles resembling cosmic spherules. The spheres can be divided into three main groups: 1. Silicate spherules rich in Al, Ca, K and Na (to varying degrees), 2. Silicate spherules rich in Mg and Fe and 3. Fe-rich spherules. Group 1 spherules are often vesiculated and can occur as aggregates. They are similar in appearance and composition to volcanic microspheres [e.g. 6] and are thus likely terrestrial in

  2. Present-day vertical displacements in the north-western Alps and southern Jura Mountains: Data from leveling comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouanne, F.; MéNard, G.; Darmendrail, X.

    1995-06-01

    Two high-precision leveling networks were successively surveyed in France, the NGF, measured during the 1886-1907 period, and the IGN69, measured from 1965 to 1979. The accuracy of these levelings (standard deviation of 1.8mm/√km to 3.8mm/√km) allows us to compute the vertical displacements of the benchmarks between two different eras. The results indicate the occurrence of discrete zones of uplift and subsidence: (1) a regional uplift (up to 1.4 mm/yr) of the Subalpine Massifs; (2) an important uplift of the internal Jura (up to 2 mm/yr); (3) a relative subsidence of the southern part of the Jura (0.8 mm/yr); and (4) a relative subsidence of the Bresse Basin with respect to the external Jura. Comparing the spatial distribution of zones of uplift and their respective vertical displacement rates with a regional structural cross section leads to the conclusion that present-day uplift of the Belledonne and Bornes Massifs and of the internal parts of the Jura Mountains, can be explained by crustal shortening along a major basement-involving thrust fault. This fault ramps up under the Bornes Massif from a depth of 12 km to 7 km, turns into a flat under the Molasse Basin, ramps up to the top of the basement at the north-eastern margin of the internal Jura Mountains, and reaches the surface in the external Jura. The Salève ramp-anticline is carried by a bifurcation of this thrust. Horizontal displacement rates of 6 mm/yr at the Bornes ramp, 2 mm/yr at the Salève ramp, and 4 mm/yr at the internal Jura ramp have been determined by inversion of profiles of uplift rates. Whether this basement-involving thrust fault was already active during the Miocene main folding phase of the Jura Mountains or whether it was activated only during Pliocene-Pleistocene times is subject to debate.

  3. PRESENT-DAY MASS FUNCTION OF SIX SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD INTERMEDIATE-AGE AND OLD STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Glatt, Katharina; Grebel, Eva K.; Jordi, Katrin; Gallagher, John S. III; Harbeck, Daniel; Da Costa, Gary; Clementini, Gisella; Tosi, Monica; Nota, Antonella; Sabbi, Elena; Sirianni, Marco

    2011-08-15

    We determined the present-day mass functions (PDMFs) of the five intermediate-age star clusters Lindsay 1, Kron 3, NGC 339, NGC 416, and Lindsay 38 and the old star cluster NGC 121 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The global PDMFs are well matched by Salpeter-like power laws from their main-sequence turnoffs to {approx}0.6 M{sub sun} with a power-law exponent {alpha} ranging from 1.51 {+-} 0.11 (Lindsay 1) to 2.29 {+-} 0.15 (NGC 339). We derive total stellar masses of {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, except for Lindsay 38, whose mass is of the order of {approx}10{sup 4} M{sub sun}. Differences between the PDMFs most likely reflect the varying stages of dynamical evolution of the clusters. These SMC clusters do not follow the {alpha} versus concentration parameter c correlation as found for Galactic globular clusters of similar mass. This might be an age effect or due to their location in a galaxy where bulge and disk crossings do not play a role. No correlation is found between {alpha} and the cluster core and tidal radii (r{sub c} and r{sub t} , respectively), the half-light radii r{sub h} , age, central surface brightness, metallicity, and galactocentric radius r{sub gc}. All six clusters mass-segregated to different degrees. The two clusters Lindsay 1 and Kron 3 barely show signs for mass segregation, but have low-mass star deficient global PDMFs and might be the remnants of star clusters whose outer parts were stripped. A trend exists between the degree of mass segregation and the ratio age/relaxation time t{sub r,h}, which indicates the stage of dynamical evolution for a cluster. Our data thus suggest that the SMC clusters in the present sample had a range of initial densities and presumably different amounts of mass loss that led to different rates of dynamical evolution. The clusters' positions in the r{sub h,m}/r{sub t} versus r{sub 0}/r{sub h,m} plane imply that all of the

  4. Paleontological records indicate the occurrence of open woodlands in a dry inland climate at the present-day Arctic coast in western Beringia during the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienast, Frank; Wetterich, Sebastian; Kuzmina, Svetlana; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Andreev, Andrei A.; Tarasov, Pavel; Nazarova, Larisa; Kossler, Annette; Frolova, Larisa; Kunitsky, Viktor V.

    2011-08-01

    Permafrost records, accessible at outcrops along the coast of Oyogos Yar at the Dmitry Laptev Strait, NE-Siberia, provide unique insights into the environmental history of Western Beringia during the Last Interglacial. The remains of terrestrial and freshwater organisms, including plants, coleopterans, chironomids, cladocerans, ostracods and molluscs, have been preserved in the frozen deposits of a shallow paleo-lake and indicate a boreal climate at the present-day arctic mainland coast during the Last Interglacial. Terrestrial beetle and plant remains suggest the former existence of open forest-tundra with larch ( Larix dahurica), tree alder ( Alnus incana), birch and alder shrubs ( Duschekia fruticosa, Betula fruticosa, Betula divaricata, Betula nana), interspersed with patches of steppe and meadows. Consequently, the tree line was shifted to at least 270 km north of its current position. Aquatic organisms, such as chironomids, cladocerans, ostracods, molluscs and hydrophytes, indicate the formation of a shallow lake as the result of thermokarst processes. Steppe plants and beetles suggest low net precipitation. Littoral pioneer plants and chironomids indicate intense lake level fluctuations due to high evaporation. Many of the organisms are thermophilous, indicating a mean air temperature of the warmest month that was greater than 13 °C, which is above the minimum requirements for tree growth. These temperatures are in contrast to the modern values of less than 4 °C in the study area. The terrestrial and freshwater organism remains were found at a coastal exposure that was only 3.5 m above sea level and in a position where they should have been under sea during the Last Interglacial when the global sea level was 6-10 m higher than the current levels. The results suggest that during the last warm stage, the site was inland, and its modern coastal situation is the result of tectonic subsidence.

  5. Effects of the past- and present-day ice melting on observed uplift rates in Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Larsen, C. F.; Miura, S.; Ohta, Y.; Fujimoto, H.; Sun, W.; Sugano, T.; Kaufman, A. M.; Motyka, R. J.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    A joint Japanese-US observation project called ISEA (International geodetic project in South-Eastern Alaska) was initiated in 2005 to follow up the work of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) by adding new geodetic data sets (Miura et al., 2007). Based on 91 improved GPS velocities and the proposed ice loss models by Larsen et al. (2004, 2005, 2007) and by Tushingham and Peltier (1991), we estimated three effects: present-day ice melting (PDIM), post-little ice age (LIA) melting, and deglaciation following the last glacier maximum (LGM). We also have reevaluated the thickness of lithosphere and the viscosities of the mantle including that of asthenosphere in the region. The effects of LGM deglaciation were computed based on the ICE3G model (Tushingham and Peltier, 1991). Although the effect of LGM ice is small in SE-AK (i.e. 2 mm/yr at the maximum), we have confirmed that, by comparing with the misfits obtained by correcting for only two effects of PDIM and LIA, correcting for the LGM effect can improve the chi^2 of misfits by about 0.5 %. We estimated the effect of post-LIA ice melting based on the melting history proposed by Larsen et al. (2004, 2005). For the viscoelastic structure, we have tested two different kinds of mantle viscosity structure: a two-layer model similar to the model used by Larsen et al. (2005) and a 4-layer model. To search the best combination of the lithosphere thickness and the mantle viscosities, the combinations of the rheological parameters tested here were 161 in total number. To test the sensitivity of the estimated rheological parameters to the elastic PDIM effects, we have compared two PDIM models; one is EPSL2005 model (Larsen et al., 2005) and the other is JGR2007 model (Larsen et al., 2007). Statistical examinations of the misfits between observations and model predictions, which were based on the magnitudes of the minimum chi^2 and the mean of residuals fitting to a Gaussian function, indicate that the JGR2007 model gives

  6. Intraseasonal Variability of the South Asian Summer Monsoon: Present-day Simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Model HIRHAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanf, F. S.; Rinke, A.; Dethloff, K.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1950, observations show a robust negative trend of the seasonal rainfall associated with the South Asian summer monsoon over India coinciding with a continuous decrease in surface solar radiation ("dimming") over South Asia due to an increase of local aerosol emissions. On the intraseasonal timescale the summer monsoon fluctuates between periods of enhanced and reduced rainfall. The frequency of occurrence of these active and breaks monsoon phases affects directly the seasonal monsoon rainfall. This study investigates the regional pattern and changes of the South Asian monsoon for the period 1979-2012 using the regional atmospheric model HIRHAM5 with a horizontal resolution of 0.25° forced at the lateral and lower boundaries with ERA-Interim reanalysis data. Despite the dry bias in the mean summer monsoon rainfall over the Indian landmass, the simulated temperature and atmospheric circulation patterns are in agreement with the ERA-Interim reanalysis indicating a realistic representation of important dynamical summer monsoon features. In addition, mechanisms which controls active and break phases within the summer monsoon season are analyzed using daily outgoing longwave radiation model data as an identification tool of monsoon breaks as proposed by Krishnan et al. (2000). Model results reveal an increasing trend of the cumulative monsoon break days of around 1.4 days per year during the last 30 years. The possible link between this increasing of cumulative monsoon break days and the observed decrease of seasonal South Asian monsoon rainfall will be the scope of further investigations.

  7. Comparison of Smoking, Drinking, and Marijuana Use between Students Present or Absent on the Day of a School-Based Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovet, Pascal; Viswanathan, Bharathi; Faeh, David; Warren, Wick

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this population-based survey was to compare the prevalence of selected risk behaviors between students present or absent on the day of a school-based survey. The study population was a representative sample of all students of secondary schools in the Seychelles (Indian Ocean). Students absent on the day of the survey were traced and…

  8. Using Television for Teaching a Second Language Through Dramatized Every Day Situations; An Assessment of Effects on Active Speech and On Understanding Dialogues Presented by Other Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidhar, Hava

    A series of experiments explored the use of television in Israel to teach English to Hebrew-Speaking students. The emphasis of the experiments was on assessing the ways in which television can be used to fulfill specific tasks in language instruction that are not easily fulfilled by the classroom teachers. Ninth graders were divided into two…

  9. Utilizing DNA analysis to combat the world wide plague of present day slavery – trafficking in persons

    PubMed Central

    Palmbach, Timothy; Blom, Jeffrey; Hoynes, Emily; Primorac, Dragan; Gaboury, Mario

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine if modern forensic DNA typing methods can be properly employed throughout the world with a final goal of increasing arrests, prosecutions, and convictions of perpetrators of modern day trafficking in persons while concurrently reducing the burden of victim testimony in legal proceedings. Without interruption of investigations, collection of samples containing DNA was conducted in a variety of settings. Evidentiary samples were analyzed on the ANDE Rapid DNA system. Many of the collected swabs yielded informative short tandem repeat profiles with Rapid DNA technology. PMID:24577820

  10. A Lagrangian analysis of the present-day sources of moisture for major ice-core sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumond, Anita; Taboada, Erica; Nieto, Raquel; Gimeno, Luis; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; López-Moreno, Juan Ignacio

    2016-07-01

    A Lagrangian approach was used to identify the moisture sources for 14 ice-core sites located worldwide for the period of 1980-2012. The sites were classified into three domains: Arctic, Central (Andes, Alps, and Kilimanjaro), and Antarctic. The approach was used to compute budgets of evaporation minus precipitation by calculating changes in the specific humidity along 10-day backward trajectories. The results indicate that the oceanic regions around the subtropical high-pressure centres provide most of moisture, and their contribution varies throughout the year following the annual cycles of the centres. For the Arctic Domain, the sources lie in the subtropical North Atlantic and Pacific. The subtropical South Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans provide moisture for the Antarctic Domain. The sources for South America are the Atlantic and South Pacific, for Europe the sources are in the Mediterranean and the North Atlantic, and for Asia the sources are the Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea.