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Sample records for pressure annular two-phase

  1. Effect of Pressure with Wall Heating in Annular Two-Phase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kumar; T.A. Trabold

    2000-10-31

    The local distributions of void fraction, interfacial frequency and velocity have been measured in annular flow of R-134a through a wall-heated, high aspect ratio duct. High aspect ratio ducts provide superior optical access to tubes or irregular geometries. This work expands upon earlier experiments conducted with adiabatic flows in the same test section. Use of thin, transparent heater films on quartz windows provided sufficient electrical power capacity to produce the full range of two-phase conditions of interest. With wall vapor generation, the system pressure was varied from 0.9 to 2.4 MPa, thus allowing the investigation of flows with liquid-to-vapor density ratios covering the range of about 7 to 27, far less than studied in air-water and similar systems. There is evidence that for a given cross-sectional average void fraction, the local phase distributions can be different depending on whether the vapor phase is generated at the wall, or upstream of the test section inlet. In wall-heated flows, local void fraction profiles measured across both the wide and narrow test section dimensions illustrate the profound effect that pressure has on the local flow structure; notably, increasing pressure appears to thin the wall-bounded liquid films and redistribute liquid toward the edges of the test section. This general trend is also manifested in the distributions of mean droplet diameter and interfacial area density, which are inferred from local measurements of void fraction, droplet frequency and velocity. At high pressure, the interfacial area density is increased due to the significant enhancement in droplet concentration.

  2. Droplet entrainment correlation for high pressure annular two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Betodano, M.A.; Jan, Cheng-Shiun; Beus, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    The amount of entrainment in annular flow is essential to predict the point of dryout. Most of the entrainment correlations available in the literature are obtained from air-water low pressure data. However many important industrial applications involve high pressure annular flows. There are very few correlations applicable in this range and they are solely based on empirical data fits. Comparing the low pressure entrainment data of Cousins and Hewitt (1968) and the high pressure data of Keeys et. al. (1970) and Wurtz (1978) with existing correlations, the agreement at high pressure is generally poor, except for the empirical correlation of Nigmatulin and Krushenok (1989) which depends on a Weber number that includes the droplet concentration. We propose a new semi-mechanistic entrainment correlation for fully developed annular flow conditions: E = (0.9642)/(1 + (3836/We{sub C})). It is developed based on the droplet continuity equation and the entrainment rate model of Dallman et. al. (1979). This model is then modified to introduce a Weber number that includes the droplet concentration, We{sub C}. This Weber number is shown to scale the available high and low pressure air-water and steam-water data better than the other definitions. Because the new correlation is based on a model of entrainment rate it may be used as a starting point in the development of a correlation for this process applicable to high pressure water-steam annular flows. A correlation is suggested pending validation with high pressure entrainment rate data. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  3. High pressure annular two-phase flow in a narrow duct. Part 1: Local measurements in the droplet field, and Part 2: Three-field modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Trabold, T.A.; Kumar, R.

    1999-07-01

    In Part 1, detailed measurements were made in a high pressure, adiabatic (boiled at the inlet) annular flow in a narrow, high aspect ratio duct using a gamma densitometer, hot-film anemometer and high-speed video photography. Measurements of void fraction, droplet frequency, velocity, drop size, and interfacial area concentration have been made to support the three field computational capability. An important aspect of this testing is the use of a modeling fluid (R-134a) in a vertical duct which permits visual access in annular flow. This modeling fluid accurately simulates the low liquid-to-vapor density ratio of steam-water flows at high pressures. These measurements have been taken in a narrow duct of hydraulic diameter 4.85 mm, and a cross-section aspect ratio of 22.5. However, the flow displays profiles of various shapes not only in the narrow dimension, but also in the width dimension. In particular, the shape of the droplet profiles depends on the entrained droplet flux from the edges in the vapor core. The average diameter from these profiles compare well with the models developed in the literature. Interfacial area concentration for these low density ratio flows is higher than the highest concentration reported for air-water flows. Video records show that along with the bow-shaped waves, three-dimensional {lambda}-shaped waves appear in annular flows for high flow rates. Part 2 outlines the development of a three-field modeling approach in annular flow and the predictive capability of an analysis code. Models have been developed here or adapted from the literature for the thin film near the wall as well as the droplets in the vapor core, and have been locally applied in a fully developed, two-phase adiabatic boiling annular flow in a duct heated at the inlet at high pressure. Numerical results have been obtained using these models that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. The two-dimensional predictions are compared with

  4. Two-phase flow instabilities in a vertical annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Babelli, I.; Nair, S.; Ishii, M.

    1995-09-01

    An experimental test facility was built to study two-phase flow instabilities in vertical annular channel with emphasis on downward flow under low pressure and low flow conditions. The specific geometry of the test section is similar to the fuel-target sub-channel of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Mark 22 fuel assembly. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was observed following flow excursion and flow reversal in the test section. Density wave instability was not recorded in this series of experimental runs. The results of this experimental study show that flow excursion is the dominant instability mode under low flow, low pressure, and down flow conditions. The onset of instability data are plotted on the subcooling-Zuber (phase change) numbers stability plane.

  5. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  6. Characterization of annular two-phase gas-liquid flows in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, W. Scott; Mcquillen, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A series of two-phase gas-liquid flow experiments were developed to study annular flows in microgravity using the NASA Lewis Learjet. A test section was built to measure the liquid film thickness around the perimeter of the tube permitting the three dimensional nature of the gas-liquid interface to be observed. A second test section was used to measure the film thickness, pressure drop and wall shear stress in annular microgravity two-phase flows. Three liquids were studied to determine the effects of liquid viscosity and surface tension. The result of this study provide insight into the wave characteristics, pressure drop and droplet entrainment in microgravity annular flows.

  7. Dynamics of face and annular seals with two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William F.; Basu, Prithwish; Beatty, Paul A.; Beeler, Richard M.; Lau, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study was made of face and annular seals under conditions where boiling, i.e., phase change of the leaking fluid, occurs within the seal. Many seals operate in this mode because of flashing due to pressure drop and/or heat input from frictional heating. Some of the distinctive behavior characteristics of two phase seals are discussed, particularly their axial stability. The main conclusions are that seals with two phase flow may be unstable if improperly balanced. Detailed theoretical analyses of low (laminar) and high (turbulent) leakage seals are presented along with computer codes, parametric studies, and in particular a simplified PC based code that allows for rapid performance prediction: calculations of stiffness coefficients, temperature and pressure distributions, and leakage rates for parallel and coned face seals. A simplified combined computer code for the performance prediction over the laminar and turbulent ranges of a two phase flow is described and documented. The analyses, results, and computer codes are summarized.

  8. Dynamics of face and annular seals with two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William F.; Basu, Prithwish; Beatty, Paul A.; Beeler, Richard M.; Lau, Stephen

    1989-01-01

    A detailed study was made of face and annular seals under conditions where boiling, i.e., phase change of the leaking fluid, occurs within the seal. Many seals operate in this mode because of flashing due to pressure drop and/or heat input from frictional heating. High pressure, water pumps, industrial chemical pumps, and cryogenic pumps are mentioned as a few of many applications. The initial motivation was the LOX-GOX seals for the space shuttle main engine, but the study was expanded to include any face or annular seal where boiling occurs. Some of the distinctive behavior characteristics of two-phase seals were discussed, particularly their axial stability. While two-phase seals probably exhibit instability to disturbances of other degrees of freedom such as wobble, etc., under certain conditions, such analyses are too complex to be treated at present. Since an all liquid seal (with parallel faces) has a neutral axial stiffness curve, and is stabilized axially by convergent coning, other degrees of freedom stability analyses are necessary. However, the axial stability behavior of the two-phase seal is always a consideration no matter how well the seal is aligned and regardless of the speed. Hence, axial stability is thought of as the primary design consideration for two-phase seals and indeed the stability behavior under sub-cooling variations probably overshadows other concerns. The main thrust was the dynamic analysis of axial motion of two-phase face seals, principally the determination of axial stiffness, and the steady behavior of two-phase annular seals. The main conclusions are that seals with two-phase flow may be unstable if improperly balanced. Detailed theoretical analyses of low (laminar) and high (turbulent) leakage seals are presented along with computer codes, parametric studies, and in particular a simplified PC based code that allows for rapid performance prediction. A simplified combined computer code for the performance prediction over the

  9. Flow field simulation of gas-water two phase flow in annular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Pengcheng; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-01

    The gas-water two-phase flow is very common in the industrial processes. the deep understanding of the two-phase flow state is to achieve the production equipment design and safe operation. In the measurement of gas-water two-phase flow, the differential pressure sensor is widely used, and some measurement model of multiphase flow have been concluded. The differential pressure is generated when fluid flowing through the throttling components to calculate flow rate. This paper mainly focuses on two points: 1. The change rule of the parameters include velocity, pressure, phase fraction as the change of time, when the phase inlet velocity is given. 2. Analysis the distribution of the parameters above-mentioned at a certain moment under the condition of different water inlet velocity. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was used to simulate gas-water two-phase flow fluid in the annular channel, which is composed of horizontal pipe and long- waist cone sensor. The simulation results were obtained from FLUENT software.

  10. Two-Phase Annular Flow in Helical Coil Flow Channels in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, Edward G.; Lin, Chin S.

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of both single- and two-phase flow studies in curved and coiled flow geometries is first presented. Some of the complexities of two-phase liquid-vapor flow in curved and coiled geometries are discussed, and serve as an introduction to the advantages of observing such flows under a low-gravity environment. The studies proposed -- annular two-phase air-water flow in helical coil flow channels are described. Objectives of the studies are summarized.

  11. Vapor core turbulence in annular two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Trabold, T.A.; Kumar, R.

    1998-06-01

    This paper reports a new technique to measure vapor turbulence in two-phase flows using hot-film anemometry. Continuous vapor turbulence measurements along with local void fraction, droplet frequency, droplet velocity and droplet diameter were measured in a thin, vertical duct. By first eliminating the portion of the output voltage signal resulting from the interaction of dispersed liquid droplets with the HFA sensor, the discrete voltage samples associated with the vapor phase were separately analyzed. The data revealed that, over the range of liquid droplet sizes and concentrations encountered, the presence of the droplet field acts to enhance vapor turbulence. In addition, there is evidence that vapor turbulence is significantly influenced by the wall-bounded liquid film. The present results are qualitatively consistent with the limited data available in the open literature.

  12. A Local Condensation Analysis Representing Two-phase Annular Flow in Condenser/radiator Capillary Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Amir

    1991-01-01

    NASA's effort for the thermal environmental control of the Space Station Freedom is directed towards the design, analysis, and development of an Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). A two phase, flow through condenser/radiator concept was baselined, as a part of the ATCS, for the radiation of space station thermal load into space. The proposed condenser rejects heat through direct condensation of ATCS working fluid (ammonia) in the small diameter radiator tubes. Analysis of the condensation process and design of condenser tubes are based on the available two phase flow models for the prediction of flow regimes, heat transfer, and pressure drops. The prediction formulas use the existing empirical relationships of friction factor at gas-liquid interface. An attempt is made to study the stability of interfacial waves in two phase annular flow. The formulation is presented of a stability problem in cylindrical coordinates. The contribution of fluid viscosity, surface tension, and transverse radius of curvature to the interfacial surface is included. A solution is obtained for Kelvin-Helmholtz instability problem which can be used to determine the critical and most dangerous wavelengths for interfacial waves.

  13. Modelling Air and Water Two-Phase Annular Flow in a Small Horizontal Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Yao, Yufeng; Arini, Antonino; McIiwain, Stuart; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been carried out to study air and water two-phase flow in a small horizontal pipe of an inner diameter of 8.8mm, in order to investigate unsteady flow pattern transition behaviours and underlying physical mechanisms. The surface liquid film thickness distributions, determined by either wavy or full annular flow regime, are shown in reasonable good agreement with available experimental data. It was demonstrated that CFD simulation was able to predict wavy flow structures accurately using two-phase flow sub-models embedded in ANSYS-Fluent solver of Eulerian-Eulerian framework, together with a user defined function subroutine ANWAVER-UDF. The flow transient behaviours from bubbly to annular flow patterns and the liquid film distributions revealed the presence of gas/liquid interferences between air and water film interface. An increase of upper wall liquid film thickness along the pipe was observed for both wavy annular and full annular scenarios. It was found that the liquid wavy front can be further broken down to form the water moisture with liquid droplets penetrating upwards. There are discrepancies between CFD predictions and experimental data on the liquid film thickness determined at the bottom and the upper wall surfaces, and the obtained modelling information can be used to assist further 3D user defined function subroutine development, especially when CFD simulation becomes much more expense to model full 3D two-phase flow transient performance from a wavy annular to a fully developed annular type.

  14. CORRELATION FOR LIQUID ENTRAINMENT IN ANNULAR TWO-PHASE FLOW OF LOW VISCOUS FLUID

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Mishima, Kaichiro

    1981-03-01

    The droplet entrainment from a liquid film by gas flow is important to mass, momentum, and energy transfer in annular two-phase flow. The amount of entrainment can significantly affect occurrences of the dryout and post-dryout heat flux as well as the rewetting phenomena of a hot dry surface. In view of these, a correlation for the amount of entrained liquid in annular flow has been developed from a simple model and experimental data. There are basically two different regions of entrainment, namely, the entrance and quasiequilibrium regions. The correlation for the equilibrium region is expressed in terms of the dimensionless gas flux, diameter, and total liquid Reynolds number. The entrance effect is taken into account by an exponential relaxation function. It has been shown that this new model can satisfactorily correlate wide ranges of experimental data for water. Furthermore, the necessary distance for the development of entrainment is identified. These correlations, therefore, can supply accurate information on entrainment which have not been available previously. (author)

  15. Two-phase flows within systems with ambient pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.; Wheeler, R. L., III; Mullen, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    In systems where the design inlet and outlet pressures are maintained above the thermodynamic critical pressure, it is often assumed that two phase flows within the system cannot occur. Designers rely on this simple rule of thumb to circumvent problems associated with a highly compressible two phase flow occurring within the supercritical pressure system along with the uncertainties in rotordynamics, load capacity, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and thermophysical property variations. The simple rule of thumb is adequate in many low power designs but is inadequate for high performance turbomachines and linear systems, where two phase regions can exist even though outlet pressure is greater than critical pressure. Rotordynamic-fluid-mechanic restoring forces depend on momentum differences, and those for a two phase zone can differ significantly from those for a single-phase zone. Using the Reynolds equation the angular velocity, eccentricity, geometry, and ambient conditions are varied to determine the point of two phase flow incipience.

  16. Influence of two-phase flow characteristic on critical heat flux in low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Lee, Sangryoul

    1996-08-01

    Estimation of the critical heat flux (CHF) in a boiling two-phase flow is one of the important subjects for the safety of water-cooled reactors and other energy systems. In the case of a boiling two-phase flow at low pressure, flow pattern and void fraction are easy to change by the power input and the flow becomes more complex due to low density of gas phase. The CHF is affected by the flow pattern. In this study, the CHFs were measured over wide quality range from the subcooled boiling to the annular-mist flow. By using Pyrex glass tube as a test channel, the two-phase flow situation was observed. Graphite rod or stainless steel tube was used as a heater rod and installed at the center of the glass tube. Two-phase flow was formed by steam injection to circulating water at an upstream region of the test section. The flow pattern was kept nearly constant over the length of test section due to the low input power density into the fluid. Then, the characteristics of CHF could be investigated at each flow patterns of bubbly, slug, annular and annular-mist flow. In the subcooled boiling region of bubbly flow, the CHF decreased with increase of quality and was less sensitive to flow rate. In the slug flow region, the CHF showed a minimum value. With more increase of quality in the annular flow, the CHF increased and reached a peak value at a certain quality depending on a flow rate. The peak of CHF occurred almost at a constant vapor mass velocity. In the annular-mist flow region, the CHF decreased with increase of quality. In the region, the effect of heated length on the CHF was systematically measured and validity of an analytical model considering dryout of liquid film based on formation of a dry patch was investigated.

  17. The Annular Two-phase Flow on Rod Bundle: The Effects of Spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Tomoaki; Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2013-11-01

    The annular two-phase flow on rod bundle keeps an important role in many heat exchange systems but our knowledge about it, especially the interaction between the liquid film flowing on the rods' surfaces and the spacers is very limited. This study is aimed to the investigation of how the spacer affects the disturbance waves of the flow in a 3 × 3 simulating BWR fuel rod bundle test section. Firstly, the characteristics of the disturbance waves at both upstream and downstream locations of the spacer were obtained by using reflected light arrangement with a high speed camera Phantom V7.1 (Vision Research Inc.) and a Nikon macro lens 105mm f/2.8. The data showed that the parameters such as frequency and circumferential coherence of the disturbance waves are strongly modified when they go through the spacer. Then, the observations at the locations right before and after the spacer were performed by using the back light arrangement with the same high speed camera and a Cassegrain optical system (Seika Cooperation). The obtained images at micro-scale of time and space provided the descriptions of the wavy interface behaviors right before and after the spacer as well as different droplets creation processes caused by the presence of this spacer.

  18. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients: Effect of viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Da Hlaing, Nan; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of liquid viscosity on the flow regimes and the corresponding pressure gradients along the vertical two-phase flow was investigated. Experiment was carried out in a vertical transparent tube of 0.019 m in diameter and 3 m in length and the pressure gradients were measured by a U-tube manometer. Water and a 50 vol.% glycerol solution were used as the working fluids whose kinematic viscosities were 0.85 x 10{sup -6} and 4.0 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In our air-liquid annular two-phase flow, the liquid film of various thicknesses flowed adjacent to the wall and the gas phase flowed at the center of the tube. The superficial air velocity, j{sub air}, was varied between 0.0021 and 58.7 m/s and the superficial liquid velocity, j{sub liquid}, was varied between 0 and 0.1053 m/s. In the bubble, the slug and the slug-churn flow regimes, the pressure gradients decreased with increasing Reynolds number. But in the annular and the mist flow regimes, pressure gradients increased with increasing Reynolds number. Finally, the experimentally measured pressure gradient values were compared and are in good agreement with the theoretical values. (author)

  19. KC-135 zero-gravity two phase flow pressure drop: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Anne; Reinarts, Thomas R.; Best, Frederick R.; Hill, Wayne S.

    1991-01-01

    Two-phase flow, thermal management systems are currently being considered as an alternative to conventional, single phase systems for future space missions because of their potential to reduce overall system mass, size, and pumping power requirements. Knowledge of flow regime transitions, heat transfer characteristics, and pressure drop correlations is necessary to design and develop two-phase systems. This work is concerned with microgravity, two-phase flow pressure drop experiments. The data are those of a recent experiment (Hill and Best 1990) funded by the U.S. Air Force and conducted by Foster-Miller in conjunction with Texas A&M University. A boiling and condensing experiment was built in which R-12 was used as the working fluid. A Foster-Miller two phase pump was used to circulate a freon mixture and allow separate measurements of the vapor and liquid flow streams. The experimental package was flown five times aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which simulates 0-``g'' conditions by its parabolic flight trajectory. Test conditions included stratified and annual flow regimes in 1-``g'' which became bubbly, slug or annular flow regimes in 0-``g''. A portion of the current work outlines a methodology to analyze data for two-phase, 0-g experimental studies. A technique for correcting the raw pressure drop data collected from the test package is given. The Corrected pressure drop measurements are compared with predictive model. The corrected pressure drop measurements show no statistically significant difference between the 1-``g'' and 0-``g'' tests for mass flow rates between 0.00653 and 0.0544 kg/s in an 8 mm ID tube. An annular flow model gave the best overall predictions of pressure drop. The homogeneous, and Beattle and Whalley (1982) models showed good agreement with the pressure drops measured for the slug and bubbly/slug flow conditions. The two-phase multiplier deduced from the data appeared to follow the Martinelli-Nelson trend but at lower values than for

  20. Theoretical and pragmatic modeling of governing equations for two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M.; Ajuha, S.; Sengpiel, W.

    1994-12-31

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy derived for a two-phase flow by volume-averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration; bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities makes the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modeling of these terms is discussed.

  1. Theoretical and pragmatic modelling of governing equations for a two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M.; Sengpiel, W.

    1992-12-01

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy, derived for a two-phase flow by volume averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration, bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities make the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modelling of these terms is discussed. 3 figs., 15 refs.

  2. Theoretical and pragmatic modelling of governing equations for a two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M. . Materials and Components Technology Div.); Sengpiel, W. . Inst. fuer Reaktorsicherheit)

    1992-01-01

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy, derived for a two-phase flow by volume averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration, bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities make the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modelling of these terms is discussed. 3 figs., 15 refs.

  3. Film Thickness Prediction in an Annular Two-Phase Flow Through Bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, P. M.; Morvan, H. P.

    2010-09-01

    A finite volume method-based CFD model has been developed in the commercial code Star CD to simulate the annular gas-liquid flow through the 30°, 60° and 90° bends. The liquid film is solved explicitly by means of a modified Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. The droplets are traced using a Lagrangian technique. The film to droplets (entrainment) and droplets to film (stick, bounce, spread and splash) interactions are taken into account using sub-models to complement the VOF model. A good agreement is found between the computed film thickness value and those cited in the literature.

  4. Simulation of two phase flow of liquid - solid in the annular space in drilling operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kootiani, Reza Cheraghi; Samsuri, Ariffin Bin

    2014-10-01

    Drilling cutting transfer is an important factor in oil and gas wells drilling. So that success drilling operation is directly dependent on the quality of clean the wellbore drilling operation. In this paper, modeled upward flow of liquid - solid in the annular concentric and non-concentric in the well drilling by Euler two - fluid model and then analysis using numerical method. Numerical simulation of liquid - solid flow evaluated initially with a Newtonian fluid (water) and then a non-Newtonian fluid (CMC solution 0.4%). After that, investigated the effect of parameters such as flow rate, rotating drill pipe and out of centered on drilling operations. The results show that drilling cutting transfer is improve due to the rotation of drill pipe particularly in drilling operations.

  5. High Pressure Deformation in Two-Phase Aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Li,L.; Addad, A.; Weidner, D.; Long, H.; Chen, J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the rheological behavior of multi-phase aggregates at high pressure and high temperature. Using synchrotron X-ray radiation as the probing tool, we are able to quantify the stress state of individual phases within the aggregates. This method provides fundamental information in interpreting the behavior of two phase/multi-phase mixtures, which contribute to our understanding of the deformation process at deep earth conditions. We choose MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel and MgO periclase as our model materials. Mixtures of various volume proportions were deformed in a multi-anvil high pressure deformation apparatus at pressure of 5 GPa and elevated temperatures. Stress is determined from X-ray diffraction, providing a measure of stress in each individual phase of the mixture in situ during the deformation. Macroscopic strain is determined from X-ray imaging. We compare the steady state strength of various mixtures at 1000 {sup o}C and 800 {sup o}C and at the strain rate in the range of 1.8 to 8.8 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. Our data indicate that the weak phase (MgO) is responsible for most of the accumulated strains while the strong phase (spinel) is supporting most of the stress when the volume proportion is 75% spinel and 25% MgO. The intermediate compositions (40/60) are much weaker than either of the end members, while the grain sizes for the intermediate compositions (submicrons) are much smaller than the end members (5-10 {mu}m). We conclude that a change in flow mechanism resulting from these smaller grains is responsible for the low strength of the intermediate composition mixtures. This study demonstrates an approach of using synchrotron X-rays to study the deformation behaviors of multi-phase aggregates at high pressure and high temperature.

  6. 75 FR 23582 - Annular Casing Pressure Management for Offshore Wells

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... published the proposed rule Annular Casing Pressure Management for Offshore Wells (74 FR 38147). The comment... the published proposed rule 1010-AD47 Annular Casing Pressure Management for Offshore Wells (74 FR... subsea wellhead. (3) hybrid well, a riser or the production casing pressure is greater than 100...

  7. Two-phase flow pressure drop and heat transfer during condensation in microchannels with uniform and converging cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching Yi; Pan, Chin

    2010-09-01

    This study experimentally investigates steam condensation in rectangular microchannels with uniform and converging cross-sections and a mean hydraulic diameter of 135 µm. The steam flow in the microchannels was cooled by water cross-flowing along its bottom surface, which is different from other methods reported in the literature. The flow patterns, two-phase flow pressure drop and condensation heat transfer coefficient are determined. The microchannels with the uniform cross-section design have a higher heat transfer coefficient than those with the converging cross-section under condensation in the mist/annular flow regimes, although the latter work best for draining two-phase fluids composed of uncondensed steam and liquid water, which is consistent with the result of our previous study. From the experimental results, dimensionless correlations of condensation heat transfer for the mist and annular flow regions and a two-phase frictional multiplier are developed for the microchannels with both types of cross-section designs. The experimental data agree well with the obtained correlations, with the maximum mean absolute errors of 6.4% for the two-phase frictional multiplier and 6.0% for the condensation heat transfer.

  8. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.

    2010-06-29

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  9. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.; Coates, Don M.

    2011-05-31

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  10. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.

    2008-10-28

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  11. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.

    2011-01-18

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  12. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.; Coates, Don M.

    2011-06-21

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  13. Optic imaging of single and two-phase pressure-driven flows in nano-scale channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihua; Ok, Jeong Tae; Sun, Yongpeng; Retterer, S T; Neeves, Keith B; Yin, Xiaolong; Bai, Baojun; Ma, Yinfa

    2013-03-21

    Microfluidic and nanofluidic devices have undergone rapid development in recent years. Functions integrated onto such devices provide lab-on-a-chip solutions for many biomedical, chemical, and engineering applications. In this paper, a lab-on-a-chip technique for direct visualization of the single- and two-phase pressure-driven flows in nano-scale channels was developed. The nanofluidic chip was designed and fabricated; concentration dependent fluorescence signal correlation was developed for the determination of flow rate. Experiments of single and two-phase flow in nano-scale channels with 100 nm depth were conducted. The linearity correlation between flow rate and pressure drop in nanochannels was obtained and fit closely into Poiseuille's Law. Meanwhile, three different flow patterns, single, annular, and stratified, were observed from the two-phase flow in the nanochannel experiments and their special features were described. A two-phase flow regime map for nanochannels is presented. Results are of critical importance to both fundamental study and many applications. PMID:23370894

  14. Experimental investigation of the two-phase flow regimes and pressure drop in horizontal mini-size rectangular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elazhary, Amr Mohamed; Soliman, Hassan M.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted in order to investigate two-phase flow regimes and fully developed pressure drop in a mini-size, horizontal rectangular channel. The test section was machined in the form of an impacting tee junction in an acrylic block (in order to facilitate visualization) with a rectangular cross-section of 1.87-mm height on 20-mm width on the inlet and outlet sides. Pressure drop measurement and flow regime identification were performed on all three sides of the junction. Air-water mixtures at 200 kPa (abs) and room temperature were used as the test fluids. Four flow regimes were identified visually: bubbly, plug, churn, and annular over the ranges of gas and liquid superficial velocities of 0.04 ≤ JG ≤ 10 m/s and 0.02 ≤ JL ≤ 0.7 m/s, respectively, and a flow regime map was developed. Accuracy of the pressure-measurement technique was validated with single-phase, laminar and turbulent, fully developed data. Two-phase experiments were conducted for eight different inlet conditions and various mass splits at the junction. Comparisons were conducted between the present data and former correlations for the fully developed two-phase pressure drop in rectangular channels with similar sizes. Wide deviations were found among these correlations, and the correlations that agreed best with the present data were identified.

  15. Refrigerant pressurization system with a two-phase condensing ejector

    DOEpatents

    Bergander, Mark

    2009-07-14

    A refrigerant pressurization system including an ejector having a first conduit for flowing a liquid refrigerant therethrough and a nozzle for accelerating a vapor refrigerant therethrough. The first conduit is positioned such that the liquid refrigerant is discharged from the first conduit into the nozzle. The ejector includes a mixing chamber for condensing the vapor refrigerant. The mixing chamber comprises at least a portion of the nozzle and transitions into a second conduit having a substantially constant cross sectional area. The condensation of the vapor refrigerant in the mixing chamber causes the refrigerant mixture in at least a portion of the mixing chamber to be at a pressure greater than that of the refrigerant entering the nozzle and greater than that entering the first conduit.

  16. Two Phase Flow Modeling: Summary of Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop Correlations in Reduced and Partial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rame, E.; Kizito, J.; Kassemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art predictions for two-phase flows relevant to Advanced Life Support. We strive to pick out the most used and accepted models for pressure drop and flow regime predictions. The main focus is to identify gaps in predictive capabilities in partial gravity for Lunar and Martian applications. Following a summary of flow regimes and pressure drop correlations for terrestrial and zero gravity, we analyze the fully developed annular gas-liquid flow in a straight cylindrical tube. This flow is amenable to analytical closed form solutions for the flow field and heat transfer. These solutions, valid for partial gravity as well, may be used as baselines and guides to compare experimental measurements. The flow regimes likely to be encountered in the water recovery equipment currently under consideration for space applications are provided in an appendix.

  17. Slim hole MWD tool accurately measures downhole annular pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Burban, B.; Delahaye, T. )

    1994-02-14

    Measurement-while-drilling of downhole pressure accurately determines annular pressure losses from circulation and drillstring rotation and helps monitor swab and surge pressures during tripping. In early 1993, two slim-hole wells (3.4 in. and 3 in. diameter) were drilled with continuous real-time electromagnetic wave transmission of downhole temperature and annular pressure. The data were obtained during all stages of the drilling operation and proved useful for operations personnel. The use of real-time measurements demonstrated the characteristic hydraulic effects of pressure surges induced by drillstring rotation in the small slim-hole annulus under field conditions. The interest in this information is not restricted to the slim-hole geometry. Monitoring or estimating downhole pressure is a key element for drilling operations. Except in special cases, no real-time measurements of downhole annular pressure during drilling and tripping have been used on an operational basis. The hydraulic effects are significant in conventional-geometry wells (3 1/2-in. drill pipe in a 6-in. hole). This paper describes the tool and the results from the field test.

  18. A Rotational Pressure-Correction Scheme for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Open Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Dong, S.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase outflows refer to situations where the interface formed between two immiscible incompressible fluids passes through open portions of the domain boundary. We present several new forms of open boundary conditions for two-phase outflow simulations within the phase field framework, as well as a rotational pressure correction based algorithm for numerically treating these open boundary conditions. Our algorithm gives rise to linear algebraic systems for the velocity and the pressure that involve only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices after discretization, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the two-phase mixture. By comparing simulation results with theory and the experimental data, we show that the method produces physically accurate results. We also present numerical experiments to demonstrate the long-term stability of the method in situations where large density contrast, large viscosity contrast, and backflows occur at the two-phase open boundaries. PMID:27163909

  19. A Rotational Pressure-Correction Scheme for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Open Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Wang, X

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase outflows refer to situations where the interface formed between two immiscible incompressible fluids passes through open portions of the domain boundary. We present several new forms of open boundary conditions for two-phase outflow simulations within the phase field framework, as well as a rotational pressure correction based algorithm for numerically treating these open boundary conditions. Our algorithm gives rise to linear algebraic systems for the velocity and the pressure that involve only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices after discretization, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the two-phase mixture. By comparing simulation results with theory and the experimental data, we show that the method produces physically accurate results. We also present numerical experiments to demonstrate the long-term stability of the method in situations where large density contrast, large viscosity contrast, and backflows occur at the two-phase open boundaries. PMID:27163909

  20. New Results in Two-Phase Pressure Drop Calculations at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braisted, Jon; Kurwitz, Cable; Best, Frederick

    2004-02-01

    The mass, power, and volume energy savings of two-phase systems for future spacecraft creates many advantages over current single-phase systems. Current models of two-phase phenomena such as pressure drop, void fraction, and flow regime prediction are still not well defined for space applications. Commercially available two-phase modeling software has been developed for a large range of acceleration fields including reduced-gravity conditions. Recently, a two-phase experiment has been flown to expand the two-phase database. A model of the experiment was created in the software to determine how well the software could predict the pressure drop observed in the experiment. Of the simulations conducted, the computer model shows good agreement of the pressure drop in the experiment to within 30%. However, the software does begin to over-predict pressure drop in certain regions of a flow regime map indicating that some models used in the software package for reduced-gravity modeling need improvement.

  1. A Non-Heating Experimental Study on the Two-Phase Natural Circulation through the Annular Gap between Reactor Vessel and Insulation under External Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, K.S.; Park, R.J.; Cho, Y.R.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D.; Kim, H.M.; Kim, K.Y.

    2004-07-01

    To improve the margin for IVR in high-power reactors, some design improvements of the vessel/insulation configuration to increase the heat removal rate by two-phase natural circulation have been proposed. To observe and evaluate the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation in the APR1400 under external reactor vessel cooling, the T-HERMES program has been performed, that is, the THERMES- SCALE, T-HERMES-SMALL, HERMES-HALF, and T-HERMES-CFD studies. In this paper, the HERMES-HALF study, which is one of the T-HERMES programs, is introduced. The HERMES-HALF is a non-heating experimental study on the two-phase natural circulation through the annular gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation. The objectives of this HERMES-HALF study are to observe and evaluate the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation in the APR1400. For these purposes, a half-scaled experimental facility is prepared utilizing the results of a scaling analysis to simulate the APR1400 reactor and insulation system. The behaviors of the boiling-induced two-phase natural circulation flow in the insulation gap are observed, and the liquid mass flow rates driven by the natural circulation loop and void fraction distribution are measured. And numerical analyses of the HERMES-HALF experiments using CFX-5.6 code have also been performed by solving unsteady, three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for multiphase flows with the zero equation turbulence model. By the experimental flow observation and numerical predictions, weak recirculation flows in the near region of the shear key are observed. The void fraction monotonically increases from the water inlet to the shear key region. There exists a short decrease of the void fraction after passing through the shear key due to geometrical expansion and the recirculation flow caused by the shear key. The variation of

  2. Hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iino, T.; Kaneko, H.

    1980-01-01

    The hydraulic forces caused by annular pressure seals were investigated. The measured inlet and exit loss coefficients of the flow through the seals were much smaller than the conventional values. The results indicate that the damping coefficient and the inertia coefficient of the fluid film in the seal are not affected much by the rotational speed or the eccentricity of the rotor, though the stiffness coefficient seemed to be influenced by the eccentricity.

  3. A new linearized theory of laminar film condensation of two phase annular flow in a capillary pumped loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y. K.; Swanson, T.; Mcintosh, R.

    1988-01-01

    Future large space based facilities, such as Space Station, will require energy management systems capable of transporting tens of kilowatts of heat over a hundred meters or more. This represents better than an order of magnitude improvement over current technology. Two-phase thermal systems are currently being developed to meet this challenge. Condensation heat transfer plays a very important role in this system. The present study attempts an analytic solution to the set of linearized partial differential equations. The axial velocity and temperature functions were found to be Bessel functions which have oscillatory behavior. This result agrees qualitatively with the experimental evidence from tests at both NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and elsewhere.

  4. Pressure Profiles in Two-Phase Geothermal Wells: Comparison of Field Data and Model Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ambastha, A.K.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1986-01-21

    Increased confidence in the predictive power of two-phase correlations is a vital part of wellbore deliverability and deposition studies for geothermal wells. Previously, the Orkiszewski (1967) set of correlations has been recommended by many investigators to analyze geothermal wellbore performance. In this study, we use measured flowing pressure profile data from ten geothermal wells around the world, covering a wide range of flowrate, fluid enthalpy, wellhead pressure and well depth. We compare measured and calculated pressure profiles using the Orkiszewski (1967) correlations.

  5. Study of Critical Heat Flux and Two-Phase Pressure Drop Under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdollahian, Davood; Quintal, Joseph; Barez, Fred; Zahm, Jennifer; Lohr, Victor

    1996-01-01

    The design of the two-phase flow systems which are anticipated to be utilized in future spacecraft thermal management systems requires a knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in reduced gravities. This program was funded by NASA headquarters in response to NRA-91-OSSA-17 and was managed by Lewis Research Center. The main objective of this program was to design and construct a two-phase test loop, and perform a series of normal gravity and aircraft trajectory experiments to study the effect of gravity on the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and onset of instability. The test loop was packaged on two aircraft racks and was also instrumented to generate data for two-phase pressure drop. The normal gravity tests were performed with vertical up and downflow configurations to bound the effect of gravity on the test parameters. One set of aircraft trajectory tests was performed aboard the NASA DC-9 aircraft. These tests were mainly intended to evaluate the test loop and its operational performance under actual reduced gravity conditions, and to produce preliminary data for the test parameters. The test results were used to demonstrate the applicability of the normal gravity models for prediction of the two-phase friction pressure drop. It was shown that the two-phase friction multipliers for vertical upflow and reduced gravity conditions can be successfully predicted by the appropriate normal gravity models. Limited critical heat flux data showed that the measured CHF under reduced gravities are of the same order of magnitude as the test results with vertical upflow configuration. A simplified correlation was only successful in predicting the measured CHF for low flow rates. Instability tests with vertical upflow showed that flow becomes unstable and critical heat flux occurs at smaller powers when a parallel flow path exists. However, downflow tests and a single reduced gravity instability experiment indicated that the system actually became more stable with a

  6. Effects of steam-liquid counterflow on pressure transient data from two-phase geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Cox, B.L.; Ripperda, M.

    1987-06-01

    Numerical studies are performed to investigate the effects localized feedzones on the pressure transients in two-phase reservoirs. It is shown that gravity effects can significantly affect the pressure transients, because of the large difference in the density of liquid water and vapor. Production from such systems enhances steam/liquid water counterflow and expands the vapor-dominated zone at the top of the reservoir. Subcooled liquid regions develop in the center of the reservoir due to gravity drainage of cooler liquid water. The vapor zone will act as a constant pressure boundary and help stabilize the decline in the system. It is shown that the pressure transients at observation wells depend greatly on the location (depth) of the major feedzone; if this is not accounted for, large errors in deduced reservoir properties will result. At shallow observation points pressures may actually increase as a result of enhanced steam upflow due to production at a deep feedzone. 12 refs., 17 figs.

  7. Two-phase flow characteristics of liquid oxygen flow in low pressure liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Namkyung; Kim, Seunghan; Kim, Youngmog; Jeong, Sangkwon; Jung, Jeheon

    2004-06-01

    In most cryogenic liquid rocket engines, liquid oxygen manifold and injector are not thermally insulated from room temperature environment for the purpose of reducing system complexity and weight. This feature of cryogenic liquid supply system results in the situation that liquid oxygen flow is vaporized especially in the vicinity of the manifold and the injector wall. The transient two-phase flow tendency is severe for low combustion pressure rocket engine without using turbo-pump. This paper focuses on the two-phase flow phenomena of liquid oxygen in low combustion pressure rocket engine. The KSR-III (Korea Sounding Rocket) engine test data is thoroughly analyzed to estimate the vapor fraction of liquid oxygen flow near the engine manifold and the injector. During the cold flow and the combustion tests of the KSR-III Engine, the static and dynamic pressures are measured at the engine inlet, the liquid oxygen manifold and the combustion chamber. The manifold outer wall and the inner wall temperatures are also measured. In this paper, we present the experimental investigation on the vapor generation, the vapor mass fraction, and the boiling characteristics of the liquid oxygen flow in the engine manifold and injector.

  8. An efficient pressure-velocity procedure for gas-droplet two-phase flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Jiang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a noniterative numerical technique for computing time-dependent gas-droplet flows. The method is a fully interacting combination of Eulerian fluid and Lagrangian particle calculations. The interaction calculations between the two phases are formulated on a pressure-velocity-coupling procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. This procedure eliminates the global iterations required in the conventional particle-source-in-cell procedure. Turbulent dispersion calculations are treated by a stochastic procedure. Numerical calculations and comparisons with available experimental data as well as efficiency assessments are given for some sprays typical of spray combustion applications.

  9. Flow Pressure Loss through Straight Annular Corrugated Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Joseph R.; Kirk, Daniel R.; Marsell, Brandon; Roth, Jacob; Schallhorn, Paul A.; Pitchford, Brian; Weber, Chris; Bulk, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Pressure loss through annular corrugated pipes, using fully developed gaseous nitrogen representing purge pipes in spacecraft fairings, was studied to gain insight into a friction factor coefficient for these pipes. Twelve pipes were tested: four Annuflex, four Masterflex and two Titeflex with ¼”, 3/8”, ½” and ¾” inner diameters. Experimental set-up was validated using smooth-pipe and showed good agreement to the Moody diagram. Nitrogen flow rates between 0-200 standard cubic feet per hour were used, producing approximate Reynolds numbers from 300-23,000. Corrugation depth varied from 0.248 = E/D = 0.349 and relative corrugation pitch of 0.192 = P/D = 0.483. Differential pressure per unit length was measured and calculated using 8-9 equidistant pressure taps. A detailed experimental uncertainty analysis, including correlated bias error terms, is presented. Results show larger differential pressure losses than smooth-pipes with similar inner diameters resulting in larger friction factor coefficients.

  10. Pressure Drop Correlations of Single-Phase and Two-Phase Flow in Rolling Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xia-xin Cao; Chang-qi Yan; Pu-zhen Gao; Zhong-ning Sun

    2006-07-01

    A series of experimental studies of frictional pressure drop for single phase and two-phase bubble flow in smooth rolling tubes were carried out. The tube inside diameters were 15 mm, 25 mm and 34.5 mm respectively, the rolling angles of tubes could be set as 10 deg. and 20 deg., and the rolling periods could be set as 5 s, 10 s and 15 s. Combining with the analysis of single-phase water motion, it was found that the traditional correlations for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient were not suitable for the rolling condition. Based on the experimental data, a new correlation for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient under rolling condition was presented, and the calculations not only agreed well with the experimental data, but also could display the periodically dynamic characteristics of frictional coefficients. Applying the new correlation to homogeneous flow model, two-phase frictional pressure drop of bubble flow in rolling tubes could be calculated, the results showed that the relative error between calculation and experimental data was less than {+-} 25%. (authors)

  11. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients under the influence of SDS surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Duangprasert, Tanabordee; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2008-01-15

    Two-phase gas/liquid flows in vertical pipes have been systematically investigated. Water and SDS surfactant solutions at various concentrations were used as the working fluids. In particular, we focus our work on the influence of surfactant addition on the flow regimes, the corresponding pressure gradients, and the bubble sizes and velocity. Adding the surfactant lowers the air critical Reynolds numbers for the bubble-slug flow and the slug flow transitions. The pressure gradients of SDS solutions are lower than those of pure water especially in the slug flow and the slug-churn flow regimes, implying turbulent drag reduction. At low Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the surfactant solution are lower than those of pure water due to the increase in viscosity. With increasing and at high Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the SDS solution become greater than those of pure water which is attributed to the effect of surface tension. (author)

  12. The effect of pressure on annular flow pressure drop in a small pipe

    SciTech Connect

    de Bertodano, M.A.L.; Beus, S.G.; Shi, Jian-Feng

    1996-09-01

    New experimental data was obtained for pressure drop and entrainment for annular up-flow in a vertical pipe. The 9.5 mm. pipe has an L/D ratio of 440 to insure fully developed annular flow. The pressure ranged from 140 kPa to 660 kPa. Therefore the density ratio was varied by a factor of four approximately. This allows the investigation of the effect of pressure on the interfacial shear models. Gas superficial velocities between 25 and 126 m/s were tested. This extends the range of previous data to higher gas velocities. The data were compared with well known models for interfacial shear that represent the state of the art. Good results were obtained when the model by Asali, Hanratty and Andreussi was modified for the effect of pressure. Furthermore an equivalent model was obtained based on the mixing length theory for rough pipes. It correlates the equivalent roughness to the film thickness.

  13. An extended pressure finite element space for two-phase incompressible flows with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, Sven; Reusken, Arnold

    2007-05-01

    We consider a standard model for incompressible two-phase flows in which a localized force at the interface describes the effect of surface tension. If a level set (or VOF) method is applied then the interface, which is implicitly given by the zero level of the level set function, is in general not aligned with the triangulation that is used in the discretization of the flow problem. This non-alignment causes severe difficulties w.r.t. the discretization of the localized surface tension force and the discretization of the flow variables. In cases with large surface tension forces the pressure has a large jump across the interface. In standard finite element spaces, due to the non-alignment, the functions are continuous across the interface and thus not appropriate for the approximation of the discontinuous pressure. In many simulations these effects cause large oscillations of the velocity close to the interface, so-called spurious velocities. In this paper, for a simplified model problem, we give an analysis that explains why known (standard) methods for discretization of the localized force term and for discretization of the pressure variable often yield large spurious velocities. In the paper [S. Groß, A. Reusken, Finite element discretization error analysis of a surface tension force in two-phase incompressible flows, Preprint 262, IGPM, RWTH Aachen, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. (accepted for publication)], we introduce a new and accurate method for approximation of the surface tension force. In the present paper, we use the extended finite element space (XFEM), presented in [N. Moes, J. Dolbow, T. Belytschko, A finite element method for crack growth without remeshing, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 46 (1999) 131-150; T. Belytschko, N. Moes, S. Usui, C. Parimi, Arbitrary discontinuities in finite elements, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 50 (2001) 993-1013], for the discretization of the pressure. We show that the size of spurious velocities is reduced substantially, provided we

  14. Wall model effects on two phase flows and pressure distribution in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellami, Nadia

    Molecular simulations of single phase bounded nanoflows, especially at high density, showed discrepancies from the classical Navier Stokes solutions: the failure of predicting the slip value at the wall, stratification of the density close to the wall and excessive heating which affects the natural thermal fluctuations of the atomistic system (NVE ensemble). These discrepancies are a direct consequence of the importance of the surface effects for such scales as the surface to volume ratio increases dramatically at the nanoscale. To alleviate some of these observed phenomena, the modeling of the solid boundaries progressed from implicit mathematical wall models to explicit multi-layered atomistic structure including temperature/pressure control mechanisms and heat transfer exchanges. However, the wall models used in molecular simulations vary greatly in physical characteristics such as the wetting property (under static conditions) or momentum and heat exchange (under flow conditions) and consequently, the equilibrium and steady state conditions reached depend on the complexity of the model and the application it is developed for. This work investigates the characteristics of different wall models found in the literature and compares their effects for the specific applications of single phase flows and nanojets (two-phase flows). It is found that the system thermodynamic pressure varies considerably depending on the parameters and complexity of the surface models and consequently alters both the flow and the jet behaviors. Assessments of these differences in terms of the system pressure, slip value at the surface and the injection velocity for different wall categories (atomistic, stochastic/diffuse and functional wall models) and parameters are provided. Another important consequence is the dependency of nanojet stability on the dense flow-surface interactions and liquid-gas-solid surface interactions. A new integrated and sinusoidal wall model was developed to

  15. Eccentric annular crack under general nonuniform internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeini-Ardakani, S.; Kamali, M. T.; Shodja, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    For a better approximation of ring-shaped and toroidal cracks, a new eccentric annular crack model is proposed and an analytical approach for determination of the corresponding stress intensity factors is given. The crack is subjected to arbitrary mode I loading. A rigorous solution is provided by mapping the eccentric annular crack to a concentric annular crack. The analysis leads to two decoupled Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. For the sake of verification, the problem of a conventional annular crack is examined. Furthermore, for various crack configurations of an eccentric annular crack under uniform tension, the stress intensity factors pertaining to the inner and outer crack edges are delineated in dimensionless plots.

  16. Calculation of sample problems related to two-phase flow blowdown transients in pressure relief piping of a PWR pressurizer

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.

    1984-02-01

    A method was published, based on the integral method of characteristics, by which the junction and boundary conditions needed in computation of a flow in a piping network can be accurately formulated. The method for the junction and boundary conditions formulation together with the two-step Lax-Wendroff scheme are used in a computer program; the program in turn, is used here in calculating sample problems related to the blowdown transient of a two-phase flow in the piping network downstream of a PWR pressurizer. Independent, nearly exact analytical solutions also are obtained for the sample problems. Comparison of the results obtained by the hybrid numerical technique with the analytical solutions showed generally good agreement. The good numerical accuracy shown by the results of our scheme suggest that the hybrid numerical technique is suitable for both benchmark and design calculations of PWR pressurizer blowdown transients.

  17. Interfacial area transport of steam-water two-phase flow in a vertical annulus at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozar, Basar

    Analysis of accident scenarios in nuclear reactors are done by using codes such as TRACE and RELAP5. Large oscillations in the core void fraction are observed in calculations of advanced passive light water reactors (ALWRs), especially during the low pressure long-term cooling phase. These oscillations are attributed to be numerical in nature and served to limit the accuracy as well as the credibility of the calculations. One of the root causes of these unphysical oscillations is determined to be flow regime transitions caused by the usage of static flow regime maps. The interfacial area transport equation was proposed earlier in order to address these issues. Previous research successfully developed the foundation of the interfacial area transport equation and the experimental techniques needed for the measurement of interfacial area, bubble diameters and velocities. In the past, an extensive database has been then generated for adiabatic air-water conditions in vertical upward and downward bubbly-churn turbulent flows in pipes. Using this database, mechanistic models for the creation (bubble breakup) and destruction (bubble coalescence) of interfacial area have been developed for the bubblyslug flow regime transition. However, none of these studies investigated the effect of phase change. To address this need, a heated annular test section was designed and constructed. The design relied on a three level scaling approach: geometric scaling; hydrodynamic scaling; thermal scaling. The test section consisted of a heated and unheated section in order to study the sub-cooled boiling and bulk condensation/flashing and evaporation phenomena, respectively. Steam-water two-phase flow tests were conducted under sub-cooled boiling conditions in the heated section and with sub-cooled/super-heated bulk liquid in the unheated section. The modeling of interfacial area transport equation with phase change effects was introduced and discussed. Constitutive relations, which took

  18. Boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion: experimental research in the evolution of the two-phase flow and over-pressure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sining; Sun, Jinhua; Wan, Wei

    2008-08-15

    In a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), the superheating and boiling of the liquefied gas inside the vessel as it fails is important information necessary to understand the mechanism of this type of disaster. In this paper, a small-scale experiment was developed to investigate the possible processes that could lead to a BLEVE. Water was used as the test fluid. High-speed video was utilized to observe the two-phase flow swelling which occurred immediately following the partial loss of containment through a simulated crack. The velocity of the two-phase swelling was measured along with pressure and temperature. It was observed that initially a mist-like two-phase layer was rapidly formed on the liquid surface (~3-4 ms) after the vessel opened. The superheated liquid rapidly boiled and this accelerated upwards the two-phase layer, the whole liquid boiled after about 17 ms form opening. It was supposed that the swelling of the two-phase layer was the possible reason for the first over-pressure measured at the top and bottom of the vessel. From 38 ms to 168 ms, the boiling of the superheated liquid weakened. And from 170 ms, the original drop/mist-like two-phase flow turned into a churn-turbulent bubbly two-phase flow, rose quickly in the field of the camera and eventually impacted the vessel top wall. The force of its impact and "cavitation" and "choke" following with the two-phase ejection were maybe main reasons for the second obvious pressure increasing. PMID:18261848

  19. The influence of the equivalent hydraulic diameter on the pressure drop prediction of annular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kayiem, A. H. H.; Ibrahim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The flow behaviour and the pressure drop throughout an annular flow test section was investigated in order to evaluate and justify the reliability of experimental flow loop for wax deposition studies. The specific objective of the present paper is to assess and highlight the influence of the equivalent diameter method on the analysis of the hydrodynamic behaviour of the flow and the pressure drop throughout the annular test section. The test section has annular shape of 3 m length with three flow passages, namely; outer thermal control jacket, oil annular flow and inner pipe flow of a coolant. The oil annular flow has internal and external diameters of 0.0422 m and 0.0801 m, respectively. Oil was re-circulated in the annular passage while a cold water-glycol mixture was re-circulated in the inner pipe counter currently to the oil flow. The experiments were carried out at oil Reynolds number range of 2000 to 17000, covering laminar, transition and turbulent flow regimes. Four different methods of equivalent diameter of the annulus have been considered in this hydraulic analysis. The correction factor model for frictional pressure drop was also considered in the investigations. All methods addressed the high deviation of the prediction from the experimental data, which justified the need of a suitable pressure prediction correlation for the annular test section. The conventional hydraulic diameter method is a convenient substitute for characterizing physical dimension of a non-circular duct, and it leads to fairly good correlation between turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer characteristic of annular ducts.

  20. Scale dependent dynamic capillary pressure effect for two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidoye, Luqman K.; Das, Diganta B.

    2014-12-01

    Causes and effects of non-uniqueness in capillary pressure and saturation (Pc-S) relationship in porous media are of considerable concern to researchers of two-phase flow. In particular, a significant amounts of discussion have been generated regarding a parameter termed as dynamic coefficient (τ) which has been proposed for inclusion in the functional dependence of Pc-S relationship to quantify dynamic Pc and its relation with time derivative of saturation. While the dependence of the coefficient on fluid and porous media properties is less controversial, its relation to domain scale appears to be dependent on artefacts of experiments, mathematical models and the intra-domain averaging techniques. In an attempt to establish the reality of the scale dependency of the τ-S relationships, we carry out a series of well-defined laboratory experiments to determine τ-S relationships using three different sizes of cylindrical porous domains of silica sand. In this paper, we present our findings on the scale dependence of τ and its relation to high viscosity ratio (μr) silicone oil-water system, where μr is defined as the viscosity of non-wetting phase over that of the wetting phase. An order of magnitude increase in the value of τ was observed across various μr and domain scales. Also, an order of magnitude increase in τ is observed when τ at the top and the bottom sections in a domain are compared. Viscosity ratio and domain scales are found to have similar effects on the trend in τ-S relationship. We carry out a dimensional analysis of τ which shows how different variables, e.g., dimensionless τ and dimensionless domain volume (scale), may be correlated and provides a means to determine the influences of relevant variables on τ. A scaling relationship for τ was derived from the dimensionless analysis which was then validated against independent literature data. This showed that the τ-S relationships obtained from the literature and the scaling

  1. Experimental study on the flow patterns and the two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal impacting T-Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; Malandrone, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper analyzes the experimental results concerning the flow patterns and pressure drops in two-phase flow through a horizontal impacting T-junction, whose outlet pipes are aligned and perpendicular to the inlet pipe. The test section consists of plexiglass pipes with inner diameter of 10 mm. A mixture of water and air at ambient temperature and pressures up to 2.4 bar flows through the T-junction, with different splitting of flow rates in the two outlet branches; superficial velocities of air and water in the inlet pipe have been varied up to a maximum of 35 m/s and 3.5 m/s respectively. The flow patterns occurring in the inlet and branch pipes are compared with the predictions of the Baker and Taitel - Dukler maps. The pressure drops along the branches have been measured relatively to different splitting of the flow rate through the two branches and the pressure loss coefficients in the junction have been evaluated. Friction pressure drops have allowed us to evaluate two-phase friction multipliers, which have then been compared to the predictions of Lockhart-Martinelli, and Friedel correlations. Local pressure drops have been extrapolated at the junction centre and analyzed; the two-phase multiplier has been evaluated and compared with the predictions of Chisholm correlation; the value of the empirical coefficient that minimizes the discrepancy has also been evaluated.

  2. Pressure distribution in a converging-diverging nozzle during two-phase choked flow of subcooled nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Choked flow rates and axial pressure distributions were measured for subcooled nitrogen in a converging-diverging nozzle with a constant area section in the throat region. Stagnation pressures ranged from slightly above saturation to twice the thermodynamic critical pressure. Stagnation temperatures ranged from 0.75 to 1.03 times the thermodynamic critical temperature. The choking plane is at the divergence end of the constant area throat section. At high stagnation pressures the fluid stays liquid well into the constant area throat region; at near saturation stagnation pressures it appears that vaporization occurs at or before the entrance to the constant area throat region. The throat-to-stagnation pressure ratio data exhibits an anomalous flat region, and this anomaly is related to the two-phase process. The fluid is metastably all liquid below the saturation pressure.

  3. Pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, liquid-vapor annular flows in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of frictional pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, annular liquid-vapor flows in zero gravity using simulation experiments conducted on earth is described. The scheme extends the authors' earlier work on dispersed flows. The simulation experiments used two immiscible liquids of identical density, namely, water and n-butyl benzoate. Because of the lack of rigorous analytical models for turbulent, annular flows, the proposed scheme resorts to existing semiempirical correlations. Results based on two different correlations are presented and compared. Others may be used. It was shown that, for both dispersed and annular flow regimes, the predicted frictional pressure gradients in 0-g are lower than those in 1-g under otherwise identical conditions. The physical basis for this finding is given.

  4. Some aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and dynamic instabilities in medium and high pressure steam generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, H. C.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental data for void fraction, incipient point of boiling, initial point of net vapor generation, bubble dynamics, dryout, two-phase flow pressure drop and density-wave oscillations were obtained in long, sodium heated steam generator tubes of different geometries for a wide range of operating conditions and at medium and high pressures. These data and data from literature taken in sodium and electrically heated steam generator tubes were correlated. Aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and density-wave oscillations in these steam generators disclosed include the distribution factor in small- and medium-size diameter steam generator tubes, the characteristic of the transitions at the incipient point of boiling and initial point of net vapor generation, bubble growth during subcooled nucleate flow boiling, the importance of the equivalent length for dryout in non-uniformly heated steam generator tubes and the mechanisms of density-wave oscillations in once-through steam generator tubes.

  5. Improvement of Vacuum Pressure in the Annular-Ring Coupled Structures for the J-PARC Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Yasuo; Oozone, Akira; Tamura, Jun

    The accelerating cavities of the J-PARC linac, additionally comprising an annular-ring-coupled structure (ACS), went into operation in 2014. To further improve the vacuum pressure of the ACS, an additional nonevaporable getter (NEG) pump was designed so that it could be installed independent of the vacuum chamber of the ACS cavity. We confirmed that the NEG pump can be appropriately activated by using a small pumping station and that purging with noble gases reduces the saturation of the NEG surface. In the evacuation test of the prototype ACS cavity with the NEG pump, the partial pressure of H2 and the total pressure were reduced from 4.8 × 10-7 and 6.8 × 10-7 Pa to 2.5 × 10-7 and 4.5 × 10-7 Pa, respectively. The additional NEG pump will be installed in the ACS cavity in the fall of 2014, after which any decrease in pressure and NEG-pump lifetime will be confirmed by long-term-operation experiments.

  6. Pressure drop of two-phase plug flow in round mini-channels: Influence of surface wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong

    2008-09-15

    In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of two-phase plug flows in round mini-channels was investigated for three different tube materials, i.e., glass, polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. Air and water were used as the test fluids. In the wet-plug flow regime (wet wall condition at the gas portions), the pressure drop was reasonably predicted by the homogeneous flow model or by the correlations of Mishima and Hibiki [K. Mishima, T. Hibiki, Some characteristics of air-water two-phase flow in small diameter vertical tubes, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 22 (1996) 703-712] and Chisholm [D. Chisholm, A theoretical basis for the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation for two-phase flow, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 10 (1967) 1767-1778]. On the other hand, in the dry-plug flow regime (dry wall condition at the gas portions), the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. To take into account the effect of the moving contact lines, a modified Lockhart-Martinelli type correlation was proposed, which fitted the measured pressure-drop data within the mean deviation of 6%. (author)

  7. Ventless pressure control of two-phase propellant tanks in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Panzarella, Charles H

    2004-11-01

    This work studies pressurization and pressure control of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. A finite element model is developed that couples a lumped thermodynamic formulation for the vapor region with a complete solution of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations for the flow and temperature fields in the liquid. Numerical results show that buoyancy effects are strong, even in microgravity, and can reposition a vapor bubble that is initially at the center of the tank to a region near the tank wall in a relatively short time. Long-term tank pressurization with the vapor bubble at the tank wall shows that after an initial transient lasting about a week, the final rate of pressure increase agrees with a purely thermodynamic analysis of the entire tank. However, the final pressure levels are quite different from thermodynamic predictions. Numerical results also show that there is significant thermal stratification in the liquid due to the effects of natural convection. A subcooled jet is used to provide simultaneous cooling and mixing in order to bring the tank pressure back down to its initial value. Three different jet speeds are examined. Although the lowest jet speed is ineffective at controlling the pressure because of insufficient penetration into the liquid region, the highest jet speed is shown to be quite effective at disrupting thermal stratification and reducing the tank pressure in reasonable time. PMID:15644378

  8. Two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop of LNG during saturated flow boiling in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Shi, Yumei

    2013-12-01

    Two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop of LNG (liquefied natural gas) have been measured in a horizontal smooth tube with an inner diameter of 8 mm. The experiments were conducted at inlet pressures from 0.3 to 0.7 MPa with a heat flux of 8-36 kW m-2, and mass flux of 49.2-201.8 kg m-2 s-1. The effect of vapor quality, inlet pressure, heat flux and mass flux on the heat transfer characteristic are discussed. The comparisons of the experimental data with the predicted value by existing correlations are analyzed. Zou et al. (2010) correlation shows the best accuracy with 24.1% RMS deviation among them. Moreover four frictional pressure drop methods are also chosen to compare with the experimental database.

  9. Prediction of two-phase pressure drop in heat exchanger for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The overall efficiency of a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocooler is governed by the performance of the recuperative heat exchanger. In the heat exchanger, the hot stream of the mixed refrigerant undergoes condensation at high pressure while the cold stream gets evaporated at low pressure. The pressure drop in the low pressure stream is crucial since it directly influences the achievable refrigeration temperature. However, experimental and theoretical studies related to two-phase pressure drop in mixtures at cryogenic temperatures, are limited. Therefore, the design of an efficient MR J-T cryocooler is a challenging task due to the lack of predictive tools. In the present work, the existing empirical correlations, which are commonly used for the prediction of pressure drop in the case of pure refrigerants, evaporating at near ambient conditions, are assessed for the mixed refrigerants. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop in the evaporating cold stream of the tube-in-tube helically coiled heat exchanger. The predicted frictional pressure drop in the heat exchanger is compared with the experimental data. The suggested empirical correlations can be used to predict the hydraulic performance of the heat exchanger.

  10. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  11. Heat transfer in two-phase flow at high reduced pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagov, V. V.; Minko, M. V.

    2011-04-01

    It is shown that heat transfer that takes place in vapor-liquid flows in the region of high reduced pressures is mainly due to the nucleate boiling mechanism even at high values of vapor quality. At relatively low heat fluxes, a noticeable enhancement of heat transfer is observed as vapor quality increases. A procedure for calculating heat transfer is proposed, which is confirmed by a comparison of calculated results with experimental data on the boiling of carbon dioxide and other liquids in channels.

  12. Two-Phase Frictional Pressure Drop Multipliers for SUVA R-134a Flowing in a Rectangular Duct

    SciTech Connect

    P Vassallo; K Keller

    2004-12-13

    The adiabatic two-phase frictional multipliers for SUVA, R-134a flowing in a rectangular duct (with D{sub H} = 4.8 mm) have been measured for 3 nominal system pressures (0.9 MPa, 1.38 MPa and 2.41 MPa) and 3 nominal mass fluxes (510, 1020 and 2040 kg/m{sup 2}/s). The data is compared with several classical correlations to assess their predictive capabilities. The Lockhart-Martinelli model gives reasonable results at the lowest pressure and mass flux, near the operating range of most refrigeration systems, but gives increasingly poor comparisons as the pressure and mass flux is increased. The Chisholm B-coefficient model is found to best predict the data over the entire range of test conditions; however, there is significant disagreement at the highest pressure tested (with the model over predicting the data upwards of 100% for some cases). The data shows an increased tendency toward homogeneous flow as the pressure and flow rate are increased, and in fact the homogeneous model best predicts the bulk of the data at the highest pressure tested.

  13. Review of critical flow rate, propagation of pressure pulse, and sonic velocity in two-phase media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y.

    1972-01-01

    For single-phase media, the critical discharge velocity, the sonic velocity, and the pressure pulse propagation velocity can be expressed in the same form by assuming isentropic, equilibria processes. In two-phase mixtures, the same concept is not valid due to the existence of interfacial transports of momentum, heat, and mass. Thus, the three velocities should be treated differently and separately for each particular condition, taking into account the various transport processes involved under that condition. Various attempts are reviewed to predict the critical discharge rate or the propagation velocities by considering slip ratio (momentum change), evaporation (mass and heat transport), flow pattern, etc. Experimental data were compared with predictions based on various theorems. The importance is stressed of the time required to achieve equilibrium as compared with the time available during the process, for example, of passing a pressure pulse.

  14. Performance at Simulated High Altitudes of a Prevaporizing Annular Turbojet Combustor Having Low Pressure Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, Carl T

    1956-01-01

    An annular prevaporizing turbojet combustor having pressure losses lower than those obtained in current turbojet combustors was developed, Pressure losses of 2 to 4 percent, satisfactory temperature profiles, and combustion efficiencies of 98, 88, and 81 percent were obtained at 56,000, 70,000, and 80,000 feet respectively, for a simulated 5.2- pressure-ratio engine at rated speed and 0.6 flight Mach number with JP-4 fuel. Use of JP-5 fuel resulted in a small penalty in efficiency due, at least in part, to insufficient prevaporizer capacity.

  15. On the transition between two-phase and single-phase interface dynamics in multicomponent fluids at supercritical pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Rainer N.; Oefelein, Joseph C.

    2013-09-01

    A theory that explains the operating pressures where liquid injection processes transition from exhibiting classical two-phase spray atomization phenomena to single-phase diffusion-dominated mixing is presented. Imaging from a variety of experiments have long shown that under certain conditions, typically when the pressure of the working fluid exceeds the thermodynamic critical pressure of the liquid phase, the presence of discrete two-phase flow processes become diminished. Instead, the classical gas-liquid interface is replaced by diffusion-dominated mixing. When and how this transition occurs, however, is not well understood. Modern theory still lacks a physically based model to quantify this transition and the precise mechanisms that lead to it. In this paper, we derive a new model that explains how the transition occurs in multicomponent fluids and present a detailed analysis to quantify it. The model applies a detailed property evaluation scheme based on a modified 32-term Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state that accounts for the relevant real-fluid thermodynamic and transport properties of the multicomponent system. This framework is combined with Linear Gradient Theory, which describes the detailed molecular structure of the vapor-liquid interface region. Our analysis reveals that the two-phase interface breaks down not necessarily due to vanishing surface tension forces, but due to thickened interfaces at high subcritical temperatures coupled with an inherent reduction of the mean free molecular path. At a certain point, the combination of reduced surface tension, the thicker interface, and reduced mean free molecular path enter the continuum length scale regime. When this occurs, inter-molecular forces approach that of the multicomponent continuum where transport processes dominate across the interfacial region. This leads to a continuous phase transition from compressed liquid to supercritical mixture states. Based on this theory, a regime diagram for

  16. Correlation and spectral measurements of fluctuating pressures and velocities in annular turbulent flow. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.J.; Jones, B.G.; Roy, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    An experimental study of the fluctuating velocity field, the fluctuating static wall pressure and the in-stream fluctuating static pressure in an annular turbulent air flow system with a radius ratio of 4.314 has been conducted. The study included direct measurements of the mean velocity profile, turbulent velocity field; fluctuating static wall pressure and in-stream fluctuating static pressure from which the statistical values of the turbulent intensity levels, power spectral densities of the turbulent quantities, the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating static pressure in the core region of the flow and the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating velocity field in the core region of the flow were obtained.

  17. Investigation of Temperature Fluctuations Caused by Steam-Water Two-Phase Flow in Pressurizer Spray Piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Koji; Nakamura, Akira; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Oumaya, Toru

    In a PWR plant, a steam-water two-phase flow may possibly exist in the pressurizer spray pipe under a normal operating condition since the flow rate of the spray water is not sufficient to fill the horizontal section of the pipe completely. Initiation of high cycle fatigue cracks is suspected to occur under such thermally stratified two phase flow conditions due to cyclic thermal stress fluctuations caused by oscillations of the water surface. Such oscillations cannot be detected by the measurement of temperature on outer surface of the pipe. In order to clarify the flow and thermal conditions in the pressurizer spray pipe and assess their impact on the pipe structure, an experiment was conducted for a steam-water flow at a low flow rate using a mock-up pressurizer spray pipe. The maximum temperature fluctuation of about 0.2 times of the steam-water temperature difference was observed at the inner wall around water surface in the test section. Visualization tests were conducted to investigate the temperature fluctuation phenomena. It was shown that the fluid temperature fluctuations were not caused by the waves on the water surface, but were caused by liquid temperature fluctuations in water layer below the interface. The influence of small amount of non-condensable gas dissolved in the reactor coolant on the liquid temperature fluctuation phenomena was investigated by injecting air into the experimental loop. The air injection attenuated the liquid temperature fluctuations in the water layer since the condensation was suppressed by the non- condensable gas. It is not expected that wall temperature fluctuation in the actual PWR plant may exceed the temperature equivalent to the fatigue limit stress amplitude when it is assumed to be proportional to the steam-water temperature difference.

  18. Pressure drop of two-phase dry-plug flow in round mini-channels: Effect of moving contact line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong

    2010-01-15

    In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of the two-phase dry-plug flow (dry wall condition at the gas portions) in round mini-channels was investigated. The air-water mixtures were flowed through the round mini-channels made of polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. In the dry-plug flow regime, the pressure drop measured became larger either by increasing the liquid superficial velocity or by decreasing the gas superficial velocity due to the increase of the number of the moving contact lines in the test section. In such a case, the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. Therefore, a pressure drop model of dry-plug flow was proposed through modification of the dynamic contact angle analysis taking account of the energy dissipation by the moving contact lines, which represents the experimental data within the mean deviation of 4%. (author)

  19. Transient two-phase CFD simulation of overload pressure pulsation in a prototype sized Francis turbine considering the waterway dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mössinger, P.; Conrad, P.; Jung, A.

    2014-03-01

    At high load operation points, Francis turbines generally produce large cavitation volumes of central vortex character in the draft tube. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the flow behaviour at high load conditions a combined 1D-3D transient two-phase numerical investigation at prototype size was carried out and these results were compared with measured site data. A one-dimensional model to capture hydroacoustic effects along a pipeline will be presented. The corresponding PDEs were solved using an implicit finite difference scheme on a staggered grid. In contrast to previous studies this model is coupled to the commercial software ANSYS CFX through an interface which exchanges pressure and discharge data within every time step until convergence. Results of the one-dimensional approach as well as the coupled solution were validated with commercial one-dimensional software (SIMSEN) and a full threedimensional calculation for hydroacoustic test cases. Unlike former investigations the described 1D-3D approach is used to compare site data with a numerical analysis at prototype size focused on the amplitude and frequency of the pressure pulsation at overload condition. The combined model is able to capture the occurring phase change in the draft tube as well as the propagating pressure oscillation through the hydraulic system without solving for the whole penstock in a 3D manner, thus saving time and computational resources.

  20. Two-phase convection in the high-pressure ice layer of the large icy moons: geodynamical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousova, K.; Sotin, C.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.; Grasset, O.

    2015-12-01

    The H2O layers of large icy satellites such as Ganymede, Callisto, or Titan probably include a liquid water ocean sandwiched between the deep high-pressure ice layer and the outer ice I shell [1]. It has been recently suggested that the high-pressure ice layer could be decoupled from the silicate core by a salty liquid water layer [2]. However, it is not clear whether accumulation of liquids at the bottom of the high-pressure layer is possible due to positive buoyancy of water with respect to high-pressure ice. Numerical simulation of this two-phase (i.e. ice and water) problem is challenging, which explains why very few studies have self-consistently handled the presence and transport of liquids within the solid ice [e.g. 3]. While using a simplified description of water production and transport, it was recently showed in [4] that (i) a significant fraction of the high-pressure layer reaches the melting point and (ii) the melt generation and its extraction to the overlying ocean significantly influence the global thermal evolution and interior structure of the large icy moons.Here, we treat the high-pressure ice layer as a compressible mixture of solid ice and liquid water [5]. Several aspects are investigated: (i) the effect of the water formation on the vigor of solid-state convection and its influence on the amount of heat that is transferred from the silicate mantle to the ocean; (ii) the fate of liquids within the upper thermal boundary layer - whether they freeze or reach the ocean; and (iii) the effect of salts and volatile compounds (potentially released from the rocky core) on the melting/freezing processes. Investigation of these aspects will allow us to address the thermo-chemical evolution of the internal ocean which is crucial to evaluate the astrobiological potential of large icy moons. This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. [1] Hussmann et al. (2007), Treatise of

  1. High pressure homogenization and two-phased anaerobic digestion for enhanced biogas conversion from municipal waste sludge.

    PubMed

    Wahidunnabi, Abdullahil K; Eskicioglu, Cigdem

    2014-12-01

    This study compared advanced anaerobic digestion combining two-phased anaerobic digestion (2PAD) with high pressure homogenization (HPH) pretreatment to conventional anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge at laboratory scale. The study began with examination of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) solubilization due to HPH pretreatment at different pressure (0-12,000 psi) and chemical dose (0.009-0.036 g NaOH/g total solids). Homogenizing pressure was found as the most significant factor (p-value < 0.05) for increasing solubilization of particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biopolymers in TWAS. Based on the preliminary results, a pretreatment with chemical dose of 0.009 g NaOH/g total solids and pressure of 12,000 psi was selected for digester studies. Upon acclimation of anaerobic inocula to pretreatments, a total number of twelve lab-scale digesters were operated under scenarios including single-stage (control), 2PAD, and HPH coupled with 2PAD (HPH + 2PAD) at sludge retention times (SRTs) of 20, 14 and 7 days. Between mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures, mesophilic digestion was found to benefit more from pretreatments. Relative (to control) improvements in methane yield and volatile solids (VS) removals increased noticeably as SRT was shortened from 20 to 14 and 7 days. HPH + 2PAD system was found to achieve the maximum methane production (0.61-1.32 L CH4/Ldigester-d) and VS removals (43-64%). Thermophilic control, 2PAD and HPH + 2PAD systems resulted in significant pathogen removals meeting Class A biosolids requirements according to Organic Matter Recycling Regulations (OMRR) of British Columbia (BC) at 20 d SRT. Energy analysis indicated that all the digestion scenarios attained positive energy balance with 2PAD system operated at 20 d SRT producing the maximum net energy of 4.76 GJ/tonne CODadded. PMID:25243656

  2. The influence of the radial pressure gradient on the blade root loss in an annular subsonic nozzle cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, D.; Weng, Z.; Xiang, Y.

    1985-09-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the blade root loss in an annular nozzle cascade in which consideration is given to the influence of the radial pressure gradient (RPG) on it. The variation of blade root losses under different RPG is obtained experimentally, and finite element method is used to calculate the pressure distribution in the blade passage.

  3. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  4. Experimental and numerical analysis of the effect of swirl on the pressure field in whirling annular and labyrinth seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robic, Bernard Francois

    1999-12-01

    In order to physically explain how the combined effect of turbulence and curvature affect the flow field in an annular and labyrinth seal, the present work presents measurements of the dynamic and mean pressure distributions on the stator wall of whirling annular and labyrinth seals for three different pre-swirl conditions: -45, 0 and +45 degrees. A calculation of the forces and moments generated by the pressure field has been performed and an analysis of the effect of swirl on the pressure field developed. In addition, because of the complex three dimensional nature of the flow and curvature which is not in the streamline direction, any prediction of the flow should be based on experimental boundary conditions to seek a convergence of the equations with better agreement with reality. Such predictive ability would greatly aid in the design of labyrinth and annular seals which are critical turbomachinery components. By providing these dynamic and mean pressure boundary conditions and utilizing the flow field velocity measured by Morrison et al. (1990, 1994), it is hoped that the following work will be a step toward improving simulation and therefore reduce testing and development cost. To illustrate the use of these data, computer simulations of centered and 50% eccentric annular and labyrinth seals for the different preswirls were performed using a CFD code, FLUENT UNS. These computer simulations of pressure and velocity data were compared to the pressure and LDV measurements.

  5. Comparison of Hirs' equation of Moody's equation for determining rotordynamic coefficients of annular pressure seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Dung T.

    1987-01-01

    The rotordynamic coefficients of an incompressible-flow annular pressure seal were determined using a bulk-flow model in conjunction with two different friction factor relationships. The first, Hirs' equation, assumes the friction factor is a function of Reynolds number only. The second, Moody's equation, approximates Moody's diagram and assumes the friction factor is a function of both Reynolds number and relative roughness. For each value of relative roughness, Hirs' constants were determined so that both equations gave the same magnitude and slope of the friction factor. For smooth seals, both relationships give the same results. For rough seals (e/2 H sub 0 = 0.05) Moody's equation predicts 44% greater direct stiffness, 35% greater cross-coupled stiffness, 19% smaller cross-coupled damping, 59% smaller cross-coupled inertia, and nominally the same direct damping and direct inertia.

  6. Wall pressure measurements of flooding in vertical countercurrent annular air–water flow

    SciTech Connect

    Choutapalli, I., Vierow, K.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study of flooding in countercurrent air-water annular flow in a large diameter vertical tube using wall pressure measurements is described in this paper. Axial pressure profiles along the length of the test section were measured up to and after flooding using fast response pressure transducers for three representative liquid flow rates representing a wide range of liquid Reynolds numbers (ReL = 4Γ/μ; Γ is the liquid mass flow rate per unit perimeter; μ is the dynamic viscosity) from 3341 to 19,048. The results show that flooding in large diameter tubes cannot be initiated near the air outlet and is only initiated near the air inlet. Fourier analysis of the wall pressure measurements shows that up to the point of flooding, there is no dominant wave frequency but rather a band of frequencies encompassing both the low frequency and the broad band that are responsible for flooding. The data indicates that flooding in large diameter vertical tubes may be caused by the constructive superposition of a plurality of waves rather than the action of a single large-amplitude wave.

  7. Cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss model for horizontal narrow annular flow with rotating drillpipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofei, T. N.; Irawan, S.; Pao, W.

    2015-04-01

    During oil and gas drilling operations, frictional pressure loss is experienced as the drilling fluid transports the drilled cuttings from the bottom-hole, through the annulus, to the surface. Estimation of these pressure losses is critical when designing the drilling hydraulic program. Two-phase frictional pressure loss in the annulus is very difficult to predict, and even more complex when there is drillpipe rotation. Accurate prediction will ensure that the correct equivalent circulating density (ECD) is applied in the wellbore to prevent formation fracture, especially in formations with narrow window between the pore pressure and fracture gradient. Few researchers have attempted to propose cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models, nevertheless, these models fail when they are applied to narrow wellbores such as in casing- while-drilling and slimhole applications. This study proposes improved cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models for narrow horizontal annuli with drillpipe rotation using Dimensional Analysis. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids were considered. The proposed model constants were fitted by generated data from a full-scale simulation study using ANSYS-CFX. The models showed improvement over existing cuttings-liquid pressure loss correlations in literature.

  8. Behavior interrelationships in annular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubring, Duwayne

    Two-phase gas-liquid flow occurs in many types of industrial boiling and condensing heat transfer equipment, including the reactor cores of boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs) and the steam generators of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In annular flow, the liquid phase often travels as both a thin film around the wall (containing disturbance waves and base film) and as entrained droplets in the central gas core. Gas bubbles are also often entrained into this film. Annular flow displays several quantifiable flow behaviors, including pressure loss, disturbance waves, and film thickness, along with micro-scale velocity profiles and fluctuations in the liquid film. The conventional approach to annular flow closely links film thickness and pressure loss, but relies on an assumed film velocity profile and does not consider disturbance waves explicitly. The present work seeks to explore a more complete range of behaviors in both horizontal and vertical flow to explore the relationships among them and thereby improve modeling of annular flow. Several of these investigations employ quantitative visualization. Modern optics and computing (in the form of non-trivial data reduction codes) are applied to the study of two-phase flow to process images of a physical experiment to quantify behavior information. Quantitative visualization allows for rapid acquisition of a large volume of flow behavior data, which allows for analysis of the flow behaviors themselves and how they relate to one another and to global modeling. By integrating behavior data from these quantitative visualizations and other conventional experimental investigations, a new two-region (base film and disturbance wave) model is proposed that can be implemented given only flow rates, external geometry, and fluid properties.

  9. Experimental investigation of two-phase flow pressure drop transients in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell reactant channels and their impact on the cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rupak; Kandlikar, Satish G.

    2014-12-01

    Fuel cells experience transients, which constitute a significant part of the drive cycle. Fuel cell response during these transients depends on the rates of reaction kinetics as well as mass transport delays. In the current work, an in situ setup is used to investigate the effect of changing load and temperature conditions on the two-phase flow in the fuel cell. Pressure drop and voltage response from the cell are used to characterize the two-phase flow and performance of the cell. The effect of changing load is simulated by changing the current by 20 A cm-2 (0.4 A cm-2) over a time period of 300 s, while the effect of changing cell temperature is studied by increasing/decreasing the cell temperature by 40 °C over 900 s. The results show that several minutes are required after a transient event for the two-phase flow to return to a new steady state condition. Transient effects are more prominent at the lower temperature of 40 °C, at which condition there is more liquid water present in the channels. Overshoot behavior, commonly seen in current and voltage response from fuel cells, has been observed for two-phase pressure drop during transient load changes.

  10. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, F.X.; Crowley, C.J.; Qureshi, Z.H.

    1992-06-01

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  11. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, F.X.; Crowley, C.J. ); Qureshi, Z.H. )

    1992-01-01

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  12. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, F. X.; Crowley, C. J.; Qureshi, Z. H.

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  13. The numerical calculation of heat transfer performance for annular flow of liquid nitrogen in a vertical annular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shufeng; Wu, Yuyuan; Zhao, Rongyi

    2001-04-01

    According to a separated phase flow model for vertical annular two-phase flow in an annular channel, the liquid film thickness, distributions of velocities and temperatures in the liquid layer are predicted in the range of heat fluxes: 6000-12000 W/m 2, mass flux: 500-1100 kg/m2 s. The pressure drop along the flow channel and heat transfer coefficient are also calculated. The liquid film thickness is in the order of micrometers and heat transfer coefficient is 2800-7800 W/m2 K of liquid nitrogen boiling in narrow annular channels. The measured heat transfer coefficient is 29% higher than the calculated values. With the mass flux increasing and the gap of the annular channel decreasing, pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient increase.

  14. Planar Pressure Field Determination in the Initial Merging Zone of an Annular Swirling Jet Based on Stereo-PIV Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Vanierschot, Maarten; Van den Bulck, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the static pressure field of an annular swirling jet is measured indirectly using stereo-PIV measurements. The pressure field is obtained from numerically solving the Poisson equation, taken into account the axisymmetry of the flow At the boundaries no assumptions are made and the exact boundary conditions are applied. Since all source terms can be measured using stereo-PIV and the boundary conditions are exact, no assumptions other than axisymmetry had to be made in the calculation of the pressure field. The advantage of this method of indirect pressure measurement is its high spatial resolution compared to the traditional pitot probes. Moreover this method is non-intrusive while the insertion of a pitot tube disturbs the flow It is shown that the annular swirling flow can be divided into three regimes: a low, an intermediate and a high swirling regime. The pressure field of the low swirling regime is the superposition of the pressure field of the non-swirling jet and a swirl induced pressure field due to the centrifugal forces of the rotating jet. As the swirl increases, the swirl induced pressure field becomes dominant and for the intermediate and high swirling regimes, the simple radial equilibrium equation holds.

  15. Using ultrasonic measurements and a two-phase composite model to assess radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    Ultrasonic methods used in the study of radiation damage and recovery in single crystals appear to also be useful for similar studies on polycrystalline alloys. Ultrasonic methods have demonstrated a sensitivity to radiation damage as affected by neutron fluence, irradiation temperature, large changes in composition, and possibly, as well, by neutron energy spectrum. On the microstructure defect evolution, only the residual defects created through the radiation event will contribute to the final macroscopic material property change. From a microstructure point, it is generally accepted that radiation hardening and embrittlement in metals are caused by clusters of vacancies, interstitial, and solute atoms that impede the motion of slip dislocations. Although vacancy-type defects are a major contributor to the material hardening, they also indicate the presence of other interstitial defects. Thus the total volume change of vacancy-type defects before and after irradiation can serve as a direct index to the final material property changes. The volume change of the vacancy-type defects can be determined by utilizing the two -phase composite model (matrix and void-type inclusion) to interpret wave velocities of baseline and irradiated specimens that are obtained from the ultrasonic wave experiment. This is a relatively economic and straightforward procedure. The correlation of the volume change of the vacancy-type defects with the existing destructive mechanical test results may play an important role in the future for the prediction of the radiation embrittlement and remaining plant lifetime, especially for the older plants on the verge of exhausting all the available mechanical test specimens loaded in the surveillance capsules. The above hypothesis was supported by the limited irradiated data analyzed and presented in his paper. The proposed ultrasonic methodology also has a potential application to assess creep damage in fossil power plants.

  16. A study of pressure drop in a Capillary tube-viscometer for a two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ohene, F.; Livingston, C.; Matthews, C.; Rhone, Y.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of pipeline transportation of highly concentrated suspensions such as coal-water slurries, can exhibit several flow characteristics depending on the concentration and the physical parameters of the dispersed phase. Experiments were conducted for coal-water slurries flows in a series of horizontal capillary tubes of diameters 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0 mm and 100 mm in length, in order to investigate the effect of concentration, pressure drop, and the transitional Reynolds number from laminar to turbulent flow in a homogeneous slurry. The solid concentration was varied from 15% to 63% in 0.1% xanthum gum solution. Pressure drop and the volume flow measurement were made using HVA-6 Capillary viscometer. The Reynolds numbers obtained were found to be dependent on the slurry concentration and the viscosity of the slurry mixture, but independent of the capillary diameter.

  17. Evaluation of two-phase relative permeability and capillary pressure relations for unstable displacements in a pore network

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Karl J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Changyong; Grate, Jay W.

    2012-10-29

    A series of displacement experiments was conducted using five wetting-nonwetting immiscible fluid pairs in a homogenous and uniform pore network. The micromodel was initially saturated with either polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG) or water as a wetting fluid, which was subsequently displaced by a nonwetting fluid (dodecane, hexadecane, or mineral oil) at different flow rates. The experiments were designed to allow determinations of nonwetting fluid relative permeabilities ( ), fluid saturations ( ), and capillary pressure heads ( ). In the displacements, nonwetting fluid saturations increased with increasing flow rates for all five fluid pairs, and viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement were observed. Viscous fingering occurred when PEG was displaced by either dodecane or hexadecane. For the water displacements, capillary fingers were observed at low capillary numbers. Due to unstable fingering phenomena, values for the PEG displacements were smaller than for the water displacements. A fitting exercise using the Brooks-Corey (1964) relationship showed that the fitted entry pressure heads are reasonably close to the computed entry pressure head. The fitted pore geometry factor, Sn values for the displacements are considerably lower than what is expected for displacements in homogeneous, highly uniform, porous systems, demonstrating the impact of unstable displacement on the apparent value of Sn. It was shown that a continuum-based multiphase model could be used to predict the average behavior for wetting fluid drainage in a pore network as long as independently fitted - and - relations are used. The use of a coupled approach through the Brooks-Corey pore geometry factor underpredicts observed values.

  18. Draft tube discharge fluctuation during self-sustained pressure surge: fluorescent particle image velocimetry in two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A.; Dreyer, M.; Andreini, N.; Avellan, F.

    2013-04-01

    Hydraulic machines play an increasingly important role in providing a secondary energy reserve for the integration of renewable energy sources in the existing power grid. This requires a significant extension of their usual operating range, involving the presence of cavitating flow regimes in the draft tube. At overload conditions, the self-sustained oscillation of a large cavity at the runner outlet, called vortex rope, generates violent periodic pressure pulsations. In an effort to better understand the nature of this unstable behavior and its interaction with the surrounding hydraulic and mechanical system, the flow leaving the runner is investigated by means of particle image velocimetry. The measurements are performed in the draft tube cone of a reduced scale model of a Francis turbine. A cost-effective method for the in-house production of fluorescent seeding material is developed and described, based on off-the-shelf polyamide particles and Rhodamine B dye. Velocity profiles are obtained at three streamwise positions in the draft tube cone, and the corresponding discharge variation in presence of the vortex rope is calculated. The results suggest that 5-10 % of the discharge in the draft tube cone is passing inside the vortex rope.

  19. Numerical study of two-phase flows in porous media : extraction of a capillary pressure saturation curve free from boundary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Moura, Marcel; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Toussaint, Renaud; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    The capillary pressure saturation relationship is a key element in the resolution of hydrological problems that involve the closure partial-flow Darcy relations. This relationship is derived empirically, and the two typical curve fitting equations that are used to describe it are the Brooks-Corey and Van Genüchten models. The question we tackle is the influence of the boundary conditions of the experimental set-up on the measurement of this retention curve, resulting in a non physical pressure-saturation curve in porous media, due the "end effects" phenomenon. In this study we analyze the drainage of a two-phase flow from a quasi 2D random porous medium, and compare it to simulations arising from an invasion percolation algorithm. The medium is initially saturated with a viscous fluid, and as the pressure difference is gradually increased, air penetrates from an open inlet, thus displacing the fluid which leaves the system from the outlet in the opposing side. In the initial stage, the liquid-air interface evolves from a planar front to the fractal structure characteristic of slow drainage processes, giving the initial downward curvature. In the final stage, air spreads all along the filter, and must reach narrower pores, calling for an increase of the pressure difference, reflected by the final upward curvature. Measuring the pressure-saturation (P-S) law in subwindows located at the inlet, outlet and middle of the network, we emphasize that these boundary effects are the fact of a fraction of pores that is likely to be negligible for high scale systems. We analyze the value of the air saturation at the end of the experiment for a series of simulations with different sample geometries : we observe that this saturation converges to a plateau when the distance between the inlet ant outlet increases, and that the value of this plateau is determined by the distance between the lateral walls. We finally show that the pressure difference between the two phases

  20. Experiments on two-phase flow in a quasi-2D porous medium: investigation of boundary effects in the measurement of pressure-saturation relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Marcel; Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Toussaint, Renaud; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    We have performed two-phase flow experiments to analyze the drainage from a quasi-2D random porous medium. The medium is transparent, which allows for the visualization of the invasion pattern during the flow and is initially fully saturated with a viscous fluid (a dyed glycerol-water mix). As the pressure in the fluid is gradually reduced, air penetrates from an open inlet, thus displacing the fluid which leaves the system from the outlet in the opposite side. A feedback mechanism was devised to control the experiment: the capillary pressure (difference in pressure between the non-wetting and wetting phases) is continuously increased to be just above the threshold value necessary to drive the invasion process. This mechanism is intended to keep the invasion process slow, in the so-called capillary regime, where capillary forces dominate the dynamics. Pressure measurements and pictures of the flow are recorded and the pressure-saturation relationship is computed. The effects of the boundary conditions to this quantity are verified experimentally by repeatedly performing the analysis using porous media of different sizes. We show that some features of the pressure-saturation curve are strongly affected by boundary effects. The invasion close to the inlet and outlet of the model are particularly influenced by the boundaries and this is reflected in the phases of pressure building up in the pressure-saturation curves, in the beginning and end of the invasion process. Conversely, at the central part of the model (away from the boundaries), the invasion process happens at an essentially constant capillary pressure, which is reflected as a plateau in the pressure-saturation curve. Additionally, the use of a high-resolution camera allows us to analyze the images down to the pore scale. We can directly obtain a distribution of pore-throat sizes in the model (and their associated capillary pressure thresholds) and divide it into distributions of invaded / non-invaded pores

  1. Experimental sizing and assessment of two-phase pressure drop correlations for a capillary tube with transcritical and subcritical carbon dioxide flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchieri, R.; Boccardi, G.; Calabrese, N.; Celata, G. P.; Zummo, G.

    2014-04-01

    In the last years, CO2 was proposed as an alternative refrigerant for different refrigeration applications (automotive air conditioning, heat pumps, refrigerant plants, etc.) In the case of low power refrigeration applications, as a household refrigerator, the use of too expensive components is not economically sustainable; therefore, even if the use of CO2 as the refrigerant is desired, it is preferable to use conventional components as much as possible. For these reasons, the capillary tube is frequently proposed as expansion system. Then, it is necessary to characterize the capillary in terms of knowledge of the evolving mass flow rate and the associate pressure drop under all possible operative conditions. For this aim, an experimental campaign has been carried out on the ENEA test loop "CADORE" to measure the performance of three capillary tubes having same inner diameter (0.55 mm) but different lengths (4, 6 and 8 meters). The test range of inlet pressure is between about 60 and 110 bar, whereas external temperatures are between about 20 to 42 °C. The two-phase pressure drop through the capillary tube is detected and experimental values are compared with the predictions obtained with the more widely used correlations available in the literature. Correlations have been tested over a wide range of variation of inlet flow conditions, as a function of different inlet parameters.

  2. Annular pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001142.htm Annular pancreas To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An annular pancreas is a ring of pancreatic tissue that encircles ...

  3. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure gradients, and rotordynamic coefficients for tapered annular gas seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, D. A.; Childs, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of current annular seal theory and a discussion of the predicted effect on stiffness of tapering the seal stator are presented. An outline of Nelson's analytical-computational method for determining rotordynamic coefficients for annular compressible-flow seals is included. Modifications to increase the maximum rotor speed of an existing air-seal test apparatus at Texas A&M University are described. Experimental results, including leakage, entrance-loss coefficients, pressure distributions, and normalized rotordynamic coefficients, are presented for four convergent-tapered, smooth-rotor, smooth-stator seals. A comparison of the test results shows that an inlet-to-exit clearance ratio of 1.5 to 2.0 provides the maximum direct stiffness, a clearance ratio of 2.5 provides the greatest stability, and a clearance ratio of 1.0 provides the least stability. The experimental results are compared to theoretical results from Nelson's analysis with good agreement. Test results for cross-coupled stiffness show less sensitivity of fluid prerotation than predicted.

  4. Development of an internally cooled annular fuel bundle for pressurized heavy water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, H.; Armstrong, J.; Kittmer, A.; Zhuchkova, A.; Xu, R.; Hyland, B.; King, M.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Livingstone, S.; Bergeron, A.

    2013-07-01

    A number of preliminary studies have been conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to explore the potential of using internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) in CANDU reactors including finite element thermo-mechanical modelling, reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, fabrication and mechanical design. The most compelling argument for this design compared to the conventional solid-rod design is the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperature for equivalent LERs (linear element ratings). This feature presents the potential for power up-rating or higher burnup and a decreased defect probability due to in-core power increases. The thermal-mechanical evaluation confirmed the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperatures for ICAF fuel compared to solid-rod fuel for equivalent LER. The maximum fuel temperature increase as a function of LER increase is also significantly less for ICAF fuel. As a result, the sheath stress induced by an equivalent power increase is approximately six times less for ICAF fuel than solid-rod fuel. This suggests that the power-increase thresholds to failure (due to stress-corrosion cracking) for ICAF fuel should be well above those for solid-rod fuel, providing improvement in operation flexibility and safety.

  5. An Annular Mechanical Temperature Compensation Structure for Gas-Sealed Capacitive Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiuchun; Jiang, Yonggang; Takao, Hidekuni; Maenaka, Kazusuke; Higuchi, Kohei

    2012-01-01

    A novel gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor with a temperature compensation structure is reported. The pressure sensor is sealed by Au-Au diffusion bonding under a nitrogen ambient with a pressure of 100 kPa and integrated with a platinum resistor-based temperature sensor for human activity monitoring applications. The capacitance-pressure and capacitance-temperature characteristics of the gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor without temperature compensation structure are calculated. It is found by simulation that a ring-shaped structure on the diaphragm of the pressure sensor can mechanically suppress the thermal expansion effect of the sealed gas in the cavity. Pressure sensors without/with temperature compensation structures are fabricated and measured. Through measured results, it is verified that the calculation model is accurate. Using the compensation structures with a 900 μm inner radius, the measured temperature coefficient is much reduced as compared to that of the pressure sensor without compensation. The sensitivities of the pressure sensor before and after compensation are almost the same in the pressure range from 80 kPa to 100 kPa. PMID:22969385

  6. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume I. Chapters 1-5)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  7. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume II. Chapters 6-10)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  8. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  9. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume IV. Chapters 15-19)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  10. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure distribution, and rotordynamic coefficients for annular gas seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicks, C. O.; Childs, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of seal behavior in rotordynamics is discussed and current annular seal theory is reviewed. A Nelson's analytical-computational method for determining rotordynamic coefficients for this type of compressible-flow seal is outlined. Various means for the experimental identification of the dynamic coefficients are given, and the method employed at the Texas A and M University (TAMU) test facility is explained. The TAMU test apparatus is described, and the test procedures are discussed. Experimental results, including leakage, entrance-loss coefficients, pressure distributions, and rotordynamic coefficients for a smooth and a honeycomb constant-clearance seal are presented and compared to theoretical results from Nelson's analysis. The results for both seals show little sensitivity to the running speed over the test range. Agreement between test results and theory for leakage through the seal is satisfactory. Test results for direct stiffness show a greater sensitivity to fluid pre-rotation than predicted. Results also indicate that the deliberately roughened surface of the honeycomb seal provides improved stability versus the smooth seal.

  11. Two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program to characterize the spray from candidate nozzles for icing-cloud simulation is discussed. One canidate nozzle, which is currently used for icing research, has been characterized for flow and drop size. The median-volume diameter (MVD) from this air-assist nozzle is compared with correlations in the literature. The new experimental spray facility is discussed, and the drop-size instruments are discussed in detail. Since there is no absolute standard for drop-size measurements and there are other limitations, such as drop -size range and velocity range, several instruments are used and results are compared. A two-phase model was developed at Pennsylvania State University. The model uses the k-epsilon model of turbulence in the continous phase. Three methods for treating the discrete phase are used: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model. In the LHF model both phases have the same velocity and temperature at each point. The DSF model provides interphase transport but ignores the effects of turbulent fluctuations. In the SSF model the drops interact with turbulent eddies whose properties are determined by the k-epsilon turbulence model. The two-phase flow model has been extended to include the effects of evaporation and combustion.

  12. Low-pressure performance of annular, high-pressure (40 atm) high-temperature (2480 K) combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental tests were conducted to develop a combustion system for a 40 atmosphere pressure, 2480 K exhaust gas temperature, turbine cooling facility. The tests were conducted in an existing facility with a maximum pressure capability of 10 atmospheres and where inlet air temperatures as high as 894 K could be attained. Exhaust gas temperatures were as high as 2365 K. Combustion efficiences were about 100 percent over a fuel air ratio range of 0.016 to 0.056. Combustion efficiency decreased at leaner and richer ratios when the inlet air temperature was 589 K. Data are presented that show the effect of fuel air ratio and inlet air temperature on liner metal temperature. Isothermal system pressure loss as a function of diffuser inlet Mach number is also presented. Data included exhaust gas pattern factors; unburned hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen emission index values; and smoke numbers.

  13. Zero-G two phase flow regime modeling in adiabatic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Best, Frederick R.; Wheeler, Montgomery; Miller, Katheryn M.

    1993-01-01

    Two-phase flow, thermal management systems are currently being considered as an alternative to conventional, single phase systems for future space missions because of their potential to reduce overall system mass, size, and pumping power requirements. Knowledge of flow regime transitions, heat transfer characteristics, and pressure drop correlations is necessary to design and develop two-phase systems. This work is concerned with microgravity, two-phase flow regime analysis. The data come from a recent sets of experiments. The experiments were funded by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and conducted by NASA JSC with Texas A&M University. The experiment was on loan to NASA JSC from Foster-Miller, Inc., who constructed it with funding from the Air Force Phillips Laboratory. The experiment used R12 as the working fluid. A Foster-Miller two phase pump was used to circulate the two phase mixture and allow separate measurements of the vapor and liquid flow streams. The experimental package was flown 19 times for 577 parabolas aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which simulates zero-G conditions by its parabolic flight trajectory. Test conditions included bubbly, slug and annular flow regimes in 0-G. The superficial velocities of liquid and vapor have been obtained from the measured flow rates and are presented along with the observed flow regimes and several flow regime transition predictions. None of the predictions completely describe the transitions as indicated by the data.

  14. Annular flow film characteristics in variable gravity.

    PubMed

    MacGillivray, Ryan M; Gabriel, Kamiel S

    2002-10-01

    Annular flow is a frequently occurring flow regime in many industrial applications. The need for a better understanding of this flow regime is driven by the desire to improve the design of many terrestrial and space systems. Annular two-phase flow occurs in the mining and transportation of oil and natural gas, petrochemical processes, and boilers and condensers in heating and refrigeration systems. The flow regime is also anticipated during the refueling of space vehicles, and thermal management systems for space use. Annular flow is mainly inertia driven with little effect of buoyancy. However, the study of this flow regime is still desirable in a microgravity environment. The influence of gravity can create an unstable, chaotic film. The absence of gravity, therefore, allows for a more stable and axisymmetric film. Such conditions allow for the film characteristics to be easily studied at low gas flow rates. Previous studies conducted by the Microgravity Research Group dealt with varying the gas or liquid mass fluxes at a reduced gravitational acceleration.(1,2) The study described here continues this work by examining the effect of changing the gravitational acceleration (hypergravity) on the film characteristics. In particular, the film thickness and the associated pressure drops are examined. The film thickness was measured using a pair of two-wire conductance probes. Experimental data was collected over a range of annular flow set points by changing the liquid and gas mass flow rates, the liquid-to-gas density ratio and the gravitational acceleration. The liquid-to-gas density ratio was varied by collecting data with helium-water and air-water at the same flow rates. The gravitational effect was examined by collecting data during the microgravity and pull-up (hypergravity) portions of the parabolic flights. PMID:12446332

  15. Two-phase viscoelastic jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J-D; Sakai, S.; Sethian, J.A.

    2008-12-10

    A coupled finite difference algorithm on rectangular grids is developed for viscoelastic ink ejection simulations. The ink is modeled by the Oldroyd-B viscoelastic fluid model. The coupled algorithm seamlessly incorporates several things: (1) a coupled level set-projection method for incompressible immiscible two-phase fluid flows; (2) a higher-order Godunov type algorithm for the convection terms in the momentum and level set equations; (3) a simple first-order upwind algorithm for the convection term in the viscoelastic stress equations; (4) central difference approximations for viscosity, surface tension, and upper-convected derivative terms; and (5) an equivalent circuit model to calculate the inflow pressure (or flow rate) from dynamic voltage.

  16. Two-phase flow model for energetic proton beam induced pressure waves in mercury target systems in the planned European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, I. F.; Imre, A. R.; Rosta, L.; Mezei, F.

    2008-12-01

    Two-phase flow calculations are presented to investigate the thermo-hydraulical effects of the interaction between 2 ms long 1.3 GeV proton pulses with a closed mercury loop which can be considered as a model system of the target of the planned European Spallation Source (ESS) facility. The two-fluid model consists of six first-order partial differential equations that present one dimensional mass, momentum and energy balances for mercury vapor and liquid phases are capable to describe quick transients like cavitation effects or shock waves. The absorption of the proton beam is represented as instantaneous heat source in the energy balance equations. Densities and internal energies of the mercury liquid-vapor system is calculated from the van der Waals equation, but general method how to obtain such properties using arbitrary equation of state is also presented. A second order accurate high-resolution shock-capturing numerical scheme is applied with different kind of limiters in the numerical calculations. Our analysis show that even 75 degree temperature heat shocks cannot cause considerable cavitation effects in mercury.

  17. Two-phase gas-liquid flow characteristics inside a plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-11-15

    In the present study, the air-water two-phase flow characteristics including flow pattern and pressure drop inside a plate heat exchanger are experimentally investigated. A plate heat exchanger with single pass under the condition of counter flow is operated for the experiment. Three stainless steel commercial plates with a corrugated sinusoidal shape of unsymmetrical chevron angles of 55 and 10 are utilized for the pressure drop measurement. A transparent plate having the same configuration as the stainless steel plates is cast and used as a cover plate in order to observe the flow pattern inside the plate heat exchanger. The air-water mixture flow which is used as a cold stream is tested in vertical downward and upward flow. The results from the present experiment show that the annular-liquid bridge flow pattern appeared in both upward and downward flows. However, the bubbly flow pattern and the slug flow pattern are only found in upward flow and downward flow, respectively. The variation of the water and air velocity has a significant effect on the two-phase pressure drop. Based on the present data, a two-phase multiplier correlation is proposed for practical application. (author)

  18. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  19. Experimental two-phase pressure gradients during evaporation of pure and mixed refrigerants in a smooth horizontal tube. Comparison with correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, A.; Vanoli, G. P.

    2006-06-01

    The paper reports the results of an experimental study on pressure drop during horizontal flow boiling of refrigerants R22, R507, R404A, R134a, R407C and R410A. The test section is a smooth, horizontal, stainless steel tube (6 mm I.D., 6 m length) uniformly heated by Joule effect. The experimental tests are carried out at an almost constant evaporating pressure of 7.0 bar varying the mass flow rate in the range 280 1,080 kg/m2 s. The experimental comparison clearly shown that the pressure drop of R22 is significantly higher as compared to all the other fluids. The results are compared against well-known pressure drop prediction methods. The available correlations can be used for both pure fluids and mixtures with no corrective factors, provided the mixture properties are evaluated at local compositions. The Chawla friction correlation is the best-fitting of our experimental data in combination with the heterogeneous momentum pressure drop model on the basis of the Rouhani-Axelsson void fraction correlation.

  20. Condensation of Forced Convection Two-Phase Flow in a Miniature Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begg, E.; Faghri, A.; Krustalev, D.

    1999-01-01

    A physical/mathematical model of annular film condensation at the inlet of a miniature tube has been developed. In the model, the liquid flow is coupled with the vapor flow along the liquid-vapor interface through the interfacial temperature, heat flux, shear stress, and pressure jump conditions due to surface tension effects. The model predicts the shape of the liquid-vapor interface along the condenser and leads to the conclusion that there is complete condensation at a certain distance from the condenser inlet. The numerical results show that complete condensation of the incoming vapor is possible at comparatively low heat loads and that this is a special case of a more general condensation regime with two-phase bubbly flow downstream of the initial annular film condensation region. Observations from the flow visualization experiment confirm the existence and qualitative features of annular film condensation leading to the complete condensation phenomenon in a small diameter (3.25 mm) circular tube condenser.

  1. Granuloma annulare.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Diptesh; Hess, Brian; Bachegowda, Lohith

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a 77-year-old, diabetic male with a 20-year history of a migratory erythematous, asymptomatic, generalized, nonscaly, and nonitchy rash that started over the dorsum of his left hand. On examination, there were multiple annular erythematous plaques, distributed symmetrically and diffusely over his torso and arms, with central clearing and no scales. A punch biopsy of the skin helped us to arrive at the diagnosis of a generalized granuloma annulare (GA). GA is a benign, self-limiting skin condition of unknown etiology that is often asymptomatic. The cause of this condition is unknown, but it has been associated with diabetes mellitus, infections such as HIV, and malignancies such as lymphoma. These lesions typically start as a ring of flesh-colored papules that slowly progress with central clearing. Lack of symptoms, scaling, or associated vesicles helps to differentiate GA from other skin conditions such as tinea corporis, pityriasis rosea, psoriasis, or erythema annulare centrifugum. Treatment is often not needed as the majority of these lesions are self-resolving within 2 years. Treatment may be pursued for cosmetic reasons. Available options include high-dose steroid creams, PUVA, cryotherapy, or drugs such as niacinamide, infliximab, Dapsone, and topical calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:20209383

  2. Convective heat transfer to CO{sub 2} at a supercritical pressure flowing vertically upward in tubes and an annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Yoon-Yeong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol

    2009-01-15

    The Super-Critical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) has been chosen by the Generation IV International Forum as one of the candidates for the next generation nuclear reactors. Heat transfer to water from a fuel assembly may deteriorate at certain supercritical pressure flow conditions and its estimation at degraded conditions as well as in normal conditions is very important to the design of a safe and reliable reactor core. Extensive experiments on a heat transfer to a vertically upward flowing CO{sub 2} at a supercritical pressure in tubes and an annular channel have been performed. The geometries of the test sections include tubes of an internal diameter (ID) of 4.4 and 9.0 mm and an annular channel (8 x 10 mm). The heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and Nusselt numbers were derived from the inner wall temperature converted by using the outer wall temperature measured by adhesive K-type thermocouples and a direct (tube) or indirect (annular channel) electric heating power. From the test results, a correlation, which covers both a deteriorated and a normal heat transfer regime, was developed. The developed correlation takes different forms in each interval divided by the value of parameter Bu. The parameter Bu (referred to as Bu hereafter), a function of the Grashof number, the Reynolds number and the Prandtl number, was introduced since it is known to be a controlling factor for the occurrence of a heat transfer deterioration due to a buoyancy effect. The developed correlation predicted the HTCs for water and HCFC-22 fairly well. (author)

  3. Granuloma Annulare.

    PubMed

    Keimig, Emily Louise

    2015-07-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a noninfectious granulomatous skin condition that can present with a variety of cutaneous morphologies. It is characterized by collagen degeneration, mucin deposition, and palisaded or interstitial histiocytes. Although the mechanism underlying development of GA is unknown, studies point to a cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to an as-yet undetermined antigen. Systemic associations with diabetes, thyroid disorders, lipid abnormalities, malignancy, and infection are described in atypical GA. Treatment is divided into localized skin-directed therapies and systemic immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapies. The selected treatment modality should be based on disease severity, comorbid conditions, consideration of potential side effects, and patient preference. PMID:26143416

  4. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  5. [Granuloma annulare].

    PubMed

    Butsch, F; Weidenthaler-Barth, B; von Stebut, E

    2015-11-01

    Granuloma annulare is a benign, chronic inflammatory skin disease. Its pathogenesis is still unclear, but reports on infections as a trigger can be found. In addition, some authors reported an association with other systemic disease, e.g., cancer, trauma, and diabetes mellitus; however, these have not been verified. The clinical picture of granuloma annulare ranges from the localized form predominantly at the extremities to disseminated, subcutaneous, or perforating forms. Diagnosis is based on the typical clinical presentation which may be confirmed by a biopsy. Histologically, necrobiotic areas within granulomatous inflammation are typical. The prognosis of the disease is good with spontaneous resolution being frequently observed, especially in localized forms. Disseminated manifestations tend to persist longer, and recurrences are reported. When choosing between different therapeutic options, the benign disease character versus the individual degree of suffering and the potential therapy side effects must be considered. For local treatment, topical application of corticosteroids is most common. Disseminated forms can be treated systemically with corticosteroids for several weeks; alternatively, dapsone, hydroxychloroquine, retinoids, fumaric acid, cyclosporine, and anti-TNFα appear to be effective. PMID:26487494

  6. Two-phase/two-phase heat exchanger analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Rhyn H.

    1992-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop (CPL) system with a condenser linked to a double two-phase heat exchanger is analyzed numerically to simulate the performance of the system from different starting conditions to a steady state condition based on a simplified model. Results of the investigation are compared with those of similar apparatus available in the Space Station applications of the CPL system with a double two-phase heat exchanger.

  7. Apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, John D.; Tong, Long S.

    1977-03-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

  8. Performance tests of a two phase ejector

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, G.S.; Kornhauser, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    The ejector expansion refrigeration cycle is a modified vapor compression cycle in which a two phase ejector is used to recover a portion of the work otherwise lost in the expansion valve. The ejector improves cycle performance by increasing compressor inlet pressure and by lowering the quality of liquid entering the evaporator. Theoretically, a cooling COP improvement of approximately 23% is achievable for a typical refrigerating cycle and an ideal ejector. If the ejector performed as well as typical single phase ejectors an improvement of 12% could be achieved. Previous tests have demonstrated a smaller 3.7% improvement; the difference is in the poor performance of the two phase ejector. The purpose of this research is to understand the operating characteristics of the two phase ejector and to devise design improvements. A two phase ejector test rig has been constructed and tested. Preliminary data show performance superior to previously tested two phase ejectors, but still inferior to single phase ejectors. Ejector performance corresponds to refrigeration cycle COP improvements ranging from 3.9% to 7.6%.

  9. Two-phase flow centrifugal pump performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisely, Eugene Andras

    The performance of centrifugal pumps subjected to a liquid-gas-mixture flow is a significant concern to manufacturers and to some users such as Chemical, Nuclear Power Plants, and Gas-Oil Industries. Particularly in the nuclear power industry, the prediction of performance degradation under the two-phase flow conditions occurring in a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is a significant part of the overall analysis of that accident. In this experimental work, the pressure distribution was measured in a rotating, partially shrouded, open, radial impeller and volute under a wide range of air-water two-phase flow conditions. To obtain these pressure measurements, small-diameter pressure-tap holes were drilled through the casing of the radial pump. High speed photography was used to determine the flow regime of the air-water mixture through the vane and in the volute. An analytical model was developed to predict the radial pump single- and two-phase flow pressure distribution. This distribution was compared with the test data for different suction void fractions. The physical mechanism responsible for pump performance degradation was also investigated.

  10. Definition of two-phase flow behaviors for spacecraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Best, Frederick R.; Miller, Katherine M.; Hill, Wayne S.

    1991-01-01

    Data for complete models of two-phase flow in microgravity are taken from in-flight experiments and applied to an adiabatic flow-regime analysis to study the feasibility of two-phase systems for spacecraft. The data are taken from five in-flight experiments by Hill et al. (1990) in which a two-phase pump circulates a freon mixture and vapor and liquid flow streams are measured. Adiabatic flow regimes are analyzed based on the experimental superficial velocities of liquid and vapor, and comparisons are made with the results of two-phase flow regimes at 1 g. A motion analyzer records the flow characteristics at a rate of 1000 frames/sec, and stratified flow regimes are reported at 1 g. The flow regimes observed under microgravitational conditions are primarily annular and include slug and bubbly-slug regimes. The present data are of interest to the design and analysis of two-phase thermal-management systems for use in space missions.

  11. Studies of Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flow in Microgravity. Ph.D. Thesis, Dec. 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William Scott

    1995-01-01

    Two-phase gas-liquid flows are expected to occur in many future space operations. Due to a lack of buoyancy in the microgravity environment, two-phase flows are known to behave differently than those in earth gravity. Despite these concerns, little research has been conducted on microgravity two-phase flow and the current understanding is poor. This dissertation describes an experimental and modeling study of the characteristics of two-phase flows in microgravity. An experiment was operated onboard NASA aircraft capable of producing short periods of microgravity. In addition to high speed photographs of the flows, electronic measurements of void fraction, liquid film thickness, bubble and wave velocity, pressure drop and wall shear stress were made for a wide range of liquid and gas flow rates. The effects of liquid viscosity, surface tension and tube diameter on the behavior of these flows were also assessed. From the data collected, maps showing the occurrence of various flow patterns as a function of gas and liquid flow rates were constructed. Earth gravity two-phase flow models were compared to the results of the microgravity experiments and in some cases modified. Models were developed to predict the transitions on the flow pattern maps. Three flow patterns, bubble, slug and annular flow, were observed in microgravity. These patterns were found to occur in distinct regions of the gas-liquid flow rate parameter space. The effect of liquid viscosity, surface tension and tube diameter on the location of the boundaries of these regions was small. Void fraction and Weber number transition criteria both produced reasonable transition models. Void fraction and bubble velocity for bubble and slug flows were found to be well described by the Drift-Flux model used to describe such flows in earth gravity. Pressure drop modeling by the homogeneous flow model was inconclusive for bubble and slug flows. Annular flows were found to be complex systems of ring-like waves and a

  12. Effective property models for homogeneous two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, M.M.; Muzychka, Y.S.

    2008-10-15

    Using an analogy between thermal conductivity of porous media and viscosity in two-phase flow, new definitions for two-phase viscosity are proposed. These new definitions satisfy the following two conditions: namely (i) the two-phase viscosity is equal to the liquid viscosity at the mass quality = 0% and (ii) the two-phase viscosity is equal to the gas viscosity at the mass quality = 100%. These new definitions can be used to compute the two-phase frictional pressure gradient using the homogeneous modeling approach. These new models are assessed using published experimental data of two-phase frictional pressure gradient in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels in the form of Fanning friction factor (f{sub m}) versus Reynolds number (Re{sub m}). The published data include different working fluids such as R-12, R-22, argon (R740), R717, R134a, R410A and propane (R290) at different diameters and different saturation temperatures. Models are assessed on the basis minimizing the root mean square error (e{sub RMS}). It is shown that these new definitions of two-phase viscosity can be used to analyze the experimental data of two-phase frictional pressure gradient in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels using simple friction models. (author)

  13. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare.

    PubMed

    Requena, Luis; Fernández-Figueras, María Teresa

    2007-06-01

    Subcutaneous granuloma annulare is a rare clinicopathologic variant of granuloma annulare, characterized by subcutaneous nodules that may appear alone or in association with intradermal lesions. The pathogenesis of this deep variant of granuloma annulare remains uncertain. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare appears more frequently in children and young adults, and the lesions consist of subcutaneous nodules with no inflammatory appearance at the skin surface, most commonly located on the anterior aspects of the lower legs, hands, head, and buttocks. Usually, subcutaneous granuloma annulare is an authentic and exclusive panniculitic process with no dermal participation, although in 25% of the patients lesions of subcutaneous granuloma annulare coexist with the classic findings of granuloma annulare in the dermis. Histopathologically, subcutaneous granuloma annulare consist of areas of basophilic degeneration of collagen bundles with peripheral palisading granulomas involving the connective tissue septa of the subcutis. Usually, the area of necrobiosis in subcutaneous granuloma annulare is larger than in the dermal counterpart. The central necrobiotic areas contain increased amounts of connective tissue mucin and nuclear dust from neutrophils between the degenerated collagen bundles. Eosinophils are more common in subcutaneous granuloma annulare than in the dermal counterpart. There are not descriptions of subcutaneous granuloma annulare showing a histopathologic pattern of the so-called incomplete or interstitial variant. Histopathologic differential diagnosis of subcutaneous granuloma annulare includes rheumatoid nodule, necrobiosis lipoidica and epithelioid sarcoma. PMID:17544961

  14. Studies of two phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    The development of instrumentation for the support of research in two-phase flow in simulated microgravity conditions was performed. The funds were expended in the development of a technique for characterizing the motion and size distribution of small liquid droplets dispersed in a flowing gas. Phenomena like this occur in both microgravity and normal earth gravity situations inside of conduits that are carrying liquid-vapor mixtures at high flow rates. Some effort to develop a conductance probe for the measurement of liquid film thickness was also expended.

  15. Spacecraft heat transfer by two-phase flow method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, A.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigerator/freezer has been designed with an oil-free compressor to provide an economical two-phase flow system for heat transfer. A computer simulation has been done for the condenser and evaporator to determine the design parameters, such as length, diameter, and flow regimes, for different refrigerants and load requirements. A large Reynolds number was considered to ensure annular flow (in order to maximize heat transfer coefficients) and large Froude number. The simulation was correlated with the test data of a vapor compression refrigerator/freezer flown on STS-4 (which provided information on vapor compression in a zero-gravity environment). The two-phase system will be used for the Spacelab mission SLS-1 and can be used in future spacecraft and high-speed aircraft, where weight, volume, and power requirements are critical.

  16. Numerical studies of gravity effects in two-phase reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Cox, B.L.

    1986-06-01

    Numerical studies are performed to investigate the effects of localized feed zones on the pressure transients in two-phase reservoirs. It is shown that gravity effects can significantly affect the pressure transients, because of the large difference in the density of liquid water and vapor. Pressure transients for shallow and deep feed zones and the resulting fluid flow patterns are discussed.

  17. Abatement of CF{sub 4} and CHF{sub 3} byproducts using low-pressure plasmas generated by annular-shaped electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Min; Lee, Jae O. K.; Hoon Song, Young; Yoo, Hoon A.

    2012-03-15

    Three different driving schemes are tested for a plasma reactor designed to abate the greenhouse gases emitted by the semiconductor industry. The reactor and electrodes all have a concentric annular shape, which allows them to be easily connected to pre-existing pipelines without any disturbance to the exhaust stream. The destruction and removal efficiencies are measured for CF{sub 4} by varying the O{sub 2}/CF{sub 4} ratio and pressure. The influences of adding O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O to the byproducts of the CHF{sub 3} abatement process are investigated by analyzing the spectra resulting from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. Based on the experimental results we suggest an appropriate combination of driving scheme and reactant gas species for efficient and economical abatement of a mixture of CHF{sub 3} and CF{sub 4}. Then, the optimal flow rate of the reactant gas is presented. Finally, the reduction rates for global warming emissions are estimated to demonstrate the feasibility of using our device for abatement of greenhouse gases emitted by the semiconductor industry.

  18. Two-phase nickel aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khadkikar, P. S.; Vedula, K.; Shabel, B. S.

    1987-01-01

    The as-extruded microstructures of two alloys in the two phase field consisting of Ni3Al and NiAl in the Ni-Al phase diagram exhibit fibrous morphology and consist of Ll(2) Ni3Al and B2 NiAl. These as-extruded microstructures can be modified dramatically by suitable heat treatments. Martensite plus NiAl or martensite plus Ni3Al microstructures are obtained upon quenching from 1523 K. Aging of martensite at 873 K results in the recently identified phase Ni5Al, whereas aging at 1123 K reverts the microstructures to Ni3Al plus NiAl. The microstructures with predominantly martensite of Ni5Al3 phases are brittle in tension at room temperature. The latter microstructure does not deform plastically even in compression at room temperature. However, some promise of room temperature tensile ductility is indicated by the Ni3Al plus NiAl phase mixtures.

  19. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  20. Two-phase potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Graham B.

    1989-01-01

    Some features of two recent approaches of two-phase potential flow are presented. The first approach is based on a set of progressive examples that can be analyzed using common techniques, such as conservation laws, and taken together appear to lead in the direction of a general theory. The second approach is based on variational methods, a classical approach to conservative mechanical systems that has a respectable history of application to single phase flows. This latter approach, exemplified by several recent papers by Geurst, appears generally to be consistent with the former approach, at least in those cases for which it is possible to obtain comparable results. Each approach has a justifiable theoretical base and is self-consistent. Moreover, both approaches appear to give the right prediction for several well-defined situations.

  1. Annular Flow Liquid Film Dynamics in Pipes and Bod Bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Peng

    Average liquid film thickness is important for detailed mechanistic modeling of annular two-phase flow in engineering applications. The existing models and correlations either have large relative errors or narrow application range. Because of this, a new liquid film thickness model has been developed for vertical annular flow in pipes based on three databases. The model includes the pressure, liquid and gas velocities, diameter, and viscosity effects on liquid film thickness. Analysis indicates the film thickness to be a function of Weber numbers for both liquid and gas, and the viscosity number. The model is compared with film thickness data which considers a wide range of liquid and gas superficial velocities, system pressure, fluid properties, as well as several pipe diameters. The trend in the current and available film thickness models at various system conditions are analyzed, highlighting the improvement and widening applicability of the new model. The newly proposed film thickness model results in an average relative error of 14% considering the complete database. Interfacial friction factor in annular two-phase flow is essential both for detailed modeling of two-fluid model and the calculation of pressure gradient. Most of the existing correlations on interfacial friction factor are based on Wallis 1969's correlation, which considers the interfacial friction factor as a function of film thickness. In this research, a new correlation of interfacial friction factor that is based on the wave characteristics has been proposed. The wave characteristics is considered to be a function of a group of non-dimensional numbers. Since the effects of wave characteristics for ripples waves and disturbance waves on interfacial friction factors are different, the correlation is divided into two sub-correlations based on these two wave regimes. The new correlation has been compared with a wide range of data. From the data comparison, the new correlation shows significant

  2. An empirical investigation on thermal characteristics and pressure drop of Ag-oil nanofluid in concentric annular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasian Arani, A. A.; Aberoumand, H.; Aberoumand, S.; Jafari Moghaddam, A.; Dastanian, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an experimental study on Silver-oil nanofluid was carried out in order to present the laminar convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor in a concentric annulus with constant heat flux boundary condition. Silver-oil nanofluid prepared by Electrical Explosion of Wire technique with no nanoparticles agglomeration during nanofluid preparation process and experiments. The average sizes of particles were 20 nm. Nanofluids with various particle Volume fractions of 0.011, 0.044 and 0.171 vol% were employed. The nanofluid flowing between the tubes is heated by an electrical heating coil wrapped around it. The effects of different parameters such as flow Reynolds number, tube diameter ratio and nanofluid particle concentration on heat transfer coefficient are studied. Results show that, heat transfer coefficient increased by using nanofluid instead of pure oil. Maximum enhancement of heat transfer coefficient occurs in 0.171 vol%. In addition the results showed that, there are slight increases in pressure drop of nanofluid by increasing the nanoparticle concentration of nanofluid in compared to pure oil.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Two Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2001-01-01

    Two phase flows can be found in broad situations in nature, biology, and industry devices and can involve diverse and complex mechanisms. While the physical models may be specific for certain situations, the mathematical formulation and numerical treatment for solving the governing equations can be general. Hence, we will require information concerning each individual phase as needed in a single phase. but also the interactions between them. These interaction terms, however, pose additional numerical challenges because they are beyond the basis that we use to construct modern numerical schemes, namely the hyperbolicity of equations. Moreover, due to disparate differences in time scales, fluid compressibility and nonlinearity become acute, further complicating the numerical procedures. In this paper, we will show the ideas and procedure how the AUSM-family schemes are extended for solving two phase flows problems. Specifically, both phases are assumed in thermodynamic equilibrium, namely, the time scales involved in phase interactions are extremely short in comparison with those in fluid speeds and pressure fluctuations. Details of the numerical formulation and issues involved are discussed and the effectiveness of the method are demonstrated for several industrial examples.

  4. Momentum flux in two phase two component low quality flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Graham, R. W.; Henry, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    In two phase flow systems line losses comprise frictional and momentum pressure drops. For design purposes, it would be desirable to estimate the line losses employing a one-dimensional calculation. Two methods for computing one-dimensional momentum flux at a test section discharge station are compared to the experimental value for a range of two-phase flow conditions. The one-dimensional homogeneous model appears to be more accurate generally in predicting the momentum than the variable slip model.

  5. Coal-Face Fracture With A Two-Phase Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    In new method for mining coal without explosive, two-phase liquid such as CO2 and water, injected at high pressure into deeper ends of holes drilled in coal face. Liquid permeates coal seam through existing microfractures; as liquid seeps back toward face, pressure eventually drops below critical value at which dissolved gas flashvaporizes, breaking up coal.

  6. Studies of Two-Phase Flow Dynamics and Heat Transfer at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.; Bousman, W. Scott; Fore, Larry B.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to predict gas-liquid flow patterns is crucial to the design and operation of two-phase flow systems in the microgravity environment. Flow pattern maps have been developed in this study which show the occurrence of flow patterns as a function of gas and liquid superficial velocities as well as tube diameter, liquid viscosity and surface tension. The results have demonstrated that the location of the bubble-slug transition is affected by the tube diameter for air-water systems and by surface tension, suggesting that turbulence-induced bubble fluctuations and coalescence mechanisms play a role in this transition. The location of the slug-annular transition on the flow pattern maps is largely unaffected by tube diameter, liquid viscosity or surface tension in the ranges tested. Void fraction-based transition criteria were developed which separate the flow patterns on the flow pattern maps with reasonable accuracy. Weber number transition criteria also show promise but further work is needed to improve these models. For annular gas-liquid flows of air-water and air- 50 percent glycerine under reduced gravity conditions, the pressure gradient agrees fairly well with a version of the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation but the measured film thickness deviates from published correlations at lower Reynolds numbers. Nusselt numbers, based on a film thickness obtained from standard normal-gravity correlations, follow the relation, Nu = A Re(sup n) Pr(exp l/3), but more experimental data in a reduced gravity environment are needed to increase the confidence in the estimated constants, A and n. In the slug flow regime, experimental pressure gradient does not correlate well with either the Lockhart-Martinelli or a homogeneous formulation, but does correlate nicely with a formulation based on a two-phase Reynolds number. Comparison with ground-based correlations implies that the heat transfer coefficients are lower at reduced gravity than at normal gravity under the same

  7. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure relationship in heart failure: an index of right ventricular contractile function and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, M; Bandera, F; Pelissero, G; Castelvecchio, S; Menicanti, L; Ghio, S; Temporelli, P L; Arena, R

    2013-11-01

    Echo-derived pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) and right ventricular (RV) tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE; from the end of diastole to end-systole) are of basic relevance in the clinical follow-up of heart failure (HF) patients, carrying two- to threefold increase in cardiac risk when increased and reduced, respectively. We hypothesized that the relationship between TAPSE (longitudinal RV fiber shortening) and PASP (force generated by the RV) provides an index of in vivo RV length-force relationship, with their ratio better disclosing prognosis. Two hundred ninety-three HF patients with reduced (HFrEF, n = 247) or with preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (HFpEF, n = 46) underwent echo-Doppler studies and N-terminal pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide assessment and were tracked for adverse events. The median follow-up duration was 20.8 mo. TAPSE vs. PASP relationship showed a downward regression line shift in nonsurvivors who were more frequently presenting with higher PASP and lower TAPSE. HFrEF and HFpEF patients exhibited a similar distribution along the regression line. Given the TAPSE, PASP, and TAPSE-to-PASP ratio (TAPSE/PASP) collinearity, separate Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed: one with TAPSE and PASP as individual measures, and the other combining them in ratio form. Hazard ratios for variables retained in the multivariate regression were as follows: TAPSE/PASP

  8. Numerical simulation of a turbulent flow with droplets injection in annular heated air tube using the Reynolds stress model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merouane, H.; Bounif, A.; Abidat, M.

    2013-12-01

    This work presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of single-phase and two-phase flow. The droplets are injected in annular heated air tube. The numerical simulation is performed by using a commercial CFD code witch uses the finite-volume method to discretize the equations of fluid flow. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Reynolds stress model were used in the computation. The governing equations are solved by using a SIMPLE algorithm to treat the pressure terms in the momentum equations. The results of prediction are compared with the experimental data.

  9. Annular flow optimization: A new integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maglione, R.; Robotti, G.; Romagnoli, R.

    1997-07-01

    During the drilling stage of an oil and gas well the hydraulic circuit of the mud assumes great importance with respect to most of the numerous and various constituting parts (mostly in the annular sections). Each of them has some points to be satisfied in order to guarantee both the safety of the operations and the performance optimization of each of the single elements of the circuit. The most important tasks for the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit are the following: (1) Maximum available pressure to the last casing shoe; (2) avoid borehole wall erosions; and (3) guarantee the hole cleaning. A new integrated system considering all the elements of the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit and the constraints imposed from each of them has been realized. In this way the family of the flow parameters (mud rheology and pump rate) satisfying simultaneously all the variables of the annular section has been found. Finally two examples regarding a standard and narrow annular section (slim hole) will be reported, showing briefly all the steps of the calculations until reaching the optimum flow parameters family (for that operational condition of drilling) that satisfies simultaneous all the flow parameters limitations imposed by the elements of the annular section circuit.

  10. Annular pancreas (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Annular pancreas is an abnormal ring or collar of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum (the part of the ... intestine that connects to stomach). This portion of pancreas can constrict the duodenum and block or impair ...

  11. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Richard F.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluidtight barrier. A counterrotation removes the barrier.

  12. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, R.F.

    1983-07-19

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces is described. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluid tight barrier. A counter rotation removes the barrier. 6 figs.

  13. Power production with two-phase expansion through vapor dome

    SciTech Connect

    Amend, W.E.; Toner, S.J.

    1984-08-07

    In a system wherein a fluid exhibits a regressive vapor dome in a T-S diagram, the following are provided: a two-phase nozzle receiving the fluid in pressurized and heated liquid state and expanding the received liquid into saturated or superheated vapor state, and apparatus receiving the saturated or superheated vapor to convert the kinetic energy thereof into power.

  14. Microgravity fluid management in two-phase thermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, Richard C.

    1987-01-01

    Initial studies have indicated that in comparison to an all liquid single phase system, a two-phase liquid/vapor thermal control system requires significantly lower pumping power, demonstrates more isothermal control characteristics, and allows greater operational flexibility in heat load placement. As a function of JSC's Work Package responsibility for thermal management of space station equipment external to the pressurized modules, prototype development programs were initiated on the Two-Phase Thermal Bus System (TBS) and the Space Erectable Radiator System (SERS). JSC currently has several programs underway to enhance the understanding of two-phase fluid flow characteristics. The objective of one of these programs (sponsored by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA-Headquarters) is to design, fabricate, and fly a two-phase flow regime mapping experiment in the Shuttle vehicle mid-deck. Another program, sponsored by OAST, involves the testing of a two-phase thermal transport loop aboard the KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft to identify system implications of pressure drop variation as a function of the flow quality and flow regime present in a representative thermal system.

  15. Measurement of thickness of thin water film in two-phase flow by capacitance method

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, R.K.; Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.; Turko, B.

    1981-09-01

    A technique has been developed for measuring water film thickness in a two-phase annular flow system by the capacitance method. An experimental model of the flow system with two types of electrodes mounted on the inner wall of a cylindrical tube has been constructed and evaluated. The apparatus and its ability to observe fluctuations and wave motions of the water film passing over the electrodes is described in some detail.

  16. Calculation of two-phase flow in gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Tolpadi, A.K.

    1995-10-01

    A method is presented for computing steady two-phase turbulent combusting flow in a gas turbine combustor. The gas phase equations are solved in an Eulerian frame of reference. The two-phase calculations are performed by using a liquid droplet spray combustion a model and treating the motion of the evaporating fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. The numerical algorithm employs nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates, a multigrid iterative solution procedure, the standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model, and a combustion model comprising an assumed shape probability density function and the conserved scalar formulation. The trajectory computation of the fuel provides the source terms for all the gas phase equations. This two-phase model was applied to a real piece of combustion hardware in the form of a modern GE/SNECMA single annular CFM56 turbofan engine combustor. For the purposes of comparison, calculations were also performed by treating the fuel as a single gaseous phase. The effect on the solution of two extreme situations of the fuel as a gas and initially as a liquid was examined. The distribution of the velocity field and the conserved scalar within the combustor, as well as the distribution of the temperature field in the reaction zone and in the exhaust, were all predicted with the combustor operating both at high-power and low-power (ground idle) conditions. The calculated exit gas temperature was compared with test rig measurements. Under both low and high-power conditions, the temperature appeared to show an improved agreement with the measured data when the calculations were performed with the spray model as compared to a single-phase calculation.

  17. Two-Phase flow instrumentation for nuclear accidents simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monni, G.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the research work performed at the Energy Department of the Politecnico di Torino, concerning the development of two-phase flow instrumentation and of models, based on the analysis of experimental data, that are able to interpret the measurement signals. The study has been performed with particular reference to the design of power plants, such as nuclear water reactors, where the two-phase flow thermal fluid dynamics must be accurately modeled and predicted. In two-phase flow typically a set of different measurement instruments (Spool Piece - SP) must be installed in order to evaluate the mass flow rate of the phases in a large range of flow conditions (flow patterns, pressures and temperatures); moreover, an interpretative model of the SP need to be developed and experimentally verified. The investigated meters are: Turbine, Venturi, Impedance Probes, Concave sensors, Wire mesh sensor, Electrical Capacitance Probe. Different instrument combinations have been tested, and the performance of each one has been analyzed.

  18. A bi-directional two-phase/two-phase heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design and test of a heat exchanger that transfers heat from one two-phase thermal loop to another with very small drops in temperature and pressure. The heat exchanger condenses the vapor in one loop while evaporating the liquid in the other without mixing of the condensing and evaporating fluids. The heat exchanger is bidirectional in that it can transfer heat in reverse, condensing on the normally evaporating side and vice versa. It is fully compatible with capillary pumped loops and mechanically pumped loops. Test results verified that performance of the heat exchanger met the design requirements. It demonstrated a heat transfer rate of 6800 watts in the normal mode of operation and 1000 watts in the reverse mode with temperature drops of less than 5 C between two thermal loops.

  19. Method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow. [PWR

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, J.D.; Tong, L.S.

    1975-12-19

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

  20. Two-Phase Flow Separator Investigation

    NASA Video Gallery

    The goal of the Two-Phase Flow Separator investigation is to help increase understanding of how to separate gases and liquids in microgravity. Many systems on the space station contain both liquids...

  1. One- and two-phase nozzle flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, I.S.

    1980-01-01

    A time-dependent technique, in conjunction with the boundary-fitted coordinates system, is applied to solve a gas-only one-phase flow and a fully-coupled, gas-particle two-phase flow inside nozzles with small throat radii of curvature, steep wall gradients, and submerged configurations. The emphasis of the study has been placed on one- and two-phase flow in the transonic region. Various particle sizes and particle mass fractions have been investigated in the two-phase flow. The salient features associated with the two-phase nozzle flow compared with those of the one-phase flow are illustrated through the calculations of the JPL nozzle, the Titan III solid rocket motor, and the submerged nozzle configuration found in the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) solid rocket motor.

  2. Two-phase flow studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.; Maeder, P.F.

    1980-08-01

    Progress on the following is reported: literature survey, design of two-phase flow testing facility, design of nozzle loop, thermophysical properties, design manual, and advanced energy conversion systems. (MHR)

  3. Estimation of shear stress in counter-current gas-liquid annular two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Yutaka; Akimoto, Hajime; Murao, Yoshio

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of the correlations of the friction factor is important for the counter-current flow (CCF) analysis with two-fluid model. However, existing two fluid model codes use the correlations of friction factors for co-current flow or correlation developed based on the assumption of no wall shear stress. The assessment calculation for two fluid model code with those existing correlations of friction factors shows the falling water flow rate is overestimated. Analytical model is developed to calculate the shear stress distribution in water film at CCF in order to get the information on the shear stress at the interface and the wall. The analytical results with the analysis model and Bharathan's CCF data shows that the wall shear stress acting on the falling water film is almost the same order as the interfacial shear stress and the correlations for co-current flow cannot be applied to the counter-current flow. Tentative correlations of the interfacial and the wall friction factors are developed based on the results of the present study.

  4. SILVA: EDF two-phase 1D annular model of a CFB boiler furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Montat, D.; Fauquet, P.; Lafanechere, L.; Bursi, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    Aiming to improve its knowledge of CFB boilers, EDF has initiated a R and D program including: laboratory work on mock-ups, numerical modelling and on-site tests in CFB power plants. One of the objectives of this program is the development of a comprehensive steady-state 1D model of the solid circulation loop, named SILVA, for plant operation and design evaluation purposes. This paper describes its mathematical and physical modelling. Promising validation of the model on cold mock-up and industrial CFB is presented.

  5. Two-Phase Potential Flow. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, G.B.

    1999-06-11

    The objective of this work was to devise essentially exact solutions to a set of well-defined basic problems of inviscid fluid flow with particulate inclusions. This would help to establish a sound basis for fundamental theoretical developments in the field of two-phase flow. The results of this effort have ranged from basic theorems and the formulation of conservation laws for two-phase mixtures, to detailed predictions for specific geometrical patterns and experimental confirmation of these results.

  6. Two Phase Flow Mapping and Transition Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, Masood; Chao, David F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, recent microgravity two-phase flow data for air-water, air-water-glycerin, and air- water-Zonyl FSP mixtures are analyzed for transition from bubbly to slug and from slug to annular flow. It is found that Weber number-based maps are inadequate to predict flow-pattern transition, especially over a wide range of liquid flow rates. It is further shown that slug to annular flow transition is dependent on liquid phase Reynolds number at high liquid flow rate. This effect may be attributed to growing importance of liquid phase inertia in the dynamics of the phase flow and distribution. As a result a new form of scaling is introduced to present data using liquid Weber number based on vapor and liquid superficial velocities and Reynolds number based on liquid superficial velocity. This new combination of the dimensionless parameters seem to be more appropriate for the presentation of the microgravity data and provides a better flow pattern prediction and should be considered for evaluation with data obtained in the future. Similarly, the analysis of bubble to slug flow transition indicates a strong dependence on both liquid inertia and turbulence fluctuations which seem to play a significant role on this transition at high values of liquid velocity. A revised mapping of data using a new group of dimensionless parameters show a better and more consistent description of flow transition over a wide range of liquid flow rates. Further evaluation of the proposed flow transition mapping will have to be made after a wider range of microgravity data become available.

  7. Erythematous Granuloma Annulare

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Joo; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Mi Kyeong

    2011-01-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a common, benign, chronic inflammatory disorder, which is characterized by grouped papules in an enlarging annular shape. It has been described in several clinical subtypes, including localized, generalized, subcutaneous, perforating, and erythematous types. Even though generalized, subcutaneous, and perforating types of GA are unusual, there are several reports of those types. However, erythematous or patch GA, has not been reported yet in the Korean literature. Herein, we report a 42-year-old woman with pruritic erythematous patches, which occurred on the extremities without preceding event, and showed typical clinical and histopatologic findings of erythematous GA. PMID:21909221

  8. Theoretical and empirical study of single-substance, upward two-phase flow in a constant-diameter adiabatic pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Laoulache, R.N.; Maeder, P.F.; DiPippo, R.

    1987-05-01

    A Scheme is developed to describe the upward flow of a two-phase mixture of a single substance in a vertical adiabatic constant area pipe. The scheme is based on dividing the mixture into a homogeneous core surrounded by a liquid film. This core may be a mixture of bubbles in a contiguous liquid phase, or a mixture of droplets in a contiguous vapor phase. Emphasis is placed upon the latter case since the range of experimental measurements of pressure, temperature, and void fraction collected in this study fall in the slug-churn''- annular'' flow regimes. The core is turbulent, whereas the liquid film may be laminar or turbulent. Turbulent stresses are modeled by using Prandtl's mixing-length theory. The working fluid is Dichlorotetrafluoroethane CCIF{sub 2}-CCIF{sub 2} known as refrigerant 114 (R-114); the two-phase mixture is generated from the single phase substance by the process of flashing. In this study, the effect of the Froude and Reynolds numbers on the liquid film characteristics is examined. The compressibility is accounted for through the acceleration pressure gradient of the core and not directly through the Mach number. An expression for an interfacial friction coefficient between the turbulent core and the liquid film is developed; it is similar to Darcy's friction coefficient for a single phase flow in a rough pipe. Finally, an actual steam-water geothermal well is simulated; it is based on actual field data from New Zealand. A similarity theory is used to predict the steam-water mixture pressure and temperature starting with laboratory measurements on the flow of R-114.

  9. Investigations of two-phase flame propagation under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokalp, Iskender

    2016-07-01

    Investigations of two-phase flame propagation under microgravity conditions R. Thimothée, C. Chauveau, F. Halter, I Gökalp Institut de Combustion, Aérothermique, Réactivité et Environnement (ICARE), CNRS, 1C Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2, France This paper presents and discusses recent results on two-phase flame propagation experiments we carried out with mono-sized ethanol droplet aerosols under microgravity conditions. Fundamental studies on the flame propagation in fuel droplet clouds or sprays are essential for a better understanding of the combustion processes in many practical applications including internal combustion engines for cars, modern aircraft and liquid rocket engines. Compared to homogeneous gas phase combustion, the presence of a liquid phase considerably complicates the physico-chemical processes that make up combustion phenomena by coupling liquid atomization, droplet vaporization, mixing and heterogeneous combustion processes giving rise to various combustion regimes where ignition problems and flame instabilities become crucial to understand and control. Almost all applications of spray combustion occur under high pressure conditions. When a high pressure two-phase flame propagation is investigated under normal gravity conditions, sedimentation effects and strong buoyancy flows complicate the picture by inducing additional phenomena and obscuring the proper effect of the presence of the liquid droplets on flame propagation compared to gas phase flame propagation. Conducting such experiments under reduced gravity conditions is therefore helpful for the fundamental understanding of two-phase combustion. We are considering spherically propagating two-phase flames where the fuel aerosol is generated from a gaseous air-fuel mixture using the condensation technique of expansion cooling, based on the Wilson cloud chamber principle. This technique is widely recognized to create well-defined mono-size droplets

  10. A numerical study of two-phase flow in gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpadi, A. K.

    1992-07-01

    A method is presented for computing steady two-phase turbulent combusting flow in a gas turbine combustor. The gas phase equations are solved in an Eulerian frame of reference. The two-phase calculations are performed by using a liquid droplet spray combustion model and treating the motion of the evaporating fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. The numerical algorithm employs nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates, a multigrid iterative solution procedure, the standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and a combustion model made up of an assumed shape probability density function and the conserved scalar formulation. The trajectory computation of the fuel provides the source terms for all the gas phase equations. Results of the application of the two-phase model to a modern GE/SNECMA single annular CFM56 turbofan engine combustor are reported.

  11. Two-phase convective CO2 dissolution in saline aquifers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martinez, M. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2016-01-30

    Geologic carbon storage in deep saline aquifers is a promising technology for reducing anthropogenic emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolution of injected CO2 into resident brines is one of the primary trapping mechanisms generally considered necessary to provide long-term storage security. Given that diffusion of CO2 in brine is woefully slow, convective dissolution, driven by a small increase in brine density with CO2 saturation, is considered to be the primary mechanism of dissolution trapping. Previous studies of convective dissolution have typically only considered the convective process in the single-phase region below the capillary transition zone and have either ignored the overlyingmore » two-phase region where dissolution actually takes place or replaced it with a virtual region with reduced or enhanced constant permeability. Our objective is to improve estimates of the long-term dissolution flux of CO2 into brine by including the capillary transition zone in two-phase model simulations. In the fully two-phase model, there is a capillary transition zone above the brine-saturated region over which the brine saturation decreases with increasing elevation. Our two-phase simulations show that the dissolution flux obtained by assuming a brine-saturated, single-phase porous region with a closed upper boundary is recovered in the limit of vanishing entry pressure and capillary transition zone. For typical finite entry pressures and capillary transition zone, however, convection currents penetrate into the two-phase region. As a result, this removes the mass transfer limitation of the diffusive boundary layer and enhances the convective dissolution flux of CO2 more than 3 times above the rate assuming single-phase conditions.« less

  12. Two-phase convective CO2 dissolution in saline aquifers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martinez, Mario J.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Geologic carbon storage in deep saline aquifers is a promising technology for reducing anthropogenic emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolution of injected CO2 into resident brines is one of the primary trapping mechanisms generally considered necessary to provide long-term storage security. Given that diffusion of CO2 in brine is woefully slow, convective dissolution, driven by a small increase in brine density with CO2 saturation, is considered to be the primary mechanism of dissolution trapping. Previous studies of convective dissolution have typically only considered the convective process in the single-phase region below the capillary transition zone and have either ignored the overlyingmore » two-phase region where dissolution actually takes place or replaced it with a virtual region with reduced or enhanced constant permeability. Our objective is to improve estimates of the long-term dissolution flux of CO2 into brine by including the capillary transition zone in two-phase model simulations. In the fully two-phase model, there is a capillary transition zone above the brine-saturated region over which the brine saturation decreases with increasing elevation. Our two-phase simulations show that the dissolution flux obtained by assuming a brine-saturated, single-phase porous region with a closed upper boundary is recovered in the limit of vanishing entry pressure and capillary transition zone. For typical finite entry pressures and capillary transition zone, however, convection currents penetrate into the two-phase region. As a result, this removes the mass transfer limitation of the diffusive boundary layer and enhances the convective dissolution flux of CO2 more than 3 times above the rate assuming single-phase conditions.« less

  13. Two-phase convective CO2 dissolution in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Geologic carbon storage in deep saline aquifers is a promising technology for reducing anthropogenic emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolution of injected CO2 into resident brines is one of the primary trapping mechanisms generally considered necessary to provide long-term storage security. Given that diffusion of CO2 in brine is woefully slow, convective dissolution, driven by a small increase in brine density with CO2 saturation, is considered to be the primary mechanism of dissolution trapping. Previous studies of convective dissolution have typically only considered the convective process in the single-phase region below the capillary transition zone and have either ignored the overlying two-phase region where dissolution actually takes place or replaced it with a virtual region with reduced or enhanced constant permeability. Our objective is to improve estimates of the long-term dissolution flux of CO2 into brine by including the capillary transition zone in two-phase model simulations. In the fully two-phase model, there is a capillary transition zone above the brine-saturated region over which the brine saturation decreases with increasing elevation. Our two-phase simulations show that the dissolution flux obtained by assuming a brine-saturated, single-phase porous region with a closed upper boundary is recovered in the limit of vanishing entry pressure and capillary transition zone. For typical finite entry pressures and capillary transition zone, however, convection currents penetrate into the two-phase region. This removes the mass transfer limitation of the diffusive boundary layer and enhances the convective dissolution flux of CO2 more than 3 times above the rate assuming single-phase conditions.

  14. Nonlinear features of Northern Annular Mode variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zuntao; Shi, Liu; Xie, Fenghua; Piao, Lin

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear features of daily Northern Annular Mode (NAM) variability at 17 pressure levels are quantified by two different measures. One is nonlinear correlation, and the other is time-irreversible symmetry. Both measures show that there are no significant nonlinear features in NAM variability at the higher pressure levels, however as the pressure level decreases, the strength of nonlinear features in NAM variability becomes predominant. This indicates that in order to reach better prediction of NAM variability in the lower pressure levels, nonlinear features must be taken into consideration to build suitable models.

  15. Two phase detonation studies conducted in 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A report is presented describing the research conducted on five phases: (1) ignition of fuel drops by a shock wave and passage of a shock wave over a burning drop, (2) the energy release pattern of a two-phase detonation with controlled drop sizes, (3) the attenuation of shock and detonation waves passing over an acoustic liner, (4) experimental and theoretical studies of film detonations, and (5) a simplified analytical model of a rotating two-phase detonation wave in a rocket motor.

  16. Dynamic characteristics of two-phase media

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotovskiy, V.S.; Sinyavskiy, V.F.; Terenik, L.V.; Spirov, V.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into the effective dynamic properties of heterogeneous media formed by a liquid and rigid spherical or cylindrical inclusions contained in it. Oscillations of a pipeline with a two-phase mixture in the general case having a non-uniform distribution of phases over the cross section are considered. Relations are obtained for the effective mass and hydrodynamic damping that determine the frequencies and dynamic-response factors. Oscillations of the bundles of elastic rods in a liquid are considered as in a two-phase mixture formed by a liquid and cylindrical inclusions and which has equivalent inertia and viscous properties.

  17. The influence of annular seal clearance to the critical speed of the multistage pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Shen, H. P.; Y Ye, X.; Hu, J. N.; Feng, Y. N.

    2013-12-01

    In the multistage pump of high head, pressure difference in two ends of annular seal clearance and rotor eccentric would produce the sealing fluid force, the effect of which can be expressed by a damping and stiffness coefficient. It has a great influence on the critical speed of the rotor system. In order to research the influence of the annular seal to the rotor system, this paper used CFD method to conduct the numerical simulation for the flow field of annular seal clearance. The radial and tangential forces were obtained to calculate the annular dynamic coefficients. Also dynamic coefficient were obtained by Matlab. The rotor system was modeled using ANSYS finite software and the critical speed with and without annular seal clearance were calculated. The result shows: annular seal's fluid field is under the comprehensive effect of pressure difference and rotor entrainment. Due to the huge pressure difference in front annular seal, fluid flows under pressure difference; the low pressure difference results in the more obvious effect on the clearance field in back annular seal. The first order critical speed increases greatly with the annular seal clearance; while the average growth rate of the second order critical speed is only 3.2%; the third and fourth critical speed decreases little. Based on the above result, the annular seal has great influence to the first order speed, while has little influence on the rest.

  18. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  19. Two-phase flow in helical and spiral coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, Edward G.; Bush, Mia L.; Omrani, Adel; Yan, An

    1995-01-01

    Coiled tube heat exchangers involving two-phase flows are used in a variety of application areas, extending from the aerospace industry to petrochemical, refrigeration land power generation industries. The optimal design in each situation requires a fundamental understanding of the heat, mass and momentum transfer characteristic of the flowing two-phase mixture. However, two-phase flows in lengths of horizontal or vertical straight channels with heat transfer are often quite difficult in themselves to understand sufficiently well to permit accurate system designs. The present study has the following general objectives: (1) Observe two-phase flow patterns of air-water and R-113 working fluids over a range of flow conditions, for helical and spiral coil geometries, of circular and rectangular cross-section; (2) Compare observed flow patterns with predictions of existing flow maps; (3) Study criteria for flow regime transitions for possible modifications of existing flow pattern maps; and (4) Measure associated pressure drops across the coiled test sections over the rage of flow conditions specified.

  20. Two-phase computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.

    1991-07-26

    The results of the project illustrate the feasibility of multiphase computerized fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Existing CFD software is capable of simulating particle fields, certain droplet fields, and certain free surface flows, and does so routinely in engineering applications. Stratified flows can be addressed by a multiphase CFD code, once one is developed with suitable capabilities. The groundwork for such a code has been laid. Calculations performed for stratified flows demonstrate the accuracy achievable and the convergence of the methodology. Extension of the stratified flow methodology to other segregated flows such as slug or annular faces no inherent limits. The research has commercial application in the development of multiphase CFD computer programs.

  1. Improved Two-Phase Switching Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Coupled-inductor polyphase regulator has better efficiency and lower inductor losses. Improved two-phase switching regulator employs negative coupling between inductors to achieve better power-to-weight ratio while reducing peak switching currents and inductor losses. Improvement of about 35 percent using new technique.

  2. Two-phase flow in fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, P.; Long, J.; Zuidema, P.

    1993-11-01

    This report gives the results of a three-day workshop on two-phase flow in fractured rock. The workshop focused on two-phase flow processes that are important in geologic disposal of nuclear waste as experienced in a variety of repository settings. The goals and objectives of the workshop were threefold: exchange information; describe the current state of understanding; and identify research needs. The participants were divided into four subgroups. Each group was asked to address a series of two-phase flow processes. The following groups were defined to address these processes: basic flow processes; fracture/matrix interactions; complex flow processes; and coupled processes. For each process, the groups were asked to address these four issues: (1) describe the two-phase flow processes that are important with respect to repository performance; (2) describe how this process relates to the specific driving programmatic issues given above for nuclear waste storage; (3) evaluate the state of understanding for these processes; and (4) suggest additional research to address poorly understood processes relevant to repository performance. The reports from each of the four working groups are given here.

  3. Condensing, Two-Phase, Contact Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. L.; Oren, J. A.; Sauer, L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Two-phase heat exchanger continuously separates liquid and vapor phases of working fluid and positions liquid phase for efficient heat transfer. Designed for zero gravity. Principle is adapted to other phase-separation applications; for example, in thermodynamic cycles for solar-energy conversion.

  4. Segmented annular combustor

    DOEpatents

    Reider, Samuel B.

    1979-01-01

    An industrial gas turbine engine includes an inclined annular combustor made up of a plurality of support segments each including inner and outer walls of trapezoidally configured planar configuration extents and including side flanges thereon interconnected by means of air cooled connector bolt assemblies to form a continuous annular combustion chamber therebetween and wherein an air fuel mixing chamber is formed at one end of the support segments including means for directing and mixing fuel within a plenum and a perforated header plate for directing streams of air and fuel mixture into the combustion chamber; each of the outer and inner walls of each of the support segments having a ribbed lattice with tracks slidably supporting porous laminated replaceable panels and including pores therein for distributing combustion air into the combustion chamber while cooling the inner surface of each of the panels by transpiration cooling thereof.

  5. Granuloma annulare, patch type.

    PubMed

    Victor, Frank C; Mengden, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred to the Bellevue Hospital Center Dermatology Clinic for evaluation of an asymptomatic eruption on his left inner arm, which had been present for 4 months and was unresponsive to topical anti-fungal therapy. One month after the initial eruption, 2 similar, asymptomatic lesions appeared on the right inner arm. The lesions were slowly expanding. A biopsy specimen from the left medial arm was consistent with interstitial granuloma annulare. The patient's clinical presentation was consistent with patch-type granuloma annulare. He was treated with a mid-potency topical glucocorticoid twice daily for 4 weeks without benefit. Since the eruption was asymptomatic, treatment was discontinued. PMID:18627757

  6. Two-phase, gas-liquid flows in static mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, N.F.; Kale, D.D. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that static mixers are used for many gas-liquid two-phase operations. some of the typical applications are processing of natural gas to remove hydrogen sulfide or carbon dioxide, waste water treatment, dissolution of gases, hydrogenation, chlorination, and so on. They have experimentally studied the pressure drop for oxygen-water system in a bubble column packed with Sulzer-Koch-type mixing elements. They observed that the ratio of pressure drop through the packed bubble column to that through the unpacked one was slightly greater than one. The suitability of static mixers to mix fluids of very widely different viscosities has been demonstrated. Two-phase operations in polymer industry involve very viscous fluids. Due to the high viscosity of these fluids, the flow will be predominantly in laminar region for both fluids. There are no data on gas-liquid two-phase systems incorporating viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids where flows are predominantly in laminar region.

  7. Two-phase flow research. Phase I. Two-phase nozzle research. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    An investigation of energy transfer in two-phase nozzles was conducted. Experimental performance of converging-diverging nozzles operating on air-water mixtures is presented for a wide range of parameters. Thrust measurements characterized the performance and photographic documentation was used to visually observe the off-design regimes. Thirty-six nozzle configurations were tested to determine the effects of convergence angle, area ratio, and nozzle length. In addition, the pressure ratio and mass flowrate ratio were varied to experimentally map off-design performance. The test results indicate the effects of wall friction and infer temperature and velocity differences between phases and the effect on nozzle performance. The major conclusions reached were: the slip ratio between the phases, gas velocity to liquid velocity, is shown to be below about 4 or 5, and, in most of the test cases run, was estimated to between about 1-1/2 to 2-1/2; in all cases except the free-jet the mass )

  8. Nonlinear stability of oscillatory core-annular flow: A generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with time periodic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coward, Adrian V.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Smyrlis, Yiorgos S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the nonlinear stability of two-phase core-annular flow in a pipe is examined when the acting pressure gradient is modulated by time harmonic oscillations and viscosity stratification and interfacial tension is present. An exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is used as the background state to develop an asymptotic theory valid for thin annular layers, which leads to a novel nonlinear evolution describing the spatio-temporal evolution of the interface. The evolution equation is an extension of the equation found for constant pressure gradients and generalizes the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with dispersive effects found by Papageorgiou, Maldarelli & Rumschitzki, Phys. Fluids A 2(3), 1990, pp. 340-352, to a similar system with time periodic coefficients. The distinct regimes of slow and moderate flow are considered and the corresponding evolution is derived. Certain solutions are described analytically in the neighborhood of the first bifurcation point by use of multiple scales asymptotics. Extensive numerical experiments, using dynamical systems ideas, are carried out in order to evaluate the effect of the oscillatory pressure gradient on the solutions in the presence of a constant pressure gradient.

  9. Azimuthally forced flames in an annular combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Nicholas; Dawson, James; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2015-11-01

    Thermoacoustic instabilities are more likely to occur in lean burn combustion systems, making their adoption both difficult and costly. At present, our knowledge of such phenomena is insufficient to produce an inherently stable combustor by design, and therefore an improved understanding of these instabilities has become the focus of a significant research effort. Recent experimental and numerical studies have demonstrated that the symmetry of annular chambers permit a range of self-excited azimuthal modes to be generated in annular geometry, which can make the study of isolated modes difficult. While acoustic forcing is common in single flame experiments, no equivalent for forced azimuthal modes in an annular chamber have been demonstrated. The present investigation focuses on the novel application of acoustic forcing to a laboratory scale annular combustor, in order to generate azimuthal standing wave modes at a prescribed frequency and amplitude. The results focus on the ability of the method to isolate the mode of oscillation using experimental pressure and high speed OH* measurements. The successful excitation of azimuthal modes demonstrated represents an important step towards improving our fundamental understanding of this phenomena in practically relevant geometry.

  10. A study of two phase flow in fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K.; Pruess, K.; Vomvoris, S.; Segan, S.

    1994-12-31

    Accurate characterization of the two-phase flow behavior of the fractured rock mass is vital to the safety of a potential high level nuclear waste repository in the unsaturated, fractured welded tuff at Yucca Mountain, NV. A tool for studying the two-phase flow properties of a fracture networks was developed. It is based on a simple mechanistic model in which the capillary pressure of a fracture is a unique function of the aperture. Whether a particular fracture element is occupied by wetting fluid or non-wetting fluid is determined by allowability and accessibility criteria. Relative permeability characteristics of a simulated fracture network were investigated using the model. Different assumptions are examined regarding the interactions between phases. In all cases, strong phase interference was observed. Hysteresis effects and irreducible saturation were also explained based on the model.

  11. Dynamic failure in two-phase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, S. J.; Walker, E. K.; Cerreta, E. K.; Trujillo, C. P.; Martinez, D. T.; Gray, G. T.

    2015-12-21

    Previous experimental research has shown that microstructural features such as interfaces, inclusions, vacancies, and heterogeneities can all act as voidnucleation sites. However, it is not well understood how important these interfaces are to damage evolution and failure as a function of the surrounding parentmaterials. In this work, we present results on three different polycrystallinematerials: (1) Cu, (2) Cu-24 wt. %Ag, and (3) Cu-15 wt. %Nb which were studied to probe the influence of bi-metal interfaces onvoidnucleation and growth. These materials were chosen due to the range of difference in structure and bulk properties between the two phases. The initial results suggest that when there are significant differences between the bulk properties (for example: stacking fault energy, melting temperature, etc.) the type of interface between the two parent materials does not principally control the damage nucleation and growth process. Rather, it is the “weaker” material that dictates the dynamic spall strength of the overall two-phase material.

  12. Pumped two-phase heat transfer loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Fred

    1988-01-01

    A pumped loop two-phase heat transfer system, operating at a nearly constant temperature throughout, includes several independently operating grooved capillary heat exchanger plates supplied with working fluid through independent flow modulation valves connected to a liquid supply line, a vapor line for collecting vapor from the heat exchangers, a condenser between the vapor and the liquid lines, and a fluid circulating pump between the condenser and the heat exchangers.

  13. Pumped two-phase heat transfer loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A pumped loop two-phase heat transfer system, operating at a nearly constant temperature throughout, includes a plurality of independently operating grooved capillary heat exchanger plates supplied with working fluid through independent flow modulation valves connected to a liquid supply line, a vapor line for collecting vapor from the heat exchangers, a condenser between the vapor and the liquid lines, and a fluid circulating pump between the condenser and the heat exchangers.

  14. Two-phase charge-coupled device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosonocky, W. F.; Carnes, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A charge-transfer efficiency of 99.99% per stage was achieved in the fat-zero mode of operation of 64- and 128-stage two-phase charge-coupled shift registers at 1.0-MHz clock frequency. The experimental two-phase charge-coupled shift registers were constructed in the form of polysilicon gates overlapped by aluminum gates. The unidirectional signal flow was accomplished by using n-type substrates with 0.5 to 1.0 ohm-cm resistivity in conjunction with a channel oxide thickness of 1000 A for the polysilicon gates and 3000 A for the aluminum gates. The operation of the tested shift registers with fat zero is in good agreement with the free-charge transfer characteristics expected for the tested structures. The charge-transfer losses observed when operating the experimental shift registers without the fat zero are attributed to fast interface state trapping. The analytical part of the report contains a review backed up by an extensive appendix of the free-charge transfer characteristics of CCD's in terms of thermal diffusion, self-induced drift, and fringing field drift. Also, a model was developed for the charge-transfer losses resulting from charge trapping by fast interface states. The proposed model was verified by the operation of the experimental two-phase charge-coupled shift registers.

  15. The rheology of two-phase magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, E. W.; Mader, H. M.; Mueller, S.

    2012-12-01

    Great advances in our understanding of the rheology of two-phase magmatic suspensions (magma with either bubbles or crystals in it) have been made in recent years. These advances are based on laboratory experiments with both magma and analogue materials, and on analytical and numerical modelling. The current state-of-the-art is the culmination of scores of studies undertaken by scores of research groups and presented in scores of publications. Consequently, whilst it is possible to construct a sophisticated rheological description of a two-phase magma based on a few easily-measured properties (melt composition, crystal/vesicle volume fraction, CSD/VSD, etc.) the task of determining how best to do this is daunting to the non-specialist. We present a straightforward, practical, algorithmic approach to determining the rheology of two-phase magma to the degree of sophistication appropriate to most modelling applications. The approach is based on a broad synthesis of the literature, on new experimental data, and on new theoretical analysis.

  16. Experimental Study of Two Phase Flow Behavior Past BWR Spacer Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnayake, Ruwan K.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Ivanov, K.N.; Cimbala, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    Performance of best estimate codes used in the nuclear industry can be significantly improved by reducing the empiricism embedded in their constitutive models. Spacer grids have been found to have an important impact on the maximum allowable Critical Heat Flux within the fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor core. Therefore, incorporation of suitable spacer grids models can improve the critical heat flux prediction capability of best estimate codes. Realistic modeling of entrainment behavior of spacer grids requires understanding the different mechanisms that are involved. Since visual information pertaining to the entrainment behavior of spacer grids cannot possibly be obtained from operating nuclear reactors, experiments have to be designed and conducted for this specific purpose. Most of the spacer grid experiments available in literature have been designed in view of obtaining quantitative data for the purpose of developing or modifying empirical formulations for heat transfer, critical heat flux or pressure drop. Very few experiments have been designed to provide fundamental information which can be used to understand spacer grid effects and phenomena involved in two phase flow. Air-water experiments were conducted to obtain visual information on the two-phase flow behavior both upstream and downstream of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) spacer grids. The test section was designed and constructed using prototypic dimensions such as the channel cross-section, rod diameter and other spacer grid configurations of a typical BWR fuel assembly. The test section models the flow behavior in two adjacent sub channels in the BWR core. A portion of a prototypic BWR spacer grid accounting for two adjacent channels was used with industrial mild steel rods for the purpose of representing the channel internals. Symmetry was preserved in this practice, so that the channel walls could effectively be considered as the channel boundaries. Thin films were established on the rod surfaces

  17. Numerical computation and validation of two-phase flow downstream of a gas turbine combustor dome swirl cup

    SciTech Connect

    Tolpadi, A.K.; Burrus, D.L.; Lawson, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    The two-phase axisymmetric flow field downstream of the swirl cup of an advanced gas turbine combustor is studied numerically and validated against experimental Phase-Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) data. The swirl cup analyzed is that of a single annular GE/SNECMA CFM56 turbofan engine that is comprised of a pair of coaxial counterswirling air streams together with a fuel atomizer. The atomized fuel mixes with the swirling air stream, resulting in the establishment of a complex two-phase flow field within the swirl chamber. The analysis procedure involves the solution of the gas phase equations in an Eulerian frame of reference using the code CONCERT. CONCERT has been developed and used extensively in the past and represents a fully elliptic body-fitted computational fluid dynamics code to predict flow fields in practical full-scale combustors. The flow in this study is assumed to be nonreacting and isothermal. The liquid phase is simulated by using a droplet spray model and by treating the motion of the fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Extensive PDPA data for the CFM56 engine swirl cup have been obtained at atmospheric pressure by using water as the fuel (Wang et al., 1992a). The PDPA system makes pointwise measurements that are fundamentally Eulerian. Measurements have been made of the continuous gas phase velocity together with discrete phase attributes such as droplet size, droplet number count, and droplet velocity distribution at various axial stations downstream of the injector. Numerical calculations were performed under the exact inlet and boundary conditions as the experimental measurements. The computed gas phase velocity field showed good agreement with the test data.

  18. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-11-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  19. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  20. Annular recuperator design

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yungmo

    2005-10-04

    An annular heat recuperator is formed with alternating hot and cold cells to separate counter-flowing hot and cold fluid streams. Each cold cell has a fluid inlet formed in the inner diameter of the recuperator near one axial end, and a fluid outlet formed in the outer diameter of the recuperator near the other axial end to evenly distribute fluid mass flow throughout the cell. Cold cells may be joined with the outlet of one cell fluidly connected to the inlet of an adjacent downstream cell to form multi-stage cells.

  1. Two-phase gravity currents in geological CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, J. A.; Golding, M.; Hesse, M. A.; Huppert, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    Geological carbon capture and storage, in which compressed CO2 is injected into deep saline aquifers for permanent storage, forms an integral part of CO2 mitigation strategies. At representative reservoir conditions CO2 is buoyant and may therefore leak into surface waters or the atmosphere. The leakage of CO2 back into the atmosphere may be prevented by the formation of disconnected immobile residual CO2 in the wake of the migrating plume. Here we constrain the magnitude of residual trapping by considering a two-phase model of the buoyancy driven propagation of a plume of injected CO2 within a saline aquifer. The buoyant rise of CO2 within saline aquifers is the principal mechanism through which CO2 contacts the host reservoir. Most simplified models of CO2 migration have assumed that the capillary transition zone is negligible relative to the current thickness and that the fluids are separated by a sharp interface. The results anticipate that such currents quickly become highly localized at the top boundary of reservoirs resulting in a concomitant reduction in residual trapping. However, such single-phase models neglect both the interfacial tension and large viscosity difference between the injected CO2 and the ambient pore fluid. The key challenge in two-phase gravity currents is the modeling of the variation in CO2 saturation with depth within the current. Here we use a standard model that considers the functional dependence of the relative permeability and capillary pressure on saturation to describe the two-phase flow. We anticipate that, after an initial transient, the extent of the current is much greater than its depth and that the capillary pressures within the current are balanced by gravity in this limit. This balance, called gravity-capillary equilibrium, and the fact that flow is predominantly horizontal within the current determine the saturation profile. Realizing that flow is driven primarily by gradients in the hydrostatic pressure, as in single

  2. Two-phase gravity currents in CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Jerome; Golding, Madeleine; Hesse, Marc

    2010-05-01

    Geological carbon capture and storage (CCS), in which compressed CO2 is injected into deep saline aquifers for permanent storage, forms an integral part of CO2 mitigation strategies. At representative reservoir conditions CO2 is buoyant and may therefore leak into surface waters or the atmosphere. The leakage of CO2 back into the atmosphere may be prevented by the formation of disconnected immobile residual CO2 in the wake of the migrating plume. Here we constrain the magnitude of residual trapping by considering a two-phase model of the buoyancy driven propagation of a plume of injected CO2 within a saline aquifer. The buoyant rise of CO2 within saline aquifers is the principal mechanism through which CO2 contacts the host reservoir. Most simplified models of CO2 migration have assumed that the capillary transition zone is negligible relative to the current thickness and that the fluids are separated by a sharp interface. The results anticipate that such currents quickly become highly localized at the top boundary of reservoirs resulting in a concomitant reduction in residual trapping. However, such single-phase models neglect both the interfacial tension and large viscosity difference between the injected CO2 and the ambient pore fluid. The key challenge in two-phase gravity currents is the modeling of the variation in CO2 saturation with depth within the current. Here we use a standard model that considers the functional dependence of the relative permeability and capillary pressure on saturation to describe the two-phase flow. We anticipate that, after an initial transient, the extent of the current is much greater than its depth and that the capillary pressures within the current are balanced by gravity in this limit. This balance, called gravity-capillary equilibrium, and the fact that flow is predominantly horizontal within the current determine the saturation profile. Realizing that flow is driven primarily by gradients in the hydrostatic pressure, as in

  3. Portal Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Harnoss, Jonathan M.; Harnoss, Julian C.; Diener, Markus K.; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Büchler, Markus W.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered. In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery). Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option. PMID:25207658

  4. Dynamic failure in two-phase materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fensin, S. J.; Walker, E. K.; Cerreta, E. K.; Trujillo, C. P.; Martinez, D. T.; Gray, G. T.

    2015-12-21

    Previous experimental research has shown that microstructural features such as interfaces, inclusions, vacancies, and heterogeneities can all act as voidnucleation sites. However, it is not well understood how important these interfaces are to damage evolution and failure as a function of the surrounding parentmaterials. In this work, we present results on three different polycrystallinematerials: (1) Cu, (2) Cu-24 wt. %Ag, and (3) Cu-15 wt. %Nb which were studied to probe the influence of bi-metal interfaces onvoidnucleation and growth. These materials were chosen due to the range of difference in structure and bulk properties between the two phases. The initial resultsmore » suggest that when there are significant differences between the bulk properties (for example: stacking fault energy, melting temperature, etc.) the type of interface between the two parent materials does not principally control the damage nucleation and growth process. Rather, it is the “weaker” material that dictates the dynamic spall strength of the overall two-phase material.« less

  5. Dynamic failure in two-phase materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensin, S. J.; Walker, E. K.; Cerreta, E. K.; Trujillo, C. P.; Martinez, D. T.; Gray, G. T.

    2015-12-01

    Previous experimental research has shown that microstructural features such as interfaces, inclusions, vacancies, and heterogeneities can all act as void nucleation sites. However, it is not well understood how important these interfaces are to damage evolution and failure as a function of the surrounding parent materials. In this work, we present results on three different polycrystalline materials: (1) Cu, (2) Cu-24 wt. %Ag, and (3) Cu-15 wt. %Nb which were studied to probe the influence of bi-metal interfaces on void nucleation and growth. These materials were chosen due to the range of difference in structure and bulk properties between the two phases. The initial results suggest that when there are significant differences between the bulk properties (for example: stacking fault energy, melting temperature, etc.) the type of interface between the two parent materials does not principally control the damage nucleation and growth process. Rather, it is the "weaker" material that dictates the dynamic spall strength of the overall two-phase material.

  6. Development of an Advanced Annular Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusnak, J. P.; Shadowen, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    The objective of the effort described in this report was to determine the structural durability of a full-scale advanced annular turbojet combustor using ASTM A-1 type fuel and operating at conditions typical of advanced supersonic aircraft. A full-scale annular combustor of the ram-induction type was fabricated and subjected to a 325-hour cyclic endurance test at conditions representative of operation in a Mach 3.0 aircraft. The combustor exhibited extensive cracking and scoop burning at the end of the test program. But these defects had no appreciable effect on combustor performance, as performance remained at a high level throughout the endurance program. Most performance goals were achieved with pressure loss values near 6% and 8%, and temperature rise variation ratio (deltaTVR) values near 1.25 and l.22 at takeoff and cruise conditions, respectively. Combustion efficiencies approached l004 and the exit radial temperature profiles were approximately as desired.

  7. Nodal analysis of two-phase instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Garea, V.P.

    1995-10-01

    Nodal models having moving nodal boundaries have been developed for the analysis of two-phase flow instabilities in a boiling channel. The first model, which was based on a Galerkin method for the discretization, has been found to be accurate in the prediction of the onset of instabilities as well as the frequency of oscillations. This model however, had some problems with the prediction of chaotic phenomena and did not allow for flow reversal in the channel. A second nodal model, based on a finite difference approach, has been found to perform better for the prediction of non-linear response and it also allows for flow reversal. Both models are numerically more efficient than the existing fixed grid models for instabilities analysis.

  8. Stability of oscillatory two phase Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coward, Adrian V.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the stability of two phase Couette flow of different liquids bounded between plane parallel plates. One of the plates has a time dependent velocity in its own plane, which is composed of a constant steady part and a time harmonic component. In the absence of time harmonic modulations, the flow can be unstable to an interfacial instability if the viscosities are different and the more viscous fluid occupies the thinner of the two layers. Using Floquet theory, we show analytically in the limit of long waves, that time periodic modulations in the basic flow can have a significant influence on flow stability. In particular, flows which are otherwise unstable for extensive ranges of viscosity ratios, can be stabilized completely by the inclusion of background modulations, a finding that can have useful consequences in many practical applications.

  9. Reconfigurable mosaic annular arrays.

    PubMed

    Thomenius, Kai E; Wodnicki, Robert; Cogan, Scott D; Fisher, Rayette A; Burdick, Bill; Smith, L Scott; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Lin, Der-Song; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Bonitz, Barry; Davies, Todd; Thomas, Glen; Woychik, Charles

    2014-07-01

    Mosaic annular arrays (MAA) based on reconfigurable array (RA) transducer electronics assemblies are presented as a potential solution for future highly integrated ultrasonic transducer subsystems. Advantages of MAAs include excellent beam quality and depth of field resulting from superior elevational focus compared with 1-D electronically scanned arrays, as well as potentially reduced cost, size, and power consumption resulting from the use of a limited number of beamforming channels for processing a large number of subelements. Specific design tradeoffs for these highly integrated arrays are discussed in terms of array specifications for center frequency, element pitch, and electronic switch-on resistance. Large-area RAs essentially function as RC delay lines. Efficient architectures which take into account RC delay effects are presented. Architectures for integration of the transducer and electronics layers of large-area array implementations are reviewed. PMID:24960699

  10. Axisymmetric annular curtain stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zahir U.; Khayat, Roger E.; Maissa, Philippe; Mathis, Christian

    2012-06-01

    A temporal stability analysis was carried out to investigate the stability of an axially moving viscous annular liquid jet subject to axisymmetric disturbances in surrounding co-flowing viscous gas media. We investigated in this study the effects of inertia, surface tension, the gas-to-liquid density ratio, the inner-to-outer radius ratio and the gas-to-liquid viscosity ratio on the stability of the jet. With an increase in inertia, the growth rate of the unstable disturbances is found to increase. The dominant (or most unstable) wavenumber decreases with increasing Reynolds number for larger values of the gas-to-liquid viscosity ratio. However, an opposite tendency for the most unstable wavenumber is predicted for small viscosity ratio in the same inertia range. The surrounding gas density, in the presence of viscosity, always reduces the growth rate, hence stabilizing the flow. There exists a critical value of the density ratio above which the flow becomes stable for very small viscosity ratio, whereas for large viscosity ratio, no stable flow appears in the same range of the density ratio. The curvature has a significant destabilizing effect on the thin annular jet, whereas for a relatively thick jet, the maximum growth rate decreases as the inner radius increases, irrespective of the surrounding gas viscosity. The degree of instability increases with Weber number for a relatively large viscosity ratio. In contrast, for small viscosity ratio, the growth rate exhibits a dramatic dependence on the surface tension. There is a small Weber number range, which depends on the viscosity ratio, where the flow is stable. The viscosity ratio always stabilizes the flow. However, the dominant wavenumber increases with increasing viscosity ratio. The range of unstable wavenumbers is affected only by the curvature effect.

  11. On-demand generation of aqueous two-phase microdroplets with reversible phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Charles

    2013-03-01

    Aqueous two-phase systems contained within microdroplets enable a bottom-up approach to mimicking the dynamic microcompartmentation of biomaterial that naturally occurs within the cytoplasm of cells. Here, we demonstrate the on-demand generation of femtolitre aqueous two-phase droplets within a microfluidic oil channel. Gated pressure pulses were used to generate individual, stationary two-phase microdroplets with a well-defined time zero for carrying out controlled and sequential phase transformations over time. Reversible phase transitions between single-phase, two-phase, and core-shell microbead states were obtained via evaporation-induced dehydration and on-demand water rehydration. In contrast to other microfluidic aqueous two-phase droplets, which require continuous flows and high-frequency droplet formation, our system enables the controlled isolation and reversible transformation of a single microdroplet and is expected to be useful for future studies in dynamic microcompartmentation and affinity partitioning.

  12. A two phase Mach number description of the equilibrium flow of nitrogen in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursik, J. W.; Hall, R. M.; Adcock, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Some additional thermodynamic properties of the usual two-phase form which is linear in the moisture fraction are derived which are useful in the analysis of many kinds of duct flow. The method used is based on knowledge of the vapor pressure and Gibbs function as functions of temperature. With these, additional two-phase functions linear in moisture fraction are generated, which ultimately reveal that the squared ratio of mixture specific volume to mixture sound speed depends on liquid mass fraction and temperature in the same manner as do many weighted mean two-phase properties. This leads to a simple method of calculating two-phase Mach numbers for various duct flows. The matching of one- and two-phase flows at a saturated vapor point with discontinuous Mach number is also discussed.

  13. On-demand generation of aqueous two-phase microdroplets with reversible phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous two-phase systems contained entirely within microdroplets enable a bottom-up approach to mimicking the dynamic microcompartmentation of biomaterial that naturally occurs within the cytoplasm of cells. Here, we demonstrate the on-demand generation of femtolitre aqueous two-phase droplets within a microfluidic oil channel. Gated pressure pulses were used to generate individual, stationary two-phase microdroplets with a well-defined time zero for carrying out controlled and sequential phase transformations over time. Reversible phase transitions between single-phase, two-phase, and core-shell microgel states were obtained via evaporation-induced dehydration and on-demand water rehydration. In contrast to other microfluidic aqueous two-phase droplets, which require continuous flows and high-frequency droplet formation, our system enables the controlled isolation and reversible transformation of a single microdroplet and is expected to be useful for future studies in dynamic microcompartmentation and affinity partitioning.

  14. Concomitant occurrence of patch granuloma annulare and classical granuloma annulare.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Daisuke; Sowa, Junko; Hiroyasu, Sho; Ishii, Masamitsu; Kobayashi, Hiromi

    2011-05-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is characterized clinically as annularly-distributed, erythematous papules on the extremities in children and adolescents. GA is recognized histologically as palisading granulomas with central degenerated collagen and mucin deposits. Here, we present a case of concomitant occurrence of patch GA (PGA), the most rare type of GA, and classical GA in a patient. A 60-year-old man was referred to our hospital for asymptomatic eruptions on the upper arms, forearms, right flank and right lateral chest. Clinical examination revealed annular erythematous plaques composed of numerous small papules on bilateral upper arms and forearms. Moreover, an indurative, exudative erythematous to violaceous plaque was present on the right lateral chest and right flank. Histopathology of the former was compatible with palisade-type GA, and the latter interstitial-type GA. This is the first report of PGA concomitant with "classical" annular papular lesions. PMID:21352310

  15. Tracer Partitioning in Two-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Hesse, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The concentration distributions of geochemical tracers in a subsurface reservoir can be used as an indication of the reservoir flow paths and constituent fluid origin. In this case, we are motivated by the origin of marked geochemical gradients in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir in northeastern New Mexico. This reservoir contains 99% CO2 with various trace noble gas components and overlies the formation brine in a sloping aquifer. It is thought that magmatic CO2 entered the reservoir, and displaced the brine. This displacement created gradients in the concentrations of the noble gases. Two models to explain noble gas partitioning in two-phase flow are presented here. The first model assumes that the noble gases act as tracers and uses a first order non-linear partial differential equation to compute the volume fraction of each phase along the displament path. A one-way coupled partial differential equation determines the tracer concentration, which has no effect on the overall flow or phase saturations. The second model treats each noble gas as a regular component resulting in a three-component, two-phase system. As the noble gas injection concentration goes to zero, we see the three-component system behave like the one-way coupled system of the first model. Both the analytical and numerical solutions are presented for these models. For the process of a gas displacing a liquid, we see that a noble gas tracer with greater preference for the gas phase, such as Helium, will move more quickly along the flowpath than a heavier tracer that will more easily enter the liquid phase, such as Argon. When we include partial miscibility of both the major and trace components, these differences in speed are shown in a bank of the tracer at the saturation front. In the three component model, the noble gas bank has finite width and concentration. In the limit where the noble gas is treated as a tracer, the width of the bank is zero and the concentration increases linearly

  16. Two-phase damage models of magma-fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhengyu; Bercovici, David

    2013-04-01

    Damage and fracturing in two-phase and porous flows are relevant for geological process such as magma-fracturing during melt migration, which is associated with the propagation of a pore-generating damage front ahead of high-pressure fluid injection. We therefore examine the propagation of porous flow in a damageable matrix by applying the two-phase theory for compaction and damage proposed by Bercovici et al. (2001a) and Bercovici and Ricard (2003). The movement of the fluid and the solid is governed by the two-phase flow laws, while damage (void generation and microcracking) is treated by considering the generation of interfacial surface energy by deformational work. Calculations of one-dimensional (1-D) flow of fluid migrating buoyantly through compacting and damageable matrix show that damage is mitigated in steady-state largely because of the loss of the velocity gradient at the fluid front. However, in time-dependent flows, linear stability analysis shows that the propagation velocity of porosity waves is strongly dependent on damage. In the damage-free case porosity waves are dispersive in that wave-speed decreases with wavenumber (inverse wavelength); however with damage the dispersion flattens and beyond a critical damage reverses (the wave speed increases with wavenumber). Since normal dispersive behavior balances breaking in the nonlinear wave case, such reversed dispersion implies that damage has a profound effect in the nonlinear limit by facilitating wave front steepening and higher wave velocities. Nonlinear solitary wave solutions are obtained numerically and show that the transmission of porosity waves induces high stress and damage that can push the damage front forward. With damage the porosity waves sharpen and calculations suggest that they can transform from shape-conserving solitary waves into faster high amplitude waves, which is also predicted by the linear theory. Such pulse-like sharper waves may prove effective at promoting fluid

  17. Two-phase methane fermentation of municipal-industrial sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Sajjad, A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an innovative two-phase methane fermentation process that provided a mesophilic methane yield of about 0.5 SCM/kg VS (8 SCF/lb VS) added from digestion of a municipal-industrial sludge at a system hydraulic residence time (HRT) of about 6 days compared with a yield of 0.22 to 0.31 SCM/kg VS (3.5 to 5.0 SCF/lb VS) added obtained from single-stage conventional high-rate digesters operated at HRT's of 10 to 20 days. This innovative process has substantive beneficial impact on the production of net energy and availability of surplus digester methane for sale or conversion to such other energy forms as substitute natural gas, electric power, hot water, or low-pressure steam. The research was conducted with a high-metal-content and difficult-to-treat primary sludge from the South Essex Sewerage District (SESD) water pollution control plant, Salem, Massachusetts. Wastewaters received at the plant include 40 to 60 vol % industrial wastes, the remainder being residential liquid wastes. Incineration, which was the sludge disposal process at the plant, is now unacceptable because it leads to the production of hexavalent chromium and other oxidized metals, and the incinerator ash containing these materials cannot be landfilled. The two-phase process does not generate oxidized species such as Cr/sup 6 +/, produces renewable energy and a highly stabilized residue, and could be an answer to the sludge disposal problems of SESD or other sewage districts. Results of bench-scale process development work are presented here. Design and operation of a 7500 L/day (2000 gal/day) two-phase pilot plant will be started this year with support from the above industrial sponsors and other governmental and public agencies. 6 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  18. Two-Phase Quality/Flow Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Werlink, Rudy J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A quality and/or flow meter employs a capacitance probe assembly for measuring the dielectric constant of flow stream, particularly a two-phase flow stream including liquid and gas components.ne dielectric constant of the flow stream varies depending upon the volume ratios of its liquid and gas components, and capacitance measurements can therefore be employed to calculate the quality of the flow, which is defined as the volume ratio of liquid in the flow to the total volume ratio of gas and liquid in the flow. By using two spaced capacitance sensors, and cross-correlating the time varying capacitance values of each, the velocity of the flow stream can also be determined. A microcontroller-based processing circuit is employed to measure the capacitance of the probe sensors.The circuit employs high speed timer and counter circuits to provide a high resolution measurement of the time interval required to charge each capacitor in the probe assembly. In this manner, a high resolution, noise resistant, digital representation of each of capacitance value is obtained without the need for a high resolution A/D converter, or a high frequency oscillator circuit. One embodiment of the probe assembly employs a capacitor with two ground plates which provide symmetry to insure that accurate measurements are made thereby.

  19. Keratocytes generate traction forces in two phases.

    PubMed

    Burton, K; Park, J H; Taylor, D L

    1999-11-01

    Forces generated by goldfish keratocytes and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts have been measured with nanonewton precision and submicrometer spatial resolution. Differential interference contrast microscopy was used to visualize deformations produced by traction forces in elastic substrata, and interference reflection microscopy revealed sites of cell-substratum adhesions. Force ranged from a few nanonewtons at submicrometer spots under the lamellipodium to several hundred nanonewtons under the cell body. As cells moved forward, centripetal forces were applied by lamellipodia at sites that remained stationary on the substratum. Force increased and abruptly became lateral at the boundary of the lamellipodium and the cell body. When the cell retracted at its posterior margin, cell-substratum contact area decreased more rapidly than force, so that stress (force divided by area) increased as the cell pulled away. An increase in lateral force was associated with widening of the cell body. These mechanical data suggest an integrated, two-phase mechanism of cell motility: (1) low forces in the lamellipodium are applied in the direction of cortical flow and cause the cell body to be pulled forward; and (2) a component of force at the flanks pulls the rear margins forward toward the advancing cell body, whereas a large lateral component contributes to detachment of adhesions without greatly perturbing forward movement. PMID:10564269

  20. Condensation in a two-phase pool

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1991-12-31

    We consider the case of vapor condensation in a liquid pool, when the heat transfer is controlled by heat losses through the walls. The analysis is based on drift flux theory for phase separation in the pool, and determines the two-phase mixture height for the pool. To our knowledge this is the first analytical treatment of this classic problem that gives an explicit result, previous work having established the result for the evaporative case. From conservation of mass and energy in a one-dimensional steady flow, together with a void relation between the liquid and vapor fluxes, we determine the increase in the mixture level from the base level of the pool. It can be seen that the thermal and hydrodynamic influences are separable. Thus, the thermal influence of the wall heat transfer appears through its effect on the condensing length L*, so that at high condensation rates the pool is all liquid, and at low rates overflows (the level swell or foaming effect). Similarly, the phase separation effect hydrodynamically determines the height via the relative velocity of the mixture to the entering flux. We examine some practical applications of this result to level swell in condensing flows, and also examine some limits in ideal cases.

  1. Condensation in a two-phase pool

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B. ); Hughes, E.D. )

    1991-01-01

    We consider the case of vapor condensation in a liquid pool, when the heat transfer is controlled by heat losses through the walls. The analysis is based on drift flux theory for phase separation in the pool, and determines the two-phase mixture height for the pool. To our knowledge this is the first analytical treatment of this classic problem that gives an explicit result, previous work having established the result for the evaporative case. From conservation of mass and energy in a one-dimensional steady flow, together with a void relation between the liquid and vapor fluxes, we determine the increase in the mixture level from the base level of the pool. It can be seen that the thermal and hydrodynamic influences are separable. Thus, the thermal influence of the wall heat transfer appears through its effect on the condensing length L*, so that at high condensation rates the pool is all liquid, and at low rates overflows (the level swell or foaming effect). Similarly, the phase separation effect hydrodynamically determines the height via the relative velocity of the mixture to the entering flux. We examine some practical applications of this result to level swell in condensing flows, and also examine some limits in ideal cases.

  2. Characterizing dynamic hysteresis and fractal statistics of chaotic two-phase flow and application to fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Michael B.; Litster, Shawn

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we analyze the stability of two-phase flow regimes and their transitions using chaotic and fractal statistics, and we report new measurements of dynamic two-phase pressure drop hysteresis that is related to flow regime stability and channel water content. Two-phase flow dynamics are relevant to a variety of real-world systems, and quantifying transient two-phase flow phenomena is important for efficient design. We recorded two-phase (air and water) pressure drops and flow images in a microchannel under both steady and transient conditions. Using Lyapunov exponents and Hurst exponents to characterize the steady-state pressure fluctuations, we develop a new, measurable regime identification criteria based on the dynamic stability of the two-phase pressure signal. We also applied a new experimental technique by continuously cycling the air flow rate to study dynamic hysteresis in two-phase pressure drops, which is separate from steady-state hysteresis and can be used to understand two-phase flow development time scales. Using recorded images of the two-phase flow, we show that the capacitive dynamic hysteresis is related to channel water content and flow regime stability. The mixed-wettability microchannel and in-channel water introduction used in this study simulate a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode air flow channel.

  3. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Boiling Two-Phase Flow of Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Oike, Mamoru; Kamijo, Kenjiro

    Two-dimensional characteristics of the boiling two-phase flow of liquid nitrogen in a duct flow are numerically investigated to contribute to the further development of new high-performance cryogenic engineering applications. First, the governing equations of the boiling two-phase flow of liquid nitrogen based on the unsteady drift-flux model are presented and several flow characteristics are numerically calculated taking account the effect of cryogenic flow states. Based on the numerical results, a two-dimensional structure of the boiling two-phase flow of liquid nitrogen is shown in detail, and it is found that the phase change of liquid nitrogen occurs in quite a short time interval compared with that of two-phase pressurized water at high temperature. Next, it is clarified that the distributions of pressure and the void fraction in a two-phase flow show a tendency different from those of fluids at room temperature because of the decrease in sound velocity due to large compressibility and the rapid phase change velocity in a cryogenic two-phase mixture flow. According to these numerical results, the fundamental characteristics of the cryogenic two-phase flow are predicted. The numerical results obtained will contribute to advanced cryogenic industrial applications.

  4. Analytical solution for two-phase flow in a wellbore using the drift-flux model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, L.; Webb, S.W.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents analytical solutions for steady-state, compressible two-phase flow through a wellbore under isothermal conditions using the drift flux conceptual model. Although only applicable to highly idealized systems, the analytical solutions are useful for verifying numerical simulation capabilities that can handle much more complicated systems, and can be used in their own right for gaining insight about two-phase flow processes in wells. The analytical solutions are obtained by solving the mixture momentum equation of steady-state, two-phase flow with an assumption that the two phases are immiscible. These analytical solutions describe the steady-state behavior of two-phase flow in the wellbore, including profiles of phase saturation, phase velocities, and pressure gradients, as affected by the total mass flow rate, phase mass fraction, and drift velocity (i.e., the slip between two phases). Close matching between the analytical solutions and numerical solutions for a hypothetical CO{sub 2} leakage problem as well as to field data from a CO{sub 2} production well indicates that the analytical solution is capable of capturing the major features of steady-state two-phase flow through an open wellbore, and that the related assumptions and simplifications are justified for many actual systems. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of the analytical solution to evaluate how the bottomhole pressure in a well in which CO{sub 2} is leaking upward responds to the mass flow rate of CO{sub 2}-water mixture.

  5. Single and two-phase flow fluid dynamics in parallel helical coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Salve, M.; Orio, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The design of helical coiled steam generators requires the knowledge of the single and two-phase fluid dynamics. The present work reports the results of an experimental campaign on single-phase and two phase pressure drops and void fraction in three parallel helicoidal pipes, in which the total water flow rate is splitted by means of a branch. With this test configuration the distribution of the water flow rate in the helicoidal pipes and the phenomena of the instability of the two-phase flow have been experimentally investigated.

  6. Investigation of single-substance horizontal two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, D.A.; Maeder, P.F.

    1984-03-01

    Despite the abundance of work in the field of two-phase flow, it seems as though a consensus has not been reached on some of the fundamental points. Although exceptions exist, adequate physical interpretation of the flow seems to be hindered either by complexity of analysis or, in the opposite extreme, the trend toward limited-range analysis and correlations. The dissertation presents the derivation of basic conservation equations for the phases. The combined equations are used to examine the phenomenon of slip and its practical limitations, the Fanno line for single-substance flow and the effect of slip on choking. Equations for critical mass flux in the presence of slip are derived. The Mach, Reynolds and Froude numbers based on conditions at flashing are introduced as the characteristic parameters, and the importance of compressibility in single-substance two-phase flow is discussed. Experimental measurements of pressure change and void fraction for flow in the highly compressible range (.5 < Ma < 1) are presented. The working fluid is Refrigerant R-114, at room temperature, in a test section of diameter 5 cm and length 8 m. The effect of the Froude and Mach numbers is examined. The experimental facility is operated intermittently with running times of approximately two minutes and is instrumented for rapid measurements using a computer data acquisition and control system. A description of the facility and procedure is provided.

  7. A Two-Phase Model for Shocked Porous Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambourn, Brian; Handley, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    Mesoscale calculations of hotspots created by a shock wave in a porous explosive show that the hotspots do not cool in times of order at least a microsecond. This suggests that single phase models of porosity like the snowplough model, which assume that a shocked porous explosive jumps to a point on the Hugoniot that is instantaneously in thermodynamic equilibrium, are not correct. A two-phased model of shocked porous explosive has been developed in which a small fraction of the material, representing the hotspots, has a high temperature but the bulk of the material is cooler than the temperature calculated by, for example, the snowplough model. In terms of the mean state of the material, it is shown that the two-phase model only minimally affects the pressure - volume and shock velocity - particle velocity plot of the Hugoniot, but that the mean state lies slightly off the equation of state surface. The results of the model will be compared with two dimensional mesoscale calculations.

  8. Manufacture of annular cermet articles

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2004-11-02

    A method to produce annular-shaped, metal-clad cermet components directly produces the form and avoids multiple fabrication steps such as rolling and welding. The method includes the steps of: providing an annular hollow form with inner and outer side walls; filling the form with a particulate mixture of ceramic and metal; closing, evacuating, and hermetically sealing the form; heating the form to an appropriate temperature; and applying force to consolidate the particulate mixture into solid cermet.

  9. Experiment of rocket-ram annular combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuyanagi, N.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Ono, F.; Sasaki, M.; Takahashi, M.

    In this experiment, the double-nozzle type of rocket-ram annular combustor with a total thrust of 5kN was designed and tested with varying ratios of thrust produced by rocket and ram. Thrust and pressure distribution along the common expansion nozzle, i.e., the ram combustor nozzle, were measured to investigate the effect of interaction of the two expansion gases on thrust. Enhancement of specific impulse was verified by the experiments. That is, the specific impulse gains in rocket-ram parallel operation, the ratio of rocket thrust to ram thrust being 50 to 50, were found to be 190 percent of gains in pure rocket operation.

  10. Interfacial friction in cocurrent upward annular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossfeld, L. M.; Bharathan, D.; Wallis, G. B.; Richter, H. J.

    1982-03-01

    Cocurrent upward annular flow is investigated, with an emphasis on correlating and predicting pressure drop. Attention is given to the characteristics of the liquid flow in the film, and the interaction of the core with the film. Alternate approaches are discussed for correlating suitably defined interfacial friction factors. Both approaches are dependent on knowledge of the entrainment in order to make predictions. Dimensional analysis is used to define characteristic parameters of the flow and an effort is made to determine, to the extent possible, the influences of these parameters on the interfacial friction factor.

  11. Neutron Imaging of a Two-Phase Refrigerant Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction remains a crucial parameter in understanding and characterizing two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in both heat transfer and pressure drop correlations of two-phase flows, from the macro to micro- channel scale. Void fraction estimation dictates the sizing of both evaporating and condensing phase change heat exchangers, for example. In order to measure void fraction some invasive approach is necessary. Typically, visualization is achieved either downstream of the test section or on top by machining to expose the channel. Both approaches can lead to inaccuracies. The former assumes the flow will not be affected moving from the heat exchanger surface to the transparent section. The latter distorts the heat flow path. Neutron Imaging can provide a non-invasive measurement because metals such as Aluminum are essentially transparent to neutrons. Hence, if a refrigerant is selected that provides suitable neutron attenuation; steady-state void fraction measurements in two-phase flow are attainable in-situ without disturbing the fluid flow or heat flow path. Neutron Imaging has been used in the past to qualitatively describe the flow in heat exchangers in terms of maldistributions without providing void fraction data. This work is distinguished from previous efforts because the heat exchanger has been designed and the refrigerant selected to avail of neutron imaging. This work describes the experimental flow loop that enables a boiling two-phase flow; the heat exchanger test section and downstream transparent section are described. The flow loop controls the degree of subcooling and the refrigerant flowrate. Heating cartridges embedded in the test section are employed to control the heat input. Neutron-imaged steady-state void fraction measurements are captured and compared to representative high-speed videography captured at the visualization section. This allows a qualitative comparison between neutron imaged and traditional techniques. The

  12. A study of two-phase flow in a reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D.; Downing, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A test loop was designed and fabricated for observing and measuring pressure drops of two-phase flow in reduced gravity. The portable flow test loop was then tested aboard the NASA-JSC KC135 reduced gravity aircraft. The test loop employed the Sundstrand Two-Phase Thermal Management System (TPTMS) concept which was specially fitted with a clear two-phase return line and condenser cover for flow observation. A two-phase (liquid/vapor) mixture was produced by pumping nearly saturated liquid through an evaporator and adding heat via electric heaters. The quality of the two-phase flow was varied by changing the evaporator heat load. The test loop was operated on the ground before and after the KC135 flight tests to create a one-gravity data base. The ground testing included all the test points run during the reduced gravity testing. Two days of reduced gravity tests aboard the KC135 were performed. During the flight tests, reduced-gravity, one-gravity, and nearly two-gravity accelerations were experienced. Data was taken during the entire flight which provided flow regime and pressure drop data for the three operating conditions. The test results show that two-phase pressure drops and flow regimes can be accurately predicted in zero-gravity.

  13. Effect of Drag Reducing Polymers on Stratified and Stratified/Annular Flow in a Horizontal Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernica, Patricia; Fleck, Brian; Heidrick, Ted

    2006-11-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the effects of a drag reducing additive (DRA) on two phase flow in horizontal stratified and stratified/annular flow patterns. Experiments were conducted in an air-water flow in a transparent rectangular channel of cross-section 25.4 mm x 50.8 mm and 2.5 m in length. Pressure drop measurements, wave characteristics and observations of entrainment with and without DRA are presented. A non-contact measurement technique using laser induced fluorescence and high speed videography was used to measure span-wise liquid wave heights and to characterize the air-water interface. Pressure drop was measured at the centerline of the duct over a one meter distance. The onset of entrainment was observed visually. Effects of DRA were observed even at a low concentration of 5ppm. This concentration yielded pressure drop reductions of 10-15% which correlate with previous experiments done in horizontal pipelines. Observations also show dampening of roll waves and the suppression of atomization. Al-Sarkhi, A., Hanratty, T.J., Int J. Multiphase Flow, 27, 1151 (2001)

  14. Flooding in counter-current two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, W.A.; Ganic, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Flooding is a phenomenon which is best described as the transition from counter-current to co-current flow. Early notice was taken of this phenomenon in the chemical engineering industry. Flooding also plays an important role in the field of two-phase heat transfer since it is a limit for many systems involving counter-current flow. Practical applications of flooding limited processes include wickless thermosyphons and the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) of pressurized water nuclear reactors. The phenomenon of flooding also is involved in the behavior of nuclear reactor core materials during severe accident conditions where flooding is one of the mechanisms governing the motion of the molten fuel pin cladding.

  15. On drag reduction in a two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatapova, E. Ya.; Ajaev, V. S.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-02-01

    Bubbles collected on a local hydrophobic surface with nanocoating in a two-phase flow in a minichannel have been detected experimentally. It has been proposed to use the effect of concentration of gas bubbles on hydrophobic segments of the surface of the channel with contrast wettability for ensuring drag reduction. A two-dimensional flow model with the Navier slip condition in the region of the bubble layer gives criteria of drag reduction, depending on the slip length, dimension of bubbles, and dimension of the segment with nanocoating. The presence of the bubble layer on half of the surface of the channel can increase the flow rate of a liquid flowing through the channel by 40% at a fixed pressure gradient.

  16. Conceptual design for spacelab two-phase flow experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, R. D.; King, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    KC-135 aircraft tests confirmed the gravity sensitivity of two phase flow correlations. The prime component of the apparatus is a 1.5 cm dia by 90 cm fused quartz tube test section selected for visual observation. The water-cabin air system with water recycle was a clear choice for a flow regime-pressure drop test since it was used satisfactorily on KC-135 tests. Freon-11 with either overboard dump or with liquid-recycle will be used for the heat transfer test. The two experiments use common hardware. The experimental plan covers 120 data points in six hours with mass velocities from 10 to 640 kg/sec-sq m and qualities 0.01 to 0.64. The apparatus with pump, separator, storage tank and controls is mounted in a double spacelab rack. Supporting hardware, procedures, measured variables and program costs are defined.

  17. Measurement of two-phase flow momentum with force transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.; Smith, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two strain-gage-based drag transducers were developed to measure two-phase flow in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) test facilities. One transducer, a drag body (DB), was designed to measure the bidirectional average momentum flux passing through an end box. The second drag sensor, a break through detector (BTD), was designed to sense liquid downflow from the upper plenum to the core region. After prototype sensors passed numerous acceptance tests, transducers were fabricated and installed in two experimental test facilities, one in Japan and one in West Germany. High-quality data were extracted from both the DBs and BTDs for a variety of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. The information collected from these sensors has added to the understanding of the thermohydraulic phenomena that occur during the refill/reflood stage of a LOCA in a PWR. 9 refs., 15 figs.

  18. THE TWO PHASES OF GALAXY FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Oser, Ludwig; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.; Burkert, Andreas; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2010-12-20

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation appear to show a 'two-phase' character with a rapid early phase at z {approx}> 2 during which 'in situ' stars are formed within the galaxy from infalling cold gas followed by an extended phase since z {approx}< 3 during which 'ex situ' stars are primarily accreted. In the latter phase, massive systems grow considerably in mass and radius by accretion of smaller satellite stellar systems formed at quite early times (z>3) outside of the virial radius of the forming central galaxy. These tentative conclusions are obtained from high-resolution re-simulations of 39 individual galaxies in a full cosmological context with present-day virial halo masses ranging from 7 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} h {sup -1} {approx} 1.7 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} h {sup -1}) assembly is dominated by accretion and merging with about 80% of the stars added by the present day. In general the simulated galaxies approximately double their mass since z = 1. For massive systems this mass growth is not accompanied by significant star formation. The majority of the in situ created stars are formed at z>2, primarily out of cold gas flows. We recover the observational result of 'archaeological downsizing', where the most massive galaxies harbor the oldest stars. We find that this is not in contradiction with hierarchical structure

  19. STUDIES OF TWO-PHASE PLUMES IN STRATIFIED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Scott A. Socolofsky; Brian C. Crounse; E. Eric Adams

    1998-11-18

    Two-phase plumes play an important role in the more practical scenarios for ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}--i.e. dispersing CO{sub 2} as a buoyant liquid from either a bottom-mounted or ship-towed pipeline. Despite much research on related applications, such as for reservoir destratification using bubble plumes, our understanding of these flows is incomplete, especially concerning the phenomenon of plume peeling in a stratified ambient. To address this deficiency, we have built a laboratory facility in which we can make fundamental measurements of plume behavior. Although we are using air, oil and sediments as our sources of buoyancy (rather than CO{sub 2}), by using models, our results can be directly applied to field scale CO{sub 2} releases to help us design better CO{sub 2} injection systems, as well as plan and interpret the results of our up-coming international field experiment. The experimental facility designed to study two-phase plume behavior similar to that of an ocean CO{sub 2} release includes the following components: 1.22 x 1.22 x 2.44 m tall glass walled tank; Tanks and piping for the two-tank stratification method for producing step- and linearly-stratified ambient conditions; Density profiling system using a conductivity and temperature probe mounted to an automated depth profiler; Lighting systems, including a virtual point source light for shadowgraphs and a 6 W argon-ion laser for laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging; Imaging system, including a digital, progressive scanning CCD camera, computerized framegrabber, and image acquisition and analysis software; Buoyancy source diffusers having four different air diffusers, two oil diffusers, and a planned sediment diffuser; Dye injection method using a Mariotte bottle and a collar diffuser; and Systems integration software using the Labview graphical programming language and Windows NT. In comparison with previously reported experiments, this system allows us to extend the parameter range of

  20. Two-phase Damage Models of Magma Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Bercovici, D.

    2011-12-01

    Damage and fracturing in two-phase and porous flows are relevant for geological process such as magma-fracturing during melt migration and hydro-fracturing of crustal rocks for carbon sequestration and shale-gas recovery. These fracturing processes are associated with the propagation of a pore-generating damage front ahead of high-pressure fluid injection. We therefore examine the propagation of porous flow in a damageable matrix by applying the two-phase theory for compaction and damage proposed by Bercovici et al. [2001]; Bercovici and Ricard [2003]. The movement of the fluid and the solid is governed by the two phase flow laws, while damage (void generation and microcracking) is treated by considering the generation of interfacial surface energy by deformational work. Calculations of one dimensional (1-D) flow of fluid migrating buoyantly through compacting and damageable matrix show that damage is mitigated in steady-state largely because of pressure loss at the fluid front. However, in time-dependent flows, linear stability analysis shows that the propagation velocity of porosity waves is strongly dependent on damage. In the damage-free case porosity waves are dispersive in that wave-speed decreases with wavenumber (inverse wavelength); however with damage the dispersion flattens and beyond a critical damage reverses (the wave speed increases with wave number). Since normal dispersive behavior balances breaking in the nonlinear wave case, such reversed dispersion implies that damage has a profound effect in the nonlinear limit by facilitating wave front steepening and high-speed shocks. Nonlinear solitary wave solutions are obtained numerically and show that the transmission of porosity waves induce high stress and damage that can push the damage front forward. With damage the porosity waves sharpen and calculations suggest that they can transform from shape-conserving solitary waves into faster shock waves, which is also predicted by the linear theory. Such

  1. Flow pattern and heat transfer behavior of boiling two-phase flow in inclined pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dezhang; Ning, Ouyang

    1992-09-01

    Movable Electrical Conducting Probe (MECP), a kind of simple and reliable measuring transducer, used for predicting full-flow-path flow pattern in a boiling vapor/liquid two-phase flow is introduced in this paper. When the test pipe is set at different inclination angles, several kinds of flow patterns, such as bubble, slug, churn, intermittent, and annular flows, may be observed in accordance with the locations of MECP. By means of flow pattern analysis, flow field numerical calculations have been carried out, and heat transfer coefficient correlations along full-flow-path derived. The results show that heat transfer performance of boiling two-phase flow could be significantly augmented as expected in some flow pattern zones. The results of the investigation, measuring techniques and conclusions contained in this paper would be a useful reference in foundational research for prediction of flow pattern and heat transfer behavior in boiling two-phase flow, as well as for turbine vane liquid-cooling design.

  2. Two-phase phenomena, minority games, and herding models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Qiu, T.; Ren, F.

    2004-04-01

    The recently discovered two-phase phenomenon in financial markets [Nature 421, 130 (2003)] is examined with the German financial index DAX, minority games, and dynamic herding models. It is observed that the two-phase phenomenon is an important characteristic of financial dynamics, independent of volatility clustering. An interacting herding model correctly produces the two-phase phenomenon.

  3. The measurement of thermodynamic performance in cryogenic two-phase turbo-expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Lu; Hou, Yu; Sun, Wan; Chen, Shuangtao

    2015-09-01

    Liquid fraction measurement in cryogenic two-phase flow is a complex issue, especially for an industrial cryogenic system. In this paper, a simple thermal method is proposed for measuring the liquid fraction in cryogenic two-phase turbo-expander by an electric heating unit in experimental study. The liquid fraction of the cryogenic two-phase flow is determined through the heat balance built at the outlet of the turbo-expander (inlet of heating unit) and the outlet of the heating unit. Liquid fractions from 1.16% to 5.02% are obtained from five two-phase expansion cases. Under the same turbo-expander inlet pressure and rotating speed, five superheated expansion cases are tested to evaluate the wetness loss in two-phase expansion. The results show that the proposed method is successful in measuring the liquid fraction of cryogenic two-phase expansion for turbo-expander in an industrial air separation plant. The experimental isentropic efficiency ratio and the tested Baumann factor decrease with the increasing mean wetness. Based on prediction of Baumann rule, the cryogenic turbo-expander with low liquid fraction in two-phase expansion cases suffers from more severe wetness loss than that with the higher liquid fraction.

  4. Nonisothermal Two-Phase Porous Flow

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-21

    NORIA is a finite element program that simultaneously solves four nonlinear parabolic, partial differential equations that describe the transport of water, water vapor, air, and energy through partially saturated porous media. NORIA is designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, non-isothermal, unsaturated porous flow problems. Nearly all material properties, such as permeability, can either be set to constant values or defined as functions of the dependent and independent variables by user-supplied subroutines. The gas phase is taken to be ideal. NORIA is intended to solve nonisothermal problems in which large gradients are expected in the gas pressure.

  5. Nonisothermal Two-Phase Porous Flow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-21

    NORIA is a finite element program that simultaneously solves four nonlinear parabolic, partial differential equations that describe the transport of water, water vapor, air, and energy through partially saturated porous media. NORIA is designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, non-isothermal, unsaturated porous flow problems. Nearly all material properties, such as permeability, can either be set to constant values or defined as functions of the dependent and independent variables by user-supplied subroutines. The gas phase ismore » taken to be ideal. NORIA is intended to solve nonisothermal problems in which large gradients are expected in the gas pressure.« less

  6. Study of two-phase flow and heat transfer in reduced gravities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdollahian, Davood; Barez, Fred

    1994-01-01

    Design of the two-phase systems which are anticipated to be utilized in future spacecraft thermal management systems requires a knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer parameters in reduced gravities. A program has been initiated by NASA to design a two-phase test loop and perform a series of experiments to generate the data for the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and onset of instability under reduced gravities. In addition to low gravity airplane trajectory testing, the experimental program consists of a set of laboratory tests with vertical upflow and downflow configurations. Modularity is considered in the design of this experiment and the test loop in instrumented to provide data for two-phase pressure drop and flow regime behavior. Since the program is in the final stages of the design and construction task, this article is intended to discuss the phenomena, design approach, and the description of the test loop.

  7. Modeling of two-phase flow in manifolds under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Cale; Best, Frederick; Kurwitz, Cable

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of a microgravity two-phase flow throughout a manifold system consisting of two parallel flow headers joined by branching conduits was modeled. Adiabatic conditions were assumed. The two-phase flow was modeled using the homogeneous equilibrium model for pressure changes, along with a previously developed phase separation equation, which describes the phase redistribution at a dividing T-junction. An iterative numerical method for calculating the mass flow rate, flow quality, and pressure associated with the flow throughout a manifold was developed.

  8. Stability of Wavy Films in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows at Normal and Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakotaiah, V.; Jayawardena, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    For flow rates of technological interest, most gas-liquid flows in pipes are in the annular flow regime, in which, the liquid moves along the pipe wall in a thin, wavy film and the gas flows in the core region. The waves appearing on the liquid film have a profound influence on the transfer rates, and hence on the design of these systems. We have recently proposed and analyzed two boundary layer models that describe the characteristics of laminar wavy films at high Reynolds numbers (300-1200). Comparison of model predictions to 1-g experimental data showed good agreement. The goal of our present work is to understand through a combined program of experimental and modeling studies the characteristics of wavy films in annular two-phase gas-liquid flows under normal as well as microgravity conditions in the developed and entry regions.

  9. Mechanical Analysis of High Power Internally Cooled Annular Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jiyun; No, Hee Cheon; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2004-05-15

    Annular fuel with internal flow is proposed to allow higher power density in pressurized water reactors. The structural behavior issues arising from the higher flow rate required to cool the fuel are assessed here, including buckling, vibrations, and potential wear problems. Five flow-induced vibration mechanisms are addressed: buckling instability, vortex-induced vibration, acoustic resonance, fluid-elastic instability, and turbulence-induced vibration. The structural behavior of the 17 x 17 traditional solid fuel array is compared with that of two types of annular fuels, a 15 x 15 array, and a 13 x 13 array.It is seen that the annular fuels are superior to the reference fuel in avoiding vibration-induced damage, even at a 50% increase in flow velocity above today's reactors. The higher resistance to vibration is mainly due to their relatively larger cross section area making them more rigid. The 13 x 13 annular fuel shows better structural performance than the 15 x 15 one due to its higher rigidity. Analysis of acoustic resonance of the inner channel cladding with pump blade passing frequencies showed that the acoustic frequencies are within 120% of the pulsation frequency. The annular fuel exhibits reduced impact, sliding, and fretting wear than the solid fuel, even at 150% flow rate of today's reactors.

  10. Hydrodynamic Dryout in Two-Phase Flows: Observations of Low Bond Number Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.; McQuillen, John B.

    1998-01-01

    Dryout occurs readily in certain slug and annular two-phase flows for systems that exhibit partial wetting. The mechanism for the ultimate rupture of the film is attributed to van der Waals forces, but the pace towards rupture is quickened by the surface tension instability (Rayleigh-type) of the annular film left by the advancing slug and by the many perturbations of the free surface present in the Re(sub g) approximately 0(10(exp 3)), Re(sub l) approximately 0(10(exp 4)), and Ca approximately 0(10(exp -1) flows. Results from low-gravity experiments using three different test fluids are presented and discussed. For the range of tests conducted, the effect of increasing viscosity is shown to eliminate the film rupture while the decrease of surface tension via a surfactant additive is shown to dramatically enhance it. Laboratory measurements using capillary tubes are presented which reveal the sensitivity of the dryout phenomena to particulate and surfactant contamination. Rom such observations, dryout due to the hydrodynamic-van der Waals instability can be expected in a certain range of flow parameters in the absence of heat transfer. The addition of heat transfer may only exacerbate the problem by producing thermal transport lines replete with "hot spots." A caution to this effect is issued to future space systems designers concerning the use of partially wetting working fluids.

  11. Annular Eclipse as Seen by Hinode

    NASA Video Gallery

    This timelapse shows an annular eclipse as seen by JAXA's Hinode satellite on Jan. 4, 2011. An annular eclipse occurs when the moon, slightly more distant from Earth than on average, moves directly...

  12. Eosinophilic annular erythema in childhood - Case report.

    PubMed

    Abarzúa, Alvaro; Giesen, Laura; Silva, Sergio; González, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic annular erythema is a rare, benign, recurrent disease, clinically characterized by persistent, annular, erythematous lesions, revealing histopathologically perivascular infiltrates with abundant eosinophils. This report describes an unusual case of eosinophilic annular erythema in a 3-year-old female, requiring sustained doses of hydroxychloroquine to be adequately controlled. PMID:27579748

  13. Eosinophilic annular erythema in childhood - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Abarzúa, Alvaro; Giesen, Laura; Silva, Sergio; González, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic annular erythema is a rare, benign, recurrent disease, clinically characterized by persistent, annular, erythematous lesions, revealing histopathologically perivascular infiltrates with abundant eosinophils. This report describes an unusual case of eosinophilic annular erythema in a 3-year-old female, requiring sustained doses of hydroxychloroquine to be adequately controlled. PMID:27579748

  14. [Two-phase Interfaces in Weak External Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percus, J. K.

    1996-01-01

    Our aim has been that of understanding from first principles the behavior of two-phase interfaces in the absence of gravitational constraints. This is fundamental to our ability to deal with the fluid structures that abound in the real biological, chemical, and physical world. A substantial effort was mounted to determine how familiar hydrodynamic concepts have to be modified and interpreted to make them appropriate to the multi-level structure alluded to above. This was primarily in the context of the microscopic symmetric pressure tensor, which was, for the first time, expressed in the invaluable density functional format, and the used to follow the predictions of popular microscopic models of the energetics of interfacial systems. In the course of these investigations, the previous murky relation between pressure tensor and thermodynamics was completely clarified. The process of extending thermodynamic information to interfacial dynamics was initiated along two paths. One was from the viewpoint of an inertialess lattice gas, resulting in the surprising conclusion that at this level, all transport is governed by precisely the thermodynamic free energy, albeit with a non-trivial effective particle mobility. The other aimed at understanding the fashion in which slow macroscopic motions, accounted for by a time-varying microscopic energy, generate effective hydrodynamic parameters. By examining a solvable model system, it was found that all current procedures for doing so are deficient, and suitable alleviation suggested. The major effect of this project was to set the stage for the analysis of the substantial dynamical regimes in which extensive equilibrium information provides the dominant background. This produces a smooth junction to the models of Araki and Munakata, Giacomin and Lebowitz, and Oxtoby. It is also crucial to our understanding of the complex interfacial equilibrium configurations required for intermediate stages of two-phase separation, for which

  15. Two-phase flow measurements with advanced instrumented spool pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, K.C.

    1980-09-01

    A series of two-phase, air-water and steam-water tests performed with instrumented piping spool pieces is described. The behavior of the three-beam densitometer, turbine meter, and drag flowmeter is discussed in terms of two-phase models. Results from application of some two-phase mass flow models to the recorded spool piece data are shown. Results of the study are used to make recommendations regarding spool piece design, instrument selection, and data reduction methods to obtain more accurate measurements of two-phase flow parameters. 13 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Detonation diffraction from an annular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, James; Ng, Hoi Dick; Lee, John H. S.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, gaseous detonation diffraction from an annular channel was investigated with a streak camera and the critical pressure for transmission of the detonation wave was obtained. The annular channel was used to approximate an infinite slot resulting in cylindrically expanding detonation waves. Two mixtures, stoichiometric acetylene-oxygen and stoichiometric acetylene-oxygen with 70% Ar dilution, were tested in a 4.3 and 14.3 mm channel width ( W). The undiluted and diluted mixtures were found to have values of the critical channel width over the cell size around 3 and 12 respectively. Comparing these results to values of the critical diameter ( d c ), in which a spherical detonation occurs, a value of critical d c / W c near 2 is observed for the highly diluted mixture. This value corresponds to the geometrical factor of the curvature term between a spherical and cylindrical diverging wave. Hence, the result is in support of Lee's proposed mechanism [Lee in Dynamics of Exothermicity, pp. 321, Gordon and Breach, Amsterdam, 1996] for failure due to diffraction based on curvature in stable mixtures such as those highly argon diluted with very regular detonation cellular patterns.

  17. Evaluation of the Sensitivity of Two-Phase Flow Model for the Steam Separator Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Michio Murase; Masao Chaki

    2006-07-01

    Reducing of the pressure losses of steam separator systems of boiling water reactor (BWR) plants is useful to reduce the required pump head and enhance core stability design margin. The need to reduce the pressure losses of steam separator systems is especially important in BWR plants that have high power density cores and natural circulation systems. The core flow rate of a BWR plant with a natural circulation system is affected by the pressure losses of steam separator systems. In BWR plants with high power density cores, the core stability design margin is affected by these pressure losses. Generally, reducing the pressure losses of the steam separator systems leads to increased carry-under and carryover. Reducing the pressure losses while keeping the characteristics of both carry-under and carryover is desired, so many studies have been done. The steam separator of a BWR plant consists of a standpipe section, a swirl vane section and three-barrel sections. Two-phase flow of steam and water enters the steam separator through the standpipe section and reaches the swirl vane section. In the swirl vane section, the two-phase flow is given centrifugal force and is basically separated into steam and water. Therefore investigating the two-phase flow characteristics of the swirl vane section is very important. After the swirl vane section, the two-phase flow enters the barrel sections. Each barrel has a pick-off ring. The water in the barrel section is mainly removed by these pick-off rings because the water mainly flows upward as a liquid film in the barrel section due to the centrifugal force given in the swirl vane section. We researched the effect of using the drag force model of the swirling two-phase flow in analyzing a steam separator and we found that the drag force model greatly affects the results of the analysis. (authors)

  18. Conservative model and numerical simulations of compressible two-phase pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerov, A.; Romenski, E.; Lebedeva, N.

    2016-06-01

    The two-phase two-pressure model for transient one-dimensional compressible pipe flow is considered. Governing equations of the model form a hyperbolic system of conservation laws. The Runge-Kutta-WENO method providing accuracy of the 3rd order in time and 5th order in space is implemented. Numerical results for several test problems are presented.

  19. Calculating the hydraulic characteristics of two-phase-helium circulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, S. P.

    1981-09-01

    An approximate analytical solution is obtained for calculating the pressure drop in the flows of a boiling two-phase liquid in a heated channel. The dependence of the maximum temperature in the channel on the rate of flow of the cryogenic fluid is determined.

  20. Self-sustained hydrodynamic oscillations in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, K. C.

    1969-01-01

    Results of an experimental and theoretical study of factors affecting self-sustaining hydrodynamic oscillations in boiling-water loops are reported. Data on flow variables, and the effects of geometry, subcooling and pressure on the development of oscillatory behavior in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop are included.

  1. Hydrodynamics of two phase flow through homogeneous and stratified porous layers

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W; Lee, H; Dhir, V K; Catton, I

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of two-phase flow through porous layers formed of nonheated glass particles has been made. The effect of particle size, particle size distribution, bed porosity and bed stratification on void fraction and pressure drop through particulate beds formed in a cylindrical and rectangular test section has been investigated. A model based on drift flux approach has been developed for the void fraction in homogeneous beds. Using the two phase friction pressure drop data, the relative permeabilities of the two phases have been concluded with void fraction. The void fraction and two-phase friction pressure gradient in beds composed of mixtures of spherical particles as well as sharps of different nominal sizes have also been examined. It is found that the models for single size particles are also applicable to mixtures of particles if a mean particle diameter for the mixture is defined. The observations in stratified beds indicate depletion or build up of voids at the interface between high and low permeability regions. Blocking of the flow into one of the layers of laterally stratified beds caused the pressures at different horizontal locations at the same bed height to be different from each other.

  2. MONA: An accurate two-phase well flow model based on phase slippage

    SciTech Connect

    Asheim, H.

    1984-10-01

    In two phase flow, holdup and pressure loss are related to interfacial slippage. A model based on the slippage concept has been developed and tested using production well data from Forties, the Ekofisk area, and flowline data from Prudhoe Bay. The model developed turned out considerably more accurate than the standard models used for comparison.

  3. COMPARING SIMULATED AND EXPERIMENTAL HYSTERETIC TWO- PHASE TRANSIENT FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hysteretic model for two-phase permeability (k)-saturation (S)-pressure (P) relations is outlined that accounts for effects of nonwetting fluid entrapment. The model can be employed in unsaturated fluid flow computer codes to predict temporal and spatial fluid distributions. Co...

  4. Experimental and Analytical Study of Two-Phase Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Abdollahian, Davood; Quintal, J.; Zahm, J.

    1996-01-01

    Design of the two-phase flow systems which are anticipated to be utilized in future spacecraft thermal management systems requires a knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer parameters in reduced gravities. A program has been initiated by NASA to design a two-phase test loop and to perform a series of experiments to study the effect of gravity on the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and onset of instability. The test loop is also instrumented to generate data for two-phase pressure drop. In addition to low gravity airplane trajectory testing, the experimental program consisted of a set of laboratory tests which were intended to generate data under the bounding conditions (+1 g and -1 g) in order to plan the test matrix. One set of airplane trajectory tests has been performed and several modifications to the test set-up have been identified. Preliminary test results have been used to demonstrate the applicability of the earth gravity models for prediction of the two-phase friction pressure drop.

  5. Gas-liquid two-phase flow across a bank of micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Santosh; Peles, Yoav

    2007-04-01

    Adiabatic nitrogen-water two-phase flow across a bank of staggered circular micropillars, 100μm long with a diameter of 100μm and a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5, was investigated experimentally for Reynolds number ranging from 5 to 50. Flow patterns, void fraction, and pressure drop were obtained, discussed, and compared to large scale as well as microchannel results. Two-phase flow patterns were determined by flow visualization, and a flow map was constructed as a function of gas and liquid superficial velocities. Significant deviations from conventional scale systems, with respect to flow patterns and trend lines, were observed. A unique flow pattern, driven by surface tension, was observed and termed bridge flow. The applicability of conventional scale models to predict the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop was also assessed. Comparison with a conventional scale void fraction model revealed good agreement, but was found to be in a physically wrong form. Thus, a modified physically based model for void fraction was developed. A two-phase frictional multiplier was found to be a strong function of mass flux, unlike in previous microchannel studies. It was observed that models from conventional scale systems did not adequately predict the two-phase frictional multiplier at the microscale, thus, a modified model accounting for mass flux was developed.

  6. Scaling of Two-Phase Flows to Partial-Earth Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn M.; Witte, Larry C.

    2003-01-01

    A report presents a method of scaling, to partial-Earth gravity, of parameters that describe pressure drops and other characteristics of two-phase (liquid/ vapor) flows. The development of the method was prompted by the need for a means of designing two-phase flow systems to operate on the Moon and on Mars, using fluid-properties and flow data from terrestrial two-phase-flow experiments, thus eliminating the need for partial-gravity testing. The report presents an explicit procedure for designing an Earth-based test bed that can provide hydrodynamic similarity with two-phase fluids flowing in partial-gravity systems. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the flow regime (i.e., the spatial orientation of the phases). The method also provides for determination of pressure drops in two-phase partial-gravity flows by use of a generalization of the classical Moody chart (previously applicable to single-phase flow only). The report presents experimental data from Mars- and Moon-activity experiments that appear to demonstrate the validity of this method.

  7. Flow regime classification in air magnetic fluid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, T.; DeVuyst, F.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2008-05-01

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  8. Flow regime classification in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, T; De Vuyst, F; Yamaguchi, H

    2008-05-21

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors. PMID:21694270

  9. A two-phase mixture model of avascular tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Deniz; Burcin Unlu, M.; Yonucu, Sirin; Cetiner, Ugur

    2012-02-01

    Interactions with biological environment surrounding a growing tumor have major influence on tumor invasion. By recognizing that mechanical behavior of tumor cells could be described by biophysical laws, the research on physical oncology aims to investigate the inner workings of cancer invasion. In this study, we introduce a mathematical model of avascular tumor growth using the continuum theory of mixtures. Mechanical behavior of the tumor and physical interactions between the tumor and host tissue are represented by biophysically founded relationships. In this model, a solid tumor is embedded in inviscid interstitial fluid. The tumor has viscous mechanical properties. Interstitial fluid exhibits properties of flow through porous medium. Associated with the mixture saturation constraint, we introduce a Lagrange multiplier which represents hydrostatic pressure of the interstitial fluid. We solved the equations using Finite Element Method in two-dimensions. As a result, we have introduced a two-phase mixture model of avascular tumor growth that provided a flexible mathematical framework to include cells' response to mechanical aspects of the tumor microenvironment. The model could be extended to capture tumor-ECM interactions which would have profound influence on tumor invasion.

  10. Particle migration in two-phase, viscoelastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaensson, Nick; Hulsen, Martien; Anderson, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Particles suspended in creeping, viscoelastic flows can migrate across stream lines due to gradients in normal stresses. This phenomenon has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. However, particle migration in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces is hardly studied. We present results of simulations in 2D and 3D of rigid spherical particles in two-phase flows, where either one or both of the fluids are viscoelastic. The fluid-fluid interface is assumed to be diffuse and is described using Cahn-Hilliard theory. The particle boundary is assumed to be sharp and is described by a boundary-fitted, moving mesh. The governing equations are solved using the finite element method. We show that differences in normal stresses between the two fluids can induce a migration of the particle towards the interface in a shear flow. Depending on the magnitude of the surface tension and the properties of the fluids, particle migration can be halted due to the induced Laplace pressure, the particle can be adsorbed at the interface, or the particle can cross the interface into the other fluid. Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), P.O. Box 902, 5600 AX Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

  11. Microgravity Two-phase Flow and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Kamiel

    2006-12-01

    Multiphase thermal systems (involving more than one phase or one component) have numerous applications in aerospace, heat-exchanger, transport of contaminants in environmental systems, and energy transport and energy conversion systems. Advances in understanding the behaviour of multiphase thermal systems could lead to higher efficiency energy production systems, improved heat-exchanger design, and safer and enhanced treatment of hazardous waste. But such advances have been greatly hindered by the strong effect of gravitational acceleration on the flow. Depending on the flow orientation and the phase velocities, gravitational forces could significantly alter the flow regime, and hence the pressure-drop and heat-transfer coefficients associated with the flow. A reduced gravity environment (or "microgravity"), provides an excellent tool to study the flow without the masking effects of gravity. This book presents for the first time a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of two-phase flow behaviour in the virtual absence of gravity. Link: http://www.springer.com/east/home?SGWID=5-102-22-173662745-0&changeHeader=true

  12. Transient boiling in two-phase helium natural circulation loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2014-01-01

    Two-phase helium natural circulation loops are used for cooling large superconducting magnets, as CMS for LHC. During normal operation or in the case of incidents, transients are exerted on the cooling system. Here a cooling system of this type is studied experimentally. Sudden power changes are operated on a vertical-heated-section natural convection loop, simulating a fast increase of heat deposition on magnet cooling pipes. Mass flow rate, heated section wall temperature and pressure drop variations are measured as a function of time, to assess the time behavior concerning the boiling regime according to the values of power injected on the heated section. The boiling curves and critical heat flux (CHF) values have been obtained in steady state. Temperature evolution has been observed in order to explore the operating ranges where heat transfer is deteriorated. Premature film boiling has been observed during transients on the heated section in some power ranges, even at appreciably lower values than the CHF. A way of attenuating these undesired temperature excursions has been identified through the application of high enough initial heating power.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic generators using two-phase liquid-metal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, M.

    1969-01-01

    Two-phase flow generator cycle of a magnetohydrodynamic /MHD/ generator uses a working fluid which is compressible and treated as an expanding gas. The two-phase mixture passes from the heat source through the MHD generator, where the expansion process takes place and the electrical energy is extracted.

  14. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of two-phase droplets subjected to high intensity radiation pulses is studied. Droplets are highly absorbing solids in weakly absorbing liquid medium. The objective of the study was to define heating thresholds required for causing explosive boiling and secondary atomization of the fuel droplet. The results point to mechanisms for energy storage and transport in two-phase systems.

  15. Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model of Two-Phase Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B

    2010-04-07

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion of a dense Aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. Let {alpha}{sub 1} denote the volume fraction occupied by the gas and {alpha}{sub 2} the fraction occupied by the solid, satisfying the volume conservation relation: {alpha}{sub 1} + {alpha}{sub 2} = 1. When the particle phase occupies a non-negligible volume fraction (i.e., {alpha}{sub 2} > 0), additional terms, proportional to {alpha}{sub 2}, appear in the conservation laws for two-phase flows. These include: (i) a particle pressure (due to particle collisions), (ii) a corresponding sound speed (which produces real eigenvalues for the particle phase system), (iii) an Archimedes force induced on the particle phase (by the gas pressure gradient), and (iv) multi-particle drag effects (which enhance the momentum coupling between phases). These effects modify the accelerations and energy distributions in the phases; we call this the Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model. A characteristics analysis of the Model equations indicates that the system is hyperbolic with real eigenvalues for the gas phase: {l_brace}v{sub 1}, v{sub 1} {+-} {alpha}{sub 1}{r_brace} and for the 'particle gas' phase: {l_brace}v{sub 2}, v{sub 2} {+-}{alpha}{sub 2}{r_brace} and the particles: {l_brace}v{sub 2}{r_brace}, where v{sub i} and {alpha}{sub i} denote the velocity vector and sound speed of phase i. These can be used to construct a high-order Godunov scheme to integrate the conservation laws of a dense heterogeneous continuum.

  16. Conceptual design of two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, B. F.; Hill, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Five specific experiments were analyzed to provide definition of experiments designed to evaluate two phase fluid behavior in low gravity. The conceptual design represents a fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for a double rack in Spacelab. The five experiments are two phase flow patterns and pressure drop, flow boiling, liquid reorientation, and interface bubble dynamics. Hardware was sized, instrumentation and data recording requirements defined, and the five experiments were installed as an integrated experimental package. Applicable available hardware was selected in the experiment design and total experiment program costs were defined.

  17. The liquid annular reactor system (LARS) propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Maise, G.; Lazareth, O.W.; Horn, F.; Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H. ); Lenard, R.X. )

    1991-01-05

    A new concept for very high specific impulse ({gt}2000 seconds) direct nuclear propulsion is described. The concept, termed LARS (Liquid Annular Reactor System) uses liquid nuclear fuel elements to heat hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures ({similar to}6000 K). Operating pressure is moderate ({similar to}10 atm), with the result that the outlet hydrogen is virtually 100% dissociated to monatomic H. The molten fuel is contained in a solid container of its own material, which is rotated to stabilize the liquid layer by centripetal force. LARS reactor designs are described, together with neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses. Power levels are on the order of 200 megawatts. Typically, LARS designs use 7 rotating fuel elements, are beryllium moderated and have critical radii of {similar to}100 cm (core L/D{approx}1.5).

  18. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuard, Adrian M.; Mahmud, Hisham B.; King, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ɷ turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model.

  19. A digital physics method for two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, David M.

    1997-10-01

    Digital Physics refers to a fully discrete, microdynamieal system whose mean behavior recovers real continuum physics. The purpose of this project is to develop a Digital Physics method by which to model the flow of single-component fluids with a non-ideal-gas equation of state, such as liquids and two-phase mixtures. The new system, called the multiphase system, is built upon the framework of a previously developed Digital Physics system. This original Digital Physics system, the standard system, is used to simulate low Mach number flow of an ideal gas. Previously, substantial performance improvements (compared to CFD numerical solvers) have been achieved with the standard system for hydrodynamic simulations of ideal gas flows. Hence the underlying motivation of this work is the development of a more efficient simulation tool for detailed two phase flow investigation as compared to current numerical methods. Specifically, the multiphase system simulates the local instantaneous flow field including explicit representation of the interfaces. The multiphase system contains significant extensions of the standard system, particularly a non-local operation allowing microscopic interactions at a distance, loosely mimicking a real liquid, while preserving exact (global) conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. It retains the advantages of Digital Physics compared to other lattice gas methods for flow modeling, such as Galilean invariance, elimination of the dynamic pressure anomaly, and a meaningful energy transport equation. In the multiphase system the energy degree of freedom has been extended to allow a consistent empirical thermodynamics suitable for a system with liquid-vapor coexistence. Thus in addition to correct hydrodynamic transport, the multiphase system achieves appropriate equations of state for the liquid and vapor phases; the current implementation employs a van der Waals thermodynamical system. The multiphase system does not model heat transfer

  20. Depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery by using annular-shaped photomechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2011-02-01

    Laser-based drug delivery is attractive for the targeting capability due to high spatial controllability of laser energy. Recently, we found that photomechanical waves (PMWs) can transiently increase the permeability of blood vessels in skin, muscle and brain of rats. In this study, we examined the use of annular-shaped PMWs to increase pressure at target depths due to superposition effect of pressure waves. This can increase the permeability of blood vessels located in the specific depth regions, enabling depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery. Annular PMWs were produced by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with annular-shaped pulsed laser beams that were produced by using an axicon lens. We first examined propagation and pressure characteristics of annular PMWs in tissue phantoms and confirmed an increased pressure at a target depth, which can be controlled by changing laser parameters. We injected Evans blue (EB) into a rat tail vein, and annular PMWs (inner diameter, 3 mm; outer diameter, 5 mm) were applied from the myofascial surface of the anterior tibialis muscle. After perfusion fixation, we observed fluorescence originating from EB in the tissue. We observed intense fluorescence at a target depth region of around 5 mm. These results demonstrate the capability of annular PMWs for depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery.

  1. Annular arc accelerator shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An annular arc accelerator shock tube employs a cold gas driver to flow a stream of gas from an expansion section through a high voltage electrode section to a test section, thus driving a shock wave in front of it. A glow discharge detects the shock wave and actuates a trigger generator which in turn fires spark-gap switches to discharge a bank of capacitors across a centered cathode and an annular anode in tandem electrode sections. The initial shock wave passes through the anode section from the cathode section thereby depositing energy into the flow gas without the necessity of any diaphragm opening in the gas flow from the expansion section through the electrode sections.

  2. Phase splitting of wet steam in annular flow through a horizontal impacting tee

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, S.F.; Rubel, M.T. )

    1992-11-01

    Phase splitting occurs during gas/liquid two-phase flow through pipe junctions and causes a gas/liquid mass ratio in the outlet legs of the junction that is different form that at the inlet. In steamflood distribution networks, this results in different steam qualities at the outlets of a junction than at the inlet. This, in turn, results in a heat distribution not in accordance with the mass distribution in the outlets of the tee. Because heat management of a steamflood project is important for both economic incentives and ultimate recovery, phase splitting must be understood and controlled. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation conducted on phase splitting of wet steam during annular flow through a horizontal 2-in. impacting tee. The experimental operating range included inlet pressures of 400 and 600 psig, inlet mass fluxes form 1,180 to 10,150 lbm/(in[sup 2]-hr), inlet steam qualities form 0.2 to 0.8, and outlet vapor extraction ratios for one outlet leg from 0.2 to 0.5.

  3. Numerical simulation of the two-phase flows in a hydraulic coupling by solving VOF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Fan, H. G.; Zhuge, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    The flow in a partially filled hydraulic coupling is essentially a gas-liquid two-phase flow, in which the distribution of two phases has significant influence on its characteristics. The interfaces between the air and the liquid, and the circulating flows inside the hydraulic coupling can be simulated by solving the VOF two-phase model. In this paper, PISO algorithm and RNG k-ɛ turbulence model were employed to simulate the phase distribution and the flow field in a hydraulic coupling with 80% liquid fill. The results indicate that the flow forms a circulating movement on the torus section with decreasing speed ratio. In the pump impeller, the air phase mostly accumulates on the suction side of the blades, while liquid on the pressure side; in turbine runner, air locates in the middle of the flow passage. Flow separations appear near the blades and the enclosing boundaries of the hydraulic coupling.

  4. Film boiling from spheres in single- and two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T.G.; Yuen, W.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data on film boiling heat transfer from single, inductively heated, spheres in single- and two-phase flow (saturated water and steam, respectively) are presented. In the single-phase-flow experiments water velocities ranged from 0.1 to 2.0 m/s; in the two-phase-flow experiments superficial water and steam velocities covered 0.1 to 0.6 m/s and 4 to 10 m/s, respectively. All experiments were run at atmospheric pressure and with sphere temperatures from 900C down to quenching. Limited interpretations of the single-phase- flow data are possible, but the two-phase-flow data are new and unique.

  5. Film boiling from spheres in single- and two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T.G.; Yuen, W.W.

    1992-10-01

    Experimental data on film boiling heat transfer from single, inductively heated, spheres in single- and two-phase flow (saturated water and steam, respectively) are presented. In the single-phase-flow experiments water velocities ranged from 0.1 to 2.0 m/s; in the two-phase-flow experiments superficial water and steam velocities covered 0.1 to 0.6 m/s and 4 to 10 m/s, respectively. All experiments were run at atmospheric pressure and with sphere temperatures from 900C down to quenching. Limited interpretations of the single-phase- flow data are possible, but the two-phase-flow data are new and unique.

  6. Analytical solution of laminar-laminar stratified two-phase flows with curved interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, N.; Rovinsky, J.; Maron, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    The present study represents a complete analytical solution for laminar two-phase flows with curved interfaces. The solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the two-phases in bipolar coordinates provides the `flow monograms` describe the relation between the interface curvature and the insitu flow geometry when given the phases flow rates and viscosity ratios. Energy considerations are employed to construct the `interface monograms`, whereby the characteristic interfacial curvature is determined in terms of the phases insitu holdup, pipe diameter, surface tension, fluids/wall adhesion and gravitation. The two monograms are then combined to construct the system `operational monogram`. The `operational monogram` enables the determination of the interface configuration, the local flow characteristics, such as velocity profiles, wall and interfacial shear stresses distribution as well as the integral characteristics of the two-phase flow: phases insitu holdup and pressure drop.

  7. Two-phase flow characterization for fluid components and variable gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenitis, John M.; Miller, Kathryn M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a program initiated by the NASA Johnson Space Center to investigate vapor-liquid flow regimes and pressure drops in pipe components and variable gravity conditions. This program supports the Space Station Freedom External Active Thermal Control System design and future space missions, including the Space Exploration Initiative activities. The objectives for this program include studying two-phase flow behavior in fluid components (smooth pipes, bellows lines, quick-disconnect fittings), expanding the two-phase database for zero-g conditions, developing a database for low-g conditions (for example, Moon-g, Mars-g), and validating models for two-phase flow analyses. Zero-g and low-g data will be gathered using a Freon-12 flow loop during four test series on the KC-135 aircraft beginning in August 1991.

  8. Energy Focusability of Annular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astadjov, Dimo N.

    2010-01-01

    A simulation of coherent annular flat two-level beams by two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform is presented. After parameterization of the source beam (the `input') we examined the influence of its parameters on the shape and proportions of the output beam profile. The output pattern has a prominent central peak and faint rings concentrically surrounding it. The fraction of the central peak energy to the whole energy of beam, PF0 gives a notion of energy spread within the focal spot: PF0 is a function of beam annularity, k (i.e. `inside diameter/outside diameter' ratio) and the intensity dip, Idip of annulus central area (i.e. ring intensity minus central-bottom intensity, normalized). Up to k = 0.8 and Idip = 0.75, PF0 does not change too much—it is ⩾0.7 which is ⩾90% of PF0 maximum (0.778 at k = 0 and Idip = 0). Simulations revealed that even great changes in the shape of input beam annulus lead to small variations in the energy spread of output beam profile in the range of practical use of coherent annular beams.

  9. Experimental Studies on the Measurement of Oil-water Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Longbo; Zhang, Hongjian; Hua, Yuefang; Zhou, Hongliang

    2007-06-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow measurement was investigated with a Venturi meter and double-U Coriolis meter in this work. Based on the Venturi differential pressure and the quality of two-phase flow, a model for measuring oil-water mass flow rate was developed, in which fluid asymmetry of oil-water two-phase flow was considered. However, measuring the quality of two-phase flow on-line is rather difficult at present. Though double-U Coriolis meter can provide accurate measurement of two-phase flow, it can not provide desired respective mass flow rate. Therefore, a double-parameter measurement method with Venturi meter and double-U Coriolis meter is proposed. According to the flow rate requirement of Venturi, a new flow regime identification method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) has been developed for the separated flow and the dispersed flow. With the Venturi model developed in this paper and mass flow rate of oil-water mixture measured with double-U Coriolis meter, mixture mass flow rate, oil mass flow rate and water mass flow rate could be obtained by the correlation. Experiments of flow rate measurement of oil-water two-phase flow were carried out in the horizontal tube with 25mm inner diameter. The water fraction range is from 5% to 95%. Experimental results showed that the flow regime could be identified well with SVM, and the relative error of the total mass flow rate and respective mass flow rate of oil-water two-phase flow was less than ±1.5% and ±10%, respectively.

  10. What types of investors generate the two-phase phenomenon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Doojin

    2013-12-01

    We examine the two-phase phenomenon described by Plerou, Gopikrishnan, and Stanley (2003) [1] in the KOSPI 200 options market, one of the most liquid options markets in the world. By analysing a unique intraday dataset that contains information about investor type for each trade and quote, we find that the two-phase phenomenon is generated primarily by domestic individual investors, who are generally considered to be uninformed and noisy traders. In contrast, our empirical results indicate that trades by foreign institutions, who are generally considered informed and sophisticated investors, do not exhibit two-phase behaviour.

  11. Void fraction correlations in two-phase horizontal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Papathanassiou, G.; Maeder, P.F.; DiPippo, R.; Dickinson, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This study examines some physical mechanisms which impose limits on the possible existence of two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe. With the aid of this analysis and the use of the Martinelli variable, X, a method is developed which determines the range of possible void fractions for a given two-phase flow. This method affords a means of direct comparison among void fraction correlations, as well as between correlation predictions and experimental results. In this respect, four well-known void fraction correlations are compared against each other and with experimental results obtained in the Brown University Two-Phase Flow Research Facility.

  12. Cavitation and two-phase flow characteristics of SRPR (Savannah River Plant Reactor) pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The possible head degradation of the SRPR pumps may be attributable to two independent phenomena, one due to the inception of cavitation and the other due to the two-phase flow phenomena. The head degradation due to the appearance of cavitation on the pump blade is hardly likely in the conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) since the coolant circulating line is highly pressurized so that the cavitation is difficult to occur even at LOCA (loss of coolant accident) conditions. On the other hand, the suction pressure of SRPR pump is order-of-magnitude smaller than that of PWR so that the cavitation phenomena, may prevail, should LOCA occur, depending on the extent of LOCA condition. In this study, therefore, both cavitation phenomena and two-phase flow phenomena were investigated for the SRPR pump by using various analytical tools and the numerical results are presented herein.

  13. Impact of Gas-liquid Two-phase Flow on Fluid Borne Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniwaki, Mitsuhiro; Shimomura, Nobuo

    In pipe lines such as those found in refrigeration cycle, a gas-liquid two-phase flow may occur because of a pressure change in the pipe. This flow causes noise. A vapor phase ratio in a fluid and the behavior of bubbles are related to the outbreak of noise. This experimental study investigated the fluid borne noise caused by gas-liquid two-phase flow passing through a contracted section in horizontal pipe. In the experiment, sound pressure was measured for two purposes: to see the influence of the air-water ratio on sound pressure and to see the change in sound pressure when a single bubble passed through a contracted section in horizontal pipe. The experiment showed that the fluid borne noise of gas-liquid two-phase flow grew louder than that of a liquid single-phase flow. As for the frequency distribution of the fluid borne noise, the sound pressure level was higher in the high frequency band. Furthermore, the fluid borne noise grew louder with increasing bubble diameter.

  14. Two-phase performance of scale models of a primary coolant pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, P.S.; Swift, W.L.

    1982-09-01

    Scale models of PWR primary coolant pumps were tested in steady and transient two-phase flows in order to generate a data base to aid in the development and assessment of pump performance models for use in computer codes for the analysis of postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCA). This report summarizes and unifies the single and two-phase air/water and steam/water performance data on the relatively high specific speed pumps (4200 rpm (US gpm) /sup 1/2//ft /sup 3/4/) tested in these programs. These data are compared with those acquired from tests on the lower specific speed Semiscale pump (926 rpm (US gpm)/sup 1/2//ft/sup 3/4/) to better understand the mechanism of performance degradation with increasing void fraction. The study revealed that scaling down the size of the pump while maintaining the same design specific speed produces very similar performance characteristics both in single and two-phase flows. Effects due to size and operating speed were not discernible within the range of test conditions and within experimental uncertainties. System pressure appears to affect the rate of degradation as a function of void fraction. The report includes a survey of the existing two-phase pump performance correlations. A correlation synthesized from the B and W, C-E and Creare two-phase data is also presented.

  15. A conservative approximation to compressible two-phase flow models in the stiff mechanical relaxation limit

    SciTech Connect

    Deledicque, Vincent; Papalexandris, Miltiadis V.

    2008-11-10

    In this article, we present and analyze a conservative approximation to reduced one-pressure one-velocity models for compressible two-phase flows that contain non-conservative products. This approximation is valid when certain material properties of the two phases are considerably different from each other. Although it cannot be applied to arbitrary mixtures, it is applicable to many heterogeneous mixtures of technological interest. Herein, we derive the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and Riemann invariants for the homogeneous part of the proposed model and develop an exact Riemann solver for it. Further, we investigate the structure of the steady two-phase detonation waves, with inert or reactive solid particles, admitted by the proposed model. Comparisons with the corresponding gaseous detonations are also made. Moreover, we derive a lower limit for the propagation speed of steady two-phase detonations in the case of reactive particles. At the limiting case of very dilute mixtures, this minimum speed tends to the Chapman-Jouguet velocity of gaseous detonations. Finally, we report on numerical simulations of the transmission of a purely gaseous detonation to heterogeneous mixtures containing inert or reactive solid particles. The effect of the solid particles on the structure of the resulting two-phase detonation is discussed in detail.

  16. Characterization and modeling of two-phase heat transfer in chip-scale non-uniformly heated microgap channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ihab A.

    Chen correlation and the 24 data points classified as being in Annular flow, using a recently proposed Intermittent/Annular transition criterion. A semi-numerical first-order technique, using the Chen correlation, was found to yield acceptable prediction accuracy (17%) for the wall temperature distribution and hot spots in non-uniformly heated "real world" microgap channels cooled by two-phase flow. Heat transfer coefficients in the 100-micron channel were found to reach an Annular flow peak of ˜8 kW/m2K at G=1500 kg/m 2s and vapor quality of x=10%. In a 500-micron channel, the Annular heat transfer coefficient was found to reach 9 kW/m2K at 270 kg/m2s mass flux and 14% vapor quality level. The peak two-phase HFE-7100 heat transfer coefficient values were nearly 2.5-4 times higher (at similar mass fluxes) than the single-phase HFE-7100 values and sometimes exceeded the cooling capability associated with water under forced convection. An alternative classification of heat transfer coefficients, based on the variable slope of the observed heat transfer coefficient curve), was found to yield good agreement with the Chen correlation predictions in the pseudo-annular flow regime (22%) but to fall to 38% when compared to the Shah correlation for data in the pseudo-intermittent flow regime.

  17. Transient two-phase performance of LOFT reactor coolant pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.H.; Modro, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Performance characteristics of Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor coolant pumps under transient two-phase flow conditions were obtained based on the analysis of two large and small break loss-of-coolant experiments conducted at the LOFT facility. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the transient two-phase flow effects on the LOFT reactor coolant pump performance during the first quadrant operation. The measured pump characteristics are presented as functions of pump void fraction which was determined based on the measured density. The calculated pump characteristics such as pump head, torque (or hydraulic torque), and efficiency are also determined as functions of pump void fractions. The importance of accurate modeling of the reactor coolant pump performance under two-phase conditions is addressed. The analytical pump model, currently used in most reactor analysis codes to predict transient two-phase pump behavior, is assessed.

  18. Dynamical mechanism of two-phase phenomena in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Gyuchang; Yong Kim, Soo; Kim, Kyungsik; Lee, Dong-In; Park, Sang-Bum

    2007-12-01

    Two-phase behavior of the Korean treasury bond (KTB) futures in the Korean exchange market is investigated in this study. To show that the two-phase phenomena are due to heavy-tailed behavior of distribution of price returns, actual data from the KTB futures market with shuffled data and a generated time series are examined according to the Brownian process. In addition, we study the correlation inherent in the KTB futures and its Brownian walk, describing the extent to which the volatility clustering plays a crucial role in equilibrium and nonequilibrium states of financial markets. It is shown that the two-phase behavior essentially results from heavy-tailed behavior of the distribution of price returns. This two-phase behavior does not appear to be relevant to volatility clustering.

  19. A jet polishing technique for thinning two phase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Witcomb, M.J. ); Dahmen, U. )

    1990-11-01

    A common problem in the preparation of thin foils for transmission electron microscopy is the different thinning rate in two-phase materials. Often this leads to foils in which the majority, or matrix, phase is evenly polished while the minority, or precipitate, phase is either etched out or stands proud of the surrounding material. In the present report we describe a two-stage jet polishing technique that has been used successfully on different relatively coarse two-phase structures. 3 figs.

  20. Forced two-phase helium cooling scheme for the Mu2e transport solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatkowski, G.; Cheban, S.; Dhanaraj, N.; Evbota, D.; Lopes, M.; Nicol, T.; Sanders, R.; Schmitt, R.; Voirin, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid (TS) is an S-shaped magnet formed by two separate but similar magnets, TS-u and TS-d. Each magnet is quarter-toroid shaped with a centerline radius of approximately 3 m utilizing a helium cooling loop consisting of 25 to 27 horizontal-axis rings connected in series. This cooling loop configuration has been deemed adequate for cooling via forced single phase liquid helium; however it presents major challenges to forced two-phase flow such as “garden hose” pressure drop, concerns of flow separation from tube walls, difficulty of calculation, etc. Even with these disadvantages, forced two-phase flow has certain inherent advantages which make it a more attractive option than forced single phase flow. It is for this reason that the use of forced two-phase flow was studied for the TS magnets. This paper will describe the analysis using helium-specific pressure drop correlations, conservative engineering approach, helium properties calculated and updated at over fifty points, and how the results compared with those in literature. Based on the findings, the use of forced-two phase helium is determined to be feasible for steady-state cooling of the TS solenoids.

  1. Forced Two-Phase Helium Cooling Scheme for the Mu2e Transport Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Tatkowski, G.; Cheban, S.; Dhanaraj, N.; Evbota, D.; Lopes, M.; Nicol, T.; Sanders, R.; Schmitt, R.; Voirin, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid (TS) is an S-shaped magnet formed by two separate but similar magnets, TS-u and TS-d. Each magnet is quarter-toroid shaped with a centerline radius of approximately 3 m utilizing a helium cooling loop consisting of 25 to 27 horizontal-axis rings connected in series. This cooling loop configuration has been deemed adequate for cooling via forced single phase liquid helium; however it presents major challenges to forced two-phase flow such as “garden hose” pressure drop, concerns of flow separation from tube walls, difficulty of calculation, etc. Even with these disadvantages, forced two-phase flow has certain inherent advantages which make it a more attractive option than forced single phase flow. It is for this reason that the use of forced two-phase flow was studied for the TS magnets. This paper will describe the analysis using helium-specific pressure drop correlations, conservative engineering approach, helium properties calculated and updated at over fifty points, and how the results compared with those in literature. Based on the findings, the use of forced-two phase helium is determined to be feasible for steady-state cooling of the TS solenoids

  2. Granuloma annulare in herpes zoster scars.

    PubMed

    Ohata, C; Shirabe, H; Takagi, K; Kawatsu, T

    2000-03-01

    A 54-year-old Japanese female developed granuloma annulare twice in herpes zoster scars. Soon after the second event, she developed ulcerative colitis, which was well controlled by sulfonamides and corticosteroid suppository. She had no history of diabetes mellitus. There was no recurrence of granuloma annulare by June of 1999. Granuloma annulare might have contributed to the complications of ulcerative colitis, although this had not been noticed before. PMID:10774142

  3. Annular Solar Eclipse of 10 May 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1993-01-01

    An annular eclipse of the Sun will be widely visible from the Western Hemisphere on 10 May 1994. The path of the Moon's shadow passes through Mexico, the United States of America, maritime Canada, the North Atlantic, the Azores and Morocco. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include tables of geographic coordinates of the annular path, local circumstances for hundreds of cities, maps of the path of annular and partial eclipse, weather prospects, and the lunar limb profile.

  4. The measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flows in a small diameter pipe using a dual-sensor multi-electrode conductance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Bian, Peng; Han, Yun-Feng; Gao, Zhong-Ke; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-04-01

    We design a dual-sensor multi-electrode conductance probe to measure the flow parameters of gas-liquid two-phase flows in a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 20 mm. The designed conductance probe consists of a phase volume fraction sensor (PVFS) and a cross-correlation velocity sensor (CCVS). Through inserting an insulated flow deflector in the central part of the pipe, the gas-liquid two-phase flows are forced to pass through an annual space. The multiple electrodes of the PVFS and the CCVS are flush-mounted on the inside of the pipe wall and the outside of the flow deflector, respectively. The geometry dimension of the PVFS is optimized based on the distribution characteristics of the sensor sensitivity field. In the flow loop test of vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flows, the output signals from the dual-sensor multi-electrode conductance probe are collected by a data acquisition device from the National Instruments (NI) Corporation. The information transferring characteristics of local flow structures in the annular space are investigated using the transfer entropy theory. Additionally, the kinematic wave velocity is measured based on the drift velocity model to investigate the propagation behavior of the stable kinematic wave in the annular space. Finally, according to the motion characteristics of the gas-liquid two-phase flows, the drift velocity model based on the flow patterns is constructed to measure the individual phase flow rate with higher accuracy.

  5. Investigation of Two-Phase Flows in Piping Bends and Elbows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Allen B.; Sciascia, Vincent M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the hydrodynamic characteristics of two-phase R-113 flow has been carried out. Straight tube pressure drop data, as a function of mass flow rate (mass flux) and flow quality has been obtained using the Two-Phase Flow Test Facility located in the Advanced Thermal Laboratories of the Crew and Thermal Systems Division at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. Additionally, after successfully obtaining the straight tube pressure drop data, the test facility was modified in order to obtain pressure drop data for the flow of two-phase R-113 through 180 deg piping bends. Inherent instabilities of the test facility prevented the successful acquisition of pressure drop data through the piping bends. The experimental straight tube data will be presented and compared with existing predictive correlations in an attempt to gain insight into the utility of such correlations as the basis for developing design criteria. A discussion of the instabilities which rendered successful acquisition of the piping bend data will be presented and suggestions will be made for eliminating these system tendencies. Finally, recommendations for future investigations, based on successful reconfiguration of the test facility, will be made.

  6. Recurrent Annular Peripheral Choroidal Detachment after Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaohui; Sun, Lisa L.; Kavanaugh, A. Scott; Langford, Marlyn P.; Liang, Chanping

    2013-01-01

    We report a challenging case of recurrent flat anterior chamber without hypotony after trabeculectomy in a 54-year-old Black male with a remote history of steroid-treated polymyositis, cataract surgery, and uncontrolled open angle glaucoma. The patient presented with a flat chamber on postoperative day 11, but had a normal fundus exam and intraocular pressure (IOP). Flat chamber persisted despite treatment with cycloplegics, steroids, and a Healon injection into the anterior chamber. A transverse B-scan of the peripheral fundus revealed a shallow annular peripheral choroidal detachment. The suprachoroidal fluid was drained. The patient presented 3 days later with a recurrent flat chamber and an annular peripheral choroidal effusion. The fluid was removed and reinforcement of the scleral flap was performed with the resolution of the flat anterior chamber. A large corneal epithelial defect developed after the second drainage. The oral prednisone was tapered quickly and the topical steroid was decreased. One week later, his vision decreased to count fingers with severe corneal stromal edema and Descemet's membrane folds that improved to 20/50 within 24 h of resumption of the oral steroid and frequent topical steroid. The patient's visual acuity improved to 20/20 following a slow withdrawal of the oral and topical steroid. Eight months after surgery, the IOP was 15 mm Hg without glaucoma medication. The detection of a shallow anterior choroidal detachment by transverse B-scan is critical to making the correct diagnosis. Severe cornea edema can occur if the steroid is withdrawn too quickly. Thus, steroids should be tapered cautiously in steroid-dependent patients. PMID:24348402

  7. A study of nonlinear dynamics of single- and two-phase flow oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawasha, Phetolo Ruby

    The dynamics of single- and two-phase flows in channels can be contingent on nonlinearities which are not clearly understood. These nonlinearities could be interfacial forces between the flowing fluid and its walls, variations in fluid properties, growth of voids, etc. The understanding of nonlinear dynamics of fluid flow is critical in physical systems which can undergo undesirable system operating scenarios such an oscillatory behavior which may lead to component failure. A nonlinear lumped mathematical model of a surge tank with a constant inlet flow into the tank and an outlet flow through a channel is derived from first principles. The model is used to demonstrate that surge tanks with inlet and outlet flows contribute to oscillatory behavior in laminar, turbulent, single-phase, and two-phase flow systems. Some oscillations are underdamped while others are self-sustaining. The mechanisms that are active in single-phase oscillations with no heating are presented using specific cases of simplified models. Also, it is demonstrated how an external mechanism such as boiling contributes to the oscillations observed in two-phase flow and gives rise to sustained oscillations (or pressure drop oscillations). A description of the pressure drop oscillation mechanism is presented using the steady state pressure drop versus mass flow rate characteristic curve of the heated channel, available steady state pressure drop versus mass flow rate from the surge tank, and the transient pressure drop versus mass flow rate limit cycle. Parametric studies are used to verify the theoretical pressure drop oscillations model using experimental data by Yuncu's (1990). The following contributions are unique: (1) comparisons of nonlinear pressure drop oscillation models with and without the effect of the wall thermal heat capacity and (2) comparisons of linearized pressure drop oscillation models with and without the effect of the wall thermal heat capacity to identify stability boundaries.

  8. A two-phase solid/fluid model for dense granular flows including dilatancy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Koné, El-Hadj; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2016-04-01

    Describing grain/fluid interaction in debris flows models is still an open and challenging issue with key impact on hazard assessment [{Iverson et al.}, 2010]. We present here a two-phase two-thin-layer model for fluidized debris flows that takes into account dilatancy effects. It describes the velocity of both the solid and the fluid phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure [{Bouchut et al.}, 2016]. The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by {Jackson} [2000] based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work [{Bouchut et al.}, 2015]. In particular, {Pitman and Le} [2005] replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's model by closing the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation following {Roux and Radjai} [1998]. This relation implies that the occurrence of dilation or contraction of the granular material in the model depends on whether the solid volume fraction is respectively higher or lower than a critical value. When dilation occurs, the fluid is sucked into the granular material, the pore pressure decreases and the friction force on the granular phase increases. On the contrary, in the case of contraction, the fluid is expelled from the mixture, the pore pressure increases and the friction force diminishes. To

  9. Two-phase flow dynamics during boiling of R134a refrigerant in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovalyg, D. M.; Baranenko, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    This study is devoted to complex experimental investigation of two-phase flow boiling of R134a refrigerant in a minichannel having a hydraulic diameter of 540 μm at heat fluxes up to 70 kW/m2 and mass fluxes up to 700 kg/(m2 s). Flow regimes, pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient, and behavior of instabilities are analyzed as functions of vapor quality. On the basis of experimental data, the methods for calculating two-phase pressure drop in a minichannel with a diameter of about 500 μm are determined, and new correlation is proposed for estimating the heat-transfer coefficient; the region of stable boiling of the refrigerant is also determined.

  10. Finite difference solution for a generalized Reynolds equation with homogeneous two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Wheeler, R. L., III; Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt is made to relate elements of two-phase flow and kinetic theory to the modified generalized Reynolds equation and to the energy equation, in order to arrive at a unified model simulating the pressure and flows in journal bearings, hydrostatic journal bearings, or squeeze film dampers when a two-phase situation occurs due to sudden fluid depressurization and heat generation. The numerical examples presented furnish a test of the algorithm for constant properties, and give insight into the effect of the shaft fluid heat transfer coefficient on the temperature profiles. The different level of pressures achievable for a given angular velocity depends on whether the bearing is thermal or nonisothermal; upwind differencing is noted to be essential for the derivation of a realistic profile.

  11. Study of two-phase flows in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tirthankar

    Study of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions is extremely important. One of the major applications of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions is in the design of active thermal control systems for future space applications. Previous space crafts were characterized by low heat generation within the spacecraft which needed to be redistributed within the craft or rejected to space. This task could easily have been accomplished by pumped single-phase loops or passive systems such as heat pipes and so on. However with increase in heat generation within the space craft as predicted for future missions, pumped boiling two-phase flows are being considered. This is because of higher heat transfer co-efficients associated with boiling heat transfer among other advantages. Two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions also find important applications in space propulsion as in space nuclear power reactors as well as in many other life support systems of space crafts. Two-fluid model along with Interfacial Area Transport Equation (IATE) is a useful tool available to predict the behavior of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions. It should be noted that considerable differences exist between two-phase flows under reduced and normal gravity conditions especially for low inertia flows. This is because due to suppression of the gravity field the gas-liquid two-phase flows take a considerable time to develop under reduced gravity conditions as compared to normal gravity conditions. Hence other common methods of analysis applicable for fully developed gas-liquid two-phase flows under normal gravity conditions, like flow regimes and flow regime transition criteria, will not be applicable to gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions. However the two-fluid model and the IATE need to be evaluated first against detailed experimental data obtained under reduced gravity conditions. Although lot of studies

  12. Two-phase convective CO2 dissolution in saline aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mario J.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Geologic carbon storage in deep saline aquifers is a promising technology for reducing anthropogenic emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolution of injected CO2 into resident brines is one of the primary trapping mechanisms generally considered necessary to provide long-term storage security. Given that diffusion of CO2 in brine is woefully slow, convective dissolution, driven by a small increase in brine density with CO2 saturation, is considered to be the primary mechanism of dissolution trapping. Previous studies of convective dissolution have typically only considered the convective process in the single-phase region below the capillary transition zone and have either ignored the overlying two-phase region where dissolution actually takes place or replaced it with a virtual region with reduced or enhanced constant permeability. Our objective is to improve estimates of the long-term dissolution flux of CO2 into brine by including the capillary transition zone in two-phase model simulations. In the fully two-phase model, there is a capillary transition zone above the brine-saturated region over which the brine saturation decreases with increasing elevation. Our two-phase simulations show that the dissolution flux obtained by assuming a brine-saturated, single-phase porous region with a closed upper boundary is recovered in the limit of vanishing entry pressure and capillary transition zone. For typical finite entry pressures and capillary transition zone, however, convection currents penetrate into the two-phase region. As a result, this removes the mass transfer limitation of the diffusive boundary layer and enhances the convective dissolution flux of CO2 more than 3 times above the rate assuming single-phase conditions.

  13. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  14. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  15. Simulation of cryogenic turbopump annular seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.

    1993-11-01

    San Andres employed the NBS software package MIPROPS to account for density's dependence on pressure in the simulation of liquid annular seals. His example on a LH2 seal showed a significant change in the mass coefficient compared to a constant density model. San Andres, Yang, and Childs extended this analysis by including the pressure and temperature dependence of density, specific heat, viscosity, volumetric expansion, and thermal conductivity in a coupled solution of the energy, momentum, and continuity equations. Their example showed very significant changes in stiffness and inertia for a high speed (38,000 rpm), large L/D ratio (0.5) LOX seal, as compared to their constant temperature results. The current research rederived the San Andres-Yang-Childs (SYC) analysis and extended it to include not only the Moody friction model of SYC but also the Hir's friction model. The derivation begins with obtaining the local differential equations of continuity, momentum, and energy conservation in the seal. These equations are averaged across the film thickness to obtain the resulting 'bulk flow' differential equations. Shear stress and convective heat loss through the stator (seal) and rotor are related to the Moody and Hir's friction factor model. The Holman analogy is employed to relate heat conduction in or out of the fluid film's boundary layer to the friction induced shear stress.

  16. Thermal Vibrational Convection in a Two-phase Stratified Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Qingming; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    2007-01-01

    The response of a two-phase stratified liquid system subject to a vibration parallel to an imposed temperature gradient is analyzed using a hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann method (HTLB). The vibrations considered correspond to sinusoidal translations of a rigid cavity at a fixed frequency. The layers are thermally and mechanically coupled. Interaction between gravity-induced and vibration-induced thermal convection is studied. The ability of applied vibration to enhance the flow, heat transfer and interface distortion is investigated. For the range of conditions investigated, the results reveal that the effect of vibrational Rayleigh number and vibrational frequency on a two-phase stratified fluid system is much different than that for a single-phase fluid system. Comparisons of the response of a two-phase stratified fluid system with a single-phase fluid system are discussed.

  17. Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Aydelotte, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

  18. Bistability and hysteresis of annular impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisovsky, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    In present study, the bistability and hysteresis of annular impinging jets is investigated. Annular impinging jets are simulated using open source CFD code - OpenFOAM. Both flow field patterns of interest are obtained and hysteresis is found by means of dynamic mesh simulation. Effect of nozzle exit velocity on resulting hysteresis loop is also illustrated.

  19. Tracking Interfaces in Vertical Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Aktas, Birol

    2002-07-01

    The presence of stratified liquid-gas interfaces in vertical flows poses difficulties to most classes of solution methods for two-phase flows of practical interest in the field of reactor safety and thermal-hydraulics. These difficulties can plague the reactor simulations unless handled with proper care. To illustrate these difficulties, the US NRC Consolidated Thermal-hydraulics Code (TRAC-M) was exercised with selected numerical bench-mark problems. These numerical benchmarks demonstrate that the use of an average void fraction for computational volumes simulating vertical flows is inadequate when these volumes consist of stratified liquid-gas interfaces. In these computational volumes, there are really two regions separated by the liquid-gas interface and each region has a distinct flow topology. An accurate description of these divided computational volumes require that separate void fractions be assigned to each region. This strategy requires that the liquid-gas interfaces be tracked in order to determine their location, the volumes of regions separated by the interface, and the void fractions in these regions. The idea of tracking stratified liquid-gas interfaces is not new. There are examples of tracking methods that were developed for reactor safety codes and applied to reactor simulations in the past with some limited success. The users of these safety codes were warned against potential flow oscillations, conflicting water levels, and pressure disturbances which could be caused by the tracking methods themselves. An example of these methods is the level tracking method of TRAC-M. A review of this method is given here to explore the reasons behind its failures. The review shows that modifications to the field equations are mostly responsible for these failures. Following the review, a systematic approach to incorporate interface tracking methods is outlined. This approach is applicable to most classes of solution methods. For demonstration, the approach to

  20. Performance of a cascade in an annular vortex-generating tunnel over range of Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Sidney; Brunk, Ralph E

    1951-01-01

    Total-pressure deficiency for an annular cascade of 65-(12)10 blades was measured at three radial stations over a range of Reynolds numbers from 50,000 to 250,000 and at angles of attack of 15 degrees and 25 degrees. The variation of turning angle and shape of static pressure distribution at these stations is also shown.

  1. Microgravity experiments with a simple two-phase thermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, C.J.; Sam, R.G. )

    1991-01-10

    Microgravity experiments with a simple two-phase thermal system are described. Microgravity experiments aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft provide variable acceleration 0.01g to 2g, with low gravity for 20 to 25 seconds. The two-phase loop allows the vapor and liquid phases to flow together between the evaporator and the condenser. It incorporates and evaporator where heat transfer is controlled by forced convection, an adiabatic transport section where transparent piping provides visualization of the flow regime, and a condenser where heat transfer is controlled by the shear between the gas and liquid phases. Stable operation of the system is observed during the variable accleration.

  2. Momentum flux in two phase two component low quality flow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Graham, R. W.; Henry, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Values of a one-dimensional momentum flux at a test section discharge station of a two-phase two-component low quality flow computed by two methods, one based on a one-dimensional homogeneous model and the other on a variable slip model, are compared to experimental values for a range of two-phase flow conditions. The comparison seems to indicate the superior accuracy in momentum flux predictions to be on the side of the one-dimensional homogeneous model.

  3. Two Phase Flow and Space-Based Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    1999-01-01

    A reduced gravity environment offers the ability to remove the effect of buoyancy on two phase flows whereby density differences that normally would promote relative velocities between the phases and also alter the shape of the interface are removed. However, besides being a potent research tool, there are also many space-based technologies that will either utilize or encounter two-phase flow behavior, and as a consequence, several questions must be addressed. This paper presents some of these technologies missions. Finally, this paper gives a description of web-sites for some funding.

  4. Two-Phase Model of Combustion in Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Khasainov, B; Bell, J

    2006-06-19

    A two-phase model for Aluminum particle combustion in explosions is proposed. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with the continuum mechanics laws of multi-phase media, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by the Khasainov model. Combustion is specified as material transformations in the Le Chatelier diagram which depicts the locus of thermodynamic states in the internal energy-temperature plane according to Kuhl. Numerical simulations are used to show the evolution of two-phase combustion fields generated by the explosive dissemination of a powdered Al fuel.

  5. Interfacial area transport across vertical elbows in air-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Mohan Singh

    The accurate prediction of two-phase flow using the two-fluid model requires closure relations for the interfacial area concentration ( ai), which can be provided by the interfacial area transport equation (IATE). Models have been developed for the IATE in straight pipe geometries. However, to analyze practical systems, it is important that the IATE accounts for flows in pipes with varying orientation that are interconnected via different flow restrictions. In view of this, the current study performs experiments to investigate the geometric effects of 90- degree vertical elbows in air-water two-phase flows and develops a one-group IATE applicable to vertical-upward-to-horizontal two-phase flows. The experimental facility consists of both vertical and horizontal sections constructed from 50.8 mm inner diameter acrylic pipes that are interconnected via 90-degree glass elbows. The elbows have a radius of curvature of Rc/D = 3 and are installed at L/D = 63 and 244.7 from the inlet. Experiments are performed to characterize the elbow-effect on both global and local two-phase flow parameters. A four-sensor conductivity probe is used to acquire detailed measurements of local two-phase flow parameters at thirteen axial locations along the test section in eight flow conditions that are within the bubbly flow regime at inlet. The measurements show that in bubbly flow conditions, the vertical-upward elbow causes a characteristic bimodal-type bubble distribution and the change in this distribution farther downstream of the elbow corresponds to the dissipation of the elbow-effects. In view of developing the IATE for vertical-upward to horizontal two-phase flows, predictive models for the dissipation length of the elbow-effect and closure relations for advection of gas-phase, pressure loss, and covariance of bubble interactions are developed. The new models are evaluated against the current experimental database. Overall, the model predictions agree with the data within +/-7

  6. Granuloma annulare with prominent lymphoid infiltrates ("pseudolymphomatous" granuloma annulare).

    PubMed

    Cota, Carlo; Ferrara, Gerardo; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2012-05-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is characterized histopathologically by 3 patterns: necrobiotic granuloma, interstitial incomplete form and, rarely, sarcoidal or tuberculoid granuloma. The amount of lymphoid infiltrate in GA is usually limited. We describe 10 cases of GA with prominent "pseudolymphomatous" lymphoid infiltrates mimicking cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia. Patients were 6 males and 4 females (mean age 49.9 years, median age 47 years, age range 25-70). Lesions were localized to a limited area of the body (n = 6), or involved the entire trunk (n = 3), or were generalized (n = 1). The correct clinical diagnosis of GA was provided only in 30% of the cases. In all cases, histopathologic features were characterized by dense, nodular, superficial, and deep infiltrates of lymphocytes. Immunohistology revealed predominance of T lymphocytes in 7 of 7 tested cases. This "pseudolymphomatous" variant of GA represents a pitfall in the histopathologic diagnosis of the disease and may be misinterpreted as other types of cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:22207445

  7. Hyperbolic models for two-phase (or two-material) flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D.L.

    1981-08-01

    For some time it has been known that many of the two-phase flow models lead to ill-posed problems unless viscous stresses are included. The inclusion of viscous stresses changes the character of the equations from hyperbolic to parabolic. A continuing problem has been to find a well-posed hyperbolic system of equations which provide a reasonable model for two-phase flow, or to show that no such model exists. Another outstanding problem has been to understand why the derivation procedures for microstructural models produce models with the peculiar defect of being unstable. A careful investigation of the derivation procedures for the simple case of stratified flow suggests that the equal-pressures assumption is most likely the assumption leading to instability. Consideration of the alternative assumption suggests a model, namely the Unequal-Pressures Model, which is expressed by a first order system of partial differential equations with real characteristics. Thus the problem of complex characteristics (or sound speeds) which lead to the instability in the equal-pressures models is obviated. The form that the analysis takes suggests a technique for categorizing models according to the evolution equations for their internal state variables in order to aid model builders in quickly determining which models will lead to complex characteristics. Also a model with real characteristics for the two-phase flow of a bubbly liquid arises from an extension of the Unequal-Pressures model for single-layered flow to multi-layered flow. This Unequal-Pressures model has real characteristics fo all physically acceptable states and has a complete set of eigenvectors except for a set of measure zero in state space and therefore is hyperbolic in state space. Also this Unequal-Pressures model is stable in the sense of von Neumann a.e. in state space.

  8. Study of two-phase flow in helical and spiral coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, Edward G.; Yan, AN; Omrani, Adel

    1990-01-01

    The principal purposes of the present study were to: (1) observe and develop a fundamental understanding of the flow regimes and their transitions occurring in helical and spiral coils; and (2) obtain pressure drop measurements of such flows, and, if possible, develop a method for predicting pressure drop in these flow geometries. Elaborating upon the above, the general intent is to develop criteria (preferably generalized) for establishing the nature of the flow dynamics (e.g. flow patterns) and the magnitude of the pressure drop in such configurations over a range of flow rates and fluid properties. Additionally, the visualization and identification of flow patterns were a fundamental objective of the study. From a practical standpoint, the conditions under which an annular flow pattern exists is of particular practical importance. In the possible practical applications which would implement these geometries, the working fluids are likely to be refrigerant fluids. In the present study the working fluids were an air-water mixture, and refrigerant 113 (R-113). In order to obtain records of flow patterns and their transitions, video photography was employed extensively. Pressure drop measurements were made using pressure differential transducers connected across pressure taps in lines immediately preceding and following the various test sections.

  9. A two-phase fluid volume compensation chamber for an electric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Lamson, T C; Ojan, O S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1990-08-01

    A volume compensation chamber is a device used to reduce large pressure fluctuations created in electric ventricular assist devices during the emptying and filling of the blood sac. In this study, the effect of motor casing pressure variation (pressure swing) on the performance of the Penn State electric ventricular assist device (EVAD) was investigated. Design criteria were established for the maximum pressure swing tolerated by the EVAD and the optimal mean chamber pressure at which to operate. At the chosen mean chamber pressure of -15 mm Hg, it was found that pressure swing should be maintained below 45 mm Hg. A two-phase fluid volume compensation chamber was developed that reduced the pressure swing enough to ensure adequate pump performance. The device consists of a metal chamber with a high-heat-flux porous coating applied to the inside surface. The chamber uses Freon as the working fluid and is isolated from the EVAD by a metal bellows. It was found that the high-flux coating significantly reduces the pressure swing, in some cases by as much as 50% when compared with an identical chamber with no coating. In the coated chamber the pressure swing was maintained between 22 and 30 mm Hg at a beat rate of 60 beats/min, for a wide range of Freon volumes (4-38 ml). Even at 100 beats/min the pressure swings obtained with the coated chamber are well within an acceptable range. PMID:2396924

  10. Conceptual plan: Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.

    1993-07-01

    The Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program was established to address concerns regarding two-phase flow properties and to provide WIPP-specific, geologically consistent experimental data to develop more appropriate correlations for Salado rock to replace those currently used in Performance Assessment models. Researchers in Sandia`s Fluid Flow and Transport Department originally identified and emphasized the need for laboratory measurements of Salado threshold pressure and relative permeability. The program expanded to include the measurement of capillary pressure, rock compressibility, porosity, and intrinsic permeability and the assessment of core damage. Sensitivity analyses identified the anhydrite interbed layers as the most likely path for the dissipation of waste-generated gas from waste-storage rooms because of their relatively high permeability. Due to this the program will initially focus on the anhydrite interbed material. The program may expand to include similar rock and flow measurements on other WIPP materials including impure halite, pure halite, and backfill and seal materials. This conceptual plan presents the scope, objectives, and historical documentation of the development of the Salado Two-Phase Flow Program through January 1993. Potential laboratory techniques for assessing core damage and measuring porosity, rock compressibility, capillary and threshold pressure, permeability as a function of stress, and relative permeability are discussed. Details of actual test designs, test procedures, and data analysis are not included in this report, but will be included in the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program Test Plan pending the results of experimental and other scoping activities in FY93.

  11. A Heat Transfer Investigation of Liquid and Two-Phase Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer investigation was conducted for liquid and two-phase methane. The tests were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center Heated Tube Facility (HTF) using resistively heated tube sections to simulate conditions encountered in regeneratively cooled rocket engines. This testing is part of NASA s Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) project. Nontoxic propellants, such as liquid oxygen/liquid methane (LO2/LCH4), offer potential benefits in both performance and safety over equivalently sized hypergolic propulsion systems in spacecraft applications. Regeneratively cooled thrust chambers are one solution for high performance, robust LO2/LCH4 engines, but cooling data on methane is limited. Several test runs were conducted using three different diameter Inconel 600 tubes, with nominal inner diameters of 0.0225-, 0.054-, and 0.075-in. The mass flow rate was varied from 0.005 to 0.07 lbm/sec. As the current focus of the PCAD project is on pressure fed engines for LO2/LCH4, the average test section outlet pressures were targeted to be 200 psia or 500 psia. The heat flux was incrementally increased for each test condition while the test section wall temperatures were monitored. A maximum average heat flux of 6.2 Btu/in.2 sec was achieved and, at times, the temperatures of the test sections reached in excess of 1800 R. The primary objective of the tests was to produce heat transfer correlations for methane in the liquid and two-phase regime. For two-phase flow testing, the critical heat flux values were determined where the fluid transitions from nucleate boiling to film boiling. A secondary goal of the testing was to measure system pressure drops in the two-phase regime.

  12. Analysis of Two-Phase Flow in Damper Seals for Cryogenic Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arauz, Grigory L.; SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Cryogenic damper seals operating close to the liquid-vapor region (near the critical point or slightly su-cooled) are likely to present two-phase flow conditions. Under single phase flow conditions the mechanical energy conveyed to the fluid increases its temperature and causes a phase change when the fluid temperature reaches the saturation value. A bulk-flow analysis for the prediction of the dynamic force response of damper seals operating under two-phase conditions is presented as: all-liquid, liquid-vapor, and all-vapor, i.e. a 'continuous vaporization' model. The two phase region is considered as a homogeneous saturated mixture in thermodynamic equilibrium. Th flow in each region is described by continuity, momentum and energy transport equations. The interdependency of fluid temperatures and pressure in the two-phase region (saturated mixture) does not allow the use of an energy equation in terms of fluid temperature. Instead, the energy transport is expressed in terms of fluid enthalpy. Temperature in the single phase regions, or mixture composition in the two phase region are determined based on the fluid enthalpy. The flow is also regarded as adiabatic since the large axial velocities typical of the seal application determine small levels of heat conduction to the walls as compared to the heat carried by fluid advection. Static and dynamic force characteristics for the seal are obtained from a perturbation analysis of the governing equations. The solution expressed in terms of zeroth and first order fields provide the static (leakage, torque, velocity, pressure, temperature, and mixture composition fields) and dynamic (rotordynamic force coefficients) seal parameters. Theoretical predictions show good agreement with experimental leakage pressure profiles, available from a Nitrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Force coefficient predictions for two phase flow conditions show significant fluid compressibility effects, particularly for mixtures with low mass

  13. Low gravity two-phase flow with heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1991-01-01

    A realistic model for the transfer line chilldown operation under low-gravity conditions is developed to provide a comprehensive predictive capability on the behavior of liquid vapor, two-phase diabatic flows in pipes. The tasks described involve the development of numerical code and the establishment of the necessary experimental data base for low-gravity simulation.

  14. Diffusion-controlled grain growth in two-phase solids

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Chen, L.Q.

    1997-08-01

    Microstructural evolution and the kinetics of grain growth in volume-conserved two-phase solids were investigated using two-dimensional (2-D) computer simulations based on a diffuse-interface field model. In this model, a two-phase microstructure is described by non-conserved field variables which represent crystallographic orientations of grains in each phase and by a conserved composition field variable which distinguishes the compositional difference between the two phases. The temporal and spatial evolution of these field variables were obtained through a numerical solution to the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations. The effect of the ratios of grain boundary energies to interfacial energy on the microstructure features was systematically studied. It was found that grain growth in a volume-conserved two-phase solid is controlled by long-range diffusion and follows the power growth law, R{sup m} {minus} R{sup m}{sub o} = kt with m = 3 in the scaling regime for all cases studied, including the microstructures containing only quadrijunctions. The effects of volume fractions and initial microstructures are discussed.

  15. Flow Pattern Phenomena in Two-Phase Flow in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keska, Jerry K.; Simon, William E.

    2004-02-01

    Space transportation systems require high-performance thermal protection and fluid management techniques for systems ranging from cryogenic fluid management devices to primary structures and propulsion systems exposed to extremely high temperatures, as well as for other space systems such as cooling or environment control for advanced space suits and integrated circuits. Although considerable developmental effort is being expended to bring potentially applicable technologies to a readiness level for practical use, new and innovative methods are still needed. One such method is the concept of Advanced Micro Cooling Modules (AMCMs), which are essentially compact two-phase heat exchangers constructed of microchannels and designed to remove large amounts of heat rapidly from critical systems by incorporating phase transition. The development of AMCMs requires fundamental technological advancement in many areas, including: (1) development of measurement methods/systems for flow-pattern measurement/identification for two-phase mixtures in microchannels; (2) development of a phenomenological model for two-phase flow which includes the quantitative measure of flow patterns; and (3) database development for multiphase heat transfer/fluid dynamics flows in microchannels. This paper focuses on the results of experimental research in the phenomena of two-phase flow in microchannels. The work encompasses both an experimental and an analytical approach to incorporating flow patterns for air-water mixtures flowing in a microchannel, which are necessary tools for the optimal design of AMCMs. Specifically, the following topics are addressed: (1) design and construction of a sensitive test system for two-phase flow in microchannels, one which measures ac and dc components of in-situ physical mixture parameters including spatial concentration using concomitant methods; (2) data acquisition and analysis in the amplitude, time, and frequency domains; and (3) analysis of results

  16. By-pass pigs for two-phase flow pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.L.; Spronsen, G. van; Klaus, E.H.; Stewart, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Pigging two-phase pipelines normally leads to the generation of large liquid slug volumes in front of the pig requiring excessively large separators or slug catchers. The concept of using a high by-pass pig to disperse the liquid and reduce the maximum liquid production rate prior to pig arrival is under investigation by Shell Exploration and Production companies. A simulation model of the dynamics of the pig and related two-phase flow behavior in the pipeline was used to predict the performance of by-pass pigs. Field trials in a dry gas pipeline were carried out to provide friction data and to validate the model. It was then used to explore operating possibilities in a two-phase lie which led to the follow-up trial in a 15.6 km, 20 inch OD two-phase offshore interfield pipeline with risers. Whereas the volume of liquid swept in front of the pig would be 179 m{sup 3} if the by-pass fraction were zero, a reduction of 70% to 53m{sup 3} was achieved in the field with a by-pass fraction of 10%. The predicted mobility of the high by-pass pig in the pipeline and risers was verified and the beneficial effects due to the by-pass concept exceeded the prediction of the simplified model. The significant gains of using a by-pass pig in modifying gas and liquid production rates during pigging operation have been demonstrated. The method can widen the possibility of applying two-phase flow pipeline transportation to cases where separator or slug catcher capacity are limited for reasons of practicality or cost.

  17. Means of manufacturing annular arrays

    DOEpatents

    Day, R.A.

    1985-10-10

    A method is described for manufacturing an annular acoustic transducer array from a plate of transducer material, which enables production of precision aligned arrays at low cost. The circular plate is sawed along at least two lines that are radial to the axis of the plate. At steps along each radial cut, the plate is rotated first in one direction and then in an opposite direction by a predetermined angle such as slightly less than 90/sup 0/. The cuts result in the forming of several largely ring-shaped lands, each largely ring-shaped land being joined to the other rings of different radii by thin portions of the plate, and each ring being cut into segments. The bridges that join different rings hold the transducer together until it can be mounted on a lens.

  18. An analytical model for prediction of two-phase (noncondensable) flow pump performance

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, O.

    1985-03-01

    During operational transients or a hypothetical LOCA (loss of coolant accident) condition, the recirculating coolant of PWR (pressurized water reactor) may flash into steam due to a loss of line pressure. Under such two-phase flow conditions, it is well known that the recirculation pump becomes unable to generate the same head as that of the single-phase flow case. Similar situations also exist in oil well submersible pumps where a fair amount of gas is contained in oil. Based on the one dimensional control volume method, an analytical method has been developed to determine the performance of pumps operating under two-phase flow conditions. The analytical method has incorporated pump geometry, void fraction, flow slippage and flow regime into the basic formula, but neglected the compressibility and condensation effects. During the course of model development, it has been found that the head degradation is mainly caused by higher acceleration on liquid phase and deceleration on gas phase than in the case of single-phase flows. The numerical results for head degradations and torques obtained with the model favorably compared with the air/water two-phase flow test data of Babcock and Wilcox (1/3 scale) and Creare (1/20 scale) pumps.

  19. A Novel Hyperbolization Procedure for The Two-Phase Six-Equation Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Samet Y. Kadioglu; Robert Nourgaliev; Nam Dinh

    2011-10-01

    We introduce a novel approach for the hyperbolization of the well-known two-phase six equation flow model. The six-equation model has been frequently used in many two-phase flow applications such as bubbly fluid flows in nuclear reactors. One major drawback of this model is that it can be arbitrarily non-hyperbolic resulting in difficulties such as numerical instability issues. Non-hyperbolic behavior can be associated with complex eigenvalues that correspond to characteristic matrix of the system. Complex eigenvalues are often due to certain flow parameter choices such as the definition of inter-facial pressure terms. In our method, we prevent the characteristic matrix receiving complex eigenvalues by fine tuning the inter-facial pressure terms with an iterative procedure. In this way, the characteristic matrix possesses all real eigenvalues meaning that the characteristic wave speeds are all real therefore the overall two-phase flowmodel becomes hyperbolic. The main advantage of this is that one can apply less diffusive highly accurate high resolution numerical schemes that often rely on explicit calculations of real eigenvalues. We note that existing non-hyperbolic models are discretized mainly based on low order highly dissipative numerical techniques in order to avoid stability issues.

  20. A Simple and Efficient Diffuse Interface Method for Compressible Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ray A. Berry; Richard Saurel; Fabien Petitpas

    2009-05-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. For many reasons, to be discussed, there is growing interest in the application of two-phase flow models to provide diffuse, but nevertheless resolved, simulation of interfaces between two immiscible compressible fluids – diffuse interface method (DIM). Because of its ability to dynamically create interfaces and to solve interfaces separating pure media and mixtures for DNS-like (Direct Numerical Simulation) simulations of interfacial flows, we examine the construction of a simple, robust, fast, and accurate numerical formulation for the 5-equation Kapila et al. [1] reduced two-phase model. Though apparently simple, the Kapila et al. model contains a volume fraction differential transport equation containing a nonlinear, non-conservative term which poses serious computational challenges. To circumvent the difficulties encountered with the single velocity and single pressure Kapila et al. [1] multiphase flow model, a 6-equation relaxation hyperbolic model is built to solve interface problems with compressible fluids. In this approach, pressure non-equilibrium is first restored, followed by a relaxation to an asymptotic solution which is convergent to the solutions of the Kapila et al. reduced model. The apparent complexity introduced with this extended hyperbolic model actually leads to considerable simplifications regarding numerical resolution, and the various ingredients used by this method are general enough to consider future extensions to problems involving complex physics.

  1. Free vortex theory for efficiency calculations from annular cascade data

    SciTech Connect

    Main, A.J.; Oldfield, M.L.G.; Lock, G.D.; Jones, T.V.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes a new three-dimensional theory to calculate the efficiency or loss of nozzle guide vane annular cascades from experimental area traverse measurements of the compressible downstream flow. To calculate such an efficiency, it is necessary to mix out the measured flow computationally to either a uniform state or one that is a function of radius only. When this is done by conserving momentum, mass, and energy flow, there is a remaining degree of freedom in that the radial distribution of circumferential velocity can be chosen. This extra freedom does not arise in two-dimensional cascades. The new method mixes the flow out to a free (i.e., irrotational) vortex. This is preferred to existing methods in that it gives a physically realistic flow and also provides a unique, lossless, isentropic reference flow. The annular cascade efficiency is then uniquely defined as the ratio of the mixed-out experimental kinetic energy flux to the ideal isentropic kinetic energy flux at the same mean radius static pressure. The mathematical derivation of this method is presented. This new theory has been used to process data obtained from a large, transonic, annular cascade in a blowdown tunnel. A four-hole pyramid probe, mounted on a computer-controlled traverse, has been used to map the passage flowfield downstream of the nozzle guide vanes. Losses calculated by the new method are compared with those calculated from the same data using earlier analysis methods.

  2. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  3. Thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Schubert, Gerald; Eichelberger, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes, due to temperature-dependent viscosity and dissipation, was investigated using finite element calculations of magma flow in dikelike channels with length-to-width ratios of 1000:1 or more. Solutions of the steady state equations governing magma flow are obtained for a variety of conditions ranging from idealized plane-parallel models to cases involving nonparallel geometry and two-phase flows. The implications of the numerical simulations for the dynamics of flow in a dike-reservoir system and the consequences of dike entrance conditions on magmatic storage are discussed. Consideration is also given to an unmixing/self-lubrication mechanism which may be important for the lubrication of silicic magmas rising to the earth's surface in mixed magma ascent scenarios, which naturally segregates magma mixtures of two components with differing viscosities to minimize the driving pressure gradient.

  4. Thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C. .; Schubert, G.; Eichelberger, J.C. California Univ., Los Angeles Alaska Univ., Fairbanks )

    1992-11-01

    The coupling between thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes, due to temperature-dependent viscosity and dissipation, was investigated using finite element calculations of magma flow in dikelike channels with length-to-width ratios of 1000:1 or more. Solutions of the steady state equations governing magma flow are obtained for a variety of conditions ranging from idealized plane-parallel models to cases involving nonparallel geometry and two-phase flows. The implications of the numerical simulations for the dynamics of flow in a dike-reservoir system and the consequences of dike entrance conditions on magmatic storage are discussed. Consideration is also given to an unmixing/self-lubrication mechanism which may be important for the lubrication of silicic magmas rising to the earth's surface in mixed magma ascent scenarios, which naturally segregates magma mixtures of two components with differing viscosities to minimize the driving pressure gradient. 56 refs.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Critical Flow with the Phase Change in the Nozzle Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, Masahiro; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Two-phase critical flow in the nozzle tube is analyzed numerically by the best estimate code TRACE and the CFD code FLUENT, and the performance of the mass flow rate estimation by the numerical codes is discussed. For the best estimate analysis by the TRACE code, the critical flow option is turned on. The mixture model is used with the cavitation model and the evaporation-condensation model for the numerical simulation by the FLUENT code. Two test cases of the two-phase critical flow are analyzed. One case is the critical flashing flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle (Super Moby Dick experiment), and the other case is the break nozzle flow for a steam generator tube rupture experiment of pressurized water reactors at Large Scale Test Facility of Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The calculation results of the mass flow rates by the numerical simulations show good agreements with the experimental results.

  6. Two phase choke flow in tubes with very large L/D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Data were obtained for two phase and gaseous choked flow nitrogen in a long constant area duct of 16200 L/D with a diverging diffuser attached to the exit. Flow rate data were taken along five isotherms (reduced temperature of 0.81, 0.96, 1.06, 1.12, and 2.34) for reduced pressures to 3. The flow rate data were mapped in the usual manner using stagnation conditions at the inlet mixing chamber upstream of the entrance length. The results are predictable by a two phase homogeneous equilibrium choking flow model which includes wall friction. A simplified theory which in essence decouples the long tube region from the high acceleration choking region also appears to predict the data resonably well, but about 15 percent low.

  7. Two phase choke flow in tubes with very large L/D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Two phase and gaseous choked flow data for fluid nitrogen were obtained for a test section which was a long constant area duct of 16 200 L/D with a diverging diffuser attached to the exit. Flow rate data were taken along five isotherms (reduced temperature of 0.81, 0.96, 1.06, 1.12, and 2.34) for reduced pressures to 3. The flow rate data were mapped in the usual manner using stagnation conditions at the inlet mixing chamber upstream of the entrance length. The results are predictable by a two-phase homogeneous equilibrium choking flow model which includes wall fraction. A simplified theory which in essence decouples the long tube region from the high acceleration choking region also appears to predict the data reasonably well, but about 15 percent low.

  8. Experiment of rocket-ram annular combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuyanagi, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazuo; Sasaki, Masaki; Ono, Fumiei

    Superiority in specific impulse of the double-nozzle type of rocket-ram combined engine over the ducted type of combined engine was shown by performance calculations. Then, a double-nozzle type of rocket-ram annular combustor with a total thrust of 5 kN was designed and experimentally tested with varying ratios of thrust produced by rocket and ram. With the combustor having different diverging half-angles, namely 10 deg 18 arcmin, and 6 deg 40 arcmin, thrust and pressure distribution along the common expansion nozzle were measured to investigate the effect of interaction of the two expansion gases on thrust. Enhancement of specific impulse was experimentally verified. That is, the specific impulse gained in rocket-ram parallel operations, the ratio of rocket thrust to ram thrust being 50 to 50, were found to be 190 percent of those in pure rocket operations. However, in the downstream region of the common nozzle, the flow might separate due to the generation of shock waves in either type of nozzle configuration.

  9. Etizolam-induced superficial erythema annulare centrifugum.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, K; Yabunami, H; Hisanaga, Y

    2002-01-01

    Erythema annulare centrifugum (EAC) is characterized by slowly enlarging annular erythematous lesions. Although the origin is not clear in most cases, EAC has been associated with infections, medications, and in rare cases, underlying malignancy. We describe a patient who developed annular erythematous lesions after etizolam administration. The eruptions were typical of the superficial form of EAC, both clinically and histopathologically. The lesions disappeared shortly after discontinuation of the medication. Patch testing with etizolam gave positive results. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of etizolam-induced superficial EAC. PMID:11952667

  10. Sealing arrangement with annular flexible disc

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Honigsberg, Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    Fluid sealing arrangements including an annular shaped flexible disc having enlarged edges disposed within channel-shaped annular receptacles which are spaced from one another. The receptacles form an annular region for contacting and containing the enlarged edges of the disc, and the disc is preloaded to a conical configuration. The disc is flexibly and movably supported within the receptacles so that unevenly distributed relative motion between the components containing the receptacles is accommodated without loss of sealing contact between the edges of the disc and the walls of the receptacles.

  11. Two-phase flow in smooth and rough fractures: Measurement and correlation by porous-medium and pipe flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Fourar, M.; Bories, S. ); Lenormand, R. ); Persoff, P. )

    1993-11-01

    Two-phase (air-water) flow experiments were conducted in horizontal artificial fractures. The fractures were between glass plates that were either smooth or artificially roughened by gluing a layer of glass beads to them. One smooth fracture with an aperture of 1 mm and three rough fractures, one with the two surfaces in contact and two without contact, were studied. For both types of fractures, the flow structures are similar to those observed in two-phase flow in a pipe, with structures (bubbles, fingering bubbles, films, and drops) depending on the gas and liquid flow rates. The pressure gradients measured for different liquid and gas velocities were interpreted by three models. First, using Darcy's law leads to relative permeability curves similar to conventional ones for porous media. However, these curves depend not only on saturation but also on flow rats. This effect is caused by inertial forces which are not included in this approach. Second, the standard approach for two-phase flow in pipes (Lockhart and Martinelli's equation) agrees with experimental results, at least for small pressure gradients. Finally, the best fit was obtained by treating the two phases as one homogeneous phase. All the properties are averaged, and the pressure drop is deduced from an empirical correlation between the two-phase Reynolds number and the friction factor. 22 refs., 11 figs.

  12. A New Void Fraction Measurement Method for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Small Channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huajun; Ji, Haifeng; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing; Wu, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a laser diode, a 12 × 6 photodiode array sensor, and machine learning techniques, a new void fraction measurement method for gas-liquid two-phase flow in small channels is proposed. To overcome the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement, the flow pattern of the two-phase flow is firstly identified by Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA). Then, according to the identification result, a relevant void fraction measurement model which is developed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to implement the void fraction measurement. A void fraction measurement system for the two-phase flow is developed and experiments are carried out in four different small channels. Four typical flow patterns (including bubble flow, slug flow, stratified flow and annular flow) are investigated. The experimental results show that the development of the measurement system is successful. The proposed void fraction measurement method is effective and the void fraction measurement accuracy is satisfactory. Compared with the conventional laser measurement systems using standard laser sources, the developed measurement system has the advantages of low cost and simple structure. Compared with the conventional void fraction measurement methods, the proposed method overcomes the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement. This work also provides a good example of using low-cost laser diode as a competent replacement of the expensive standard laser source and hence implementing the parameter measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The research results can be a useful reference for other researchers’ works. PMID:26828488

  13. A New Void Fraction Measurement Method for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Small Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Ji, Haifeng; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing; Wu, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a laser diode, a 12 × 6 photodiode array sensor, and machine learning techniques, a new void fraction measurement method for gas-liquid two-phase flow in small channels is proposed. To overcome the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement, the flow pattern of the two-phase flow is firstly identified by Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA). Then, according to the identification result, a relevant void fraction measurement model which is developed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to implement the void fraction measurement. A void fraction measurement system for the two-phase flow is developed and experiments are carried out in four different small channels. Four typical flow patterns (including bubble flow, slug flow, stratified flow and annular flow) are investigated. The experimental results show that the development of the measurement system is successful. The proposed void fraction measurement method is effective and the void fraction measurement accuracy is satisfactory. Compared with the conventional laser measurement systems using standard laser sources, the developed measurement system has the advantages of low cost and simple structure. Compared with the conventional void fraction measurement methods, the proposed method overcomes the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement. This work also provides a good example of using low-cost laser diode as a competent replacement of the expensive standard laser source and hence implementing the parameter measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The research results can be a useful reference for other researchers' works. PMID:26828488

  14. Tutorial on Quantification of Differences between Single- and Two-Component Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delil, A. A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Single-component two-phase systems are envisaged for aerospace thermal control applications: Mechanically Pumped Loops, Vapour Pressure Driven Loops, Capillary Pumped Loops and Loop Heat Pipes. Thermal control applications are foreseen in different gravity environments: Micro-g, reduced-g for Mars or Moon bases, 1-g during terrestrial testing, and hyper-g in rotating spacecraft, during combat aircraft manoeuvres and in systems for outer planets. In the evaporator, adiabatic line and condenser sections of such single-component two-phase systems, the fluid is a mixture of the working liquid (for example ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethanol, or other refrigerants, etc.) and its saturated vapour. Results of two-phase two-component flow and heat transfer research (pertaining to liquid-gas mixtures, e.g. water/air, or argon or helium) are often applied to support research on flow and heat transfer in two-phase single-component systems. The first part of the tutorial updates the contents of two earlier tutorials, discussing various aerospace-related two-phase flow and heat transfer research. It deals with the different pressure gradient constituents of the total pressure gradient, with flow regime mapping (including evaporating and condensing flow trajectories in the flow pattern maps), with adiabatic flow and flashing, and with thermal-gravitational scaling issues. The remaining part of the tutorial qualitatively and quantitatively determines the differences between single- and two-component systems: Two systems that physically look similar and close, but in essence are fully different. It was already elucidated earlier that, though there is a certain degree of commonality, the differences will be anything but negligible, in many cases. These differences (quantified by some examples) illustrates how careful one shall be in interpreting data resulting from two-phase two-component simulations or experiments, for the development of single-component two-phase thermal control

  15. Gelfand-type problem for two-phase porous media

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Peter V.; Moroz, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    We consider a generalization of the Gelfand problem arising in Frank-Kamenetskii theory of thermal explosion. This generalization is a natural extension of the Gelfand problem to two-phase materials, where, in contrast to the classical Gelfand problem which uses a single temperature approach, the state of the system is described by two different temperatures. We show that similar to the classical Gelfand problem the thermal explosion occurs exclusively owing to the absence of stationary temperature distribution. We also show that the presence of interphase heat exchange delays a thermal explosion. Moreover, we prove that in the limit of infinite heat exchange between phases the problem of thermal explosion in two-phase porous media reduces to the classical Gelfand problem with renormalized constants. PMID:24611025

  16. Melt-band instabilities with two-phase damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudge, John F.; Bercovici, David

    2015-05-01

    Deformation experiments on partially molten rocks in simple shear form melt bands at 20° to the shear plane instead of at the expected 45° principal compressive stress direction. These melt bands may play an important role in melt focusing in mid-ocean ridges. Such shallow bands are known to form for two-phase media under shear if strongly non-Newtonian power-law creep is employed for the solid phase, or anisotropy imposed. However laboratory experiments show that shallow bands occur regardless of creep mechanism, even in diffusion creep, which is nominally Newtonian. Here we propose that a couple of forms of two-phase damage allow for shallow melt bands even in diffusion creep.

  17. Computer simulation of two-phase flow in nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.

    1992-09-01

    Two-phase flow models dominate the economic resource requirements for development and use of computer codes for analyzing thermohydraulic transients in nuclear power plants. Six principles are presented on mathematical modeling and selection of numerical methods, along with suggestions on programming and machine selection, all aimed at reducing the cost of analysis. Computer simulation is contrasted with traditional computer calculation. The advantages of run-time interactive access operation in a simulation environment are demonstrated. It is explained that the drift-flux model is better suited for two-phase flow analysis in nuclear reactors than the two-fluid model, because of the latter`s closure problem. The advantage of analytical over numerical integration is demonstrated. Modeling and programming techniques are presented which minimize the number of needed arithmetical and logical operations and thereby increase the simulation speed, while decreasing the cost.

  18. A review of two-phase flow-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    1987-08-01

    Two-phase flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers and power generation components. The flowing fluid is a source of energy that can induce small-amplitude subcritical oscillations and large-amplitude dynamic instabilities. In fact, many practical system components have experienced excessive flow-induced vibrations. To prevent unacceptable flow-induced vibration, we must understand excitation mechanisms, develop analytical and experimental techniques, and provide reliable design guidelines. Thus, we are conducting a comprehensive program to study structural vibration in components subjected to two-phase flow. This report reviews the current understanding of vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, crossflow, and axial flow, with emphasis on excitation mechanisms, mathematical models, and available experimental data. A unified theory is presented for cylinders oscillating under different flow conditions. Based on the theory, future research needs are outlined.

  19. A pumped two-phase cooling system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.; Costello, F. A.

    1983-01-01

    A pumped, two-phase heat-transport system is being developed for possible use for temperature control of scientific instruments on future NASA missions. As compared to a single-phase system, this two-phase system can maintain tighter temperature control with less pumping power. A laboratory model of the system has been built and tested. The measured heat transfer coefficients were approximately the same as in heat pipes, 220 Btu/hr-sq ft-F, as compared to 25 Btu/hr-sq ft-F for single-phase liquid flow. Heat shearing between experiments has been demonstrated wherein vapor generated in the cold plate of an active experiment was condensed in a cold, unheated experiment. System stability has been observed. However, additional development is needed. The use of non-azeotropic mixtures of coolants appears especially promising as a simple way to determine exit quality and thus control the flow rates to prevent dryout.

  20. A Two-Phase Metaheuristic for Farm Workscheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Senlin; Nakamura, Morikazu; Shikanai, Takeshi; Okazaki, Takeo

    This paper proposes a two-phase metaheuristic approach to planning daily farm work for agriculture production corporations. The two-phase metaheuristic contains the optimization of resources assignment and searching schedule based on Genetic Algorithm and hybrid Petri nets model. In the experiment, the effect on optimizing the resource assignment and priority list, initializing population of GA with sorted chromosomes by waiting time, inheriting priority list from tasks in the previous resources assignment enhanced the evolutionary speed and solution quality. The computational experiment revealed high effectiveness for constructing farm work schedule with high ratio of resource utilization. The proposed approach also contributes a referential scheme for combining metaheuristic to solve scheduling problem under constraints.

  1. Cascade modeling of single and two-phase turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnov, Igor A.

    The analysis of turbulent two-phase flows requires closure models in order to perform reliable computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CFMD) analyses. A turbulence cascade model, which tracks the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy between the various eddy sizes, has been developed for the analysis of the single and bubbly two-phase turbulence. Various flows are considered including the decay of isotropic grid-induced turbulence, uniform shear flow and turbulent channel flow. The model has been developed using a "building block" approach by moving from modeling of simpler turbulent flows (i.e., homogeneous, isotropic decay) to more involved turbulent flows (i.e., non-homogeneous channel flow). The spectral cascade-transport model's performance has been assessed against a number of experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) results.

  2. Dual shell pressure balanced vessel

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.

    1992-01-01

    A dual-wall pressure balanced vessel for processing high viscosity slurries at high temperatures and pressures having an outer pressure vessel and an inner vessel with an annular space between the vessels pressurized at a pressure slightly less than or equivalent to the pressure within the inner vessel.

  3. Theory and Tests of Two-Phase Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    New turbines open possibility of new types of power cycles. Report describes theoretical analysis and experimental testing of two-phase impulse turbines. Such turbines open possibility of new types of power cycles operating with extremely wet mixtures of steam and water, organic fluids, or immiscible liquids and gases. Possible applications are geothermal power, waste-heat recovery, refrigerant expansion, solar conversion, transportation, and engine-bottoming cycles.

  4. Two-fluid model for two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, M.

    1987-06-01

    The two-fluid model formulation is discussed in detail. The emphasis of the paper is on the three-dimensional formulation and the closure issues. The origin of the interfacial and turbulent transfer terms in the averaged formulation is explained and their original mathematical forms are examined. The interfacial transfer of mass, momentum, and energy is proportional to the interfacial area and driving force. This is not a postulate but a result of the careful examination of the mathematical form of the exact interfacial terms. These two effects are considered separately. Since all the interfacial transfer terms involve the interfacial area concentration, the accurate modeling of the local interfacial area concentration is the first step to be taken for a development of a reliable two-fluid model closure relations. The interfacial momentum interaction has been studied in terms of the standard-drag, lift, virtual mass, and Basset forces. Available analytical and semi-empirical correlations and closure relations are reviewed and existing shortcomings are pointed out. The other major area of importance is the modeling of turbulent transfer in two-phase flow. The two-phase flow turbulence problem is coupled with the phase separation problem even in a steady-state fully developed flow. Thus the two-phase turbulence cannot be understood without understanding the interfacial drag and lift forces accurately. There are some indications that the mixing length type model may not be sufficient to describe the three-dimensional turbulent and flow structures. Although it is a very difficult challenge, the two-phase flow turbulence should be investigated both experimentally and analytically with long time-scale research.

  5. Recent advances in two-phase flow numerics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Macian, R.

    1997-07-01

    The authors review three topics in the broad field of numerical methods that may be of interest to individuals modeling two-phase flow in nuclear power plants. The first topic is iterative solution of linear equations created during the solution of finite volume equations. The second is numerical tracking of macroscopic liquid interfaces. The final area surveyed is the use of higher spatial difference techniques.

  6. An experimental investigation of two-phase liquid oxygen pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental program to explore the feasibility of pumping two-phase oxygen (liquid and gas) at the pump inlet are reported. Twenty-one cavitation tests were run on a standard J-2 oxygen pump at the MSFC Components Test Laboratory. All tests were run with liquid oxygen 5 to 10 K above the normal boiling point temperature. During ten tests run at approximately at the pump inlet were noted before complete pump performance 50 percent of the nominal operating speed, two phase conditions were achieved. Vapor volumes of 40 to 50 percent at the pump inlet were noted before complete pump performance loss. The experimental results compared to predictions. Nine cavitation tests run at the nominal pump speed over a 5 K temperature range showed progressively lower net positive suction head (NPSH) requirements as temperature was increased. Two-phase operation was not achieved. The temperature varying NPSH data were used to calculate thermodynamic effects on NPSH, and the results were compared to existing data.

  7. Method and apparatus for continuous annular electrochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.

    1987-01-01

    Separation of complex mixtures and solutions can be carried out using a method and apparatus for continuous annular electrochromatography. Solutes are diverted radially by an imposed electrical field as they move downward in a rotating chromatographic column.

  8. Granuloma Annulare Treated with Excimer Laser

    PubMed Central

    Ragi, Jennifer; Milgraum, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To review the current therapy for granuloma annulare and report a case of refractory generalized granuloma annulare successfully treated with excimer laser. A discussion about the characteristics of excimer laser and the mechanism of its effectiveness is presented. Design: Patient case report and literature review. Setting: Outpatient dermatology practice. Participants: A 73-year-old woman suffering from generalized granuloma annulare for more than 40 years. Measurements: Change in clinical appearance of lesions. Results: Use of excimer laser therapy resulted in prompt and complete resolution in treated areas with no residual skin changes or side effects. Conclusion: Excimer laser therapy is a powerful treatment modality with minimal side effects for patients with granuloma annulare. Further study is necessary to elucidate optimal dosing, long-term efficacy, and safety profile. PMID:23198013

  9. [Treatment of disseminated granuloma annulare with anthralin].

    PubMed

    Jantke, M E; Bertsch, H-P; Schön, M P; Fuchs, T

    2011-12-01

    Granuloma annulare is a benign, often asymptomatic and self-limiting granulomatous skin disease. In cases of disseminated granuloma annulare, spontaneous regression is considerably less frequent than in localized forms so that therapy is often desired. Systemic treatments should always be assessed critically and reserved for patients who are severely affected and in whom treatment approaches with few side effects such as local application of anthralin do not suffice to achieve a satisfactory effect. PMID:21656108

  10. Annular-Cross-Section CFE Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed continuous-flow-electrophoresis (CFE) chamber of annular cross section offers advantages over conventional CFE chamber, and wedge-cross-section chamber described in "Increasing Sensitivity in Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis" (MFS-26176). In comparison with wedge-shaped chamber, chamber of annular cross section virtually eliminates such wall effects as electro-osmosis and transverse gradients of velocity. Sensitivity enhanced by incorporating gradient maker and radial (collateral) flow.

  11. Adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopy with annular pupils

    PubMed Central

    Sulai, Yusufu N.; Dubra, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Annular apodization of the illumination and/or imaging pupils of an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) for improving transverse resolution was evaluated using three different normalized inner radii (0.26, 0.39 and 0.52). In vivo imaging of the human photoreceptor mosaic at 0.5 and 10° from fixation indicates that the use of an annular illumination pupil and a circular imaging pupil provides the most benefit of all configurations when using a one Airy disk diameter pinhole, in agreement with the paraxial confocal microscopy theory. Annular illumination pupils with 0.26 and 0.39 normalized inner radii performed best in terms of the narrowing of the autocorrelation central lobe (between 7 and 12%), and the increase in manual and automated photoreceptor counts (8 to 20% more cones and 11 to 29% more rods). It was observed that the use of annular pupils with large inner radii can result in multi-modal cone photoreceptor intensity profiles. The effect of the annular masks on the average photoreceptor intensity is consistent with the Stiles-Crawford effect (SCE). This indicates that combinations of images of the same photoreceptors with different apodization configurations and/or annular masks can be used to distinguish cones from rods, even when the former have complex multi-modal intensity profiles. In addition to narrowing the point spread function transversally, the use of annular apodizing masks also elongates it axially, a fact that can be used for extending the depth of focus of techniques such as adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AOOCT). Finally, the positive results from this work suggest that annular pupil apodization could be used in refractive or catadioptric adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes to mitigate undesired back-reflections. PMID:22808435

  12. Annular gel reactor for chemical pattern formation

    DOEpatents

    Nosticzius, Zoltan; Horsthemke, Werner; McCormick, William D.; Swinney, Harry L.; Tam, Wing Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an annular gel reactor suitable for the production and observation of spatiotemporal patterns created during a chemical reaction. The apparatus comprises a vessel having at least a first and second chamber separated one from the other by an annular polymer gel layer (or other fine porous medium) which is inert to the materials to be reacted but capable of allowing diffusion of the chemicals into it.

  13. Multiple Granuloma Annulare in a 2-year-old Child

    PubMed Central

    Siddalingappa, Karjigi; Murthy, Sambasiviah Chidambara; Herakal, Kallappa; Kusuma, Marganahalli Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Granuloma annulare is a benign, self-limiting, inflammatory and granulomatous disease of unknown etiology occurring in both adults and children. An 18-month-old male child had multiple progressive annular plaques over the lower extremities. Clinical and histopathological features were consistent with granuloma annulare. Localized granuloma annulare is the most common form in children. We report a young child with multiple, progressive granuloma annulare over the lower extremities. PMID:26677301

  14. Exhaust emissions of a double annular combustor: Parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    A full scale double-annular ram-induction combustor designed for Mach 3.0 cruise operation was tested. Emissions of oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and smoke were measured over a range of combustor operating variables including reference velocity, inlet air temperature and pressure, and exit average temperature. ASTM Jet-A fuel was used for these tests. An equation is provided relating oxides of nitrogen emissions as a function of the combustor, operating variables. A small effect of radial fuel staging on reducing exhaust emissions (which were originally quite low) is demonstrated.

  15. Effects of dynamic load on flow and heat transfer of two-phase boiling water in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qiu-Ping; Song, Bao-Yin; Zhao, Mei; Cao, Xi

    2009-07-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to obtain the flow and heat transfer characteristics of single-phase water flow and two-phase pipe boiling water flow under high gravity (Hi-G) in present work. The experiments were conducted on a rotating platform, and boiling two-phase flow state was obtained by means of electric heating. The data were collected specifically in the test section, which was a lucite pipe with inner diameter of 20 mm and length of 400 mm. By changing the parameters, such as rotation speed, inlet temperature, flow rate, and etc., and analyzing the fluid resistance, effective heat and heat transfer coefficient of the experimental data, the effects of dynamic load on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of single phase water and two-phase boiling water flow were investigated and obtained. The two-phase flow patterns under Hi-G condition were obtained with a video camera. The results show that the dynamic load significantly influences the flow characteristic and boiling heat transfer of the two-phase pipe flow. As the direction of the dynamic load and the flow direction are opposite, the greater the dynamic load, the higher the outlet pressure and the flow resistance, and the lower the flow rate, the void fraction, the wall inner surface temperature and the heat transfer capability. Therefore, the dynamic load will block the fluid flow, enhance heat dissipation toward the ambient environment and reduce the heat transfer to the two-phase boiling flow.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of diesel injector opening with a two phase cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouvinis, P.; Gavaises, M.; Li, J.; Wang, L.

    2015-12-01

    In the current paper, indicative results of the flow simulation during the opening phase of a Diesel injector are presented. In order to capture the complex flow field and cavitation structures forming in the injector, Large Eddy Simulation has been employed, whereas compressibility of the liquid was included. For taking into account cavitation effects, a two phase homogenous mixture model was employed. The mass transfer rate of the mixture model was adjusted to limit as much as possible the occurrence of negative pressures. During the simulation, pressure peaks have been found in areas of vapour collapse, with magnitude beyond 4000bar, which is higher that the yield stress of common materials. The locations of such pressure peaks corresponds well with the actual erosion location as found from X ray scans.

  17. Design and operation of a two-phase flow research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maeder, P.F.; Kestin, J.; Dickinson, D.A.; DiPippo, R.; Olia, H.

    1982-05-01

    In this report we describe the new two-phase flow facility that has been constructed at Brown University. Included is the design philosophy that led us to select a blow-down, Freon tunnel as the means of studying the flow of a pure substance undergoing liquid-vapor phase changes. Each component is discussed from the initial design considerations, through sizing calculations, to actual system specifications. Special emphasis is placed on the instrumentation and automatic data acquisition and processing system. Finally a sampling of results obtained so far is presented. Section 1 gives the reasons for the construction of the facility and lists some of the uses and objectives of its operation. The reader can gain a good overview of the facility from Section 2 without a great deal of detail. In Section 3 we present the rationale for the particular design choices that were made and give details about the selection and sizing of all major components except the instrumentation. The latter subject is treated in Section 4 where we discuss the temperature and pressure probes, mass flow rate measurement, and other instrumentation. Section 5 is devoted to the test section proper where all the two-phase flow measurements and observations take place. The electronic data acquisition and facility control system is the subject of Section 6. Results on two-phase friction factors and flow pattern observations in a horizontal pipe are given in Section 7 along with the ranges of flow that have been covered so far. In capsule summary, the two-phase flow test facility is operational and has demonstrated a wide range of flow conditions from purely liquid to purely vapor through a variety of two-phase situations. Only horizontal flows have been studied so far, but the test section has been designed to operate in inclined positions up to fully vertical. The instrumentation performs very well as does the fully automatic control system. We believe the test facility is capable of yielding

  18. Conservative numerical schemes for unsteady one-dimensional two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cascales, Jose Ramon

    The thesis is devoted to the modelization of non steady two phase mixtures of liquid and vapour. It has been motivated by the great amount of industrial applications in which we find these phenomena. Transient two phase flow is a very important issue in nuclear, chemical and industrial applications. In the case of the nuclear industry due to the importance of preventing loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and guaranteeing a good performance of the coolant system in power plants. We justify the present development by means of the introduction of the most important codes developed during the last two decades and their associated mesh techniques. It is basically focused on the extension of some conservative and explicit schemes to obtain approximate solutions of the system of equations in one dimensional one pressure two phase flow. They have been centred and upwind schemes to solve multiphase flow problems, most of them based on the exact or approximate solution of Riemann problems using Godunov's like methods such as Approximate Riemann solvers or Flux Splitting methods. We have studied mainly TVD schemes, Adapted TVD schemes (ATVD) and the AUSM family of schemes. Firstly we introduce the 1D two phase flow system of equations with which we will work. We consider the systems of equations more used depending on the model. Thus we introduce the homogeneous model, the isentropic model and the separated model will be treated in some detail. The evaluation of the eigenstructure of the homogeneous and the separated two phase flow is studied. Different methods to determine the eigenvalues are presented. A general method to determine the eigenvectors is studied as well. We extend different conservative schemes to two phase flow whose good behaviour in single phase has been well proved. They are basically TVD schemes, the Adapted TVD schemes developed by Gascon and Corberan and the AUSM family of schemes, firstly introduced by Steffen and Liou. Most of the extensions developed

  19. An experimental investigation of two-phase crossflow over rigidly and flexibly mounted tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhart, S.M.

    1991-12-31

    Two-phase crossflow over heat exchanger tubes induces vibrations which contribute greatly to the wear on the tubes. Of the three mechanisms leading to two-phase flow-induced vibrations which have been identified, fluid-elastic instability has been recognized as that which leads to the vibrations with the largest amplitude. The mass damping parameter is used to predict the onset of fluid-elastic instability, and the mean drag coefficient is used to calculate the mass damping parameter. In this thesis, the drag coefficient measured over single tubes and tubes within array, in single-phase and two-phase flow at various Reynolds numbers, is discussed. The drag coefficient was measured by two methods. For flexibly mounted tubes, strain gages were mounted on cantilever beams which held the tube in place and allowed it to vibrate in the direction parallel to the flow only. For both rigidly and flexibly mounted tubes, pressure distributions were measured around the perimeter of the tube. Forces, and then the drag coefficient, could be calculated from this information. The drag coefficient was not found to depend upon the flexibility of the tube mounting. As the void fraction of the flow increases, the drag coefficient over the tube increases. This effect was found to be quite large at low Reynolds numbers, and weaker at higher Reynolds numbers, and a different effect was found at very high Reynolds numbers.

  20. Two-phase flow in geothermal energy sources. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    A geothermal well consisting of single and two-phase flow sections was modeled in order to explore the variables important to the process. For this purpose a computer program was developed in a versatile form in order to be able to incorporate a variety of two phase flow void fraction and friction correlations. A parametric study indicated that the most significant variables controlling the production rate are: hydrostatic pressure drop or void fraction in the two-phase mixture; and, heat transfer from the wellbore to the surrounding earth. Downhole instrumentation was developed and applied in two flowing wells to provide experimental data for the computer program. The wells (East Mesa 8-1, and a private well) behaved differently. Well 8-1 did not flash and numerous shakedown problems in the probe were encountered. The private well did flash and the instrumentation detected the onset of flashing. A Users Manual was developed and presented in a workshop held in conjunction with the Geothermal Resources Council.

  1. Two-Phase Flow Visualization of Refrigerant Fluid at Expansion Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeo; Saito, Takayuki; Kiwata, Takahiro; Matsumura, Kazuhiko

    Recently, the noise caused by the refrigerant fluid is spotlighted due to the demand of low noise home and office air conditioners. Especially, reduction of refrigerant fluid noise and vibration noise generated from throttle in the expansion valve is becoming important. Therefore in this study it is intended to resolve fluctuating phenomena of fluid, which may be the cause of noise, by flow visualization and measurement of fluid pressure and temperature at throttle valves, focusing on two-phase flow of refrigerant fluid. A test equipment suitable for flow visualization of R410a refrigerant was developed by epoch making design and manufacturing method. Visualization was realized by laser beam irradiated on the visualization equipment and by high-speed video camera. Test conditions are set of combinations of 4 different conditions of compressor revolution and 4 different conditions of valve opening of expansion valve. As results of the following conclusions are drawn. (1)A visualization technique of throttle of expansion valve has been developed by manufacturing visualization equipment, which is most suitable to the test. (2)It has been confirmed that refrigerants is liquid and two-phase condition in the upstream of throttle, where a needle is inserted and that refrigerant fluid flow in two-phase in the downstream of throttle.

  2. Pore-scale investigation of two-phase flow using micro particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshmati, M.; Piri, M.; Stegmeir, M.

    2015-12-01

    Utilizing a two phase, two fields of view (FOV) Micro Particle Image Velocimetry (uPIV) system, simultaneous flow of oil and water in PDMS and glass porous systems are studied. We use glass and PDMS micromodels that are water- and oil-wet, respectively. They allow the study the effect of wettability on the flow. The velocity field of each phase is resolved in real-time and space using two high speed 4 MP cameras and a high repetition dual-head laser for small FOV and two 29 MP cameras and a low repetition dual-head powerful laser for the large FOV. Small FOV part of the system is used to investigate details of the flow at the pore scale and the interactions between the fluids and the medium. The large FOV is used to resolve the velocity over the entire micromodel. High-resolution micro-CT images of Bentheimer sandstone are used to construct two-dimensional. Single- and two-phase flow experiments are performed in these models. In the two-phase flow tests, imbibition and drainage experiments are carried out to obtain capillary pressure-saturation curves for different flow combinations. The velocity fields are resolved during each imbibition and drainage test and the effect of saturation of each phase on the velocity field is shown.

  3. Optical readout of a two phase liquid argon TPC using CCD camera and THGEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrokoridis, K.; Ball, F.; Carroll, J.; Lazos, M.; McCormick, K. J.; Smith, N. A.; Touramanis, C.; Walker, J.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study into the use of CCDs to image secondary scintillation light generated by THick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEMs) in a two phase LAr TPC. A Sony ICX285AL CCD chip was mounted above a double THGEM in the gas phase of a 40 litre two-phase LAr TPC with the majority of the camera electronics positioned externally via a feedthrough. An Am-241 source was mounted on a rotatable motion feedthrough allowing the positioning of the alpha source either inside or outside of the field cage. Developed for and incorporated into the TPC design was a novel high voltage feedthrough featuring LAr insulation. Furthermore, a range of webcams were tested for operation in cryogenics as an internal detector monitoring tool. Of the range of webcams tested the Microsoft HD-3000 (model no:1456) webcam was found to be superior in terms of noise and lowest operating temperature. In ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure 1 ppm pure argon gas, the THGEM gain was ≈ 1000 and using a 1 msec exposure the CCD captured single alpha tracks. Successful operation of the CCD camera in two-phase cryogenic mode was also achieved. Using a 10 sec exposure a photograph of secondary scintillation light induced by the Am-241 source in LAr has been captured for the first time.

  4. Chromatographic sample collection from two-phase (gas+liquid) flows.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Thomas J; Windom, Bret C

    2011-12-01

    A particularly challenging sample presentation in analytical chemistry is a flowing stream that consists of both a gas and liquid phase, combined with the common situation in which a reliable analysis is needed for both phases, separately. In these cases, the vapor and liquid must be physically separated (without change to either), before the individual phases can be collected and analyzed. It is not possible to analyze two-phase flows otherwise. Although the two phases are at equilibrium, it is imperative that no liquid contaminate the vapor, and no vapor be entrained in the liquid at a given temperature and pressure. In this paper, we describe a simple on-line device that can individually separate and collect the vapor and liquid phases of a two-phase flow. The apparatus, which we call P(2)SC, uses an adaptation of the branch point separator, with vapor collection done downstream in a metal bellows. The liquid collection is done in a length of Teflon tube. The separated vapor and liquid phases are then easily transferred into any desired analytical instrument with a syringe, although any sample introduction method, such as a valve, could be used as well. We discuss the application of this device with a stream of thermally stressed rocket kerosene. PMID:22036084

  5. Two-Phase Refrigerant Flow Distribution in a Multipass Evaporator with Vertical Upward Main Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Manabu; Katasuta, Masafumi

    In this article, a calculation model that enables to predict two-phaseflow distribution in a multipass evaporator is proposed. The model considers the multipass evaporator as the combination of simple elements, i. e. straight pipes and T-junctions, and utilizes the correlations to predict the pressure drop at the elements. For the T-junction, however, we have so little knowledge, especially for the small diameter T-junction, that we make some experiments to evaluate the existing correlations for the junction pressure drop. We also do not have reliable model for predicting the phase separation characteristics, so that we used the empirical equations for liquid division ratio derived in our previous papers. By this model, gas phase flow distribution to each pass is determined as it makes the pressure at the outlet of each pass equal. Calculation results well predict the previously presented experimental data that were obtained under the condition of larger quality at the header inlet. The suitableness of this model suggests that the complexity of the two-phase flow distribution in multipass tube attributes to the phase separation phenomena in dividing two-phase flow at a T-junction

  6. Development of two-phase pipeline hydraulic analysis model based on Beggs-Brill correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluyo, Joko; Hermawan, Achilleus; Indarto

    2016-06-01

    The hydraulic analysis is an important stage in a reliable pipeline design. In the implementation, fluid distribution from a source to the sinks often occurs on parallel pipeline networks. The solution to the problem is complicated because of the iterative technique requirement. Regarding its solution effectiveness, there is a need for analysis related to the model and the solution method. This study aims to investigate pipeline hydraulic analysis on distributing of two-phase fluids flow. The model uses Beggs-Brill correlation to converse mass flow rates into pressure drops. In the solution technique, the Newton-Raphson iterative method is utilized. The iterative technique is solved using a computer program. The study is carried out using a certain pipeline network. The model is validated by comparing between Beggs-Brill towards Mukherjee-Brill correlation. The result reveals that the computer program enables solving of iterative calculation on the parallel pipeline hydraulic analysis. Convergence iteration is achieved by 50 iterations. The main results of the model are mass flow rate and pressure drop. The mass flow rate is obtained in the deviation up to 2.06%, between Beggs-Brill and Mukherjee-Brill correlation. On the other hand, the pressure gradient deviation is achieved on a higher deviation due to the different approach of the two correlations. The model can be further developed in the hydraulic pipeline analysis for two-phase flow.

  7. Damping and fluidelastic instability in two-phase cross-flow heat exchanger tube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Joaquin E.

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate damping and fluidelastic instability in tube arrays subjected to two-phase cross-flow. The purpose of this research was to improve our understanding of these phenomena and how they are affected by void fraction and flow regime. The model tube bundle had 10 cantilevered tubes in a parallel-triangular configuration, with a pitch ratio of 1.49. The two-phase flow loop used in this research utilized Refrigerant 11 as the working fluid, which better models steam-water than air-water mixtures in terms of vapour-liquid mass ratio as well as permitting phase changes due to pressure fluctuations. The void fraction was measured using a gamma densitometer, introducing an improvement over the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) in terms of void fraction, density and velocity predictions. Three different damping measurement methodologies were implemented and compared in order to obtain a more reliable damping estimate. The methods were the traditionally used half-power bandwidth, the logarithmic decrement and an exponential fitting to the tube decay response. The decay trace was obtained by "plucking" the monitored tube from outside the test section using a novel technique, in which a pair of electromagnets changed their polarity at the natural frequency of the tube to produce resonance. The experiments showed that the half-power bandwidth produces higher damping values than the other two methods. The primary difference between the methods is caused by tube frequency shifting, triggered by fluctuations in the added mass and coupling between the tubes, which depend on void fraction and flow regime. The exponential fitting proved to be the more consistent and reliable approach to estimating damping. In order to examine the relationship between the damping ratio and mass flux, the former was plotted as a function of void fraction and pitch mass flux in an iso-contour plot. The results showed that damping is not independent of mass

  8. Liquid jet pumps for two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.G.

    1995-06-01

    Isothermal compression of a bubbly secondary fluid in a mixing-throat and diffuser is described by a one-dimensional flow model of a liquid-jet pump. Friction-loss coefficients used in the four equations may be determined experimentally, or taken from the literature. The model reduces to the liquid-jet gas compressor case if the secondary liquid is zero. Conversely, a zero secondary-gas flow reduces the liquid-jet gas and liquid (LJGL) model to that of the familiar liquid-jet liquid pump. A ``jet loss`` occurs in liquid-jet pumps if the nozzle tip is withdrawn from the entrance plane of the throat, and jet loss is included in the efficiency equations. Comparisons are made with published test data for liquid-jet liquid pumps and for liquid-jet gas compressors. The LJGL model is used to explore jet pump responses to two-phase secondary flows, nozzle-to-throat area ratio, and primary-jet velocity. The results are shown in terms of performance curves versus flow ratios. Predicted peak efficiencies are approximately 50 percent. Under sever operating conditions, LJGL pump performance curves exhibit maximum-flow ratios or cut-offs. Cut-offs occurs when two-phase secondary-flow steams attain sonic values at the entry of the mixing throat. A dimensionless number correlates flow-ratio cut-offs with pump geometry and operating conditions. Throat-entry choking of the secondary flow can be predicted, hence avoided, in designing jet pumps to hand two-phase fluids.

  9. Experimental study of a two-phase surface jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Matias; Esmaeilpour, Mehdi; Politano, Marcela S.; Carrica, Pablo M.

    2013-04-01

    Results of an experimental study of a two-phase jet are presented, with the jet issued near and below a free surface, parallel to it. The jet under study is isothermal and in fresh water, with air injectors that allow variation of the inlet air volume fraction between 0 and 13 %. Measurements of water velocity have been performed using LDV, and the jet exit conditions measured with PIV. Air volume fraction, bubble velocity and chord length distributions were measured with sapphire optical local phase detection probes. The mean free surface elevation and RMS fluctuations were obtained using local phase detection probes as well. Visualization was performed with laser-induced fluorescence. Measurements reveal that the mean free surface elevation and turbulent fluctuations significantly increase with the injection of air. The water normal Reynolds stresses are damped by the presence of bubbles in the bulk of the liquid, but very close to the free surface the effect is reversed and the normal Reynolds stresses increase slightly for the bubbly flow. The Reynolds shear stresses < {u^' } w^' } } rangle decrease when bubbles are injected, indicating turbulence attenuation, and are negative at deeper locations, as turbulent eddies shed downward carry high axial momentum deeper into the flow. Flow visualization reveals that the two-phase jet is lifted with the presence of bubbles and reaches the free surface sooner. Significant bubble coalescence is observed, leading to an increase in mean bubble size as the jet develops. The coalescence near the free surface is particularly strong, due to the time it takes the bubbles to pierce the free surface, resulting in a considerable increase in the local air volume fraction. In addition to first explore a bubbly surface jet, the comprehensive dataset reported herein can be used to validate two-phase flow models and computational tools.

  10. Two phase flow and heat transfer in porous beds under variable body forces, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evers, J. L.; Henry, H. R.

    1969-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations of a pilot model of a channel for the study of two-phase flow under low or zero gravity are presented. The formulation of dimensionless parameters to indicate the relative magnitude of the effects of capillarity, gravity, pressure gradient, viscosity, and inertia is described. The investigation is based on the principal equations of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Techniques were investigated by using a laser velocimeter for measuring point velocities of the fluid within the porous material without disturbing the flow.

  11. Precursors in two-phase detonation: Occurrence of a contact discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailovsky, Irina; Sivashinsky, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with detonation-propelled shocks (precursors) occurring in gas-permeable charges. It is shown that the basic aspects of the event may successfully be reproduced within a one-dimensional two-phase picture widely employed in the modelling of porous energetic materials. Precursor shocks are sustained by intense gasification of the solid phase, provided the ignition pressure (Pign) exceeds a certain critical level. At high enough Pign, the post-shock flow is found to acquire a contact discontinuity. Although this pattern is compatible with the associated self-similar solution, the question of the mechanism governing its formation remains open.

  12. Investigation of two phase (oil, tensid) flow in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, G.

    1980-07-01

    Capillary flow phenomena were studied. The feasibility of a crude extraction method which can increase the eventual output of existing oil wells is discussed. A gas/water solution together with other additives is pumped into the well. This solution acts on the crude trapped in permeable stone formations. The state of the trapped oil is similar to oil in a capillary tube. Using laboratory apparatus, the characteristic two phase flow resulting when the tensid solution forces the oil out of the capillary was demonstrated.

  13. Modeling of density loaded two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, A.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a mathematical model for densely loaded particle-laden flows is proposed to account for particle collisions and particle-turbulence interaction. The coupled conservation equations are based on a Eulerian scheme for the gas and a stochastic Lagrangian technique for the particles. The model was validated against the experimental data of densely loaded particle-laden jet flows. The comparison between the computational results and measurements suggested that both turbulence modulation and particle collisions are important and should be considered in an accurate analysis of dense two-phase flows.

  14. Radiation heat transfer in two-phase media

    SciTech Connect

    Adzerikho, K.S.

    1988-05-01

    The state of the art of approximate and numerical methods of the theory of radiation heat transfer is analyzed. The principles for producing engineering methods of computing the radiation heat-transfer characteristics in power plants are examined. These principles include: the integration of the transport equation, computing the radiation heat transfer in nonisothermal two-phase media bounded by emitting and reflecting surfaces, the thermal efficiency of screens as a function of the optical properties of the boundary surfaces and the furnace medium, the scattering processes, temperature distribution, and a program NOTAK in the FORTRAN-IV language.

  15. Synthesis of Galacto-oligosaccharide in Two-phase System.

    PubMed

    Gui, Li-Qiong; Wei, Dong-Zhi; Cui, Yu-Min; Yu, Jun-Tang

    1999-01-01

    35 of the total products of galacto-oligosaccharide (GOS) could be obtained from the two-phase system with cyclohexane and ethyl acetate as bulk organic phases and 15% phosphate buffer as aqueous phase. The effects of temperature pH of buffer lactose concentration galactose and glucose and the immobilization of enzyme on the synthesis of GOS were studied. It was found that the reaction temperature and initial lactose concentration didn'thave obvious effects while the addition of glucose and galactose somewhat affected the GOS yield and the GOS yields could reach 64.78% with lactase immobilized on resin D345. PMID:12136210

  16. TOPLOSS - A thermal analyzer for two-phase loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzott, Walter; Faust, Thomas; Rothmeyer, Markus

    Two phase flow cooling loops are an answer to the new thermal requirements established by future space missions which tend to larger size and higher power demand. The software package TOPLOSS simulates the thermal, fluid- and thermodynamic behavior of two and single phase cooling loops of arbitrary geometry including all relevant components. TOPLOSS structure is modular, the different loop components are modeled in separate adaptable subroutines. The fluid properties module is an improved version of GASP, a NASA-developed fluid property program. TOPLOSS is linked to the thermal network analyzer SINDA which is used to manage the thermal boundaries for the loop. An example illustrates TOPLOSS performance.

  17. Centrifugal inertia effects in two-phase face seal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, P.; Hughes, W. F.; Beeler, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified, semianalytical model has been developed to analyze the effect of centrifugal inertia in two-phase face seals. The model is based on the assumption of isothermal flow through the seal, but at an elevated temperature, and takes into account heat transfer and boiling. Using this model, seal performance curves are obtained with water as the working fluid. It is shown that the centrifugal inertia of the fluid reduces the load-carrying capacity dramatically at high speeds and that operational instability exists under certain conditions. While an all-liquid seal may be starved at speeds higher than a 'critical' value, leakage always occurs under boiling conditions.

  18. Modulating patterns of two-phase flow with electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dingsheng; Hakimi, Bejan; Volny, Michael; Rolfs, Joelle; Anand, Robbyn K.; Turecek, Frantisek; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of electro-hydrodynamic actuation to control the transition between three major flow patterns of an aqueous-oil Newtonian flow in a microchannel: droplets, beads-on-a-string (BOAS), and multi-stream laminar flow. We observed interesting transitional flow patterns between droplets and BOAS as the electric field was modulated. The ability to control flow patterns of a two-phase fluid in a microchannel adds to the microfluidic tool box and improves our understanding of this interesting fluid behavior. PMID:25379091

  19. Two-phase flow measurement based on oblique laser scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendruscolo, Tiago P.; Fischer, Robert; Martelli, Cícero; Rodrigues, Rômulo L. P.; Morales, Rigoberto E. M.; da Silva, Marco J.

    2015-07-01

    Multiphase flow measurements play a crucial role in monitoring productions processes in many industries. To guarantee the safety of processes involving multiphase flows, it is important to detect changes in the flow conditions before they can cause damage, often in fractions of seconds. Here we demonstrate how the scattering pattern of a laser beam passing a two-phase flow under an oblique angle to the flow direction can be used to detect derivations from the desired flow conditions in microseconds. Applying machine-learning techniques to signals obtained from three photo-detectors we achieve a compact, versatile, low-cost sensor design for safety applications.

  20. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    SciTech Connect

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2012-09-26

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the

  1. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2012-09-01

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini [1] is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the

  2. Separation of aqueous two-phase polymer systems in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, J. M.; Harris, J. M.; Synder, S.; Curreri, P. A.; Bamberger, S. B.; Brooks, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Phase separation of polymer systems in microgravity is studied in aircraft flights to prepare shuttle experiments. Short duration (20 sec) experiments demonstrate that phase separation proceeds rapidly in low gravity despite appreciable phase viscosities and low liquid interfacial tensions (i.e., 50 cP, 10 micro N/m). Ostwald ripening does not appear to be a satisfactory model for the phase separation mechanism. Polymer coated surfaces are evaluated as a means to localize phases separated in low gravity. Contact angle measurements demonstrate that covalently coupling dextran or PEG to glass drastically alters the 1-g wall wetting behavior of the phases in dextran-PEG two phase systems.

  3. Two-Phase Flow Simulations In a Natural Rock Fracture using the VOF Method

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  4. Lattice Boltzmann Methods to Address Fundamental Boiling and Two-Phase Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, Rizwan

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the progress made during the fourth (no cost extension) year of this three-year grant aimed at the development of a consistent Lattice Boltzmann formulation for boiling and two-phase flows. During the first year, a consistent LBM formulation for the simulation of a two-phase water-steam system was developed. Results of initial model validation in a range of thermo-dynamic conditions typical for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) were shown. Progress was made on several fronts during the second year. Most important of these included the simulation of the coalescence of two bubbles including the surface tension effects. Work during the third year focused on the development of a new lattice Boltzmann model, called the artificial interface lattice Boltzmann model (AILB model) for the 3 simulation of two-phase dynamics. The model is based on the principle of free energy minimization and invokes the Gibbs-Duhem equation in the formulation of non-ideal forcing function. This was reported in detail in the last progress report. Part of the efforts during the last (no-cost extension) year were focused on developing a parallel capability for the 2D as well as for the 3D codes developed in this project. This will be reported in the final report. Here we report the work carried out on testing the AILB model for conditions including the thermal effects. A simplified thermal LB model, based on the thermal energy distribution approach, was developed. The simplifications are made after neglecting the viscous heat dissipation and the work done by pressure in the original thermal energy distribution model. Details of the model are presented here, followed by a discussion of the boundary conditions, and then results for some two-phase thermal problems.

  5. Gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern identification by ultrasonic echoes reflected from the inner wall of a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fachun; Zheng, Hongfeng; Yu, Hao; Sun, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A novel ultrasonic pulse echo method is proposed for flow pattern identification in a horizontal pipe with gas-liquid two-phase flow. A trace of echoes reflected from the pipe’s internal wall rather than the gas-liquid interface is used for flow pattern identification. Experiments were conducted in a horizontal air-water two-phase flow loop. Two ultrasonic transducers with central frequency of 5 MHz were mounted at the top and bottom of the pipe respectively. The experimental results show that the ultrasonic reflection coefficient of the wall-gas interface is much larger than that of the wall-liquid interface due to the large difference in the acoustic impedance of gas and liquid. The stratified flow, annular flow and slug flow can be successfully recognized using the attenuation ratio of the echoes. Compared with the conventional ultrasonic echo measurement method, echoes reflected from the inner surface of a pipe wall are independent of gas-liquid interface fluctuation, sound speed, and gas and liquid superficial velocities, which makes the method presented a promising technique in field practice.

  6. Velocity gradient method for calulating velocities in an axisymmetric annular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.

    1982-01-01

    The velocity distribution along an arbitrary line between the inner and outer walls of an annular duct with axisymmetric swirling flow is calculated. The velocity gradient equation is used with an assumed variation of meridional streamline curvature. Upstream flow conditions can vary between the inner and outer walls, and an assumed total pressure distribution can be specified.

  7. Theory and tests of two-phase turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, D.G.

    1982-03-15

    Two-phase turbines open the possibility of new types of power cycles operating with extremely wet mixtures of steam and water, organic fluids, or immiscible liquids and gases. Possible applications are geothermal power, waste-heat recovery, refrigerant expansion, solar conversion, transportation turbine engines, and engine bottoming cycles. A theoretical model for two-phase impulse turbines was developed. Apparatus was constructed for testing one- and two-stage turbines (using speed decrease from stage to stage). Turbines were tested with water-and-nitrogen mixtures and Refrigerant 22. Nozzle efficiencies were 0.78 (measured) and 0.72 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures at a water/nitrogen mixture ratio of 68, by mass; and 0.89 (measured) and 0.84 (theoretical) for Refrigerant 22 expanding from 0.02 quality to 0.28 quality. Blade efficiencies (shaft power before windage and bearing loss divided by nozzle jet power) were 0.63 (measured) and 0.71 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures and 0.62 (measured) and 0.63 (theoretical) for Refrigerant 22 with a single-stage turbine, and 0.70 (measured) and 0.85 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures with a two-stage turbine.

  8. Aqueous Two Phase System Assisted Self-Assembled PLGA Microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeredla, Nitish; Kojima, Taisuke; Yang, Yi; Takayama, Shuichi; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai

    2016-06-01

    Here, we produce poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based microparticles with varying morphologies, and temperature responsive properties utilizing a Pluronic F127/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) assisted self-assembly. The PLGA polymer, when emulsified in Pluronic F127/dextran ATPS, forms unique microparticle structures due to ATPS guided-self assembly. Depending on the PLGA concentration, the particles either formed a core-shell or a composite microparticle structure. The microparticles facilitate the simultaneous incorporation of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules, due to their amphiphilic macromolecule composition. Further, due to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) properties of Pluronic F127, the particles exhibit temperature responsiveness. The ATPS based microparticle formation demonstrated in this study, serves as a novel platform for PLGA/polymer based tunable micro/nano particle and polymersome development. The unique properties may be useful in applications such as theranostics, synthesis of complex structure particles, bioreaction/mineralization at the two-phase interface, and bioseparations.

  9. Droplets formation and merging in two-phase flow microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hao; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2011-01-01

    Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i) the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution); and (ii) the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed. PMID:21731459

  10. Numerical calculation of two-phase turbulent jets

    SciTech Connect

    Saif, A.A.

    1995-05-01

    Two-phase turbulent round jets were numerically simulated using a multidimensional two-phase CFD code based on the two-fluid model. The turbulence phenomena were treated with the standard k-{epsilon} model. It was modified to take into account the additional dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy by the dispersed phase. Within the context of the two-fluid model it is more appropriate and physically justified to treat the diffusion by an interfacial force in the momentum equation. In this work, the diffusion force and the additional dissipation effect by the dispersed phase were modeled starting from the classical turbulent energy spectrum analysis. A cut-off frequency was proposed to decrease the dissipation effect by the dispersed phase when large size particles are introduced in the flow. The cut-off frequency combined with the bubble-induced turbulence effect allows for an increase in turbulence for large particles. Additional care was taken in choosing the right kind of experimental data from the literature so that a good separate effect test was possible for their models. The models predicted the experimental data very closely and they were general enough to predict extreme limit cases: water-bubble and air-droplet jets.

  11. Aqueous Two Phase System Assisted Self-Assembled PLGA Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Yeredla, Nitish; Kojima, Taisuke; Yang, Yi; Takayama, Shuichi; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai

    2016-01-01

    Here, we produce poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based microparticles with varying morphologies, and temperature responsive properties utilizing a Pluronic F127/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) assisted self-assembly. The PLGA polymer, when emulsified in Pluronic F127/dextran ATPS, forms unique microparticle structures due to ATPS guided-self assembly. Depending on the PLGA concentration, the particles either formed a core-shell or a composite microparticle structure. The microparticles facilitate the simultaneous incorporation of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules, due to their amphiphilic macromolecule composition. Further, due to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) properties of Pluronic F127, the particles exhibit temperature responsiveness. The ATPS based microparticle formation demonstrated in this study, serves as a novel platform for PLGA/polymer based tunable micro/nano particle and polymersome development. The unique properties may be useful in applications such as theranostics, synthesis of complex structure particles, bioreaction/mineralization at the two-phase interface, and bioseparations. PMID:27279329

  12. Ultrasonic wave propagation in two-phase media: Spherical inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S.; Sheu, Y. C.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering theory, recently developed via the extended method of equivalent inclusion, is used to study the propagation of time-harmonic waves in two-phase media of elastic matrix with randomly distributed elastic spherical inclusion materials. The elastic moduli and mass density of the composite medium are determined as functions of frequencies when given properties and concentration of the spheres and the matrix. Velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves in two-phase media are determined for cases of distributed spheres and localized damage. An averaging theorem that requires the equivalence of the strain energy and the kinetic energy between the effective medium and the original matrix with spherical inhomogeneities is employed to derive the effective moduli and mass density. The functional dependency of these quantities upon frequencies and concentration provides a method of data analysis in ultrasonic evaluation of material properties. Numerical results or moduli, velocity and/or attenuation as functions of concentration of inclusion material, or porosity, are graphically displayed.

  13. Rapid mixing using two-phase hydraulic focusing in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhigang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2005-03-01

    Rapid mixing is important in biomedical analysis. In this study, rapid mixing is obtained through two-phase hydraulic focusing in microchannels. Two mixing streams are focused by two sheath streams. Assuming a laminar flow in the channel, the spreading behavior of the two immiscible fluids is modeled and solved analytically. The results show that both viscosity ratio and flow rate ratio between the sheath flow and the sample flow can affect the focusing ratio. Thus, the mixing path of the sample flows can be adjusted by either viscosity ratio or flow rate ratio. Furthermore, an analytical model was proposed and solved for convective/diffusive mixing between the sample streams. According to this model, the focusing ratio is a key parameter for rapid mixing. A fully polymeric micro mixer was fabricated and tested for verification of the presented analytical models. The micromixer was fabricated by laser micromachining and adhesive bonding. The characterization results show the promising potential of mixing in microscale using two-phase hydraulic focusing. PMID:15834516

  14. Two-Phase Mass Flow Measurement Using Noise Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Robert Pugmire; Keller, Joseph George; Stephens, A. G.; Blotter, J.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a low cost, non-intrusive, mass flow measurement sensor for two-phase flow conditions in geothermal applications. The emphasis of the work to date has been on a device that will monitor two-phase flow in the above-ground piping systems. The flashing brines have the potential for excessive scaling and corrosion of exposed surfaces, which can reduce the effectiveness of any measurement device. A major objective in the work has been the development of an instrument that is less susceptible to the scaling and corrosion effects. The focus of the project efforts has been on transducer noise analysis, a technology initiated at the INEEL. A transducer sensing a process condition will have, in addition to its usual signal, various noise components superimposed upon the primary signal that can be related to flow. Investigators have proposed that this technique be applied to steam and liquid water flow mixtures where the signal from an accelerometer mounted on an external pipe surface is evaluated to determine flow rate.

  15. Ultrasonic wave propagation in two-phase media - Spherical inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S.; Sheu, Y. C.

    1984-01-01

    The scattering theory, recently developed via the extended method of equivalent inclusion, is used to study the propagation of time-harmonic waves in two-phase media of elastic matrix with randomly distributed elastic spherical inclusion materials. The elastic moduli and mass density of the composite medium are determined as functions of frequencies when given properties and concentration of the spheres and the matrix. Velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves in two-phase media are determined for cases of distributed spheres and localized damage. An averaging theorem that requires the equivalence of the strain energy and the kinetic energy between the effective medium and the original matrix with spherical inhomogeneities is employed to derive the effective moduli and mass density. The functional dependency of these quantities upon frequencies and concentration provides a method of data analysis in ultrasonic evaluation of material properties. Numerical results or moduli, velocity and/or attenuation as functions of concentration of inclusion material, or porosity, are graphically displayed.

  16. Droplets Formation and Merging in Two-Phase Flow Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hao; Duits, Michel H. G.; Mugele, Frieder

    2011-01-01

    Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i) the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution); and (ii) the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed. PMID:21731459

  17. Experimental study of phase separation in dividing two phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yong; Yang Zhilin; Xu Jijun

    1996-12-31

    Experimental study of phase separation of air-water two phase bubbly, slug flow in the horizontal T-junction is carried out. The influences of the inlet mass quality X1, mass extraction rate G3/G1, and fraction of extracted liquid QL3/QL1 on phase separation characteristics are analyzed. For the first time, the authors have found and defined pulsating run effect by the visual experiments, which show that under certain conditions, the down stream flow of the T-junction has strangely affected the phase redistribution of the junction, and firstly point out that the downstream geometric condition is very important to the study of phase separation phenomenon of two-phase flow in a T-junction. This kind of phenomenon has many applications in the field of energy, power, petroleum and chemical industries, such as the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) caused by a small break in a horizontal coolant pipe in nuclear reactor, and the flip-flop effect in the natural gas transportation pipeline system, etc.

  18. Nondestructive ultrasonic characterization of two-phase materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, K.

    1987-01-01

    The development of ultrasonic methods for the nondestructive characterization of mechanical properties of two phase engineering materials are described. The primary goal was to establish relationships between the nonlinearity parameter and the percentage of solid solution phase in two phase systems such as heat treatable aluminum alloys. The acoustoelastic constant was also measured on these alloys. A major advantage of the nonlinearity parameter over that of the acoustoelastic constant is that it may be determined without the application of stress on the material, which makes the method more applicable to inservice nondestructive characterization. The results obtained on the heat treatable 7075 and the work hardenable 5086 and 5456 aluminum alloys show that both the acoustoelastic constant and the acoustic nonlinearity parameter change considerable with the volume fraction of second phase precipitates in these aluminum alloys. A mathematical model was also developed to relate the effective acoustic nonlinearity parameter to volume fraction of second phase precipitates in an alloy. The equation is approximated to within experimental error by a linear expression for volume fractions up to approx. 10%.

  19. Aqueous Two Phase System Assisted Self-Assembled PLGA Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yeredla, Nitish; Kojima, Taisuke; Yang, Yi; Takayama, Shuichi; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai

    2016-01-01

    Here, we produce poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based microparticles with varying morphologies, and temperature responsive properties utilizing a Pluronic F127/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) assisted self-assembly. The PLGA polymer, when emulsified in Pluronic F127/dextran ATPS, forms unique microparticle structures due to ATPS guided-self assembly. Depending on the PLGA concentration, the particles either formed a core-shell or a composite microparticle structure. The microparticles facilitate the simultaneous incorporation of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules, due to their amphiphilic macromolecule composition. Further, due to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) properties of Pluronic F127, the particles exhibit temperature responsiveness. The ATPS based microparticle formation demonstrated in this study, serves as a novel platform for PLGA/polymer based tunable micro/nano particle and polymersome development. The unique properties may be useful in applications such as theranostics, synthesis of complex structure particles, bioreaction/mineralization at the two-phase interface, and bioseparations. PMID:27279329

  20. Two-phase flow effect on hybrid rocket combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jih Lung

    2009-10-01

    This study numerically explores the aerodynamic and combustion processes in a hybrid rocket combustor, under a two-phase turbulent flow environment, considering the evaporation, combustion and drag of droplet and droplet ignition criterion. The predictions of temperature, reaction mode, reactant mass fraction, velocity, oxidizer consumption, fuel regression and droplet number distribution enhance understanding of the two-phase combustion aerodynamics inside the combustor. A parametric study of the inlet spray pattern, including spray cone angle, spray injection velocity and droplet size, is performed to improve the operation of reactant mixing and higher fuel regression rate. Analytical results indicate that both the oxidizer consumption and the fuel regression increase with increasing spray cone angle and spray injection velocity in the practical range of operation. However, for stoichiometric operation, the superior spray cone angle is within 20-60°, and spray injection velocity within 20-40 m/s, under a volume-mean droplet radius of 50 μm. The power dependence of solid-fuel regression on total mass flux is found to decrease with rising of droplet mean size.

  1. End plate assembly having a two-phase fluid-filled bladder and method for compressing a fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Carlstrom, Jr., Charles M.

    2001-01-01

    An end plate assembly is disclosed for use in a fuel cell assembly in which the end plate assembly includes a housing having a cavity, and a bladder receivable in the cavity and engageable with the fuel cell stack. The bladder includes a two-phase fluid having a liquid portion and a vapor portion. Desirably, the two-phase fluid has a vapor pressure between about 100 psi and about 600 psi at a temperature between about 70 degrees C. to about 110 degrees C.

  2. Effect of design features on performance of a double-annular ram-induction combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive test program was undertaken to determine the effect of many design features such as the size and number of air scoops, and the type of diffuser airflow distribution to use to optimize performance of a double-annular ram-induction combustor of 94 cm outer diameter. Six combustor configurations were tested. It was found that a snouted double annular combustor built with 256 ram-induction air scoops with a combustor open area giving a total pressure loss of 5.0 percent at a diffuser inlet Mach number of 0.25 gave the best overall performance of the configurations tested.

  3. Theory versus experiment for the rotordynamic coefficients of annular gas seals. I - Test facility and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Nelson, C. E.; Nicks, C.; Scharrer, J.; Elrod, D.

    1985-01-01

    A facility and apparatus are described for determining the rotordynamic coefficients and leakage characteristics of annular gas seals. The coefficients and leakage characteristics of annular gas seals. The apparatus has a current top speed of 8000 cpm with a nominal seal diameter of 15.24 cmn (6 in.). The air supply unit yields a seal pressure ratio of approximately 7. An external shaker is used to excite the test rotor. The capability to independently calculate all rotordynamic coefficients at a given operating condition with one excitation frequency are discussed.

  4. Production and delivery of a fluid mixture to an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Bland, Ronald Gene; Foley, Ron Lee; Bloys, James B.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Daniel, John M.; Robinson, Ian M.; Carpenter, Robert B.

    2012-01-24

    The methods described herein generally relate to preparing and delivering a fluid mixture to a confined volume, specifically an annular volume located between two concentrically oriented casing strings within a hydrocarbon fluid producing well. The fluid mixtures disclosed herein are useful in controlling pressure in localized volumes. The fluid mixtures comprise at least one polymerizable monomer and at least one inhibitor. The processes and methods disclosed herein allow the fluid mixture to be stored, shipped and/or injected into localized volumes, for example, an annular volume defined by concentric well casing strings.

  5. Theoretical and experimental study of inverted annular film boiling and regime transition during reflood transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Lokanath

    from single tube experiments. The root mean square error in predicting the FLECHT-SEASET data is 20% whereas for single tube data it is 12%. In previous studies, the transition criterion from the IAFB to the ISFB regime is purely empirical. In this work, a theoretical stability analysis of a liquid jet co-flowing with its vapor in a tube is carried out to seek a better understanding of the underlying physics of the regime transition. The effect of heat and mass transfer at the interface is included in the stability analysis. Also, the effect of viscous force is included in the stability analysis, by employing the viscous potential flow method. The wavelength that is responsible for breakup of the liquid core in IAFB is predicted in the present analysis and is compared with the adiabatic experiments of IAFB from the literature. The effects of various controlling parameters including the relative Weber number, vapor Reynolds number, velocity ratio, density ratio and viscosity ratio of vapor and liquid are studied to understand the physics of transition. Finally a physics-based heat transfer model is proposed for heat transfer in the ISFB regime using the wavelength obtained from the stability analysis. Keywords: Inverted annular film boiling, Two-phase heat transfer, Subcooled flow film boiling, Inverted slug film boiling, Regime transition, Void fraction in post CHF regime, Rod bundle, Spacer grid, Stability, Two-phase flow, Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, Capillary instability, Co-axial jets, Viscous potential flow, Interfacial heat and mass transfer.

  6. Investigating an annular nozzle on combustion products of hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V. A.; Afonina, N. E.; Gromov, V. G.; Smekhov, G. D.; Khmelevsky, A. N.; Markov, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    Full-scale and computational experiments were used to investigate the flows in the jet thrust unit with annular nozzle and deflector in the form of a spherical segment. The used working gas was the combustion products of air mixtures with acetylene, gas-phase aviation kerosene, and natural gas. Experimental studies were carried out in a hot-shot wind tunnel in the range of stagnation pressure from 0.48 to 2.05 MPa. The calculations for the cases of combustion products outflow in terrestrial and high altitude conditions were performed with the original computer program that used the Euler and Navier-Stokes systems supplemented by equations of chemical kinetics. It was found that the thrust of the jet module with an annular nozzle at high altitude almost twice exceeds the sound nozzle thrust, but is lesser (about 25 %) than the thrust of the ideal calculated Laval nozzle; the difference therewith decreases markedly with the decrease of flight altitude and stagnation pressure.

  7. Design and construction of an experiment for two-phase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.G.; Aziz, K.

    1993-08-01

    In numerical reservoir simulation naturally fractured reservoirs are commonly divided into matrix and fracture systems. The high permeability fractures are usually entirely responsible for flow between blocks and flow to the wells. The flow in these fractures is modeled using Darcy`s law and its extension to multiphase flow by means of relative permeabilities. The influence and measurement of fracture relative permeability for two-phase flow in fractured porous media have not been studied extensively, and the few works presented in the literature are contradictory. Experimental and numerical work on two-phase flow in fractured porous media has been initiated. An apparatus for monitoring this type of flow was designed and constructed. It consists of an artificially fractured core inside an epoxy core holder, detailed pressure and effluent monitoring, saturation measurements by means of a CT-scanner and a computerized data acquisition system. The complete apparatus was assembled and tested at conditions similar to the conditions expected for the two-phase flow experiments. Fine grid simulations of the experimental setup-were performed in order to establish experimental conditions and to study the effects of several key variables. These variables include fracture relative permeability and fracture capillary pressure. The numerical computations show that the flow is dominated by capillary imbibition, and that fracture relative permeabilities have only a minor influence. High oil recoveries without water production are achieved due to effective water imbibition from the fracture to the matrix. When imbibition is absent, fracture relative permeabilities affect the flow behavior at early production times.

  8. Influence of Two-Phase Thermocapillary Flow on Cryogenic Liquid Retention in Microscopic Pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. R.; Nadarajah, A.; Chung, T. J.; Karr, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous experiments indicate that the bubble point pressure of spacecraft liquid hydrogen acquisition devices is reduced substantially when the ullage is pressurized with heated hydrogen vapor. The objective is to determine whether the two-phase thermocapillary convection arising from thermodynamic non-equilibrium along the porous surfaces of such devices could lead to this observed degradation in retention performance. We also examine why retention capability appears to be unaffected by pressurization with heated helium or direct heating through the porous structure. Computational assessments based on coupled solution of the flowfield and liquid free surface indicate that for highly wetting fluids in small pores, dynamic pressure and vapor recoil dictate surface morphology and drive meniscus deformation. With superheating, the two terms exert the same influence on curvature and promote mechanical equilibrium, but with subcooling, the pressure distribution produces a suction about the pore center-line that degrades retention. This result points to thermocapillary-induced deformation arising from condensation as the cause for retention loss. It also indicates that increasing the level of non-equilibrium by reducing accommodation coefficient restricts deformation and explains why retention failure does not occur with direct screen heating or helium pressurization.

  9. The influence of downstream passage on the flow within an annular S-shaped duct

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, T.; Arima, T.; Oana, M.

    1998-10-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations were carried out to gain a better understanding of the flow characteristics within an annular S-shaped duct, including the influence of the shape of the downstream passage located at the exit of the duct on the flow. A duct with six struts and the same geometry as that used to connect the compressor spools on the new experimental small two-spool turbofan engine was investigated. Two types of downstream passage were used. One type had a straight annular passage and the other a curved annular passage with a meridional flow path geometry similar to that of the centrifugal compressor. Results showed that the total pressure loss near the hub is large due to instability of the flow, as compared with that near the casing. Also, a vortex related to the horseshoe vortex was observed near the casing. In the case of the curved annular passage, the total pressure loss near the hub was greatly increased compared with the case of the straight annular passage, and the spatial position of this vortex depends on the passage core pressure gradient. Furthermore, results of calculation using an in-house-developed three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code with a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model were in good qualitative agreement with experimental results. According to the simulation results, a region of very high pressure loss is observed near the hub at the duct exit with the increase of inlet boundary layer thickness. Such regions of high pressure loss may act on the downstream compressor as a large inlet distortion, and strongly affect downstream compressor performance.

  10. Experimental and Analytical Study of Lead-Bismuth-Water Direct Contact Boiling Two-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitrian; Dostal, Vaclav; Takahashi, Minoru

    The characteristics of lead-bismuth(Pb-Bi)-water boiling two-phase flow were investigated experimentally and analytically using a Pb-Bi-water direct contact boiling two-phase flow loop. Pb-Bi flow rates and void fraction were measured in a vertical circular tube at conditions of system pressure 7MPa, liquid metal temperature 460°C and injected water temperature 220°C. The drift-flux model with the assumption that bubble sizes were dependent on the fluid surface tension and the density ratio of Pb-Bi to steam-water mixture was chosen and modified by the best fit to the measured void fraction. Pb-Bi flow rates were analytically estimated using balance condition between buoyancy force and pressure losses, where the buoyancy force was calculated from void fraction estimated using the modified drift-flux model. The deviation of the analytical results of the flow rates from the experimental ones was less than 10%.

  11. Stability analysis of two phase stratified flow in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagavatula, Dinesh; S, Pushpavanam

    2015-11-01

    Two phase stratified flows arise in extraction operations in microfluidic systems. It is well established that stratified flows in between two infinite plates is always unstable. However such flows are experimentally observed in micro channels. To understand this paradox we perform a linear stability analysis of stratified two phase Poiseuille flow in a rectangular duct. A two-dimensional fully developed flow through the rectangular channel is considered. The linearized equations along with the boundary conditions in primitive variable formulation are numerically solved using Chebyshev collocation method. All the primitive variables, which are the velocity and pressure fields, are retained in the linearised governing equations. Since boundary conditions for disturbance pressure do not exist, the corresponding compatibility conditions derived from the Navier-Stokes equations are collocated both at the walls and the interface. The resulting eigen-value problem is solved using a shift and invert Arnoldi algorithm. The role of different parameters such as Aspect ratio, density ratio, viscosity ratio on the stability characteristics is analyzed. The stability results are validated in the limit of large Aspect Ratios. The flow fields are sought as a combination of Chebyshev polynomials in both y and z directions. Ministry of Human Resource and Development (MHDR).

  12. Single- and two-phase flow characterization using optical fiber bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Baroncini, Virgínia H V; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Marco José; Morales, Rigoberto E M

    2015-01-01

    Single- and two-phase flow characterization using optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is presented. The sensor unit consists of the optical fiber Bragg grating positioned transversely to the flow and fixed in the pipe walls. The hydrodynamic pressure applied by the liquid or air/liquid flow to the optical fiber induces deformation that can be detected by the FBG. Given that the applied pressure is directly related to the mass flow, it is possible to establish a relationship using the grating resonance wavelength shift to determine the mass flow when the flow velocity is well known. For two phase flows of air and liquid, there is a significant change in the force applied to the fiber that accounts for the very distinct densities of these substances. As a consequence, the optical fiber deformation and the correspondent grating wavelength shift as a function of the flow will be very different for an air bubble or a liquid slug, allowing their detection as they flow through the pipe. A quasi-distributed sensing tool with 18 sensors evenly spread along the pipe is developed and characterized, making possible the characterization of the flow, as well as the tracking of the bubbles over a large section of the test bed. Results show good agreement with standard measurement methods and open up plenty of opportunities to both laboratory measurement tools and field applications. PMID:25789494

  13. Single- and Two-Phase Flow Characterization Using Optical Fiber Bragg Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Baroncini, Virgínia H.V.; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Marco José; Morales, Rigoberto E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Single- and two-phase flow characterization using optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is presented. The sensor unit consists of the optical fiber Bragg grating positioned transversely to the flow and fixed in the pipe walls. The hydrodynamic pressure applied by the liquid or air/liquid flow to the optical fiber induces deformation that can be detected by the FBG. Given that the applied pressure is directly related to the mass flow, it is possible to establish a relationship using the grating resonance wavelength shift to determine the mass flow when the flow velocity is well known. For two phase flows of air and liquid, there is a significant change in the force applied to the fiber that accounts for the very distinct densities of these substances. As a consequence, the optical fiber deformation and the correspondent grating wavelength shift as a function of the flow will be very different for an air bubble or a liquid slug, allowing their detection as they flow through the pipe. A quasi-distributed sensing tool with 18 sensors evenly spread along the pipe is developed and characterized, making possible the characterization of the flow, as well as the tracking of the bubbles over a large section of the test bed. Results show good agreement with standard measurement methods and open up plenty of opportunities to both laboratory measurement tools and field applications. PMID:25789494

  14. Thermoseparating aqueous two-phase systems: Recent trends and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Leong, Yoong Kit; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Loh, Hwei-San; Ling, Tau Chuan; Ooi, Chien Wei; Show, Pau Loke

    2016-02-01

    Having the benefits of being environmentally friendly, providing a mild environment for bioseparation, and scalability, aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) have increasingly caught the attention of industry and researchers for their application in the isolation and recovery of bioproducts. The limitations of conventional ATPSs give rise to the development of temperature-induced ATPSs that have distinctive thermoseparating properties and easy recyclability. This review starts with a brief introduction to thermoseparating ATPSs, including its history, unique characteristics and advantages, and lastly, key factors that influence partitioning. The underlying mechanism of temperature-induced ATPSs is covered together with a summary of recent applications. Thermoseparating ATPSs have been proven as a solution to the demand for economically favorable and environmentally friendly industrial-scale bioextraction and purification techniques. PMID:26447739

  15. Human interaction recognition through two-phase sparse coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Conci, N.; De Natale, Francesco G. B.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to recognize two-person interactions through a two-phase sparse coding approach. In the first phase, we adopt the non-negative sparse coding on the spatio-temporal interest points (STIPs) extracted from videos, and then construct the feature vector for each video by sum-pooling and l2-normalization. At the second stage, we apply the label-consistent KSVD (LC-KSVD) algorithm on the video feature vectors to train a new dictionary. The algorithm has been validated on the TV human interaction dataset, and the experimental results show that the classification performance is considerably improved compared with the standard bag-of-words approach and the single layer non-negative sparse coding.

  16. Advanced investigation of two-phase charge-coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosonocky, W. F.; Carnes, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of experimental two phase, charge-coupled shift registers constructed using polysilicon gates overlapped by aluminum gates was studied. Shift registers with 64, 128, and 500 stages were built and operated. Devices were operated at the maximum clock frequency of 20 MHz. Loss per transfer of less than .0001 was demonstrated for fat zero operation. The effect upon transfer efficiency of various structural and materials parameters was investigated including substrate orientation, resistivity, and conductivity type; channel width and channel length; and method of channel confinement. Operation of the devices with and without fat zero was studied as well as operation in the complete charge transfer mode and the bias charge, or bucket brigade mode.

  17. Dynamics Coefficient for Two-Phase Soil Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrana, Bogumił

    2015-02-01

    The paper investigates a description of energy dissipation within saturated soils-diffusion of pore-water. Soils are assumed to be two-phase poro-elastic materials, the grain skeleton of which exhibits no irreversible behavior or structural hysteretic damping. Description of motion and deformation of soil is introduced as a system of equations consisting of governing dynamic consolidation equations based on Biot theory. Selected constitutive and kinematic relations for small strains and rotation are used. This paper derives a closed form of analytical solution that characterizes the energy dissipation during steady-state vibrations of nearly and fully saturated poro-elastic columns. Moreover, the paper examines the influence of various physical factors on the fundamental period, maximum amplitude and the fraction of critical damping of the Biot column. Also the so-called dynamic coefficient which shows amplification or attenuation of dynamic response is considered.

  18. Application of two-phase thermosiphons in tube furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kazhdan, A.Z.; Bezrodnyi, M.K.; Baklashov, V.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two-phase (vaporizing) thermosiphons (TTS) are used in various types of heating units, including vessels used in processing hydrocarbon media. A thermosiphon is a heat transfer device and is illustrated here. In many cases, the use of TTSs can increase the level of reliability and heat capacity of a particular process unit and savings of electric energy can be achieved as is shown by the authors. It has been proposed that TTSs should be used to increase the heat capacity of tube furnaces, where the principal element is the tube coil. The authors show distribution of heat flux density around the circumference of the tube coil. Designs of tube furnaces are shown with a TTS as the shield of the product coil. Calculations show that when the TTS is used, the heat capacity of two furnaces may be increased by a factor of 1.4-1.6.

  19. A simplified model for two phase face seal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, S. Y.; Hughes, W. F.; Basu, P.; Beatty, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified quasi-isothermal low-leakage laminar model for analyzing the stiffness and the stability characteristics of two-phase face seals with real fluids is developed. Sample calculations with this model for low-leakage operations are compared with calculations for high-leakage operations, performed using the adiabatic turbulent model of Beatty and Hughes (1987). It was found that the seal characteristics predicted using the two extreme models tend to overlap with each other, indicating that the simplified laminar model may be a useful tool for seal design. The effect of coning was investigated using the simplified model. The results show that, for the same balance, a coned seal has a higher leakage rate than a parallel face seal.

  20. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The Oak Ridge

  1. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, G. A.; Trapp, J. A.

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles, thus, avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  2. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Spann, J F; Maloney, D J; Lawson, W F; Casleton, K H

    1993-04-20

    The response of two-phase droplets to intense radiant heating is studied to determine the incident power that is required for causing explosive boiling in the liquid phase. The droplets studied consist of strongly absorbing coal particles dispersed in a weakly absorbing water medium. Experiments are performed by confining droplets (radii = 37, 55, and 80 microm) electrodynamically and irradiating them from two sides with pulsed laser beams. Emphasis is placed on the transition region from accelerated droplet vaporization to droplet superheating and explosive boiling. The time scale observed for explosive boiling is more than 2 orders of magnitude longer than published values for pure liquids. The delayed response is the result of energy transfer limitations between the absorbing solid phase and the surrounding liquid. PMID:20820360

  3. Design of an advanced two-phase capillary cold plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, D. R.; Kroliczek, E. J.; Ku, J.

    1986-01-01

    The functional principles and implementation of capillary pumped loop (CPL) two phase heat transport system for various elements of the Space Station program are described. Circulation of the working fluid by the surface-tension forces in a fine-pore capillary wick is the core principle of CPL systems. The liquid, usually NH3 at the moment, is changed into a vapor by heat absorption at one end of the loop, and the vapor is carrried back along the wick by the surface tension within the wick. NASA specifications and the results of mechanical and thermal tests for prototype cold plate and the capillary pump designs are outlined. The CPL is targeted for installation on free-flying platforms, attached payloads, and power subsystem thermal control systems.

  4. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A. ); Trapp, J.A. Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  5. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A.; Trapp, J.A. |

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  6. Two-phase flow cell for chemiluminescence and bioluminescence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, J.L.; Seitz, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach to two-phase CL (chemiluminescence) measurements is reported. A magnetically stirred reagent phase is separated from the analyte phase by a dialysis membrane so that only smaller molecules can go from one phase to the other. The system is designed so that the analyte phase flows through a spiral groove on an aluminum block that is flush against the dialysis membrane. As solution flows through the spiral grove, analyte diffuses into the reagent phase where it reacts to produce light. A simple model is developed to predict how this system will behave. Experimentally, the system is evaluated by using the luminol reaction catalyzed by peroxidase, the firefly reaction, and the bacterial bioluminescence reaction. 10 references, 4 tables, 6 figures.

  7. Aligned two-phase magnets: Permanent magnetism of the future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, R.

    1994-11-01

    Micromagnetic calculations are used to investigate coercivity and energy products of magnets consisting of an aligned hard-magnetic skeleton phase and a soft-magnetic phase with high saturation magnetization. Compared to the present-day theoretical limit of 516 kJ/cu m for single-phase Nd2Fe14B, the energy product in suitable nanostructured Sm2Fe17N3/Fe65Co35 composites is predicted to be as high as 1090 kJ/cu m. The influence of the skeleton's texture and shape is discussed, and aligned nanocrystalline two-phase magnets are compared with remanence-enhanced isotropic magnets. In particular, it is shown how the nucleation-based analytical approach breaks down in the isotropic limit. Finally, we outline conceivable processing methods and discuss potential applications of 'megajoule' magnets.

  8. Tsunami Generated by a Two-Phase Submarine Debris Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, S. P.

    2012-04-01

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini (2011) is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model includes several essential physical aspects, including Mohr-Coulomb plasticity for the solid stress, while the fluid stress is modelled as a solid volume fraction gradient enhanced non-Newtonian viscous stress. The generalized interfacial momentum transfer includes the viscous drag, buoyancy, and the virtual mass. The generalized drag covers both the solid-like and fluid-like contributions, and can be applied to linear to quadratic drags. Strong couplings exist between the solid and the fluid momentum transfer. The advantage of the real two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase or quasi-two-phase models is that by considering the solid (and/or the fluid) volume fraction appropriately, the initial mass can be divided into several (even mutually disjoint) parts; a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This offers a unique and innovative opportunity within a single framework to simultaneously simulate (a) the sliding debris (or landslide), (b) the water lake or ocean, (c) the debris impact at the lake or ocean, (d) tsunami generation and propagation, (e) mixing and separation between the solid and the fluid phases, and (f) sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. The new model is applied to two-phase subaerial and submarine debris flows. Benchmark numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of the debris impact induced tsunamis are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanche and landslides. Special attention is paid to study the basic features of the debris impact to the mountain lakes or oceans. This includes the generation, amplification and propagation of the multiple

  9. Theory and tests of two-phase turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical model for two-phase turbines was developed. Apparatus was constructed for testing one- and two-stage turbines (using speed decrease from stage to stage). Turbines were tested with water and nitrogen mixtures and refrigerant 22. Nozzle efficiencies were 0.78 (measured) and 0.72 (theoretical) for water and nitrogen mixtures at a water/nitrogen mixture ratio of 68, by mass; and 0.89 (measured) and 0.84 (theoretical) for refrigerant 22 expanding from 0.02 quality to 0.28 quality. Blade efficiencies (shaft power before windage and bearing loss divided by nozzle jet power) were 0.63 (measured) and 0.71 (theoretical) for water and nitrogen mixtures and 0.62 (measured) and 0.63 (theoretical) for refrigerant 22 with a single stage turbine, and 0,70 (measured) and 0.85 (theoretical) for water and nitrogen mixtures with a two-stage turbine.

  10. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The response of two-phase droplets to intense radiant heating is studied to determine the incident power that is required for causing explosive boiling in the liquid phase. The droplets studied consist of strongly absorbing coal particles dispersed in a weakly absorbing water medium. Experiments are performed by confining droplets (radii of 37, 55, and 80 microns) electrodynamically and irradiating them from two sides with pulsed laser beams. Emphasis is placed on the transition region from accelerated droplet vaporization to droplet superheating and explosive boiling. The time scale observed for explosive boiling is more than 2 orders of magnitude longer than published values for pure liquids. The delayed response is the result of energy transfer limitations between the absorbing solid phase and the surrounding liquid.

  11. Rationale for two phase polymer system microgravity separation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. E.; Bamberger, S. B.; Harris, J. M.; Vanalstine, J.

    1984-01-01

    The two-phase systems that result when aqueous solutions of dextran and poly(ethylene glycol) are mixed at concentrations above a few percent are discussed. They provide useful media for the partition and isolation of macromolecules and cell subpopulations. By manipulating their composition, separations based on a variety of molecular and surface properties are achieved, including membrane hydrophobic properties, cell surface charge, and membrane antigenicity. Work on the mechanism of cell partition shows there is a randomizing, nonthermal energy present which reduces separation resolution. This stochastic energy is probably associated with hydrodynamic interactions present during separation. Because such factors should be markedly reduced in microgravity, a series of shuttle experiments to indicate approaches to increasing the resolution of the procedure are planned.

  12. A Two Phase Treatment of an Infected Hip Endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ciriviri, Jasmin; Talevski, Darko; Nestorovski, Zoran; Vraniskoski, Tode; Mishevska-Perchinkova, Snežana

    2015-01-01

    The revision of the two phase treatment represents a golden standard in the treatment of infected endoprosthesis. Throughout this study, the results of 21 patients with an infected hip endoprosthesis treated in two phases have been processed, with the use of an antibiotic spacer, within the period of 2009 and 2012. Thereby, a unique protocol for diagnosis and treatment of infections has been applied to all the patients, which entails a preoperational x-ray image, laboratory findings (Se, CRP), as well as a puncture aspiration with a microbiological and biochemical examination of the aspirated fragments. The operational treatment consists of: taking a sample for microbiological and histopathological diagnosis, removal of the implanted endoprosthesis, excision of the avascular and necrotic tissue and installing an antibiotic spacer. Postoperatively, the patients are treated with a parenteral application of an antibiotics based on an antibiogram, throughout a period of two weeks, and later on an oral treatment, a combination of two antibiotics, depending on the antibiogram, within the following four to six weeks. After the appeasement of the local findings and the laboratory results, a revision with a removal of the antibiotic spacer and reimplantation of an endoprosthesis - revisional or primary has been conducted on the patients, depending on the bone deficit. The functionality of the joint is graded based on the Haris Hip Score. The patients are being observed postoperatively for a period of 12 to 36 months. A definite reimplantation has been applied to 20 patients, while one patient has been treated with a resection method. The Haris Hip Score was 45 preoperatively, and 80 postoperatively. The applied protocol of the treatment of infected endoprosthesis is effective in the eradication of the infection and the final reimplantation. PMID:27442385

  13. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  14. Correct numerical simulation of a two-phase coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroshilin, A. E.; Kroshilin, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    Different models used in calculating flows of a two-phase coolant are analyzed. A system of differential equations describing the flow is presented; the hyperbolicity and stability of stationary solutions of the system is studied. The correctness of the Cauchy problem is considered. The models' ability to describe the following flows is analyzed: stable bubble and gas-droplet flows; stable flow with a level such that the bubble and gas-droplet flows are observed under and above it, respectively; and propagation of a perturbation of the phase concentration for the bubble and gas-droplet media. The solution of the problem about the breakdown of an arbitrary discontinuity has been constructed. Characteristic times of the development of an instability at different parameters of the flow are presented. Conditions at which the instability does not make it possible to perform the calculation are determined. The Riemann invariants for the nonlinear problem under consideration have been constructed. Numerical calculations have been performed for different conditions. The influence of viscosity on the structure of the discontinuity front is studied. Advantages of divergent equations are demonstrated. It is proven that a model used in almost all known investigating thermohydraulic programs, both in Russia and abroad, has significant disadvantages; in particular, it can lead to unstable solutions, which makes it necessary to introduce smoothing mechanisms and a very small step for describing regimes with a level. This does not allow one to use efficient numerical schemes for calculating the flow of two-phase currents. A possible model free from the abovementioned disadvantages is proposed.

  15. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students’ emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter, Snyder, & Artman, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter & Van Norman, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al., 2005; Stormont, Reinke, Newcomer, Darney, & Lewis, 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker, Bradshaw, Domitrovich, & Ialongo, 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS® curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs. PMID:23660973

  16. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Closed-Type Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Fujimoto, Hiromitsu

    A closed-loop two-phase thermosyphon can transport a large amount of thermal energy with small temperature differences without any external power supply. A fundamental investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics was performed experimentally and theoretically using water, ethanol and R113 as the working liquids. Heat transfer coefficients in an evaporator and a condenser, and circulation flow rates were measured experimentally. The effects of liquid fill charge, rotation angle, pressure in the loop and heat flux on the heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator and the condenser were correlated by the expressions for pool boiling and film condensation respectively. As a result, the heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were correlated by the Stephan-Abdelsalam equations within a±40% error. Theoretically, the circulation flow rate was predicted by calculating pressure, temperature, quality and void fraction along the loop. And, the comparison between the calculated and experimental results was made.

  17. Global effects of thermal conduction on two-phase media. [in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of two-phase systems of astrophysical gases which change mass between the phases is studied to see whether a steady state is ever reached. The criterion for thermal instability in a cloudy medium is derived. The evolution of the pressure and density of the intercloud medium under the combined effects of heating and radiative cooling of the intercloud gas on the one hand and evaporation and condensation of the clouds on the other is determined. The equilibrium density to which the system evolves is determined for the case when the pressure is fixed. The theory is illustrated by the case in which the intercloud gas is heated by Compton scattering in a hard radiation field and cooled by bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering.

  18. Annular bilayer magnetoelectric composites: theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingsen; Dong, Shuxiang

    2010-01-01

    The laminated bilayer magnetoelectric (ME) composites consist of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric layers are known to have giant ME coefficient due to the high coupling efficiency in bending mode. In our previous report, the bar-shaped bilayer composite has been investigated by using a magnetoelectric-coupling equivalent circuit. Here, we propose an annular bilayer ME composite, which consists of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric rings. This composite has a much lower resonance frequency of bending mode compared with its radial mode. In addition, the annular bilayer ME composite is expected to respond to vortex magnetic field as well as unidirectional magnetic field. In this paper, we investigate the annular bilayer ME composite by using impedance-matrix method and predict the ME coefficients as a function of geometric parameters of the composites. PMID:20178914

  19. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1996-01-01

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  20. A new Spool Piece for horizontal two-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monni, G.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    This works presents the characterization of a Spool Piece (SP), made up of a Classical Venturi and a Wire Mesh Sensor (WMS), that are installed in a horizontal test section, in which an air-water mixture flows. The test section consists of a horizontal Plexiglas pipe of internal diameter 19.5 mm and total length of about 7 m. The flow quality ranges from 0 to 0.73 and the superficial velocity ranges from 0.14 to 32 m/s for air and from 0.019 to 2.62 m/s for water; the pressure ranges from atmospheric pressure to 4 bar depending on the experimental conditions. The observed flow patterns are stratified-bubbly-slug/plug-annular. The instruments response is analyzed and discussed. From the signal analysis the mass flow rate of each phase is obtained. The developed model allows the evaluation of the mass flow rate with an accuracy higher than 20% in the 84% of the cases and with an accuracy higher than 10% in the 73.3% of the cases. Finally the introduction of the estimated parameters in the SP model is considered and discussed.

  1. Pressure-actuated joint system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided that includes first and second case segments mated with one another. First and second annular rubber layers are disposed inboard of the first and second case segments, respectively. The second annular rubber layer has a slot extending from the radial inner surface across a portion of its thickness to define a main body portion and a flexible portion. The flexible portion has an interfacing surface portion abutting against an interfacing surface portion of the first annular rubber layer to follow movement of the first annular rubber layer during operation of the pressure vessel. The slot receives pressurized gas and establishes a pressure-actuated joint between the interfacing surface portions. At least one of the interfacing surface portions has a plurality of enclosed and sealed recesses formed therein.

  2. A multilevel multiscale mimetic (M 3) method for two-phase flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnikov, K.; Moulton, J. D.; Svyatskiy, D.

    2008-07-01

    We describe a multilevel multiscale mimetic (M 3) method for solving two-phase flow (water and oil) in a heterogeneous reservoir. The governing equations are the elliptic equation for the reservoir pressure and the hyperbolic equation for the water saturation. On each time step, we first solve the pressure equation and then use the computed flux in an explicit upwind finite volume method to update the saturation. To reduce the computational cost, the pressure equation is solved on a much coarser grid than the saturation equation. The coarse-grid pressure discretization captures the influence of multiple scales via the subgrid modeling technique for single-phase flow recently proposed in [Yu. A. Kuznetsov. Mixed finite element method for diffusion equations on polygonal meshes with mixed cells. J. Numer. Math., 14 (4) (2006) 305-315; V. Gvozdev. discretization of the diffusion and Maxwell equations on polyhedral meshes. Technical Report Ph.D. Thesis, University of Houston, 2007; Yu. Kuznetsov. Mixed finite element methods on polyhedral meshes for diffusion equations, in: Computational Modeling with PDEs in Science and Engineering, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, in press]. We extend significantly the applicability of this technique by developing a new robust and efficient method for estimating the flux coarsening parameters. Specifically, with this advance the M 3 method can handle full permeability tensors and general coarsening strategies, which may generate polygonal meshes on the coarse grid. These problem dependent coarsening parameters also play a critical role in the interpolation of the flux, and hence, in the advection of saturation for two-phase flow. Numerical experiments for two-phase flow in highly heterogeneous permeability fields, including layer 68 of the SPE Tenth Comparative Solution Project, demonstrate that the M 3 method retains good accuracy for high coarsening factors in both directions, up to 64 for the considered models. Moreover, we demonstrate

  3. Field evidence of two-phase abrasion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Szabo, T.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Domokos, G.

    2013-12-01

    The rounded shape of river rocks is clear evidence that abrasion due to bed load transport is a significant agent for mass loss. Its contribution to downstream fining, however, is typically assumed to be negligible - as diminution trends may be explained solely by size-selective transport. A recent theory has predicted that pebble abrasion occurs in two well separated phases: in Phase 1, an intially-polyhedral pebble rounds to the shape of an inscribed ellipsoid without any change in axis dimensions; in Phase II, axis dimensions are slowly reduced. Importantly, Phase I abrasion means that an initially-blocky pebble may lose up to half its mass without any apparent change in 'size', which is only measured as the length of a single pebble axis by most field researchers. We hypothesize that field studies have significantly underestimated the importance of abrasion because they do not quantify pebble shape, and we set out to demonstrate that two-phase abrasion occurs in a natural stream. Our study examines downstream trends in pebble size and shape along a 10-km stretch of the Rio Mameyes within the Luquillo Critical Zone observatory, where volcaniclastic cobbles and boulders are transported by bed load at slopes up to 10%. The upper reaches of the stream consist of alluviated bedrock valleys that preclude sediment storage and thus minimize size-selective transport, which allows us to isolate the effects of abrasion. The lower 5 km is an alluvial river in which size-selective transport becomes operative. We quantified the shape and size of thousands of pebbles along the profile using hand and image-based techniques. The data provide the first field validation of two-phase abrasion; in the bedrock reaches, pebbles clearly evolve toward ellipsoids without any significant change in axis dimensions (rounding), while in the lower reaches pebbles slowly reduce their axis dimensions with little or no change in roundness. Results also show that shape metrics determined from

  4. Design of a Subscale Propellant Slag Evaluation Motor Using Two-Phase Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Dill, Richard A.; Purinton, David C.; Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1996-01-01

    Small pressure perturbations in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) are caused by the periodic expulsion of molten aluminum oxide slag from a pool that collects in the aft end of the motor around the submerged nozzle nose during the last half of motor operation. It is suspected that some motors produce more slag than others due to differences in aluminum oxide agglomerate particle sizes that may relate to subtle differences in propellant ingredient characteristics such as particle size distributions or processing variations. A subscale motor experiment was designed to determine the effect of propellant ingredient characteristics on the propensity for slag production. An existing 5 inch ballistic test motor was selected as the basic test vehicle. The standard converging/diverging nozzle was replaced with a submerged nose nozzle design to provide a positive trap for the slag that would increase the measured slag weights. Two-phase fluid dynamic analyses were performed to develop a nozzle nose design that maintained similitude in major flow field features with the full scale RSRM. The 5 inch motor was spun about its longitudinal axis to further enhance slag collection and retention. Two-phase flow analysis was used to select an appropriate spin rate along with other considerations, such as avoiding bum rate increases due to radial acceleration effects. Aluminum oxide particle distributions used in the flow analyses were measured in a quench bomb for RSRM type propellants with minor variations in ingredient characteristics. Detailed predictions for slag accumulation weights during motor bum compared favorably with slag weight data taken from defined zones in the subscale motor and nozzle. The use of two-phase flow analysis proved successful in gauging the viability of the experimental program during the planning phase and in guiding the design of the critical submerged nose nozzle.

  5. Airlift bioreactors: Experimental and theoretical analysis or two-phase hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Local two-phase flow measurements were obtained in a pilot-scale, external loop airlift bioreactor. The gas-liquid system was air and water; the gas phase was not recirculated. Sparging rates ranged from 1.0-8.0 cm/s, using a multiorifice, ring sparger. The axial dependence of the cross sectionally averaged gas volume fraction was determined using a track-mounted gamma densitometer. Hot-film anemometry was used to measure the radial and azimuthal dependence of the liquid velocity and turbulence for two axial riser locations. The same spatial dependence was ascertained for the gas velocity and volume fraction using resistivity probe techniques. The axial distribution of liquid phase pressure was measured with precision inclined manometers. The axial dependence of the void fraction was found to be modest. The radial dependence of the gas and liquid velocities and the void fraction was substantial, especially near the sparger. Local property changes with azimuthal position were small, and the flow may be characterized as being azimuthally symmetric. The developing flow effects were pronounced, as evidenced by the distinct changes in the radial profiles of fluid flow properties with axial position. Under certain operating conditions, liquid acceleration effects near the sparger resulted in greatly reduced slip velocities. For the two-phase riser flow, a model was developed directly from the point equations of continuity and motion, resulting in a differential, two-fluid form. Macroscopic mechanical energy balance equations were used to describe the flow in the gas-liquid separator and the downcomer. The model incorporates empirical parameters for the frictional effects only. The developing two-phase flow characteristic of airlift risers was observed to create large frictional effects at the wall.

  6. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Toumi, I.; Caruge, D.

    1997-07-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for both one and three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solvers concepts to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the paper presents the numerical method for a one dimensional hyperbolic two-fluid model including differential terms as added mass and interface pressure. This numerical solution scheme makes use of the Riemann problem solution to define backward and forward differencing to approximate spatial derivatives. The construction of this approximate Riemann solver uses an extension of Roe`s method that has been successfully used to solve gas dynamic equations. As far as the two-fluid model is hyperbolic, this numerical method seems very efficient for the numerical solution of two-phase flow problems. The scheme was applied both to shock tube problems and to standard tests for two-fluid computer codes. The second part describes the numerical method in the three dimensional case. The authors discuss also some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. Such a scheme is not implemented in a thermal-hydraulic computer code devoted to 3-D steady-state and transient computations. Some results obtained for Pressurised Water Reactors concerning upper plenum calculations and a steady state flow in the core with rod bow effect evaluation are presented. In practice these new numerical methods have proved to be stable on non staggered grids and capable of generating accurate non oscillating solutions for two-phase flow calculations.

  7. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  8. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A.; Vitoshkin, H.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-04-01

    Linear stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels to arbitrary wavenumber disturbances is studied. The problem is reduced to Orr-Sommerfeld equations for the stream function disturbances, defined in each sublayer and coupled via boundary conditions that account also for possible interface deformation and capillary forces. Applying the Chebyshev collocation method, the equations and interface boundary conditions are reduced to the generalized eigenvalue problems solved by standard means of numerical linear algebra for the entire spectrum of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors. Some additional conclusions concerning the instability nature are derived from the most unstable perturbation patterns. The results are summarized in the form of stability maps showing the operational conditions at which a stratified-smooth flow pattern is stable. It is found that for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems, the stratified flow with a smooth interface is stable only in confined zone of relatively low flow rates, which is in agreement with experiments, but is not predicted by long-wave analysis. Depending on the flow conditions, the critical perturbations can originate mainly at the interface (so-called "interfacial modes of instability") or in the bulk of one of the phases (i.e., "shear modes"). The present analysis revealed that there is no definite correlation between the type of instability and the perturbation wavelength.

  9. Diffusion path representation for two-phase ternary diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Dayananda, M A; Venkatasubramanian, R

    1986-01-01

    Several two-phase, solid-solid diffusion couples from diffusion studies in the ternary Cu-Ni-Zn, Fe-Ni-Al and Cu-Ag-Au systems were investigated for their analytical representation on the basis of characteristic path parameters. The concentration profiles were examined in terms of relative concentration variables for cross-over compositions and internal consistency. The diffusion paths delineated single or double S-shaped curves crossing the straight line joining the terminal alloy compositions once or thrice. Cross-over compositions were identified in the individual phase regions or at an interface. Based on the symmetry between the path segments on either side of cross-over compositions, the paths were analytically represented with the aid of cross-over compositions and path slopes at these compositions, considered as path parameters. Exprestion for the ratios of diffusion depth on the two sides of the Matano plane were derived in terms of cross-over compositions and the estimated ratios of diffusion depths were found to be consistent with those observed from the concentration profiles.

  10. Development of a two-phase cold plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Y.; Furukawa, M.; Ishii, Y.; Shigehara, M.; Komori, M.; Mimura, K.; Oshima, S.

    1990-03-01

    A two-phase cold plate using evaporators of grooved double-pipe type was tested in order to examine its heat transfer and hydrodynamic characteristics under practical operating conditions. Under a uniform heat load, excellent temperature uniformity of the cold plate was obtained. Under an uneven heat load, however, the temperature distributions were not uniform; they were high in active areas and low in inactive areas. It seems to be due to ineffective liquid flow through inactive pipes, which causes liquid shortage in active tubes and over-cooling by sub-cooled liquid in inactive tubes. Parallel operations with two cold plates were performed successfully, demonstrating that both temperatures were kept at the same level even under different heat loads. In a certain operating condition, the individual flow rate of the two cold plates was observed to oscillate symmetrically to each other, while total flow rate was kept constant and no anomalous behavior on heat transfer was induced. Through the tests, a design approach for the cold plate from the viewpoint of a loop control technology was obtained.

  11. Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment: Results overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, T.; Buchko, M.; Brennan, P.; Bello, M.; Stoyanof, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper focuses on the flight results of the Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment (CRYOTP), which was a Hitchhiker based experiment that flew on the space shuttle Columbia in March of 1994 (STS-62). CRYOTP tested two new technologies for advanced cryogenic thermal control; the Space Heat Pipe (SHP), which was a constant conductance cryogenic heat pipe, and the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit (BETSU), which was a cryogenic phase-change thermal storage device. These two devices were tested independently during the mission. Analysis of the flight data indicated that the SHP was unable to start in either of two attempts, for reasons related to the fluid charge, parasitic heat leaks, and cryocooler capacity. The BETSU test article was successfully operated with more than 250 hours of on-orbit testing including several cooldown cycles and 56 freeze/thaw cycles. Some degradation was observed with the five tactical cryocoolers used as thermal sinks, and one of the cryocoolers failed completely after 331 hours of operation. Post-flight analysis indicated that this problem was most likely due to failure of an electrical controller internal to the unit.

  12. Modeling of crude oil biodegradation using two phase partitioning bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Fakhru'l-Razi, A; Peyda, Mazyar; Ab Karim Ghani, Wan Azlina Wan; Abidin, Zurina Zainal; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Moeini, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, crude oil biodegradation has been optimized in a solid-liquid two phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) by applying a response surface methodology based d-optimal design. Three key factors including phase ratio, substrate concentration in solid organic phase, and sodium chloride concentration in aqueous phase were taken as independent variables, while the efficiency of the biodegradation of absorbed crude oil on polymer beads was considered to be the dependent variable. Commercial thermoplastic polyurethane (Desmopan®) was used as the solid phase in the TPPB. The designed experiments were carried out batch wise using a mixed acclimatized bacterial consortium. Optimum combinations of key factors with a statistically significant cubic model were used to maximize biodegradation in the TPPB. The validity of the model was successfully verified by the good agreement between the model-predicted and experimental results. When applying the optimum parameters, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed a significant reduction in n-alkanes and low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This consequently highlights the practical applicability of TPPB in crude oil biodegradation. PMID:24692323

  13. Cytoplasm dynamics and cell motion: two-phase flow models.

    PubMed

    Alt, W; Dembo, M

    1999-03-01

    The motion of amoeboid cells is characterized by cytoplasmic streaming and by membrane protrusions and retractions which occur even in the absence of interactions with a substratum. Cell translocation requires, in addition, a transmission mechanism wherein the power produced by the cytoplasmic engine is applied to the substratum in a highly controlled fashion through specific adhesion proteins. Here we present a simple mechano-chemical model that tries to capture the physical essence of these complex biomolecular processes. Our model is based on the continuum equations for a viscous and reactive two-phase fluid model with moving boundaries, and on force balance equations that average the stochastic interactions between actin polymers and membrane proteins. In this paper we present a new derivation and analysis of these equations based on minimization of a power functional. This derivation also leads to a clear formulation and classification of the kinds of boundary conditions that should be specified at free surfaces and at the sites of interaction of the cell and the substratum. Numerical simulations of a one-dimensional lamella reveal that even this extremely simplified model is capable of producing several typical features of cell motility. These include periodic 'ruffle' formation, protrusion-retraction cycles, centripetal flow and cell-substratum traction forces. PMID:10204394

  14. Unsteady flow analysis of a two-phase hydraulic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, N.; Kwak, M.; Lee, W. J.; Moshfeghi, M.; Chang, C.-S.; Kang, N.-W.

    2016-06-01

    Hydraulic couplings are being widely used for torque transmitting between separate shafts. A mechanism for controlling the transmitted torque of a hydraulic system is to change the amount of working fluid inside the system. This paper numerically investigates three-dimensional turbulent flow in a real hydraulic coupling with different ratios of charged working fluid. Working fluid is assumed to be water and the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model together with the VOF method are used to investigate two-phase flow inside the wheels. Unsteady simulations are conducted using the sliding mesh technique. The primary wheel is rotating at a fixed speed of 1780 rpm and the secondary wheel rotates at different speeds for simulating different speed ratios. Results are investigated for different blade angles, speed ratios and also different water volume fractions, and are presented in the form of flow patterns, fluid average velocity and also torques values. According to the results, blade angle severely affects the velocity vector and the transmitted torque. Also in the partially-filled cases, air is accumulated in the center of the wheel forming a toroidal shape wrapped by water and the transmitted torque sensitively depends on the water volume fraction. In addition, in the fully-filled case the transmitted torque decreases as the speed ration increases and the average velocity associated with lower speed ratios are higher.

  15. Screw dislocation in a two-phase isotropic thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, S. N. G.

    1982-04-01

    By using the complex potential and conformal mapping techniques, the stress field of a straight screw dislocation lying parallel to the surface of a two-phase isotropic thin film of equal thickness in each phase and a welded interface is analyzed. The solution, when reduced to a single-phase thin film, is in agreement with that derived by Liebfried and Dietze using an infinite array of image dislocations. The presence of a second phase is found to increase the magnitude of the stress components for the screw dislocation except for τxz near the interface where the effect is the reverse. The image force on the dislocation near the interface can be attractive or repulsive depending upon whether the dislocation is situated in the hard or soft phase. In the case where the dislocation is situated in the soft phase, the total image force tends to drive the screw dislocation to the surface. Furthermore, the screw dislocation is found to be unstable at the interface. The elastic solution for an interfacial dislocation becomes a special case.

  16. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  17. Particle Rotation Effects in Rarefied Two-Phase Plume Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jonathan M.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2005-05-01

    We evaluate the effects of solid particle rotation in high-altitude solid rocket exhaust plume flows, through the development and application of methods for the simulation of two phase flows involving small rotating particles and a nonequilibrium gas. Green's functions are derived for the force, moment, and heat transfer rate to a rotating solid sphere within a locally free-molecular gas, and integration over a Maxwellian gas velocity distribution is used to determine the influence of particle rotation on the heat transfer rate at the equilibrium limit. The use of these Green's functions for the determination of particle phase properties through the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method is discussed, and a procedure is outlined for the stochastic modeling of interphase collisions. As a test case, we consider the nearfield plume flow for a Star-27 solid rocket motor exhausting into a vacuum, and vary particle angular velocities at the nozzle exit plane in order to evaluate the influence of particle rotation on various flow properties. Simulation results show that rotation may lead to slightly higher particle temperatures near the central axis, but for the case considered the effects of particle rotation are generally found to be negligible.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamics stability of a streaming annular cylindrical liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.; Elazab, Samia S.; Hydia, Wafaa M.

    1997-08-01

    The instability of a streaming annular magnetized fluid jet surrounding a solid mantle subject to capillary, inertia, fluid kinetic pressure gradient and Lorentz forces has been developed for all kind of perturbations. Several recent works are recovered as limiting cases from the present result. The analytical discussion results are confirmed along with numerical and asymptotic analysis methods. The streaming has a strong destabilizing influence in hydrodynamic, magnetodynamic and hydromagnetics versions. That influence is found to be independent of the kind of perturbation and idem the stabilizing effect of the magnetic field pervaded the interior of the annular fluid jet model. An external longitudinal magnetic field is strongly stabilizing in both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric perturbation modes. An external transverse varying magnetic field is destabilizing or stabilizing according to restrictions. Large values for the parameter of the transverse field is needed so that stability due to this transverse field may arise and thence the model stability states are modified. The streaming destabilizing influence may be overcome if the intensity of the axials fields interior and exterior the model is so strong that the Alfvén magnetic velocity is much larger than the basic streaming velocity of the fluid in the unperturbed initial state.

  19. Survey of the literature applicable to two-phase natural circulation flows in the hot leg of a PWR: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, J.A.; Crowley, C.J.; Wallis, G.B.

    1986-10-01

    This report reviews the two-phase flow literature relevant to the natural circulation flow in the hot leg of a pressurized water nuclear reactor during a small break loss of coolant accident. The phenomena of interest in two-phase naural circulation flows are numerous and complex. Three technical areas were identified for individual review in this report: gas-liquid flows in straight pipes; gas-liquid flows in bends; and two-phase natural circulation in reactor geometries. The literature has been surveyed, findings summarized, and suggestions have been made as to where the findings may influence thinking and model development for the reactor situation.

  20. One-Dimensional, Two-Phase Flow Modeling Toward Interpreting Motor Slag Expulsion Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibbey, Timothy P.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum oxide slag accumulation and expulsion was previously shown to be a player in various solid rocket motor phenomena, including the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) pressure perturbation, or "blip," and phantom moment. In the latter case, such un ]commanded side accelerations near the end of burn have also been identified in several other motor systems. However, efforts to estimate the mass expelled during a given event have come up short. Either bulk calculations are performed without enough physics present, or multiphase, multidimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic analyses are performed that give a snapshot in time and space but do not always aid in grasping the general principle. One ]dimensional, two ]phase compressible flow calculations yield an analytical result for nozzle flow under certain assumptions. This can be carried further to relate the bulk motor parameters of pressure, thrust, and mass flow rate under the different exhaust conditions driven by the addition of condensed phase mass flow. An unknown parameter is correlated to airflow testing with water injection where mass flow rates and pressure are known. Comparison is also made to full ]scale static test motor data where thrust and pressure changes are known and similar behavior is shown. The end goal is to be able to include the accumulation and flow of slag in internal ballistics predictions. This will allow better prediction of the tailoff when much slag is ejected and of mass retained versus time, believed to be a contributor to the widely-observed "flight knockdown" parameter.

  1. Effects of Gravity on Cocurrent Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flows Through Packed Columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    2001-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results of research on the influence of gravity on flow pattern transitions, pressure drop and flow characteristics for cocurrent gas-liquid two-phase flow through packed columns. The flow pattern transition data indicates that the pulse flow regime exists over a wider range of gas and liquid flow rates under reduced gravity conditions compared to normal gravity cocurrent down-flow. This is illustrated by comparing the flow regime transitions found in reduced gravity with the transitions predicted by Talmor. Next, the effect of gravity on the total pressure drop in a packed column is shown to depend on the flow regime. The difference is roughly equivalent to the liquid static head for bubbly flow but begins to decrease at the onset of pulse flow. As the spray flow regime is approached by increasing the gas to liquid ratio, the effect of gravity on pressure drop becomes negligible. Finally, gravity tends to suppress the amplitude of each pressure pulse. An example of this phenomenon is presented.

  2. Heat Transfer in a Two-Phase Closed-Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji

    A two-phase closed-loop thermosyphon is a device which transports heat energy from a heat source to a sink under the body force field and has many practical applications. The critical heat flux of this thermosyphon is larger than that of a non-loop thermosyphon, because the flooding phenomenon occurring in the no-loop one does not occur. In addition, there is another merit that the evaporator and the condencer can be installed in comparatively arbitrary position because these are interconnected by piping. In most previous investigations of the two-phase closed-loop thermosyphons, overall heat resistances were measured. The overall heat resistance, however, consists of three heat resistances; the heat resistances in the evaporator and the condenser, and the transport resistance in the interconnecting pipe. Therefore, we should consider these heat resistances separately. In the present study, we took note of the heat resistances (or heat transfer coefficients) of the evaporator and the condenser. The experiment was performed using two experimental setups and three kinds of test liquid. And, the effects of rotation angle, heat flux, inside temperature (or inside pressure) and liquid charge on the heat transfer coefficients were investigated.

  3. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Horie, Yoshiatsu; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy from a heat source to a heat sink by natural convective circulation under a body force field without any external power supply such as a pump. It is, therefore, thought that this could be applied to an energy-saving heat transportation system, and so forth. In practical use, an evaporator has several heated tubes and also the heat supplied to each of the heated tubes is not always equal. Therefore, the present study was performed both experimentally and theoretically on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in the two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with the evaporator with three heated tubes as a comparatively simple multi-tube evaporator in the lower part of the loop. The circulation mass flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, as well as the heat transfer coefficients in the heated tubes were measured using water, ethanol and benzene, on which the effects of subcooling at the evaporator inlet and a heat input ratio of the three heated tubes were examined, and the experimental data were compared with the theoretically calculated results.

  4. Development of a prototype two-phase thermal bus system for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myron, D. L.; Parish, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the basic elements of a pumped two-phase ammonia thermal control system designed for microgravity environments, the development of the concept into a Space Station flight design, and design details of the prototype to be ground-tested in the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Thermal Test Bed. The basic system concept is one of forced-flow heat transport through interface heat exchangers with anhydrous ammonia being pumped by a device expressly designed for two-phase fluid management in reduced gravity. Control of saturation conditions, and thus system interface temperatures, is accomplished with a single central pressure regulating valve. Flow control and liquid inventory are controlled by passive, nonelectromechanical devices. Use of these simple control elements results in minimal computer controls and high system reliability. Building on the basic system concept, a brief overview of a potential Space Station flight design is given. Primary verification of the system concept will involve testing at JSC of a 25-kW ground test article currently in fabrication.

  5. Second-law-based thermoeconomic optimization of two-phase heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Zubair, S.M. ); Kadaba, P.V.; Evans, R.B. )

    1987-05-01

    This paper presents a closed-form analytical method for the second-law-based thermoeconomic optimization of two-phase heat exchangers used as condensers or evaporators. The concept of internal economy as a means of estimating the economic value of entropy generated (due to finite temperature difference heat transfer and pressure drops) has been proposed, thus permitting the engineer to trade the cost of entropy generation in the heat exchanger against its capital expenditure. Results are presented in terms of the optimum heat exchanger area as a function of the exit/inlet temperature ratio of the coolant, unit cost of energy dissipated, and the optimum overall heat transfer coefficient. The total heat transfer resistance represented by (1/U = C1 + C2 Re{sup {minus}n}) in the present analysis is patterned after Wilson (1915) which accommodates the complexities associated with the determination of the two-phase heat transfer coefficient and the buildup of surface scaling resistances. The analysis of a water-cooled condenser and an air-cooled evaporator is presented with supporting numerical examples which are based on the thermoeconomic optimization procedure of this paper.

  6. Thermal effects in two-phase flow through face seals. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Prithwish

    1988-01-01

    When liquid is sealed at high temperature, it flashes inside the seal due to pressure drop and/or viscous heat dissipation. Two-phase seals generally exhibit more erratic behavior than their single phase counterparts. Thermal effects, which are often neglected in single phase seal analyses, play an important role in determining seal behavior under two-phase operation. It is necessary to consider the heat generation due to viscous shear, conduction into the seal rings and convection with the leakage flow. Analytical models developed work reasonably well at the two extremes - for low leakage rates when convection is neglected and for higher leakage rates when conduction is neglected. A preliminary model, known as the Film Coefficient Model, is presented which considers conduction and convection both, and allows continuous boiling over an extended region unlike the previous low-leakage rate model which neglects convection and always forces a discrete boiling interface. Another simplified, semi-analytical model, based on the assumption of isothermal conditions along the seal interafce, has been developed for low leakage rates. The Film Coefficient Model may be used for more accurate and realistic description.

  7. Effective parameters for two-phase flow in a porous medium with periodic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataie-Ashtiani, B.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Oostrom, M.; Celia, M. A.; White, M. D.

    2001-05-01

    Computational simulations of two-phase flow in porous media are used to investigate the feasibility of replacing a porous medium containing heterogeneities with an equivalent homogeneous medium. Simulations are performed for the case of infiltration of a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in a water-saturated, heterogeneous porous medium. For two specific porous media, with periodic and rather simple heterogeneity patterns, the existence of a representative elementary volume (REV) is studied. Upscaled intrinsic permeabilities and upscaled nonlinear constitutive relationships for two-phase flow systems are numerically calculated and the effects of heterogeneities are evaluated. Upscaled capillary pressure-saturation curves for drainage are found to be distinctly different from the lower-scale curves for individual regions of heterogeneity. Irreducible water saturation for the homogenized medium is found to be much larger than the corresponding lower-scale values. Numerical simulations for both heterogeneous and homogeneous representations of the considered porous media are carried out. Although the homogenized model simulates the spreading behavior of DNAPL reasonably well, it still fails to match completely the results form the heterogeneous simulations. This seems to be due, in part, to the nonlinearities inherent to multiphase flow systems. Although we have focussed on a periodic heterogeneous medium in this study, our methodology is applicable to other forms of heterogeneous media. In particular, the procedure for identification of a REV, and associated upscaled constitutive relations, can be used for randomly heterogeneous or layered media as well.

  8. Simulation of two-phase flow through porous media using the finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    A finite-element model of two-phase flow of air and water movement through porous media was developed. The formulation for radial flow used axisymmetric linear triangular elements. Due to the radial nature of the problem, a two-dimensional formulation was used to represent three-dimensional space. Governing equations were based on Darcy's equation and continuity. Air was treated as a compressible fluid by using the Ideal Gas Law. A gravity-driven saturated-flow problem was modeled and the predicted flow rate exactly matched the analytical solution. Comparisons of analytical and experimental results of one-phase radial and vertical flow were made in which capillary pressure distributions were almost exactly matched by the two-phase model (TPM). The effect of air compression on infiltration was simulated. It was concluded that the TPM modeled air compression and its inhibiting effect on infiltration even though air counter flow through the surface boundary was not permitted. The difficulty in describing the boundary conditions for air at a boundary where infiltration occurred was examined. The effect of erroneous input data for the soil moisture characteristic curve and the relative permeability curve was examined.

  9. Investigation on Two-phase Flow Dynamics with Discrete Bubble Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, Takeyuki; Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Shoji, Masahiro

    Conventional modeling including drift-flux model and two-fluid model is based on “continuous flow hypothesis”, being constructed by time-averaging, and thus both phases are defined in every spatio-temporal space. This makes it possible to apply to a variety of two-phase flow dynamics, while the intrinsic void fraction fluctuations, typically observed in slug and churn flows, are hardly simulated. In order to break through such a problem caused by time-averaging, discrete bubble model based on one-dimensional mass conservation equation, i.e. void propagation equation, has been developed. This model takes into account, as momentum effects, the wake effect induced by preceding bubbles, the local pressure fluctuation and the compressibility of gas phase together with the phase re-distribution due to geometrical constrains. Thus obtained spatio-temporal fluctuation characteristics of void fraction well simulated inherent two-phase behavior not only in a steady flow but also in an oscillatory flow.

  10. Numerical simulation of gas-solid two-phase flow in U-beam separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. Y.; Zhang, H. Z.; Chen, X. P.; Ruan, J. M.; Dou, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation is carried out for gas-solid two-phase flow in a U-beam separator. In this study, the U-beam is altered with the inlet fins in order to improve the performance of the separator. The inlet fin angle of the separator are 30°, 35°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55 ° and 60°. The governing equations are the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with the standard k-epsilon model and the discrete phase model (DPM) describing the discrete two - phase flow as well as stochastic tracking model. Results show that the pressure drop deviation with fins is within 3% from those without fins. It is found that there is a maximum separation efficiency at the fin angle of 35°. Fin induces generation of a stagnation region which could collect particles and lead to change of vortical structures. The fin induced flow also causes the turbulent intensity inside the baffle to decrease to facilitate separation.

  11. Volume-Of-Fluid Simulation for Predicting Two-Phase Cooling in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorle, Catherine; Parida, Pritish; Houshmand, Farzad; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    Two-phase flow in microfluidic geometries has applications of increasing interest for next generation electronic and optoelectronic systems, telecommunications devices, and vehicle electronics. While there has been progress on comprehensive simulation of two-phase flows in compact geometries, validation of the results in different flow regimes should be considered to determine the predictive capabilities. In the present study we use the volume-of-fluid method to model the flow through a single micro channel with cross section 100 × 100 μm and length 10 mm. The channel inlet mass flux and the heat flux at the lower wall result in a subcooled boiling regime in the first 2.5 mm of the channel and a saturated flow regime further downstream. A conservation equation for the vapor volume fraction, and a single set of momentum and energy equations with volume-averaged fluid properties are solved. A reduced-physics phase change model represents the evaporation of the liquid and the corresponding heat loss, and the surface tension is accounted for by a source term in the momentum equation. The phase change model used requires the definition of a time relaxation parameter, which can significantly affect the solution since it determines the rate of evaporation. The results are compared to experimental data available from literature, focusing on the capability of the reduced-physics phase change model to predict the correct flow pattern, temperature profile and pressure drop.

  12. Two-phase flow numerical simulation of infiltration and groundwater drainage in a rice field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugomela, G. V.

    Farming of rice normally uses a substantially larger amount of water than other cereal grain crops mainly due to the traditional flooding of rice fields. Flooding of the fields result in a seepage flow condition whereby infiltration occurs at a potential rate. The potential infiltration rate obstructs the free movement of pore-air through the ground surface and gradually compresses the pore-air between the infiltrating wetting front and the groundwater table under which subsurface drains are installed. The Galerkin finite element method (FEM) simulation of two-phase flow of air and water in the porous media of the rice field shows that the subsequent increase in the pore-air pressure makes the pore-air act as a link phase which transfers the effects of the processes taking place in the wetting front above and the saturated zone below the groundwater table. This phenomenon is clearly demonstrated when the results of the two-phase flow simulation are compared to the corresponding single-phase flow simulation which neglects the effect of the pore-air. It is concluded that the ‘ponding’ which appears in rice fields can partly be explained by the resistance offered by the pore-air to the percolation process. The study demonstrates that flooding of rice fields during most of its growth time is not necessary rather it is enough to keep the ground surface just saturated and the rest of the water can be saved.

  13. Efficiency Enhancement of Chiller and Heat Pump Using Natural Working Fluids with Two-phase Flow Ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Choiku; Hattori, Kazuhiro; Jeong, Jongsoo; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao

    An ejector can transform the expansion energy of the driving flow into the pressure build-up energy of the suction flow. Therefore, by utilizing the ejector instead of the expansion valve for the absorption and the compression cycle, the performance of the refrigerator can be greatly improved. Until now, many studies have been conducted with regard to the single-phase flow ejector. But, single or two component two-phase flow ejector which needs for the compression and absorption cycle has not been examined sufficiently. This paper constructs the simulation model of single and two component two-phase flow ejector and investigates the characteristics of that ejector by the simulation. Working fluids are ammonia, CO2 and ammonia-water mixture. As a result, the optimum mixing section inlet pressure exists to maximize the performance of the ejector. And the ejector performance is analyzed in detail.

  14. The Effect of Subcooling on the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Doi, Kyoji; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon is used as a heat transfer device in an energy-saving heat transportation system and so forth, because it transports thermal energy without any external power supply such as a pump under a body force field. We previously performed a fundamental study on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in a two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with a single heated tube evaporator both experimentally and theoretically which was made under the condition of near saturation temperature of liquid in a reservoir. In the present study, the effects of liquid subcooling and the heat input on the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions, and heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were examined experimentally using water, ethanol, benzene and Freon 113 as the working fluids. On the other hand, the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions were theoretically calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  15. Dimension-optimizing design method for annular-type cooling channel of thrust chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie

    1995-05-01

    The new-generation liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant liquid fuel rocket engine will use a high-pressure combustion chamber arrangement. In this case, cooling the thrust chamber becomes a key technical problem. The article presents a design scheme for the geometric-dimension optimization of annular-type regenerative cooling channels. The aim of the optimization is minimum pressure losses as coolant passes through the cooling channel. As shown in typical computations and experiments, application of this optimizing design method can reduce 50 percent of pressure losses. In other words, the optimization design is advantageous in solving the cooling problem in high-pressure thrust chambers.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Two-Phase Flow in Rock Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Malama, Bwalya; Howard, Clifford L.

    2014-07-01

    This Test Plan describes procedures for conducting laboratory scale flow tests on intact, damaged, crushed, and consolidated crushed salt to measure the capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. The primary focus of the tests will be on samples of bedded geologic salt from the WIPP underground. However, the tests described herein are directly applicable to domal salt. Samples being tested will be confined by a range of triaxial stress states ranging from atmospheric pressure up to those approximating lithostatic. Initially these tests will be conducted at room temperature, but testing procedures and equipment will be evaluated to determine adaptability to conducting similar tests under elevated temperatures.

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Two-Phase Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Christopher James

    This thesis, comprised of two parts, deals with the flow of suspensions. Part I concerns specifically with the stability of a single drop translating through a quiescent, unbounded suspending fluid at low Reynolds number. The evolution of the shape of an initially nonspherical drop as it translates is studied numerically and experimentally. For finite capillary numbers, it is shown that the drop reverts to a sphere provided that the initial deformation is small enough. However, beyond certain critical initial deformation, the drop deforms continuously. For initially prolate shapes, the drop elongates with the formation of a tail; for initially oblate shapes, the drop flattens with the formation of a cavity at its rear. Experiments extend the numerical results. It is found that initially unstable prolate drops break up into multiple droplets, while initially unstable oblate drops deform in double-emulsion drops. Part II of this thesis considers the flow of high concentration solid suspensions through a rectangular channel. By adapting the well-known Laser Doppler Anemometry, an experimental technique is developed to measure the velocity as well as particle volume fraction of the suspension. A crucial element in these experiments is the reduction of the optical turbidity of the suspension. To accomplish this goal, a systematic method based on refractive-index-matching of the two phases is employed. Experimental results show that the velocity profile is blunted while the concentration profile has a maximum near the center. The qualitative features of the experimental data compare reasonably well with theoretical predictions based on the shear-induced particle migration theory.

  18. Two-phase Flow Characteristics in a Gas-Flow Channel of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Chan

    patterns are obtained optically and two-phase pressure drop is measured experimentally. Cross-sectional view of two-phase flow is visualized in simplified circumstance to understand liquid-phase location in gas flow channels. Various surfaces on the GDL side are examined and are compared. The two-phase friction multipliers (pressure drop) predicted by two model groups are compared showing a good agreement for the cases with low liquid flow rate. Optimization of one relative permeability correlation is presented. Theoretical analysis is also presented to examine the relative permeability correlation for annulus flow. Real-time pressure drops are presented to show the effect of flow patterns on pressure drop. This work presents analytical results for droplet deformation, criteria for droplet detachment, and compares empirical and physical two-phase flow models for the gas flow channel of PEM fuel cells. These fundamentals are important for channel design, fuel cell diagnostic, water management, and understanding of two-phase flow in PEM fuel cells.

  19. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine.

  20. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine. Previously announced in STAR as N83-21896