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Sample records for pressure dbp readings

  1. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Aug 17,2016 Blood pressure is typically ... Your doctor should evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare ...

  2. Measurement of arm blood pressure using different oscillometry manometers compared to auscultatory readings.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Majid; Rotenberg, Daniel Kaminski; Nielsen, Jesper Kent; Wiinberg, Niels; Nielsen, Poul Ebbe

    2003-01-01

    Five different semiautomatic manometers were tested, where oscillometry is the measuring principle. Three of the manometers (Omron R4, A&D UB 322 and Braun) were wrist manometers, where the occluding cuff is placed around the volar surface of the wrist. Two of the manometers (A&D UA 777 and Omron M4) measure on the upper arm. The investigation included 72 patients with systolic blood pressure (SBP) ranging between 110 and 200, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between 62 and 114 mmHg. Forty-five of the subjects were on antihypertensive medication when the manometer tests were carried out. Each of the manometers was tested with double measurements of blood pressure against 2 x 2 auscultatory measurements done before and after the semiautomatic readings. The auscultatory measurements are all performed by the same observer, who was blinded for the measurements with semiautomatic manometers. The mean difference between the oscillometric recordings compared to auscultatory measurements varied from +1.2 to -8.5 mmHg for SBP and from -0.5 to -8.3 mmHg for DBP. However, the interindividual differences varied considerable with standard deviation of the difference varying from 8 to 18 mmHg for SBP with the highest values for wrist manometers. Concerning DBP, the standard deviation of difference for all five manometers was between 6 and 8 mmHg, with the highest values for wrist manometers. None of the tested manometers fulfilled the criteria for grading A or B in the previously introduced grading by the British Hypertension Society. To conclude, the upper-arm manometers have a measuring accuracy for SBP a little higher than that of the wrist manometers, while there is no bigger difference in the measuring accuracy of DBP. The most important point is that the measuring accuracy in a single patient is unpredictable. If home readings are prepared, a test of the accuracy against auscultatory recordings should be done in every single patient. In the clinical wards, it is

  3. Real-Time Detection of Dust Devils from Pressure Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri

    2009-01-01

    A method for real-time detection of dust devils at a given location is based on identifying the abrupt, temporary decreases in atmospheric pressure that are characteristic of dust devils as they travel through that location. The method was conceived for use in a study of dust devils on the Martian surface, where bandwidth limitations encourage the transmission of only those blocks of data that are most likely to contain information about features of interest, such as dust devils. The method, which is a form of intelligent data compression, could readily be adapted to use for the same purpose in scientific investigation of dust devils on Earth. In this method, the readings of an atmospheric- pressure sensor are repeatedly digitized, recorded, and processed by an algorithm that looks for extreme deviations from a continually updated model of the current pressure environment. The question in formulating the algorithm is how to model current normal observations and what minimum magnitude deviation can be considered sufficiently anomalous as to indicate the presence of a dust devil. There is no single, simple answer to this question: any answer necessarily entails a compromise between false detections and misses. For the original Mars application, the answer was sought through analysis of sliding time windows of digitized pressure readings. Windows of 5-, 10-, and 15-minute durations were considered. The windows were advanced in increments of 30 seconds. Increments of other sizes can also be used, but computational cost increases as the increment decreases and analysis is performed more frequently. Pressure models were defined using a polynomial fit to the data within the windows. For example, the figure depicts pressure readings from a 10-minute window wherein the model was defined by a third-degree polynomial fit to the readings and dust devils were identified as negative deviations larger than both 3 standard deviations (from the mean) and 0.05 mbar in magnitude. An

  4. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  5. The effect of the first office blood pressure reading on hypertension-related clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Oladipo, Idris; Ayoade, Adedokun

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the first office blood pressure reading (FBPR) on hypertension-related decisions was evaluated using blood pressure (BP) readings taken with the BpTRU BPM-100 device. BP readings were grouped into three pairs: (1) single readings (first and second readings), (2) computed average of three readings (one including and one excluding the first reading), and (3) computed average of five readings (one including and one excluding the first reading). Categorisation of BP readings under JNC-7 classes and distribution into < 140/90 and ≥ 140/90 mmHg groups were selected as parameters guiding hypertension-related decisions. Readings including FBPR had strong positive correlations to those excluding FBPR (Pearson's correlation coefficient ranged from 0.86-1.00). Also, FBPR-included and FBPR-excluded readings did not differ statistically in JNC-7 categorisation or distribution into < 140/90 or ≥ 140/90 mmHg groups. Our findings suggest that exclusion of FBPR may have no significant impact on hypertension-related clinical decisions. PMID:23044502

  6. Genomic structure of the human D-site binding protein (DBP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Shutler, G.; Glassco, T.; Kang, Xiaolin

    1996-06-15

    The human gene for the D-Site Binding Protein (DBP) has been sequenced and characterized. This gene is a member of the b/ZIP family of transcription factors and is one of three genes forming the PAR sub-family. DBP has been implicated in the diurnal regulation of a variety of liver-specific genes. Examination of the genomic structure of DBP reveals that the gene is divided into four exons and is contained within a relatively compact region of approximately 6 kb. These exons appear to correspond to functional divisions the DBP protein. Exon 1 contains a long 5{prime} UTR, and conservation between the rat and the human genes of the presence of small open reading frames within this region suggests that is may play a role in translational control. Exon 2 contains a limited region of similarity to the other PAR domain genes, which may be part of a potential activation domain. Exon 3 contains the PAR domain and differs by only 1 of 71 amino acids between rat and human. Exon 4, containing both the basic and the leucine zipper domains, is likewise highly conserved. The overall degree of homology between the rat and the human cDNA sequences is 82% for the nucleic acid sequence and 92% for the protein sequence. comparison of the rat and human proximal promoters reveals extensive sequence conservation, with two previously characterized DNA binding sites being conserved at the functional and sequence levels. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  7. DBP formation of aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomes, M.L.; Green, W.R.; Thurman, E.M.; Orem, W.H.; Lerch, H.E.

    1999-01-01

    Aquatic humic substances (AHSs) in water generate potentially harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) such as haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs) during chlorination. AHSs from two Arkansas reservoirs were characterized to define source, identify meta-dihydroxybenzene (m-DHB) structures as probable DBP precursors, and evaluate predicted HAA and THM formation potentials. Elemental nitrogen content 0.5 ??eq/mg, ??13C values of -27???, and low yields of syringyl phenols found by cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation suggest a pine tree source for the AHSs found in the Maumelle and Winona reservoirs in Little Rock, Ark. CuO oxidation yielded fewer m-DHB structures in Maumelle AHSs than in Winona AHSs. A higher 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,5-DHBA) content correlated with increased HAA and THM formation potential. The 3,5-DHBA concentration in Winona AHSs was similar to the range found in AHSs extracted from deciduous leaf litter, twigs, and grass leachates.

  8. The control of N-DBP and C-DBP precursors with MIEX®.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiaojie; Karanfil, Tanju; Kaplan Bekaroglu, S Sule; Shan, Junhong

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of Magnetic Ion Exchange (MIEX(®)) technology for removing nitrogenous disinfection byproduct (N-DBP) precursors while minimizing carbonaceous DBP (C-DBP) precursors in (i) surface waters, and (ii) effluent impacted waters. Samples were collected from several drinking water source waters and wastewater treatment plant effluents. The effluent impacted source waters were simulated in the laboratory by mixing treated wastewater effluents with the same source water. Formation potential (FP) tests were conducted for regulated trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), and selected N-DBPs (nitrosamines and halonitromethanes (HNMs)) before and after the MIEX(®) treatment. The MIEX(®) process substantially lowered UV absorbance, total organic carbon, and THM and HAA FPs in all examined water samples, ranging from 39 to 87% reduction. A relatively small portion (9-33%) of HNM precursors was removed by the MIEX(®) treatment. On the other hand, an increase in N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) FP was observed after the MIEX(®) process but only for the effluent impacted waters. Soluble metals, inorganic nitrogen, and bromide in effluent impacted waters did not correlate with the increase in NDMA FP. There was no effect of MIEX(®) treatment on the removal of other nitrosamine species precursors. Simulations of typical water treatment and distribution systems scenarios showed that NDMA concentrations remained below 10 ng/L, when chlorine alone or 40 min chlorine contact time prior to ammonia addition were employed for post-disinfection. However, when chlorine and ammonia were added simultaneously, NDMA concentration reached 36 ng/L for the water tested in the study. PMID:23286988

  9. Reading pulmonary vascular pressure tracings. How to handle the problems of zero leveling and respiratory swings.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor; Avian, Alexander; Pienn, Michael; Naeije, Robert; Olschewski, Horst

    2014-08-01

    The accuracy of pulmonary vascular pressure measurements is of great diagnostic and prognostic relevance. However, there is variability of zero leveling procedures, and the current recommendation of end-expiratory reading may not always be adequate. A review of physiological and anatomical data, supported by recent imaging, leads to the practical recommendation of zero leveling at the cross-section of three transthoracic planes, which are, respectively midchest frontal, transverse through the fourth intercostal space, and midsagittal. As for the inevitable respiratory pressure swings, end-expiratory reading at functional residual capacity allows for minimal influence of elastic lung recoil on pulmonary pressure reading. However, hyperventilation is associated with changes in end-expiratory lung volume and increased intrathoracic pressure, eventually exacerbated by expiratory muscle contraction and dynamic hyperinflation, all increasing pulmonary vascular pressures. This problem is amplified in patients with obstructed airways. With the exception of dynamic hyperinflation states, it is reasonable to assume that negative inspiratory and positive expiratory intrathoracic pressures cancel each other out, so averaging pulmonary vascular pressures over several respiratory cycles is most often preferable. This recommendation may be generalized for the purpose of consistency and makes sense, as pulmonary blood flow measurements are not corrected for phasic inspiratory and expiratory changes in clinical practice. PMID:24869464

  10. Dbp5, Gle1-IP6 and Nup159

    PubMed Central

    Folkmann, Andrew W.; Noble, Kristen N.; Cole, Charles N.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression is a stepwise process involving distinct cellular processes including transcription, mRNA (mRNA) processing, mRNA export, and translation. As mRNAs are being synthesized, proteins associate with the RNA to form messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs). Previous studies have demonstrated that the RNA-binding protein composition of these mRNPs is dynamic, changing as the mRNP moves through the different steps of gene expression, and playing a critical role in these events. An important step during this maturation process occurs at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) where the export protein Gle1 bound to inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) spatially activates the ATP-hydrolysis and mRNP-remodeling activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5. Recent work from our laboratory and others has provided important insights into the function and regulation of Dbp5. These include a more detailed explanation of the mechanism of Dbp5 RNP remodeling, the role of Gle1-IP6 in stimulating Dbp5 ATPase activity, and the identification of a novel paradigm for regulation of Dbp5 by Nup159. Based on in vitro biochemical assays, X-ray crystallography, and corresponding in vivo phenotypes, we propose here an updated model of the Dbp5 cycle during mRNP export through the NPC. This takes into account all available data and provides a platform for future studies. PMID:22064466

  11. Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulford, Jeremy, Ed.

    1971-01-01

    A collection of articles reflecting the underlying concern of British contributors with continuity--conceiving reading and learning as a whole throughout the school years--comprises this special issue of "English in Education." Specific topics treated are: "What Children Learn in Learning to Read" by R. Morris; "Reading without Primers" by W.…

  12. Quality control of the blood pressure phenotype in the Gaoyou population study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Chao; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Odili, Augustine N; Yao, Wen-Ming; Gong, Lei; Zhou, Yan-Li; Zhou, Fang; Yang, Rong; Sheng, Yan-Hui; Xu, Dong-Jie; Kong, Xiang-Qing; Staessen, Jan A; Li, Xin-Li

    2016-06-01

    The Korotkoff approach is the only blood pressure (BP) measurement technique that allows contemporary data to be compared with decades of research. We randomly recruited 4483 people (53.3% women; mean age 52.1 years) from Gaoyou County, Jiangsu Province, China. Nine observers recorded the participants™ BP three times consecutively following Chinese Society of Hypertension guidelines. We assessed the BP phenotype based on five criteria: completeness of readings, percentage of identical BP readings, odd BP readings, end-digit preference and trends in BP from the first to the third reading. The proportion of participants with identical readings were 2.0% and 3.1% for systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), respectively. Among 26,898 BP values, 0.3% ended in an odd number. Among observers, the prevalence of identical readings varied from 0% to 5.3% for SBP and from 0% to 6.8% for DBP. Compared with the expected frequency of 20%, those ending in 0 had a lower frequency (17.2%; p < 0.001), whereas those ending in 8 had a higher frequency (22.4%; p < 0.001). From the first to the third measurement, SBP and DBP decreased (p < 0.001) by 0.87 and 0.55 mmHg, respectively. In conclusion, the procedures set up in the Gaoyou study produced a high-quality BP phenotype. PMID:26581308

  13. DBP formation and disinfection under current and future climates - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    How to predict and monitoring DBP formation under current and future climate is a challenge and important to water plant operations and water supply security. This presentation summarizes a system approach being developed at the EPA Water Resources Adaptation Program (WRAP).

  14. IRIS Toxicological Review of Dibutyl Phthalate (Dbp) (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In January 2015, EPA released the draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for DBP to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA was interested in ...

  15. ANALYSIS OF ICR DATA TO PREDICT DBP FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project is a cooperative agreement with the University of North Carolina and jointly funded by NRMRL/ORD and TSC/OGWDW/OW. It is entitled "Application of ICR Data to Analyze DBP Occurrence in the Context of Water Quality, Treatment and Distribution System Characteristics." ...

  16. DBP CONTROL IN DRINKING WATER: COST AND PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is currently attempting to balance the complex trade-offs in chemical and microbial risks associated with controlling disinfection and disinfection byproducts (D/DBP) in drinking water. In attempting to achieve this balance, the...

  17. RIVERBANK FILTRATION: FATE OF DBP PRECURSORS AND SELECTED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors and selected microorganisms during riverbank filtration (RBF) was monitored at three different mid-Western drinking water utilities. At all three sites, filtration (RBF) was monitored at three different mid-Western drinking wa...

  18. The Causal Effect of Vitamin D Binding Protein (DBP) Levels on Calcemic and Cardiometabolic Diseases: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Aaron; Rehman, Waheed; Dastani, Zari; Greenwood, Celia; Timpson, Nicholas; Langsetmo, Lisa; Berger, Claudie; Fu, Lei; Wong, Betty Y. L.; Malik, Suneil; Malik, Rainer; Hanley, David A.; Cole, David E. C.; Goltzman, David; Richards, J. Brent

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have shown that vitamin D binding protein (DBP) levels, a key determinant of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD) levels, and 25OHD levels themselves both associate with risk of disease. If 25OHD levels have a causal influence on disease, and DBP lies in this causal pathway, then DBP levels should likewise be causally associated with disease. We undertook a Mendelian randomization study to determine whether DBP levels have causal effects on common calcemic and cardiometabolic disease. Methods and Findings We measured DBP and 25OHD levels in 2,254 individuals, followed for up to 10 y, in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Using the single nucleotide polymorphism rs2282679 as an instrumental variable, we applied Mendelian randomization methods to determine the causal effect of DBP on calcemic (osteoporosis and hyperparathyroidism) and cardiometabolic diseases (hypertension, type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, and stroke) and related traits, first in CaMos and then in large-scale genome-wide association study consortia. The effect allele was associated with an age- and sex-adjusted decrease in DBP level of 27.4 mg/l (95% CI 24.7, 30.0; n = 2,254). DBP had a strong observational and causal association with 25OHD levels (p = 3.2×10−19). While DBP levels were observationally associated with calcium and body mass index (BMI), these associations were not supported by causal analyses. Despite well-powered sample sizes from consortia, there were no associations of rs2282679 with any other traits and diseases: fasting glucose (0.00 mmol/l [95% CI −0.01, 0.01]; p = 1.00; n = 46,186); fasting insulin (0.01 pmol/l [95% CI −0.00, 0.01,]; p = 0.22; n = 46,186); BMI (0.00 kg/m2 [95% CI −0.01, 0.01]; p = 0.80; n = 127,587); bone mineral density (0.01 g/cm2 [95% CI −0.01, 0.03]; p = 0.36; n = 32,961); mean arterial pressure (−0.06 mm Hg [95% CI −0.19, 0.07]); p = 0.36; n

  19. Vitamin D and DBP: The free hormone hypothesis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Rene F.; Peercy, Bradford E.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Nielson, Carrie M.; Adams, John S.; Hewison, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The last five years have witnessed a remarkable renaissance in vitamin D research and a complete re-evaluation of its benefits to human health. Two key factors have catalyzed these changes. First, it now seems likely that localized, tissue-specific, conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) drives many of the newly recognized effects of vitamin D on human health. The second key factor concerns the ongoing discussion as to what constitutes adequate or optimal serum vitamin D (25OHD) status, with the possibility that vitamin D-deficiency is common to communities across the globe. These two concepts appear to be directly linked when low serum concentrations of 25OHD compromise intracrine generation of 1,25(OH)2D within target tissues. But, is this an over-simplification? Pro-hormone 25OHD is a lipophilic molecule that is transported in the circulation bound primarily to vitamin D binding protein (DBP). While the association between 25OHD and DBP is pivotal for renal handling of 25OHD and endocrine synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D, what is the role of DBP for extra-renal synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D? We hypothesize that binding to DBP impairs delivery of 25OHD to the vitamin D-activating enzyme 1α-hydroxylase in some target cells. Specifically, it is unbound, ‘free’ 25OHD that drives many of the non-classical actions of vitamin D. Levels of ‘free’ 25OHD are dependent on the concentration of DBP and alternative serum binding proteins such as albumin, but will also be influenced by variations in DBP binding affinity for specific vitamin D metabolites. The aim of this review will be to discuss the merits of ‘free 25OHD’ as an alternative marker of vitamin D status, particularly in the context of non-classical responses to vitamin D. PMID:24095930

  20. A new automatic blood pressure kit auscultates for accurate reading with a smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongjun; Wang, Bingjian; Zhu, Xinpu; Chu, Guang; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The widely used oscillometric automated blood pressure (BP) monitor was continuously questioned on its accuracy. A novel BP kit named Accutension which adopted Korotkoff auscultation method was then devised. Accutension worked with a miniature microphone, a pressure sensor, and a smartphone. The BP values were automatically displayed on the smartphone screen through the installed App. Data recorded in the phone could be played back and reconfirmed after measurement. They could also be uploaded and saved to the iCloud. The accuracy and consistency of this novel electronic auscultatory sphygmomanometer was preliminarily verified here. Thirty-two subjects were included and 82 qualified readings were obtained. The mean differences ± SD for systolic and diastolic BP readings between Accutension and mercury sphygmomanometer were 0.87 ± 2.86 and −0.94 ± 2.93 mm Hg. Agreements between Accutension and mercury sphygmomanometer were highly significant for systolic (ICC = 0.993, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.989–0.995) and diastolic (ICC = 0.987, 95% CI: 0.979–0.991). In conclusion, Accutension worked accurately based on our pilot study data. The difference was acceptable. ICC and Bland–Altman plot charts showed good agreements with manual measurements. Systolic readings of Accutension were slightly higher than those of manual measurement, while diastolic readings were slightly lower. One possible reason was that Accutension captured the first and the last korotkoff sound more sensitively than human ear during manual measurement and avoided sound missing, so that it might be more accurate than traditional mercury sphygmomanometer. By documenting and analyzing of variant tendency of BP values, Accutension helps management of hypertension and therefore contributes to the mobile heath service. PMID:27512876

  1. The impact of arm position and pulse pressure on the validation of a wrist-cuff blood pressure measurement device in a high risk population

    PubMed Central

    Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Carney, Shane; Gillies, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of blood pressure (BP) wrist monitors for self-BP measurement at home, device validation and the effect of arm position remains an issue. This study focused on the validation of the Omron HEM-609 wrist BP device, including an evaluation of the impact of arm position and pulse pressure on BP measurement validation. Fifty patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease were selected (age 65 ± 10 years). Each patient had two measurements with a mercury sphygmomanometer and three measurements with the wrist BP device (wrist at the heart level while the horizontal arm supported [HORIZONTAL], hand supported on the opposite shoulder [SHOULDER], and elbow placed on a desk [DESK]), in random order. The achieved systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) wrist-cuff readings were compared to the mercury device and the frequencies of the readings within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg of the gold standard were computed and compared with the British Hypertension Society (BHS) and Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) protocols. The results showed while SBP readings with HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions were significantly different from the mercury device (mean difference = 7.1 and 13.3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05), the DESK position created the closest reading to mercury (mean difference = 3.8, P > 0.1). Approximately 71% of SBP readings with the DESK position were within ±10 mmHg, whereas it was 62.5% and 34% for HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions, respectively. Wrist DBP attained category D with BHS criteria with all three arm positions. Bland–Altman plots illustrated that the wrist monitor systematically underestimated SBP and DBP values. However a reading adjustment of 5 and 10 mmHg for SBP and DBP (DESK position) resulted in improvement with 75% and 77% of the readings being within 10 mmHg (grade B), respectively. AAMI criteria were not fulfilled due to heterogeneity. The findings also showed that the mismatch between

  2. Validation of the custo screen 400 ambulatory blood pressure-monitoring device according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010

    PubMed Central

    Bramlage, Peter; Deutsch, Cornelia; Krüger, Ralf; Wolf, Andreas; Müller, Peter; Zwingers, Thomas; Beime, Beate; Mengden, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to validate the custo screen 400 ambulatory blood pressure-monitoring (ABPM) device according to the 2010 International Protocol revision of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH-IP). The device can be used for ABPM for up to 72 hours. Materials and methods Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively) were sequentially measured in 33 adult subjects (13 males and 20 females) and compared with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers). A total of 99 comparison pairs were obtained. Results The custo screen 400 met the requirements of parts 1 and 2 of the ESH-IP revision 2010. The mean difference between the device and reference sphygmomanometer readings was −0.5±4.5 mmHg for SBP and −0.1±3.3 mmHg for DBP. All but one measurement were within the absolute difference of 10 mmHg between the device and the observers for SBP and DBP. The number of absolute differences between the device and the observers within a range of 5 mmHg was 84 of 99 readings for SBP, and 93 of 99 readings for DBP. Conclusion The custo screen 400 ABPM device met the requirements of the 2010 ESH-IP revision, and hence can be recommended for ABPM in adults. To our knowledge, the custo screen 400 is the first device to pass the revised ESH-IP 2010. PMID:24868162

  3. Under-recognition of Low Blood Pressure Readings in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Syed Asif; Kazmouz, Suhaib; Heydemann, Peter; Li, Hong; Kenny, Damien

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a recessive sex-linked hereditary disorder, is characterized by degeneration, atrophy, and weakness of skeletal and cardiac muscle. The purpose of this study was to document the prevalence of abnormally low resting BP recordings in patients with DMD in our outpatient clinic. The charts of 31 patients with DMD attending the cardiology clinic at Rush University Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic data, systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures along with current medications, echocardiograms, and documented clinical appreciation and management of low blood pressure were recorded in the form of 104 outpatient clinical visits. Blood pressure (BP) was classified as low if the systolic and/or mean BP was less than the fifth percentile for height for patients aged ≤17 years (n = 23). For patients ≥18 years (n = 8), systolic blood pressure (SBP) <90 mmHg or a mean arterial pressure (MAP) <60 mmHg was recorded as a low reading. Patients with other forms of myopathy or unclear diagnosis were excluded. Statistical analysis was done using PASW version 18. BP was documented at 103 (99.01 %) outpatient encounters. Low systolic and mean BP were recorded in 35 (33.7 %) encounters. This represented low recordings for 19 (61.3 %) out of a total 31 patients with two or more successive low recordings for 12 (38.7 %) patients. Thirty-one low BP encounters were in patients <18 years old. Hispanic patients accounted for 74 (71.2 %) visits and had low BP recorded in 32 (43.2 %) instances. The patients were non-ambulant in 71 (68.3 %) encounters. Out of 35 encounters with low BP, 17 patients (48.6 %) were taking heart failure medication. In instances when patients had low BP, 22 (66.7 %) out of 33 echocardiography encounters had normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Clinician comments on low BP reading were present in 11 (10.6 %) encounters, and treatment modification occurred in only 1 (1 %) patient. Age in years (p

  4. Noise in pressure transducer readings produced by variations in solar radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, S. F., III; Davis, G.A.; Loheide, S.P., II; Butler, J.J., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in solar radiation can produce noise in readings from gauge pressure transducers when the transducer cable is exposed to direct sunlight. This noise is a result of insolation-induced heating and cooling of the air column in the vent tube of the transducer cable. A controlled experiment was performed to assess the impact of variations in solar radiation on transducer readings. This experiment demonstrated that insolation-induced fluctuations in apparent pressure head can be as large as 0.03 m. The magnitude of these fluctuations is dependent on cable color, the diameter of the vent tube, and the length of the transducer cable. The most effective means of minimizing insolation-induced noise is to use integrated transducer-data logger units that fit within a well. Failure to address this source of noise can introduce considerable uncertainty into analyses of hydraulic tests when the head change is relatively small, as is often the case for tests in highly permeable aquifers or for tests using distant observation wells.

  5. Noise in pressure transducer readings produced by variations in solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Cain, Samuel F; Davis, Gregory A; Loheide, Steven P; Butler, James J

    2004-01-01

    Variations in solar radiation can produce noise in readings from gauge pressure transducers when the transducer cable is exposed to direct sunlight. This noise is a result of insolation-induced heating and cooling of the air column in the vent tube of the transducer cable. A controlled experiment was performed to assess the impact of variations in solar radiation on transducer readings. This experiment demonstrated that insolation-induced fluctuations in apparent pressure head can be as large as 0.03 m. The magnitude of these fluctuations is dependent on cable color, the diameter of the vent tube, and the length of the transducer cable. The most effective means of minimizing insolation-induced noise is to use integrated transducer-data logger units that fit within a well. Failure to address this source of noise can introduce considerable uncertainty into analyses of hydraulic tests when the head change is relatively small, as is often the case for tests in highly permeable aquifers or for tests using distant observation wells. PMID:15584307

  6. The Effect of Compressibility on the Pressure Reading of a Prandtl Pitot Tube at Subsonic Flow Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walchner, O

    1939-01-01

    Errors arising from yawed flow were also determined up to 20 degrees angle of attack. In axial flow, the Prandtl pitot tube begins at w/a approx. = 0.8 to give an incorrect static pressure reading, while it records the tank pressure correctly, as anticipated, up to sonic velocity. Owing to the compressibility of the air, the Prandtl pitot tube manifests compression shocks when the air speed approaches velocity of sound. This affects the pressure reading of the instrument. Because of the increasing importance of high speed in aviation, this compressibility effect is investigated in detail.

  7. Results of epidemiological studies of blood pressure are biased by continuous variation in arm size related to body mass.

    PubMed

    Ulijaszek, Stanley J; Henneberg, Maciej

    2012-08-01

    In cross-sectional epidemiological studies, blood pressure (BP) is often found to be positively correlated with fatness. Usually sphygmomanometers with only one cuff size for adults are used to measure BP while arm circumference (AC) influences BP readings. We have studied cross-sectional anthropometric and BP data of adult men and women from three populations: Cook Islanders (n = 259), Papua New Guinean: Purari (n = 295), and Ok Tedi (n = 274). These were selected because of their diverse socio-economic, anthropometric, and BP characteristics. Partial correlations and regressions were used to analyze these data. Systolic and diastolic pressures (SBP, DBP) showed dependence on AC, body mass index (BMI), and skinfold thickness. Stature had some effect on SBP and DBP, independent of BMI and AC. When effects of AC and stature were statistically controlled, BMI did not correlate with either SBP or DBP. People of larger body mass have greater AC, and this biases BP readings. Average values of SBP and DBP in groups of underweight, normal, overweight, and obese people predicted by AC (sex, age, and BMI being statistically controlled) closely matched observed SBP and DBP averages in those groups. Out of 24 pairwise comparisons (3 samples from different populations × 4 groups of BMI × 2 pressure readings) of predicted and actual BP, only two produced statistically significant differences while 21 of the differences were 5 mm Hg or less. Correlations between BP and obesity found in epidemiological studies may be severely biased by effects of variation in AC. Sphygmomanometric measurements of BP should be corrected for continuous variation in AC. PMID:23249317

  8. Repression of major histocompatibility complex I-A beta gene expression by dbpA and dbpB (mYB-1) proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, J; Maki, R A; Celada, A

    1995-01-01

    The induction of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression is mediated by three DNA elements in the promoters of these genes (W, X, and Y boxes). The Y box contains an inverted CCAAT box sequence, and the binding activity to the CAAT box is mediated by factor NF-Y, which is composed of subunits NF-YA and NF-YB. We have found that transfection of either dbpA or dbpB (mYB-1) or both inhibits I-A beta gene expression. Although the genes for some members of the Y-box family of binding proteins have been isolated by screening an expression library using the Y-box sequence, under our conditions no binding of dbpA or dbpB to the Y box of the I-A beta or I-E alpha promoter was detected. This suggested that repression of I-A beta gene expression by dbpA and dbpB was not due to competition for binding to the Y-box sequence. The results suggest two other mechanisms by which dbpA and dbpB can inhibit transcription from the I-A beta promoter. When dbpA was added, the binding of NF-YA to DNA increased, which could be explained by interaction between these two proteins whose purpose is to increase the binding affinity of NF-YA for DNA. However, this complex was unable to stimulate transcription from the I-A beta promoter. Thus, dbpA competed for the interaction between NF-YA and NF-YB by binding to NF-YA. When dbpB factor was added together with NF-YA and NF-YB, the binding of the NF-YA--NF-YB complex was reduced. This suggested that dbpB may complete with NF-YB for interaction with NF-YA. These results provide an example of how dbpA and dbpB may regulate transcription of promoters that utilize NF-Y as a transcription factor. PMID:7651426

  9. Characterization of a baculovirus lacking the DBP (DNA-binding protein) gene

    PubMed Central

    Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Mikhailov, Victor S.; Rohrmann, George F.

    2009-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes two proteins that possess properties typical of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs), late expression factor-3 (LEF-3), and a protein referred to as DNA-binding protein (DBP). Whereas LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein essential for viral DNA replication, transporting helicase into the nucleus, and forms a stable complex with the baculovirus alkaline nuclease, the role for DBP in baculovirus replication remains unclear. Therefore, to better understand the functional role of DBP in viral replication, a DBP knockout virus was generated from an AcMNPV bacmid and analyzed. The results of a growth curve analysis indicated that the dbp knockout construct was unable to produce budded virus indicating that dbp is essential. The lack of DBP does not cause a general shutdown of the expression of viral genes, as was revealed by accumulation of early (LEF-3), late (VP39), and very late (P10) proteins in cells transfected with the dbp knockout construct. To investigate the role of DBP in DNA replication, a real-time PCR-based assay was employed and showed that, although viral DNA synthesis occurred in cells transfected with the dbp knockout, the levels were less than that of the control virus suggesting that DBP is required for normal levels of DNA synthesis or for stability of nascent viral DNA. In addition, analysis of the viral DNA replicated by the dbp knockout by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis failed to detect the presence of genome-length DNA. Furthermore, analysis of DBP from infected cells indicated that similar to LEF-3, DBP was tightly bound to viral chromatin. Assessment of the cellular localization of DBP relative to replicated viral DNA by immunoelectron microscopy indicated that, at 24 hours post-infection, DBP co-localized with replicated DNA at distinct electron-dense regions within the nucleus. Finally, immunoelectron microscopic analysis of cells transfected with the dbp

  10. Characterization of a baculovirus lacking the DBP (DNA-binding protein) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Mikhailov, Victor S.; Rohrmann, George F. . E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-08-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes two proteins that possess properties typical of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs), late expression factor-3 (LEF-3), and a protein referred to as DNA-binding protein (DBP). Whereas LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein essential for viral DNA replication, transporting helicase into the nucleus, and forms a stable complex with the baculovirus alkaline nuclease, the role for DBP in baculovirus replication remains unclear. Therefore, to better understand the functional role of DBP in viral replication, a DBP knockout virus was generated from an AcMNPV bacmid and analyzed. The results of a growth curve analysis indicated that the dbp knockout construct was unable to produce budded virus indicating that dbp is essential. The lack of DBP does not cause a general shutdown of the expression of viral genes, as was revealed by accumulation of early (LEF-3), late (VP39), and very late (P10) proteins in cells transfected with the dbp knockout construct. To investigate the role of DBP in DNA replication, a real-time PCR-based assay was employed and showed that, although viral DNA synthesis occurred in cells transfected with the dbp knockout, the levels were less than that of the control virus suggesting that DBP is required for normal levels of DNA synthesis or for stability of nascent viral DNA. In addition, analysis of the viral DNA replicated by the dbp knockout by using field inversion gel electrophoresis failed to detect the presence of genome-length DNA. Furthermore, analysis of DBP from infected cells indicated that similar to LEF-3, DBP was tightly bound to viral chromatin. Assessment of the cellular localization of DBP relative to replicated viral DNA by immunoelectron microscopy indicated that, at 24 h post-infection, DBP co-localized with nascent DNA at distinct electron-dense regions within the nucleus. Finally, immunoelectron microscopic analysis of cells transfected with the dbp knockout

  11. Effects of Parity on Blood Pressure among African-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jacquelyn Y.; Chambers, Angelina N.; Funnell, Beth; Wu, Chun Yi

    2010-01-01

    It has been well established that age, ethnicity, weight, and lifestyle behaviors can affect blood pressure (BP). Co-morbid conditions such as HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets), pre-eclampsia, and previous hypertension diagnosis might also be risks for chronic hypertension among women who have had children. Although parity has been linked to changes in blood pressure in White women, these findings have not been replicated among African-American women. The purpose of this study was to determine if the number of pregnancies urban African-American women have effects BMI and blood pressure readings later in life. Results indicated that women with a previous diagnosis of hypertension had higher SBP and DBP, and a slightly higher BMI than women who had never been diagnosed. Additionally, women with a prior history of hypertension had more children than those without a diagnosis of hypertension. As parity increased, SBP increased. However, DBP decreased after 3 to 4 children, even with increases in BMI. This study shows that parity may increase African-American women’s risk for hypertension in terms of increased SBP and BMI with increased parity. However, increased parity and BMI may also serve as protective factors in lowering DBP. Further studies, with larger samples followed throughout their pregnancies, is needed before more definitive statements may be drawn about the effects of parity on BMI and blood pressure readings among African-American women can be made. PMID:19397049

  12. Recovering strain readings from chirping fiber Bragg gratings in composite overwrapped pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutner, Scott M.; Pena, Frank; Piazza, Anthony; Parker, Allen R.; Richards, W. Lance; Carman, Gregory P.

    2014-04-01

    This study reports on signal recovery of optical fiber Bragg gratings embedded in a carbon fiber composite overwrapped pressure vessel's (COPV) structure which have become chirped due to microcracks. COPVs are commonly used for the storage of high pressure liquids and gases. They utilize a thin metal liner to seal in contents, with a composite overwrap to strengthen the vessel with minimal additional mass. A COPV was instrumented with an array of surface mounted and embedded fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) for structural health monitoring (SHM) via strain sensing of the material. FBGs have been studied as strain sensors for the last couple decades. Many of the embedded FBGs reflected a multi-peak, chirped response which was not able to be interpreted well by the current monitoring algorithm. Literature and this study found that the chirping correlated with microcracks. As loading increases, so does the number of chirped FBGs and microcracks. This study uses optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) to demultiplex the array of FBGs, and then sub- divide individual FBGs. When a FBG is sub-divided using OFDR, the gratings' strain along its length is recovered. The sub-divided chirped FBGs have strain gradients along their length from microcracks. Applying this to all chirped gratings, nearly the entirety of the embedded sensors' readings can be recovered into a series of single peak responses, which show very large local strains throughout the structure. This study reports on this success in recovering embedded FBGs signal, and the strain gradient from microcracks.

  13. Augmented blood pressure measurement through the noninvasive estimation of physiological arterial pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Soueidan, Karen; Chen, Silu; Dajani, Hilmi R; Bolic, Miodrag; Groza, Voicu

    2012-06-01

    Current noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement methods, such as the oscillometric method, estimate the systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) at two random instants in time and do not take into account the natural variability in BP. The standard for automated BP devices sets a maximum allowable system error of ±5 mmHg, even though natural BP variability often exceeds these limits. This paper proposes a new approach using simultaneous recordings of the oscillometric and continuous arterial pulse waveforms to augment the conventional noninvasive measurement by providing (1) the mean SBP and DBP over the measurement interval and the associated confidence intervals of the mean, (2) the standard deviation of SBP and DBP over the measurement interval, which indicates the degree of fluctuation in BP and (3) an indicator as to whether or not the oscillometric reading is an outlier. Recordings with healthy subjects demonstrate the potential utility of this approach to characterize BP, to detect outlier measurements, and that it does not suffer from bias relative to the conventional oscillometric method. PMID:22551623

  14. Contrahelicase activity of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor mtDBP

    PubMed Central

    Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2005-01-01

    The sea urchin mitochondrial D-loop binding protein (mtDBP) is a transcription termination factor that is able to arrest bidirectionally mitochondrial RNA chain elongation. The observation that the mtDBP binding site in the main non-coding region is located in correspondence of the 3′ end of the triplex structure, where the synthesis of heavy strand mitochondrial (mt) DNA is either prematurely terminated or allowed to continue, raised the question whether mtDBP could also regulate mtDNA replication. By using a helicase assay in the presence of the replicative helicase of SV40, we show that mtDBP is able to inhibit the enzyme thus acting as a contrahelicase. The impairing activity of mtDBP is bidirectional as it is independent of the orientation of the protein binding site. The inhibition is increased by the presence of the guanosine-rich sequence that flanks mtDBP binding site. Finally, a mechanism of abrogation of mtDBP contrahelicase activity is suggested that is based on the dissociation of mtDBP from DNA caused by the passage of the RNA polymerase through the protein–DNA complex. All these findings favour the view that mtDBP, besides serving as transcription termination factor, could also act as a negative regulator of mtDNA synthesis at the level of D-loop expansion. PMID:16006625

  15. The DbpA catalytic core unwinds double-helix substrates by directly loading on them.

    PubMed

    Childs, Jared J; Gentry, Riley C; Moore, Anthony F T; Koculi, Eda

    2016-03-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. Similar to all the members of the DEAD-box family, the DbpA protein has two N-terminal RecA-like domains, which perform the RNA unwinding. However, unlike other members of this family, the DbpA protein also possesses a structured C-terminal RNA-binding domain that mediates specific tethering of DbpA to hairpin 92 of the Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA. Previous studies using model RNA molecules containing hairpin 92 show that the RNA molecules support the DbpA protein's double-helix unwinding activity, provided that the double helix has a 3' single-stranded region. The 3' single-stranded region was suggested to be the start site of the DbpA protein's catalytic unwinding activity. The data presented here demonstrate that the single-stranded region 3' of the double-helix substrate is not required for the DbpA protein's unwinding activity and the DbpA protein unwinds the double-helix substrates by directly loading on them. PMID:26755693

  16. Validation of the Oregon Scientific BPU 330 for self-monitoring of blood pressure according to the International Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Zhang, XinYu; Yan, ChunHong; Liang, QingXiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Extensive marketing of devices for self-measurement of blood pressure has created a need for purchasers to be able to satisfy themselves that such devices have been evaluated according to agreed criteria. The Oregon Scientific BPU 330 blood pressure monitor is an electronic device for upper arm measurement. This study assessed the accuracy of the Oregon Scientific BPU 330 blood pressure monitor according to the International Protocol by the Working Group on Blood Pressure Monitoring of the European Society of Hypertension for validation of blood pressure measuring devices. Method: 52 participants over 30 years of age were studied in the validation. Nine blood pressure measurements were taken alternately with a mercury sphygmomanometer by two observers, and by the supervisor, using the BPU 330 device. A total of 33 participants were selected for the analysis. The validation was divided into two phases. Phase 1 included 15 participants. If the device passed phase 1, 18 more participants were included. The 99 pairs of measurements were compared according to the International Protocol. The device was given a pass/fail recommendation based on its accuracy compared with the mercury standard (within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg), as well as the number met in the ranges specified by the International Protocol. Results: The mean and standard deviation of the difference between the mean of the observers and the BPU 330 device were 1.7 ± 4.7 mmHg and 2.8 ± 3.9 mmHg for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), respectively. In phase 1, the device passed with a total of 33, 43, and 44 SBP readings; 38, 44, and 45 DBP readings were within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively. In phase 2.1, 81, 95, and 96 for SBP, and 83, 95, and 98 for DBP readings fell within the zones of 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively. In phase 2.2, the last phase, 28 participants fell within the zone of two of the three comparisons, lying within 5 mmHg for SBP and 29 participants for

  17. Identifying Robust Variations Associated with Reading Comprehension Skill: The Search for Pressure Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Donald L.; Pearson, P. David

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of "JREE" ["Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness"] features studies from three of the teams (Barnes, Stuebing, Fletcher, Barth, & Francis; Language and Reading Research Consortium, Arthur, & Davis; LaRusso et al.) supported by the Institute of Education Sciences--Reading for Understanding…

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP) in the Rat Determined by UPLC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Li-Wen; Hou, Mei-Ling; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2013-01-01

    Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) is commonly used to increase the flexibility of plastics in industrial products. However, several plasticizers have been illegally used as clouding agents to increase dispersion of aqueous matrix in beverages. This study thus develops a rapid and validated analytical method by ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of DBP in free moving rats. The UPLC-MS/MS system equipped with positive electrospray ionization (ESI) source in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used to monitor m/z 279.25→148.93 transitions for DBP. The limit of quantification for DBP in rat plasma and feces was 0.05 μg/mL and 0.125 μg/g, respectively. The pharmacokinetic results demonstrate that DBP appeared to have a two-compartment model in the rats; the area under concentration versus time (AUC) was 57.8 ± 5.93 min μg/mL and the distribution and elimination half-life (t1/2,α and t1/2,β) were 5.77 ± 1.14 and 217 ± 131 min, respectively, after DBP administration (30 mg/kg, i.v.). About 0.18% of the administered dose was recovered from the feces within 48 h. The pharmacokinetic behavior demonstrated that DBP was quickly degraded within 2 h, suggesting a rapid metabolism low fecal cumulative excretion in the rat. PMID:23344044

  19. Home and office blood pressure in children and adolescents: the role of obesity. The Arsakeion School Study.

    PubMed

    Karatzi, K; Protogerou, A; Rarra, V; Stergiou, G S

    2009-08-01

    Obesity is related to office blood pressure (OBP). Important discrepancies exist between OBP and home blood pressure (HBP), providing complementary information for the management of hypertension. The association between obesity and HBP has not been investigated in children. The evidence on the role of obesity in the predominance of systolic blood pressure (SBP) over diastolic (DBP) in paediatric hypertension is limited. A total of 778 healthy subjects aged 6-18 years were recruited in this study. OBP and HBP were measured using electronic devices validated in children. Anthropometric measurements were measured and expressed as z-scores for height or age. Among all indices of obesity (z-scores), body mass index (BMI) showed the best association with BP. The effect of obesity (BMI) was more pronounced on: (i) SBP than DBP and (ii) H-SBP than O-SBP (O-SBP: r2=0.09, O-DBP: r2=0.05, H-SBP: r2=0.12, H-DBP: r2=0.06). The prevalence of systolic hypertension was higher than that of diastolic hypertension. This difference was significant only in office readings and independent from obesity (normal weight: 6.3% systolic hypertension versus 1.2% diastolic; obese: 37.9% versus 6.9%, P<0.05 for both). These data imply that in children and adolescents the z-score of BMI is the most appropriate index of the association between BP and obesity. It also suggests that obesity is probably more closely associated with home than office BP. Finally, although obesity appears to affect SBP more than DBP, these results suggest that the predominance of systolic hypertension in children and adolescents might not be only related to obesity but also to the measurement setting (office). PMID:19129855

  20. Red blood cell invasion by Plasmodium vivax: structural basis for DBP engagement of DARC.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Joseph D; Malpede, Brian M; Omattage, Natalie S; DeKoster, Gregory T; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Tolia, Niraj H

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites use specialized ligands which bind to red blood cell (RBC) receptors during invasion. Defining the mechanism of receptor recognition is essential for the design of interventions against malaria. Here, we present the structural basis for Duffy antigen (DARC) engagement by P. vivax Duffy binding protein (DBP). We used NMR to map the core region of the DARC ectodomain contacted by the receptor binding domain of DBP (DBP-RII) and solved two distinct crystal structures of DBP-RII bound to this core region of DARC. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies show these structures are part of a multi-step binding pathway, and individual point mutations of residues contacting DARC result in a complete loss of RBC binding by DBP-RII. Two DBP-RII molecules sandwich either one or two DARC ectodomains, creating distinct heterotrimeric and heterotetrameric architectures. The DARC N-terminus forms an amphipathic helix upon DBP-RII binding. The studies reveal a receptor binding pocket in DBP and critical contacts in DARC, reveal novel targets for intervention, and suggest that targeting the critical DARC binding sites will lead to potent disruption of RBC engagement as complex assembly is dependent on DARC binding. These results allow for models to examine inter-species infection barriers, Plasmodium immune evasion mechanisms, P. knowlesi receptor-ligand specificity, and mechanisms of naturally acquired P. vivax immunity. The step-wise binding model identifies a possible mechanism by which signaling pathways could be activated during invasion. It is anticipated that the structural basis of DBP host-cell engagement will enable development of rational therapeutics targeting this interaction. PMID:24415938

  1. Lyophilization, Reconstitution, and DBP Formation in Reverse-Osmosis Concentrated Natural Organic Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by natural organic matter (NOM) temporal variability. NOM preservation by lyophilization (freeze-drying) has been long practiced to address this issue; however, its applicability for drinking w...

  2. Comparison of Chemical Composition of Complex Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Mixtures Produced by Different Treatment Methods - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of the chemical composition of complex DBP mixtures, produced by different drinking water treatment processes, are essential to generate toxicity data required for assessing their risks to humans. For mixture risk assessments, whole mixture toxicology studies generally a...

  3. Comparison of Chemical Composition of Complex Disinfection Byproduct (DBP) Mixtures Produced by Different Treatment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of the chemical composition of complex DBP mixtures, produced by different drinking water treatment processes, are essential to generate toxicity data required for assessing their risks to humans. For mixture risk assessments, whole mixture toxicology studies generally a...

  4. Cross-talk among structural domains of human DBP upon binding 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arjun; Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is structurally very similar to serum albumin (ALB); both have three distinct structural domains and high cysteine-content. Yet, functionally they are very different. DBP possesses high affinity for vitamin D metabolites and G-actin, but ALB does not. It has been suggested that there may be cross-talk among the domains so that binding of one ligand may influence the binding of others. In this study we have employed 2-p-toluidinyl-6-sulphonate (TNS), a reporter molecule that fluoresces upon binding to hydrophobic pockets of DBP. We observed that recombinant domain III possesses strong binding for TNS, which is not influenced by 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3), yet TNS-fluorescence of the whole protein is quenched by 25-OH-D3. These results provide a direct evidence of cross-talk among the structural domains of DBP. PMID:18035050

  5. A new automatic blood pressure kit auscultates for accurate reading with a smartphone: A diagnostic accuracy study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongjun; Wang, Bingjian; Zhu, Xinpu; Chu, Guang; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-08-01

    The widely used oscillometric automated blood pressure (BP) monitor was continuously questioned on its accuracy. A novel BP kit named Accutension which adopted Korotkoff auscultation method was then devised. Accutension worked with a miniature microphone, a pressure sensor, and a smartphone. The BP values were automatically displayed on the smartphone screen through the installed App. Data recorded in the phone could be played back and reconfirmed after measurement. They could also be uploaded and saved to the iCloud. The accuracy and consistency of this novel electronic auscultatory sphygmomanometer was preliminarily verified here. Thirty-two subjects were included and 82 qualified readings were obtained. The mean differences ± SD for systolic and diastolic BP readings between Accutension and mercury sphygmomanometer were 0.87 ± 2.86 and -0.94 ± 2.93 mm Hg. Agreements between Accutension and mercury sphygmomanometer were highly significant for systolic (ICC = 0.993, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.989-0.995) and diastolic (ICC = 0.987, 95% CI: 0.979-0.991). In conclusion, Accutension worked accurately based on our pilot study data. The difference was acceptable. ICC and Bland-Altman plot charts showed good agreements with manual measurements. Systolic readings of Accutension were slightly higher than those of manual measurement, while diastolic readings were slightly lower. One possible reason was that Accutension captured the first and the last korotkoff sound more sensitively than human ear during manual measurement and avoided sound missing, so that it might be more accurate than traditional mercury sphygmomanometer. By documenting and analyzing of variant tendency of BP values, Accutension helps management of hypertension and therefore contributes to the mobile heath service. PMID:27512876

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mediates DBP-maf-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Reddy, C Damodar; Swamy, Narasimha

    2003-09-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage-activating factor (DBP-maf) is derived from serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP) by selective deglycosylation during inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DBP-maf on RAW 264.7 macrophages and the underlying intracellular signal transduction pathways. DBP-maf increased proapoptotic caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. However, DBP, the precursor to DBP-maf did not induce apoptosis in these cells. Cell cycle analysis of DBP-maf-treated RAW 264.7 cells revealed growth arrest with accumulation of cells in sub-G(0)/G(1) phase. We also investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in the DBP-maf-induced apoptosis of RAW264.7 cells. DBP-maf increased the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK1/2, while it decreased the ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB202190, attenuated DBP-maf-induced apoptosis. PD98059, a MEK specific inhibitor, did not show a significant inhibition of apoptosis induced by DBP-maf. Taken together, these results suggest that the p38 MAPK pathway plays a crucial role in DBP-maf-mediated apoptosis of macrophages. Our studies indicate that, during inflammation DBP-maf may function positively by causing death of the macrophages when activated macrophages are no longer needed at the site of inflammation. In summary, we report for the first time that DBP-maf induces apoptosis in macrophages via p38 and JNK1/2 pathway. PMID:12938159

  7. Hostility, cultural orientation, and casual blood pressure readings in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Daniels, I N; Harrell, J P; Floyd, L J; Bell, S R

    2001-01-01

    Evidence suggests that hostility correlates with blood pressure levels in African-American samples. However, some studies have reported an inverse relationship, while others have found the relationship between blood pressure and hostility to be positive. Other literature suggests health outcomes in general, and blood pressure in particular, are related to cultural orientation in African-American samples. In the present study, six casual measures of blood pressure and heart rate in a sample of 90 African-American college students were aggregated and correlated with measures of hostility and cultural orientation. Correlational and regression analyses revealed a weak positive relationship between hostility and systolic blood pressure. The relationships between the cardiovascular measures and cultural orientation were more consistent. The tendency to embrace mainstream Euro-American values, such as materialism, individuality, and competitiveness, was associated with more rapid heart rate and higher diastolic blood pressure levels for both men and women. The relationship between systolic blood pressure and cultural orientation emerged for men only. The findings encourage further research into the relationship between personality variables and cardiovascular activity in African-American samples. PMID:11763302

  8. Bayesian statistical modeling of disinfection byproduct (DBP) bromine incorporation in the ICR database.

    PubMed

    Francis, Royce A; Vanbriesen, Jeanne M; Small, Mitchell J

    2010-02-15

    Statistical models are developed for bromine incorporation in the trihalomethane (THM), trihaloacetic acids (THAA), dihaloacetic acid (DHAA), and dihaloacetonitrile (DHAN) subclasses of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) using distribution system samples from plants applying only free chlorine as a primary or residual disinfectant in the Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of water quality conditions before, during, and post-treatment on distribution system bromine incorporation into DBP mixtures. Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are used to model individual DBP concentrations and estimate the coefficients of the linear models used to predict the bromine incorporation fraction for distribution system DBP mixtures in each of the four priority DBP classes. The bromine incorporation models achieve good agreement with the data. The most important predictors of bromine incorporation fraction across DBP classes are alkalinity, specific UV absorption (SUVA), and the bromide to total organic carbon ratio (Br:TOC) at the first point of chlorine addition. Free chlorine residual in the distribution system, distribution system residence time, distribution system pH, turbidity, and temperature only slightly influence bromine incorporation. The bromide to applied chlorine (Br:Cl) ratio is not a significant predictor of the bromine incorporation fraction (BIF) in any of the four classes studied. These results indicate that removal of natural organic matter and the location of chlorine addition are important treatment decisions that have substantial implications for bromine incorporation into disinfection byproduct in drinking waters. PMID:20095529

  9. Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Oliver; Onizuka, Shinya; Becker, Christian M; Fannon, Michael; Flynn, Evelyn; D'Amato, Robert; Zetter, Bruce; Folkman, Judah; Ray, Rahul; Swamy, Narasimha; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven

    2003-01-01

    We have isolated a selectively deglycosylated form of vitamin D binding protein (DBP-maf) generated from systemically available DBP by a human pancreatic cancer cell line. DBP-maf is antiproliferative for endothelial cells and antiangiogenic in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. DBP-maf administered daily was able to potently inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer in immune compromised mice (T/C=0.09). At higher doses, DBP-maf caused tumor regression. Histological examination revealed that treated tumors had a higher number of infiltrating macrophages as well as reduced microvessel density, and increased levels of apoptosis relative to untreated tumors. Taken together, these data suggest that DBP-maf is an antiangiogenic molecule that can act directly on endothelium as well as stimulate macrophages to attack both the endothelial and tumor cell compartment of a growing malignancy. PMID:12659668

  10. Vitamin D Binding Protein-Macrophage Activating Factor (DBP-maf) Inhibits Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Kisker, Oliver; Onizuka, Shinya; Becker, Christian M; Fannon, Michael; Flynn, Evelyn; D'Amato, Robert; Zetter, Bruce; Folkman, Judah; Ray, Rahul; Swamy, Narasimha; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Abstract We have isolated a selectively deglycosylated form of vitamin D binding protein (DBP-maf) generated from systemically available DBP by a human pancreatic cancer cell line. DBP-maf is antiproliferative for endothelial cells and antiangiogenic in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. DBP-maf administered daily was able to potently inhibit the growth of human pancreatic cancer in immune compromised mice (T/C=0.09). At higher doses, DBP-maf caused tumor regression. Histological examination revealed that treated tumors had a higher number of infiltrating macrophages as well as reduced microvessel density, and increased levels of apoptosis relative to untreated tumors. Taken together, these data suggest that DBP-maf is an antiangiogenic molecule that can act directly on endothelium as well as stimulate macrophages to attack both the endothelial and tumor cell compartment of a growing malignancy. PMID:12659668

  11. Short term exposure to di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) disrupts ovarian function in young CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sen, Nivedita; Liu, Xiaosong; Craig, Zelieann R

    2015-06-01

    Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) is present in many beauty and medical products. Human exposure estimates range from 0.007-0.01 mg/kg/day in the general population and up to 0.233 mg/kg/day in patients taking DBP-coated medications. Levels of phthalates tend to be higher in women, thus, evaluating ovarian effects of DBP exposure is of great importance. Mice were given corn oil (vehicle) or DBP at 0.01, 0.1, and 1000 mg/kg/day (high dose) for 10 days to test whether DBP causes ovarian toxicity. Estrous cyclicity, steroidogenesis, ovarian morphology, and apoptosis and steroidogenesis gene expression were evaluated. DBP exposure decreased serum E2 at all doses, while 0.1DBP increased FSH, decreased antral follicle numbers, and increased mRNA encoding pro-apoptotic genes (Bax, Bad, Bid). Interestingly, mRNAs encoding the steroidogenic enzymes Hsd17b1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 were increased in all DBP-treated groups. These novel findings show that DBP can disrupt ovarian function in mice at doses relevant to humans. PMID:25765776

  12. Integrated Disinfection Byproducts (DBPs) Mixtures Research: DBP Concentration via Reverse Osmosis Membrane Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the completion of the 4-lab project, the NOM concentration aspect of 4-lab is being continued with renewed focus on creating drinking water relevant freeze-dried NOM isolates that can be used for many drinking water research efforts from DBP investigations to water reuse inv...

  13. Effects of Di-butyl Phthalate (DBP) on Developing Medaka Embryos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Sherry

    2012-01-01

    Plasticizers are chemical additives that enhance plastic flexibility. They are ubiquitous environmental contaminants and are commonly found in river and lake waters (Fromme et al 2002). The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a water-soluble plasticizer, dibutyl phthalate (DBP) on developing Medaka ("Oryzias latipes") embryos. Three…

  14. Teratogenicity of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, K; Nishimura, H

    1982-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were mixed with diet at graded levels of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2. 0.4 and 1.0 wt-% and given to pregnant ICR mice throughout gestation. Maternal weight gain was suppressed and fetal resorption increased at 0.2, 0.4 and 1.0% levels of DEHP and 1.0% level of DBP. All the implanted ova died early in rats fed 0.4 and 1.0% levels of DEHP. External malformations increased significantly by 0.2% DEHP, and 1.0% DBP showed borderline significance. The major malformations in treated groups were neural tube defects (exencephaly and myeloschisis), suggesting that the phthalic acid esters (PAEs) affect neural tube closure in developing embryos. Treatment with the compounds caused intrauterine growth retardation and delayed ossification with an apparently dose-related response pattern. These results indicate that a high dose of DEHP and DBP might be embryotoxic and teratogenic in mice. The maximum nonembryotoxic doses of PAEs in mice were more than 2000 times the estimated level of human intake through the food chain. Thus it is assumed that the current "normal" exposure level of PAEs dose not pose an imminent threat to human fetal development. PMID:7140698

  15. PI3K regulates BMAL1/CLOCK-mediated circadian transcription from the Dbp promoter.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Yoshikazu; Miura, Daiki; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    The circadian rhythm generated by circadian clock underlies a molecular mechanism of rhythmic transcriptional regulation by transcription factor BMAL1/CLOCK. Importantly, the circadian clock is coordinated by exogenous cues to accommodate to changes in the external environment. However, the molecular mechanisms by which intracellular-signaling pathways mediate the adjustments of the circadian transcriptional rhythms remain unclear. In this study, we found that pharmacological inhibition or shRNA-mediated knockdown of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) blocked upregulation of Dbp mRNA induced by serum shock in NIH 3T3 cells. Moreover, the inhibition of PI3K significantly reduced the promoter activity of the Dbp gene, as well as decreased the recruitment of BMAL1/CLOCK to the E-box in the Dbp promoter. Interestingly, the inhibition of PI3K blocked heterodimerization of BMAL1 and CLOCK. Our findings suggest that PI3K signaling plays a modulatory role in the regulation of the transcriptional rhythm of the Dbp gene by targeting BMAL1 and CLOCK. PMID:27022680

  16. Structural Analysis of the Synthetic Duffy Binding Protein (DBP) Antigen DEKnull Relevant for Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Edwin; Salinas, Nichole D.; Ntumngia, Francis B.; Adams, John H.; Tolia, Niraj H.

    2015-01-01

    The Plasmodium vivax vaccine candidate Duffy Binding Protein (DBP) is a protein necessary for P. vivax invasion of reticulocytes. The polymorphic nature of DBP induces strain-specific immune responses that pose unique challenges for vaccine development. DEKnull is a synthetic DBP based antigen that has been engineered through mutation to enhance induction of blocking inhibitory antibodies. We determined the x-ray crystal structure of DEKnull to identify if any conformational changes had occurred upon mutation. Computational and experimental analyses assessed immunogenicity differences between DBP and DEKnull epitopes. Functional binding assays with monoclonal antibodies were used to interrogate the available epitopes in DEKnull. We demonstrate that DEKnull is structurally similar to the parental Sal1 DBP. The DEKnull mutations do not cause peptide backbone shifts within the polymorphic loop, or at either the DBP dimerization interface or DARC receptor binding pockets, two important structurally conserved protective epitope motifs. All B-cell epitopes, except for the mutated DEK motif, are conserved between DEKnull and DBP. The DEKnull protein retains binding to conformationally dependent inhibitory antibodies. DEKnull is an iterative improvement of DBP as a vaccine candidate. DEKnull has reduced immunogenicity to polymorphic regions responsible for strain-specific immunity while retaining conserved protein folds necessary for induction of strain-transcending blocking inhibitory antibodies. PMID:25793371

  17. Blood Pressure Profile in School Children (6–16 Years) of Southern India: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Sayeemuddin, Mohammad; Sharma, Deepak; Pandita, Aakash; Sultana, Tabassum; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objective: To determine normal blood pressure (BP) in apparently healthy, asymptomatic school children in the age group of 6–16 years and to determine the correlation of BP values with different sex, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) and also to find out prevalence of hypertension in school going population. Materials and methods: This prospective, observational study enrolled 3,302 urban children (1,658 boys and 1,644 girls) in the age group of 6–16 years. These were analyzed to study the distribution pattern of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at different ages, sex, weight, height, and BMI. The SBP and DBP were noted as per age and sex. The association was seen between mean SBP and mean DBP with weight, height, and BMI. Information was collected about the family history of hypertension and was correlated with the obtained SBP and DBP readings. Results: The mean SBP in males at 6 years was 99.69 ± 3.62 mm of Hg, at 10 years was 102.20 ± 2.16 mm of Hg, and at 16 years was 115.33 ± 1.26 mm of Hg. The mean SBP in females at 6 years was 96.55 ± 2.86 mm of Hg, at 10 years was 101.16 ± 2.12 mm of Hg, and at 16 years was 112.41 ± 1.06 mm of Hg. The correlation coefficient for relationship between age and SBP in males and females was 0.89 and 0.91, respectively, and for DBP was 0.92 and 0.90, respectively. The correlation coefficient for relationship between height and SBP in males and females was 0.91 and 0.93, respectively, and for DBP was 0.92 and 0.88, respectively. The correlation coefficient for relationship between weight and SBP in males and females was 0.92 and 0.92, respectively, and for DBP was 0.94 and 0.91, respectively. In the nomogram obtained in the study, 95% of study population fall between mean +2SD and −2SD. Conclusion: The blood pressure (BP) (SBP and DBP) tends to increase with age, weight, height, and BMI. The BP values (SBP and DBP

  18. A role for the cytoplasmic DEAD box helicase Dbp21E2 in rhodopsin maturation and photoreceptor viability

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, Karen L.; O’Tousa, Joseph. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Dbp21E2 (Dead box protein 21E2) is a member of a family of DEAD box helicases active in RNA processing and stability. We used genetic mosaics to identify mutants in Dbp21E2 that affect rhodopsin biogenesis and the maintenance of photoreceptor structure. Analysis of a GFP-tagged Rh1 rhodopsin construct placed under control of a heat shock promoter showed that Dbp21E21 fails to efficiently transport Rh1 from the photoreceptor cell body to the rhabdomere. Retinal degeneration is not dependent on the Rh1 transport defects. We also show that GFP- and RFP-tagged Dbp21E2 proteins are localized to discrete cytoplasmic structures that are not associated with organelles known to be active in rhodopsin transport. The molecular genetic analysis described here reveals an unexpected role for the Dbp21E2 helicase and provides an experimental system to further characterize its function. PMID:22794106

  19. Inhibition of angiogenesis by vitamin D-binding protein: characterization of anti-endothelial activity of DBP-maf.

    PubMed

    Kalkunte, Satyan; Brard, Laurent; Granai, Cornelius O; Swamy, Narasimha

    2005-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process involving coordinated steps of endothelial cell activation, proliferation, migration, tube formation and capillary sprouting with participation of intracellular signaling pathways. Regulation of angiogenesis carries tremendous potential for cancer therapy. Our earlier studies showed that vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) acts as a potent anti-angiogenic factor and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. The goal of this investigation was to understand the effect of DBP-maf on human endothelial cell (HEC) and the mechanism of angiogenesis inhibition. DBP-maf inhibited human endothelial cell (HEC) proliferation by inhibiting DNA synthesis (IC(50) = 7.8 +/- 0.15 microg/ml). DBP-maf significantly induced S- and G0/G1-phase arrest in HEC in 72 h. DBP-maf potently blocked VEGF-induced migration, tube-formation of HEC in a dose dependent manner. In addition, DBP-maf inhibited growth factor-induced microvessel sprouting in rat aortic ring assay. Moreover, DBP-maf inhibited VEGF signaling by decreasing VEGF-mediated phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and ERK1/2, a downstream target of VEGF signaling cascade. However, Akt activation was not affected. These studies collectively demonstrate that DBP-maf inhibits angiogenesis by blocking critical steps such as HEC proliferation, migration, tube formation and microvessel sprouting. DBP-maf exerts its effect by inhibiting VEGR-2 and ERK1/2 signaling cascades. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of anti-endothelial activity of DBP-maf will allow us to develop it as an angiogenesis targeting novel drug for tumor therapy. PMID:16400520

  20. Measuring Helicase Inhibition of the DEAD-box Protein Dbp2 by Yra1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wai Kit; Tran, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the highly conserved helicase core, individual DEAD-box proteins are specialized in diverse RNA metabolic processes. One mechanism that determines DEAD-box protein specificity is enzymatic regulation by other protein cofactors. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for purifying the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD-box RNA helicase Dbp2 and RNA-binding protein Yra1 and subsequent analysis of helicase regulation. The experiments described here can be adapted to RNA helicase and purified co-factor. PMID:25579587

  1. Dimerization of Plasmodium vivax DBP is induced upon receptor binding and drives recognition of DARC

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Joseph D.; Zahm, Jacob A.; Tolia, Niraj H.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi depend on the Duffy-Binding Protein DBL domain (RII-PvDBP or RII-PkDBP) engaging Duffy Antigen/Receptor for Chemokines on red blood cells during invasion. Inhibition of this key interaction provides an excellent opportunity for parasite control. There are competing models for whether Plasmodium ligands engage receptors as monomers or dimers, resolution of which has profound implications for parasite biology and control. We report crystallographic, solution and functional studies of RII-PvDBP, showing dimerization is required for and driven by receptor engagement. This work provides a unifying framework for prior studies and accounts for the action of naturally-acquired blocking-antibodies and the mechanism of immune evasion. We show dimerization is conserved in DBL-domain receptor-engagement, and propose receptor-mediated ligand-dimerization drives receptor affinity and specificity. Since dimerization is prevalent in signaling, our studies raise the possibility that induced dimerization activates pathways for invasion. PMID:21743458

  2. CspE is Overproduced by Temperature Downshift in the Acinetobacter johnsonii DBP-3.

    PubMed

    Su, Dan; Hao, Linlin; Chen, Fuwang; Li, Siming; Abdelrahman, Ahmed Mohamed; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Hao; Liu, Songcai; Li, Mingtang

    2016-05-01

    The denitrifying bacterium Acinetobacter johnsonii strain DBP-3 which was capable of removing phosphate, nitrate, and ammoniacal salt is psychrotolerant, whereas, the cold shock response mechanisms or the cold shock proteins (Csps) was unclear. In this article, the optimal growth temperature (25 °C) and cold shock temperature (7.5 °C) were determined firstly by an Arrhenius plot of the growth of the strain DBP-3. Then, among the seven cold shock-like protein genes which were cloned and identified referenced by A. johnsonii SH046 genome, qRT-PCR and shotgun-LTQ mass spectrometry showed that Csp3 and Csp4 were overexpressed under cold shock condition. Furthermore, Western blotting confirmed the result with the antibodies against Csp3 and Csp4 prepared by ourselves. Finally, the phylogenetic analysis showed that the similarity percent between Csp3 and Csp4 was 76.85 %, and Csp3 and Csp4 belonged to CspE family. The results indicated that CspE is overproduced by temperature downshift and may play an important role in the psychrotolerant process of strain DBP-3. PMID:26794214

  3. Particles in swimming pool filters--does pH determine the DBP formation?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kamilla M S; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans; Andersen, Henrik R

    2012-04-01

    The formation was investigated for different groups of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during chlorination of filter particles from swimming pools at different pH-values and the toxicity was estimated. Specifically, the formation of the DBP group trihalomethanes (THMs), which is regulated in many countries, and the non-regulated haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) were investigated at 6.0≤pH≤8.0, under controlled chlorination conditions. The investigated particles were collected from a hot tub with a drum micro filter. In two series of experiments with either constant initial active or initial free chlorine concentrations the particles were chlorinated at different pH-values in the relevant range for swimming pools. THM and HAA formations were reduced by decreasing pH while HAN formation increased with decreasing pH. Based on the organic content the relative DBP formation from the particles was higher than previously reported for body fluid analogue and filling water. The genotoxicity and cytotoxicity estimated from formation of DBPs from the treated particle suspension increased with decreasing pH. Among the quantified DBP groups the HANs were responsible for the majority of the toxicity from the measured DBPs. PMID:22285035

  4. Suppression of grp78 core promoter element-mediated stress induction by the dbpA and dbpB (YB-1) cold shock domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Li, W W; Hsiung, Y; Wong, V; Galvin, K; Zhou, Y; Shi, Y; Lee, A S

    1997-01-01

    The highly conserved grp78 core promoter element plays an important role in the induction of grp78 under diverse stress signals. Previous studies have established a functional region in the 3' half of the core (stress-inducible change region [SICR]) which exhibits stress-inducible changes in stressed nuclei. The human transcription factor YY1 is shown to bind the SICR and transactivate the core element under stress conditions. Here we report that expression library screening with the core element has identified two new core binding proteins, YB-1 and dbpA. Both proteins belong to the Y-box family of proteins characterized by an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding motif, the cold shock domain (CSD). In contrast to YY1, which binds only double-stranded SICR, the Y-box/CSD proteins much prefer the lower strand of the SICR. The Y-box proteins can repress the inducibility of the grp78 core element mediated by treatment of cells with A23187, thapsigargin, and tunicamycin. In gel shift assays, YY1 binding to the core element is inhibited by either YB-1 or dbpA. A yeast interaction trap screen using LexA-YY1 as a bait and a HeLa cell cDNA-acid patch fusion library identified YB-1 as a YY1-interacting protein. In cotransfection experiments, the Y-box proteins antagonize the YY1-mediated enhancement of transcription directed by the grp78 core in stressed cells. Thus, the CSD proteins may be part of the stress signal transduction mechanism in the mammalian system. PMID:8972186

  5. Time course of large ribosomal subunit assembly in E. coli cells overexpressing a helicase inactive DbpA protein.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Riley C; Childs, Jared J; Gevorkyan, Jirair; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Koculi, Eda

    2016-07-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit assembly. Previous studies have shown that when the ATPase and helicase inactive DbpA construct, R331A, is expressed in E. coli cells, a large ribosomal subunit intermediate accumulates. The large subunit intermediate migrates as a 45S particle in a sucrose gradient. Here, using a number of structural and fluorescent assays, we investigate the ribosome profiles of cells lacking wild-type DbpA and overexpressing the R331A DbpA construct. Our data show that in addition to the 45S particle previously described, 27S and 35S particles are also present in the ribosome profiles of cells overexpressing R331A DbpA. The 27S, 35S, and 45S independently convert to the 50S subunit, suggesting that ribosome assembly in the presence of R331A and the absence of wild-type DbpA occurs via multiple pathways. PMID:27194011

  6. Smad2/3 Upregulates the Expression of Vimentin and Affects Its Distribution in DBP-Exposed Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Wang, Xiaogang; Liu, Taixiu; Mo, Min; Ao, Lin; Liu, Jinyi; Cao, Jia; Cui, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli cells (SCs) in the testes provide physical and nutritional support to germ cells. The vimentin cytoskeleton in SCs is disrupted by dibutyl phthalate (DBP), which leads to SCs dysfunction. In a previous study, we found that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) influenced the distribution of vimentin by affecting its phosphorylation in DBP-exposed SCs. In the present study, we investigated the role of Smad2/3 in regulating the expression of vimentin in DBP-exposed SCs. We hypothesized that Smad2/3 affects the distribution of vimentin by regulating its expression and that there is cross talk between Smad2/3 and PPARα. The real-time PCR and ChIP-qPCR results showed that SB431542 (an inhibitor of Smad2/3) could significantly attenuate the expression of vimentin induced by DBP in SCs. Phosphorylated and soluble vimentin were both downregulated by SB431542 pretreatment. WY14643 (an agonist of PPARα) pretreatment stimulated, while GW6471 (an antagonist of PPARα) inhibited, the activity of Smad2/3; SB431542 pretreatment also inhibited the activity of PPARα, but it did not rescue the DBP-induced collapse in vimentin. Our results suggest that, in addition to promoting the phosphorylation of vimentin, DBP also stimulates the expression of vimentin by activating Smad2/3 in SCs and thereby induces irregular vimentin distribution. PMID:26819576

  7. Experimental investigations on PVC-LiAsF 6-DBP polymer electrolyte systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, S.; Uma, T.

    Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC)-LiAsF 6 polymer electrolytes plasticized with dibutyl phthalate in different mole ratios have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and a.c. impedance spectroscopy. The complexation has been confirmed from XRD and IR studies. A maximum room temperature conductivity (3.938×10 -5 S cm -1) has been observed for PVC: LiAsF 6: DBP (10:5:85 mol%) complex. The log σ vs. 1/ T plots ( σ=electrical conductivity; T=temperature) show Arrhenius behaviour. The activation energy is estimated and the results are discussed.

  8. Comparison of responses by bacteriophages and bacteria to pressures on the base composition of open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, James R; Forsdyke, Donald R

    2003-01-01

    Differences in the base composition of genomes can occur because of GC pressure, purine-loading pressure (AG pressure) and RNY pressure, for which there are possible functional explanations, and because of the more abstract pressures exerted by individual bases. The graphical approach of Muto and Osawa was used to analyse how bacteriophages and bacteria balance potentially conflicting pressures on their genomes. Phages generally respond to AG pressure by increasing A while keeping T constant, and by decreasing C while keeping G constant. In contrast, bacteria generally increase both A and T, the former more so, and decrease both G and C, the latter more so. These differences largely occur at third codon positions, which are more responsive than first and second codon positions to AG pressure and GC pressure. Phages respond to AG pressure more in the third codon position than bacteria, whereas bacteria respond more in the first codon position than phages. Conversely, bacteria respond to GC pressure more in the third codon position than phages, whereas phages respond more in the first codon position than bacteria. As GC pressure increases, A is traded for C and AG pressure decreases; first and second codon positions, having more A than T, are most responsive to this negative effect of increased GC pressure; third positions either do not respond (phages) or respond weakly (bacteria). In a set of 48 phage-host pairs, degrees of purine loading were less correlated between phage and host than were GC percentages. These results suggest that pressures on conventional and genome phenotypes operate differentially in phages and bacteria, generating both general differences in base composition and specific differences characteristic of particular phage-host pairs. The reciprocal relationship between GC pressure and AG pressure implies that effects attributed to GC pressure may actually be due to AG pressure, and vice versa. PMID:15130833

  9. The toothless osteopetrotic rat has a normal vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) cascade and chondrodysplasia resistant to treatments with colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and/or DBP-MAF.

    PubMed

    Odgren, P R; Popoff, S N; Safadi, F F; MacKay, C A; Mason-Savas, A; Seifert, M F; Marks, S C

    1999-08-01

    The osteopetrotic rat mutation toothless (tl) is characterized by little or no bone resorption, few osteoclasts and macrophages, and chondrodysplasia at the growth plates. Short-term treatment of tl rats with colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) has been shown to increase the number of osteoclasts and macrophages, producing dramatic resolution of skeletal sclerosis at some, but not all, sites. Defects in production of vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) have been identified in two other independent osteopetrotic mutations of the rat (op and ia), and two in the mouse (op and mi), in which macrophages and osteoclasts can be activated by the administration of exogenous DBP-MAF. The present studies were undertaken to examine the histology and residual growth defects in tl rats following longer CSF-1 treatments, to investigate the possibility that exogenous DBP-MAF might act synergistically with CSF-1 to improve the tl phenotype, and to assess the integrity of the endogenous DBP-MAF pathway in this mutation. CSF-1 treatment-with or without DBP-MAF-induced resorption of metaphyseal bone to the growth plate on the marrow side, improved slightly but did not normalize long bone growth, and caused no improvement in the abnormal histology of the growth plate. Injections of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) to prime macrophage activation via the DBP-MAF pathway raised superoxide production to similar levels in peritoneal macrophages from both normal and mutant animals, indicating no defect in the DBP-MAF pathway in tl rats. Interestingly, pretreatments with CSF-1 alone also increased superoxide production, although the mechanism for this remains unknown. In summary, we find that, unlike other osteopetrotic mutations investigated to date, the DBP-MAF pathway does not appear to be defective in the tl rat; that additional DBP-MAF does not augment the beneficial skeletal effects seen with CSF-1 alone; and that the growth plate chondrodystrophy seen in

  10. Reduced Fgf10/Fgfr2 and androgen receptor (AR) in anorectal malformations male rats induced by di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP): A study on the local and systemic toxicology of DBP.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Tao; Xu, Hong-Li; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Wood, Kristofer; Li, En-Hui; Sun, Wen-Lan; Yuan, Quan; Xu, Dong-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Wei; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Previous study have demonstrated that not only the anorectal development but also the general conditions of anorectal malformations (ARMs) male rats are severely affected by di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) maternal exposure. However, the mechanisms underlying DBP-induced congenital defects remain elusive. Reportedly, Fgf10/Fgfr2 and androgen receptor (AR) are pivotal for the development of multiple organs. In this study, we therefore investigated the expression of Fgf10/Fgfr2 together with AR in the terminal rectum and multiple organs of ARM male rats induced by in utero exposure to DBP. DBP was administered to pregnant rats to establish the model and the incidence of ARMs in male offspring was 39.5%. On postnatal day(PND)1, the gross photograph and histopathological staining confirmed the abnormal manifestations in these organs of newborn ARMs. Decreased anogenital distance, body weight and serum testosterone level were observed in ARM male offspring. The reduced expression of Fgf10/Fgfr2 mRNA and protein was seen in terminal rectum and kidney, spleen, liver, heart in ARM male rats, whereas the reduced expression of AR was only observed in the kidney and terminal rectum. Our findings suggest the potential involvement of altered Fgf10/Fgfr2 signaling and AR in pathogenesis of local and systemic development defects in ARMs male rats induce by DBP. PMID:26514922

  11. Evaluation of riverbank infiltration as a process for removing particles and DBP precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Smith, J.; Dooley, L.

    1996-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of waterborne disease attributed to Cryptosporidium in drinking water have raised serious concerns over the effectiveness of conventional water treatment processes to produce safe drinking water supplies. Past studies have shown Cryptosporidium and Giardia to be prevalent in surface water supplies, particularly in urban-impacted surface waters such as the Ohio River which Louisville Water Company (LWC) treatment facilities utilize as their source water. Such indications of the widespread occurrence of these pathogens in source waters underscore the need for the water supply industry to evaluate alternative technologies to conventional water treatment to reduce the risk of waterborne disease occurrence. Public health concerns, shared by the water utility industry, drinking water regulators, and public water supply consumers alike, prompted the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to propose regulatory action aimed at balancing the risks of microbial disease occurrence and the health risks associated with exposure to potentially harmful compounds formed during drinking water disinfection. In pursuit of this objective, USEPA proposed the Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (ESWTR) to improve public water supply treatment performance for microbial removal and proposed the Disinfectant/Disinfection Byproduct (D/DBP) Rule to reduce DBP exposure levels. As a consequence of these rules, many water utilities will be tasked with the challenge of developing treatment capabilities which improve microbial removal performance while minimizing the production of DBPs.

  12. Self-Assembly of Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) Films on Ag(111) in the Monolayer Regime.

    PubMed

    Kirchhuebel, Tino; Gruenewald, Marco; Sojka, Falko; Kera, Satoshi; Bussolotti, Fabio; Ueba, Takahiro; Ueno, Nobuo; Rouillé, Gaël; Forker, Roman; Fritz, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) is a promising candidate as a component of highly efficient organic photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes. The structural properties of thin films of this particular lander-type molecule on Ag(111) were investigated by complementary techniques. Highly ordered structures were obtained, and their mutual alignment was characterized by means of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal two slightly different arrangements within the first monolayer (ML), both describable as specific herringbone patterns with two molecules per unit cell whose dibenzoperiflanthene framework is parallel to the surface. In contrast, single DBP molecules in the second ML were imaged with much higher intramolecular resolution, resembling the shape of the frontier orbitals in the gas phase as calculated by means of density functional theory (DFT). Further deposition leads to the growth of highly ordered bilayer islands on top of the first ML with identical unit cell dimensions and orientation but slightly inclined molecules. This suggests that the first ML acts as a template for the epitaxial growth of further layers. Simultaneously, a significant number of second-layer molecules mainly located at step edges or scattered over narrow terraces do not form highly ordered aggregates. PMID:26844381

  13. The Relationship Between Preoperative and Primary Care Blood Pressure Among Veterans Presenting from Home for Surgery. Is There Evidence for Anesthesiologist-Initiated Blood Pressure Referral?

    PubMed Central

    Schonberger, Robert B.; Burg, Matthew M.; Holt, Natalie; Lukens, Carrie L.; Dai, Feng; Brandt, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    SBP≥146mmHg had 95.9% estimated specificity (95% CI 94.4 to 97.0) for identifying subsequent primary care SBP≥140mmHg and estimated sensitivity of 26.8% (95% CI 22.0 to 32.0). A similarly high specificity using a single DOS SBP required a threshold SBP≥160mmHg, for which estimated specificity was 95.2% (95% CI 94.2 to 96.1). For DBP, a presenting DOS DBP≥92mmHg had 95.7% specificity (95% CI 94.8 to 96.4) for subsequent primary care DBP≥90mmHg with a sensitivity of 18.8% (95% CI 14.4 to 24.0). Conclusion A small bias toward higher DOS blood pressures relative to subsequent primary care measurements was observed. DOS factors predicted only a small proportion of the observed variation. Accounting for the observed bias, a two-stage SBP threshold and a single-reading DBP threshold were highly specific though insensitive for identifying subsequent primary care blood pressure elevation. PMID:22075017

  14. The Effect of Chance Variability in Blood Pressure Readings on the Decision Making of General Practitioners: An Internet-Based Case Vignette Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Marshall, Tom; Gill, Paramjit

    2012-01-01

    Background Guidelines for the management of blood pressure (BP) in primary care generally suggest that decisions be made on the basis of specific threshold values (e.g. BP 140/90 mmHg); but this fails to adequately accommodate a common cause of variation – the play of chance. Objective To determine the impact of chance variability in BP readings on the clinical decision making of general practitioners (GPs) regarding anti-hypertensive treatment and cardiovascular risk management. Method We used an internet based study design, where 109 GPs were assigned to manage one of eight case vignettes (guidelines would recommend treatment for only one of the eight) and presented with blood pressure readings that were randomly selected from an underlying population. Results Seventeen (15.6%, 17/109) GPs consulted the vignette for whom treatment was recommended, but only 7/17 (41.2%) GPs prescribed treatment, whereas 14/92 (15.2%) GPs prescribed medication to the other vignettes. When deciding to follow-up a vignette GPs were influenced by threshold values for systolic and diastolic BP, but not by the overall cardiovascular risk. If the first reading was a low BP (systolic <140, diastolic <90) GPs were highly likely to discharge the vignette and follow-up a high BP reading (diastolic >90 or systolic BP≥140). Similar factors predicted the decision to prescribe a drug, although the vignette’s cardiovascular risk (>20%) was now statistically significant (p = 0.03). Conclusions GP decision making, whilst generally consistent with guidelines, appears to be compromised by chance variation leading to under and over treatment. Interventions to adequately accommodate chance variability into clinical decision making are required. PMID:23133591

  15. Prenatal exposure to di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) differentially alters androgen cascade in undeformed versus hypospadiac male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Tao; Zhong, Chen; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Xu, Dong-Liang; Wood, Kristofer; Sun, Wen-Lan; Li, En-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Yuan; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2016-06-01

    This study was to compare the alterations of androgen cascades in di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP)-exposed male offspring without hypospadias (undeformed) versus those with hypospadias. To induce hypospadias in male offspring, pregnant rats received DBP via oral gavage at a dose of 750mg/kg BW/day during gestational days 14-18. The mRNA expression levels of genes downstream of the androgen signaling pathway, such as androgen receptor (AR) and Srd5a2, in testes of undeformed rat pups were similar to those in controls; in hypospadiac rat pups these levels were significantly lower than those of control pups. In contrast, both undeformed and hypospadiac rats had decreased serum testosterone levels, reduced mRNA expression of key enzymes in the androgen synthetic pathway in the testes, and ablated genes of developmental pathways, such as Shh, Bmp4, Fgf8, Fgf10 and Fgfr2, in the genital tubercle (GT) as compared to those in DBP-unexposed controls, albeit hypospadiac rats had a more severe decrement than those of undeformed rats. Although other possibilities cannot be excluded, our findings suggest that the relatively normal levels of testosterone-AR-Srd5a2 may contribute to the resistance to DBP toxicity in undeformed rats. In conclusion, our results showed a potential correlation between decreased testosterone levels, reduced mRNA expression of AR and Srd5a2 and the occurrence of hypospadias in male rat offspring prenatally exposed to DBP. PMID:26948521

  16. The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Resting Blood Pressure in Spousal Alzheimer’s Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Harmell, Alexandrea L.; Mausbach, Brent T; Roepke, Susan K.; Moore, Raeanne; von Känel, Roland; Patterson, Thomas L; Dimsdale, Joel E; Mills, Paul J; Ziegler, Michael G.; Allison, Matthew A.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Grant, Igor

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether increased self-efficacy for using problem-focused coping was significantly related to several resting blood pressure measures in spousal Alzheimer’s disease caregivers. METHODS Participants included 100 older caregivers (mean age= 73.8 ± 8.14 years) providing in home care for a spouse with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). All participants completed a 13 item short form of the coping self-efficacy scale and underwent an in-home assessment where a visiting nurse took the average of three serial blood pressure readings. Multiple regression was used to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and pulse pressure (PP) after controlling for age, gender, smoking history, body mass index, the care recipient’s clinical dementia rating (CDR), diabetes, alcohol use, and the use of anti-hypertensive medications. RESULTS Overall, increased self-efficacy (as measured by the Coping Self-efficacy scale) was significantly related to lower resting MAP (β = −.26, t(90) = −2.47, p = .016) and SBP (β=−.28, t(90)= −2.74, p= .007) . Self-efficacy was marginally associated with resting DBP, but not significant (β = −.20, t(90) = −1.91, p= .06). Lastly, self-efficacy was significantly related to pulse pressure (β = −.21, t(90) = −2.31 p= .023). In addition, 1 standard deviation increase in self-efficacy was associated with a decrease of approximately 4 mmHg in SBP. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest an association between high self-efficacy on resting blood pressure. Because psychosocial interventions for Alzheimer’s caregivers have potential to increase self-efficacy, it appears possible that these interventions could have a beneficial impact on caregivers’ cardiovascular function. PMID:21489059

  17. Cellular DBP and E4BP4 proteins are critical for determining the period length of the circadian oscillator.

    PubMed

    Yamajuku, Daisuke; Shibata, Yasutaka; Kitazawa, Masashi; Katakura, Toshie; Urata, Hiromi; Kojima, Tomoko; Takayasu, Satoko; Nakata, Osamu; Hashimoto, Seiichi

    2011-07-21

    The phenotypes of mice carrying clock gene mutations have been critical to understanding the mammalian clock function. However, behavior does not necessarily reflect cell-autonomous clock phenotypes, because of the hierarchical dominance of the central clock. We performed cell-based siRNA knockdown and cDNA overexpression and monitored rhythm using bioluminescent reporters of clock genes. We found that knockdown of DBP, D-box positive regulator, in our model led to a short-period phenotype, whereas overexpressing of DBP produced a long-period rhythm when compared to controls. Furthermore, knockdown and overexpressing of E4BP4, D-box negative regulator, led to an opposite effect of DBP. Our experiments demonstrated that D-box regulators play a crucial role in determining the period length of Per1 and Per2 promoter-driven circadian rhythms in Rat-1 fibroblasts. PMID:21635892

  18. Teaching Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    "Teaching Reading" uncovers the interactive processes that happen when people learn to read and translates them into a comprehensive easy-to-follow guide on how to teach reading. Richard Day's revelations on the nature of reading, reading strategies, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and reading objectives make fascinating…

  19. Recruitment, Duplex Unwinding and Protein-Mediated Inhibition of the Dead-Box RNA Helicase Dbp2 at Actively Transcribed Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wai Kit; Paudel, Bishnu P; Xing, Zheng; Sabath, Ivan G; Rueda, David; Tran, Elizabeth J

    2016-03-27

    RNA helicases play fundamental roles in modulating RNA structures and facilitating RNA-protein (RNP) complex assembly in vivo. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that the DEAD-box RNA helicase Dbp2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required to promote efficient assembly of the co-transcriptionally associated mRNA-binding proteins Yra1, Nab2, and Mex67 onto poly(A)(+)RNA. We also found that Yra1 associates directly with Dbp2 and functions as an inhibitor of Dbp2-dependent duplex unwinding, suggestive of a cycle of unwinding and inhibition by Dbp2. To test this, we undertook a series of experiments to shed light on the order of events for Dbp2 in co-transcriptional mRNP assembly. We now show that Dbp2 is recruited to chromatin via RNA and forms a large, RNA-dependent complex with Yra1 and Mex67. Moreover, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer and bulk biochemical assays show that Yra1 inhibits unwinding in a concentration-dependent manner by preventing the association of Dbp2 with single-stranded RNA. This inhibition prevents over-accumulation of Dbp2 on mRNA and stabilization of a subset of RNA polymerase II transcripts. We propose a model whereby Yra1 terminates a cycle of mRNP assembly by Dbp2. PMID:26876600

  20. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  1. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The ...

  2. Application of a standardised protocol for hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement improves quality of readings and facilitates reduction of variceal bleeding in cirrhotics

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Tze Tong; Gogna, Apoorva; Irani, Farah Gillan; Too, Chow Wei; Lo, Hoau Gong Richard; Tan, Bien Soo; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Lui, Hock Foong; Chang, Pik Eu Jason

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement is recommended for prognostic and therapeutic indications in centres with adequate resources and expertise. Our study aimed to evaluate the quality of HVPG measurements at our centre before and after introduction of a standardised protocol, and the clinical relevance of the HVPG to variceal bleeding in cirrhotics. METHODS HVPG measurements performed at Singapore General Hospital from 2005–2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Criteria for quality HVPG readings were triplicate readings, absence of negative pressure values and variability of ≤ 2 mmHg. The rate of variceal bleeding was compared in cirrhotics who achieved a HVPG response to pharmacotherapy (reduction of the HVPG to < 12 mmHg or by ≥ 20% of baseline) and those who did not. RESULTS 126 HVPG measurements were performed in 105 patients (mean age 54.7 ± 11.4 years; 55.2% men). 80% had liver cirrhosis and 20% had non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH). The mean overall HVPG was 13.5 ± 7.2 mmHg, with a significant difference between the cirrhosis and NCPH groups (p < 0.001). The proportion of quality readings significantly improved after the protocol was introduced. HVPG response was achieved in 28 (33.3%, n = 84) cirrhotics. Nine had variceal bleeding over a median follow-up of 29 months. The rate of variceal bleeding was significantly lower in HVPG responders compared to nonresponders (p = 0.025). CONCLUSION The quality of HVPG measurements in our centre improved after the introduction of a standardised protocol. A HVPG response can prognosticate the risk of variceal bleeding in cirrhotics. PMID:26996384

  3. Genotoxicity of sub-lethal di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) / Genotoksičnost subletalne koncentracije di-n-butil ftalata (DBP-a) u nilskoj tilapiji (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Benli, Aysel Çağlan Karasu; Erkmen, Belda; Erkoç, Figen

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to assess genotoxicity in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) erythrocytes after exposure to a sub-lethal concentration of 10 mg L-1 di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) for 24 and 96 h. The results showed that mean MN frequencies in both DBP and ethyl methane-sulfonate (EMS, positive control for MN bioassay) groups were significantly different (p<0.01) with respect to control and solvent control groups, in both exposure scenarios. When analysing nuclear abnormalities, the frequency of notched nuclei was significantly different (p<0.05) but the frequencies of other subtypes did not change. The 96-h exposure led to an increase in the mean frequencies of notched nuclei, and also caused significant differences between MN frequencies in all groups (p<0.01). Our findings indicate that sub-lethal DBP concentrations when tested in controlled laboratory conditions have genotoxic potential towards Nile tilapia. Further detailed studies should be done for the determination of the environmental risk assessment for aquatic life since DBP is a high risk contaminant of freshwater and marine ecosystems. PMID:27092636

  4. THE OCCURRENCE OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF HEALTH CONCERN IN DRINKING WATER: RESULTS OF A NATIONWIDE DBP OCCURRENCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The motivation for this Nationwide Disinfection By-product (DBP) Occurrence Study was two-fold: First, more than 500 DBPs have been reported in the literature, yet there is almost no quantitative occurrence information for most. As a result, there is significant uncertainty ove...

  5. MODULATION OF THE CYTOTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY OF THE DRINKING WATER DBP IODOACETIC ACID BY SUPPRESSORS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated by the chemical disinfection of water and may pose a hazard to the public health. Previously we demonstrated that iodoacetic acid was the most cytotoxic and genotoxic DBP analyzed in a mammalian cell system. Little is k...

  6. THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) WAS LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) W AS LESS THAN ADDITIVE.

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may under or over represent the actual biological res...

  7. EPA Peer Consultation Workshop Report on the Review of the Draft IRIS Toxicological Review of Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA finalized comments gathered from a public peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. The peer review has en...

  8. Maternal exposure to di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) induces combined anorectal and urogenital malformations in male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Ping; Li, En-Hui; Sun, Wen-Lan; Xu, Dong-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Wei; Wood, Kristofer; Xia, Shu-Jie; Jiang, Jun-Tao

    2016-06-01

    Anorectal malformations in combination with hypospadias (ARMs & hypospadias) are a type of complex congenital malformations. The underlying mechanisms of this deformity are largely unknown. In this study, we comprehensively characterized the dysplasia, histological malformations, and genetic changes of ARMs & hypospadias in male rats after maternal exposure to di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by gastric intubation at doses of 850mg/kg bw/day during GD11-15. On postnatal day 1, anatomical and histopathological analysis confirmed combined malformations of the genital tubercle (GT), terminal rectum (TR) and testes. DBP-induced dysplasia was also seen in the kidney, lung, spleen, heart and liver of ARMs & hypospadias male rats. Moreover, decreased levels of serum testosterone, as well as reduced expression of genes related to the androgen signaling pathway (Cyp11a1, Hsd3b, Scarb1, Star, AR, Srd5a2) were found in the testes of ARMs & hypospadias male rats after DBP exposure as compared to untreated controls. Further, decreased mRNA levels of Shh, Fgf10, Gli2, Gli3, Bmp4, Wnt5a, Hoxa13, Hoxd13, Fgfr2 and AR were observed in TR and GT in the ARMs & hypospadias group. These results provide evidence that prenatal exposure to DBP can lead to combined anorectal and urogenital malformations as well as dysplasia of the testes. PMID:27079746

  9. RENAL CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) IN EKER RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RENAL CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING / WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) IN EKER RATS.

    Eker rats develop hereditary renal cell carcinoma secondary to a germline mutation in the tuberous sclerosis 2 tumor suppressor gene, and are highly suscepti...

  10. Blood pressure as a predictor of cardiovascular events in the elderly: the William Hale Research Program.

    PubMed

    Masley, S C; Phillips, S E; Schocken, D D

    2006-06-01

    This study evaluates the association between blood pressure (BP) and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in the elderly. The Morton Plant Mease Foundation has followed 4,008 elderly patients >64 years of age for at least 5 years. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) was divided into categories. Cardiovascular disease events were classified as myocardial infarction, stroke, and CVD-related deaths reported from the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazard ratios were used to assess the relationship between BP and CVD events and controlled for weight, gender, smoker, and alcohol use. Ages <75 and >or=75 years were assessed separately. After 11.1 years of follow-up, elevated SBP (P=<0.0001) is strongly associated with developing a future CVD event; the relationship is linear and graded and holds for ages above and below 75 years. The frequency of CVD events was lowest in the SBP <120 mm Hg group. In subjects <75 years of age, DBP elevations were not a significant risk factor for CVD events. (relative risk (RR): DBP 70 to <80 mm Hg=0.92; DBP 80 to <90 mm Hg=0.88; DBP >or=90 mm Hg=1.02.) With subjects >or=75 years of age, a DBP between 80 and 90 is associated with the lowest significant risk for CVD (RR: DBP 70 to <80 mm Hg=0.74; DBP 80 to <90 mm Hg=0.59; DBP >or=90=0.71). In conclusion, these findings support the Joint National Committee on Hypertension recommendations for SBP in the elderly. Further studies are warranted to identify optimal DBP for the elderly at various ages. PMID:16543911

  11. Validation of the FM-800 ambulatory blood pressure monitor according to the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation criteria and the International Protocol.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kaori; Kikuya, Masahiro; Hara, Azusa; Hirose, Takuo; Obara, Taku; Metoki, Hirohito; Asayama, Kei; Inoue, Ryusuke; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Totsune, Kazuhito; Imai, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    To validate the FM-800 device (Fukuda Denshi Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), this validation study was performed based on the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) protocol and the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) criteria. Thirty-three participants were included (15 in phase 1 and an additional 18 in phase 2) in the ESH protocol. The device was tested on 85 participants according to the AAMI criteria, which require a mean device-observers discrepancy within 5 ± 8 mmHg. The tested device passed all the criteria for both systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and for the Korotkoff and oscillometric methods according to the ESH protocol. The test device also fulfilled the AAMI accuracy criteria for the 85 participants; the mean ± SD of the SBP/DBP differences between the tested device and the mean of the observer readings were -1.1 ± 4.2/-0.8 ± 4.2 mmHg for the Korotkoff method and 2.3 ± 3.9/-2.3 ± 3.9 mmHg for the oscillometric method. The FM-800 device for ABPM passed all the validation criteria of the ESH and AAMI and can, therefore, be recommended for clinical use in an adult population. PMID:21091358

  12. Nuclear Export of Pre-Ribosomal Subunits Requires Dbp5, but Not as an RNA-Helicase as for mRNA Export

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Bettina; Wu, Haijia; Hackmann, Alexandra; Krebber, Heike

    2016-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA-helicase Dbp5/Rat8 is known for its function in nuclear mRNA export, where it displaces the export receptor Mex67 from the mRNA at the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here we show that Dbp5 is also required for the nuclear export of both pre-ribosomal subunits. Yeast temperature-sensitive dbp5 mutants accumulate both ribosomal particles in their nuclei. Furthermore, Dbp5 genetically and physically interacts with known ribosomal transport factors such as Nmd3. Similar to mRNA export we show that also for ribosomal transport Dbp5 is required at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC. However, unlike its role in mRNA export, Dbp5 does not seem to undergo its ATPase cycle for this function, as ATPase-deficient dbp5 mutants that selectively inhibit mRNA export do not affect ribosomal transport. Furthermore, mutants of GLE1, the ATPase stimulating factor of Dbp5, show no major ribosomal export defects. Consequently, while Dbp5 uses its ATPase cycle to displace the export receptor Mex67 from the translocated mRNAs, Mex67 remains bound to ribosomal subunits upon transit to the cytoplasm, where it is detectable on translating ribosomes. Therefore, we propose a model, in which Dbp5 supports ribosomal transport by capturing ribosomal subunits upon their cytoplasmic appearance at the NPC, possibly by binding export factors such as Mex67. Thus, our findings reveal that although different ribonucleoparticles, mRNAs and pre-ribosomal subunits, use shared export factors, they utilize different transport mechanisms. PMID:26872259

  13. Reading(s).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, Geoffrey; Summerfield, Judith

    Developed for college English courses, this book presents selections of poetry, short stories, and commentary intended to invite different ways of reading and interpreting literature. An introduction provides an overview of the book's content, as well as a discussion of how to read. The first section, "Entering a Language," considers the…

  14. Correlation between SUVA and DBP formation during chlorination and chloramination of NOM fractions from different sources.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guanghui; Reckhow, David A; Abusallout, Ibrahim

    2015-07-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is the major precursor to the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment. Specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) is a widely used surrogate parameter to characterize NOM and predict its DBP formation potential. The objective of this study was to determine the relationships between SUVA and different classes of DBPs formed by NOM fractions from different sources. Three natural waters with a wide SUVA range were fractionated into differing hydrophobicity and molecular weight groups using XAD-4 and XAD-8 resins and ultrafiltration membranes. Each NOM fraction was treated with chlorine and monochloramine under controlled laboratory conditions. Different classes of DBPs showed different relationships with SUVA. SUVA correlated strongly with trihaloacetic acids (THAAs) and unknown total organic halogen (UTOX) yields whereas weak correlations were observed between SUVA and trihalomethane (THM) and dihaloacetic acid (DHAA) yields during chlorination. These results reinforce the hypothesis that DHAAs and THAAs form through different precursors and reaction pathways. Strong correlation between SUVA and UTOX was also observed during chloramination. However, no significant relationship was observed between SUVA and chloramination THMs and DHAAs. Overall, SUVA is a good indicator for the formation of unknown DBPs. This indicates that UV absorbing compounds and aromatic carbon within NOM are the primary sources of precursors for unknown DBPs. PMID:25862949

  15. Reproducibility of ambulatory blood pressure load.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, P K; Sheps, S G; Bailey, K R; Wiltgen, C M; Moore, A G

    1990-12-01

    Twenty-two hypertensive patients were monitored during two separate drug-free occasions with a Del Mar Avionics ambulatory device. Blood pressure loads (percentage of systolic and diastolic readings more than 140 and 90 mmHg, respectively) and mean BP were measured both to determine their reproducibility and to examine how they correlate with each other. The systolic and diastolic mean awake BPs for day 1 and day 2 were 140/93 mmHg and 140/91 mmHg, respectively, and BP loads were 45%/55% and 43%/54%. Moreover, mean BP loads correlated highly (r = 0.93) with mean BP values taken on the same day. Both ambulatory mean SBP and BP load were highly reproducible (r = 0.87 and 0.80, respectively, during the awake hours), and mean DBP and load were fairly reproducible (r = 0.59 and 0.39, respectively, during the awake hours). Clinically, however, both were consistent from day 1 to day 2. Mean and individual standard deviations also were reproducible for both systolic and diastolic pressures and loads. PMID:2096203

  16. The K+-dependent GTPase Nug1 is implicated in the association of the helicase Dbp10 to the immature peptidyl transferase centre during ribosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Manikas, Rizos-Georgios; Thomson, Emma; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis employs a number of energy-consuming enzymes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. One such enzyme is the conserved circularly permuted GTPase Nug1 (nucleostemin in human). Nug1 is essential for 60S subunit assembly and nuclear export, but its role and time of action during maturation remained unclear. Based on in vitro enzymatic assays using the Chaetomium thermophilum (Ct) orthologue, we show that Nug1 exhibits a low intrinsic GTPase activity that is stimulated by potassium ions, rendering Nug1 a cation-dependent GTPase. In vivo we observe 60S biogenesis defects upon depletion of yeast Nug1 or expression of a Nug1 nucleotide-binding mutant. Most prominently, the RNA helicase Dbp10 was lost from early pre-60S particles, which suggested a physical interaction that could be reconstituted in vitro using CtNug1 and CtDbp10. In vivo rRNA–protein crosslinking revealed that Nug1 and Dbp10 bind at proximal and partially overlapping sites on the 60S pre-ribosome, most prominently to H89 that will constitute part of the peptidyl transferase center (PTC). The binding sites of Dbp10 are the same as those identified for the prokaryotic helicase DbpA bound to the 50S subunit. We suggest that Dbp10 and DbpA are performing a conserved role during PTC formation in all organisms. PMID:26823502

  17. The K⁺-dependent GTPase Nug1 is implicated in the association of the helicase Dbp10 to the immature peptidyl transferase centre during ribosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Manikas, Rizos-Georgios; Thomson, Emma; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed

    2016-02-29

    Ribosome synthesis employs a number of energy-consuming enzymes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. One such enzyme is the conserved circularly permuted GTPase Nug1 (nucleostemin in human). Nug1 is essential for 60S subunit assembly and nuclear export, but its role and time of action during maturation remained unclear. Based on in vitro enzymatic assays using the Chaetomium thermophilum (Ct) orthologue, we show that Nug1 exhibits a low intrinsic GTPase activity that is stimulated by potassium ions, rendering Nug1 a cation-dependent GTPase. In vivo we observe 60S biogenesis defects upon depletion of yeast Nug1 or expression of a Nug1 nucleotide-binding mutant. Most prominently, the RNA helicase Dbp10 was lost from early pre-60S particles, which suggested a physical interaction that could be reconstituted in vitro using CtNug1 and CtDbp10. In vivo rRNA-protein crosslinking revealed that Nug1 and Dbp10 bind at proximal and partially overlapping sites on the 60S pre-ribosome, most prominently to H89 that will constitute part of the peptidyl transferase center (PTC). The binding sites of Dbp10 are the same as those identified for the prokaryotic helicase DbpA bound to the 50S subunit. We suggest that Dbp10 and DbpA are performing a conserved role during PTC formation in all organisms. PMID:26823502

  18. Sea urchin mtDBP is a two-faced transcription termination factor with a biased polarity depending on the RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Roberti, Marina; Di Ponzio, Barbara; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Montoya, Julio; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2001-01-01

    The sea urchin mitochondrial displacement (D)-loop binding protein mtDBP has been previously identified and cloned. The polypeptide (348 amino acids) displays a significant homology with the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor mTERF. This similarity, and the observation that the 3′ ends of mitochondrial RNAs coded by opposite strands mapped in correspondence of mtDBP-binding sites, suggested that mtDBP could function as transcription termination factor in sea urchin mitochondria. To investigate such a role we tested the capability of mtDBP bound to its target sequence in the main non-coding region to affect RNA elongation by mitochondrial and bacteriophage T3 and T7 RNA polymerases. We show that mtDBP was able to terminate transcription bidirectionally when initiated by human mitochondrial RNA polymerase but only unidirectionally when initiated by T3 or T7 RNA polymerases. Time-course experiments indicated that mtDBP promotes true transcription termination rather than transcription pausing. These results indicate that mtDBP is able to function as a bipolar transcription termination factor in sea urchin mitochondria. The functional significance of such an activity could be linked to the previously proposed dual role of the protein in modulating mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. PMID:11713324

  19. P(I) Release Limits the Intrinsic and RNA-Stimulated ATPase Cycles of DEAD-Box Protein 5 (Dbp5).

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily V; Cao, Wenxiang; Vörös, Judit; Merchant, Monique; Modis, Yorgo; Hackney, David D; Montpetit, Ben; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2016-01-29

    mRNA export from the nucleus depends on the ATPase activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5/DDX19. Although Dbp5 has measurable ATPase activity alone, several regulatory factors (e.g., RNA, nucleoporin proteins, and the endogenous small molecule InsP6) modulate catalytic activity in vitro and in vivo to facilitate mRNA export. An analysis of the intrinsic and regulator-activated Dbp5 ATPase cycle is necessary to define how these factors control Dbp5 and mRNA export. Here, we report a kinetic and equilibrium analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbp5 ATPase cycle, including the influence of RNA on Dbp5 activity. These data show that ATP binds Dbp5 weakly in rapid equilibrium with a binding affinity (KT~4 mM) comparable to the KM for steady-state cycling, while ADP binds an order of magnitude more tightly (KD~0.4 mM). The overall intrinsic steady-state cycling rate constant (kcat) is limited by slow, near-irreversible ATP hydrolysis and even slower subsequent phosphate release. RNA increases kcat and rate-limiting Pi release 20-fold, although Pi release continues to limit steady-state cycling in the presence of RNA, in conjunction with RNA binding. Together, this work identifies RNA binding and Pi release as important biochemical transitions within the Dbp5 ATPase cycle and provides a framework for investigating the means by which Dbp5 and mRNA export is modulated by regulatory factors. PMID:26730886

  20. Impact of DBP on histology and expression of HSP 70 in gill and liver tissue of Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Agus, Hizlan H; Erkmen, Belda; Sümer, Sibel; Sepici-Dinçel, Aylin; Erkoç, Figen

    2015-09-01

    Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) widely used plasticizer in the plastic industry, affects regulation of the endocrine system and causes toxicity in animals. In the present study, the aim was to study the toxic effects/damages of DBP exposure using Hsp70 levels and histopathological changes in Carp liver and gill. Hsp70 expression levels were assessed as specific biomarker of in vivo ecotoxicological stress. Carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed to sub-lethal concentration of DBP (di-n-butyl phthalate, 1 mg/L) for 4, 24 and 96 h. Gill and liver tissues were evaluated histopathologically and RNA quantifications for Hsp70 expression levels were carried out using a two-step real-time RT-PCR. In liver, a rapid but non-significant increase in mRNA levels in the first 4 h was observed. mRNA levels significantly increased up to 2-3 fold after 24 and 96 h (p < 0.05). However, irregular mRNA level changes were also recorded: Gill specific and time-dependent regulation of Hsp70 expression were 4-5 fold inhibition after 4 and 24 h (p < 0.05), then increased up to 4 fold after 96 h (p < 0.05). Histopathological findings support altered transcription results as: Epithelial lifting, hyperplasia, fusion of secondary lamellae, telangiectasis, passive hyperemia and hydropic degeneration. Significant alterations of Hsp70 levels were likely due to a tissue specific response against chemical stress, cellular damage and lesions due to DBP. Carp was found to be a suitable experimental model for toxicology, and Hsp70 mRNA levels are reliable, specific biomarkers. PMID:26311152

  1. Towards reducing DBP formation potential of drinking water by favouring direct ozone over hydroxyl radical reactions during ozonation.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Glen Andrew; Stalter, Daniel; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Weinberg, Howard S; Keller, Jurg; Farré, Maria José

    2015-12-15

    When ozonation is employed in advanced water treatment plants to produce drinking water, dissolved organic matter reacts with ozone (O3) and/or hydroxyl radicals (OH) affecting disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation with subsequently used chlorine-based disinfectants. This study presents the effects of varying exposures of O3 and •OH on DBP concentrations and their associated toxicity generated after subsequent chlorination. DBP formation potential tests and in vitro bioassays were conducted after batch ozonation experiments of coagulated surface water with and without addition of tertiary butanol (t-BuOH, 10 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mg/mg O3), and at different pH (6-8) and transferred ozone doses (0-1 mg/mg TOC). Although ozonation led to a 24-37% decrease in formation of total trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetamides, an increase in formation of total trihalonitromethanes, chloral hydrate, and haloketones was observed. This effect however was less pronounced for samples ozonated at conditions favoring molecular ozone (e.g., pH 6 and in the presence of t-BuOH) over •OH reactions (e.g., pH 8 and in the presence of H2O2). Compared to ozonation only, addition of H2O2 consistently enhanced formation of all DBP groups (20-61%) except trihalonitromethanes. This proves that •OH-transformed organic matter is more susceptible to halogen incorporation. Analogously, adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) concentrations increased under conditions that favor •OH reactions. The ratio of unknown to known AOX, however, was greater at conditions that promote direct O3 reactions. Although significant correlation was found between AOX and genotoxicity with the p53 bioassay, toxicity tests using 4 in vitro bioassays showed relatively low absolute differences between various ozonation conditions. PMID:26378731

  2. Development of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model for disinfection byproduct (DBP) research: A review of methods and resources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baiyang; Zhang, Tian; Bond, Tom; Gan, Yiqun

    2015-12-15

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are tools for linking chemical activities with molecular structures and compositions. Due to the concern about the proliferating number of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in water and the associated financial and technical burden, researchers have recently begun to develop QSAR models to investigate the toxicity, formation, property, and removal of DBPs. However, there are no standard procedures or best practices regarding how to develop QSAR models, which potentially limit their wide acceptance. In order to facilitate more frequent use of QSAR models in future DBP research, this article reviews the processes required for QSAR model development, summarizes recent trends in QSAR-DBP studies, and shares some important resources for QSAR development (e.g., free databases and QSAR programs). The paper follows the four steps of QSAR model development, i.e., data collection, descriptor filtration, algorithm selection, and model validation; and finishes by highlighting several research needs. Because QSAR models may have an important role in progressing our understanding of DBP issues, it is hoped that this paper will encourage their future use for this application. PMID:26142156

  3. Reading Faster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the visual nature of the reading process as it relates to reading speed. It points out that there is a physical limit on normal reading speed and beyond this limit the reading process will be different from normal reading where almost every word is attended to. The article describes a range of activities for developing…

  4. Reading Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Joanna R., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the Arizona Reading Journal focuses on the theme "reading recovery" and includes the following articles: "Why Is an Inservice Programme for Reading Recovery Teachers Necessary?" (Marie M. Clay); "What Is Reading Recovery?" (Gay Su Pinnell); "Teaching a Hard To Teach Child" (Constance A. Compton); "Reading Recovery in Arizona--A…

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O’Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian’an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hotteng, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, M Fabiola; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco JC; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; ’t Hoen, Peter AC; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; DeStefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth JF; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP. PMID:21909110

  6. The Relative Utility of Home, Ambulatory, and Office Blood Pressures in the Prediction of End-Organ Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Daichi; Pickering, Thomas G.; Spruill, Tanya M.; Abraham, Dennis; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Gerin, William

    2007-01-01

    Background Home blood pressure (HBP) monitoring plays an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. We evaluated the independent value of HBP compared to ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and office blood pressure (OBP) in the prediction of cardiovascular end-organ damage in normotensive subjects and untreated patients with mild hypertension. Methods 163 subjects underwent measurements of OBP, HBP, ABP, and echocardiography. A physician using a mercury column sphygmomanometer performed three OBP measurements. ABP was recorded using a noninvasive ambulatory monitor (mean 35.4 awake readings per subject). Participants took HBP readings with an automatic, oscillometric device over a 10-week period (mean 277.9 readings per subject). Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was calculated from measurements obtained from 2-dimensionally guided M-mode or linear tracings on echocardiography. Results For systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP/DBP), the correlation coefficients of LVMI with OBP, awake ABP, and HBP were .29/.27, .41/.26, and .47/.35 respectively (all ps<.01). In a multivariate regression analysis in which age, sex, body mass index, OBP, awake ABP, and HBP were included, only age, sex, and HBP were significant predictors of LVMI. When only the first 12 home readings were used, the superiority of HBP was no longer evident. Conclusions In contrast to OBP and ABP, HBP measurements, when averaged over a 10-week period, are independently related to LVMI. HBP adds prognostic information over and above OBP and ABP in the prediction of cardiovascular end-organ damage, but this relation appears to depend on the number of readings taken. PMID:17485006

  7. Maternal Blood Pressure During Pregnancy and Early Childhood Blood Pressures in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wai-Yee; Lee, Yung-Seng; Yap, Fabian Kok-Peng; Aris, Izzudin Mohd; Ngee, Lek; Meaney, Michael; Gluckman, Peter D.; Godfrey, Keith M.; Kwek, Kenneth; Chong, Yap-Seng; Saw, Seang-Mei; Pan, An

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although epidemiological studies suggest that offspring of women with preeclampsia are at increased risk to higher blood pressures and cardiovascular disease, little is known about the nature of blood pressures between the mother and her offspring. As blood pressures comprise of both pulsatile (systolic blood pressure [SBP] and pulse pressure [PP]) and stable (diastolic blood pressure [DBP]) components, and they differ between central and peripheral sites, we sought to examine maternal peripheral and central blood pressure components in relation to offspring early childhood blood pressures. A prospective birth cohort of 567 Chinese, Malay, and Indian mother–offspring with complete blood pressure information were studied. Maternal brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 26 to 28 weeks gestation; and central SBP and PP were estimated from radial artery waveforms. Offspring brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 3 years of age. Associations between continuous variables of maternal blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, PP, central SBP, and PP) and offspring blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, and PP) were examined using multiple linear regression with adjustment for maternal characteristics (age, education level, parity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and physical activity during pregnancy, and pre-pregnancy BMI) and offspring characteristics (sex, ethnicity, BMI, and height at 3 years of age). In the multivariate models, offspring peripheral SBP increased by 0.08 (95% confidence interval 0.00–0.17, P = 0.06) mmHg with every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central SBP, and offspring peripheral PP increased by 0.10 (0.01–0.18, P = 0.03) mmHg for every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central PP. The relations of maternal-offspring peripheral blood pressures (SBP, DBP, and PP) were positive but not statistically significant, and the corresponding values were 0.05 (−0.03 to 0.13; P = 0.21), 0.03 (−0.04 to 0.10; P = 0

  8. Reading Rituals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2007-01-01

    The Ogden, Utah schools have used the mandates of the federal Reading First grant program to transform reading instruction and student achievement in low-performing schools. Reading First was approved by Congress in 2001 under the No Child Left Behind Act to bring scientifically based reading methods and materials to struggling schools. The $1…

  9. Reading Comics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Carol L.

    2008-01-01

    Many adults, even librarians who willingly add comics to their collections, often dismiss the importance of comics. Compared to reading "real" books, reading comics appears to be a simple task and compared to reading no books, reading comics might be preferable. After all, comics do have words, but the plentiful pictures seem to carry most of the…

  10. High blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000468.htm High blood pressure To use the sharing features on ... body. Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are given as ...

  11. The DBP Phenotype Gc-1f/Gc-1f Is Associated with Reduced Risk of Cancer. The Tromsø Study

    PubMed Central

    Jorde, Rolf; Schirmer, Henrik; Wilsgaard, Tom; Bøgeberg Mathiesen, Ellisiv; Njølstad, Inger; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Joakimsen, Ragnar Martin; Grimnes, Guri

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective In addition to its role as a transport protein, the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) may also affect lipid metabolism, inflammation and carcinogenesis. There are three common variants of the DBP, Gc1s (1s), Gc1f (1f), Gc2 (2) that result in six common phenotypes (1s/1s, 1s/1f, 1s/2, 1f/1f, 1f/2, and 2/2). These phenotypes can be identified by genotyping for the two single nucleotide polymorphisms rs7041 and rs4588 in the GC gene. The DBP variants have different binding coefficients for the vitamin D metabolites, and accordingly there may be important relations between DBP phenotypes and health. Methods DNA was prepared from subjects who participated in the fourth survey of the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995 and who were registered with the endpoints myocardial infarction (MI), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), cancer or death as well as a randomly selected control group. The endpoint registers were complete up to 2010- 2013. Genotyping was performed for rs7041 and rs4588 and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured. Results Genotyping for rs7041 and rs4588 was performed successfully in 11 704 subjects. Among these, 1660 were registered with incident MI, 958 with T2DM, 2410 with cancer and 4318 had died. Subjects with the DBP phenotype 1f/1f had 23 – 26 % reduced risk of incident cancer compared to the 1s/1s and 2/2 phenotypes (P < 0.02, Cox regression with gender as covariate). Differences in serum 25(OH)D levels could not explain the apparent cancer protective effect of the DBP variant 1f. In addition to cancer and 25(OH)D, there were significant associations between DBP phenotype and body height, hip circumference and serum calcium. Conclusion There are important biological differences between the common DBP phenotypes. If the relation between the DBP variant 1f and cancer is confirmed in other studies, determination of DBP phenotype may have clinical importance. PMID:25993554

  12. An insight of disinfection by-product (DBP) formation by alternative disinfectants for swimming pool disinfection under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linyan; Schmalz, Christina; Zhou, Jin; Zwiener, Christian; Chang, Victor W-C; Ge, Liya; Wan, Man Pun

    2016-09-15

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is the most commonly used disinfectant in pool treatment system. Outdoor pools usually suffer from the strong sunlight irradiation which degrades the free chlorine rapidly. In addition, more pools start to adopt the recirculation of swimming pool water, which intensifies the disinfection by-product (DBP) accumulation issue. Given these potential drawbacks of using NaClO in the tropical environment, two alternative organic-based disinfectants, trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA, C3Cl3N3O3) and bromochlorodimethylhydantoin (BCDMH, C5H6BrClN2O2), were investigated and compared to NaClO in terms of their self-degradation and the formation of DBPs, including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), under simulated tropical climate conditions. The result reveals that halogen stabilizer, TCCA, had the advantages of slower free chlorine degradation and lower DBP concentration compared to NaClO, which makes it a good alternative disinfectant. BCDMH was not recommended mainly due to the highly reactive disinfecting ingredient, hypobromous acid (HBrO), which fails to sustain the continuous disinfection requirement. Total disinfectant dosage was the main factor that affects residual chlorine/bromine and THM/HAA formation regardless of different disinfectant dosing methods, e.g. shock dosing (one-time spiking) in the beginning, and continuous dosing during the whole experimental period. Two-stage second-order-kinetic-based models demonstrate a good correlation between the measured and predicted data for chlorine decay (R(2) ≥ 0.95), THM (R(2) ≥ 0.99) and HAA (R(2) ≥ 0.83) formation. Higher temperature was found to enhance the DBP formation due to the temperature dependence of reaction rates. Thus, temperature control of pools, especially for those preferring higher temperatures (e.g. hydrotherapy and spa), should take both bather comfort and DBP formation potential into consideration. It is also observed that chlorine competition

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CIRCADIAN BLOOD PRESSURE VARIATION AND AGE ANALYSED FROM 7-DAY MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    SIEGELOVÁ, J.; DUŠEK, J.; FIŠER, B.; HOMOLKA, P.; VANK, P.; MAŠEK, M.; HAVELKOVÁ, A.; CORNÉLISSEN, G.; HALBERG, F.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between age and circadian blood pressure (BP) variation was the aim of the present study. One hundred and eighty-seven subjects (130 males, 57 females), 20-77 years old, were recruited for seven-day BP monitoring. Colin medical instruments (Komaki, Japan) were used for ambulatory BP monitoring (oscillation method, 30-minute interval between measurements). A sinusoidal curve was fitted (minimum square method) and the mean value and amplitude of the curve (double amplitude corresponds to the night-day difference) were evaluated on every day of monitoring. The average 7-day values of the mean (M) and of double amplitude (2A) for systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were determined in each subject. The mean values of M (±SD) for the whole group were: SBP- 127±8, DBP - 79±6 mmHg, HR - 70±6 bpm; of 2A: SBP - 21±7, DBP - 15±5 mmHg, HR - 15±6 bpm. A linear relationship between M of SBP and age (r=0.341, p< 0.001) and DBP and age (r=0.384, p<0.001) was found (difference between 20 and 77 years: SBP - 16, DBP - 12 mmHg). 2A of SBP and DBP was increasing with age up to 35 years, then the curve remained relatively flat up to 55 years (maximum at 45 years), and then it decreased again (difference between 45 and 77 years: SBP - 13mmHg, DBP - 12 mmHg). Heart rate M and 2A were age-independent. The mean values of SBP and DBP were increasing with age up to 75 years, but the night-day difference of SBP and DBP reached its maximum value at 45 years and then decreased. PMID:19436777

  14. Aluminum electrocoagulation as pretreatment during microfiltration of surface water containing NOM: A review of fouling, NOM, DBP, and virus control.

    PubMed

    Chellam, Shankararaman; Sari, Mutiara Ayu

    2016-03-01

    Electrocoagulation (EC) is the intentional corrosion of sacrificial anodes (typically aluminum or iron) by passing electricity to release metal-ion coagulant species and destabilize a wide range of suspended, dissolved, and macromolecular contaminants. It can be integrated ahead of microfiltration (MF) to effectively control turbidity, microorganisms, and disinfection by-products (DBPs) and simultaneously maintain a high MF specific flux. This manuscript summarizes the current knowledge on MF pretreatment by aluminum EC particularly focusing on mechanisms of (i) electrocoagulant dosing, (ii) (bio)colloid destabilization, (iii) fouling reductions, and (iv) enhanced removal of viruses, natural organic matter (NOM), and DBP precursors. Electrolysis efficiently removes hydrophobic NOM, viruses, and siliceous foulants. Aluminum effectively electrocoagulates viruses by physically encapsulating them in flocs, neutralizing their surface charge and reducing electrostatic repulsion, and increasing hydrophobic interactions between any sorbed NOM and free viruses. New results included herein demonstrate that EC achieves DBP control by removing NOM, reducing chlorine-reactivity of remaining NOM, and inducing a slight shift toward more brominated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. EC reduces MF fouling by forming large flocs that tend to deposit on the membrane surface, i.e. decrease pore penetration and forming more permeable cakes and by reducing foulant mass in case of significant floc-flotation. PMID:26619048

  15. 2014 CRL Blood Pressure Study of Life Insurance Applicants.

    PubMed

    Fulks, Michael; Dolan, Vera F; Stout, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Objective .- Define the relative mortality risk by systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in a relatively healthy cohort split by age and sex with adjustment for smoking status, other findings and admitted heart disease history. Method .- Blood pressure (BP in mm Hg), build, laboratory studies and limited medical history are collected when people apply for individual life insurance. Information on 2,472,706 applicants tested by Clinical Reference Laboratory from 1993 to 2007 was utilized with follow-up for vital status using the September 2011 Social Security Death Master File identifying 31,033 deaths. Data was analyzed by SBP and DBP split by age and sex accounting for smoking and for BMI, urine protein/creatinine ratio and history of heart disease in a Cox multivariate survival analysis. Separate analysis by admitted hypertension history was also conducted. Results are presented by SBP and DBP for 4 age-sex groups with and without added covariates beyond age and smoking status. Results .- Relative mortality progressively increased by SBP level from the 90 to 119 band (down to 80 in younger women) upward with little additional impact by DBP. Addition of covariates beyond age and smoking resulted in a 5% to 10% reduction in relative risk. Although high DBP had limited impact, a pulse pressure/SBP ratio >½ identified 1% of applicants at high mortality risk, with little difference in risk for ratios ≤½. Hypertension history with current BP control was associated with a 10% to 25% increase in relative mortality risk as compared to those with similar BP but no such history. Conclusion .- Increasing SBP is closely associated with increasing relative mortality, starting from the lowest SBP. Increasing DBP has little additional impact, but a pulse pressure/SBP ratio >½ is a potent marker of increased risk as well. Accounting for build and other laboratory findings reduces risk modestly. A history of hypertension with current control increases risk. PMID

  16. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  17. Pathway modeling of microarray data: A case study of pathway activity changes in the testis following in utero exposure to dibutyl phthalate (DBP)

    SciTech Connect

    Ovacik, Meric A.; Sen, Banalata; Euling, Susan Y.; Gaido, Kevin W.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2013-09-15

    Pathway activity level analysis, the approach pursued in this study, focuses on all genes that are known to be members of metabolic and signaling pathways as defined by the KEGG database. The pathway activity level analysis entails singular value decomposition (SVD) of the expression data of the genes constituting a given pathway. We explore an extension of the pathway activity methodology for application to time-course microarray data. We show that pathway analysis enhances our ability to detect biologically relevant changes in pathway activity using synthetic data. As a case study, we apply the pathway activity level formulation coupled with significance analysis to microarray data from two different rat testes exposed in utero to Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP). In utero DBP exposure in the rat results in developmental toxicity of a number of male reproductive organs, including the testes. One well-characterized mode of action for DBP and the male reproductive developmental effects is the repression of expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport, steroid biosynthesis and testosterone synthesis that lead to a decreased fetal testicular testosterone. Previous analyses of DBP testes microarray data focused on either individual gene expression changes or changes in the expression of specific genes that are hypothesized, or known, to be important in testicular development and testosterone synthesis. However, a pathway analysis may inform whether there are additional affected pathways that could inform additional modes of action linked to DBP developmental toxicity. We show that Pathway activity analysis may be considered for a more comprehensive analysis of microarray data.

  18. Baculovirus-expressed vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) activates osteoclasts and binding of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) does not influence this activity.

    PubMed

    Swamy, N; Ghosh, S; Schneider, G B; Ray, R

    2001-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is a multi-functional serum protein that is converted to vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) by post-translational modification. DBP-maf is a new cytokine that mediates bone resorption by activating osteoclasts, which are responsible for resorption of bone. Defective osteoclast activation leads to disorders like osteopetrosis, characterized by excessive accumulation of bone mass. Previous studies demonstrated that two nonallelic mutations in the rat with osteopetrosis have independent defects in the cascade involved in the conversion of DBP to DBP-maf. The skeletal defects associated with osteopetrosis are corrected in these mutants with in vivo DBP-maf treatment. This study evaluates the effects of various forms of DBP-maf (native, recombinant, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) bound) on osteoclast function in vitro in order to determine some of the structural requirements of this protein that relate to bone resorbing activities. Osteoclast activity was determined by evaluating pit formation using osteoclasts, isolated from the long bones of newborn rats, incubated on calcium phosphate coated, thin film, Ostologic MultiTest Slides. Incubation of osteoclasts with ex vivo generated native DBP-maf resulted in a dose dependent, statistically significant, activation of the osteoclasts. The activation was similar whether or not the vitamin D binding site of the DBP-maf was occupied. The level of activity in response to DBP-maf was greater than that elicited by optimal doses of other known stimulators (PTH and 1,25(OH(2)D(3)) of osteoclast function. Furthermore, another potent macrophage activating factor, interferon--gamma, had no effect on osteoclast activity. The activated form of a full length recombinant DBP, expressed in E. coli showed no activity in the in vitro assay. Contrary to this finding, baculovirus-expressed recombinant DBP-maf demonstrated significant osteoclast activating activity. The normal

  19. How Is High Blood Pressure Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure and maintain normal blood pressure readings. Healthy Eating To help treat high blood pressure, health care ... Read more about the DASH eating plan. Heart-Healthy Eating Your health care provider also may recommend heart- ...

  20. Multicultural Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltze, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Multicultural reading advocates believe in the power of literature to transform and to change people's lives. They take seriously the arguments that racism and prejudice can be lessened through multicultural reading, and also that children from undervalued societal groups who read books that depict people like themselves in a positive light will…

  1. Maternal Blood Pressure During Pregnancy and Early Childhood Blood Pressures in the Offspring: The GUSTO Birth Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wai-Yee; Lee, Yung-Seng; Yap, Fabian Kok-Peng; Aris, Izzudin Mohd; Ngee, Lek; Meaney, Michael; Gluckman, Peter D; Godfrey, Keith M; Kwek, Kenneth; Chong, Yap-Seng; Saw, Seang-Mei; Pan, An

    2015-11-01

    Although epidemiological studies suggest that offspring of women with preeclampsia are at increased risk to higher blood pressures and cardiovascular disease, little is known about the nature of blood pressures between the mother and her offspring. As blood pressures comprise of both pulsatile (systolic blood pressure [SBP] and pulse pressure [PP]) and stable (diastolic blood pressure [DBP]) components, and they differ between central and peripheral sites, we sought to examine maternal peripheral and central blood pressure components in relation to offspring early childhood blood pressures. A prospective birth cohort of 567 Chinese, Malay, and Indian mother-offspring with complete blood pressure information were studied. Maternal brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 26 to 28 weeks gestation; and central SBP and PP were estimated from radial artery waveforms. Offspring brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 3 years of age. Associations between continuous variables of maternal blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, PP, central SBP, and PP) and offspring blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, and PP) were examined using multiple linear regression with adjustment for maternal characteristics (age, education level, parity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and physical activity during pregnancy, and pre-pregnancy BMI) and offspring characteristics (sex, ethnicity, BMI, and height at 3 years of age). In the multivariate models, offspring peripheral SBP increased by 0.08 (95% confidence interval 0.00-0.17, P = 0.06) mmHg with every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central SBP, and offspring peripheral PP increased by 0.10 (0.01-0.18, P = 0.03) mmHg for every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central PP. The relations of maternal-offspring peripheral blood pressures (SBP, DBP, and PP) were positive but not statistically significant, and the corresponding values were 0.05 (-0.03 to 0.13; P = 0.21), 0.03 (-0.04 to 0.10; P = 0.35), and 0.05 (-0

  2. Pressure and temperature dependent viscosity of two glass forming liquids: Glycerol and dibutyl phthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Richard L.; King, H. E., Jr.; Herbst, Chris A.; Herschbach, Dudley R.

    1994-04-01

    The pressure and temperature dependent viscosities of two glass forming liquids, glycerol and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), have been studied in the range P=0-3 GPa, T=0-125 °C, and η=101-1010 cP. These studies were made using a combination of a rolling-ball and a centrifugal-force diamond anvil cell viscometer. The majority of the results extend up to viscosities of 107 cP, with those at 22.5 °C going to 1010 cP. The overall precision of the data are approximately 10% or better throughout. This level of precision allows us to define a viscosity surface which can then be extrapolated to the glass transition along both temperature and pressure cuts. The T-dependence of viscosity is larger for glycerol than DBP but the P-dependence smaller for glycerol than for DBP, whereas the T-dependence is much more pressure sensitive for DBP. These data provide an assessment of the T-dependence of an isothermal model (free volume), the P-dependence of an isobaric model (Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher) and by extension that for isochoric conditions. Fragility parameters are evaluated for these three isometric conditions. For glycerol and (less conclusively) DBP under isobaric conditions, the fragility increases markedly at high pressure. Under isochoric conditions, the fragility for both glycerol and DBP increases with increasing density. This is dramatic for DBP, which goes from a strong to an intermediate-strength liquid. For the isothermal model, we derive a new measure of fragility. Using this, DBP shows a trend common to several liquids, a decrease in fragility with increasing temperature. Glycerol, however, becomes more fragile over the same temperature range. For glycerol, the trends towards increased fragility at elevated pressure and temperature are consistent with diminished hydrogen bonding under those conditions. The P-dependence of the glass transition is also determined over a wide range of T. The slope, dTg/dP, is positive with the pressure dependence for glycerol being

  3. Dbp73D, a Drosophila gene expressed in ovary, encodes a novel D-E-A-D box protein.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, L F; Harvey, M; Lasko, P F

    1992-01-01

    Proteins of the D-E-A-D family of putative ATP-dependent RNA helicases have been implicated in translation initiation and RNA splicing in a variety of organisms from E. coli to man. The Drosophila vasa protein, a member of this family, is required in the female germ line for fertility and for specification of germ line and posterior positional information in progeny embryos. We report the isolation of another D-E-A-D gene from Drosophila, which, like vasa, is expressed in germ line tissue. The predicted amino acid sequence of this new gene, Dbp73D, contains all of the highly conserved helicase motifs, but is otherwise the farthest-diverged member of the family so far identified. Images PMID:1620603

  4. AN APPROACH TO USING TOXICOGENOMIC DATA IN U.S. EPA HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENTS: A DIBUTYL PHTHALATE (DBP) CASE STUDY (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft report is a description of an approach to evaluate genomic data for use in risk assessment and a case study to illustrate the approach. The dibutyl phthalate (DBP) case study example focuses on male reproductive developmental effects and the qualitative application of...

  5. MALFORMATIONS IN GUBERNACULAR LIGAMENT DEVELOPMENT INDUCED BY DEHP, DBP, AND BBP ARE ASSOCIATED WITH DECREASES IN INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN THE FETAL RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Malformations in gubernacular ligament development induced by DEHP, DBP, and BBP are associated with decreases in insl3 gene expression in the fetal rat testis.
    Vickie S.Wilson, Christy Lambright, Johnathan Furr, Carmen Wood, Gary Held, L. Earl Gray Jr. U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEER...

  6. Toxicity and molecular effects of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) on CYP1A, SOD, and GPx in Cyprinus carpio (common carp).

    PubMed

    Agus, Hizlan H; Sümer, Sibel; Erkoç, Figen

    2015-07-01

    Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), a widely used plasticizer in the plastic industry, affects regulation of the endocrine system and causes toxicity in animals. In the present study, we evaluated a series of ecotoxicological stress biomarkers in the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) as an experimental model to test for alterations in gene expression at a sublethal concentration of 1 mg/L DBP for 4, 24, and 96 h. In gills, an immediate increase in CYP1A messenger RNA (mRNA) levels was observed within the first 4 h and persisted for 96 h. Protein levels were nearly consistent with mRNA levels. However, a time-dependent inhibition was observed in CYP1A levels in the liver within 96 h. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels increased gradually in liver with exposure time to a maximum level of 11-fold. Varied responses of different tissues were likely due to xenobiotic metabolism of DBP. In conclusion, evaluating the tissue-specific alterations of CYP1A, SOD, and GPx levels can be used as specific and effective biomarkers for ecotoxicological monitoring of DBP pollution. We strongly recommend using molecular tools to ecotoxicologists for aquatic monitoring of newly emerging pollutants. PMID:26065888

  7. Chlorine Decay and DBP formation under Different Flow Regions in PVC and Ductile Iron Pipes: Preliminary Results on the Role of flow Velocity and Radial Mass Transfer - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic experimental study was conducted using a pilot-scale drinking water distribution system simulator to quantify the effect of hydrodynamics, total organic carbon (TOC), initial disinfectant levels, and pipe materials on chlorine decay and disinfection by-product (DBP) ...

  8. Chlorine decay and DBP formation under different flow regions in PVC and ductile iron pipes: Preliminary results on the role of flow velocity and radial mass transfer

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic experimental study was conducted using a pilot-scale drinking water distribution system simulator to quantify the effect of hydrodynamics, total organic carbon (TOC), initial disinfectant levels, and pipe materials on chlorine decay and disinfection by-product (DBP) ...

  9. Effect of Pressurized Cement Insertion on Cardiopulmonary Parameters during Cemented Hip Hemiarthroplasty: A Randomized Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo Suk; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Sang Hoon; Park, Sub Ri; Park, Byoung Hark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the cardiopulmonary effects of pressurized cement insertion in elderly patients undergoing cemented hip hemiarthroplasty. Materials and Methods We conducted a randomized prospective study on elderly patients undergoing cemented hip hemiarthroplasty. Patients were divided into pressurized and non-pressurized groups based on the pressure application during cement insertion. We measured mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), arterial blood gases and serotonin concentration in blood. These variables were measured before bone cement insertion, and 3 and 5 minute after insertion. They were also measured immediately and 15 minutes after reduction. Results In cemented hip hemiarthroplasty, there were no significant change in MAP (P=0.92), SBP (P=0.85), DBP (P=0.98), HR (P=0.97) and serotonin concentration over time. There were no statistically significant difference between the two groups in MAP, SBP, DBP, HR, PO2, PaCO2, SaO2 and serotonin concentration, though three minutes after cement insertion, both groups showed decreases in SBP, DBP and MBP. Conclusion The pressurization method in cemented hip hemiarthroplasty was not found to be related with development of bone cement syndromes in elderly patients.

  10. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1(-/-) A(y)/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the Arnt promoter in MIN6 cells. These results suggest that in mouse pancreatic islets mRNA expression of Arnt fluctuates significantly in a circadian manner and that the down-regulation of Dbp and up-regulation E4bp4 contribute to direct suppression of Arnt expression in diabetes. PMID:23567972

  11. Why should I read? - A cross-cultural investigation into adolescents' reading socialisation and reading attitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeder, Peter; Stokmans, Mia

    2013-06-01

    While reading behaviour of adolescents is a frequent object of research, most studies in this field are restricted to a single country. This study investigates reading as a leisure-time activity across social groups from three regions differing in reading tradition as well as in the facilities available for reading. The authors analyse the reading behaviour of a total of 2,173 adolescents in the Netherlands, in Beijing (China), and in Cape Town (South Africa). Taking Icek Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour as a starting point, the authors adjusted it to model the three most important determinants of reading behaviour, namely (1) reading attitude; (2) subjective norms (implicit and explicit social pressure to read); and (3) perceived behavioural control, which includes reading proficiency and appropriateness of the available books (book supply). While they found the adjusted model to fit the Dutch and Beijing situation quite well, it appeared to be inappropriate for the Cape Town situation. Despite considerable cultural and situational differences between the Netherlands and Beijing, the results show a similar pattern for these two environments. The most important determinants turn out to be: the hedonic reading attitude, the implicit norm of family and friends, the attractiveness of the available choice of books, and the perceived reading proficiency.

  12. Evidence for a major gene influencing 7-year increases in diastolic blood pressure with age

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shu-Chuan Cheng; Carmelli, D.; Hunt, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to blood pressure levels is well established. The contribution of genes to the longitudinal change in blood pressure has been less well studied, because of the lack of longitudinal family data. The present study investigated a possible major-gene effect on the observed increase with age in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels. Subjects included 965 unmedicated adults (age {ge}18 years) in 73 pedigrees collected in Utah as part of a longitudinal cardiovascular family study. Segregation analysis of DBP change over 7.2 years of follow-up identified a recessive major-gene effect with a gene frequency of p = .23. There was also a significant age effect on the genotypic means, which decreased expression of the major gene at older ages. For those inferred to have the genotype responsible for large DBP increases, DBP increased 32.3%, compared with a 1.5% increase in the nonsusceptible group (P < .0001). The relative risk of developing hypertension between the susceptible and nonsusceptible groups after 7.2 years was 2.4 (P = .006). Baseline DBP reactivities to mental arithmetic (P < .0001) and isometric hand-grip (P < .0001) stress tests were greatest in those assigned to the susceptible genotype. We conclude that age-related changes in DBP are influenced by a major gene. Characteristics of this major-gene effect for greater age-related blood pressure increases include greater reactivity to mental and physical stressors. The present study thus provides evidence for genetic control of changes in blood pressure, in addition to the previously suggested genetic control of absolute blood pressure level. 28 refs., 6 tabs.

  13. Systolic blood pressure goals to reduce cardiovascular disease among older adults.

    PubMed

    Muntner, Paul; Bowling, C Barrett; Shimbo, Daichi

    2014-08-01

    The 2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults Report From the Panel Members Appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) was recently published. This guideline recommended that older adults (≥60 years) without diabetes or chronic kidney disease with systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥150 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mm Hg be initiated on antihypertensive medication with a treatment goal SBP/DBP <150/90 mm Hg. In contrast, the previous 3 JNC guidelines recommended treatment for these individuals be initiated at SBP/DBP ≥140/90 mm Hg with goal SBP/DBP <140/90 mm Hg. In this article, we review randomized trials of antihypertensive medication and observational data on SBP and DBP with cardiovascular outcomes among older adults, possible explanations underlying the different findings from these randomized trials and observational studies, and contemporary antihypertensive treatment patterns among older U.S. adults. In closing, we highlight future research needs related to hypertension and outcomes among older adults. PMID:24978394

  14. Against Readings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmundson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Edmundson states that if he could make one wish for the members of his profession, college and university professors of literature, he would wish that for one year, two, three, or five, they would give up readings. By "a reading," he means the application of an analytical vocabulary to describe and (usually) to judge a work of literary art.…

  15. Read Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This manual, designed to help public libraries in Arizona to plan their summer reading programs for children, celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Arizona Reading Program. The material in the manual is prepared for libraries to adapt for their own uses. Chapters of the manual include: (1) Introductory Materials; (2) Goals, Objectives and…

  16. Required Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janko, Edmund

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the author insists that those seeking public office prove their literary mettle. As an English teacher, he does have a litmus test for all public officials, judges and senators included--a reading litmus test. He would require that all candidates and nominees have read and reflected on a nucleus of works whose ideas and insights…

  17. Reading Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Lorna

    This guide is intended for use in conducting a reading lab for a broad group of workers ranging from nonreaders to persons reading at a fifth-grade level. Presented first is a course overview that includes the following: information on the course's targeted population, student selection process, and demographics; strategies for adult remediation;…

  18. Repeated Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Sandra B.

    1982-01-01

    The article reviews research on the use of multiple oral rereading (MOR) with reading disabled students. MOR uses daily practice on a selection of little difficulty. Its effectiveness in increasing fluency (accuracy and speed) is examined, and the role of redundancy in three types of reading models is analyzed. (CL)

  19. Reading Remixed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenza, Joyce Kasman; Stephens, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Critics claim that digital technologies are killing reading, but these teacher-librarians have observed that teens are as excited about reading as they ever were. Online communities give these readers opportunities to get to know authors, communicate with other fans, and learn more about books of interest. Publishers and authors are responding to…

  20. Teaching Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Mary

    1980-01-01

    Described are five approaches to teaching reading: Language Experience, Modified Alphabet, Linguistic, Programmed, and Basal. It is suggested that a good teacher, well trained, certified in his or her profession, an active participant in professional organizations, can teach reading successfully using almost any approach. (KC)

  1. Reading Aloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delo, Lynda

    2008-01-01

    Many resources are available to elementary teachers who wish to support science learning with literature. Unfortunately, somewhere between middle school and high school, the emphasis on using literature to teach science content--particularly the exercise of reading aloud--has all but disappeared. However, the practice of reading aloud is helpful…

  2. Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    Notes that a major issue in literacy instruction today is whether commercial reading programs emphasizing phonemic awareness and phonics are more effective than teacher-designed programs that focus on literature-based reading and process writing with integrated skill instruction. Reviews two books that address this controversy. Presents seven…

  3. Pathway modeling of microarray data: a case study of pathway activity changes in the testis following in utero exposure to dibutyl phthalate (DBP).

    PubMed

    Ovacik, Meric A; Sen, Banalata; Euling, Susan Y; Gaido, Kevin W; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2013-09-15

    Pathway activity level analysis, the approach pursued in this study, focuses on all genes that are known to be members of metabolic and signaling pathways as defined by the KEGG database. The pathway activity level analysis entails singular value decomposition (SVD) of the expression data of the genes constituting a given pathway. We explore an extension of the pathway activity methodology for application to time-course microarray data. We show that pathway analysis enhances our ability to detect biologically relevant changes in pathway activity using synthetic data. As a case study, we apply the pathway activity level formulation coupled with significance analysis to microarray data from two different rat testes exposed in utero to Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP). In utero DBP exposure in the rat results in developmental toxicity of a number of male reproductive organs, including the testes. One well-characterized mode of action for DBP and the male reproductive developmental effects is the repression of expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport, steroid biosynthesis and testosterone synthesis that lead to a decreased fetal testicular testosterone. Previous analyses of DBP testes microarray data focused on either individual gene expression changes or changes in the expression of specific genes that are hypothesized, or known, to be important in testicular development and testosterone synthesis. However, a pathway analysis may inform whether there are additional affected pathways that could inform additional modes of action linked to DBP developmental toxicity. We show that Pathway activity analysis may be considered for a more comprehensive analysis of microarray data. PMID:20850466

  4. Effects of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) infusion on bone resorption in two osteopetrotic mutations.

    PubMed

    Schneider, G B; Benis, K A; Flay, N W; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1995-06-01

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of bone diseases characterized by an excess accumulation of bone and a variety of immune defects. Osteopetrosis (op) and incisors absent (ia) are two nonallelic mutations in the rat which demonstrated these skeletal defects as a result of reduced bone resorption. Osteopetrotic (op) rats have severe sclerosis as a result of reduced numbers of osteoclasts which are structurally abnormal. The sclerosis in ia rats is not as severe as in op mutants; they have elevated numbers of osteoclasts, but they are also morphologically abnormal, lacking a ruffled border. Both of these mutations have defects in the inflammation-primed activation of macrophages. They demonstrate independent defects in the cascade involved in the conversion of vitamin D binding protein (DBP) to a potent macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF). Because this factor may also play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoclastic dysfunction, the effects of ex vivo-generated DBP-MAF were evaluated on the skeletal system of these two mutations. Newborn ia and op rats and normal littermate controls were injected with DBP-MAF or vehicle once every 4 days from birth until 2 weeks of age, at which time bone samples were collected to evaluate a number of skeletal parameters. DBP-MAF treated op rats had an increased number of osteoclasts and the majority of them exhibited normal structure. There was also reduced bone volume in the treated op animals and an associated increased cellularity of the marrow spaces. The skeletal sclerosis was also corrected in the ia rats; the bone marrow cavity size was significantly enlarged and the majority of the osteoclasts appeared normal with extensive ruffled borders. PMID:7669443

  5. Blood Pressure over Height Ratios: Simple and Accurate Method of Detecting Elevated Blood Pressure in Children.

    PubMed

    Galescu, Ovidiu; George, Minu; Basetty, Sudhakar; Predescu, Iuliana; Mongia, Anil; Ten, Svetlana; Bhangoo, Amrit

    2012-01-01

    Background. Blood pressure (BP) percentiles in childhood are assessed according to age, gender, and height. Objective. To create a simple BP/height ratio for both systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP). To study the relationship between BP/height ratios and corresponding BP percentiles in children. Methods. We analyzed data on height and BP from 2006-2007 NHANES data. BP percentiles were calculated for 3775 children. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to calculate sensitivity and specificity of BP/height ratios as diagnostic tests for elevated BP (>90%). Correlation analysis was performed between BP percentiles and BP/height ratios. Results. The average age was 12.54 ± 2.67 years. SBP/height and DBP/height ratios strongly correlated with SBP & DBP percentiles in both boys (P < 0.001, R(2) = 0.85, R(2) = 0.86) and girls (P < 0.001, R(2) = 0.85, R(2) = 0.90). The cutoffs of SBP/height and DBP/height ratios in boys were ≥0.75 and ≥0.46, respectively; in girls the ratios were ≥0.75 and ≥0.48, respectively with sensitivity and specificity in range of 83-100%. Conclusion. BP/height ratios are simple with high sensitivity and specificity to detect elevated BP in children. These ratios can be easily used in routine medical care of children. PMID:22577400

  6. Blood Pressure over Height Ratios: Simple and Accurate Method of Detecting Elevated Blood Pressure in Children

    PubMed Central

    Galescu, Ovidiu; George, Minu; Basetty, Sudhakar; Predescu, Iuliana; Mongia, Anil; Ten, Svetlana; Bhangoo, Amrit

    2012-01-01

    Background. Blood pressure (BP) percentiles in childhood are assessed according to age, gender, and height. Objective. To create a simple BP/height ratio for both systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP). To study the relationship between BP/height ratios and corresponding BP percentiles in children. Methods. We analyzed data on height and BP from 2006-2007 NHANES data. BP percentiles were calculated for 3775 children. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to calculate sensitivity and specificity of BP/height ratios as diagnostic tests for elevated BP (>90%). Correlation analysis was performed between BP percentiles and BP/height ratios. Results. The average age was 12.54 ± 2.67 years. SBP/height and DBP/height ratios strongly correlated with SBP & DBP percentiles in both boys (P < 0.001, R2 = 0.85, R2 = 0.86) and girls (P < 0.001, R2 = 0.85, R2 = 0.90). The cutoffs of SBP/height and DBP/height ratios in boys were ≥0.75 and ≥0.46, respectively; in girls the ratios were ≥0.75 and ≥0.48, respectively with sensitivity and specificity in range of 83–100%. Conclusion. BP/height ratios are simple with high sensitivity and specificity to detect elevated BP in children. These ratios can be easily used in routine medical care of children. PMID:22577400

  7. Which is More Accurate in Measuring the Blood Pressure? A Digital or an Aneroid Sphygmomanometer

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Aparajita; Sarkar, Kaushik; Sahoo, Sanjaya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is one of the major public health problem affecting the whole world so its accurate measurement is of utmost importance for its early diagnosis and management. Concerns related to the potential ill effects of mercury on health and environment, has led to the widespread use of non-mercury sphygmomanometers. Aim A study was conducted to compare the accuracy of readings of aneroid and digital sphygmomanometers in reference to mercury sphygmomanometers and determine the hypertensive classification agreement between the mercury and non-mercury devices. Materials and Methods The study was conducted in an OPD of a health centre in a rural community of West Bengal which is the rural field practice area of our institute. An aneroid and a digital sphygmomanometer were compared to a properly calibrated mercury sphygmomanometer. All the subjects above the age of 25 years, in two days per week, selected randomly from five working days per week in a period of one month were selected. Two blood pressure readings of each of 218 study subjects was recorded with each pretested sphygmomanometer. Paired t-test, Kappa coefficients, sensitivity and specificity tests were done. Receiver Operating Characteristics curve analysis was done and Youden index was estimated to detect the optimal cut off point for the diagnosis of hypertension by non-mercury sphygmomanometers. Results Data analysis of 218 study subjects showed the mean difference of the mercury reading and the test device was much less for aneroid than that of the digital device for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. More than 89% of aneroid readings and less than 44% of the readings by digital device had absolute difference of 5mm Hg. when compared with the mercury readings for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Sensitivity and specificity of aneroid device was higher (86.7% and 98.7%) than digital device (80% and 67.7%). Receiver Operating Characteristic curve had larger area under

  8. Does the position or contact pressure of the stethoscope make any difference to clinical blood pressure measurements: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fan; Zheng, Dingchang; He, Peiyu; Murray, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on auscultatory blood pressure (BP) measurement. Thirty healthy subjects were studied. Two identical stethoscopes (one under the cuff, the other outside the cuff) were used to simultaneously and digitally record 2 channels of Korotkoff sounds during linear cuff pressure deflation. For each subject, 3 measurements with different contact pressures (0, 50, and 100 mm Hg) on the stethoscope outside the cuff were each recorded at 3 repeat sessions. The Korotkoff sounds were replayed twice on separate days to each of 2 experienced listeners to determine systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP). Variance analysis was performed to study the measurement repeatability and the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on BPs. There was no significant BP difference between the 3 repeat sessions, between the 2 determinations from each listener, between the 2 listeners and between the 3 stethoscope contact pressures (all P > 0.06). There was no significant SBP difference between the 2 stethoscope positions at the 2 lower stethoscope pressures (P = 0.23 and 0.45), but there was a small (0.4 mm Hg, clinically unimportant) significant difference (P = 0.005) at the highest stethoscope pressure. The key result was that, DBP from the stethoscope under the cuff was significantly lower than that from outside the cuff by 2.8 mm Hg (P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval -3.5 to -2.1 mm Hg). Since it is known that the traditional Korotkoff sound method, with the stethoscope outside the cuff, tends to give a higher DBP than the true intra-arterial pressure, this study could suggest that the stethoscope position under the cuff, and closer to the arterial occlusion, might yield measurements closer to the actual invasive DBP. PMID:25546675

  9. Does the Position or Contact Pressure of the Stethoscope Make Any Difference to Clinical Blood Pressure Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fan; Zheng, Dingchang; He, Peiyu; Murray, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on auscultatory blood pressure (BP) measurement. Thirty healthy subjects were studied. Two identical stethoscopes (one under the cuff, the other outside the cuff) were used to simultaneously and digitally record 2 channels of Korotkoff sounds during linear cuff pressure deflation. For each subject, 3 measurements with different contact pressures (0, 50, and 100 mm Hg) on the stethoscope outside the cuff were each recorded at 3 repeat sessions. The Korotkoff sounds were replayed twice on separate days to each of 2 experienced listeners to determine systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP). Variance analysis was performed to study the measurement repeatability and the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on BPs. There was no significant BP difference between the 3 repeat sessions, between the 2 determinations from each listener, between the 2 listeners and between the 3 stethoscope contact pressures (all P > 0.06). There was no significant SBP difference between the 2 stethoscope positions at the 2 lower stethoscope pressures (P = 0.23 and 0.45), but there was a small (0.4 mm Hg, clinically unimportant) significant difference (P = 0.005) at the highest stethoscope pressure. The key result was that, DBP from the stethoscope under the cuff was significantly lower than that from outside the cuff by 2.8 mm Hg (P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval −3.5 to −2.1 mm Hg). Since it is known that the traditional Korotkoff sound method, with the stethoscope outside the cuff, tends to give a higher DBP than the true intra-arterial pressure, this study could suggest that the stethoscope position under the cuff, and closer to the arterial occlusion, might yield measurements closer to the actual invasive DBP. PMID:25546675

  10. The anabolic effects of vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) and a novel small peptide on bone.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gary B; Grecco, Kristina J; Safadi, Fayez F; Popoff, Steven N

    2003-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) has previously been shown to stimulate bone resorption and correct the skeletal defects associated with osteopetrosis in two nonallelic mutations in rats. This same protein and a small fragment of the protein have now been shown to demonstrate an anabolic effect on the skeleton of both newborn and young adult, intact rats. The novel peptide fragment was synthetically produced based on the human amino acid sequence at the site of glycosylation in the third domain of the native protein (DBP). The peptide tested is 14 amino acids in length and demonstrates no homologies other than to that region of DBP. Newborn rats were injected i.p. with saline, peptide (0.4 ng/g body wt.) or DBP-MAF (2 ng/g body wt.) every other day from birth to 14 days of age. On day 16 the rats were euthanized and the long bones collected for bone densitometry by pQCT. After 2 weeks of treatment with either the whole protein (DBP-MAF) or the small peptide, bone density was significantly increased in the treated animals compared to the saline controls. Young adult female rats (180 grams) were given s.c. injections of saline or peptide (0.4 ng/g body wt. or 5 ng/g body wt.) every other day for 2 weeks; 2 days after the final injections, the rats were euthanized and the femurs and tibias collected for bone densitometry. Both doses of the peptide resulted in significant increases in bone density as determined by pQCT. Young adult rats were injected locally with a single dose of the peptide (1 microg) or saline into the marrow cavity of the distal femur. One week after the single injection, the bones were collected for radiographic and histological evaluation. The saline controls showed no evidence of new bone formation, whereas the peptide-treated animals demonstrated osteoinduction in the marrow cavity and osteogenesis of surrounding cortical and metaphyseal bone. These data suggest that DBP-MAF and the synthetic peptide represent

  11. Does E-Reading Enhance Reading Fluency?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbar, Rahima S.; Taqi, Hanan A.; Dashti, Abdulmohsin A.; Sadeq, Taiba M.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive reading is reading as much as possible, for one's own pleasure, at a difficulty level at which one can read smoothly and quickly. In the domain of reading, this paper investigates the effect of extensive reading from e-books, through utilizing a number of downloadable reading application programs on the students' e-devices, as opposed to…

  12. Reading Research in Hungary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamaras, Istvan; Nagy, Attila

    1981-01-01

    Notes that most recent reading research conducted in Hungary has focused on the formation of readers' attitudes and value judgments. Discusses studies conducted in the areas of reading psychology, children's reading, reading habits, reading motivation, and readers' responses. (FL)

  13. 25(OH)D2 Half-Life Is Shorter Than 25(OH)D3 Half-Life and Is Influenced by DBP Concentration and Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Assar, S.; Harnpanich, D.; Bouillon, R.; Lambrechts, D.; Prentice, A.; Schoenmakers, I.

    2014-01-01

    Context: There is uncertainty over the equivalence of vitamins D2 and D3 to maintain plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the plasma half-lives of 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 in two distinct populations with different dietary calcium intake and 25(OH)D status. Participants: Healthy men (aged 24 and 39 y), resident in The Gambia (n = 18) or the United Kingdom (n = 18) participated in the study. Interventions: The intervention included an oral tracer dose of deuterated-25(OH)D2 and deuterated-25(OH)D3 (both 40 nmol). Blood samples were collected over 33 days. Main Outcome Measures: 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 plasma half-lives, concentrations of 25(OH)D, and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) and DBP genotypes were measured. Results: 25(OH)D2 half-life [mean (SD)] [13.9 (2.6) d] was shorter than 25(OH)D3 half-life [15.1 (3.1) d; P = .001] for countries combined, and in Gambians [12.8 (2.3) d vs 14.7 (3.5) d; P < .001], but not in the United Kingdom [15.1 (2.4) d vs 15.6 (2.5) d; P = .3]. 25(OH)D concentration was 69 (13) and 29 (11) nmol/L (P < .0001), and the DBP concentration was 259 (33) and 269 (23) mg/L (P = .4) in The Gambia and United Kingdom, respectively. Half-lives were positively associated with plasma DBP concentration for countries combined [25(OH)D2 half-life: regression coefficient (SE) 0.03 (0.01) d per 1 mg/L DBP, P = .03; 25(OH)D3 half-life: 0.04 (0.02) d, P = .02] and in Gambians [25(OH)D2 half-life: 0.04 (0.01) d; P = .02; 25(OH)D3 half-life: 0.06 (0.02) d, P = .01] but not in UK participants. The DBP concentration × country interactions were not significant. DBP Gc1f/1f homozygotes had shorter 25(OH)D2 half-lives compared with other combined genotypes (P = .007) after correction for country. Conclusions: 25(OH)D2 half-life was shorter than 25(OH)D3 half-life, and half-lives were affected by DBP concentration and genotype. The stable isotope 25(OH)D half-life measurements provide a novel tool to investigate

  14. How Reading Volume Affects Both Reading Fluency and Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allington, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Long overlooked, reading volume is actually central to the development of reading proficiencies, especially in the development of fluent reading proficiency. Generally no one in schools monitors the actual volume of reading that children engage in. We know that the commonly used commercial core reading programs provide only material that requires…

  15. Cloning and characterisation of mtDBP, a DNA-binding protein which binds two distinct regions of sea urchin mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Loguercio Polosa, P; Roberti, M; Musicco, C; Gadaleta, M N; Quagliariello, E; Cantatore, P

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA for the sea urchin mitochondrial D-loop-binding protein (mtDBP), a 40 kDa protein which binds two homologous regions of mitochondrial DNA (the D-loop region and the boundary between the oppositely transcribed ND5 and ND6 genes), has been cloned. Four different 3'-untranslated regions have been detected that are related to each other in pairs and do not contain the canonical polyadenylation signal. The in vitro synthesised mature protein (348 amino acids), deprived of the putative signal sequence, binds specifically to its DNA target sequence and produces a DNase I footprint identical to that given by the natural protein. mtDBP contains two leucine zippers, one of which is bipartite, and two small N- and C-terminal basic domains. A deletion mutation analysis of the recombinant protein has shown that the N-terminal region and the two leucine zippers are necessary for the binding. Furthermore, evidence was provided that mtDBP binds DNA as a monomer. This rules out a dimerization role for the leucine zippers and rather suggests that intramolecular interactions between leucine zippers take place. A database search has revealed as the most significative homology a match with the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF), a protein that also binds DNA as a monomer and contains three leucine zippers forming intramolecular interactions. These similarities, and the observation that mtDBP-binding sites contain the 3'-ends of mtRNAs coded by opposite strands and the 3'-end of the D-loop structure, point to a dual function of the protein in modulating sea urchin mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. PMID:10101198

  16. Cloning and characterisation of mtDBP, a DNA-binding protein which binds two distinct regions of sea urchin mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Loguercio Polosa, P; Roberti, M; Musicco, C; Gadaleta, M N; Quagliariello, E; Cantatore, P

    1999-04-15

    The cDNA for the sea urchin mitochondrial D-loop-binding protein (mtDBP), a 40 kDa protein which binds two homologous regions of mitochondrial DNA (the D-loop region and the boundary between the oppositely transcribed ND5 and ND6 genes), has been cloned. Four different 3'-untranslated regions have been detected that are related to each other in pairs and do not contain the canonical polyadenylation signal. The in vitro synthesised mature protein (348 amino acids), deprived of the putative signal sequence, binds specifically to its DNA target sequence and produces a DNase I footprint identical to that given by the natural protein. mtDBP contains two leucine zippers, one of which is bipartite, and two small N- and C-terminal basic domains. A deletion mutation analysis of the recombinant protein has shown that the N-terminal region and the two leucine zippers are necessary for the binding. Furthermore, evidence was provided that mtDBP binds DNA as a monomer. This rules out a dimerization role for the leucine zippers and rather suggests that intramolecular interactions between leucine zippers take place. A database search has revealed as the most significative homology a match with the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF), a protein that also binds DNA as a monomer and contains three leucine zippers forming intramolecular interactions. These similarities, and the observation that mtDBP-binding sites contain the 3'-ends of mtRNAs coded by opposite strands and the 3'-end of the D-loop structure, point to a dual function of the protein in modulating sea urchin mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. PMID:10101198

  17. The Effect of CardioWaves Interval Training on Resting Blood Pressure, Resting Heart Rate, and Mind-Body Wellness

    PubMed Central

    NIELSON, CAMILLA M.; LOCKHART, BARBARA D.; HAGER, RONALD L.; GEORGE, JAMES D.; EGGETT, DENNIS L.; STEFFEN, PATRICK R.; MITCHELL, ULRIKE H.; BAILEY, BRUCE W.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study to examine the effects of CardioWaves interval training (CWIT) and continuous training (CT) on resting blood pressure, resting heart rate, and mind-body wellness. Fifty-two normotensive (blood pressure <120/80 mmHg), pre-hypertensive (120–139/80–89 mmHg), and hypertensive (>140/90 mmHg) participants were randomly assigned and equally divided between the CWIT and CT groups. Both groups participated in the assigned exercise protocol 30 minutes per day, four days per week for eight weeks. Resting blood pressure, resting heart rate, and mind-body wellness were measured pre- and post-intervention. A total of 47 participants (15 females and 32 males) were included in the analysis. The CWIT group had a non-significant trend of reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP) and increased diastolic blood pressure (DBP) while the CT group had a statistically significant decrease in awake SBP (p = 0.01) and total SBP (p = 0.01) and a non-significant decrease in DBP. With both groups combined, the female participants had a statistically significant decrease in awake SBP (p = 0.002), asleep SBP (p = 0.01), total SBP (p = 0.003), awake DBP (p = 0.02), and total DBP (p = 0.05). The male participants had an increase in SBP and DBP with total DBP showing a statistically significant increase (p = 0.05). Neither group had a consistent change in resting heart rate. Both groups showed improved mind-body wellness. CWIT and CT reduced resting blood pressure, with CT having a greater effect. Resting heart rate did not change in either group. Additionally, both CWIT and CT improved mind-body wellness. PMID:27182421

  18. Tap and Dbp5, but not Gag, are involved in DR-mediated nuclear export of unspliced Rous sarcoma virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, Jason J.; Uddowla, Sabena; Abraham, Benjamin; Clatterbuck, Sarah; Beemon, Karen L. . E-mail: KLB@jhu.edu

    2007-07-05

    All retroviruses must circumvent cellular restrictions on the export of unspliced RNAs from the nucleus. While the unspliced RNA export pathways for HIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus are well characterized, that of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is not. We have previously reported that the RSV direct repeat (DR) elements are involved in the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced viral RNA. Here, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we demonstrate that unspliced viral RNAs bearing a single point mutation (G8863C) in the DR exhibit a restricted cellular localization in and around the nucleus. In contrast, wild type unspliced viral RNA had a diffuse localization throughout the nucleus and cytoplasm. Since the RSV Gag protein has a transient localization in the nucleus, we examined the effect of Gag over-expression on a DR-mediated reporter construct. While Gag did not enhance DR-mediated nuclear export, the dominant-negative expression of two cellular export factors, Tap and Dbp5, inhibited expression of the same reporter construct. Furthermore, FISH studies using the dominant-negative Dbp5 demonstrated that unspliced wild type RSV RNA was retained within the nucleus. Taken together, these results further implicate the DR in nuclear RNA export through interactions with Tap and Dbp5.

  19. Impact of wastewater treatment processes on organic carbon, organic nitrogen, and DBP precursors in effuent organic matter.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Stuart W; Westerhoff, Paul; Chen, Baiyang; Rittmann, Bruce E; Nam, Seong-Nam; Amy, Gary

    2009-04-15

    Unintentional, indirect wastewater reuse often occurs as wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharges contaminate receiving waters serving as drinking-water supplies. A survey was conducted at 23 WWTPs that utilized a range of treatment technologies. Samples were analyzed for typical wastewater and drinking-water constituents, chemical characteristics of the dissolved organic matter (DOM), and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors present in the effluent organic matter (EfOM). This was the first large-scale assessment of the critical water quality parameters that affect the formation of potential carcinogens during drinking water treatment relative to the discharge of upstream WWTPs. This study considered a large and wide range of variables, including emerging contaminants rarely studied at WWTPs and never before in one study. This paper emphasizesthe profound impact of nitrification on many measures of effluent water quality, from the obvious wastewater parameters (e.g., ammonia, biochemical oxygen demand) to the ones specific to downstream drinking water treatment plants (e.g., formation potentialsfor a diverse group of DBPs of health concern). Complete nitrification reduced the concentration of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and changed the ratio of BDOC/DOC. Although nitrification reduced ultraviolet absorbance (UVA) at 254 nm, it resulted in an increase in specific UVA (UVA/DOC). This is attributed to preferential removal of the less UV-absorbing (nonhumic) fraction of the DOC during biological treatment. EfOM is composed of hydrophilic and biodegradable DOM, as well as hydrophobic and recalcitrant DOM, whose proportions change with advanced biological treatment. The onset of nitrification yielded lower precursor levels for haloacetic acids and nitrogenous DBPs (haloacetonitriles, N-nitrosodimethylamine). However, trihalomethane precursors were relatively unaffected by the level of wastewater treatment Thus, one design/operations parameter in

  20. PPCP degradation by UV/chlorine treatment and its impact on DBP formation potential in real waters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Sun, Jianliang; Fu, Wenjie; Shang, Chii; Li, Yin; Chen, Yiwei; Gan, Wenhui; Fang, Jingyun

    2016-07-01

    The ultraviolet/chlorine (UV/chlorine) water purification process was evaluated for its ability to degrade the residues of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) commonly found in drinking water sources. The disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed after post-chlorination were documented. The performance of the UV/chlorine process was compared with that of the UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) process in treating three types of sand-filtered natural water. Except caffeine and carbamazepine residues, the UV/chlorine process was found to be 59-99% effective for feed water with a high level of dissolved organic carbon and alkalinity, and 27-92% effective for water with a high ammonia content. Both chlorine radicals and hydroxyl radicals were found to contribute to the observed PPCP degradation. The removal efficiencies of chlorine- and UV-resistant PPCPs such as carbamazepine and caffeine were 2-3 times greater than in the UV/H2O2 process in waters not enriched with ammonia. UV/chlorine treatment slightly enhanced the formation chloral hydrate (CH), haloketone (HK) and trichloronitromethane (TCNM). It reduced haloacetonitrile (HAN) formation during the post-chlorination in comparison with the UV/H2O2 process. In waters with high concentrations of ammonia, the UV/chlorine process was only 5-7% more effective than the UV/H2O2 process, and it formed slightly more THMs, HKs and TCNM along with reduced formation of CH and HAN. The UV/chlorine process is thus recommended as a good alternative to UV/H2O2 treatment for its superior PPCP removal without significantly enhancing DBP formation. PMID:27110887

  1. Plastics Derived Endocrine Disruptors (BPA, DEHP and DBP) Induce Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Obesity, Reproductive Disease and Sperm Epimutations

    PubMed Central

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental compounds are known to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease in subsequent generations (F1–F3) following ancestral exposure during fetal gonadal sex determination. The current study was designed to determine if a mixture of plastic derived endocrine disruptor compounds bisphenol-A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) at two different doses promoted epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and associated DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation females were exposed to either the “plastics” or “lower dose plastics” mixture during embryonic days 8 to 14 of gonadal sex determination and the incidence of adult onset disease was evaluated in F1 and F3 generation rats. There were significant increases in the incidence of total disease/abnormalities in F1 and F3 generation male and female animals from plastics lineages. Pubertal abnormalities, testis disease, obesity, and ovarian disease (primary ovarian insufficiency and polycystic ovaries) were increased in the F3 generation animals. Kidney and prostate disease were only observed in the direct fetally exposed F1 generation plastic lineage animals. Analysis of the plastics lineage F3 generation sperm epigenome previously identified 197 differential DNA methylation regions (DMR) in gene promoters, termed epimutations. A number of these transgenerational DMR form a unique direct connection gene network and have previously been shown to correlate with the pathologies identified. Observations demonstrate that a mixture of plastic derived compounds, BPA and phthalates, can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease. The sperm DMR provide potential epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and/or ancestral environmental exposures. PMID:23359474

  2. STUDIES OF DBP INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The trihalomethanes (THMs), chloroform, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), chlorodibromomethane and bromoform, were selected as the first class of chemicals for investigation. We examined in the male F-344 rat the assumption of additivity for acute exposure to mixtures of BDCM and chlo...

  3. Does Schumann resonance affect our blood pressure?

    PubMed Central

    Mitsutake, G.; Otsuka, K.; Hayakawa, M.; Sekiguchi, M.; Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether Schumann resonance (SR) affects blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and depression and, if so, whether the putative BP reactivity to SR (BPR-SR) is associated with health-related lifestyle (HLS), disease-related illnesses (DRI), and depression. Methods A sample of 56 adults in Urausu, Hokkaido, Japan, wore an ambulatory BP monitor, except for the time in the shower, for seven consecutive days. They completed the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form and a health survey questionnaire on HLS and DRI. Group mean differences and within-individual differences in systolic (S) and diastolic (D) BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), double product (DP), and HR were, respectively, compared between normal and enhanced SR days, using Student’s t-test. Correlations between BPR-SR and other characteristics (i.e. age, gender, HLS, DRI, subjective health, and depression) were analyzed, using Pearson’s product moment correlation. Results and discussion Group mean SBP, DBP, MAP, and DP for enhanced SR days were lower than those for normal days (P = 0.005-0.036). DRI was negatively associated with BPR-SR in SBP, DBP, MAP, and DP (P = 0.003-0.024), suggesting a better health status for those who showed lower BP on enhanced SR days. HLS was negatively associated with BPR-SR in DBP and MAP (P = 0.016-0.029). Males showed higher BPR-SR in DBP and MAP than females (P = 0.0044-0.016). Neither subjective health nor depression was significantly associated with BPR-SR. Future studies based on larger sample sizes are planned to see whether possible health effects can be generalized. PMID:16275477

  4. Blood pressure change and antihypertensive treatment in old and very old people: evidence of age, sex and cohort effects.

    PubMed

    Molander, L; Lövheim, H

    2013-03-01

    The epidemiology of blood pressure in very old age has not been thoroughly studied. The objective of this study was to study blood pressure changes throughout old age and changes in blood pressure and antihypertensive drug use from 1981 to 2005. The study includes 1133 blood pressure measurements from two studies carried out in Umeå, Sweden. The U70 study (1981-1990) included individuals aged 70-88 and the Umeå 85+/GERDA study (2000-2005) covered people aged 85, 90 or ≥95 years. The impact of age, sex and year of investigation on blood pressure was investigated using linear regression. Mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased by 0.35 mm Hg (P<0.001) for each year of age. An inverted U-shaped relation was found between age and systolic blood pressure (SBP), with SBP reaching its maximum at 74.5 years. Mean SBP and DBP also decreased over time (SBP by 0.44 mm Hg per year, P<0.001 and DBP by 0.34 mm Hg per year, P<0.001). The proportion of participants on antihypertensive drugs increased from 39.0% in 1981 to 69.4% in 2005. In this study of people aged ≥70 years, mean SBP and DBP decreased with higher age and later investigation year. Antihypertensive drug use increased with time, which might partly explain the observed cohort effect. PMID:22513755

  5. Blood pressure control in treated hypertensive patients: clinical performance of general practitioners.

    PubMed Central

    Frijling, B D; Spies, T H; Lobo, C M; Hulscher, M E; van Drenth, B B; Braspenning, J C; Prins, A; van der Wouden, J C; Grol, R P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The blood pressure of many treated hypertensive patients remains above recommended target levels. This discrepancy may be related to general practitioners' (GPs') actions. AIM: To assess clinical performance of GPs in blood pressure control in treated hypertensive patients and to explore the influence of patient and GP characteristics on clinical performance. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional study conducted on 195 GPs with invitations to participate made via bulletins and by letter. SETTING: One hundred and thirty-two practices in the southern half of The Netherlands from November 1996 to April 1997. METHOD: Performance criteria were selected from Dutch national hypertension guidelines for general practice. GPs completed self-report forms immediately after follow-up visits of hypertensive patients treated with antihypertensive medication. RESULTS: The GPs recorded 3526 follow-up visits. In 63% of these consultations the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was 90 mmHg or above. The median performance rates of the GPs were less than 51% for most of the recommended actions, even at a DBP of > or = 100 mmHg. Performance of non-pharmacological actions increased gradually with increasing DBP; prescribing an increase in antihypertensive medication and making a follow-up appointment scheduled within six weeks rose steeply at a DBP of > or = 100 mmHg. Patient and GP characteristics contributed little to clinical performance. Action performance rates varied considerably between GPs. CONCLUSION: GPs seem to target their actions at a DBP of below 100 mmHg, whereas guidelines recommend targeting at a DBP of below 90 mmHg. PMID:11271892

  6. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  7. Reading Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patrick

    The central purpose of this book is to challenge current social constructions of poverty, reading education, and the putative relationship between the two. It explores how official and popular representations of poverty are bound to specific historical, social, and economic conditions of their own production. The book offers four stances of…

  8. Does Extensive Reading Promote Reading Speed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Mu

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown a wide range of learning benefits accruing from extensive reading. Not only is there improvement in reading, but also in a wide range of language uses and areas of language knowledge. However, few research studies have examined reading speed. The existing literature on reading speed focused on students' reading speed…

  9. Oral Reading Fluency in Second Language Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeon, Eun Hee

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the role of oral reading fluency in second language reading. Two hundred and fifty-five high school students in South Korea were assessed on three oral reading fluency (ORF) variables and six other reading predictors. The relationship between ORF and other reading predictors was examined through an exploratory factor…

  10. Albuminuria in relation to the single and combined effects of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Liu, Ming; Zou, Jun; Huang, Qi-Fang; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the single and combined effects of systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) on albuminuria in Chinese. We measured blood pressure (BP), anthropometry and urinary excretions of albumin and creatinine, and defined albuminuria as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio of at least 17 and 25 mg/g in men and women, respectively. The 1068 participants (mean age 56.3 years) included 407 (38.5%) men and 410 (38.4%) hypertensive patients. A J-shaped relationship between the risk of albuminuria and BP was observed for both SBP (mean ± SD, 126.1 ± 18.9 mmHg) and DBP (77.1 ± 9.4 mmHg) with nadir levels of 110 mmHg and 70 mmHg, respectively. The risk of albuminuria was significantly (p ≤ 0.01) associated with DBP in the subjects with a SBP of at least 130 mmHg and with SBP in subjects with a DBP of at least 80 mmHg, and inversely and significantly (p = 0.04) associated with SBP in subjects with a DBP below 70 mmHg. In conclusion, as far as albuminuria is concerned, there is indeed a J-shaped phenomenon. However, it has a nadir level far below the currently recommended target BP of 140/90 or 130/80 mmHg. PMID:23244371

  11. The effect of low-sodium dialysate on ambulatory blood pressure measurement parameters in patients undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Akdag, Serkan; Akyol, Aytac; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Tosu, Aydin Rodi; Asker, Muntecep; Yaman, Mehmet; Babat, Naci; Soyoral, Yasemin; Cegin, Muhammed Bilal; Gur, Ali Kemal; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background End stage renal disease is related to increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disorder among hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-sodium dialysate on the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels detected by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) in patients undergoing sustained HD treatment. Patients and methods The study included 46 patients who had creatinine clearance levels less than 10 mL/min/1.73 m2 and had been on chronic HD treatment for at least 1 year. After the enrollment stage, the patients were allocated low-sodium dialysate or standard sodium dialysate for 6 months via computer-generated randomization. Results Twenty-four hour SBP, daytime SBP, nighttime SBP, and nighttime DBP were significantly decreased in the low-sodium dialysate group (P<0.05). No significant reduction was observed in both groups in terms of 24-hour DBP and daytime DBP (P=NS). No difference was found in the standard sodium dialysate group in terms of ABPM. Furthermore, IDWG was found to be significantly decreased in the low-sodium dialysate group after 6 months (P<0.001). Conclusion The study revealed that low-sodium dialysate leads to a decrease in ABPM parameters including 24-hour SBP, daytime SBP, nighttime SBP, and nighttime DBP and it also reduces the number of antihypertensive drugs used and IDWG. PMID:26715849

  12. The Effect of Anthocyanins on Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongjian; Bo, Yacong; Wang, Xi; Lu, Wenjie; Wang, Xule; Han, Zhanying; Qiu, Chunguang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The findings of clinical studies concerning the association between anthocyanins supplementation and blood pressure (BP) are inconsistent. In order to provide a more precise estimate of the overall effect of anthocyanins on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), we conducted a meta-analysis of clinical trials about anthocyanins supplementation and BP. PubMed, Web of Science, Wanfang Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (until October 2015) were searched to identify potential studies with information on anthocyanins extract supplementation and arterial BP. The weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used as a summary statistic. Net changes in SBP and DBP between anthocyanins supplementation and placebo groups were calculated by subtracting the values at end of follow-up from those at baseline. Meta regression was used to explore the potential moderators of effect size. The publication bias was assessed using Begger's Funnel plots and Egger's tests; P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Finally, 6 clinical studies with 472 participants for the effect of anthocyanins consumption on BP were included in the present meta-analysis. There is no significant effect on either SBP (WMD: 1.15 mm Hg, 95% CI: −3.17 to 5.47, I2 = 56%) or DBP (WMD: 1.06 mm Hg, 95% CI: −0.71 to 2.83, I2 = 0%) following supplementation with anthocyanins. In summary, results from this meta-analysis do not favor any clinical efficacy of supplementation with anthocyanins in improving blood pressure. Further well-designed large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with long follow-up period are needed to verify the association of anthocyanins supplementation and blood pressure. PMID:27082604

  13. DBP formation in hot and cold water across a simulated distribution system: effect of incubation time, heating time, pH, chlorine dose, and incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A

    2013-10-15

    This paper demonstrates that disinfection byproducts (DBP) concentration profiles in heated water were quite different from the DBP concentrations in the cold tap water. Chloroform concentrations in the heated water remained constant or even decreased slightly with increasing distribution system water age. The amount of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) was much higher in the heated water than in the cold water; however, the maximum levels in heated water with different distribution system water ages did not differ substantially. The levels of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in the heated water were similar to the TCAA levels in the tap water, and a slight reduction was observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. Regardless of water age, significant reductions of nonregulated DBPs were observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. For tap water with lower water ages, there were significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), chloropicrin (CP), and 1,1-dichloropropane (1,1-DCP) after a short period of heating. Heating of the tap water with low pH led to a more significant increase of chloroform and a more significant short-term increase of DCAN. High pH accelerated the loss of the nonregulated DBPs in the heated water. The results indicated that as the chlorine doses increased, levels of chloroform and DCAA in the heated water increased significantly. However, for TCAA, the thermally induced increase in concentration was only notable for the chlorinated water with very high chlorine dose. Finally, heating may lead to higher DBP concentrations in chlorinated water with lower distribution system temperatures. PMID:24044418

  14. The Stress-Buffering Effects of Functional Social Support on Ambulatory Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Kimberly S.; Uchino, Bert N.; Birmingham, Wendy; Carlisle, McKenzie; Smith, Timothy W.; Light, Kathleen C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Social support is a reliable predictor of cardiovascular health. According to the buffering hypothesis, stress is one mechanism by which support is able to affect physiological processes. However, most of the experimental evidence for the hypothesis comes from laboratory studies. Ambulatory blood pressure protocols examine participants in their natural environment, where they are more likely to encounter personally relevant real-world stressors. Furthermore, prior work shows that examining support by its specific functional components reveals additional independent links to health. Methods The current study aimed to examine the stress-buffering effects of functional social support on ABP. 188 participants completed a one day ABP assessment along with measures of functional social support and both global perceived stress and momentary stress at time of reading. Results Results indicated main effects for both stress measures. Global support, emotional, tangible, and informational support only moderated the effects of momentary stress, but not global stress, in predicting ABP. Informational support was the most consistent stress-buffering predictor of ABP, predicting both ambulatory SBP and DBP. Conclusions The predicted values in ABP for informational support achieved health-relevant differences, emphasizing the value of examining functional support beyond global support alone. PMID:24245843

  15. Pulsatile and steady components of blood pressure and subclinical cerebrovascular disease: the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Cheung, Ken; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess whether pulse pressure (PP) is associated, independently of mean arterial pressure (MAP), with perivascular spaces (PVS), lacunar lesions presumably ischemic (LPI), and white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) seen on brain MRI. METHODS Participants in the Northern Manhattan Study had their blood pressure (BP) taken during their baseline enrollment visit and again during a visit for a brain MRI a mean of 7 years later. We assessed small and large PVS, lacunar LPI, and WMHV on MRI. We examined the association of systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), MAP, and PP at baseline with subclinical markers of cerebrovascular disease using generalized linear models and adjusting for vascular risk factors. RESULTS Imaging and BP data were available for 1009 participants (mean age 68 ± 8 years, 60% women, 60% Hispanic). DBP was associated with lacunar LPI and WMHV, while SBP was associated with small and large PVS. Using MAP and PP together disclosed that the effect size for PP was greater for large PVS while the effect of MAP was greater for lacunar LPI and WMHV. The effects of DBP were flat or negative at any degree of SBP > 120 mm Hg for small and large PVS, while a positive association was noted for lacunar LPI and WMHV with any DBP increase over any degree of SBP. CONCLUSIONS We report here a segregated association between the pulsatile and steady components of the BP with subclinical markers of cerebrovascular disease. These differential associations may reflect the underlying pathology of these biomarkers. PMID:26259124

  16. Slow Reading: Reading along "Lectio" Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badley, K. Jo-Ann; Badley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The medieval monastic movement preserved and developed reading practices--lectio--from ancient Greek pedagogy as a slow, mindful approach to reading for formation. This ancient way of reading, now better known as lectio divina, challenges the fast, pragmatic reading so characteristic of our time. We propose that the present moment may be ripe for…

  17. Pleasure Reading and Reading Rate Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beglar, David; Hunt, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of (a) the amount of pleasure reading completed, (b) the type of texts read (i.e., simplified or unsimplified books), and (c) the level of simplified texts read by 14 Japanese university students who made the largest reading rate gains over one academic year. The findings indicated that the participants who made…

  18. Reading Together: A Successful Reading Fluency Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chase; Mohr, Kathleen A. J.; Rasinski, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The article describes a reading fluency intervention called Reading Together that combines the method of repeated readings (Samuels, 1979) and the Neurological Impress Method (Heckelman, 1969). Sixteen volunteers from various backgrounds were recruited and trained to deliver the Reading Together intervention to struggling readers in third through…

  19. Oscillometric blood pressure measurements: differences between measured and calculated mean arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Kiers, H D; Hofstra, J M; Wetzels, J F M

    2008-12-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is often used as an index of overall blood pressure. In recent years, the use of automated oscillometric blood pressure measurement devices is increasing. These devices directly measure and display MAP; however, MAP is often calculated from systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) as displayed by the device. In this study we have analysed measured and calculated MAP, obtained by two different oscillometric BP measurement devices in two different patient cohorts. The first cohort included 242 healthy subjects (male 40.5%, 50+/-13 years). BP measurements were performed with a Welch Allyn 5300P device. We found a small but significant difference between measured MAP and calculated MAP (MAP(m-c:) -1.8 mmHg, range -5.7 to 12.9 mmHg, p < 0.001). MAP(m-c) showed a significant, but weak correlation with DBP and SBP. The second cohort included included 134 patients with glomerular diseases (male 63%, 50+/14 years). BP measurements were performed with a Dinamap 487210 device. In this group we also observed a small difference between measured MAP and calculated MAP (+1.7 mmHg, range -15.3 to 28.2 mmHg, p<0.001). MAP (m-c) correlated with age, all blood pressure indices and heart rate. An overall analysis showed that age, SBP, DBP, and type of device are all independently related to MAP (m-c). There is a significant difference between measured and calculated MAP. The difference is small on average; however, this MAP(m-c) can be large in the individual patient. Moreover, there are differences of reported MAP between devices. Our data suggest that calculated and measured MAP cannot be used interchangeably. PMID:19075313

  20. Does pulmonary rehabilitation reduce peripheral blood pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Canavan, Jane L; Kaliaraju, Djeya; Nolan, Claire M; Clark, Amy L; Jones, Sarah E; Kon, Samantha S C; Polkey, Michael I; Man, William D-C

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) can improve aerobic exercise capacity, health-related quality of life and dyspnoea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recent studies have suggested that exercise training may improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness, albeit in small highly selected cohorts. The aim of the study was to establish whether supervised outpatient or unsupervised home PR can reduce peripheral blood pressure. Resting blood pressure was measured in 418 patients with COPD before and after outpatient PR, supervised by a hospital-based team (HOSP). Seventy-four patients with COPD undergoing an unsupervised home-based programme acted as a comparator group (HOME). Despite significant improvements in mean (95% confidence interval) exercise capacity in the HOSP group (56 (50-60) m, p < 0.001) and HOME group (30 (17-42) m, p < 0.001) systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) did not change in either the HOSP (SBP: p = 0.47; DBP: p = 0.06; MAP: p = 0.38) or HOME group (SBP: p = 0.67; DBP: p = 0.38; MAP: p = 0.76). Planned subgroup analysis of HOSP patients with known hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease showed no impact of PR upon blood pressure. PR is unlikely to reduce blood pressure, and by implication, makes a mechanism of action in which arterial stiffness is reduced, less likely. PMID:26015460

  1. Cuff width alters the amplitude envelope of wrist cuff pressure pulse waveforms.

    PubMed

    Jilek, Jiri; Stork, Milan

    2010-07-01

    The accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement with any method is affected by cuff width. Measurement with a too narrow cuff overestimates BP and measurement with a too wide cuff underestimates BP. Automatic wrist cuff BP monitors use permanently attached narrow cuffs with bladders about 6 cm wide. Such narrow cuffs should result in under-cuffing for wrist circumferences larger than 15 cm. The objective of this qualitative study was to show that a narrow wrist cuff results in increased BP values when a cuff pulse amplitude ratio algorithm is used. According to the algorithm used in this study, systolic pressure (SBP) corresponds to the point of 50% of maximal amplitude; for diastolic pressure (DBP) the ratio is 70%. Data were acquired from 12 volunteers in the sitting position. The mean wrist circumference was 18 cm. The acquired cuff pulse data were used to compute SBP, mean pressure (MAP) and DBP. The mean values for a 6 cm cuff were SBP = 144 mmHg, MAP = 104 mmHg and DBP = 88 mmHg. The values for a 10 cm cuff were SBP = 128 mmHg, MAP = 93 mmHg and DBP = 78 mmHg. The reference BP values were SBP = 132 mmHg, MAP = 96 mmHg and DBP = 80 mmHg. All narrow (6 cm) cuff BP values were higher than wide (10 cm) cuff or reference BP values. The results indicate that wider wrist cuffs may be desirable for more accurate and reliable BP measurement with wrist monitors. PMID:20505218

  2. Validating sample preservation techniques and holding times for the approved compliance monitoring methods for haloacetic acids under the US EPA's stage 1 D/DBP rule.

    PubMed

    Pepich, Barry V; Domino, Mark M; Dattilio, Teri A; Fair, Patricia S; Munch, David J

    2004-02-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs), which are formed during the disinfection of drinking waters with chlorine, are regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection Byproducts (D/DBP) Rule. Recently, three studies have been reported indicating that low concentrations of HAAs can also be formed during disinfection with chloramines. Methods currently approved for compliance monitoring under the Stage 1 Rule arrest the chlorine-mediated formation of HAAs by adding ammonium chloride, which forms chloramines. Studies were undertaken using an in-process water that favored the formation of HAAs with moderate total organic carbon concentration and high levels of chlorine to investigate the potential formation of HAAs under sample storage conditions. The ammonium chloride-quenched sample did form a small amount of HAAs, but total formation over a period equal to the 14-day sample storage time was less than 2 microg/l, whereas the unquenched samples increased 41 microg/l during the same period. Pour plate studies indicated that chlorinated drinking waters quenched with ammonium chloride are protected from microbial growth, which is an important additional advantage to this preservation scheme. The presence of a combined chlorine residual should prevent microbial degradation of HAAs in samples. These studies support the preservation protocols and the sample storage times promulgated for compliance monitoring under the Stage 1 D/DBP Rule. PMID:14769409

  3. Association of ambulatory heart rate and atherosclerosis risk factors with blood pressure in young non-hypertensive adults

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cynthia; Daskalakis, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study objective was to assess the association between 24 h ambulatory heart rate (HR), atherosclerosis risk factors and blood pressure (BP) in young non-hypertensive patients. Methods We recruited 186 participants aged 18–45 years from a large urban academic Family Medicine outpatient practice, serving 40 000 individuals for this observational study. The main analyses were based on multiple linear regression, with mean 24 h BP (systolic BP (SBP) or diastolic BP (DBP)) as the outcomes, mean 24 h HR as the main predictor of interest, and controlling for age, gender, race, insulin sensitivity/resistance and endothelial function measured by strain gauge venous occlusion plethysmography. Results HR was independently associated with mean 24 h SBP and DBP (SBP and DBP: p=0.042 and 0.001, respectively). In our analyses, associations were markedly stronger for ambulatory compared with office BP measurements. Endothelial dysfunction was associated with higher SBP (p=0.013); plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was significantly associated with both SBP and DBP (p=0.041 and 0.015, respectively), while insulin resistance was not associated with either SBP or DBP. Insulin resistance and C reactive protein were significant predictors of HR (p=0.013 and 0.007, respectively). Conclusions These findings suggest that HR may be a potential marker of elevated cardiovascular risk in young asymptomatic individuals, prior to the development of clinical hypertension or cardiovascular disease. PMID:26925242

  4. Beyond Cognition: Reading Motivation and Reading Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Wigfield, Allan; Gladstone, Jessica; Turci, Lara

    2016-01-01

    The authors review research on children’s reading motivation and its relation to their reading comprehension. They begin by discussing work on the development of school motivation in general and reading motivation in particular, reviewing work showing that many children’s reading motivation declines over the school years. Girls tend to have more positive motivation for reading than do boys, and there are ethnic differences in children’s reading motivation. Over the last 15 years researchers have identified in both laboratory and classroom-based research instructional practices that positively impact students’ reading motivation and ultimately their reading comprehension. There is a strong need for researchers to build on this work and develop and study in different age groups of children effective classroom-based reading motivation instructional programs for a variety of narrative and informational materials.

  5. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... when the sounds disappear. When a blood pressure reading is taken, the higher number represents the systolic ...

  6. Discrepancies in Goldmann tonometer readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaoui, Marie; Tahi, Hassan; Nose, Izuru; Fantes, Francisco; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate discrepancies in Goldmann tonometer readings in eyes with varying degrees of corneal hydration and stromal amount. Methods. 6 Eye Bank eyes, donated by Florida Lion's Eye Bank, were evaluated. Each eye was affixed to a customized artificial orbit system with intraocular pressure (IOP) measured directly by a pressure transducer inserted into the vitreous and with a Goldmann tonometric readings. The eyes were dehydrated for 5-minute intervals in a 30% Dextran-BSS solution, with readings taken between each submersion. Once corneal thickness stabilized, a corneal trephination of 6mm was made. The corneal buttons were frozen and dehydrated by lyophilization and weighed. Results. Preliminary results show a possible overestimation in thicker corneas and an underestimation in thinner corneas, as previously published. Corresponding data on the weight of corneal material is provided. Further studies need to be conducted to determine statistical significance of the data. Conclusion. This study uses Eye Bank eyes with a protocol that produces results similar to previously published results. Further studies in correlating the amount of corneal stroma and discrepancies in Goldmann tonometer readings of intraocular pressure are important especially with the increasing acceptance of corneal refractive surgeries.

  7. Reading Consultant's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, Penny, Comp.; And Others

    This handbook contains brief essays concerning aspects of reading and reading skills, activities designed to promote those skills, and biographies of reading specialists. The first section of the handbook discusses reading readiness, word recognition, word analysis, word meaning, comprehension, and content area reading. After discussion of each…

  8. Reading Recovery. [Fact Sheets].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Recovery Council of North America, Columbus, OH.

    This set of 10 fact sheets (each 2 to 4 pages long) addresses aspects of Reading Recovery, a program that helps children to be proficient readers and writers by the end of the first grade. It discusses the basic facts of Reading Recovery; Reading Recovery for Spanish literacy; Reading Recovery lessons; Reading Recovery professional development;…

  9. Blood pressure levels and variance assessed by ambulatory monitoring: optimal parameters.

    PubMed

    Yates, F E; Benton, L A

    1990-01-01

    We obtained multiple ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) records over five years from two trained, normotensive subjects experienced in wearing the apparatus. The resulting time series data on systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were used to suggest optimal parameters for monitoring by two instruments (Colin Medical Instruments ABPM-630 and Del Mar Avionics Pressurometer) and to compare two indirect methods (auscultatory and oscillometric). A 10-min sampling interval day and night provided sufficient density of data to support spectral analysis for ultradian rhythms in the frequency range of one cycle per hour to one cycle per 9 h on a 24-h record. Rhythms with major periods of approximately 3, 6, and 9 h were variously found in 94 normotensive subjects, aged 20 to 95 years, including the two trained subjects. When the monitoring period was extended to 72 h, the circadian (approximately 24 h) rhythm could be more sharply defined, as well as a 12-h harmonic. In some studies the two trained subjects wore two monitors, one on each arm, set to read simultaneously. From the simultaneous measurements on both arms, it was shown that averaging across three points (30 min of record) reduced the coefficient of variation between the two simultaneous records to 6% or less. Auscultatory and oscillometric methods were equally reliable. Echocardiographic data were obtained in five normotensive subjects and compared to their ABPM data. The ABPM records provided additional information about cardiovascular function not merely duplicating that obtained by acute stress tests, such as exercise or cold pressor responses, or echocardiography. Standards for ABPM are suggested. PMID:2221507

  10. Inter-Arm Difference in Brachial Blood Pressure in the General Population of Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bo Mi; Shim, Jee-Seon; Lee, Myung Ha; Choi, Dong Phil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We investigated the inter-arm difference in blood pressure of the general Korean population to identify associated factors. Subjects and Methods A total of 806 participants aged 30 to 64 years without history of major cardiovascular disease were analyzed in this cross-sectional study. They participated in the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Etiology Research Center cohort study that began in 2013. Brachial blood pressure was measured simultaneously for both arms using an automated oscillometric device equipped with two cuffs in seated position. After five minutes of rest, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured three times. The average of the three measurements was used for analysis. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with inter-arm differences in blood pressure. Results The mean inter-arm difference was 3.3 mmHg for SBP and 2.0 mmHg for DBP. Large inter-arm differences (≥10 mmHg) in SBP and in DBP were found in 3.7% and 0.9% of subjects, respectively. A large inter-arm difference in SBP was associated with mean SBP (p=0.002) and C-reactive protein (p=0.014) while a large inter-arm different in DBP was only associated with body mass index (p=0.015). Sex, age, and anti-hypertensive medication use were not associated with differences in inter-arm blood pressure. Conclusion Large inter-arm difference in blood pressure is only present in a small portion of healthy Korean adults. Our findings suggest that high SBP, chronic inflammation, and obesity may be associated with larger difference in inter-arm blood pressure. PMID:27275174

  11. Children Can Love Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zibart, Rosemary

    1980-01-01

    Describes the Reading Is Fundamental Program (RIF), whose reading motivation concept is simple: young people who get the opportunity to freely choose and to own books may begin to experience reading as a pleasurable activity. (Author/LLS)

  12. Reading: The Human Touch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roswell, Florence G.

    1978-01-01

    Reading programs must be reassessed, and fragmented, isolated, and repetitive exercises must be eliminated. The goal of any reading program is to get the child to experience the joys of reading and learning. (Author/WI)

  13. Association between Macronutrients Intake, Visceral Obesity and Blood Pressure in a Sample of Obese Egyptian Women

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Nayera E.; El Shebini, Salwa M.; Ahmed, Nihad H.; Selim Mostafa, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Study the association between the total caloric intake, protein, lipid, and some classes of fatty acids of the diet, and their effects on blood pressure in a sample of Egyptian obese women with and without visceral obesity. METHODS: Five hundred forty-nine obese women were included in the study with mean age of 38.1 ± 11.56 years and mean Body mass index [BMI] of 36.17 ± 7.23. They enrolled in a program for losing weight. Visceral fat was determined using ultrasound. Blood pressure was measured 3 times and the mean was recorded. Twenty four hours dietary recall was reported. RESULTS: Thirty point four percentages of samples has visceral obesity ≥ 7cm; they were the older, showed higher values of BMI, visceral obesity and blood pressure. Significant difference was found between groups regarding mean value of BMI, visceral obesity, both systolic blood pressure SBP and diastolic blood pressure DBP and most of the daily macronutrients intake. In groups (2&3) positive significant correlation was recorded between (SBP) & (DBP) and total daily intake of total calories, carbohydrate, total fat, saturated fatty acids and cholesterol, and negative significant correlation with total daily intake of total protein, animal and vegetable protein, linolenic and linoleic fatty acids, while oleic fatty acid showed negative correlation with SBP&DBP in all groups. CONCLUSION: This study emphasizes the hypothesis that the macronutrients composition of diet influences blood pressure in different ways, in obese patients with visceral obesity. PMID:27275219

  14. Short-term exposure to noise, fine particulate matter and nitrogen oxides on ambulatory blood pressure: A repeated-measure study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Te; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Yang, Wei-Ting; Wang, Ven-Shing; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Bao, Bo-Ying; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to road traffic noise, fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm; PM2.5) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) has been associated with transient changes in blood pressure, but whether an interaction exists remains unclear. This panel study investigated whether noise, PM2.5 and NOx exposure were independently associated with changes in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure. We recruited 33 males and 33 females aged 18-32 years as study subjects. Personal noise exposure and ambulatory blood pressure were monitored simultaneously in 2007. During the data collection periods, 24-h data on PM2.5 and NOx from five air-quality monitors within 6 km of participants' home addresses were used to estimate their individual exposures. Linear mixed-effects regression models were used to estimate single and combined effects on ambulatory blood pressure. Exposure to both noise and PM2.5 was significantly associated with increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) over 24h; NOx exposure was only significantly related to elevated DBP. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure increased with the current noise exposure of 5 A-weighted decibels (dBA) (SBP 1.44 [95% confidence interval: 1.16, 1.71] mmHg and DBP 1.40 [1.18, 1.61] mmHg) and PM2.5 exposure of 10-µg/m(3) (SBP 0.81 [0.19, 1.43] mmHg and DBP 0.63 [0.17, 1.10] mmHg), as well as the current NOx exposure of 10-ppb (DBP 0.54 [0.12, 0.97] mmHg) after simultaneous adjustment. These findings suggest that exposure to noise and air pollutants may independently increase ambulatory blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26073201

  15. Extensive Reading Quizzes and Reading Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoeckel, Tim; Reagan, Nevitt; Hann, Fergus

    2012-01-01

    Extensive reading (ER) has become a common feature of many English as a second or foreign language (ESL/EFL) programs. There is evidence that reading large amounts of easy, interesting material may improve foreign language skills, most notably in vocabulary, reading rates, and overall proficiency. However, teacher evaluation of extensive reading…

  16. Cosmetology Reading Strategies. 1980 Vocational Reading Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, L. Jay; And Others

    Cosmetology Reading Strategies is one of five instructional guides in the Reading Strategies in Vocational Education Series. Developed to assist teachers working with students considered disadvantaged because of reading deficiency, the guide contains several strategies, suitable for adaptation, specifically related to cosmetology instruction. Each…

  17. Promoting Reading Motivation by Reading Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monteiro, Vera

    2013-01-01

    In the present project we tested the hypothesis that tutorial situations with peers would benefit children's reading motivation. Participants were from elementary school--80 fourth-graders and 80 second-graders. We used a questionnaire to assess reading motivation. In the tutorial sessions we developed a Paired Reading Program. The children who…

  18. Teaching Reading Comprehension through Collaborative Strategic Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Klingner, Janette Kettman

    1999-01-01

    Provides an overview of collaborative strategic reading (CSR) as an approach to enhancing the reading-comprehension skills of students with learning disabilities. Procedures for implementing CSR with collaborative groups and techniques for teaching reading-comprehension skills are provided. The role of the teacher is described and sample teaching…

  19. Preparing Teachers of Reading and Reading Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Mary C.

    There is an immediate need for improving the training of reading teachers and specialists. A new program should provide additional instruction at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Preservice teachers whether elementary or secondary, need some formal education in the teaching of reading. Graduate reading specialists should have (1) a minimum…

  20. Relationship of adiposity and cardiorespiratory fitness with resting blood pressure of South African adolescents: the PAHL Study.

    PubMed

    Awotidebe, A; Monyeki, M A; Moss, S J; Strydom, G L; Amstrong, M; Kemper, H C G

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and low level of cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with high blood pressure in both adolescents and adults. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship of adiposity and cardiorespiratory fitness with resting blood pressure in 14-year-old male and female adolescents. Cross-sectional data on 310 adolescents (31.8% boys) from six high schools, who were participating in the on-going Physical Activity and Health Longitudinal Study, were collected. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage of body fat, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, predicted and resting systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were assessed according to standard procedures. The prevalence of elevated SBP and DBP were 4.9% and 6.5%, respectively. The highest prevalence of elevated blood pressure (SBP=10% and DBP=15%) were measured in overweight adolescents, who also performed poorly for predicted (M=26.66 ml kg(-1 )min(-1)±6.44) compared with underweight and normal-weight adolescents. Multiple regression showed that BMI was positively associated with SBP (β=0.77, P=0.005) and was negatively associated with DBP (β=-0.43, P=0.001). Overweight adolescents presented with a relatively high prevalence of elevated blood pressure and poor health-related fitness. Fatness and poor cardiorespiratory fitness were positively associated with elevated SBP and DBP, respectively. In view of the health implications of these findings, strategic interventions are needed to promote obesity-reduction programmes and physical activities in adolescents. PMID:26202691

  1. Low job control is associated with higher diastolic blood pressure in men with mildly elevated blood pressure: the Rosai Karoshi study.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Tomomi; Munakata, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Job strain is a risk factor for hypertension, but it is not fully understood if components of job strain, or job demand or job control per se could be related to blood pressure (BP), and if so, whether the relationship differs between normotension and mildly elevated BP. We examined resting BP, and job stress components in 113 Japanese male hospital clerks (38.1 ± 4.4 yr). Subjects were classified into normotensive (NT) (<130/85 mmHg, n=83) and mildly elevated BP (ME) (≥130/85 mmHg) groups. Diastolic BP (DBP) showed a significant interaction between group and job control level (p=0.013). Subjects with low job control demonstrated higher DBP than those with high job control (89.1 ± 2.1 vs. 82.3 ± 2.3 mmHg, p=0.042) in ME group even after adjustments for covariates while DBP did not differ between low and high job control subjects in NT group. Systolic BP (SBP) did not differ between high and low job control subjects in both groups. Neither SBP nor DBP differed between high and low demand groups in either group. Among job strain components, job control may be independently related to BP in Japanese male workers with mildly elevated BP. PMID:25914072

  2. Low job control is associated with higher diastolic blood pressure in men with mildly elevated blood pressure: the Rosai Karoshi study

    PubMed Central

    HATTORI, Tomomi; MUNAKATA, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Job strain is a risk factor for hypertension, but it is not fully understood if components of job strain, or job demand or job control per se could be related to blood pressure (BP), and if so, whether the relationship differs between normotension and mildly elevated BP. We examined resting BP, and job stress components in 113 Japanese male hospital clerks (38.1 ± 4.4 yr). Subjects were classified into normotensive (NT) (<130/85 mmHg, n=83) and mildly elevated BP (ME) (≥130/85 mmHg) groups. Diastolic BP (DBP) showed a significant interaction between group and job control level (p=0.013). Subjects with low job control demonstrated higher DBP than those with high job control (89.1 ± 2.1 vs. 82.3 ± 2.3 mmHg, p=0.042) in ME group even after adjustments for covariates while DBP did not differ between low and high job control subjects in NT group. Systolic BP (SBP) did not differ between high and low job control subjects in both groups. Neither SBP nor DBP differed between high and low demand groups in either group. Among job strain components, job control may be independently related to BP in Japanese male workers with mildly elevated BP. PMID:25914072

  3. Does hormone therapy affect blood pressure changes in the Diabetes Prevention Program?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Golden, Sherita H.; Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin; Mather, Kieren J.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether blood pressure reductions differ by estrogen use among overweight glucose-intolerant women. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of postmenopausal Diabetes Prevention Program participants who used oral estrogen with or without progestogen at baseline and at 1-year follow-up (n=324) vs. those who did not use at either time point (n=382). Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) changes were examined by randomization arm (intensive lifestyle change (ILS), metformin 850 mg twice daily, or placebo). Associations between changes in blood pressure with changes in sex hormone binding globulin, estradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone were also examined. Results Estrogen users and non-users had similar prevalences of baseline hypertension (33% vs. 34%, p=0.82) and use of blood pressure medications at baseline (p=0.25) and follow-up (p=0.10). Estrogen users and non-users randomized to ILS had similar decreases in SBP (-3.3 vs. -4.7 mmHg, p=0.45) and DBP (-3.1 vs. -4.7 mmHg, p=0.16). Among estrogen users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in SBP (p=0.016) and DBP (p=0.009) vs. placebo. Among non-users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in DBP (p=0.001) vs. placebo, but declines in SBP were not significant (p=0.11). Metformin was not associated with blood pressure reductions vs. placebo regardless of estrogen therapy. Blood pressure changes were not associated with changes in sex hormones regardless of estrogen therapy. Conclusions Among overweight women with dysglycemia, the magnitude of blood pressure reductions after ILS was unrelated to postmenopausal estrogen use. PMID:23942251

  4. Age, arterial stiffness, and components of blood pressure in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meili; Xu, Xiping; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong; Xu, Xin; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Xing, Houxun; Fan, Fangfang; Cui, Wei; Yang, Xinchun

    2014-12-01

    Blood pressure (BP) changes with age. We conducted a cross-sectional study in rural Chinese adults to investigate: (1) what is the relationship between age, arterial stiffness, and BP in Chinese men and women; and (2) to what degree can the age-BP relationship be explained by arterial stiffness, controlling for other covariables. These analyses included a total of 1688 subjects (males/females: 623/1065), aged 40 to 88 years. Among them, 353 (20.9%) had hypertension (defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mm Hg). Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). baPWV appeared to be more strongly correlated with BP (including SBP, DBP, mean arterial pressure [MAP], pulse pressure [PP]) than age (P < 0.001 for comparisons between Spearman correlation coefficients). Furthermore, baPWV was associated with BP (including SBP, DBP, MAP, and PP) and risk of hypertension in a dose-response fashion, independent of age; in contrast, the age-BP associations were either attenuated or became negative after adjusting for baPWV. Arterial stiffness appears to be an independent contributor to hypertension, even after adjusting for age and other covariables. In contrast, age-BP associations became attenuated or negative after adjusting for baPWV. The utility of baPWV as a diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic indicator for hypertension warrants further investigation. PMID:25546666

  5. Designing the Reading Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The design of the reading curriculum presents a vision of what will be stressed in reading instruction. A first ingredient to discuss in developing the reading curriculum emphasizes the degree to which different curriculum areas should be related in teaching and learning. Reading then could be taught as a separate subject matter area from the…

  6. Failure Free Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Failure Free Reading, a program with the primary goal of providing a basic understanding of the reading process to students in grades K-12 with pronounced reading difficulty and move them into traditional reading programs. The program is targeted to and most effective with at-risk and English as a Second Language…

  7. Big Read, Big ROI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Beth

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) released a grim report on the state of literary reading in America. "Reading at Risk" (www.nea.gov/pub/ReadingAtRisk.pdf) detailed a dramatic decline in recreational reading across all segments of the American population--young and old, black, brown, and white. It also included the projected…

  8. Narration in Reading Remediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersting, Frank; Ferguson, Janice

    A case study examined the whole-part application of the language experience approach to reading as used for students whose reading development is severely delayed. The subject, a third-grade female student reading on the first-grade level as determined by the Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests-Revised (Woodcock, 1987), participated in a reading…

  9. Focus on Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Harriet W., Ed.

    1972-01-01

    The theme of this issue of the "Minnesota English Journal" is reading. The contents include "Preamblings," which discusses some of the current concerns in reading instruction; "The State of Minnesota's Right to Read Program," which looks at the Minnesota plan for building the reading program in conjunction with inservice education, and for…

  10. What Should Students Read?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolk, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The reading students are required to do for school bears little semblance to the reading they do outside of school. Students today are reading the same texts in school that students read a generation ago, but the varieties of text used outside of school are much different. One result is that many students are unmotivated to become readers.…

  11. Reading and Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagan, Ruth L.

    For years, reading teachers in the schools have emphasized word identification skills and believed that reading is comprised of a set of subskills that a child must master before he or she can learn to read. To teach a child to read, however, instruction must focus on comprehension. Therefore, word attack skills should be taught in conjunction…

  12. Reading Therapy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Roxanne

    2002-01-01

    Examines the results of using the Phono-Graphix reading method, designed for students with reading disabilities, to teach nine prison inmates to read. Reports that inmates' average basic reading skills standard score gains were 17 points (more than one standard deviation) after 33 one-hour sessions, an average gain of 1.9 standard points per…

  13. Reading Assessment: Looking Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afflerbach, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on three areas of reading assessment that I believe to be crucial for students' reading development: developing comprehensive formative assessments, assessing the wide array of factors that contribute to students' reading development, and fostering student independence by helping students learn to use reading assessment on…

  14. Interactions of Genetic Variants with Physical Activity are Associated with Blood Pressure in Chinese: The GenSalt Study

    PubMed Central

    Montasser, May E.; Gu, Donfeng; Chen, Jing; Shimmin, Lawrence C.; Gu, Charles; Kelly, Tanika N.; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Rice, Treva; Rao, DC; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jichun; Liu, De-pei; Whelton, Paul; He, Jiang; Hixson, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) homeostasis involves complex interactions among genetic and non-genetic factors, providing major challenges to dissection of the genetic components that influence BP and hypertension. In this study, we examine the effects of interaction of genetic variants with physical activity on BP in a relatively genetically homogenous cohort of rural Chinese villagers. Methods Generalized estimating equations analysis was used to test for associations of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with variants in 24 genes in BP pathways (196 SNPs) among 3,142 Chinese participants divided according to physical activity (active versus inactive groups). Results In the physically active group, 2 SNPs in NR3C2 were significantly associated with lower SBP, and a SNP in SCNN1B was significantly associated with lower SBP and DBP. In the physically inactive group, a SNP in APLNR was associated with lower SBP, a SNP in GNB3 was associated with higher SBP and DBP, and a SNP in BDKRB2 was associated with lower DBP. Cumulative effects in carriers of minor alleles of these SNPs showed reductions of SBP and DBP as large as 8 and 5 mmHg, respectively, in the active individuals compared to inactive individuals carrying the same number of minor alleles. Conclusions We found that physical activity modifies the effects of genetic variants on BP. However, our results also show that active individuals with specific genotypes always have lower BP than inactive individuals with the same genotypes, demonstrating the overall beneficial effects of physical activity on blood pressure. PMID:21654856

  15. Controlled aerobic exercise training reduces resting blood pressure in sedentary older adults.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoyuan; Shi, Xiangrong; Gibson, Cheryl A; Huang, Sunny C; Coudret, Nadine A; Ehlman, Mary C

    2013-12-01

    The results of existing controlled clinical trials were synthesized to determine effects of aerobic exercise training on resting systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among previously sedentary older adults, to quantify the magnitude of observed changes, and to examine the influence of the associated interventional variables on these changes. Studies were identified via a systematic computer database search, hand searching, and cross-referencing of previously located articles. All potentially eligible articles were carefully reviewed and examined with the established inclusion criteria. Twenty-three studies, representing a total of 1226 older subjects, were included in the final analysis. Robust statistically significant effects were found in terms of the pooled standardized effect size of - 0.33 ± 0.06 (p < 0.0001) in SBP and - 0.39 ± 0.09 (p < 0.0001) in DBP. When compared with the control group, net decreases in both SBP (- 5.39 ± 1.21 mmHg, p < 0.0001) and DBP (-3.68 ± 0.83 mmHg, p < 0.0001) were observed in older exercisers, representing a 3.9% and a 4.5% reduction, respectively. This meta-analytic study provides robust quantitative data to support the efficacy and effectiveness of controlled endurance exercise training in decreasing resting SBP and DBP among previously sedentary older adults. PMID:23550511

  16. What Oral Text Reading Fluency Can Reveal about Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenendaal, Nathalie J.; Groen, Margriet A.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    Text reading fluency--the ability to read quickly, accurately and with a natural intonation--has been proposed as a predictor of reading comprehension. In the current study, we examined the role of oral text reading fluency, defined as text reading rate and text reading prosody, as a contributor to reading comprehension outcomes in addition to…

  17. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... below to read more. High Blood Pressure and Edema : You may notice swelling in some parts of ... blood pressure. This buildup of fluids, called peripheral edema, usually occurs in your ankles, feet, lower legs, ...

  18. Everyday Discrimination and Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping in Black and White Americans

    PubMed Central

    Tomfohr, Lianne; Cooper, Denise C.; Mills, Paul J.; Nelesen, Richard A.; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Attenuated nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping is closely linked to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Self-reported experiences of everyday discrimination have also been associated with negative cardiovascular health outcomes. This study investigated whether an association exists between experiences of everyday discrimination and BP dipping in a biracial sample of Black and White adults. Methods Seventy-eight hypertensive and normotensive women and men (30 Black and 48 White) reported on their experiences of everyday discrimination (the Everyday Discrimination Scale) and underwent two separate 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) sessions approximately one week apart. Results Correlation analysis revealed that higher endorsement of everyday discrimination was significantly associated with less diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) dipping (p <0.05). Subsequent hierarchical regression analyses indicated that everyday discrimination explained 8-11% of the variance in SBP and DBP dipping above and beyond other demographic and lifestyle-related factors including race, age, 24-hour BP, body mass index (BMI), and current socioeconomic status (SES). The relationship between discrimination and dipping was significantly stronger on the second night of monitoring. Finally, analyses revealed that everyday discrimination mediated the relationship between race and BP dipping. Conclusions These findings suggest that experiences of everyday discrimination are associated with less nocturnal SBP and DBP dipping above and beyond the effect of known covariates. The use of multiple ABPM sessions may facilitate the detection of relationships between psychological variables and BP dipping. PMID:20124424

  19. Improved Measurement of Blood Pressure by Extraction of Characteristic Features from the Cuff Oscillometric Waveform

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Pooi Khoon; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Jassim, Wissam A.; Redmond, Stephen J.; Zilany, Mohammad; Avolio, Alberto; Lim, Einly; Tan, Maw Pin; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel approach to improve the estimation of systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) from oscillometric waveform data using variable characteristic ratios between SBP and DBP with mean arterial pressure (MAP). This was verified in 25 healthy subjects, aged 28 ± 5 years. The multiple linear regression (MLR) and support vector regression (SVR) models were used to examine the relationship between the SBP and the DBP ratio with ten features extracted from the oscillometric waveform envelope (OWE). An automatic algorithm based on relative changes in the cuff pressure and neighbouring oscillometric pulses was proposed to remove outlier points caused by movement artifacts. Substantial reduction in the mean and standard deviation of the blood pressure estimation errors were obtained upon artifact removal. Using the sequential forward floating selection (SFFS) approach, we were able to achieve a significant reduction in the mean and standard deviation of differences between the estimated SBP values and the reference scoring (MLR: mean ± SD = −0.3 ± 5.8 mmHg; SVR and −0.6 ± 5.4 mmHg) with only two features, i.e., Ratio2 and Area3, as compared to the conventional maximum amplitude algorithm (MAA) method (mean ± SD = −1.6 ± 8.6 mmHg). Comparing the performance of both MLR and SVR models, our results showed that the MLR model was able to achieve comparable performance to that of the SVR model despite its simplicity. PMID:26087370

  20. Blood pressure and antihypertensive medication profile in a multiethnic Asian population of stable chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Boon Wee; Chua, Horng Ruey; Wong, Weng Kin; Haroon, Sabrina; Subramanian, Srinivas; Loh, Ping Tyug; Sethi, Sunil; Lau, Titus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Clinical practice guidelines recommend different blood pressure (BP) goals for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Usage of antihypertensive medication and attainment of BP targets in Asian CKD patients remain unclear. This study describes the profile of antihypertensive agents used and BP components in a multiethnic Asian population with stable CKD. METHODS Stable CKD outpatients with variability of serum creatinine levels < 20%, taken > 3 months apart, were recruited. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured using automated manometers, according to practice guidelines. Serum creatinine was assayed and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) calculated using the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration equation. BP and antihypertensive medication profile was examined using univariate analyses. RESULTS 613 patients (55.1% male; 74.7% Chinese, 6.4% Indian, 11.4% Malay; 35.7% diabetes mellitus) with a mean age of 57.8 ± 14.5 years were recruited. Mean SBP was 139 ± 20 mmHg, DBP was 74 ± 11 mmHg, serum creatinine was 166 ± 115 µmol/L and GFR was 53 ± 32 mL/min/1.73 m2. At a lower GFR, SBP increased (p < 0.001), whereas DBP decreased (p = 0.0052). Mean SBP increased in tandem with the number of antihypertensive agents used (p < 0.001), while mean DBP decreased when ≥ 3 antihypertensive agents were used (p = 0.0020). CONCLUSION Different targets are recommended for each BP component in CKD patients. A majority of patients cannot attain SBP targets and/or exceed DBP targets. Research into monitoring and treatment methods is required to better define BP targets in CKD patients. PMID:27212015

  1. Is there a causal role for homocysteine concentration in blood pressure? A Mendelian randomization study12

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Fernando P; Oliveira, Isabel O; Horta, Bernardo L

    2016-01-01

    Background: An understanding of whether homocysteine is a cause or a marker of increased blood pressure is relevant because blood homocysteine can be effectively lowered by safe and inexpensive interventions (e.g., vitamin B-6, B-9, and B-12 supplementation). Objective: The aim was to assess the causal influence of homocysteine on systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively) in adults with the use of Mendelian randomization (MR). Design: Data from the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort (Brazil) were used. A total of 4297 subjects were evaluated in 2004–2005 (mean age: 22.8 y). The association of homocysteine concentration with SBP and DBP was assessed by conventional ordinary least-squares (OLS) linear regression and 2-stage least-squares (2SLS) regression (MR analysis). The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T (rs1801133) was used as proxy for homocysteine concentration. We also applied MR to data from the International Consortium for Blood Pressure (ICBP) genomewide association studies (>69,000 participants) using rs1801133 and additional homocysteine-associated SNPs as instruments. Results: In OLS regression, a 1-SD unit increase in log homocysteine concentration was associated with an increase of 0.9 (95% CI: 0.4, 1.4) mm Hg in SBP and of 1.0 (95% CI: 0.6, 1.4) mm Hg in DBP. In 2SLS regression, for the same increase in homocysteine, the coefficients were −1.8 mm Hg for SBP (95% CI: −3.9, 0.4 mm Hg; P = 0.01) and 0.1 mm Hg for DBP (95% CI: −1.5, 1.7 mm Hg; P = 0.24). In the MR analysis of ICBP data, homocysteine concentration was not associated with SBP (β = 0.6 mm Hg for each 1-SD unit increase in log homocysteine; 95% CI: −0.8, 1.9 mm Hg) but was positively associated with DBP (β = 1.1 mm Hg; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.9 mm Hg). The association of genetically increased homocysteine with DBP was not consistent across different SNPs. Conclusion: Overall, the present findings do not corroborate the

  2. Reading: Putting the Pieces Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Bernard L., Ed.; Camperell, Kay, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The papers in this yearbook focus on the strategies, practices, and research related to elementary reading, secondary reading, adult reading, literature, philosophy of reading, psychology of reading, affective issues, administration, supervision, research, teacher training, assessment that affect reading and reading instruction. Papers in the book…

  3. Beginning Readers' Reading Performance and Reading Habits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppanen, Ulla; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective relationships between reading performance and reading habits among Finnish children during the first and second grades of primary school. One hundred and ninety-five children were examined twice during their first primary school year and once during the spring term of Grade 2. The results showed, first, that…

  4. Lights, Camera, Read! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is the manual for the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) 2003 entitled "Lights, Camera, Read!" This theme spotlights books that were made into movies, and allows readers to appreciate favorite novels and stories that have progressed to the movie screen. The manual consists of eight sections. The Introduction includes welcome letters from…

  5. Reading Disabilities and PASS Reading Enhancement Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahapatra, Shamita

    2016-01-01

    Children experience difficulties in reading either because they fail to decode the words and thus are unable to comprehend the text or simply fail to comprehend the text even if they are able to decode the words and read them out. Failure in word decoding results from a failure in phonological coding of written information, whereas reading…

  6. Toddler Reading Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... Studies show that kids with active exposure to language have social and educational advantages over their peers — ... reading is one of the best exposures to language. Reading to toddlers sets the foundation for later ...

  7. Assessing Motivation to Read.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrell, Linda B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Motivation to Read Profile (MRP), which assesses children's self-concepts as readers and the value they see in reading. Discusses its development and offers suggestions for its use with elementary students. Includes the MRP. (SR)

  8. What Are Reading Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What are reading disorders? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... for more information about these problems. Types of Reading Disorders Dyslexia is a brain-based type of ...

  9. Impacts of measurement protocols on blood pressure tracking from childhood into adulthood: a metaregression analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Youfa; Appel, Lawrence J; Mi, Jie

    2008-03-01

    The best approach for blood pressure (BP) measurement in children remains controversial, specifically regarding the choice of Korotkoff phase 4 versus Korotkoff phase 5 for diastolic BP (DBP) and the use of automated devices. To examine the impacts of different BP measurement protocols on BP tracking from childhood into adulthood, we conducted a meta-analysis of 50 related studies published between 1970 and 2006 identified based on a systematic search of PubMed. These studies provided 617 data points (tracking correlation coefficient, our outcome variable) for systolic BP and 547 data points for DBP for our meta-analysis. The explanatory variables included the use of Korotkoff phase 4/Korotkoff phase 5, BP device, and number of BP measurements per visit. Analyses were adjusted for potential confounders, including sex, baseline age, follow-up length, publication year, and study country. Tracking correlation coefficients for DBP measured using Korotkoff phase 4 was higher than that of Korotkoff phase 5 by 0.035 but not significant. DBP tracking assessed by automated device was higher than that of Korotkoff phase 5 by 0.152 (P=0.024) and higher than the mercury manometer by 0.223 (P=0.005). BP tracking was slightly higher with multiple BP measurements per visit, but measurements of >or=3 times did not improve the tracking further compared with 2 measurements. Although policy-making bodies currently recommend the use of Korotkoff phase 5 to assess DBP in children, our metaregression analysis did not support the recommendation. In general, Korotkoff phase 4 seems to be different from Korotkoff phase 5, and automated device is a promising approach for BP assessment in childhood. PMID:18212267

  10. Predictors of the short-term effect of isoleucine-proline-proline/valine-proline-proline lactotripeptides from casein on office and ambulatory blood pressure in subjects with pharmacologically untreated high-normal blood pressure or first-degree hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cicero, A F G; Rosticci, M; Ferroni, A; Bacchelli, S; Veronesi, M; Strocchi, E; Borghi, C

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the predictors of Isoleucine-Proline-Proline/Valine-Proline-Proline (IPP-VPP) lactotripeptides (LTPs) antihypertensive effect in the context of a short-term large double-blind randomized clinical trial involving 164 pharmacologically untreated subjects in primary prevention for cardiovascular disease. When compared with the baseline, office systolic blood pressure (SBP) (-3.42 mm Hg, P < .001) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (-2.35 mm Hg, P < .001) significantly decreased, in the LTP-treated patients only. No significant change in predictors during the study of ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) parameters was observed. A short-term supplementation with LTPs significantly improves the office SBP and DBP, especially in male subjects. The main predictor of LTP antihypertensive effect was the baseline BP. PMID:22574612

  11. An assessment of discriminatory power of office blood pressure measurements in predicting optimal ambulatory blood pressure control in people with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kengne, Andre Pascal; Libend, Christelle Nong; Dzudie, Anastase; Menanga, Alain; Dehayem, Mesmin Yefou; Kingue, Samuel; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) measurements (ABPM) predict health outcomes better than office BP, and are recommended for assessing BP control, particularly in high-risk patients. We assessed the performance of office BP in predicting optimal ambulatory BP control in sub-Saharan Africans with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods Participants were a random sample of 51 T2DM patients (25 men) drug-treated for hypertension, receiving care in a referral diabetes clinic in Yaounde, Cameroon. A quality control group included 46 non-diabetic individuals with hypertension. Targets for BP control were systolic (and diastolic) BP. Results Mean age of diabetic participants was 60 years (standard deviation: 10) and median duration of diabetes was 6 years (min-max: 0-29). Correlation coefficients between each office-based variable and the 24-h ABPM equivalent (diabetic vs. non-diabetic participants) were 0.571 and 0.601 for systolic (SBP), 0.520 and 0.539 for diastolic (DBP), 0.631 and 0.549 for pulse pressure (PP), and 0.522 and 0.583 for mean arterial pressure (MAP). The c-statistic for the prediction of optimal ambulatory control from office-BP in diabetic participants was 0.717 for SBP, 0.494 for DBP, 0.712 for PP, 0.582 for MAP, and 0.721 for either SBP + DBP or PP + MAP. Equivalents in diabetes-free participants were 0.805, 0.763, 0.695, 0.801 and 0.813. Conclusion Office DBP was ineffective in discriminating optimal ambulatory BP control in diabetic patients, and did not improve predictions based on office SBP alone. Targeting ABPM to those T2DM patients who are already at optimal office-based SBP would likely be more cost effective in this setting. PMID:25838859

  12. Reading difficulties in Albanian.

    PubMed

    Avdyli, Rrezarta; Cuetos, Fernando

    2012-10-01

    Albanian is an Indo-European language with a shallow orthography, in which there is an absolute correspondence between graphemes and phonemes. We aimed to know reading strategies used by Albanian disabled children during word and pseudoword reading. A pool of 114 Kosovar reading disabled children matched with 150 normal readers aged 6 to 11 years old were tested. They had to read 120 stimuli varied in lexicality, frequency, and length. The results in terms of reading accuracy as well as in reading times show that both groups were affected by lexicality and length effects. In both groups, length and lexicality effects were significantly modulated by school year being greater in early grades and later diminish in length and just the opposite in lexicality. However, the reading difficulties group was less accurate and slower than the control group across all school grades. Analyses of the error patterns showed that phonological errors, when the letter replacement leading to new nonwords, are the most common error type in both groups, although as grade rises, visual errors and lexicalizations increased more in the control group than the reading difficulties group. These findings suggest that Albanian normal children use both routes (lexical and sublexical) from the beginning of reading despite of the complete regularity of Albanian, while children with reading difficulties start using sublexical reading and the lexical reading takes more time to acquire, but finally both routes are functional. PMID:22739980

  13. Reading Difficulties in Albanian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avdyli, Rrezarta; Cuetos, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Albanian is an Indo-European language with a shallow orthography, in which there is an absolute correspondence between graphemes and phonemes. We aimed to know reading strategies used by Albanian disabled children during word and pseudoword reading. A pool of 114 Kosovar reading disabled children matched with 150 normal readers aged 6 to 11 years…

  14. Current Issues in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Michael P., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Articles in this journal issue focus on reading acquisition and instruction. The titles and authors are as follows: (1) "10 Good Ways to Involve Parents in the Reading Program," by Nickolas Criscuolo; (2) "A Parent Guide for Helping the Child with A Reading Disability," by Frederick Duffelmeyer and Dale Baum; (3) "Promoting a Good Attitude toward…

  15. Developing a Reading Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, F. H. Th.; And Others

    A course for improving Dutch reading proficiency of entering university students was developed by the Linguistic and Literacy Studies department of the University of Tilburg in the Netherlands. Dutch secondary school students receive instruction in text-specific approaches to reading but no instruction in reading methodology. The course focuses on…

  16. Supervising the Reading Clinician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridout, Susan Ramp; Bailey, Kevin Sue

    Designed for graduate students supervising undergraduate work in a reading clinic, this practicum manual provides guidelines and materials needed for the graduate section of the Reading Practicum (Methods of Teaching Reading II) at Indiana University Southeast. In addition to the syllabus, which includes course description and objectives, course…

  17. The Reading Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridout, Susan Ramp; Bailey, Kevin Sue

    Organized to allow undergraduate and graduate students to work together in helping children learn to read, this practicum manual provides guidelines and materials needed for the undergraduate section of the Methods of Teaching Reading II Reading Practicum at Indiana University Southeast. In addition to the syllabus, which includes a course…

  18. Reading and Writing Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Jana M., Ed.

    This collection of papers, from a conference on reading and writing connections held at the University of Illinois in October 1986, reflects the value of demonstrating connections between reading instruction and writing. The book shows practitioners how writing can be blended with reading instruction and how writing activities can be used not just…

  19. Time for Reading?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William R.

    1989-01-01

    Reading for pleasure and enlightenment is a critical, and endangered, element in a well-informed citizenry. As a basis for intellectual growth, reading is threatened by media misuse and lack of encouragement of recreational reading. Solutions include emphasis on integrated skills, improved time allocation, and cooperation among parents, teachers,…

  20. Guided Reading and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauptman, Allyson L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between Guided Reading and student motivation to read across fourth, fifth, and sixth grades. The study defined literacy motivation as: (a) task value; (b) self-perceived competence; (c) students' perceptions of the Guided Reading format. Factor analysis and repeated measures ANOVAs were…

  1. ELLs' Perceptions of Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Rachael M.

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated reading support and book preferences of fourth grade English language learners (ELLs) who were struggling readers. This qualitative research focused on three case studies. Interviews were conducted to explore ELLs' perceptions on reading motivation, reading programs, and types of support they received. Descriptions of…

  2. Reading, Language Arts & Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Kathy, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on educational technology issues related to reading, language arts, and literacy: (1) "The Infusion of Technology into a Teacher Education Course: Issues and Strategies" (Mary Ann Kolloff); (2) "Project READ: Developing Online Course Materials for a Reading Methods Class" (Judith A. Crowe); (3) "Reading…

  3. Free Reading Is UTOPIA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCrone, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    In high school students get tied up in extracurricular activities and have little time for pleasure reading. It is true that with rigorous academic schedules they have little time for pleasure reading. Thus began a conversation with a sophomore English teacher at the author's high school. As they were discussing the plight of free reading he was…

  4. The Future of Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Tom

    2009-01-01

    The future of reading is very much in doubt. In this century, reading could soar to new heights or crash and burn. Some educators and librarians fear that sustained reading for learning, for work, and for pleasure may be slowly dying out as a widespread social practice. Several social and technological developments of the 20th century, such as…

  5. Reading to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Phillip; Wardrip, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Science teachers expect high school students to know how to read, understand, and learn from texts at the core of the curriculum. But though students learn to read in grade school, many do not know how to "read to learn" science. And science teachers are often too busy teaching science to actively help students increase their science reading…

  6. Psycholinguistics and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frank, (Ed.)

    Psycholinguistics has offered many new insights into the development of reading, e.g., only a small part of the information necessary for reading comprehension comes from the printed page, comprehension must precede the identification of individual words, and reading is not decoding to spoken language. These views are elaborated in this collection…

  7. Learning to Read Again.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, O. F., McCreery, Liz

    1988-01-01

    A project was developed which successfully taught individuals with visual impairments to read commercial large-print books, with either their own reading spectacles or with lower levels of magnification than usually prescribed. Over the course of the project, print sizes were systematically reduced and healthy reading habits were re-taught. (JDD)

  8. Reading/Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These seven projects comprise the reading and language arts section of a report on Elementary Secondary Education Act Title IV programs for the state of Illinois. Complete descriptions are furnished for the following: a multi-text, individualized reading skills program for grades four through eight; a reading program which stresses phonetic and…

  9. Reading in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taschow, Horst G.

    Difficulties inherent in the reading of mathematics at secondary and college levels are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on the reading of arithmetic numerals, literal numbers, operational symbols, and expressions of relationships, as well as the reading of technical vocabularies and specialized meanings of general words. While each…

  10. Family Reading Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…