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Sample records for pressure drop prediction

  1. Predicting Pressure Drop In Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1990-01-01

    Theory developed to predict drop in pressure based on drag of individual fibers. Simple correlation method for data also developed. Helps in predicting flow characteristics of many strain-isolation pad (SIP) glow geometries in Shuttle Orbiter tile system. Also helps in predicting venting characteristics of tile assemblies during ascent and leakage of hot gas under tiles during descent. Useful in study of mechanics of flows through fibrous and porous media, and procedures applicable to purged fiberglass insulation, dialysis filters, and other fibrous and porous media.

  2. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  3. Pressure drop and thrust predictions for transonic micronozzle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J.; Groll, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the expansion of xenon, argon, krypton, and neon gases through a Laval nozzle is studied experimentally and numerically. The pressurized gases are accelerated through the nozzle into a vacuum chamber in an attempt to simulate the operating conditions of a cold-gas thruster for attitude control of a micro-satellite. The gases are evaluated at several mass flow rates ranging between 0.178 mg/s and 3.568 mg/s. The Re numbers are low (8-256) and the estimated values of Kn number lie between 0.33 and 0.02 (transition and slip-flow regime). Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and continuum-based simulations with a no-slip boundary condition are performed. The DSMC and the experimental results show good agreement in the range Kn > 0.1, while the Navier-Stokes results describe the experimental data more accurately for Kn < 0.05. Comparison between the experimental and Navier-Stokes results shows high deviations at the lower mass flow rates and higher Kn numbers. A relation describing the deviation of the pressure drop through the nozzle as a function of Kn is obtained. For gases with small collision cross sections, the experimental pressure results deviate more strongly from the no-slip assumption. From the analysis of the developed function, it is possible to correct the pressure results for the studied gases, both in the slip-flow and transition regimes, with four gas-independent accommodation coefficients. The thrust delivered by the cold-gas thruster and the specific impulse is determined based on the numerical results. Furthermore, an increase of the thickness of the viscous boundary layer through the diffuser of the micronozzle is observed. This results in a shock-less decrease of the Mach number and the flow velocity, which penalizes thrust efficiency. The negative effect of the viscous boundary layer on thrust efficiency can be lowered through higher values of Re and a reduction of the diffuser length.

  4. Prediction of pressure drop in fluid tuned mounts using analytical and computational techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasher, William C.; Khalilollahi, Amir; Mischler, John; Uhric, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A simplified model for predicting pressure drop in fluid tuned isolator mounts was developed. The model is based on an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and was made more general through the use of empirical coefficients. The values of these coefficients were determined by numerical simulation of the flow using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package FIDAP.

  5. Blood Pressure Drop Prediction by using HRV Measurements in Orthostatic Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Giovanna; Melillo, Paolo; Stranges, Saverio; De Pietro, Giuseppe; Pecchia, Leandro

    2015-11-01

    Orthostatic Hypotension is defined as a reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure within 3 minutes of standing, and may cause dizziness and loss of balance. Orthostatic Hypotension has been considered an important risk factor for falls since 1960. This paper presents a model to predict the systolic blood pressure drop due to orthostatic hypotension, relying on heart rate variability measurements extracted from 5 minute ECGs recorded before standing. This model was developed and validated with the leave-one-out cross-validation technique involving 10 healthy subjects, and finally tested with an additional 5 healthy subjects, whose data were not used during the training and cross-validation process. The results show that the model predicts correctly the systolic blood pressure drop in 80 % of all experiments, with an error rate below the measurement error of a sphygmomanometer digital device. PMID:26345451

  6. In vivo validation of the in silico predicted pressure drop across an arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Browne, Leonard D; Griffin, Philip; Bashar, Khalid; Walsh, Stewart R; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T

    2015-06-01

    The creation of an arteriovenous fistula offers a unique example of vascular remodelling and adaption. Yet, the specific factors which elicit remodelling events which determine successful maturation or failure have not been unambiguously determined. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations are increasingly been employed to investigate the interaction between local hemodynamics and remodelling and can potentially be used to assist in clinical risk assessment of maturation or failure. However, these simulations are inextricably linked to their prescribed boundary conditions and are reliant on in vivo measurements of flow and pressure to ensure their validity. The study compares in vivo measurements of the pressure distribution across arteriovenous fistulae against a representative numerical model. The results of the study indicate relative agreement (error ≈ 8-10%) between the in vivo and CFD prediction of the mean pressure drop across the AVFs. The large pressure drop across the AVFs coincided with a palpable thrill (perivascular vibration) in vivo and fluctuations were observed in the numerical pressure drop signal due to flow instabilities arising at the anastomosis. This study provides a benchmark of the pressure distribution within an AVF and validates that CFD solutions are capable of replicating the abnormal physiological flow conditions induced by fistula creation. PMID:25753016

  7. Prediction of Frictional Pressure Drop During Water Permeation Through Packed Beds of Granular Particulates

    SciTech Connect

    KING, WILLIAM D.; ALEMAN, SEBASTIAN E.; HAMM, L. LARRY; PETTIS, MYRA A.

    2005-10-25

    A methodology has been developed based on the Kozeny-Carman equation to predict frictional pressure drops during water permeation of packed columns containing essentially noncompressible, but highly irregular particles. The resulting model accurately predicts pressure drop as a function of liquid flow rate and resin particle size for this system. A total of five particle sieve cuts across the range -20 to +70 mesh were utilized for testing using deionized water as the mobile phase. The Rosin-Rammler equation was used to fit the raw particle size data (wet sieve analysis) for the as-received resin sample and generate a continuous cumulative distribution function based on weight percent passing through the sieve. Probability distribution functions were calculated from the cumulative distribution for each particle sieve cut tested. Nine particle diameter definitions (i.e., number mean, volume mean, etc.) were then selected from the distribution function for each sample to represent the average spherically-equivalent particle diameter as input to the Kozeny-Carman equation. Nonlinear least squares optimization of the normalized pressure drop residuals were performed by parameter estimation of particle shape factor and bed porosity for all samples simultaneously using a given average particle diameter definition. Good fits to the full experimental data set were obtained when utilizing the number mean and the number median diameters. However, the shape factor and porosity values of 0.88 and 0.40, respectively, obtained from fitting the data using the number mean diameter were more consistent with experimental observations.

  8. Predicting Equations for Evaporation Pressure Drop Inside Horizontal Smooth and Grooved Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Atsushi; Uchida, Mari; Shikazono, Naoki

    A new prediction method for evaporation pressure drop inside horizontal smooth and grooved tubes is proposed. These tubes had an outer diameter of 7mm, and the working fluids were R407C (HFC-32/HFC-125/HFC-134a, 23/25/52 mass%) and R410A (HFC-32/HFC-125, 50/50 mass%). The previous and present experimental data were correlated by Lockhart-Martinelli method, where Colburn and Carnavos equations were utilized for predicting single phase pressure drop of smooth and grooved tubes, respectively. Different numerical constants were adopted for smooth and grooved tubes to calculate the L-M pressure parameter φ L.Inorder to express the gravitational effect, a damping function for φ L was introduced. The proposed damping function was expressed as a function of Froude number for both smooth and grooved tubes. It is confirmed that 95% of the predicted results are within the accuracy of ±30% for both smooth and grooved tubes.

  9. The influence of the equivalent hydraulic diameter on the pressure drop prediction of annular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kayiem, A. H. H.; Ibrahim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The flow behaviour and the pressure drop throughout an annular flow test section was investigated in order to evaluate and justify the reliability of experimental flow loop for wax deposition studies. The specific objective of the present paper is to assess and highlight the influence of the equivalent diameter method on the analysis of the hydrodynamic behaviour of the flow and the pressure drop throughout the annular test section. The test section has annular shape of 3 m length with three flow passages, namely; outer thermal control jacket, oil annular flow and inner pipe flow of a coolant. The oil annular flow has internal and external diameters of 0.0422 m and 0.0801 m, respectively. Oil was re-circulated in the annular passage while a cold water-glycol mixture was re-circulated in the inner pipe counter currently to the oil flow. The experiments were carried out at oil Reynolds number range of 2000 to 17000, covering laminar, transition and turbulent flow regimes. Four different methods of equivalent diameter of the annulus have been considered in this hydraulic analysis. The correction factor model for frictional pressure drop was also considered in the investigations. All methods addressed the high deviation of the prediction from the experimental data, which justified the need of a suitable pressure prediction correlation for the annular test section. The conventional hydraulic diameter method is a convenient substitute for characterizing physical dimension of a non-circular duct, and it leads to fairly good correlation between turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer characteristic of annular ducts.

  10. Prediction of two-phase pressure drop in heat exchanger for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The overall efficiency of a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocooler is governed by the performance of the recuperative heat exchanger. In the heat exchanger, the hot stream of the mixed refrigerant undergoes condensation at high pressure while the cold stream gets evaporated at low pressure. The pressure drop in the low pressure stream is crucial since it directly influences the achievable refrigeration temperature. However, experimental and theoretical studies related to two-phase pressure drop in mixtures at cryogenic temperatures, are limited. Therefore, the design of an efficient MR J-T cryocooler is a challenging task due to the lack of predictive tools. In the present work, the existing empirical correlations, which are commonly used for the prediction of pressure drop in the case of pure refrigerants, evaporating at near ambient conditions, are assessed for the mixed refrigerants. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop in the evaporating cold stream of the tube-in-tube helically coiled heat exchanger. The predicted frictional pressure drop in the heat exchanger is compared with the experimental data. The suggested empirical correlations can be used to predict the hydraulic performance of the heat exchanger.

  11. Evaluation of the models available for the prediction of pressure drop in venturi scrubbers.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J A; Alonso, D F; Costa, M A; Azzopardi, B J; Coury, J R

    2001-01-29

    The major running cost derived from the operation of venturi scrubbers is pressure drop. In the present study, the predictions of different models are compared to experimental data from venturi scrubbers of different sizes (throat diameter from 1.9 to 16cm), geometries, operating variables and liquid injection arrangements. As a result, it is concluded that most of the models must be used with caution. Much attention must be paid to the validity of the assumptions employed in the mathematical models. The equations proposed by Calvert [Scrubbing, Air Pollution, 3rd Edition, Vol. IV, Academic Press, New York, 1982], Yung et al. [JAPCA 27 (1977) 348] or Hesketh [Atomization and cloud behaviour in wet scrubbers, in: Proceedings of the US-USSR Symposium Control Fine Particulate Emissions 1974, San Francisco, 15-18 January 1974] produce good results only in very specific situations. The model proposed by Boll [Ind. Eng. Chem. Fundam. 12 (1973) 40] is simple, easy to compute and agrees reasonably well with the experimental data. Unfortunately, it cannot predict the effect of different liquid injection arrangements. The model by Azzopardi and coworkers [Filtr. Sep. 21 (1984) 196; Trans. IchemE. 69B (1991) 237; Chem Eng. J. 67 (1997) 9] was the only one to give good predictions for all the range of variables studied. On the other hand, this model is not simple and requires from the engineer an additional effort in terms of computation. In order to apply this model to the rectangular geometry, the concept of hydraulic equivalent diameter was used. PMID:11118688

  12. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  13. Short term Heart Rate Variability to predict blood pressure drops due to standing: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Standing from a bed or chair may cause a significant lowering of blood pressure (ΔBP), which may have severe consequences such as, for example, falls in older subjects. The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model to predict the ΔBP due to standing in healthy subjects, based on their Heart Rate Variability, recorded in the 5 minutes before standing. Methods Heart Rate Variability was extracted from an electrocardiogram, recorded from 10 healthy subjects during the 5 minutes before standing. The blood pressure value was measured before and after rising. A mathematical model aiming to predict ΔBP based on Heart Rate Variability measurements was developed using a robust multi-linear regression and was validated with the leave-one-subject-out cross-validation technique. Results The model predicted correctly the ΔBP in 80% of experiments, with an error below the measurement error of sphygmomanometer digital devices (±4.5 mmHg), a false negative rate of 7.5% and a false positive rate of 10%. The magnitude of the ΔBP was associated with a depressed and less chaotic Heart Rate Variability pattern. Conclusions The present study showes that blood pressure lowering due to standing can be predicted by monitoring the Heart Rate Variability in the 5 minutes before standing. PMID:26391336

  14. On the accuracy of CFD-based pressure drop predictions for right-angle ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brankovic, Andreja

    1993-07-01

    The predictive capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for turbulent flow through curved ducts is of significant importance to the design and performance analysis of modern rocket engine flowpaths. Code calibration and validation studies for this class of flow are desireable to estimate the performance margin and operating range of components designed using Navier-Stokes methods. Parametric experimental studies such as that of Weske (NACA ARR W-39) provided a wealth of performance data for the design of single- and compound elbow configurations with various cross-sections, curvature and aspect ratios at varying Reynolds numbers. In that work, the majority of data is presented in the form of loss coefficients, characterizing pressure losses due to duct curvature, and including losses due to wall friction. Using measured friction coefficients, losses of equivalent straight lengths of duct are subtracted, resulting in performance curves useful for design computations. These data are currently used in a CFD-based parametric study covering a broad range of operating conditions. Of particular interest for the accuracy of CFD predictions are the effects on pressure loss due to inlet boundary layer thickness (dependent on upstream development length), and the wall treatment for the turbulence equations (conventional wall functions vs. wall integration using a two-layer model). The experimental data are reassessed in the form of an error analysis, and are compared with CFD predictions for 18 computational cases. Grid-independence, grid spacing, and convergence requirements of the cases are discussed. Conclusions regarding the relative importance of the parametric variables will be presented.

  15. Validated heat-transfer and pressure-drop prediction methods based on the discrete-element method: Phase 2, two-dimensional rib roughness

    SciTech Connect

    James, C.A.; Hodge, B.K.; Taylor, R.P.

    1993-05-01

    Surface roughness is a commonly used approach for enhancing the rate of heat transfer of surfaces, such as in heat-exchanger tubes. Because the improved thermal performance of roughened surfaces is at the expense of increased flow resistance (increased pressure drop or friction factor), accurate prediction techniques for determining the friction factors and Nusselt numbers for roughened surfaces are required if such features are to be considered as design options. This report presents the results of the second phase of a research program sponsored by Argonne National Laboratory to validate models for the prediction of friction factors and Nusselt numbers for fully developed turbulent flow in enhanced heat-exchanger tubes. The first phase was concerned with validating a roughness model for turbulent flow in tubes internally roughened with three-dimensional distributed roughness elements, such as sandgrains, spheres, hemispheres, and cones. The second phase is concerned with devising and validating methods for the prediction of friction factors and Nusselt numbers for turbulent flow in tubes internally roughened with repeated, two-dimensional ribs aligned perpendicular to the flow. The ribs are spaced sufficiently far apart that the leeward-side separated flow reattaches to the wall before again separating in order to negotiate the next rib. This heat-transfer enhancement mechanism is called the separation and reattachment mechanism, after Rabas (1989). This work is limited to rectangular rib shapes.

  16. Pressure Drop in Radiator Air Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R

    1921-01-01

    This report describes a method for measuring the drop in static pressure of air flowing through a radiator and shows (1) a reason for the discrepancy noted by various observers between head resistance and drop in pressure; (2) a difference in degree of contraction of the jet in entering a circular cell and a square cell; (3) the ratio of internal frictional resistance to total head resistance for two representative types; (4) the effect of smoothness of surface on pressure gradient; and (5) the effects of supplying heat to the radiator on pressure gradient. The fact that the pressure gradients are found to be approximately proportional to the square of the rate of flow of air appears to indicate turbulent flow, even in the short tubes of the radiator. It was found that the drop in the static pressure in the air stream through a cellular radiator and the pressure gradient in the air tubes are practically proportional to the square of the air flow in a given air density; that the difference between the head resistance per unit area and the fall of static pressure through the air tubes in radiators is apparent rather than real; and that radiators of different types differ widely in the amount of contraction of the jet at entrance. The frictional resistance was found to vary considerably, and in one case to be two-thirds of the head resistance in the type using circular cells and one-half of the head resistance of the radiator type using square cells of approximately the same dimensions.

  17. Comparison of Predicted and Experimental Heat-Transfer and Pressure-Drop Results for an Air-Cooled Plug Nozzle and Supporting Struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graber, E. J., Jr.; Clark, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A calculational procedure is presented to analyze the heat-transfer and fluid-flow characteristics of a convectively air -cooled plug-nozzle operating on an afterburning turbojet engine. Anderson's method was used to predict hot-gas static pressures in the supersonic stream with fully expanded flow (high nozzle-pressure ratios); the results were excellent. For low nozzle-pressure ratios, the flow was assumed to expand one-dimensionally and isentropically to the plug back pressure. Wall temperatures predicted using this latter pressure distribution agreed well with the wall temperatures predicted using the measured hot-gas pressures (maximum deviation was about 30 K (54 deg R)). Either an in tegral boundary-layer technique or a simple pipe-flow equation may be used to calculate convective heat transfer from the hot gas to the wall. The simple pipeflow equation results in the prediction of slightly higher wall temperatures than does the integral technique. Experimental wall temperatures were generally in good agreement with the two predicted wall temperature distributions. Excellent agreement was noted b etween measured and predicted coolant static-pressure distributions. The plug-coolant temperature rise was generally overpredicted by about 22.2 K (40 deg R); possible explanations are offered. Although an an alysis of the struts, which support the plug, was purposely kept simple, reasonable results were obtained. Potential flow over an ellipse was used to calculate hot-gas static pressure; the results were satisfactory.

  18. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  19. Routines for Computing Pressure Drops in Venturis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Quay, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    A set of computer-program routines has been developed for calculating pressure drops and recoveries of flows through standard venturis, nozzle venturis, and orifices. Relative to prior methods used for such calculations, the method implemented by these routines offers greater accuracy because it involves fewer simplifying assumptions and is more generally applicable to wide ranges of flow conditions. These routines are based on conservation of momentum and energy equations for real nonideal fluids, the properties of which are calculated by curve-fitting subroutines based on empirical properties data. These routines are capable of representing cavitating, choked, non-cavitating, and unchoked flow conditions for liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. For a computation of flow through a given venturi, nozzle venturi, or orifice, the routines determine which flow condition occurs: First, they calculate a throat pressure under the assumption that the flow is unchoked or non-cavitating, then they calculate the throat pressure under the assumption that the flow is choked or cavitating. The assumption that yields the higher throat pressure is selected as the correct one.

  20. Resonances, radiation pressure and optical scattering phenomena of drops and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, P. L.; Goosby, S. G.; Langley, D. S.; Loporto-Arione, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic levitation and the response of fluid spheres to spherical harmonic projections of the radiation pressure are described. Simplified discussions of the projections are given. A relationship between the tangential radiation stress and the Konstantinov effect is introduced and fundamental streaming patterns for drops are predicted. Experiments on the forced shape oscillation of drops are described and photographs of drop fission are displayed. Photographs of critical angle and glory scattering by bubbles and rainbow scattering by drops are displayed.

  1. Method for reducing pressure drop through filters, and filter exhibiting reduced pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Sappok, Alexander; Wong, Victor

    2014-11-18

    Methods for generating and applying coatings to filters with porous material in order to reduce large pressure drop increases as material accumulates in a filter, as well as the filter exhibiting reduced and/or more uniform pressure drop. The filter can be a diesel particulate trap for removing particulate matter such as soot from the exhaust of a diesel engine. Porous material such as ash is loaded on the surface of the substrate or filter walls, such as by coating, depositing, distributing or layering the porous material along the channel walls of the filter in an amount effective for minimizing or preventing depth filtration during use of the filter. Efficient filtration at acceptable flow rates is achieved.

  2. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P.

    1995-02-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO{sub 2}). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 {mu} M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 {mu}m AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a {open_quotes}turn-table{close_quotes} generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS`publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced.

  3. Pressure drop and heat transfer in inverted film boiling hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, James

    Two-phase boiling hydrogen pressure drop and heat transfer is studied in the context of high velocity upflow in a constant, high heat flux, steady state, internal pipe flow environment. These data were generated by NASA in the early and mid 1960s in support of the manned space flight programs. Measurements taken were local pressure, temperature, and voltage drop. System measurements included mass flow rate, and test section inlet and discharge pressure and temperature. This effort establishes the nature of the flow as inverted film boiling, which has been studied to some degree. In this structure, the wall temperatures are too hot to allow liquid to remain at the surface. Therefore, a vapor film is established at the wall throughout the flow. The approach of this analysis is to reverse-engineer the data to determine mass quality, void fraction, and velocity slip. This is accomplished by applying a one-dimensional, five-equation model, with pressure gradient being the one combined equation for the liquid and vapor phases. Other major assumptions are that all of the vapor is at the mean film temperature, and the liquid core experiences no sensible heating. The resulting velocity slips are correlated for high and low pressure conditions, with the cutoff established at 600 kPa. Good agreement is achieved between the pressures predicted using the slip correlations and the measured pressures. Results are in general significantly better than those from the homogeneous equilibrium model. Various established heat transfer coefficient models are also applied to these data. It is shown that pre-critical heat flux models fail absolutely to predict the heat transfer coefficient. It is further shown that film boiling models that focus on buoyancy fail as well. While all forced convection film boiling models are within a reasonable range of the data, recommendations for appropriate models are made. The range of pipe inlet conditions are 188 kPa to 1265 kPa, mass fluxes from 327

  4. Cyclone optimization based on a new empirical model for pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, G.; Leith, D. ); Dirgo, J. ); Feldman, H. )

    1991-01-01

    An empirical model for predicting pressure drop across a cyclone, developed by Dirgo is presented. The model was developed through a statistical analysis of pressure drop data for 98 cyclone designs. The model is shown to perform better than the pressure drop models of Shepherd and Lapple, Alexander, First, Stairmand, and Barth. This model is used with the efficiency model of Iozia and Leith to develop an optimization curve which predicts the minimum pressure drop and the dimension ratios of the optimized cyclone for a given aerodynamic cut diameter, d{sub 50}. The effect of variation in cyclone height, cyclone diameter, and flow on the optimization is determined. The optimization results are used to develop a design procedure for optimized cyclones.

  5. Pressure drop in tubing in aircraft instrument installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wildhack, W A

    1937-01-01

    The theoretical basis of calculation of pressure drop in tubing is reviewed briefly. The effect of pressure drop in connecting tubing upon the operation and indication of aircraft instruments is discussed. Approximate equations are developed, and charts and tables based upon them are presented for use in designing installations of altimeters, air-speed indicators, rate-of-climb indicators, and air-driven gyroscopic instruments.

  6. Determination of pressure drop coefficient by CFD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skočilasová, Blanka; Skočilas, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with method applied to the verification of the turbulence models. The turbulence models were used in the simulation of the Newtonian fluid turbulent flow in the circular tube. The principle of the method is in the comparison of the pressure drop obtained by the simulation and the analytic solution. The parameters of the fluid flow were varied with the specified Reynolds number range. The pressure drop of inserted element in the pipe is evaluated.

  7. The effect of pressure drop on respirator faceseal leakage.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Larry; Weber, Robert

    2005-07-01

    Users of particulate air-purifying respirators are typically told to change their filters when breathing resistance becomes uncomfortable. It has been proposed that a noticeable increase in breathing resistance (pressure drop) may increase airflow through respirator faceseal leaks. This logic has been extended to suggest that respirator user exposure to contaminants may increase because of this theoretical increase in air leakage. Procedures similar to those of previous investigators were used to study this issue. Repeated faceseal leak rate measurements were made at -5.6 through -20.1 mm water pressure drops across the faceseal. Subjects were divided into two groups, representing acceptable fit or unacceptable fit, based on leak rate criteria prescribed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Subjects with acceptable fit did not experience an increase in faceseal leak rate with increased pressure drop. Leak rates for subjects with unacceptable fit were highly variable and did not show an association with pressure drop. Results of this study do not support the concept of increased faceseal leakage with increased pressure drop. The evidence does not suggest increased risk of contaminant exposure through the face seal as pressure drop increases. PMID:16020096

  8. Ground Motion Prediction Equations Empowered by Stress Drop Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, H.; Oth, A.

    2015-12-01

    Significant variation of stress drop is a crucial issue for ground motion prediction equations and probabilistic seismic hazard assessment, since only a few ground motion prediction equations take into account stress drop. In addition to average and sigma studies of stress drop and ground motion prediction equations (e.g., Cotton et al., 2013; Baltay and Hanks, 2014), we explore 1-to-1 relationship for each earthquake between stress drop and between-event residual of a ground motion prediction equation. We used the stress drop dataset of Oth (2013) for Japanese crustal earthquakes ranging 0.1 to 100 MPa and K-NET/KiK-net ground motion dataset against for several ground motion prediction equations with volcanic front treatment. Between-event residuals for ground accelerations and velocities are generally coincident with stress drop, as investigated by seismic intensity measures of Oth et al. (2015). Moreover, we found faster attenuation of ground acceleration and velocities for large stress drop events for the similar fault distance range and focal depth. It may suggest an alternative parameterization of stress drop to control attenuation distance rate for ground motion prediction equations. We also investigate 1-to-1 relationship and sigma for regional/national-scale stress drop variation and current national-scale ground motion equations.

  9. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  10. Effects of pressure drop and superficial velocity on the bubbling fluidized bed incinerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Jehng; Chen, Suming; Lei, Perng-Kwei; Wu, Chung-Hsing

    2007-12-01

    Since performance and operational conditions, such as superficial velocity, pressure drop, particles viodage, and terminal velocity, are difficult to measure on an incinerator, this study used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to determine numerical solutions. The effects of pressure drop and superficial velocity on a bubbling fluidized bed incinerator (BFBI) were evaluated. Analytical results indicated that simulation models were able to effectively predict the relationship between superficial velocity and pressure drop over bed height in the BFBI. Second, the models in BFBI were simplified to simulate scale-up beds without excessive computation time. Moreover, simulation and experimental results showed that minimum fluidization velocity of the BFBI must be controlled in at 0.188-3.684 m/s and pressure drop was mainly caused by bed particles. PMID:18074287

  11. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  12. Reducing cyclone pressure drop with evasés

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are widely used to separate particles from gas flows and as air emissions control devices. Their cost of operation is proportional to the fan energy required to overcome their pressure drop. Evasés or exit diffusers potentially could reduce exit pressure losses without affecting collection...

  13. Microseismicity Induced by Fluid Pressure Drop (Laboratory Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeny; Melchaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Pore pressure change in saturated porous rocks may result in its fracturing (Maury et Fourmaintraux, 1993) and corresponding microseismic event occurrences. Microseismicity due to fluid injection is considered in numerous papers (Maxwell, 2010, Shapiro et al., 2005). Another type of the porous medium fracturing is related with rapid pore pressure drop at some boundary. The mechanism of such fracturing was considered by (Khristianovich, 1985) as a model of sudden coal blowing and by (Alidibirov, Panov, 1998) as a model of volcano eruptions. If the porous saturated medium has a boundary where it directly contacted with fluid under the high pressure (in a hydraulic fracture or in a borehole), and the pressure at that boundary is dropped, the conditions for tensile cracks can be achieved at some distance from the boundary. In the paper, the results of experimental study of saturated porous sample fracturing due to pore pressure rapid drop are discussed. The samples (82 mm high, ∅60 mm) were made of quartz sand, which was cemented by "liquid glass" glue with mass fraction 1%. The sample (porosity 35%, uniaxial unconfined compression strength 2.5 MPa) was placed in a mould and saturated by oil. The upper end of the sample contacted with the mould upper lid, the lower end contacted with fluid. The fluid pressure was increased to 10 MPa and then discharged through the bottom nipple. The pressure increases/drops were repeated 30-50 times. Pore pressure and acoustic emission (AE) were registered by transducers mounted into upper and bottom lids of the mould. It was found, that AE sources (corresponded to microfracturing) were spreading from the open end to the closed end of the sample, and that maximal number of AE events was registered at some distance from the opened end. The number of AE pulses increased with every next pressure drop, meanwhile the number of pulses with high amplitudes diminished. It was found that AE maximal rate corresponded to the fluid pressure

  14. Controlling Vapor Pressure In Hanging-Drop Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Smith, Robbie

    1988-01-01

    Rate of evaporation adjusted to produce larger crystals. Device helps to control vapor pressure of water and other solvents in vicinity of hanging drop of solution containing dissolved enzyme protein. Well of porous frit (sintered glass) holds solution in proximity to drop of solution containing protein or enzyme. Vapor from solution in frit controls evaporation of solvent from drop to control precipitation of protein or enzyme. With device, rate of nucleation limited to decrease number and increase size (and perhaps quality) of crystals - large crystals of higher quality needed for x-ray diffraction studies of macromolecules.

  15. Liquid-metal pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhibi; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-08-01

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used as a heat transfer enhancement method in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This paper investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post design beamline mirror with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in literature about pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information about the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even more sparse. Due to this the authors considered the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry, which is very similar to that of the pin-post, to examine the pressure drop correlation with liquid metals over pin fins. The cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank was studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. Study lead to two major variables to influence the pressure drop: fluid properties, viscosity and density, and the relative length of the posts. Correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the prediction of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Oscillatory Flow Pressure and Pressure Drop Through Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Wang, Meng; Gedeon, David

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate the oscillatory flow pressure and pressure drop through complex geometries. These experiments were conducted at the CSU-SLRE facility which is a horizontally opposed, two-piston, single-acting engine with a split crankshaft driving mechanism. Flow through a rectangular duct, with no insert (obstruction), was studied first. Then four different inserts were examined: Abrupt, Manifold, Diverging Short and Diverging Long. The inserts were mounted in the center of the rectangular duct to represent different type of geometries that could be encountered in Stirling machines. The pressure and pressure drop of the oscillating flow was studied for: 1) different inserts, 2) different phase angle between the two pistons of the engine (zero, 90 lead, 180, and 90 lag), and 3) for different piston frequencies (5, 10, 15, and 20 Hz). It was found that the pressure drop of the oscillatory flow increases with increasing Reynolds number. The pressure drop was shown to be mainly due to the gas inertia for the case of oscillatory flow through a rectangular duct with no insert. On the other hand, for the cases with different inserts into the rectangular duct, the pressure drop has three sources: inertia, friction, and local losses. The friction pressure drop is only a small fraction of the total pressure drop. It was also shown that the dimensionless pressure drop decreases with increasing kinetic Reynolds number.

  17. PRESSURE DROP EVALUATION OF THE HYDROGEN CIRCULATION SYSTEM FOR JSNS

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Kato, T.; Futakawa, M.

    2010-04-09

    In J-PARC, an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a proton beam of 1 MW has selected supercritical hydrogen with a temperature of around 20 K and the pressure of 1.5 MPa as a moderator material. A hydrogen-circulation system, which consists of two pumps, an ortho-para hydrogen converter, a heater, an accumulator and a helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, has been designed to provide supercritical hydrogen to the moderators and remove the nuclear heating there. A hydrogen-circulation system is cooled through the heat exchanger by a helium refrigerator with the refrigeration power of 6.45 kW at 15.5 K. It is important for the cooling design of the hydrogen-circulation system to understand the pressure drops through the equipments. In this work, the pressure drop through each component was analyzed by using a CFD code, STAR-CD. The correlation of the pressure drops through the components that can describe the analytical results within 14% differences has been derived. It is confirmed that the pressure drop in the hydrogen circulation system would be estimated to be 37 kPa for the circulation flow rate of 160 g/s by using the correlations derived here, and is sufficiently lower than the allowable pump head of 100 kPa.

  18. Pressure Drop Evaluation of the Hydrogen Circulation System for Jsns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Kato, T.; Futakawa, M.

    2010-04-01

    In J-PARC, an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a proton beam of 1 MW has selected supercritical hydrogen with a temperature of around 20 K and the pressure of 1.5 MPa as a moderator material. A hydrogen-circulation system, which consists of two pumps, an ortho-para hydrogen converter, a heater, an accumulator and a helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, has been designed to provide supercritical hydrogen to the moderators and remove the nuclear heating there. A hydrogen-circulation system is cooled through the heat exchanger by a helium refrigerator with the refrigeration power of 6.45 kW at 15.5 K. It is important for the cooling design of the hydrogen-circulation system to understand the pressure drops through the equipments. In this work, the pressure drop through each component was analyzed by using a CFD code, STAR-CD. The correlation of the pressure drops through the components that can describe the analytical results within 14% differences has been derived. It is confirmed that the pressure drop in the hydrogen circulation system would be estimated to be 37 kPa for the circulation flow rate of 160 g/s by using the correlations derived here, and is sufficiently lower than the allowable pump head of 100 kPa.

  19. PRESSURE DROP REDUCTION BY ELECTRICAL ENHANCEMENT OF FABRIC FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses economic studies of electrostatic augmentation of fabric filtration (ESFF) that indicate that the reduced rate of pressure drop rise can lead to lower capital and operating costs. (ESFF has been evaluated in the laboratory and at various pilot scales over the ...

  20. A steady state pressure drop model for screen channel liquid acquisition devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, J. W.; Darr, S. R.; McQuillen, J. B.; Rame, E.; Chato, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the derivation of a simplified one dimensional (1D) steady state pressure drop model for flow through a porous liquid acquisition device (LAD) inside a cryogenic propellant tank. Experimental data is also presented from cryogenic LAD tests in liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) to compare against the simplified model and to validate the model at cryogenic temperatures. The purpose of the experiments was to identify the various pressure drop contributions in the analytical model which govern LAD channel behavior during dynamic, steady state outflow. LH2 pipe flow of LAD screen samples measured the second order flow-through-screen (FTS) pressure drop, horizontal LOX LAD outflow tests determined the relative magnitude of the third order frictional and dynamic losses within the channel, while LH2 inverted vertical outflow tests determined the magnitude of the first order hydrostatic pressure loss and validity of the full 1D model. When compared to room temperature predictions, the FTS pressure drop is shown to be temperature dependent, with a significant increase in flow resistance at LH2 temperatures. Model predictions of frictional and dynamic losses down the channel compare qualitatively with LOX LADs data. Meanwhile, the 1D model predicted breakdown points track the trends in the LH2 inverted outflow experimental results, with discrepancies being due to a non-uniform injection velocity across the LAD screen not accounted for in the model.

  1. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across a Blowbox: Gin Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox. Ho...

  2. Effect of superficial velocity on vaporization pressure drop with propane in horizontal circular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novianto, S.; Pamitran, A. S.; Nasruddin, Alhamid, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    Due to its friendly effect on the environment, natural refrigerants could be the best alternative refrigerant to replace conventional refrigerants. The present study was devoted to the effect of superficial velocity on vaporization pressure drop with propane in a horizontal circular tube with an inner diameter of 7.6 mm. The experiments were conditioned with 4 to 10 °C for saturation temperature, 9 to 20 kW/m2 for heat flux, and 250 to 380 kg/m2s for mass flux. It is shown here that increased heat flux may result in increasing vapor superficial velocity, and then increasing pressure drop. The present experimental results were evaluated with some existing correlations of pressure drop. The best prediction was evaluated by Lockhart-Martinelli (1949) with MARD 25.7%. In order to observe the experimental flow pattern, the present results were also mapped on the Wang flow pattern map.

  3. A Validated All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model and Lewis Number Effects for a Binary Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1999-01-01

    The differences between subcritical liquid drop and supercritical fluid drop behavior are discussed. Under subcritical, evaporative high emission rate conditions, a film layer is present in the inner part of the drop surface which contributes to the unique determination of the boundary conditions; it is this film layer which contributes to the solution's convective-diffusive character. In contrast, under supercritical condition as the boundary conditions contain a degree of arbitrariness due to the absence of a surface, and the solution has then a purely diffusive character. Results from simulations of a free fluid drop under no-gravity conditions are compared to microgravity experimental data from suspended, large drop experiments at high, low and intermediary temperatures and in a range of pressures encompassing the sub-and supercritical regime. Despite the difference between the conditions of the simulations and experiments (suspension vs. free floating), the time rate of variation of the drop diameter square is remarkably well predicted in the linear curve regime. The drop diameter is determined in the simulations from the location of the maximum density gradient, and agrees well with the data. It is also shown that the classical calculation of the Lewis number gives qualitatively erroneous results at supercritical conditions, but that an effective Lewis number previously defined gives qualitatively correct estimates of the length scales for heat and mass transfer at all pressures.

  4. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  5. New Results in Two-Phase Pressure Drop Calculations at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braisted, Jon; Kurwitz, Cable; Best, Frederick

    2004-02-01

    The mass, power, and volume energy savings of two-phase systems for future spacecraft creates many advantages over current single-phase systems. Current models of two-phase phenomena such as pressure drop, void fraction, and flow regime prediction are still not well defined for space applications. Commercially available two-phase modeling software has been developed for a large range of acceleration fields including reduced-gravity conditions. Recently, a two-phase experiment has been flown to expand the two-phase database. A model of the experiment was created in the software to determine how well the software could predict the pressure drop observed in the experiment. Of the simulations conducted, the computer model shows good agreement of the pressure drop in the experiment to within 30%. However, the software does begin to over-predict pressure drop in certain regions of a flow regime map indicating that some models used in the software package for reduced-gravity modeling need improvement.

  6. PROGRAM DROP: A computer program for prediction of evaporation from freely falling multicomponent drops

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    PROGRAM DROP consists of a series of FORTRAN routine which together are used to model the evaporation of a freely falling, multicomponent drop composed of an arbitrary number of volatile species and a single nonvolatile, inert component. The physics underlying the model are clearly identified, and the model`s relationship to previous work in the literature is described. Test cases are used to illustrate the viability of the model and to highlight its potential usefulness in the accurate prediction of multicomponent droplet vaporization in a variety of applications.

  7. Theoretical analysis of pressure-drop type instabilities in an upflow boiling system with an exit restriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Kakaç, S.; Liu, H. T.; Sarma, P. K.

    In this work, two-phase flow pressure-drop type instabilities in an upflow boiling system are studied theoretically. Dynamic simulations of the pressure-drop type instabilities require the knowledge of the steady state characteristics of the system in terms of the pressure drop versus the mass flow rate. In a boiling system with an exit restriction at the outlet of the boiling channel, the pressure drop through the system concentrates at the exit restriction. Therefore, the correlation of the pressure drop of the two-phase mixture flowing through the exit restriction (i.e. a sharp-edged orifice) is essential in the calculation of the total pressure drop of the system. A model for the exit restriction is developed and compared with the experimental results covering a wide range of vapor quality with different heat inputs and inlet subcoolings. The drift-flux model is adopted to predict the steady state characteristics of the boiling system. The dynamic oscillations of the quasi-static pressure-drop type instabilities in the boiling system are simulated and good predictions of the system stability boundary and oscillatory characteristics are obtained when compared with the experimental results.

  8. Predicting Drop-Out from Social Behaviour of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Jaroslav; Bydzovska, Hana; Geryk, Jan; Obsivac, Tomas; Popelinsky, Lubomir

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on predicting drop-outs and school failures when student data has been enriched with data derived from students social behaviour. These data describe social dependencies gathered from e-mail and discussion board conversations, among other sources. We describe an extraction of new features from both student data and behaviour…

  9. Model calibration for pressure drop in a pulse-jet cleaned fabric filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, John L.; David, Leith

    A model based on Darcy's law allows prediction of pressure drop in a pulse-jet cleaned fabric filter. The model considers the effects of filtration velocity, dust areal density added during one filtration cycle, and pulse pressure. Data used to calibrate the model were collected in experiments with three fabric surface treatments and three dusts conducted at three filtration velocities, for a total of 27 different experimental conditions. The fabric used was polyester felt with untreated, singed, or PTFE-laminated surface. The dusts used were granite, limestone and fly ash. Filtration velocities were 50,75 and 100 mm s -1. Dust areal density added during one filtration cycle was constant, as was pulse pressure. Under these conditions, fabric surface treatment alone largely determined the values for two of the three constants in the model; the third constant depends on pressure drop characteristics of the venturi at the top of each filter bag.

  10. Pressure drop and temperature rise in He II flow in round tubes, Venturi flowmeters and valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walstrom, P. L.; Maddocks, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Pressure drops in highly turbulent He II flow were measured in round tubes, valves, and Venturi flowmeters. Results are in good agreement with single-phase flow correlations for classical fluids. The temperature rise in flow in a round tube was measured, and found to agree well with predictions for isenthalpic expansion. Cavitation was observed in the venturis under conditions of low back pressure and high flow rate. Metastable superheating of the helium at the venturi throat was observed before the helium made a transition to saturation pressure.

  11. KC-135 zero-gravity two phase flow pressure drop: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Anne; Reinarts, Thomas R.; Best, Frederick R.; Hill, Wayne S.

    1991-01-01

    Two-phase flow, thermal management systems are currently being considered as an alternative to conventional, single phase systems for future space missions because of their potential to reduce overall system mass, size, and pumping power requirements. Knowledge of flow regime transitions, heat transfer characteristics, and pressure drop correlations is necessary to design and develop two-phase systems. This work is concerned with microgravity, two-phase flow pressure drop experiments. The data are those of a recent experiment (Hill and Best 1990) funded by the U.S. Air Force and conducted by Foster-Miller in conjunction with Texas A&M University. A boiling and condensing experiment was built in which R-12 was used as the working fluid. A Foster-Miller two phase pump was used to circulate a freon mixture and allow separate measurements of the vapor and liquid flow streams. The experimental package was flown five times aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which simulates 0-``g'' conditions by its parabolic flight trajectory. Test conditions included stratified and annual flow regimes in 1-``g'' which became bubbly, slug or annular flow regimes in 0-``g''. A portion of the current work outlines a methodology to analyze data for two-phase, 0-g experimental studies. A technique for correcting the raw pressure drop data collected from the test package is given. The Corrected pressure drop measurements are compared with predictive model. The corrected pressure drop measurements show no statistically significant difference between the 1-``g'' and 0-``g'' tests for mass flow rates between 0.00653 and 0.0544 kg/s in an 8 mm ID tube. An annular flow model gave the best overall predictions of pressure drop. The homogeneous, and Beattle and Whalley (1982) models showed good agreement with the pressure drops measured for the slug and bubbly/slug flow conditions. The two-phase multiplier deduced from the data appeared to follow the Martinelli-Nelson trend but at lower values than for

  12. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  13. Numerical Analysis including Pressure Drop in Oscillating Water Column Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    das Neves Gomes, Mateus; Domingues dos Santos, Elizaldo; Isoldi, Liércio André; Rocha, Luiz Alberto Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    The wave energy conversion into electricity has been increasingly studied in the last years. There are several proposed converters. Among them, the oscillatingwater column (OWC) device has been widespread evaluated in literature. In this context, the main goal of this work was to perform a comparison between two kinds of physical constraints in the chimney of the OWC device, aiming to represent numerically the pressure drop imposed by the turbine on the air flow inside the OWC. To do so, the conservation equations of mass,momentumand one equation for the transport of volumetric fraction were solved with the finite volume method (FVM). To tackle thewater-air interaction, the multiphase model volume of fluid (VOF)was used. Initially, an asymmetric constraint inserted in chimney duct was reproduced and investigated. Subsequently, a second strategywas proposed,where a symmetric physical constraint with an elliptical shapewas analyzed. Itwas thus possible to establish a strategy to reproduce the pressure drop in OWC devices caused by the presence of the turbine, as well as to generate its characteristic curve.

  14. Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of boiling water in sub-hundred micron channel

    SciTech Connect

    Bhide, R.R.; Singh, S.G.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Duttagupta, S.P.; Agrawal, Amit

    2009-09-15

    The current work focuses on the pressure drop, heat transfer and stability in two phase flow in microchannels with hydraulic diameter of less than one hundred microns. Experiments were conducted in smooth microchannels of hydraulic diameter of 45, 65 {mu}m, and a rough microchannel of hydraulic diameter of 70 {mu}m, with deionised water as the working fluid. The local saturation pressure and temperature vary substantially over the length of the channel. In order to correctly predict the local saturation temperature and subsequently the heat transfer characteristics, numerical techniques have been used in conjunction with the conventional two phase pressure drop models. The Lockhart-Martinelli (liquid-laminar, vapour-laminar) model is found to predict the two phase pressure drop data within 20%. The instability in two phase flow is quantified; it is found that microchannels of smaller hydraulic diameter have lesser instabilities as compared to their larger counterparts. The experiments also suggest that surface characteristics strongly affect flow stability in the two phase flow regime. The effect of hydraulic diameter and surface characteristics on the flow characteristics and stability in two phase flow is seldom reported, and is of considerable practical relevance. (author)

  15. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  16. Pressure drop of He II flow through a porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports on measurements of He II pressure drop across two porous SiO2 ceramic filter materials. These materials vary only in porosity, having values of 0.94 and 0.96. The average fiber diameter in both cases is approximately 5 microns. The experiment consists of a glass tube containing a piece of this sponge in one end. The tube is rapidly displaced downward in a bath of helium and the liquid levels are allowed to equilibrate over time producing variable velocities up to 10 cm/sec. The results are compared with those previously obtained using fine mesh screens. Good qualitative agreement is observed for turbulent flow; however, the behavior in the laminar flow regime is not fully understood.

  17. Estimation of inspiratory pressure drop in neonatal and pediatric endotracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Jarreau, P H; Louis, B; Dassieu, G; Desfrere, L; Blanchard, P W; Moriette, G; Isabey, D; Harf, A

    1999-07-01

    Endotracheal tubes (ETTs) constitute a resistive extra load for intubated patients. The ETT pressure drop (DeltaP(ETT)) is usually described by empirical equations that are specific to one ETT only. Our laboratory previously showed that, in adult ETTs, DeltaP(ETT) is given by the Blasius formula (F. Lofaso, B. Louis, L. Brochard, A. Harf, and D. Isabey. Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. 146: 974-979, 1992). Here, we also propose a general formulation for neonatal and pediatric ETTs on the basis of adimensional analysis of the pressure-flow relationship. Pressure and flow were directly measured in seven ETTs (internal diameter: 2.5-7.0 mm). The measured pressure drop was compared with the predicted drop given by general laws for a curved tube. In neonatal ETTs (2.5-3.5 mm) the flow regime is laminar. The DeltaP(ETT) can be estimated by the Ito formula, which replaces Poiseuille's law for curved tubes. For pediatric ETTs (4.0-7.0 mm), DeltaP(ETT) depends on the following flow regime: for laminar flow, it must be calculated by the Ito formula, and for turbulent flow, by the Blasius formula. Both formulas allow for ETT geometry and gas properties. PMID:10409556

  18. a Comprehensive Model for Capillary Pressure Difference across a Drop/bubble Flowing Through a Constricted Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Mingchao; Wei, Junhong; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Chengguo; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-09-01

    The capillary pressure is one of the crucial parameters in many science and engineering applications such as composite materials, interface science, chemical engineering, oil exploration, etc. The drop/bubble formation and its mechanisms that affect the permeability of porous media have steadily attracted much attention in the past. When a drop/bubble moves from a larger capillary to a smaller one, it is often obstructed by an additional pressure difference caused by the capillary force. In this paper, a comprehensive model is derived for the capillary pressure difference when a drop/bubble flows through a constricted capillary, i.e. a geometrically constricted passage with an abrupt change in radius. The proposed model is expressed as a function of the smaller capillary radius, pore-throat ratio, contact angle, surface tension and length of the drop/bubble in the smaller capillary. The model predictions are compared with the available experimental data, and good agreement is found between them.

  19. An improved method for simultaneous determination of frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in vertical flow boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausner, J. F.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in the vertical boiling and adiabatic flow of the refrigerant, R11, have been simultaneously measured by a liquid balancing column and differential magnetic reluctance pressure transducers. An account is given of the experimental apparatus and procedure, data acquisition and analysis, and error estimation employed. All values of two-phase multipliers evaluated on the basis of the measured frictional pressure drop data in vertical upflow fall in the range bounded by the predictions of the Chisholm correlation and the homogeneous model.

  20. Preliminary Analysis of Liquid Metal MHD Pressure Drop in the Blanket for the FDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-yan; Wu, Yi-can; He, Xiao-xong

    2002-10-01

    Preliminary analysis and calculation of liquid metal Li17Pb83 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the blanket for the FDS have been presented to evaluate the significance of MHD effects on the thermal-hydraulic design of the blanket. To decrease the liquid metal MHD pressure drop, Al2O3 is applied as an electronically insulated coating onto the inner surface of the ducts. The requirement for the insulated coating to reduce the additional leakage pressure drop caused by coating imperfections has been analyzed. Finally, the total liquid metal MHD pressure drop and magnetic pump power in the FDS blanket have been given.

  1. Experimental study on the flow patterns and the two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal impacting T-Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; Malandrone, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper analyzes the experimental results concerning the flow patterns and pressure drops in two-phase flow through a horizontal impacting T-junction, whose outlet pipes are aligned and perpendicular to the inlet pipe. The test section consists of plexiglass pipes with inner diameter of 10 mm. A mixture of water and air at ambient temperature and pressures up to 2.4 bar flows through the T-junction, with different splitting of flow rates in the two outlet branches; superficial velocities of air and water in the inlet pipe have been varied up to a maximum of 35 m/s and 3.5 m/s respectively. The flow patterns occurring in the inlet and branch pipes are compared with the predictions of the Baker and Taitel - Dukler maps. The pressure drops along the branches have been measured relatively to different splitting of the flow rate through the two branches and the pressure loss coefficients in the junction have been evaluated. Friction pressure drops have allowed us to evaluate two-phase friction multipliers, which have then been compared to the predictions of Lockhart-Martinelli, and Friedel correlations. Local pressure drops have been extrapolated at the junction centre and analyzed; the two-phase multiplier has been evaluated and compared with the predictions of Chisholm correlation; the value of the empirical coefficient that minimizes the discrepancy has also been evaluated.

  2. Prediction of performance of centrifugal pumps during starts under pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1969-01-01

    Method which calculates start-up characteristics of centrifugal pumps reveals a capacity to predict pressure drop characteristics of pumps with vaned diffusers. Calculations are based on pump geometry, design-point flow, speed, and pressure rise, and the pump characteristic within range of approximately ten percent of the design-point flow.

  3. Pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, liquid-vapor annular flows in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of frictional pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, annular liquid-vapor flows in zero gravity using simulation experiments conducted on earth is described. The scheme extends the authors' earlier work on dispersed flows. The simulation experiments used two immiscible liquids of identical density, namely, water and n-butyl benzoate. Because of the lack of rigorous analytical models for turbulent, annular flows, the proposed scheme resorts to existing semiempirical correlations. Results based on two different correlations are presented and compared. Others may be used. It was shown that, for both dispersed and annular flow regimes, the predicted frictional pressure gradients in 0-g are lower than those in 1-g under otherwise identical conditions. The physical basis for this finding is given.

  4. Numerical investigation of cavitation flow inside spool valve with large pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; Pan, Dingyi; Xie, Fangfang; Shao, Xueming

    2015-12-01

    Spool valves play an important role in fluid power system. Cavitation phenomena happen frequently inside the spool valves, which cause structure damages, noise and lower down hydrodynamic performance. A numerical tools incorporating the cavitation model, are developed to predict the flow structure and cavitation pattern in the spool valve. Two major flow states in the spool valve chamber, i.e. flow-in and flow-out, are studies. The pressure distributions along the spool wall are first investigated, and the results agree well with the experimental data. For the flow-in cases, the local pressure at the throttling area drops much deeper than the pressure in flow-out cases. Meanwhile, the bubbles are more stable in flow-in cases than those in flow-out cases, which are ruptured and shed into the downstream.

  5. The effect of pressure on annular flow pressure drop in a small pipe

    SciTech Connect

    de Bertodano, M.A.L.; Beus, S.G.; Shi, Jian-Feng

    1996-09-01

    New experimental data was obtained for pressure drop and entrainment for annular up-flow in a vertical pipe. The 9.5 mm. pipe has an L/D ratio of 440 to insure fully developed annular flow. The pressure ranged from 140 kPa to 660 kPa. Therefore the density ratio was varied by a factor of four approximately. This allows the investigation of the effect of pressure on the interfacial shear models. Gas superficial velocities between 25 and 126 m/s were tested. This extends the range of previous data to higher gas velocities. The data were compared with well known models for interfacial shear that represent the state of the art. Good results were obtained when the model by Asali, Hanratty and Andreussi was modified for the effect of pressure. Furthermore an equivalent model was obtained based on the mixing length theory for rough pipes. It correlates the equivalent roughness to the film thickness.

  6. Modeling and experimental validation on pressure drop in a reverse-flow cyclone separator at high inlet solid loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuezhi; Liu, Jie; Xu, Xiang; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-08-01

    High inlet solid loading is one of the most important features of cyclone separators in high density circulating fluidized beds (CFB). In this work, the effect of high solid loading on pressure drop in a reverse-flow cyclone was experimentally studied. The particles used were sand and γ-Al2O3. An extended range of inlet solid loadings ( M), up to 30 kg of solids/ kg of air was tested at different inlet air velocities ( V in=16˜24 m/s), well beyond the solid loading range reported before. The experiments showed that, in the tested range of solid loadings, the cyclone pressure drop decreased dramatically with increasing solid loading when M<7.5 kg/kg and then almost remained constant. A new semi-empirical model for predicting cyclone pressure drop was also developed. The calculated and experimental results showed good agreement for particle free flow and particle laden flow.

  7. Pressure drop control using multiple orifice system in compressible pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heuydong; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Matsuo, Shigeru; Raghunathan, S. R.

    2001-10-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of an orifice system in producing pressure drops and the effect of compressibility on the pressure drop, computations using the mass-averaged implicit Navier-Stokes equations were applied to the axisymmetric pipe flows with the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 20.0. The standard k- ɛ turbulence model was employed to close the governing equations. Numerical calculations were carried out for some combinations of the multiple orifice configurations. The present CFD data showed that the orifice systems, which have been applied to incompressible flow regime to date, could not be used for the high operating pressure ratio flows. The orifice interval did not strongly affect the total pressure drop, but the orifice area ratio more than 2.5 led to relatively high pressure drops. The total pressure drop rapidly increased in the range of the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 4.0, but it nearly did not increase when the operating pressure ratio was over 4.0. In the compressible pipe flows through double and triple orifice systems, the total pressure drop was largely due to shock losses.

  8. Low pressure drop airborne molecular contaminant filtration using open-channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Ding, Lefei; Joriman, Jon; Zastera, Dustin; Seguin, Kevin; Empson, James

    2006-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for AMC is offered by granular filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of adsorbents extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the low pressure drop AMC filters currently offered tend to be quiet costly and contaminant nonspecific. Many of these low pressure drop filters are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCNs), can still offer good filter life and removal efficiency, with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and full fan unit filters this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for AMC removal in a wide range of applications.

  9. Effect of External Pressure Drop on Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentung, Ku; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of the pressure drop on the operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP). Because the evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) both contain two-phase fluid, a thermodynamic constraint exists between the temperature difference and the pressure drop for these two components. As the pressure drop increases, so will the temperature difference. The temperature difference in turn causes an increase of the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, resulting in a higher CC temperature. Furthermore, the heat leak strongly depends on the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core. Tests were conducted by installing a valve on the vapor line so as to vary the pressure drop, and by charging the LHP with various amounts of fluid. Test results verify that the LHP operating temperature increases with an increasing differential pressure, and the temperature increase is a strong function of the fluid inventory in the loop.

  10. LHe Flow Regime/Pressure Drop for D0 Solenoid at Steady State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-03-03

    This paper describes in a note taking format what was learned from several sources on two phase liquid helium flow regimes and pressure drops as applied to the D-Zero solenoid upgrade project. Calculations to estimate the steady state conditions for the D-Zero solenoid at 5, 10 and 15 g/s are also presented. For the lower flow rates a stratified type regime can be expected with a pressure drop less than 0.5 psi. For the higher flow rate a more homogeneous flow regime can be expected with a pressure drop between 0.4 to 1.5 psi.

  11. Laboratory manual for static pressure drop experiments in LMFBR wire wrapped rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.J.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-07-01

    Purpose of this experiment is to determine both interior and edge subchannel axial pressure drops for a range of Reynolds numbers. The subchannel static pressure drop is used to calculate subchannel and bundle average friction factors, which can be used to verify existing friction factor correlations. The correlations for subchannel friction factors are used as input to computer codes which solve the coupled energy, continuity, and momentum equations, and are also used to develop flow split correlations which are needed as input to codes which solve only the energy equation. The bundle average friction factor is used to calculate the overall bundle pressure drop, which determines the required pumping power.

  12. Compressibility Effects on Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Smooth Cylindrical Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N

    1944-01-01

    An analysis is made to simplify pressure-drop calculations for nonadiabatic and adiabatic friction flow of air in smooth cylindrical tubes when the density changes due to heat transfer and pressure drop are appreciable. Solutions of the equation of motion are obtained by the use of Reynolds' analogy between heat transfer and skin friction. Charts of the solutions are presented for making pressure-drop calculations. A technique of using the charts to determine the position of a normal shock in a tube is described.

  13. Two Phase Flow Modeling: Summary of Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop Correlations in Reduced and Partial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rame, E.; Kizito, J.; Kassemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art predictions for two-phase flows relevant to Advanced Life Support. We strive to pick out the most used and accepted models for pressure drop and flow regime predictions. The main focus is to identify gaps in predictive capabilities in partial gravity for Lunar and Martian applications. Following a summary of flow regimes and pressure drop correlations for terrestrial and zero gravity, we analyze the fully developed annular gas-liquid flow in a straight cylindrical tube. This flow is amenable to analytical closed form solutions for the flow field and heat transfer. These solutions, valid for partial gravity as well, may be used as baselines and guides to compare experimental measurements. The flow regimes likely to be encountered in the water recovery equipment currently under consideration for space applications are provided in an appendix.

  14. Two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop of LNG during saturated flow boiling in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Shi, Yumei

    2013-12-01

    Two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop of LNG (liquefied natural gas) have been measured in a horizontal smooth tube with an inner diameter of 8 mm. The experiments were conducted at inlet pressures from 0.3 to 0.7 MPa with a heat flux of 8-36 kW m-2, and mass flux of 49.2-201.8 kg m-2 s-1. The effect of vapor quality, inlet pressure, heat flux and mass flux on the heat transfer characteristic are discussed. The comparisons of the experimental data with the predicted value by existing correlations are analyzed. Zou et al. (2010) correlation shows the best accuracy with 24.1% RMS deviation among them. Moreover four frictional pressure drop methods are also chosen to compare with the experimental database.

  15. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  16. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  17. Pressure-drops control strategy in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Thalasso, F; Razo-Flores, E; Ancia, R; Naveau, H P; Nyns, E J

    2001-01-29

    This paper presents a strategy to control pressure-drops (head loss) in a biofilter designed according to the "Mist-Foam" concept. This concept is based on the mixing of the gaseous substrate and a liquid nutrient solution with an atomization nozzle to generate a mist passing subsequently through a synthetic polyurethane foam. In this type of bioreactor, the microbial growth reduces progressively the empty bed volume of the biofilter and causes an increase in the pressure-drops. This phenomenon can result in a complete clogging of the biofilter. The strategy of pressure-drops control presented here consists of successive interruption of the liquid flow, automatically controlled, resulting in a drying effect of the biomass. Tested during a 160 days experiment, this system has permitted to reduce and stabilize the pressure-drops in a biofilter in which the carrier exhibited a high likelihood of clogging. PMID:11118687

  18. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, F.X.; Crowley, C.J.; Qureshi, Z.H.

    1992-06-01

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  19. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, F.X.; Crowley, C.J. ); Qureshi, Z.H. )

    1992-01-01

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  20. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, F. X.; Crowley, C. J.; Qureshi, Z. H.

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  1. Liquid-metal, pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L. )

    1995-02-01

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This article investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post crystal with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in the literature on pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information on the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even rarer. Because the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry is very similar to that of the pin post, the pressure drop correlation data for the cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank are studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. The emphasis of this article is on the influence of two variables on the pressure drop: viscosity and density of fluid. The difference and correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the predication of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  2. Study on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of internal heat exchangers in CO2 system under cooling condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Hoon; Lee, Jae-Heon; Choi, Jun Young; Kwon, Young Chul

    2009-12-01

    In order to study the heat transfer and pressure drop on four types of internal heat exchangers (IHXs) of a CO2 system, the experiment and numerical analysis were performed under a cooling condition. The configuration of the IHXs was a coaxial type and a micro-channel type. Two loops on the gas cooler part and the evaporator part were made, for experiment. And the section-by-section method and Hardy-Cross method were used for the numerical analysis. The capacity and pressure drop of the IHX are larger at the micro-channel type than at the coaxial type. When increasing the mass flow rate and the IHX length the capacity and pressure drop increase. The pressure drop of the evaporator loop is much larger than that of the gas cooler loop. The performance of the IHX was affected with operating condition of the gas-cooler and evaporator. The deviations between the experimental result and the numerical result are about ±20% for the micro-channel type and ±10% for the coaxial type. Thus, the new CO2 heat transfer correlation should be developed to precisely predict a CO2 heat transfer.

  3. Effect of bed pressure drop on performance of a CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Shi Yang; Guangxi Yue; Jun Su; Zhiping Fu

    2009-05-15

    The effect of bed pressure drop and bed inventory on the performances of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler was studied. By using the state specification design theory, the fluidization state of the gas-solids flow in the furnace of conventional CFB boilers was reconstructed to operate at a much lower bed pressure drop by reducing bed inventory and control bed quality. Through theoretical analysis, it was suggested that there would exist a theoretical optimal value of bed pressure drop, around which the boiler operation can achieve the maximal combustion efficiency and with significant reduction of the wear of the heating surface and fan energy consumption. The analysis was validated by field tests carried out in a 75 t/h CFB boiler. At full boiler load, when bed pressure drop was reduced from 7.3 to 3.2 kPa, the height of the dense zone in the lower furnace decreased, but the solid suspension density profile in the upper furnace and solid flow rate were barely influenced. Consequently, the average heat transfer coefficient in the furnace was kept nearly the same and the furnace temperature increment was less than 17{sup o}C. It was also found that the carbon content in the fly ash decreased first with decreasing bed pressure drop and then increased with further increasing bed pressure drop. The turning point with minimal carbon content was referred to as the point with optimal bed pressure drop. For this boiler, at the optimum point the bed pressure was around 5.7 kPa with the overall excess air ratio of 1.06. When the boiler was operated around this optimal point, not only the combustion efficiency was improved, but also fan energy consumption and wear of heating surface were reduced. 23 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Experimental microbubble generation by sudden pressure drop and fluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco Gutierrez, Fernando; Figueroa Espinoza, Bernardo; Aguilar Corona, Alicia; Vargas Correa, Jesus; Solorio Diaz, Gildardo

    2014-11-01

    Mass and heat transfer, as well as chemical species in bubbly flow are of importance in environmental and industrial applications. Microbubbles are well suited to these applications due to the large interface contact area and residence time. The objective of this investigation is to build devices to produce microbubbles using two methods: pressure differences and fluidics. Some characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of both methods are briefly discussed, as well as the characterization of the bubbly suspensions in terms of parameters such as the pressure jump and bubble equivalent diameter distribution. The authors acknowledge the support of Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología.

  5. Novel cyclone empirical pressure drop and emissions with heterogeneous particulate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New cyclone designs equally effective at controlling emissions that have smaller pressure losses would reduce both the financial and the environmental cost of procuring electricity. Tests were conducted with novel and industry standard 30.5 cm diameter cyclones at inlet velocities from 8 to 18 m s-...

  6. Novel cyclone pressure drop and emissions with heterogeneous particulate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New cyclone designs equally effective at controlling emissions that have smaller pressure losses would reduce both the financial and the environmental cost of procuring electricity. Tests were conducted with novel and industry standard 30.5 cm diameter cyclones at inlet velocities from 8 to 18 m s-...

  7. Pressure drop characteristics of cryogenic mixed refrigerant at macro and micro channel heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Jeong, Sangkwon; Hwang, Gyuwan

    2012-12-01

    Mixed Refrigerant-Joule Thomson (MR-JT) refrigerators are widely used in various kinds of cryogenic systems these days. The temperature glide effect is one of the major features of using mixed refrigerants since a recuperative heat exchanger in a MR-JT refrigerator is utilized for mostly two-phase flow. Although a pressure drop estimation for a multi-phase and multi-component fluid in the cryogenic temperature range is necessarily required in MR-JT refrigerator heat exchanger designs, it has been rarely discussed so far. In this paper, macro heat exchangers and micro heat exchangers are compared in order to investigate the pressure drop characteristics in the experimental MR-JT refrigerator operation. The tube in tube heat exchanger (TTHE) is a well-known macro-channel heat exchanger in MR-JT refrigeration. Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHEs) have been developed as a compact heat exchanger with micro size channels. Several two-phase pressure drop correlations are examined to discuss the experimental pressure measurement results. The result of this paper shows that cryogenic mixed refrigerant pressure drop can be estimated with conventional two-phase pressure drop correlations if an appropriate flow pattern is identified.

  8. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Boiling Nitrogen in Square Pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Nakayama, Tadashi; Takahashi, Koichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Aoki, Itsuo

    Pressure drop and forced convection heat transfer were studied in the boiling nitrogen flow in a horizontal square pipe with a side of 12 mm at inlet pressure between 0.1 and0.15 MPa with a mass flux between 70 and 2000 kg/m2-s and with a heat flux of 5, 10 and 20 kW/m2. Accordingly, the flow and heat transfer mechanisms specific to square pipe were elucidated, and the applicability to cryogenic fluids of pressure drop and heat transfer models originally proposed for room temperature fluids was clarified.

  9. Active control of static pressure drop caused by hydraulic servo-actuator engage

    SciTech Connect

    Janlovic, J.

    1994-12-31

    Pressure drop caused by propagation of expansion waves in the source pipeline of fast high cyclic hydraulic actuator produces possible anomalies in its function. To prevent pressure drop it is possible to minimize wave effects by active control of actuator servo-valve throttle leakage. In the paper is presented synthesis of possible discrete active control of hydraulic actuator and its servo-valve for prevention expansion wave pressure drop. Control synthesis is based on static pressure increasing with decreasing of fluid flow velocity, which can be realized by lower throttle leakage. Some of the effects of assumed control are shown on corresponding diagrams of control valve throttle motion, piston displacement and its corresponding linear velocity.

  10. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; et al

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  11. Effect of flameholder pressure drop on emissions and performance of premixed-prevaporized combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerr, R. A.; Lyons, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to determine the effects of flameholder pressure drop on the emissions and performance of lean premixed-prevaporized combustors. A conical flameholder mounted in a diverging duct was tested with two values of flameholder blockage. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons were measured for combustor entrance conditions of 600 to 800 K air temperature, 0.3 MPa to 0.5 MPa pressure, and 20 m/sec to 35 m/sec reference velocity. Jet A fuel was injected at flow rates corresponding to an equivalence ratio range from 0.8 down to the lean stability limit. Emission results for the high-blockage flameholder were a substantial improvement over the low-blockage emission results. A correlation of combustion efficiency with flameholder pressure drop was developed for pressure drops less than 9 percent.

  12. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures. PMID:27182751

  13. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  14. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux. This document consists solely of the plato file index from 11/87 to 11/90.

  15. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 2

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux.

  16. Single-drop impact damage prediction for low density, coated ceramic materials. [rain erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustelier, D.

    1984-01-01

    A technique utilizing finite element analysis, liquid impact kinematics, and momentum theory is described and compared to single-drop impact test data performed on various configurations of coated ceramic material. The method correlates well with test data and is useful in predicting the single-drop impact damage velocity threshold for low-density, coated ceramic materials.

  17. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  18. Analysis of MHD Pressure Drop in the Packed Pebble Bed-Based Blanket for the Fds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyan; Wu, Yican; He, Xiaoxiong

    2003-06-01

    The Fusion-Driven Sub-critical System as a multifunctional hybrid reactor has been investigated in ASIPP. The liquid metal LiPb flow through a packed pebble bed-based blanket is considered to be one of the blanket candidates. In this contribution, the MHD pressure drop of liquid metal flow through the packed pebble bed has been calculated and analyzed under various conditions including (a) the size of the packed pebbles; (b) the ratio of occupied room by the packed pebbles to that of liquid metal; and (c) whether the pebbles surface is insulated or not Furthermore, asymptotic techniques to analyze large Hartmann parameter flow and interaction parameter flow are employed and an analytical model has been developed for the calculations of MHD pressure drop of liquid metal flow in a packed pebble bed. The appropriate method for calculating the MHD effects on the pressure drop through the packed pebble bed-based blanket for the FDS has been presented.

  19. Pressure drop measurements on supercritical helium cooled cable in conduit conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, M. A.; Huang, Y.; Vansciver, S. W.

    1988-08-01

    Forced flow cable-in-conduit conductors with large cooled surface areas provide excellent stability margins at the price of high frictional losses and large pumping power requirements. For extensive projects such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design cooperation, it is essential to know the pressure drops to be expected from different conductor geometries and operating conditions. To measure these pressure drops a flow loop was constructed to circulate supercritical helium through different conductors. The loop is surrounded by a 5 K radiation shield to allow for stable operation at the required temperatures. A coil heat exchanger immersed in a helium bath is used to remove the heat generated by the pump. Pressure drops are measured across 1 meter lengths of the conductors for various mass flow rates. Friction factor versus Reynolds number plots are used to correlate the data.

  20. An improved correlation of the pressure drop in stenotic vessels using Lorentz's reciprocal theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chang-Jin; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Noda, Shigeho; He, Ying; Himeno, Ryutaro

    2015-02-01

    A mathematical model of the human cardiovascular system in conjunction with an accurate lumped model for a stenosis can provide better insights into the pressure wave propagation at pathological conditions. In this study, a theoretical relation between pressure drop and flow rate based on Lorentz's reciprocal theorem is derived, which offers an identity to describe the relevance of the geometry and the convective momentum transport to the drag force. A voxel-based simulator V-FLOW VOF3D, where the vessel geometry is expressed by using volume of fluid (VOF) functions, is employed to find the flow distribution in an idealized stenosis vessel and the identity was validated numerically. It is revealed from the correlation that the pressure drop of NS flow in a stenosis vessel can be decomposed into a linear term caused by Stokes flow with the same boundary conditions, and two nonlinear terms. Furthermore, the linear term for the pressure drop of Stokes flow can be summarized as a correlation by using a modified equation of lubrication theory, which gives favorable results compared to the numerical ones. The contribution of the nonlinear terms to the pressure drop was analyzed numerically, and it is found that geometric shape and momentum transport are the primary factors for the enhancement of drag force. This work paves a way to simulate the blood flow and pressure propagation under different stenosis conditions by using 1D mathematical model.

  1. Study of Critical Heat Flux and Two-Phase Pressure Drop Under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdollahian, Davood; Quintal, Joseph; Barez, Fred; Zahm, Jennifer; Lohr, Victor

    1996-01-01

    The design of the two-phase flow systems which are anticipated to be utilized in future spacecraft thermal management systems requires a knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in reduced gravities. This program was funded by NASA headquarters in response to NRA-91-OSSA-17 and was managed by Lewis Research Center. The main objective of this program was to design and construct a two-phase test loop, and perform a series of normal gravity and aircraft trajectory experiments to study the effect of gravity on the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and onset of instability. The test loop was packaged on two aircraft racks and was also instrumented to generate data for two-phase pressure drop. The normal gravity tests were performed with vertical up and downflow configurations to bound the effect of gravity on the test parameters. One set of aircraft trajectory tests was performed aboard the NASA DC-9 aircraft. These tests were mainly intended to evaluate the test loop and its operational performance under actual reduced gravity conditions, and to produce preliminary data for the test parameters. The test results were used to demonstrate the applicability of the normal gravity models for prediction of the two-phase friction pressure drop. It was shown that the two-phase friction multipliers for vertical upflow and reduced gravity conditions can be successfully predicted by the appropriate normal gravity models. Limited critical heat flux data showed that the measured CHF under reduced gravities are of the same order of magnitude as the test results with vertical upflow configuration. A simplified correlation was only successful in predicting the measured CHF for low flow rates. Instability tests with vertical upflow showed that flow becomes unstable and critical heat flux occurs at smaller powers when a parallel flow path exists. However, downflow tests and a single reduced gravity instability experiment indicated that the system actually became more stable with a

  2. Low pressure drop filtration of airborne molecular organic contaminants using open-channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Joriman, Jon; Ding, Lefei; Weineck, Gerald; Seguin, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Besides airborne acids and bases, airborne organic contaminants such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), perfluoroalkylamines and condensables are of primary concern in these applications. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for organics is offered by granular carbon filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of activated carbon extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the lower pressure drop AMC filters currently offered are quite expensive and are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCN's), offer good filter life and removal efficiency with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and fan filter units (FFUs) this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for the removal of airborne organics in a wide range of applications.

  3. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 8

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of tables of temperature measurements.

  4. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 4

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  5. Fundamental study of transpiration cooling. [pressure drop and heat transfer data from porous metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Dutton, J. L.; Benson, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Isothermal and non-isothermal pressure drop data and heat transfer data generated on porous 304L stainless steel wire forms, sintered spherical stainless steel powder, and sintered spherical OFHC copper powder are reported and correlated. Pressure drop data was collected over a temperature range from 500 R to 2000 R and heat transfer data collected over a heat flux range from 5 to 15 BTU/in2/sec. It was found that flow data could be correlated independently of transpirant temperature and type (i.e., H2, N2). It was also found that no simple relation between heat transfer coefficient and specimen porosity was obtainable.

  6. Pressure drop of two-phase plug flow in round mini-channels: Influence of surface wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong

    2008-09-15

    In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of two-phase plug flows in round mini-channels was investigated for three different tube materials, i.e., glass, polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. Air and water were used as the test fluids. In the wet-plug flow regime (wet wall condition at the gas portions), the pressure drop was reasonably predicted by the homogeneous flow model or by the correlations of Mishima and Hibiki [K. Mishima, T. Hibiki, Some characteristics of air-water two-phase flow in small diameter vertical tubes, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 22 (1996) 703-712] and Chisholm [D. Chisholm, A theoretical basis for the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation for two-phase flow, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 10 (1967) 1767-1778]. On the other hand, in the dry-plug flow regime (dry wall condition at the gas portions), the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. To take into account the effect of the moving contact lines, a modified Lockhart-Martinelli type correlation was proposed, which fitted the measured pressure-drop data within the mean deviation of 6%. (author)

  7. Testing of a 4 K to 2 K heat exchanger with an intermediate pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2015-12-01

    Most large sub-atmospheric helium refrigeration systems incorporate a heat exchanger at the load, or in the distribution system, to counter-flow the sub-atmospheric return with the super-critical or liquid supply. A significant process improvement is theoretically obtainable by handling the exergy loss across the Joule-Thompson throttling valve supplying the flow to the load in a simple but different manner. As briefly outlined in previous publications, the exergy loss can be minimized by allowing the supply flow pressure to decrease to a sub-atmospheric pressure concurrent with heat exchange flow from the load. One practical implementation is to sub-divide the supply flow pressure drop between two heat exchanger sections, incorporating an intermediate pressure drop. Such a test is being performed at Jefferson Lab's Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF). This paper will briefly discuss the theory, practical implementation and test results and analysis obtained to date.

  8. Review of Singular Cooling Inlet and Linear Pressure Drop for ITER Coils Cable in Conduit Conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicollet, S.; Bessette, D.; Cloez, H.; Decool, P.; Lacroix, B.; Lebailly, C. A.; Serries, J. P.

    2006-04-01

    New tests and measurements performed (Othello Facility, EFDA Task) on TF mock up cooling inlet and different central spirals (characteristics: hydraulic outer diameter and perforation ratio) are presented, as well as the new model of singular and linear friction factor. The ITER Coils CICC hydraulic length pressure drop is determined in operating conditions (m=8 g/s, P=0.6 MPa and T=5 K): the important result is an increase in linear pressure drop for the TF (290 Pa/m) and CS (430 Pa/m), in comparison with prototype model coils TFMC (100 Pa/m) and CSMC (180 Pa/m). The main reason is the reduction of the central spiral diameter and associated increase of friction factor and bundle to total mass flow ratio α (from 1/3 up to 2/3 typically). The ratio of singular cooling inlet to CICC linear pressure drop is estimated: TF mock up ratio (3 m) is lower than previous CS mock up tested (12 m), due to design changes. The cryogenic power necessary to compensate the CICC pressure drop is calculated for the 4 primary loop circuits: typically 2.3 kW at 5 K for TF winding system represents 40% of the whole average TF winding magnet heat loads during operation.

  9. An experimental study of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of divergent wavy minichannels using nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, A.; Sarangan, J.; Suresh, S.; Devahdhanush, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of an array of wavy divergent minichannels and the results were compared with wavy minichannels with constant cross-section. The experiment was conducted in hydro dynamically developed and thermally developing laminar and transient regimes. The minichannel heat sink array consisted of 15 rectangular channels machined on a 30 × 30 mm2 and 11 mm thick Aluminium substrate. Each minichannel was of 0.9 mm width, 1.8 mm pitch and the depth was varied from 1.3 mm at entrance to 3.3 mm at exit for the divergent channels. DI water and 0.5 and 0.8 % concentrations of Al2O3/water nanofluid were used as working fluids. The Reynolds number was varied from 700 to 3300 and the heat flux was maintained at 45 kW/m2. The heat transfer and pressure drop of these minichannels were analyzed based on the experimental results obtained. It was observed that the heat transfer performance of divergent wavy minichannels was 9 % higher and the pressure drop was 30-38 % lesser than that of the wavy minichannels with constant cross-section, in the laminar regime. Hence, divergent channel flows can be considered one of the better ways to reduce pressure drop. The performance factor of divergent wavy minichannels was 115-126 % for water and 110-113 % for nanofluids.

  10. Effects of Fin Shape on Condensation Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop inside Herringbone Micro Fin Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Akio; Otsubo, Yusuke; Ohtsuka, Satoshi

    Experiments of in-tube condensation of R410A have been carried out for as mooth tube, a h elical micro fin tube and five types of herringbone micro fin tubes. In the herringbone micro fin tube, the micro fins work to remove liquid at fin-diverging parts and collect liquid at fin-converging parts. In the high mass velocity region, heat transfer coefficient of all the herringbone tubes is about 2-4 times higher than that of the helical micro fin tube. In the low mass velocity region, however, the heat transfer coefficients of the herringbone micro fin tubes are equal to or smaller than those of the helical micro fin tube. Up to the fin height of 0.18 mm, the heat transfer coefficient is higher for higher fin, whereas that of ah igher fin tube is saturated. The pressure drop increases with increasing fin height. The helix angle strongly affects the heat transfer and pressure drop. Higher helix angle causes higher heat transfer coefficient and higher pressure drop. In the case of the herringbone tube which has shorter fin and/or smaller helix angle, pressure drops are equal to or lower than that of the helical micro fin tube, whereas those of other tubes are higher.

  11. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer of Water Flowing Shell-Side of Multitube Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yukio; Hashizume, Kenichi

    Experimental studies on heat transfer augmentation in water-flowing shell sides of counter flow multitube exchangers are presented. Various kinds of augmented tube bundles have been examined to obtain the characteristics of pressure drop and heat transfer. Data for a smooth tube bundle were a little different from those for the tube side. The pressure drop in the shell side depended on Re-0.4 and deviated from the tube side pressure drop to within +30%, while the shell side heat transfer coefficient depended on Re0.8 but about 35%. larger than that of the tube side. Furthermore the augmented tube bundles have been evaluated and compared using 21 evaluation criteria. Enhanced tube bundles, low-finned tube bundles and those with twisted tapes inserted had especially good performances. The ratios of increase in heat transfer were larger than those in pressure drop. In case of low-finned tube bundles, there seem to exist an optimum fin-pitch and an optimum relation between the fin-pitch and the pitch of twisted tapes inserted.

  12. Pressure drop and pumping power for fluid flow through round tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinek, D.

    1973-01-01

    Program, written for Hewlett-Packard 9100A electronic desk computer provides convenient and immediate solution to problem of calculating pressure drop and fluid pumping power for flow through round tubes. Program was designed specifically for steady-state analysis and assumes laminar flow.

  13. Pressure drop of slush nitrogen flow in converging-diverging pipes and corrugated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Okuyama, Jun; Nakagomi, Kei; Takahashi, Koichi

    2012-12-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are solid-liquid, two-phase fluids. As a functional thermal fluid, there are high expectations for use of slush fluids in various applications such as fuels for spacecraft engines, clean-energy fuels to improve the efficiency of transportation and storage, and as refrigerants for high-temperature superconducting equipment. Experimental flow tests were performed using slush nitrogen to elucidate pressure-drop characteristics of converging-diverging (C-D) pipes and corrugated pipes. In experimental results regarding pressure drop in two different types of C-D Pipes, i.e., a long-throated pipe and a short-throated pipe, each having an inner diameter of 15 mm, pressure drop for slush nitrogen in the long-throated pipe at a flow velocity of over 1.3 m/s increased by a maximum of 50-60% as compared to that for liquid nitrogen, while the increase was about 4 times as compared to slush nitrogen in the short-throated pipe. At a flow velocity of over 1.5 m/s in the short-throated pipe, pressure drop reduction became apparent, and it was confirmed that the decrease in pressure drop compared to liquid nitrogen was a maximum of 40-50%. In the case of two different types of corrugated pipes with an inner diameter of either 12 mm or 15 mm, a pressure-drop reduction was confirmed at a flow velocity of over 2 m/s, and reached a maximum value of 37% at 30 wt.% compared to liquid nitrogen. The greater the solid fractions, the smaller the pipe friction factor became, and the pipe friction factor at the same solid fraction showed a constant value regardless of the Reynolds number. From the observation of the solid particles' behavior using a high-speed video camera and the PIV method, the pressure-drop reduction mechanisms for both C-D and corrugated pipes were demonstrated.

  14. Analyses of MHD Pressure Drop in a Curved Bend for Different Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Kameel; Rafique, Muhammad; Majid, Asad

    In this research we have analyzed liquid-metal flow in a curved bend in the presence of a magnetic field, which acts in two transverse directions. The magnetic field along the x-axis varied as B0(R + x)-1, while the magnetic field in y-direction is kept constant. The duct has conducting vanadium walls and liquid metal (lithium, sodium and potassium) have been used as a coolant. Magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) equations in three dimensions have been developed in the modified toroidal coordinate system. Then these coupled set of equations are solved by using finite difference techniques and an extended SIMPLER algorithm approach and an estimation of MHD pressure drop has been made for three different liquid metals, namely lithium, sodium and potassium. The results for a curved bend indicate an immense axial MHD pressure drop. The axial MHD pressure drop for three liquid metals, increases for an increase in both kinds of magnetic fields. It has been found that the MHD pressure drop is maximum in the case of sodium and minimum in the case of lithium In this paper a detailed comparative analysis has been carried out to find a suitable fluid for the cooling of high heat flux components of a fusion reactor, which is compatible with liquid metal lithium blanket and can also remove the 5 MW m-2 heat flux falling on the limiter or diverter plate. We finally concluded that from MHD pressure drop point of view that liquid lithium is the best choice for cooling of high heat flux components of a fusion reactor

  15. Intercooler cooling-air weight flow and pressure drop for minimum drag loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, J George; Valerino, Michael F

    1944-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the drag losses in airplane flight of cross-flow plate and tubular intercoolers to determine the cooling-air weight flow and pressure drop that give a minimum drag loss for any given cooling effectiveness and, thus, a maximum power-plant net gain due to charge-air cooling. The drag losses considered in this analysis are those due to (1) the extra drag imposed on the airplane by the weight of the intercooler, its duct, and its supports and (2) the drag sustained by the cooling air in flowing through the intercooler and its duct. The investigation covers a range of conditions of altitude, airspeed, lift-drag ratio, supercharger-pressure ratio, and supercharger adiabatic efficiency. The optimum values of cooling air pressure drop and weight flow ratio are tabulated. Curves are presented to illustrate the results of the analysis.

  16. The oceanic response of the Turkish Straits System to an extreme drop in atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Jeffrey W.; Jarosz, Ewa; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Beşiktepe, Åükrü

    2014-06-01

    Moorings across all four entry/exit sections of the Dardanelles Strait and the Bosphorus Strait simultaneously measured the response of the Turkish Straits System to the passage of a severe cyclonic storm that included an atmospheric pressure drop of more than 30 mbar in less than 48 h. The bottom pressure response at the Aegean Sea side of the Dardanelles Strait was consistent with an inverted barometer response, but the response at the other sections did not follow an inverted barometer, leading to a large bottom pressure gradient through the Turkish Straits System. Upper-layer flow toward the Aegean Sea was reversed by the storm and flow toward the Black Sea was greatly enhanced. Bottom pressure across the Sea of Marmara peaked 6 h after the passage of the storm's minimum pressure. The response on the Dardanelles side was a combination of sea elevation and pycnocline depth rise, and the response on the Bosphorus side was an even greater sea elevation rise and a drop in pycnocline depth. The peak in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara was followed by another reverse in the flow through the Dardanelles Strait as flow was then directed away from the Sea of Marmara in both straits. A simple conceptual model without wind is able to explain fluctuations in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara to a 0.89-0.96 level of correlation. This stresses the importance of atmospheric pressure dynamics in driving the mass flux of the Turkish Strait System for extreme storms.

  17. Blood Pressure Patterns May Predict Stroke Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158731.html Blood Pressure Patterns May Predict Stroke Risk Odds increase with rapid rise in middle ... overall pattern to predict a patient's risk of stroke or early death, new research suggests. "Our study ...

  18. An experimental investigation of pressure drop of aqueous foam in laminar tube flow

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, B.F.; Sobolik, K.B.

    1987-04-01

    This report is the first of two detailing pressure-drop and heat-transfer measurements made at the Foam Flow Heat Transfer Loop. The work was motivated by a desire to extend the application of aqueous foam from petroleum drilling to geothermal drilling. Pressure-drop measurements are detailed in this report; a forthcoming report (SAND85-1922) will describe the heat-transfer measurements. The pressure change across a 2.4-m (8-ft) length of the 2.588-cm (1.019-in.) ID test section was measured for liquid volume fractions between 0.05 and 0.35 and average velocities between 0.12 and 0.80 m/s (0.4 and 2.6 ft/s). The resulting pressure-drop/flow-rate data were correlated to a theoretical model for a Bingham plastic. Simple expressions for the dynamic viscosity and the yield stress as a function of liquid volume fraction were estimated.

  19. Swirls and splashes: pressure dependence of the airflow created by drop impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Mauser, Kelly W.; Ray, Bahni; Lee, Taehun; Nagel, Sidney R.; JFI; Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 6063 Collaboration; Department of Mechanical Engineering, CCNY, NY 10031 Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    A drop impacting a solid surface with sufficient velocity will splash and emit many small droplets. However, removing the ambient air suppresses splashing completely. The transition between splashing and non-splashing occurs gradually: decreasing the air pressure systematically delays and eventually fully inhibits the occurrence of a splash. The mechanism by which the surrounding gas affects the drop dynamics remains unknown. We use modified Schlieren optics combined with high-speed video imaging to visualize the airflow created by the rapid spreading of the drop after it hits the substrate. We observe the generation of a vortex ring that is initially bound to the outer edge of the spreading liquid and subsequently detaches from the liquid to form a beautiful toroidal vortex sheet that expands and curls up into a roll. We have studied the dynamics of this vortex as a function of gas pressure and find that the sheet gets progressively smaller as the air pressure is decreased. This suggests a weakening of the vortex strength at low pressure. We acknowledge support from NSF MRSEC and PREM grants.

  20. Gas-liquid pressure drop in vertical internally wavy 90 bend

    SciTech Connect

    Benbella, Shannak; Al-Shannag, Mohammad; Al-Anber, Zaid A.

    2009-01-15

    Experiments of air water two-phase flow pressure drop in vertical internally wavy 90 bend have been carried out. The tested bends are flexible and made of stainless steel with inner diameter of 50 mm and various curvature radiuses of 200, 300, 400 and 500 mm. The experiments were performed under the following conditions of two-phase parameters; mass flux from 350 to 750 kg/m{sup 2} s. Gas quality from 1% to 50% and system pressure from 4 to 7.5 bar. The results demonstrate that the effect of the above-mentioned parameters is very significant at high ranges of mass flow quality. Due to the increasing of two-phase flow resistance, energy dissipations, friction losses and interaction of the two-phases in the vertical internally wavy 90 bend the total pressure drops are perceptible about 2-5 times grater than that in smooth bends. Based on the mass and energy balance as well as the presented experimental results, new empirical correlation has been developed to calculate the two-phase pressure drop and hence the two-phase friction factor of the tested bends. The correlation includes the relevant primary parameter, fit the data well, and is sufficiency accurate for engineering purposes. (author)

  1. Effects of phosphoric acid sprayed into an incinerator furnace on the flue gas pressure drop at fabric filters.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Hwang, In-Hee; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2016-06-01

    Fabric filters are widely used to remove dust from flue gas generated by waste incineration. However, a pressure drop occurs at the filters, caused by growth of a dust layer on the filter fabric despite regular cleaning by pulsed-jet air. The pressure drop at the fabric filters leads to energy consumption at induced draft fan to keep the incinerator on negative pressure, so that its proper control is important to operate incineration facility efficiently. The pressure drop at fabric filters decreased whenever phosphoric acid wastewater (PAW) was sprayed into an incinerator for treating industrial waste. Operational data obtained from the incineration facility were analyzed to determine the short- and long-term effects of PAW spraying on the pressure drop. For the short-term effect, it was confirmed that the pressure drop at the fabric filters always decreased to 0.3-1.2kPa within about 5h after spraying PAW. This effect was expected to be obtained by about one third of present PAW spraying amount. However, from the long-term perspective, the pressure drop showed an increase in the periods of PAW spraying compared with periods for which PAW spraying was not performed. The pressure drop increase was particularly noticeable after the initial PAW spraying, regardless of the age and type of fabric filters used. These results suggest that present PAW spraying causes a temporary pressure drop reduction, leading to short-term energy consumption savings; however, it also causes an increase of the pressure drop over the long-term, degrading the overall operating conditions. Thus, appropriate PAW spraying conditions are needed to make effective use of PAW to reduce the pressure drop at fabric filters from a short- and long-term point of view. PMID:27040089

  2. Microfluidic analysis of pressure drop and flow behavior in hypertensive micro vessels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruiqing; Li, Fen; Lv, Jiaqi; He, Ying; Lu, Detang; Yamada, Takashi; Ono, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The retinal arterial network is the only source of the highly nutrient-consumptive retina, thus any insult on the arteries can impair the retinal oxygen and nutrient supply and affect its normal function. The aim of this work is to study the influences of vascular structure variation on the flow and pressure characteristics via microfluidic devices. Two sets of micro-channel were designed to mimic the stenosed microvessels and dichotomous branching structure in the retinal arteries. Three working fluids including red blood cell (RBC) suspension were employed to investigate the pressure drop in the stenosed channel. The flow behaviors of RBC suspensions inside the micro channels were observed using high speed camera system. Pressure drop of different working fluids and RBC velocity profiles in the stenosed channel were obtained. Moreover, hematocrit levels of RBC suspensions inside the bifurcated channels were analyzed from the sequential images of RBC flow. The results of the flow in the stenosed channel show that RBCs drift from the center of the channels, and RBC velocity is influenced not only by the inlet flow rate but also the interaction between RBCs. The measured pressure drops in the stenosed channel increase notably with the increase of fluid viscosity. Furthermore, the dimensionless pressure drop due to the stenosis decreases with Reynolds number. On the other hand, the results of flow through the bifurcated channels show that as the ratio of the daughter-branch width to the mother-channel width increases, the ratio of hematocrit in two connected branches (Ht/Hd) decreases, which is in favorable agreement with the available analysis results. PMID:26004808

  3. Characteristics of pebble packing and evaluation of sweep gas pressure drop into the in-pile mock-up on fusion blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Nakamichi, Masaru; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Sagawa, Hisashi; Kanzawa, Toru; Suzuki, Tatsushi; Saito, Minoru

    1994-09-01

    The characteristics of pebble packing and the sweep gas pressure drop have been investigated for the design of the in-pile mock-up in Japan Materials Testing Reactor, and the results obtained are the following. The packing fraction of single diameter pebbles is kept at constant, i.e., about 63%, under the condition that the ratio of tube inside diameter to pebble diameter is above 10. The pebble distribution in the bed is not homogeneous, i.e., the mixture of close packing and loose packing zones both in the middle of bed and near wall. The packing fraction is about 77% for two-size pebble packing consisting of Ø1 and 5 mm pebbles. The measured pressure drops agree with those predicted by the Kozeny-Carman equation within the range of (+25)-(-60)%. The pressure drop is not affected by moisture concentration (< 100 ppm) and does not change for tests lasting as long as 300 hours.

  4. Analysis of single phase flow pressure drop and heat transfer in a horizontal rifled tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Soo Poey; Wahab, Abas Abdul; Ariffin, Saparudin; Kiow, Lee Woon

    2012-06-01

    Analysis by using Fluent® has been carried out to investigate the pressure drop and heat transfer of single phase flow (Reynolds number ranging from 2.0×104 - 1.4×105) in a 2 meter long of rifled tube and smooth tube which are heated at the outer wall at constant temperature. The rifled tube or also known as spiral internally ribbed tube which is used in this investigation has an outside diameter 45.0 mm and inside equivalent diameter of 33.1 mm while the smooth tube has an outside diameter 45.0 mm and inside diameter 34.1 mm. The working fluid that is used in this investigation is water. In this analysis, realizable k-epsilon model has been chosen to solve the fully developed turbulence flow in both the tubes. The result from simulation shows that the pressure drop in rifled tube is about 1.69-2.0 times higher than in the smooth tube while the heat transfer coefficient of water in the rifle tube is 0.97-1.27 times than in the smooth tube. The high pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in rifled tube comparing to smooth tube is due to the helical rib in the rifled tube which not only acted as rough surface, but also causes swirling effect near the wall which enhance heat transfer. The present study has proved that although the rifled tube produces high pressure drop but it is good in heat transfer enhancement through the ratio of heat flux to the pumping power. Correlations have been proposed for the single phase friction factor and Nusselt number of the rifled tube.

  5. Pressure drop in fully developed, duct flow of dispersed liquid-vapor mixture at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics of steady, fully developed dispersed liquid-vapor flow in a straight duct at 0-g is simulated by flowing water containing n-butyl benzoate droplets. Water and benzoate are immiscible and have identical density at room temperature. The theoretical basis of the simulation is given. Experiments showed that, for a fixed combined flow rate of water and benzoate, the frictional pressure drop is unaffected by large changes in the volume fraction of benzoate drops and their size distribution. Measured power spectra of the static wall pressure fluctuations induced by the turbulent water-benzoate flow also revealed that their dynamics is essentially unaltered by the presence of the droplets. These experimental findings, together with the theoretical analysis, led to the conclusion that the pressure drop in fully developed, dispersed liquid-vapor flow in straight ducts of constant cross section at 0-g is identical to that due to liquid flowing alone at the same total volumetric flow rate of the liquid-vapor mixture and, therefore, can be readily determined.

  6. Equivalent particle diameter and length scale for pressure drop in porous metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dukhan, Nihad; Patel, Pragnesh

    2008-04-15

    The internal architecture of metal foam is significantly different from that of traditional porous media. This provides a set of challenges for understanding the fluid flow in this relatively new class of materials. This paper proposes that despite the geometrical differences between metal foam and traditional porous media, the Ergun correlation is a good fit for the linear pressure drop as a function of the Darcian velocity, provided that an appropriate equivalent particle diameter is used. The paper investigates an appropriate particle diameter considering the physics of energy dissipation, i.e. the viscous shear and the form drag. The above approach is supported by wind tunnel steady-state unidirectional pressure drop measurements for airflow through several isotropic open-cell aluminum foam samples having different porosities and pore densities. For each foam sample, the equivalent particle diameter correlated well with the surface area per unit volume of the foam. This was also very well valid for previous porous metal pressure drop data in the open literature. (author)

  7. Changes in predictive motor control in drop-jumps based on uncertainties in task execution.

    PubMed

    Leukel, Christian; Taube, Wolfgang; Lorch, Michael; Gollhofer, Albert

    2012-02-01

    Drop-jumps are controlled by predictive and reactive motor strategies which differ with respect to the utilization of sensory feedback. With reaction, sensory feedback is integrated while performing the task. With prediction, sensory information may be used prior to movement onset. Certainty about upcoming events is important for prediction. The present study aimed at investigating how uncertainties in the task execution affect predictive motor control in drop-jumps. Ten healthy subjects (22±1 years, M±SD) participated. The subjects performed either (i) drop-jumps by knowing that they might had to switch to a landing movement upon an auditory cue, which was sometimes elicited prior to touch-down (uncertainty). In (ii), subjects performed drop-jumps by knowing that there would be no auditory cue and consequently no switch of the movement (certainty). The m. soleus EMG prior to touch-down was higher when subjects knew there would be no auditory cue compared to when subjects performed the same task but switching from drop-jump to landing was possible (uncertainty). The EMG was reversed in the late concentric phase, meaning that it was higher in the high uncertainty task. The results of the present study showed that the muscular activity was predictively adjusted according to uncertainties in task execution. It is argued that tendomuscular stiffness was the variable responsible for the adjustment of muscular activity. The required tendomuscular stiffness was higher in drop-jumps than in landings. Consequently, when it was not certain whether to jump or to land, muscular activity and therefore tendomuscular stiffness was reduced. PMID:21757248

  8. Effects of sudden expansion and contraction flow on pressure drops in the Stirling engine regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, K.; Yamashita, I.; Hirata, K.

    1998-07-01

    The flow losses in the regenerators greatly influence the performance of the Stirling engine. The losses mainly depend on fluid friction through the regenerator matrix, but are also generated in sudden expansion and contraction flow at the regenerator ends. The latter losses can't be neglected in the case of small area ratio (entrance area/cross-sectional area in regenerator). The pressure drops in regenerators are usually estimated assuming a uniform velocity distribution of working gas in the matrices. The estimation results, however, are generally smaller than practical data. The cross-sectional flow areas of the heater and cooler of typical Stirling engines are smaller than the cross- sectional area of the regenerator. The effects of the small flow passage on the velocity distribution of working fluid in the matrix, that is, a flow transition from tubes or channels to a regenerator matrix, can be often confirmed by the discolored matrix. Especially, the lack of a uniform distribution of velocity in the matrix causes increased flow loss and decreased thermal performance. So, it is necessary to understand the quantitative effects of the sudden change in flow area at the regenerator ends on the velocity distribution and pressure drop. In this paper, using matrices made of stacks of wire screens, the effects of the entrance and exit areas and the length of the regenerator on pressure drops are examined by an unidirectional steady flow apparatus. The experimental data are arranged in an empirical equation. The lack of a uniformity of velocity distribution is visualized using smoke-wire methods. The empirical equation presented is applied to the estimation of pressure loss in an actual engine regenerator. The applicability of the equation is examined by comparison of estimated value with engine data in pressure loss.

  9. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development: Task 8.1, Low-pressure drop recuperator

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Purpose of the ATS program is to develop a new baseline for industrial gas turbine systems for the 21st century. A recuperated gas turbine cycle was selected; the eventual engine that result will utilize Solar`s Primary Surface Recuperator (PSR) technology. Besides higher thermal efficiency, other goals included lower emission, cost of power, and improved RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability). Performance data have been obtained for the candidate heat transfer surface, and on a scaled rig. Pretest predictions of air-side and gas-side pressure drop were in very good agreement with tests results; predicted effectiveness also agreed well with experiment. A flattened tube test to determine changes of the PSR heat transfer surface profile after exposure is underway.

  10. Determination of the cathode and anode voltage drops in high power low-pressure amalgam lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Vasiliev, A. I. Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V.; Startsev, A. Yu.; Kudryavtsev, N. N.

    2011-12-15

    For the first time, cathode and anode drops of powerful low-pressure amalgam lamps were measured. The lamp discharge current is 3.2 A, discharge current frequency is 43 kHz, linear electric power is 2.4 W/cm. The method of determination of a cathode drop is based on the change of a lamp operating voltage at variation of the electrode filament current at constant discharge current. The total (cathode plus anode) drop of voltage was measured by other, independent ways. The maximum cathode fall is 10.8 V; the anode fall corresponding to the maximal cathode fall is 2.4 V. It is shown that in powerful low pressure amalgam lamps the anode fall makes a considerable contribution (in certain cases, the basic one) to heating of electrodes. Therefore, the anode fall cannot be neglected, at design an electrode and ballast of amalgam lamps with operating discharge current frequency of tens of kHz.

  11. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy: A Recurrent and Bilateral Foot Drop Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Rodrigues, Maria Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, “sausage-like” swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis. PMID:24251057

  12. Development of a new pressure dependent threshold superheated drop detector for neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeian, Peiman; Raisali, Gholamreza; Akhavan, Azam; Ghods, Hossein; Hajizadeh, Bardia

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a set of superheated drop detectors operated at different pressures is developed and fabricated by adding an appropriate amount of Freon-12 liquid on the free surface of the detector. The fabricated detectors have been used for determination of the threshold pressure for 2.89 MeV neutrons of a neutron generator in order to estimate the thermodynamic efficiency. Finally, knowing the thermodynamic efficiency of the detector and in a similar manner, the threshold pressure for 241Am-Be neutrons is determined and accordingly, the maximum neutron energy of the source spectrum is estimated. The maximum neutron energy of the 241Am-Be is estimated as 10.97±2.11 MeV. The agreement between this measured maximum energy and the reported value of the 241Am-Be neutron source shows that the method developed to apply pressure on the superheated drop detectors can be used to control the energy threshold of these detectors.

  13. Extraction of essential oils from Algerian myrtle leaves using instant controlled pressure drop technology.

    PubMed

    Berka-Zougali, Baya; Hassani, Aicha; Besombes, Colette; Allaf, Karim

    2010-10-01

    In the present work, the new extraction process of Détente Instantanée Contrôlée DIC (French, for instant controlled pressure drop) was studied, developed, quantitatively and qualitatively compared to the conventional hydrodistillation method for the extraction of essential oils from Algerian myrtle leaves. DIC was used as a thermomechanical treatment, DIC subjecting the product to a high-pressure saturated steam. The DIC cycle ends with an abrupt pressure drop towards vacuum, and this instantly leads to an autovaporization of myrtle volatile compounds. An immediate condensation in the vacuum tank produced a micro-emulsion of water and essential oils. Thus, an ultra-rapid cooling of residual leaves occurred, precluding any thermal degradation. An experimental protocol was designed with 3 independent variables: saturated steam pressure between 0.1 and 0.6 MPa, resulting in a temperature between 100 and 160°C, a total thermal processing time between 19 and 221 s, and between 2 and 6 DIC cycles. The essential oils yield was defined as the main dependent variable. This direct extraction gave high yields and high quality essential oil, as revealed by composition and antioxidant activity (results not shown). After this treatment, the myrtle leaves were recovered and hydrodistilled in order to quantify the essential oil content in residual DIC-treated samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed some modification of the structure with a slight destruction of cell walls after DIC treatment. PMID:20813373

  14. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Dion, Seth-Andrew T.; Karl, Justin O.; Spivey, Nicholas S.; Walker, James L., II

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were collected during the hydroburst testing of eleven 15 inch diameter filament wound composite overwrapped pressure vessels. A neural network burst pressure prediction was generated from the resulting AE amplitude data. The bottles shared commonality of graphite fiber, epoxy resin, and cure time. Individual bottles varied by cure mode (rotisserie versus static oven curing), types of inflicted damage, temperature of the pressurant, and pressurization scheme. Three categorical variables were selected to represent undamaged bottles, impact damaged bottles, and bottles with lacerated hoop fibers. This categorization along with the removal of the AE data from the disbonding noise between the aluminum liner and the composite overwrap allowed the prediction of burst pressures in all three sets of bottles using a single backpropagation neural network. Here the worst case error was 3.38 percent.

  15. Water management of proton exchange membrane fuel cell based on control of hydrogen pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mancun; Pei, Pucheng; Zha, Hongshan; Xu, Huachi

    2014-12-01

    Flooding experiments in various conditions are developed and the hydrogen pressure drop is investigated on a two-piece PEM fuel cell in this study. A two-level characteristic of hydrogen pressure drop is observed and analyzed in combination with water droplet accumulation in channels. Based on the characteristic, the flooding process can be divided into four continuous periods, which are the proper period, the humid period, the transitional period and the flooding period. The voltage shows the segmented tendency during these periods. Experimental results show that current and temperature have little influence on the growth rate of the two levels, while the effects of pressure and hydrogen stoichiometry are remarkable. The growth rate can be calculated through the channel dimensions and matches the experimental results well. Hydrogen purge is not a fundamental method to solve flooding. The end of the humid period should be the boundary before flooding. The moist section can be obtained in the beginning part of the humid period. In this section PEM fuel cell is neither flooding nor dehydration by adjusting the cell temperature, which is verified by two additional experiments. This water management is convenient and swift for PEM fuel cell applications and the fault diagnosis.

  16. Condensation pressure drop of R22, R134a and R410A in a single circular microtube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Chang-Hyo; Oh, Hoo-Kyu

    2012-08-01

    The condensation pressure drop characteristics for pure refrigerants R22, R134a, and a binary refrigerant mixture R410A without lubricating oil in a single circular microtube were investigated experimentally. The test section consists of 1,220 mm length with horizontal copper tube of 3.38 mm outer diameter and 1.77 mm inner diameter. The experiments were conducted at refrigerant mass flux of 450-1,050 kg/m2s, and saturation temperature of 40°C. The main experimental results showed that the condensation pressure drop of R134a is higher than that of R22 and R410A for the same mass flux. The experimental data were compared against 14 two-phase pressure drop correlations. A new pressure drop model that is based on a superposition model for refrigerants condensing in the single circular tube is presented.

  17. Analysis of MHD Pressure Drop in Liquid LiPb Flow in Chinese ITER DFLL-TBM with Insulating Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongli; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Hongyan

    2008-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the Chinese Dual Functional Liquid Lithium-lead Test Blanket Module (DFLL-TBM) proposed for ITER is discussed in this paper. Electrical insulation between the coolant channel surfaces and the liquid metal is required to reduce the MHD pressure drop to a manageable level. Insulation can be provided by a thin insulating coating, such as Al2O3, which can also serve as a tritium barrier layer, at the channel surfaces in contact with LiPb. The coating's effectiveness for reducing the MHD pressure drop is analysed through three-dimensional numerical simulation. A MHD-based commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software FLUENT is used to simulate the LiPb flow. The effect on the MHD pressure drop due to cracks or faults in the coating layer is also considered. The insulating performance requirement for the coating material in DFLL-TBM design is proposed according to the analysis.

  18. Pressure drop considerations of a lithium cooled fusion breeder tokamak reactor blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.P.C.

    1983-12-06

    Liquid lithium was selected as one of the coolants for the 1983 fusion breeder blanket used on the magnetically confined tokamak fusion reactor, and as a result, the thermal-hydraulic calculations were dominated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) considerations. The applicable sets of MHD equations for the engineering thermal-hydraulic design were reviewed and compared. Special attention was given to the MHD calculations for the fertile material zone, a packed bed of composite beryllium and thorium balls, since this region can dominate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of this blanket module. To keep the pressure drops acceptable, fertile fuel balls were omitted in the inboard blanket.

  19. Dysfunctional vestibular system causes a blood pressure drop in astronauts returning from space

    PubMed Central

    Hallgren, Emma; Migeotte, Pierre-François; Kornilova, Ludmila; Delière, Quentin; Fransen, Erik; Glukhikh, Dmitrii; Moore, Steven T.; Clément, Gilles; Diedrich, André; MacDougall, Hamish; Wuyts, Floris L.

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge for the human body to maintain stable blood pressure while standing. The body’s failure to do so can lead to dizziness or even fainting. For decades it has been postulated that the vestibular organ can prevent a drop in pressure during a position change – supposedly mediated by reflexes to the cardiovascular system. We show – for the first time – a significant correlation between decreased functionality of the vestibular otolith system and a decrease in the mean arterial pressure when a person stands up. Until now, no experiments on Earth could selectively suppress both otolith systems; astronauts returning from space are a unique group of subjects in this regard. Their otolith systems are being temporarily disturbed and at the same time they often suffer from blood pressure instability. In our study, we observed the functioning of both the otolith and the cardiovascular system of the astronauts before and after spaceflight. Our finding indicates that an intact otolith system plays an important role in preventing blood pressure instability during orthostatic challenges. Our finding not only has important implications for human space exploration; they may also improve the treatment of unstable blood pressure here on Earth. PMID:26671177

  20. Dysfunctional vestibular system causes a blood pressure drop in astronauts returning from space.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Emma; Migeotte, Pierre-François; Kornilova, Ludmila; Delière, Quentin; Fransen, Erik; Glukhikh, Dmitrii; Moore, Steven T; Clément, Gilles; Diedrich, André; MacDougall, Hamish; Wuyts, Floris L

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge for the human body to maintain stable blood pressure while standing. The body's failure to do so can lead to dizziness or even fainting. For decades it has been postulated that the vestibular organ can prevent a drop in pressure during a position change--supposedly mediated by reflexes to the cardiovascular system. We show--for the first time--a significant correlation between decreased functionality of the vestibular otolith system and a decrease in the mean arterial pressure when a person stands up. Until now, no experiments on Earth could selectively suppress both otolith systems; astronauts returning from space are a unique group of subjects in this regard. Their otolith systems are being temporarily disturbed and at the same time they often suffer from blood pressure instability. In our study, we observed the functioning of both the otolith and the cardiovascular system of the astronauts before and after spaceflight. Our finding indicates that an intact otolith system plays an important role in preventing blood pressure instability during orthostatic challenges. Our finding not only has important implications for human space exploration; they may also improve the treatment of unstable blood pressure here on Earth. PMID:26671177

  1. Clinical outcomes of combined flow-pressure drop measurements using newly developed diagnostic endpoint: Pressure drop coefficient in patients with coronary artery dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Effat, Mohamed A; Peelukhana, Srikara Viswanath; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To combine pressure and flow parameter, pressure drop coefficient (CDP) will result in better clinical outcomes in comparison to the fractional flow reserve (FFR) group. METHODS: To test this hypothesis, a comparison was made between the FFR < 0.75 and CDP > 27.9 groups in this study, for the major adverse cardiac events [major adverse cardiac events (MACE): Primary outcome] and patients’ quality of life (secondary outcome). Further, a comparison was also made between the survival curves for the FFR < 0.75 and CDP > 27.9 groups. Two-tailed χ2 test proportions were performed for the comparison of primary and secondary outcomes. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to compare the survival curves of FFR < 0.75 and CDP > 27.9 groups (MedcalcV10.2, Mariakerke, Belgium). Results were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. RESULTS: The primary outcomes (%MACE) in the FFR < 0.75 group (20%, 4 out of 20) was not statistically different (P = 0.24) from the %MACE occurring in CDP > 27.9 group (8.57%, 2 out of 35). Noteworthy is the reduction in the %MACE in the CDP > 27.9 group, in comparison to the FFR < 0.75 group. Further, the secondary outcomes were not statistically significant between the FFR < 0.75 and CDP > 27.9 groups. Survival analysis results suggest that the survival time for the CDP > 27.9 group (n = 35) is significantly higher (P = 0.048) in comparison to the survival time for the FFR < 0.75 group (n = 20). The results remained similar for a FFR = 0.80 cut-off. CONCLUSION: Based on the above, CDP could prove to be a better diagnostic end-point for clinical revascularization decision-making in the cardiac catheterization laboratories. PMID:27022460

  2. Effects of slitted fins on the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a compact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.; Yun, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    A compact heat exchanger which consists of air-cooled aluminum fins and copper tubes circulating refrigerant has been used in a cooling system for a long time. There are two key parameters to be seriously considered for a design of the heat exchanger and its performance improvement. These are the heat transfer rate and pressure drop coefficient which varies with the change of the tube size, its arrangement and the fin configuration. In here, a numerical study was carried to understand the effect of the fin configuration on the heat transfer and pressure drop of the heat exchanger. The diameter and the arrangement of tubes were fixed but three different types of the fin configuration were used to see its effect on the heat transfer capacity and the static pressure drop. The calculation results were compared with that of a flat plate fin. From the comparison, it was found that the slitted fins have higher pressure drop; however, they have higher heat transfer rate. It means that the simpler of the fin configuration, the lower pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients are obtained. It is mainly due to the discretisation of the thermal boundary layer on the fin surface to maximize the heat transfer to air. The slitted sides of fins act like obstacles in the airflow path. From the experimental result, it was found that the same trend in the variation of the heat transfer rate and the pressure drop with the change of the fin configuration was obtained.

  3. Condensation pressure drop of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth and micro-fin U-tube

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Pradeep A.; Sapali, S.N.

    2011-01-15

    The frictional pressure drop during condensation of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth (8.56 mm ID) and micro-fin U-tubes (8.96 mm ID) are experimentally investigated. Different from previous studies, the present experiments are performed for various condensing temperatures. The test runs are done at average saturated condensing temperatures ranging from 35 C to 60 C. The mass fluxes are between 90 and 800 kg/m{sup 2}s. The experimental results indicate that the average frictional pressure drop increases with mass flux but decreases with increasing condensing temperature for both smooth and micro-fin-tubes. The average frictional pressure drops of HFC-134a and R-404A for the micro-fin-tubes were 1-1.7 and 1-2.1 times larger than that in smooth tube respectively. New correlations based on the data gathered during the experimentation for predicting frictional pressure drop are proposed for wide range of operating conditions. (author)

  4. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy presenting with hand drop in a young child.

    PubMed

    Sobreira, Inês; Sousa, Cátia; Raposo, Ana; Soares, M Rita; Soudo, Ana; Dias, Ana Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) results from the deletion of the PMP22 gene in chromosome 17p11.2. Clinically, it presents with painless pressure palsies, typically in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life, being a rare entity in childhood. We present the case study of a six-year-old male child who presented with left hand drop that he kept for over four weeks. Electrophysiological studies suggested HNPP and genetic studies confirmed it. With this paper, we pretend to create awareness to this entity as a diagnosis to be considered in a child with painless monoparesis and to emphasize the importance of electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis. PMID:22953141

  5. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy Presenting with Hand Drop in a Young Child

    PubMed Central

    Sobreira, Inês; Sousa, Cátia; Raposo, Ana; Soares, M. Rita; Soudo, Ana; Dias, Ana Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) results from the deletion of the PMP22 gene in chromosome 17p11.2. Clinically, it presents with painless pressure palsies, typically in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life, being a rare entity in childhood. We present the case study of a six-year-old male child who presented with left hand drop that he kept for over four weeks. Electrophysiological studies suggested HNPP and genetic studies confirmed it. With this paper, we pretend to create awareness to this entity as a diagnosis to be considered in a child with painless monoparesis and to emphasize the importance of electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis. PMID:22953141

  6. Pressure Drop in Tortuosity/Kinking of the Internal Carotid Artery: Simulation and Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Daming; Hu, Shen; Liu, Jiachun; Zhou, Zhilun; Lu, Jun; Qi, Peng; Song, Shiying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Whether carotid tortuosity/kinking of the internal carotid artery leads to cerebral ischemia remains unclear. There is very little research about the hemodynamic variation induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking in the literature. The objective of this study was to research the blood pressure changes induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking. Methods. We first created a geometric model of carotid tortuosity/kinking. Based on hemodynamic boundary conditions, the hemodynamics of carotid tortuosity and kinking were studied via a finite element simulation. Then, an in vitro system was built to validate the numerical simulation results. The mean arterial pressure changes before and after carotid kinking were measured using pressure sensors in 12 patients with carotid kinking. Results. Numerical simulation revealed that the pressure drops increased with increases in the kinking angles. Clinical tests and in vitro experiments confirmed the numerical simulation results. Conclusions. Carotid kinking leads to blood pressure reduction. In certain conditions, kinking may affect the cerebral blood supply and be associated with cerebral ischemia. PMID:27195283

  7. Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristic of zinc-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonage, B. K.; Mohanan, P.

    2015-04-01

    Development of alternative working fluids with enhanced thermal properties is very much needed to replace conventional fluids. Colloidal solution of some base fluid with solid nanoparticles dispersed in it, which is called as nanofluid, is emerging as a promising alternative heat transfer fluid. Zinc, being ecofriendly material, is selected as dispersed phase in water to develop zinc-water (Zn-H2O) nanofluid. Zn-H2O nanofluid is synthesized by single step method and characterized. Thermophysical properties are estimated by available theoretical models. Estimated properties proved that nanofluid is having enhanced thermophysical properties compared to the base fluid due to which nanofluid can become potential working fluid for heat exchanging devices. Synthesized nanofluid is circulated through heat transfer loop to assess its performance in turbulent flow regime and at constant wall temperature condition. Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop are estimated from experimental results and both are considered as performance evaluation criteria for heat transfer performance assessment. 83 % increase in Nusselt number with 9 % increase in pressure drop is observed for the nanofluid compared to water.

  8. Pressure Drop Correlations of Single-Phase and Two-Phase Flow in Rolling Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xia-xin Cao; Chang-qi Yan; Pu-zhen Gao; Zhong-ning Sun

    2006-07-01

    A series of experimental studies of frictional pressure drop for single phase and two-phase bubble flow in smooth rolling tubes were carried out. The tube inside diameters were 15 mm, 25 mm and 34.5 mm respectively, the rolling angles of tubes could be set as 10 deg. and 20 deg., and the rolling periods could be set as 5 s, 10 s and 15 s. Combining with the analysis of single-phase water motion, it was found that the traditional correlations for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient were not suitable for the rolling condition. Based on the experimental data, a new correlation for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient under rolling condition was presented, and the calculations not only agreed well with the experimental data, but also could display the periodically dynamic characteristics of frictional coefficients. Applying the new correlation to homogeneous flow model, two-phase frictional pressure drop of bubble flow in rolling tubes could be calculated, the results showed that the relative error between calculation and experimental data was less than {+-} 25%. (authors)

  9. Predictive a priori pressure-dependent kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Ahren W; Pelzer, Kenley M; Miller, James A; Kamarchik, Eugene; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    The ability to predict the pressure dependence of chemical reaction rates would be a great boon to kinetic modeling of processes such as combustion and atmospheric chemistry. This pressure dependence is intimately related to the rate of collision-induced transitions in energy E and angular momentum J. We present a scheme for predicting this pressure dependence based on coupling trajectory-based determinations of moments of the E,J-resolved collisional transfer rates with the two-dimensional master equation. This completely a priori procedure provides a means for proceeding beyond the empiricism of prior work. The requisite microcanonical dissociation rates are obtained from ab initio transition state theory. Predictions for the CH4 = CH3 + H and C2H3 = C2H2 + H reaction systems are in excellent agreement with experiment. PMID:25477457

  10. Eddy current technique for predicting burst pressure

    DOEpatents

    Petri, Mark C.; Kupperman, David S.; Morman, James A.; Reifman, Jaques; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2003-01-01

    A signal processing technique which correlates eddy current inspection data from a tube having a critical tubing defect with a range of predicted burst pressures for the tube is provided. The method can directly correlate the raw eddy current inspection data representing the critical tubing defect with the range of burst pressures using a regression technique, preferably an artificial neural network. Alternatively, the technique deconvolves the raw eddy current inspection data into a set of undistorted signals, each of which represents a separate defect of the tube. The undistorted defect signal which represents the critical tubing defect is related to a range of burst pressures utilizing a regression technique.

  11. Pressure Drop Characteristics in Tight-Lattice Bundles for Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    The reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) consists of several distinctive structures; a triangular tight-lattice configuration and a double-flat core. In order to design the RMWR core from the point of view of thermal-hydraulics, an evaluation method on pressure drop characteristics in the rod bundles at the tight-lattice configuration is required. In this study, calculated results by the Martinelli-Nelson's and Hancox's correlations were compared with experimental results in 4×5 rod bundles and seven-rod bundles. Consequently, the friction loss in two-phase flows becomes smaller at the tight-lattice configuration with the hydraulic diameter less than about 3mm. This reason is due to the difference of the configuration between the multi-rod bundle and the circular tube and due to the effect of the small hydraulic diameter on the two-phase multiplier.

  12. Pressure drop and heat transfer for spirally fluted tubes including validation of the role of transition

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.; Snell, K.H. . Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer Lab.); Rabas, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for spirally fluted tubes in laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air. It is established that, in the laminar, transitional and turbulent regimes, the friction factor for the spirally fluted tube is generally higher than that for a smooth tube. The values for the critical Reynolds number at the onset of transition to turbulent flow are lower, while the corresponding critical friction factors are higher, than those for a smooth tube. Consistent with the expected effect of transition on heat transfer, the experimentally determined Nusselt numbers are generally higher than the smooth tube values. The results indicate that there is a definite connection between transition and the heat transfer enhancement. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of circular and oblong low aspect ratio pin fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, S. C.; Messeh, W. A.

    1985-09-01

    The pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of circular and oblong pin fins of height-to-diameter ratio of unity used to augment internal cooling of gas turbine airfoils are presented. Data were obtained for an array of 10 rows of staggered pin fins in a 25:1 aspect ratio channel, with both pins and channel endwalls forming the heat transfer surface. Results show that the array average friction factor increases with increasing blockage caused by different arrangement of pin fin geometries in the channel. The local heat transfer coefficient increases up to the 3rd row of pin fins and decreases thereafter. Oblong pin fins with gamma=90 deg (major axis parallel to the direction of flow) result in higher heat transfer rates and lower friction factor than the circular pin fins. For other orientations, oblong pin fins do not offer any advantage over circular pin fins for Re or = 20,000 (typical of small gas turbine engines).

  14. Preliminary investigation of labyrinth packing pressure drops at onset of swirl-induced rotor instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. H.; Vohr, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Backward and forward subsynchronous instability was observed in a flexible model test rotor under the influence of swirl flow in a straight-through labyrinth packing. The packing pressure drop at the onset of instability was then measured for a range of operating speeds, clearances and inlet swirl conditions. The trend in these measurements for forward swirl and forward instability is generally consistent with the short packing rotor force formulations of Benchert and Wachter. Diverging clearances were also destabilizing and had a forward orbit with forward swirl and a backward orbit with reverse swirl. A larger, stiff rotor model system is now being assembled which will permit testing steam turbine-type straight-through and hi-lo labyrinth packings. With calibrated and adjustable bearings in this new apparatus, direct measure of the net destabilizing force generated by the packings can be made.

  15. Some flow characteristics of conventional and tapered high pressure drop simulated seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The leak rates through shaft seals with large pressure drops were simulated using gaseous hydrogen, or nitrogen flowing through an annulus with a nonrotating centerbody. The flows were choked. For concentric or eccentric position of the rotor and parallel or convergent tapered flow passages, data and analysis revealed that mass flux or leak rate can be determined from a relation whose normalizing parameters depend on the thermodynamic critical constants of the working fluid and an average flow area expressed in terms of the inlet and exit cross-sectional areas. Using these normalized relations, the flow data for parallel and three convergent tapered shaft seal configurations are in good agreement. Generalization to any simple gas or gas mixture is implied and demonstrated.

  16. Using leg muscles as shock absorbers: theoretical predictions and experimental results of drop landing performance.

    PubMed

    Minetti, A E; Ardigò, L P; Susta, D; Cotelli, F

    1998-12-01

    The use of muscles as power dissipators is investigated in this study, both from the modellistic and the experimental points of view. Theoretical predictions of the drop landing manoeuvre for a range of initial conditions have been obtained by accounting for the mechanical characteristics of knee extensor muscles, the limb geometry and assuming maximum neural activation. Resulting dynamics have been represented in the phase plane (vertical displacement versus speed) to better classify the damping performance. Predictions of safe landing in sedentary subjects were associated to dropping from a maximum (feet) height of 1.6-2.0 m (about 11 m on the moon). Athletes can extend up to 2.6-3.0 m, while for obese males (m = 100 kg, standard stature) the limit should reduce to 0.9-1.3 m. These results have been calculated by including in the model the estimated stiffness of the 'global elastic elements' acting below the squat position. Experimental landings from a height of 0.4, 0.7, 1.1 m (sedentary males (SM) and male (AM) and female (AF) athletes from the alpine ski national team) showed dynamics similar to the model predictions. While the peak power (for a drop height of about 0.7 m) was similar in SM and AF (AM shows a +40% increase, about 33 W/kg), AF stopped the downward movement after a time interval (0.219 +/- 0.030 s) from touch-down 20% significantly shorter than SM. Landing strategy and the effect of anatomical constraints are discussed in the paper. PMID:9857837

  17. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith

    2016-05-15

    Oil-particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual-numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil-particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil-particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil-particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil-particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil-particle aggregation. PMID:26992749

  18. Measurement and modelling of forced convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of Al2O3- and SiO2-water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julia, J. E.; Hernández, L.; Martínez-Cuenca, R.; Hibiki, T.; Mondragón, R.; Segarra, C.; Jarque, J. C.

    2012-11-01

    Forced convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of SiO2- and Al2O3-water nanofluids were characterized. The experimental facility was composed of thermal-hydraulic loop with a tank with an immersed heater, a centrifugal pump, a bypass with a globe valve, an electromagnetic flow-meter, a 18 kW in-line pre-heater, a test section with band heaters, a differential pressure transducer and a heat exchanger. The test section consists of a 1000 mm long aluminium pipe with an inner diameter of 31.2 mm. Eighteen band heaters were placed all along the test section in order to provide a uniform heat flux. Heat transfer coefficient was calculated measuring fluid temperature using immersed thermocouples (Pt100) placed at both ends of the test section and surface thermocouples in 10 axial locations along the test section (Pt1000). The measurements have been performed for different nanoparticles (Al2O3 and SiO2 with primary size of 11 nm and 12 nm, respectively), volume concentrations (1% v., 5% v.), and flow rates (3 103Re<105). Maximum heat transfer coefficient enhancement (300%) and pressure drop penalty (1000%) is obtained with 5% v. SiO2 nanofluid. Existing correlations can predict, at least in a first approximation, the heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of nanofluids if thermal conductivity, viscosity and specific heat were properly modelled.

  19. Boiling Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of a Refrigerant Flowing Vertically Downward in a Small Diameter Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazushi; Mori, Hideo; Ohishi, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu

    Experiments were performed on boiling heat transfer and pressure drop of a refrigerant R410A flowing vertically downward in a copper smooth tube of 1.0 mm inside diameter for the development of a high-performance heat exchanger using small diameter tubes for air conditioning systems. Local heat transfer coefficients were measured in a range of mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s), heat fluxes from 1 to 16 kW/m2 and quality from 0.1 to over 1 at evaporation temperature of 10°C. Pressure drops were measured and flow patterns were observed at mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s) and quality from 0.1 to 0.9. The characteristics of frictional pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient and dryout qualities were clarified by comparing the measurements with the data for the vertically upward flow previously obtained.

  20. Characterisation of heat transfer and pressure drop in condensation processes within mini-channel tubes with last generation of refrigerant fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Belchi, D. Alejandro

    Heat exchanger developments are driven by energetic efficiency increase and emissionreduction. To reach the standards new system are required based on mini-channels. Mini-channels can be described as tubes with one or more ports extruded in aluminiumwith hydraulic diameter are in the range of 0.2 to 3 mm. Its use in refrigeration systemsfor some years ago is a reality thanks to the human ability to made micro-scale systems.Some heat exchanger enterprises have some models developed specially for their use inautomotive sector, cooling sector, and industrial refrigeration without having a deepknowledge of how these reduced geometries affect the most important parameters suchas pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient. To respond to this objective, an exhaustive literature review of the last two decades hasbeen performed to determinate the state of the research. Between all the publications,several models have been selected to check the predicting capacities of them becausemost of them were developed for single port mini-channel tubes. Experimentalmeasurements of heat transfer coefficient and frictional pressure drop were recorded inan experimental installation built on purpose at the Technical University of Cartagena.Multiple variables are recorded in this installation in order to calculate local heattransfer coefficient in two-phase condensing flow within mini-channels. Both pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient experimental measurements arecompared to the previously mentioned models. Most of them capture the trend correctlybut others fail predicting experimental data. These differences can be explained by theexperimental parameters considered during the models development. In some cases themodels found in the literature were developed specific conditions, consequently theirpredicting capacities are restricted. As main contributions, this thesis provides new modelling tools for mini-channelscondensing pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient

  1. Decomposition of pilocarpine eye drops assessed by a highly efficient high pressure liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Kuks, P F; Weekers, L E; Goldhoorn, P B

    1990-10-19

    A rapid high-resolution high pressure liquid chromatographic method was developed for assaying pilocarpine. Pilocarpine in ophthalmic solutions decomposes fairly rapidly to give isopilocarpine, pilocarpic acid and isopilocarpic acid. The quality of an ophthalmic solution can be assessed by assaying these decomposition products. Existing high pressure liquid chromatographic methods suffer from long analysis times and poor resolution. The new method uses as the mobile phase 6 ml/l of triethylamine in water (pH 2.3, adjusted with 85% phosphoric acid) at a flow of 1.5 ml/min and as the stationary phase a C18-silica 125 x 4.6 mm column. 2-Amino-1-phenyl-1,3-propanediol is used as an internal standard. Complete separation was obtained within 8 min. Pilocarpine eye drops were stored under different conditions and then analysed for decomposition products. During heat treatment, decomposition to isopilocarpine predominated over decomposition to pilocarpic or isopilocarpic acid. However, when stored at room temperature or in a refrigerator, formation of pilocarpic acid clearly prevailed. Thus, from assessment of decomposition products, the cause of decomposition can be established. PMID:2255589

  2. Measurements of pressure drop and heat transfer in turbulent pipe flows of particulate slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. V.; Choi, U. S.; Kasza, K. E.

    1988-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under sponsorhip of DOE, Office of Buildings and Community Systems, has been conducting a comprehensive, long-range program to develop high-performance advanced energy transmission fluids for use in district heating and cooling (DHC) systems. The current study focuses on the development of phase-change slurries as advanced energy transmission fluids. The objectives are: (1) to establish proof-of-concept of enhanced heat transfer by a slurry, with and without phase change, relative to heat transfer in a pure carrier liquid; (2) to investigate the effect of particle volumetric loading, size, and flow rate on the slurry pressure drip and heat transfer behavior with and without friction-reducing additives; and (3) to generate pressure drop and heat transfer data needed for the development and design of improved DHC systems. Two types of phase-change materials were used in the experiments: ice slush for cooling, and cross-linked, high- density polyethylene (X-HDPE) particles with diameters of 1/8 and 1/20 in. (3.2 and 1.3 mm) for heating. The friction-reducing additive used in the tests was Separan AP-272 at 65 wppm. This report describes the test facility, discusses the experimental procedures, and presents significant experimental results on flow and heat transfer characteristics of the non-melting slurry flows.

  3. High-Pressure Transport Properties Of Fluids: Theory And Data From Levitated Drops At Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth; Ohsaka, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Although the high pressure multicomponent fluid conservation equations have already been derived and approximately validated for binary mixtures by this PI, the validation of the multicomponent theory is hampered by the lack of existing mixing rules for property calculations. Classical gas dynamics theory can provide property mixing-rules at low pressures exclusively. While thermal conductivity and viscosity high-pressure mixing rules have been documented in the literature, there is no such equivalent for the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. The primary goal of this investigation is to extend the low pressure mixing rule theory to high pressures and validate the new theory with experimental data from levitated single drops. The two properties that will be addressed are the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. To validate/determine the property calculations, ground-based experiments from levitated drops are being conducted.

  4. Fluctuation emergence of bubbles under a rapid drop of pressure in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, P. A.; Vinogradov, V. E.

    2015-07-01

    Explosive cavitation at the front of a negative-pressure pulse has been studied. Conditions for the emergence of bubbles by the mechanism of homogeneous fluctuation nucleation were identified. Those conditions feature a high rate of the phase transformation, with the vapor formation process being concentrated in time at the instant of attainment of a certain pressure. Under such conditions, the liquid cavitation strength is maximal, and its value can be predicted by the homogeneous nucleation theory. For implementing the regime with high nucleation frequency, a method based on passing a negative-pressure pulse across a region with locally heated liquid was employed. The cavitation kinetics was examined by monitoring the perturbation of the heat flow from a miniature heater. The experimental data were generalized using the theory of explosive vapor formation in shock boiling mode. A method for calculating the cavitation in the regime of the fluctuation emergence of bubbles was approbated.

  5. Numerical simulation of flow and the effect of baffle arrangement on pressure drop and temperature pattern in a circular combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorashi, Bahman; Taruvai, Sastry

    A numerical simulation study was conducted to determine the effect of baffle arrangement on pressure drop in an experimental reverse-flow circular combustor with several mini-combustion zones (MCZ). The fluent computer code developed by Creare Inc., was used for this study. Three parameters which appeared to significantly affect the pressure drop were varied, and pressure drop for each case was numerically determined. The portion of the combustor volume that was investigated had two baffles on the upper face and two baffles on the lower face. Heated air at 1000 F with an inlet air velocity of 100 ft/sec and 1 atmosphere pressure was introduced into the combustor. Fuel (pentane) at 80 F was introduced via nozzles which were placed between the baffles. The following changes were then made in the baffle arrangement and the effects on the pressure drop and temperature distribution were evaluated for each of the following cases: (1) the positions of the baffles on the upper and lower face were changed; (2) the dimensions of the baffles were varied; (3) the shapes of the baffles were altered. The effects of the above mentioned design alterations are summarized.

  6. Boiling Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of a Refrigerant Flowing Vertically Upward in a Small Diameter Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazushi; Mori, Hideo; Ohishi, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu

    In the present study, experiments were performed to examine characteristics of flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop of a refrigerant R410A flowing vertically upward in a copper smooth tube with 1.0 mm inside diameter for the development of a high-performance heat exchanger using small diameter tubes for air conditioning systems. Local heat transfer coefficients were measured in a range of mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s), heat fluxes from 1 to 16 kW/m2 and qualities from 0.1 to over 1 at evaporation temperature of 10°C, and pressure drops were also measured at mass fluxes of 100 and 200 kg/(m2•s) and qualities from 0.1 to 0.9. Three types of flow pattern were observed in the tube: A slug, a slug-annular and an annular flow. Based on the measurements, the characteristics of frictional pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient and dryout qualities were clarified. The measured pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient were compared with correlations.

  7. Comparative study of heat transfer and pressure drop during flow boiling and flow condensation in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Jakubowska, Blanka; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    In the paper a method developed earlier by authors is applied to calculations of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling and also flow condensation for some recent data collected from literature for such fluids as R404a, R600a, R290, R32,R134a, R1234yf and other. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in annular flow structure are considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter. The shear stress between vapor phase and liquid phase is generally a function of nonisothermal effects. The mechanism of modification of shear stresses at the vapor-liquid interface has been presented in detail. In case of annular flow it contributes to thickening and thinning of the liquid film, which corresponds to condensation and boiling respectively. There is also a different influence of heat flux on the modification of shear stress in the bubbly flow structure, where it affects bubble nucleation. In that case the effect of applied heat flux is considered. As a result a modified form of the two-phase flow multiplier is obtained, in which the nonadiabatic effect is clearly pronounced.

  8. Measurement of heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with turbulence promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Park, J. S.; Ibrahim, M. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Periodic rib turbulators were used in advanced turbine cooling designs to enhance the internal heat transfer. The objective of the present project was to investigate the combined effects of the rib angle of attack and the channel aspect ratio on the local heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with two opposite ribbed walls for Reynolds number varied from 10,000 to 60,000. The channel aspect ratio (W/H) was varied from 1 to 2 to 4. The rib angle of attack (alpha) was varied from 90 to 60 to 45 to 30 degree. The highly detailed heat transfer coefficient distribution on both the smooth side and the ribbed side walls from the channel sharp entrance to the downstream region were measured. The results showed that, in the square channel, the heat transfer for the slant ribs (alpha = 30 -45 deg) was about 30% higher that of the transverse ribs (alpha = 90 deg) for a constant pumping power. However, in the rectangular channels (W/H = 2 and 4, ribs on W side), the heat transfer at alpha = 30 -45 deg was only about 5% higher than 90 deg. The average heat transfer and friction correlations were developed to account for rib spacing, rib angle, and channel aspect ratio over the range of roughness Reynolds number.

  9. Heat transfer and pressure drop in blade cooling channels with turbulence promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Park, J. S.; Lei, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    Repeated rib roughness elements have been used in advanced turbine cooling designs to enhance the internal heat transfer. Often the ribs are perpendicular to the main flow direction so that they have an angle-of-attack of 90 deg. The objective of the project was to investigate the effect of rib angle-of-attack on the pressure drop and the average heat transfer coefficients in a square duct with two opposite rib-roughned walls for Reynolds number varied from 8000 to 80,000. The rib height-to-equivalent diameter ratio (e/D) was kept at a constant value of 0.063, the rib pitch-to-height ratio (P/e) was varied from 10 to 20, and the rib angle-of-attack (alpha) was varied from 90 deg to 60 deg to 45 deg to 30 deg respectively. Two types of entrance conditions were examined, namely, long duct and sudden contraction. The heat transfer coefficient distribution on the smooth side wall and the rough side wall at the entrance and the fully developed regions were measured. Thermal performance comparison indicated that the pumping power requirement for the rib with an oblique angle to the flow (alpha = 45 deg to 30 deg) was about 20 to 50 percent lower than the rib with a 90 deg angle to the flow for a given heat transfer duty.

  10. Impact of instantaneous controlled pressure drop on microstructural modification of green tea and its infusion quality.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuefei; Xu, Ping; Feng, Liyun; Yang, Xianqiang; Qian, Lisheng

    2014-01-01

    Instantaneous controlled pressure drop (DIC) was applied to obtain a suitable cell disruption extent as a technology in green tea processing. Microstructural observations showed that DIC increased cell disruption in an even manner as reflected from loosened palisade, distorted cells, widened space between cells, disrupted and rearranged cellular membrane in tea leaves. Color difference determination supported that DIC could facilitate the release and transport of cell contents. DIC sample showed a rise in redness, over 2.5 times greater than the control after spreading naturally for 24 h. Chemical determination revealed a better infusion behavior of tea polyphenols and amino acids in green tea manufactured by DIC method both at high and low temperature. The increase in tea polyphenols content in liquor for the first brew from twisted and needle tea was about 35% and that from flat tea was about 15% in DIC method over the traditional processing. These results suggest that DIC process can be applied in green tea processing for both a traditional product and a new kind of tea capable of making with cold water. PMID:24426047

  11. Antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic air filter with high filtration efficiency and low pressure drop.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kyoung Mi; Park, Hyun-Seol; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrated an antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic (ES) air filter. Antimicrobial natural-product Sophora flavescens nanoparticles were produced using an aerosol process, and were continuously deposited onto the surface of air filter media. For the electrostatic activation of the filter medium, a corona discharge electrification system was used before and after antimicrobial treatment of the filter. In the antimicrobial treatment process, the deposition efficiency of S. flavescens nanoparticles on the ES filter was ~12% higher than that on the pristine (Non-ES) filter. In the evaluation of filtration performance using test particles (a nanosized KCl aerosol and submicron-sized Staphylococcus epidermidis bioaerosol), the ES filter showed better filtration efficiency than the Non-ES filter. However, antimicrobial treatment with S. flavescens nanoparticles affected the filtration efficiency of the filter differently depending on the size of the test particles. While the filtration efficiency of the KCl nanoparticles was reduced on the ES filter after the antimicrobial treatment, the filtration efficiency was improved after the recharging process. In summary, we prepared an antimicrobial ES air filter with >99% antimicrobial activity, ~92.5% filtration efficiency (for a 300-nm KCl aerosol), and a ~0.8 mmAq pressure drop (at 13 cm/s). This study provides valuable information for the development of a hybrid air purification system that can serve various functions and be used in an indoor environment. PMID:26172593

  12. The effect of twisted-tape width on heat transfer and pressure drop for fully developed laminar flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chakroun, W.M.; Al-Fahed, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to study the effect of twisted-tape width on the heat transfer and pressure drop with laminar flow in tubes. Data for three twisted-tape wavelengths, each with five different widths, have been collected with constant wall temperature boundary condition. Correlations for the friction factor and Nusselt number are also available. The correlations predict the experimental data to within 10 to 15 percent for the heat transfer and friction factor, respectively. The presence of the twisted tape has caused the friction factor to increase by a factor of 3 to 7 depending on Reynolds number and the twisted-tape geometry. Heat transfer results have shown an increase of 1.5 to 3 times that of plain tubes depending on the flow conditions and the twisted-tape geometry. The width shows no effect on friction factor and heat transfer in the low range of Reynolds number but has a more pronounced effect on heat transfer at the higher range of Reynolds number. It is recommended to use loose-fit tapes for low Reynolds number flows instead of tight-fit in the design of heat exchangers because they are easier to install and remove for cleaning purposes.

  13. Carbon dioxide and R410A flow boiling heat transfer, pressure drop, and flow pattern in horizontal tubes at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang Yong

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been seriously considered as an alternate refrigerant for HCFC and HFC fluids, due to the increasing interest of environmentally safe refrigerants in air-conditioning and refrigeration systems. In this study, CO2 flow boiling heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are measured in macro-scale (6.1 and 3.5 mm) tubes at evaporation temperatures of -15 and -30°C. The measured results show that the nucleate boiling is a main heat transfer mechanism in the 6.1 mm tube and the contribution of convective boiling becomes greater with the decrease of tube diameters and the increase of mass fluxes. The surface roughness of the 6.1 and 3.5 mm tube are presented by SEM and AFM images and surface profiles, and it is shown that the rougher surface of the 6.1 mm tube can affect the flow boiling heat transfer. The CO2 heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are measured in a mini-scale (0.89 mm) multi-ported tube at the evaporation temperature of -30°C. Also, R410A and R22 flow boiling heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop in a macro-scale (6.1 mm) tube were measured, and they are compared with CO2. This comparison presents that the CO2 flow boiling heat transfer coefficients are higher than R410A and R22 at low vapor qualities, and CO2 pressure drop is significantly lower than R410A and R22. This advantageous characteristic for CO2 could be explained by properties such as surface tension, reduced pressure, and the density ratio of liquid to vapor. The prediction of heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop was performed by general correlations and the calculation results are compared with measured values. Two-phase flow patterns were visualized for CO2 and R410A in the 6 and 3 mm glass tubes, and they are compared with the Weisman et al. and the Wojtan et al. flow pattern maps. The flow pattern maps can determine the flow patterns relatively well, except the transition from intermittent to annular flow.

  14. Predicting increased blood pressure using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Golino, Hudson Fernandes; Amaral, Liliany Souza de Brito; Duarte, Stenio Fernando Pimentel; Gomes, Cristiano Mauro Assis; Soares, Telma de Jesus; Dos Reis, Luciana Araujo; Santos, Joselito

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the prediction of increased blood pressure by body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip circumference (HC), and waist hip ratio (WHR) using a machine learning technique named classification tree. Data were collected from 400 college students (56.3% women) from 16 to 63 years old. Fifteen trees were calculated in the training group for each sex, using different numbers and combinations of predictors. The result shows that for women BMI, WC, and WHR are the combination that produces the best prediction, since it has the lowest deviance (87.42), misclassification (.19), and the higher pseudo R (2) (.43). This model presented a sensitivity of 80.86% and specificity of 81.22% in the training set and, respectively, 45.65% and 65.15% in the test sample. For men BMI, WC, HC, and WHC showed the best prediction with the lowest deviance (57.25), misclassification (.16), and the higher pseudo R (2) (.46). This model had a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 86.25% in the training set and, respectively, 58.38% and 69.70% in the test set. Finally, the result from the classification tree analysis was compared with traditional logistic regression, indicating that the former outperformed the latter in terms of predictive power. PMID:24669313

  15. Summary report for ITER Task-T19: MHD pressure drop and heat transfer study for liquid metal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Claude B.; Hua, Thanh Q.; Natesan, Ken; Kirillov, Igor R.; Vitkovski, Ivan V.; Anisimov, Aleksandr M.

    1995-03-01

    A key feasibility issue for the ITER Vanadium/Lithium breeding blanket is the question of insulator coatings. Design calculations show that an electrically insulating layer is necessary to maintain an acceptably low MHD pressure drop. To begin experimental investigations of the MHD performance of candidate insulator materials and the technology for putting them in place, a new test section was prepared. Aluminum oxide was chosen as the first candidate insulating material because it may be used in combination with NaK in the ITER vacuum vessel and/or the divertor. Details on the methods used to produce the aluminum oxide layer as well as the microstructures of the coating and the aluminide sublayer are presented and discussed. The overall MHD pressure drop, local MHD pressure gradient, local transverse MHD pressure difference, and surface voltage distributions in both the circumferential and the axial directions are reported and discussed. The positive results obtained here for high-temperature NaK have two beneficial implications for ITER. First, since NaK may be used in the vacuum vessel and/or the divertor, these results support the design approach of using electrically insulating coatings to substantially reduce MHD pressure drop. Secondly, while Al2O3/SS is not the same coating/base material combination which would be used in the advanced blanket, this work nonetheless shows that it is possible to produce a viable insulating coating which is stable in contact with a high temperature alkali metal coolant.

  16. Numerical simulation of blood flow and pressure drop in the pulmonary arterial and venous circulation.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M Umar; Vaughan, Gareth D A; Sainsbury, Christopher; Johnson, Martin; Peskin, Charles S; Olufsen, Mette S; Hill, N A

    2014-10-01

    A novel multiscale mathematical and computational model of the pulmonary circulation is presented and used to analyse both arterial and venous pressure and flow. This work is a major advance over previous studies by Olufsen et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 28:1281-1299, 2012) which only considered the arterial circulation. For the first three generations of vessels within the pulmonary circulation, geometry is specified from patient-specific measurements obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood flow and pressure in the larger arteries and veins are predicted using a nonlinear, cross-sectional-area-averaged system of equations for a Newtonian fluid in an elastic tube. Inflow into the main pulmonary artery is obtained from MRI measurements, while pressure entering the left atrium from the main pulmonary vein is kept constant at the normal mean value of 2 mmHg. Each terminal vessel in the network of 'large' arteries is connected to its corresponding terminal vein via a network of vessels representing the vascular bed of smaller arteries and veins. We develop and implement an algorithm to calculate the admittance of each vascular bed, using bifurcating structured trees and recursion. The structured-tree models take into account the geometry and material properties of the 'smaller' arteries and veins of radii ≥ 50 μm. We study the effects on flow and pressure associated with three classes of pulmonary hypertension expressed via stiffening of larger and smaller vessels, and vascular rarefaction. The results of simulating these pathological conditions are in agreement with clinical observations, showing that the model has potential for assisting with diagnosis and treatment for circulatory diseases within the lung. PMID:24610385

  17. Experimental investigation of the two-phase flow regimes and pressure drop in horizontal mini-size rectangular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elazhary, Amr Mohamed; Soliman, Hassan M.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted in order to investigate two-phase flow regimes and fully developed pressure drop in a mini-size, horizontal rectangular channel. The test section was machined in the form of an impacting tee junction in an acrylic block (in order to facilitate visualization) with a rectangular cross-section of 1.87-mm height on 20-mm width on the inlet and outlet sides. Pressure drop measurement and flow regime identification were performed on all three sides of the junction. Air-water mixtures at 200 kPa (abs) and room temperature were used as the test fluids. Four flow regimes were identified visually: bubbly, plug, churn, and annular over the ranges of gas and liquid superficial velocities of 0.04 ≤ JG ≤ 10 m/s and 0.02 ≤ JL ≤ 0.7 m/s, respectively, and a flow regime map was developed. Accuracy of the pressure-measurement technique was validated with single-phase, laminar and turbulent, fully developed data. Two-phase experiments were conducted for eight different inlet conditions and various mass splits at the junction. Comparisons were conducted between the present data and former correlations for the fully developed two-phase pressure drop in rectangular channels with similar sizes. Wide deviations were found among these correlations, and the correlations that agreed best with the present data were identified.

  18. Prediction in cases with superposition of different hydrological phenomena, such as from weather "cold drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, J. M.; Grau, J. B.; Tarquis, A. M.; Andina, D.; Sanchez, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The authors have been involved in Model Codes for Construction prior to Eurocodes now Euronorms, and in a Drainage Instruction for Roads for Spain that adopted a prediction model from BPR (Bureau of Public Roads) of USA to take account of evident regional differences in Iberian Peninsula and Spanish Isles, and in some related studies. They used Extreme Value Type I (Gumbell law) models, with independent actions in superposition; this law was also adopted then to obtain maps of extreme rains by CEDEX. These methods could be extrapolated somehow with other extreme values distributions, but the first step was useful to set valid superposition schemas for actions in norms. As real case, in East of Spain rain comes usually extensively from normal weather perturbations, but in other cases from "cold drop" local high rains of about 400mm in a day occur, causing inundations and in cases local disasters. The city of Valencia in East of Spain was inundated at 1,5m high from a cold drop in 1957, and the river Turia formerly through that city was just later diverted some kilometers to South in a wider canal. With Gumbell law the expected intensity grows with time for occurrence, indicating a value for each given "return period", but the increasing speed grows with the "annual dispersion" of the Gumbell law, and some rare dangerous events may become really very possible in periods of many years. That can be proved with relatively simple models, e.g. with Extreme Law type I, and they could be made more precise or discussed. Such effects were used for superposition of actions on a structure for Model Codes, and may be combined with hydraulic effects, e.g. for bridges on rivers. These different Gumbell laws, or other extreme laws, with different dispersion may occur for marine actions of waves, earthquakes, tsunamis, and maybe for human perturbations, that could include industrial catastrophes, or civilization wars if considering historical periods.

  19. A study of pressure drop in a Capillary tube-viscometer for a two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ohene, F.; Livingston, C.; Matthews, C.; Rhone, Y.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of pipeline transportation of highly concentrated suspensions such as coal-water slurries, can exhibit several flow characteristics depending on the concentration and the physical parameters of the dispersed phase. Experiments were conducted for coal-water slurries flows in a series of horizontal capillary tubes of diameters 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0 mm and 100 mm in length, in order to investigate the effect of concentration, pressure drop, and the transitional Reynolds number from laminar to turbulent flow in a homogeneous slurry. The solid concentration was varied from 15% to 63% in 0.1% xanthum gum solution. Pressure drop and the volume flow measurement were made using HVA-6 Capillary viscometer. The Reynolds numbers obtained were found to be dependent on the slurry concentration and the viscosity of the slurry mixture, but independent of the capillary diameter.

  20. Experimental study of the effect of drag reducing agent on pressure drop and thermal efficiency of an air cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Hashemabadi, S. H.; Saffarian, H.; Shekari, F.

    2016-01-01

    Effect of polymeric drag reduction agents (DRAs) on pressure drop and heat transfer was studied. Aqueous solutions of carboxy methyl cellulose were used inside an air-finned heat exchanger. Despite the previous studies which indicated the importance of drag reduction just in turbulent flow, results of this study in laminar flow indicated that the addition of DRA increases drag reduction, and decreases the overall heat transfer coefficient.

  1. Smooth- and enhanced-tube heat transfer and pressure drop : Part II. The role of transition to turbulent flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N. T.; Das, L.; Rabas, T. J.

    2000-11-14

    The objectives of this presentation are two-fold: first, to demonstrate the connection between the attainable coefficients and transition to turbulent flow by using the transition-based corresponding states method to generalize results obtained with smooth tubes and enhanced tubes, and second, to provide guidelines on the calculation of heat transfer coefficients from pressure-drop data and vice versa by using the transition concept or the functional law of corresponding states.

  2. A model to predict the conditions for liquid drop breakup and the resultant mean fragment size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wert, K. L.; Jacobs, H. R.

    1994-01-01

    The potential significance of drop fragmentation in sprays and other propulsion-related multiphase flows has been noted in the literature. This has motivated recent experimental and theoretical works to: better understand the fundamentals of physics of drop breakup processes, and develop models of drop fragmentation suitable for use in multiphase flow codes. The works summarized below aim to contribute to both sides of this two-pronged attack.

  3. Workplace field testing of the pressure drop of particulate respirators using welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that respirator testing with a sodium chloride aerosol gave a conservative estimate of filter penetration for welding fume aerosols. A rapid increase in the pressure drop (PD) of some respirators was observed as fumes accumulated on the filters. The present study evaluated particulate respirator PD based on workplace field tests. A field PD tester was designed and validated using the TSI 8130 Automatic Filter Tester, designed in compliance with National Institute for Occupational and Safety and Health regulation 42 CFR part 84. Three models (two replaceable dual-type filters and one replaceable single-type filter) were evaluated against CO(2) gas arc welding on mild steel in confined booths in the workplace. Field tests were performed under four airborne concentrations (27.5, 15.4, 7.9, and 2.1 mg m(-3)). The mass concentration was measured by the gravimetric method, and number concentration was monitored using P-Trak (Model 8525, TSI, USA). Additionally, photos and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to visualize and analyze the composition of welding fumes trapped in the filters. The field PD tester showed no significant difference compared with the TSI tester. There was no significant difference in the initial PD between laboratory and field results. The PD increased as a function of fume load on the respirator filters for all tested models. The increasing PD trend differed by models, and PD increased rapidly at high concentrations because greater amount of fumes accumulated on the filters in a given time. The increase in PD as a function of fume load on the filters showed a similar pattern as fume load varied for a particular model, but different patterns were observed for different models. Images and elemental analyses of fumes trapped on the respirator filters showed that most welding fumes were trapped within the first layer, outer web cover, and second layer, in order, while no fumes

  4. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of

  5. Characterization of surface roughness effects on pressure drop in single-phase flow in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandlikar, Satish G.; Schmitt, Derek; Carrano, Andres L.; Taylor, James B.

    2005-10-01

    Roughness features on the walls of a channel wall affect the pressure drop of a fluid flowing through that channel. This roughness effect can be described by (i) flow area constriction and (ii) increase in the wall shear stress. Replotting the Moody's friction factor chart with the constricted flow diameter results in a simplified plot and yields a single asymptotic value of friction factor for relative roughness values of ɛ /D>0.03 in the fully developed turbulent region. After reviewing the literature, three new roughness parameters are proposed (maximum profile peak height Rp, mean spacing of profile irregularities RSm, and floor distance to mean line Fp). Three additional parameters are presented to consider the localized hydraulic diameter variation (maximum, minimum, and average) in future work. The roughness ɛ is then defined as Rp+Fp. This definition yields the same value of roughness as obtained from the sand-grain roughness [H. Darcy, Recherches Experimentales Relatives au Mouvement de L'Eau dans les Tuyaux (Mallet-Bachelier, Paris, France, 1857); J. T. Fanning, A Practical Treatise on Hydraulic and Water Supply Engineering (Van Nostrand, New York, 1877, revised ed. 1886); J. Nikuradse, "Laws of flow in rough pipes" ["Stromungsgesetze in Rauen Rohren," VDI-Forschungsheft 361 (1933)]; Beilage zu "Forschung auf dem Gebiete des Ingenieurwesens," Ausgabe B Band 4, English translation NACA Tech. Mem. 1292 (1937)]. Specific experiments are conducted using parallel sawtooth ridge elements, placed normal to the flow direction, in aligned and offset configurations in a 10.03mm wide rectangular channel with variable gap (resulting hydraulic diameters of 325μm-1819μm with Reynolds numbers ranging from 200 to 7200 for air and 200 to 5700 for water). The use of constricted flow diameter extends the applicability of the laminar friction factor equations to relative roughness values (sawtooth height) up to 14%. In the turbulent region, the aligned and offset

  6. Pressure drop of two-phase dry-plug flow in round mini-channels: Effect of moving contact line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong

    2010-01-15

    In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of the two-phase dry-plug flow (dry wall condition at the gas portions) in round mini-channels was investigated. The air-water mixtures were flowed through the round mini-channels made of polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. In the dry-plug flow regime, the pressure drop measured became larger either by increasing the liquid superficial velocity or by decreasing the gas superficial velocity due to the increase of the number of the moving contact lines in the test section. In such a case, the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. Therefore, a pressure drop model of dry-plug flow was proposed through modification of the dynamic contact angle analysis taking account of the energy dissipation by the moving contact lines, which represents the experimental data within the mean deviation of 4%. (author)

  7. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements in an air/molten salt direct-contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of experimental data with a recently published model of heat exchange in irrigated packed beds. Heat transfer and pressure drop were measured in a 150 mm (ID) column with a 610-mm bed of metal Pall rings. Molten nitrate salt and preheated air were the working fluids with a salt inlet temperature of approximately 440{degree}C and air inlet temperatures of approximately 230{degree}C. A comparison between the experimental data and the heat transfer model is made on the basis of heat transfer from the salt. For the range of air and salt flow rates tested, 0.3 to 1.2 kg/m{sup 2} s air flow and 6 to 18 kg/m{sup 2} s salt flow, the data agree with the model within 22% standard deviation. In addition, a model for the column pressure drop was validated, agreeing with the experimental data within 18% standard deviation over the range of column pressure drop from 40 to 1250 Pa/m. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Experimental sizing and assessment of two-phase pressure drop correlations for a capillary tube with transcritical and subcritical carbon dioxide flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchieri, R.; Boccardi, G.; Calabrese, N.; Celata, G. P.; Zummo, G.

    2014-04-01

    In the last years, CO2 was proposed as an alternative refrigerant for different refrigeration applications (automotive air conditioning, heat pumps, refrigerant plants, etc.) In the case of low power refrigeration applications, as a household refrigerator, the use of too expensive components is not economically sustainable; therefore, even if the use of CO2 as the refrigerant is desired, it is preferable to use conventional components as much as possible. For these reasons, the capillary tube is frequently proposed as expansion system. Then, it is necessary to characterize the capillary in terms of knowledge of the evolving mass flow rate and the associate pressure drop under all possible operative conditions. For this aim, an experimental campaign has been carried out on the ENEA test loop "CADORE" to measure the performance of three capillary tubes having same inner diameter (0.55 mm) but different lengths (4, 6 and 8 meters). The test range of inlet pressure is between about 60 and 110 bar, whereas external temperatures are between about 20 to 42 °C. The two-phase pressure drop through the capillary tube is detected and experimental values are compared with the predictions obtained with the more widely used correlations available in the literature. Correlations have been tested over a wide range of variation of inlet flow conditions, as a function of different inlet parameters.

  9. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  10. Quadratic formula for determining the drop size in pressure-atomized sprays with and without swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.-W.; An, Keju

    2016-06-01

    We use a theoretical framework based on the integral form of the conservation equations, along with a heuristic model of the viscous dissipation, to find a closed-form solution to the liquid atomization problem. The energy balance for the spray renders to a quadratic formula for the drop size as a function, primarily of the liquid velocity. The Sauter mean diameter found using the quadratic formula shows good agreements and physical trends, when compared with experimental observations. This approach is shown to be applicable toward specifying initial drop size in computational fluid dynamics of spray flows.

  11. Theory of Planned Behavior: Sensitivity and Specificity in Predicting Graduation and Drop-Out among College and University Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Amsel, Rhonda; Jorgensen, Mary; Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Budd, Jillian; King, Laura; Jorgensen, Shirley; Asuncion, Jennison

    2016-01-01

    We examined sensitivity and specificity when using the three theory of planned behavior (TPB) scales (Perceived Behavioral Control, Subjective Norms, Attitude) to predict graduation and drop-out in a longitudinal study of 252 college and university students with disabilities and in a separate cross-sectional study of a random sample of 1380…

  12. Shape oscillations of acoustically levitated drops in water: Early research with Bob Apfel on modulated radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2001-05-01

    In 1976, research in collaboration with Bob Apfel demonstrated that low-frequency shape oscillations of hydrocarbon drops levitated in water could be driven using modulated radiation pressure. While that response to modulated ultrasound was subsequently extended to a range of systems, the emphasis here is to recall the initial stages of development in Bob Apfel's laboratory leading to some publications [P. L. Marston and R. E. Apfel, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 68, 280-286 (1979); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 27-37 (1980)]. The levitation technology used at that time was such that it was helpful to develop a sensitive method for detecting weak oscillations using the interference pattern in laser light scattered by levitated drops. The initial experiments to verify this scattering method used shape oscillations induced by modulated electric fields within the acoustic levitator. Light scattering was subsequently used to detect shape oscillations induced by amplitude modulating a carrier having a high frequency (around 680 kHz) at a resonance of the transducer. Methods were also developed for quantitative measurements of the drop's response and with improved acoustic coupling drop fission was observed. The connection with research currently supported by NASA will also be noted.

  13. Detailed characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers: LES predictions compared to DNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results have been compared from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, to assess the ability of LES to reproduce detailed characteristics of DNS.

  14. Experimental validation of a numerical model for predicting the trajectory of blood drops in typical crime scene conditions, including droplet deformation and breakup, with a study of the effect of indoor air currents and wind on typical spatter drop trajectories.

    PubMed

    Kabaliuk, N; Jermy, M C; Williams, E; Laber, T L; Taylor, M C

    2014-12-01

    Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA) provides information about events during an assault, e.g. location of participants, weapon type and number of blows. To extract the maximum information from spatter stains, the size, velocity and direction of the drop that produces each stain, and forces acting during flight, must be known. A numerical scheme for accurate modeling of blood drop flight, in typical crime scene conditions, including droplet oscillation, deformation and in-flight disintegration, was developed and validated against analytical and experimental data including passive blood drop oscillations, deformation at terminal velocity, cast-off and impact drop deformation and breakup features. 4th order Runge-Kutta timestepping was used with the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model and Pilch and Erdman's (1987) expression for breakup time. Experimental data for terminal velocities, oscillations, and deformation was obtained via digital high-speed imaging. A single model was found to describe drop behavior accurately in passive, cast off and impact scenarios. Terminal velocities of typical passive drops falling up to 8m, distances and times required to reach them were predicted within 5%. Initial oscillations of passive blood drops with diameters of 1mmPredictions of oscillating passive drop aspect ratio were within 1.6% of experiment. Under typical crime scene conditions, the velocity of the drop within the first 1.5m of fall is affected little by drag, oscillation or deformation. Blood drops with diameter 0.4-4mm and velocity 1-15m/s cast-off from a rotating disk showed low deformation levels (Weber number<3). Drops formed by blunt impact 0.1-2mm in diameter at velocities of 14-25m/s were highly deformed (aspect ratios down to 0.4) and the larger impact blood drops (∼1-1.5mm in diameter) broke up at critical Weber numbers of 12-14. Most break-ups occurred within 10-20cm of the impact point. The model predicted deformation

  15. Impact of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation, feed channel pressure drop increase and permeate flux decline in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Bucs, Sz S; Valladares Linares, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-12-15

    The influence of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation (biofouling) and pressure drop development in membrane filtration systems was investigated. Nutrient load is the product of nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity. Biofouling - excessive growth of microbial biomass in membrane systems - hampers membrane performance. The influence of biodegradable organic nutrient load on biofouling was investigated at varying (i) crossflow velocity, (ii) nutrient concentration, (iii) shear, and (iv) feed spacer thickness. Experimental studies were performed with membrane fouling simulators (MFSs) containing a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane and a 31 mil thick feed spacer, commonly applied in practice in RO and nanofiltration (NF) spiral-wound membrane modules. Numerical modeling studies were done with identical feed spacer geometry differing in thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil). Additionally, experiments were done applying a forward osmosis (FO) membrane with varying spacer thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil), addressing the permeate flux decline and biofilm development. Assessed were the development of feed channel pressure drop (MFS studies), permeate flux (FO studies) and accumulated biomass amount measured by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total organic carbon (TOC). Our studies showed that the organic nutrient load determined the accumulated amount of biomass. The same amount of accumulated biomass was found at constant nutrient load irrespective of linear flow velocity, shear, and/or feed spacer thickness. The impact of the same amount of accumulated biomass on feed channel pressure drop and permeate flux was influenced by membrane process design and operational conditions. Reducing the nutrient load by pretreatment slowed-down the biofilm formation. The impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance was reduced by applying a lower crossflow velocity and/or a thicker and/or a modified geometry feed spacer. The results indicate that cleanings can be delayed

  16. Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient.

    PubMed

    Dreszer, C; Flemming, H-C; Zwijnenburg, A; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-03-01

    Biofilm formation causes performance loss in spiral-wound membrane systems. In this study a microfiltration membrane was used in experiments to simulate fouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules without the influence of concentration polarization. The resistance of a microfiltration membrane is much lower than the intrinsic biofilm resistance, enabling the detection of biofilm accumulation in an early stage. The impact of biofilm accumulation on the transmembrane (biofilm) resistance and feed channel pressure drop as a function of the crossflow velocity (0.05 and 0.20 m s(-1)) and feed spacer presence was studied in transparent membrane biofouling monitors operated at a permeate flux of 20 L m(-2) h(-1). As biodegradable nutrient, acetate was dosed to the feed water (1.0 and 0.25 mg L(-1) carbon) to enhance biofilm accumulation in the monitors. The studies showed that biofilm formation caused an increased transmembrane resistance and feed channel pressure drop. The effect was strongest at the highest crossflow velocity (0.2 m s(-1)) and in the presence of a feed spacer. Simulating conditions as currently applied in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis installations (crossflow velocity 0.2 m s(-1) and standard feed spacer) showed that the impact of biofilm formation on performance, in terms of transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop, was strong. This emphasized the importance of hydrodynamics and feed spacer design. Biomass accumulation was related to the nutrient load (nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity). Reducing the nutrient concentration of the feed water enabled the application of higher crossflow velocities. Pretreatment to remove biodegradable nutrient and removal of biomass from the membrane elements played an important part to prevent or restrict biofouling. PMID:24374131

  17. Heat transfer, pressure drop, and mass flow rate in pin fin channels with long and short trailing edge ejection holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Han, J. C.; Batten, T.

    1988-06-01

    The turbulent heat transfer and friction characteristics in the pin fin channels with small trailing edge ejection holes found in internally-cooled turbine airfoils have been experimentally investigated. It is found that the overall heat transfer increases when the length of the trailing edge ejection holes is increased and when the trailing edge ejection holes are configured such that much of the cooling air is forced to flow further downstream in the radial flow direction prior to exiting. The increase in the overall heat transfer is shown to be accompanied by an increase in the overall pressure drop.

  18. Transient integral boundary layer method to calculate the translesional pressure drop and the fractional flow reserve in myocardial bridges

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Stefan; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Tilgner, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Background The pressure drop – flow relations in myocardial bridges and the assessment of vascular heart disease via fractional flow reserve (FFR) have motivated many researchers the last decades. The aim of this study is to simulate several clinical conditions present in myocardial bridges to determine the flow reserve and consequently the clinical relevance of the disease. From a fluid mechanical point of view the pathophysiological situation in myocardial bridges involves fluid flow in a time dependent flow geometry, caused by contracting cardiac muscles overlying an intramural segment of the coronary artery. These flows mostly involve flow separation and secondary motions, which are difficult to calculate and analyse. Methods Because a three dimensional simulation of the haemodynamic conditions in myocardial bridges in a network of coronary arteries is time-consuming, we present a boundary layer model for the calculation of the pressure drop and flow separation. The approach is based on the assumption that the flow can be sufficiently well described by the interaction of an inviscid core and a viscous boundary layer. Under the assumption that the idealised flow through a constriction is given by near-equilibrium velocity profiles of the Falkner-Skan-Cooke (FSC) family, the evolution of the boundary layer is obtained by the simultaneous solution of the Falkner-Skan equation and the transient von-Kármán integral momentum equation. Results The model was used to investigate the relative importance of several physical parameters present in myocardial bridges. Results have been obtained for steady and unsteady flow through vessels with 0 – 85% diameter stenosis. We compare two clinical relevant cases of a myocardial bridge in the middle segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). The pressure derived FFR of fixed and dynamic lesions has shown that the flow is less affected in the dynamic case, because the distal pressure partially recovers

  19. Blood Pressure Patterns May Predict Stroke Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. High blood pressure is the number one risk ... of epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Andrew Rogove, M.D., Ph.D., medical director, ...

  20. In vitro comparison of Günther Tulip and Celect filters: testing filtering efficiency and pressure drop.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, M; Malvé, M; Peña, E; Martínez, M A; Leask, R

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the trapping ability of the Günther Tulip and Celect inferior vena cava filters was evaluated. Thrombus capture rates of the filters were tested in vitro in horizontal position with thrombus diameters of 3 and 6mm and tube diameter of 19mm. The filters were tested in centered and tilted positions. Sets of 30 clots were injected into the model and the same process was repeated 20 times for each different condition simulated. Pressure drop experienced along the system was also measured and the percentage of clots captured was recorded. The Günther Tulip filter showed superiority in all cases, trapping almost 100% of 6mm clots both in an eccentric and tilted position and trapping 81.7% of the 3mm clots in a centered position and 69.3% in a maximum tilted position. The efficiency of all filters tested decreased as the size of the embolus decreased and as the filter was tilted. The injection of 6 clots raised the pressure drop to 4.1mmHg, which is a reasonable value that does not cause the obstruction of blood flow through the system. PMID:25553669

  1. Bed mixing and leachate recycling strategies to overcome pressure drop buildup in the biofiltration of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Roshani, Babak; Torkian, Ayoob; Aslani, Hasan; Dehghanzadeh, Reza

    2012-04-01

    The effects of leachate recycling and bed mixing on the removal rate of H(2)S from waste gas stream were investigated. The experimental setup consisted of an epoxy-coated three-section biofilter with an ID of 8 cm and effective bed height of 120 cm. Bed material consisted of municipal solid waste compost and PVC bits with an overall porosity of 54% and dry bulk density of 0.456 g cm(-3). Leachate recycling had a positive effect of increasing elimination capacity (EC) up to 21 g S m(-3) bed h(-1) at recycling rates of 75 ml d(-1), but in the bed mixing period EC declined to 8 g S m(-3) bed h(-1). Pressure drop had a range of zero to 18 mm H(2)O m(-1) in the course of leachate recycling. Accumulation of sulfur reduced removal efficiency and increased pressure drop up to 110 mm H(2)O m(-1) filter during the bed mixing stage. PMID:22300638

  2. A simple expression for pressure drops of water and other low molecular liquids in the flow through micro-orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Ushida, Akiomi; Narumi, Takatsune

    2015-12-01

    Flows are generally divided into two types: shear flows and shear-free elongational (extensional) flows. Both are necessary for a thorough understanding of the flow properties of a fluid. Shear flows are easy to achieve in practice, for example, through Poiseuille or Couette flows. Shear-free elongational flows are experimentally hard to achieve, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the flow properties of fluids in micro-devices. Nevertheless, flows through micro-orifices are useful for probing the properties of elongational flows at high elongational rates; although these flows exhibit shear and elongation, the elongation is dominant and the shear is negligible in the central region of the flows. We previously reported an anomalous reduction in pressure drops in the flows of water, a 50/50 mixture of glycerol and water, and silicone oils through micro-orifices. In the present paper, we rearrange the data presented in the previous paper and reveal a simple relationship where the pressure drop is proportional to the velocity through the micro-orifices, independent of the orifice diameter and the viscosity of the liquids tested. We explain our observations by introducing a "fluid element" model, in which fluid elements are formed on entering the orifice. The model is based on the idea that low molecular liquids, including water, generate strong elongational stress, similar to a polymer solution, in the flow through micro-orifices.

  3. Evaluation of static pressure drops and PM10 and TSP emissions for modified 1D-3D cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, G.A.; Baker, R.V.; Hughs, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Five modifications of a standard 1D3D cyclone were tested and compared against the standard 1D3D design in the areas of particulate emissions and static pressure drop across the cyclone. The modifications to the 1D3D design included a 2D2D inlet, a 2D2D air outlet, a D/3 trash exit, an expansion chamber with a D/3 trash exit, and a tapered air outlet duct. The 1D3D modifications that exhibited a significant improvement in reducing both PM10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) emissions were the designs with the 2D2D inlet and air exhaust combined with either the conical D/3 tail cone or the expansion chamber. In reference to the standard 1D3D cyclone, the average reduction in PM10 emissions was 24 to 29% with a 29 to 35% reduction observed in TSP emissions. The modifications with the tapered air outlets did not show any significant improvements in controlling PM10 emissions. However, the modification with the tapered air outlet/expansion chamber combination exhibited statistical significance in reducing TSP emissions by 18% compared to the 1D3D cyclone. All modifications tested exhibited lower static pressure drops than the standard 1D3D.

  4. Heat transfer and pressure drop of supercritical carbon dioxide flowing in several printed circuit heat exchanger channel patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, M.; Kruizenga, A.; Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.

    2012-07-01

    Closed-loop Brayton cycles using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) show potential for use in high-temperature power generation applications including High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) and Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR). Compared to Rankine cycles SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles offer similar or improved efficiency and the potential for decreased capital costs due to a reduction in equipment size and complexity. Compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) are being considered as part of several SCO{sub 2} Brayton designs to further reduce equipment size with increased energy density. Several designs plan to use a gas cooler operating near the pseudo-critical point of carbon dioxide to benefit from large variations in thermophysical properties, but further work is needed to validate correlations for heat transfer and pressure-drop characteristics of SCO{sub 2} flows in candidate PCHE channel designs for a variety of operating conditions. This paper presents work on experimental measurements of the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of miniature channels using carbon dioxide at supercritical pressure. Results from several plate geometries tested in horizontal cooling-mode flow are presented, including a straight semi-circular channel, zigzag channel with a bend angle of 80 degrees, and a channel with a staggered array of extruded airfoil pillars modeled after a NACA 0020 airfoil with an 8.1 mm chord length facing into the flow. Heat transfer coefficients and bulk temperatures are calculated from measured local wall temperatures and local heat fluxes. The experimental results are compared to several methods for estimating the friction factor and Nusselt number of cooling-mode flows at supercritical pressures in millimeter-scale channels. (authors)

  5. Prediction of dynamic and mixing characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers using DNS and LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) have been conducted of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, in order to assess the ability of LES to reproduce dynamic and mixing aspects of the DNS which affect combustion, independently of combustion models.

  6. Two-Phase Frictional Pressure Drop Multipliers for SUVA R-134a Flowing in a Rectangular Duct

    SciTech Connect

    P Vassallo; K Keller

    2004-12-13

    The adiabatic two-phase frictional multipliers for SUVA, R-134a flowing in a rectangular duct (with D{sub H} = 4.8 mm) have been measured for 3 nominal system pressures (0.9 MPa, 1.38 MPa and 2.41 MPa) and 3 nominal mass fluxes (510, 1020 and 2040 kg/m{sup 2}/s). The data is compared with several classical correlations to assess their predictive capabilities. The Lockhart-Martinelli model gives reasonable results at the lowest pressure and mass flux, near the operating range of most refrigeration systems, but gives increasingly poor comparisons as the pressure and mass flux is increased. The Chisholm B-coefficient model is found to best predict the data over the entire range of test conditions; however, there is significant disagreement at the highest pressure tested (with the model over predicting the data upwards of 100% for some cases). The data shows an increased tendency toward homogeneous flow as the pressure and flow rate are increased, and in fact the homogeneous model best predicts the bulk of the data at the highest pressure tested.

  7. Extension of spray nozzle correlations to the prediction of drop size distributions using principles of maximum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankagiri, N.; Ruff, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    For years, design and evaluation of the performance of many existing liquid spray systems has made use of the many empirical correlations for the bulk properties of a spray such as mean drop size, spread angle, etc. However, more detailed information, such as the drop size distribution, is required to evaluate critical performance parameters such as NOx emission in internal combustion engines and the combustion efficiency of a hazardous waste incinerator. The principles of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy can be applied through the maximum entropy formulation to estimate the joint drop size-velocity distribution provided that some information about the bulk properties of the spray exists from empirical correlations. A general method for this determination is described in this paper and differences from previous work are highlighted. Comparisons between the predicted and experimental results verify that this method does yield a good estimation of the drop size distribution for certain applications. Other uses for this methodology in spray analysis are also discussed.

  8. Condensation heat transfer and pressure drop of R-134a saturated vapour inside a brazed compact plate fin heat exchanger with serrated fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana Murthy, K. V.; Ranganayakulu, C.; Ashok Babu, T. P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the experimental heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop measured during R-134a saturated vapour condensation inside a small brazed compact plate fin heat exchanger with serrated fin surface. The effects of saturation temperature (pressure), refrigerant mass flux, refrigerant heat flux, effect of fin surface characteristics and fluid properties are investigated. The average condensation heat transfer coefficients and frictional pressure drops were determined experimentally for refrigerant R-134a at five different saturated temperatures (34, 38, 40, 42 and 44 °C). A transition point between gravity controlled and forced convection condensation has been found for a refrigerant mass flux around 22 kg/m2s. In the forced convection condensation region, the heat transfer coefficients show a three times increase and 1.5 times increase in frictional pressure drop for a doubling of the refrigerant mass flux. The heat transfer coefficients show weak sensitivity to saturation temperature (Pressure) and great sensitivity to refrigerant mass flux and fluid properties. The frictional pressure drop shows a linear dependence on the kinetic energy per unit volume of the refrigerant flow. Correlations are provided for the measured heat transfer coefficients and frictional pressure drops.

  9. Pressure drop testing of corrugated stainless steel pliable gas tubing (PLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bharadwaj

    An experimental program was initiated to determine the Darcy friction factor in straight corrugated stainless steel pliable gas tubing (PLT). Pressure loss tests were conducted on PLT per I.S. EN 15266:2007. A power law least-squares curve fit was used to relate pressure loss per unit length as a function of volume flow rate. The calculated coefficient of determination values for the straight PLT exceeded 0.90 indicating suitable correlation. Darcy friction factors were calculated from test data for each case and plotted on a Moody diagram as a function of Reynolds number based on the minimum PLT cross section. For Reynolds numbers less than 2300 the pressure loss data for PLT yielded an inverse relationship between the Darcy friction factor and the Reynolds number, with a proportionality coefficient of 49. The measurement uncertainty estimates for straight sections was performed with a 95% confidence level. Straight PLT flow rates for air and representative fuel gases that would yield a pressure loss Deltap = 1 mbar were calculated as a function of PLT length and diameter. Fitting pressure loss tests were performed for elbows, tees, and bullhead tees. The loss coefficients were evaluated and tabulated. The calculated coefficient of determination values for the fittings was found to be low. The measurement uncertainty was calculated using the root sum square error method and was found to be very high because of the low flow rates considered in this experiment.

  10. Earthquake dynamics. Mapping pressurized volcanic fluids from induced crustal seismic velocity drops.

    PubMed

    Brenguier, F; Campillo, M; Takeda, T; Aoki, Y; Shapiro, N M; Briand, X; Emoto, K; Miyake, H

    2014-07-01

    Volcanic eruptions are caused by the release of pressure that has accumulated due to hot volcanic fluids at depth. Here, we show that the extent of the regions affected by pressurized fluids can be imaged through the measurement of their response to transient stress perturbations. We used records of seismic noise from the Japanese Hi-net seismic network to measure the crustal seismic velocity changes below volcanic regions caused by the 2011 moment magnitude (M(w)) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. We interpret coseismic crustal seismic velocity reductions as related to the mechanical weakening of the pressurized crust by the dynamic stress associated with the seismic waves. We suggest, therefore, that mapping seismic velocity susceptibility to dynamic stress perturbations can be used for the imaging and characterization of volcanic systems. PMID:24994652

  11. Analytical prediction of reverse buckling pressure for thin shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martindale, D. L.; Urbanac, C.

    1970-01-01

    Analytical technique is developed for prediction of reverse buckling in thin curved shells. Test data indicate technique predicts actual reverse buckling pressure within 10 percent, and should be useful for analytical prediction of reversed condition failure for problems such as explosive decomposition through vacuum failure.

  12. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer Characteristics of The Fluid Flow through an Array of Interrupted, Parallel-Plate Heat Transfer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Sadanari; Yagi, Yoshinao

    A scale-up modeling technique was used to examine the effect of the geometrical properties of interrupted surfaces on the heat transfer and pressure drop performance of compact heat exchangers having off-set-strip and slotted fins. The test cores, each consisting of a number of machined copper finns, were tested in a subsonic wind tunnel. The heat transfer and the pressure drop for each test core was measured for various fin lengths (in flow direction) and slot distances. Flow visualization and local turbulence intensity and pressure measurements within each test core were also performed to gain insight into the mechanisms of heat transfer augmentation in compact heat exchangers with interrupted surfaces. The effect of the geometrical properties of the fins as well as the Reynolds number on the heat transfer rate and the pressure drop were determined and those results were interpreted in terms of observed flow structure. Basic heat transfer and pressure drop data are presented in terms of Colburn j-factors and Fanning friction factors plotted versus Reynolds number. An empirical correlation for heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics for off-set-strip fins are presented.

  13. A Prediction Model of the Capillary Pressure J-Function.

    PubMed

    Xu, W S; Luo, P Y; Sun, L; Lin, N

    2016-01-01

    The capillary pressure J-function is a dimensionless measure of the capillary pressure of a fluid in a porous medium. The function was derived based on a capillary bundle model. However, the dependence of the J-function on the saturation Sw is not well understood. A prediction model for it is presented based on capillary pressure model, and the J-function prediction model is a power function instead of an exponential or polynomial function. Relative permeability is calculated with the J-function prediction model, resulting in an easier calculation and results that are more representative. PMID:27603701

  14. Novel high-pressure phase of ZrO{sub 2}: An ab initio prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2015-10-15

    The high-pressure behavior of the orthorhombic cotunnite type ZrO{sub 2} is explored using an ab initio constant pressure technique. For the first time, a novel hexagonal phase (Ni{sub 2}In type) within P6{sub 3}/mmc symmetry is predicted through the simulation. The Ni{sub 2}In type crystal is the densest high-pressure phase of ZrO{sub 2} proposed so far and has not been observed in other metal dioxides at high pressure before. The phase transformation is accompanied by a small volume drop and likely to occur around 380 GPa in experiment. - Graphical abstract: Post-cotunnite Ni{sub 2}In type hexagonal phase forms in zirconia at high pressure. - Highlights: • A post-cotunnite phase is predicted for ZrO{sub 2} through an ab initio simulation. • Cotunnite ZrO{sub 2} adopts the Ni{sub 2}In type structure at high pressure. • The Ni{sub 2}In type structure is the densest high-pressure phase of ZrO{sub 2} proposed so far. • The preferred mechanism in ZrO{sub 2} differs from the other metal dioxides.

  15. Pressure Drop Across Woven Screens Under Uniform and Nonuniform Flow Conditions. [flow characteristics of water through Dutch twill and square weave fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, M.; Omori, S.; Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the experimental pressure drop and velocity data for water flowing through woven screens. The types of materials used are dutch twill and square weave fabrics. Pressure drop measures were made at four locations in a rectangular channel. The data are presented as change in pressure compared with the average entry velocity and the numerical relationship is determined by dividing the volumetric flow rate by the screen area open to flow. The equations of continuity and momentum are presented. A computer program listing an extension of a theoretical model and data from that computer program are included.

  16. Building a Model to Predict Which Fourth through Eighth Graders Will Drop Out in High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, John D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Classification accuracies of models for predicting later high school dropouts from data available in student records for grades 4 through 8 were examined for 503 dropouts and 282 persisters (nondropouts) in Florida. Separate prediction models for each grade level have practical importance; implications for dropout prediction are discussed. (SLD)

  17. Condensation inside tubes: Computer program for pressure drop in straight tubes (horizontal and vertical with downflow)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-12-01

    ESDU 93014 introduces a Fortran program that implements the calculation procedures of ESDU 90024 and 91023 respectively for vertical and horizontal cases. Those documents should be consulted for details of the empirical correlation used. Since vapor density is an important variable in the calculation and is usually available as a function of saturation temperature, the relationship between pressure and saturation temperature is required at points along the tube, although a constant value of vapor density may be used if the user wishes. The program provides options to use an Antoine or Wagner equation, or to provide a set of values of saturation pressure and temperature; for the vapor density the options are to use the ideal gas law, to provide a set of values of saturation temperature and density or to use a specific correlation equation (log density as a fraction of critical as a five term polynomial function of reciprocal reduced temperature minus one). For a wide range of pure compounds the ESDU Physical Data, Chemical Engineering Sub-series provides values of the constants in the correlation equations for saturation temperature and vapor density. The program (ESDUpac A9314) is provided on disc (uncompiled) in the software volume, and also compiled within ESDUview, a user-friendly shell running under MS DOS that prompts on screen for the input data. A worked example illustrates the use of the program and the formats of the input data and the output.

  18. Gas-Non-Newtonian liquid flow through helical coils—pressure drop and CFD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, T. K.; Biswas, A. B.; Das, S. K.

    2010-10-01

    The problem of determining the pressure losses in helical coil is important in design and analysis of the fluid machinery. It is well known that when a fluid flows through a curved pipe, the flow pattern becomes more complex than that of a straight pipe because of the generation of secondary flows due to the interaction between centrifugal and viscous forces. To understand the interaction between the two-phase gas- non-Newtonian liquid flow through helical coil tube, hydrodynamic modeling is being performed with a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code—FLUENT 6.3. The modeling has attempted to describe the results of flow visualization experiments performed in transparent helical coil tube. Both phases are first treated separately as homogeneous. Coupling is achieved through pressure and interphase exchange coefficients. Multiphase model Eulerian-Eulerian, viscous non-Newtonian laminar power law model is used to describe the interaction between the phases. The CFD modeling is compared with the experimental data.

  19. Condensation heat transfer and pressure drop of R-410A in a 7.0 mm O.D. microfin tube at low mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nae-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    R-410A condensation heat transfer and pressure drop data are provided for a 7.0 mm O.D. microfin tube at low mass fluxes (50-250 kg/m2 s). The heat transfer coefficient of the microfin tube shows a minimum behavior with the mass flux. At a low mass flux, where flow pattern is stratified, condensation induced by surface tension by microfins overwhelms condensation induced by shear, and the heat transfer coefficient decreases as mass flux increases. At a high mass flux, where flow pattern is annular, condensation induced by shear governs the heat transfer, and the heat transfer coefficient increases as mass flux increases. The pressure drop of the microfin tube is larger than that of the smooth tube at the annular flow regime. On the contrary, the pressure drop of the smooth tube is larger than that of the microfin tube at the stratified flow regime.

  20. Heat transfer and pressure drop performance of a finned-tube heat exchanger proposed for use in the NASA Lewis Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A segment of the heat exchanger proposed for use in the NASA Lewis Altitude Wind Tunnel (AWT) facility has been tested under dry and icing conditions. The heat exchanger has the largest pressure drop of any component in the AWT loop. It is therefore critical that its performance be known at all conditions before the final design of the AWT is complete. The heat exchanger segment is tested in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in order to provide an icing cloud environment similar to what will be encountered in the AWT. Dry heat transfer and pressure drop data are obtained and compared to correlations available in the literature. The effects of icing sprays on heat transfer and pressure drop are also investigated.

  1. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: Effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop.

    PubMed

    Brownell, H H; Yu, E K; Saddler, J N

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or airdry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars, and the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. PMID:18555395

  2. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, H.H.; Yu, E.K.C.; Saddler, J.N.

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or air dry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzmatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one-third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. 17 references.

  3. Modeling of drop breakup in the bag breakup regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Chang, S.; Wu, H.; Xu, J.

    2014-04-01

    Several analytic models for predicting the drop deformation and breakup have been developed over the last three decades, but modeling drop breakup in the bag-type regime is less reported. In this Letter, a breakup model has been proposed to predict the drop deformation length and breakup time in the bag-type breakup regime in a more accurate manner. In the present model, the drop deformation which is approximately as the displacement of the centre of mass (c. m.) along the axis located at the centre of the drop, and the movement of c. m. is obtained by solving the pressure balance equation. The effects of the drop deformation on the drop external aerodynamic force are considered in this model. Drop breakup occurs when the deformation length reaches the maximum value and the maximum deformation length is a function of Weber number. The performance and applicability of the proposed breakup model are tested against the published experimental data.

  4. PRESSURE DROP OF FILTERING FACEPIECE RESPIRATORS: HOW LOW SHOULD WE GO?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J.; Powell, Jeffrey B.; Shaffer, Ronald E.; Ylitalo, Caroline M.; Sebastian, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was undertaken to determine the mean peak filter resistance to airflow (Rfilter) encountered by subjects while wearing prototype filtering facepiece respirators (PRs) with low Rfilter during nasal and oral breathing at sedentary and low-moderate work rates. Material and Methods In-line pressure transducer measurements of mean Rfilter across PRs with nominal Rfilter of 29.4 Pa, 58.8 Pa and 88.2 Pa (measured at 85 l/min constant airflow) were obtained during nasal and oral breathing at sedentary and low-moderate work rates for 10 subjects. Results The mean Rfilter for the 29.4 PR was significantly lower than the other 2 PRs (p < 0.000), but there were no significant differences in mean Rfilter between the PRs with 58.8 and 88.2 Pa filter resistance (p > 0.05). The mean Rfilter was greater for oral versus nasal breathing and for exercise compared to sedentary activity (p < 0.001). Conclusions Mean oral and nasal Rfilter for all 3 PRs was at, or below, the minimal threshold level for detection of inspiratory resistance (the 58.8–74.5 Pa/1×s−1), which may account for the previously-reported lack of significant subjective or physiological differences when wearing PRs with these low Rfilter. Lowering filtering facepiece respirator Rfilter below 88.2 Pa (measured at 85 l/min constant airflow) may not result in additional subjective or physiological benefit to the wearer. PMID:26159949

  5. Effect of filtration velocity and filtration pressure drop on the bag-cleaning performance of a pulse-jet baghouse

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.J.; Tsai, M.L.; Lu, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    In this study the filtration velocity and filtration pressure drop at the beginning of bag cleaning were used as experimental parameters to evaluate the bag-cleaning performance of a pulse-jet baghouse. The effective residual pressure loss was used to indicate the cleaning performance after bag cleaning. Two different test dusts, fly ash and limestone, were used. The critical cleaning indices under different operation conditions for bag cleaning were also investigated. A critical average pulse overpressure was found to exist beyond which bag-cleaning performance did not improve much. It was found the filter's final filtration resistance is an important parameter to decide whether a Venturi is necessary for a good bag-cleaning performance or not. Use of a Venturi was found to increase the average pulse overpressure for a system with a filter's final resistance coefficient greater than about 500 Pa{center{underscore}dot}s/cm. However, no Venturi is recommended when the filter's final resistance coefficient is smaller than 500 Pa{center{underscore}dot}s/cm.

  6. Electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop with inertia.

    PubMed

    Nganguia, H; Young, Y-N; Layton, A T; Lai, M-C; Hu, W-F

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing numerical and theoretical investigations on the electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop have focused on the creeping Stokes flow regime, where nonlinear inertia effects are neglected. In this work we study the inertia effects on the electrodeformation of a viscous drop under a DC electric field using a novel second-order immersed interface method. The inertia effects are quantified by the Ohnesorge number Oh, and the electric field is characterized by an electric capillary number Ca_{E}. Below the critical Ca_{E}, small to moderate electric field strength gives rise to steady equilibrium drop shapes. We found that, at a fixed Ca_{E}, inertia effects induce larger deformation for an oblate drop than a prolate drop, consistent with previous results in the literature. Moreover, our simulations results indicate that inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation are dictated by the direction of normal electric stress on the drop interface: Larger drop deformation is found when the normal electric stress points outward, and smaller drop deformation is found otherwise. To our knowledge, such inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation has not been reported in the literature. Above the critical Ca_{E}, no steady equilibrium drop deformation can be found, and often the drop breaks up into a number of daughter droplets. In particular, our Navier-Stokes simulations show that, for the parameters we use, (1) daughter droplets are larger in the presence of inertia, (2) the drop deformation evolves more rapidly compared to creeping flow, and (3) complex distribution of electric stresses for drops with inertia effects. Our results suggest that normal electric pressure may be a useful tool in predicting drop pinch-off in oblate deformations. PMID:27300985

  7. Electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop with inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganguia, H.; Young, Y.-N.; Layton, A. T.; Lai, M.-C.; Hu, W.-F.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing numerical and theoretical investigations on the electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop have focused on the creeping Stokes flow regime, where nonlinear inertia effects are neglected. In this work we study the inertia effects on the electrodeformation of a viscous drop under a DC electric field using a novel second-order immersed interface method. The inertia effects are quantified by the Ohnesorge number Oh, and the electric field is characterized by an electric capillary number CaE. Below the critical CaE, small to moderate electric field strength gives rise to steady equilibrium drop shapes. We found that, at a fixed CaE, inertia effects induce larger deformation for an oblate drop than a prolate drop, consistent with previous results in the literature. Moreover, our simulations results indicate that inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation are dictated by the direction of normal electric stress on the drop interface: Larger drop deformation is found when the normal electric stress points outward, and smaller drop deformation is found otherwise. To our knowledge, such inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation has not been reported in the literature. Above the critical CaE, no steady equilibrium drop deformation can be found, and often the drop breaks up into a number of daughter droplets. In particular, our Navier-Stokes simulations show that, for the parameters we use, (1) daughter droplets are larger in the presence of inertia, (2) the drop deformation evolves more rapidly compared to creeping flow, and (3) complex distribution of electric stresses for drops with inertia effects. Our results suggest that normal electric pressure may be a useful tool in predicting drop pinch-off in oblate deformations.

  8. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  9. Predicting pore pressure and porosity from VSP data

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.G.

    1984-04-01

    Presently, VSP is being used to predict interval velocity and depth beneath the drill bit. The method is to exploit special properties of the VSP to produce a successful inversion to acoustic impedance. Depth and interval velocity are derived from the acoustic impedance prediction. This technique is often a valuable aid in making drilling decisions. Other rock properties may be computed from the same data. Pore pressure is one such rock parameter that can be computed from interval transit times and depth. The product of interval transit times, depth, normal compaction ratios, and an area constant is pore pressure. Pore pressure prediction is as reliable as the predicted velocities and depths. In reservoir evaluation, and sometimes in the well completion program, porosity is the important rock property. The interval transit times predicted beneath the bit can be used to compute porosity. Unlike pore pressure, porosity computations require knowledge or assumptions about the rock matrix and shale percentages. For certain conditions these values are known. Further penetration of a reef in search of deeper porous zones is an example of a viable condition for porosity prediction. For both these rock properties the same conventions employed by well log analysis in modifying and interpreting results are needed. Where the parameters assumed fit the actual conditions, the results should have merit. If not, further interpretation is required.

  10. Predicting mass loading as a function of pressure difference across prefilter/HEPA filter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Klassen, J.F. ); Monson, P.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology for predicting the mass loading and pressure drop effects on a prefilter/ HEPA filter system. The methodology relies on the use of empirical equations for the specific resistance of the aerosol loaded filter as a function of the particle diameter. These correlations relate the pressure difference across a filter to the mass loading on the filter and accounts for aerosol particle density effects. These predictions are necessary for the efficient design of new filtration systems and for risk assessment studies of existing filter systems. This work specifically addresses the prefilter/HEPA filter Airborne Activity Confinement Systems (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. In order to determine the mass loading on the system, it is necessary to establish the efficiency characteristics for the prefilter, the mass loading characteristics of the prefilter measured as a function of pressure difference across the prefilter, and the mass loading characteristics of the HEPA filter as a function of pressure difference across the filter. Furthermore, the efficiency and mass loading characteristics need to be determined as a function of the aerosol particle diameter. A review of the literature revealed that no previous work had been performed to characterize the prefilter material of interest. In order to complete the foundation of information necessary to predict total mass loadings on prefilter/HEPA filter systems, it was necessary to determine the prefilter efficiency and mass loading characteristics. The measured prefilter characteristics combined with the previously determined HEPA filter characteristics allowed the resulting pressure difference across both filters to be predicted as a function of total particle mass for a given particle distribution. These predictions compare favorably to experimental measurements ({plus minus}25%).

  11. Predictability of the cold drops in the European area, study based on ECMWF deterministic and ensemble models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Nikolett; Ihasz, Istvan

    2014-05-01

    Upper-Level Lows (ULL-s) are closed; cyclonically circulating eddies isolated from the main western stream in the middle and upper troposphere. They are also sometimes called "cold drops" because the air within an Upper Level low is colder than in its surroundings. The cold air within usually does not show up on the surface, meaning the vertical temperature gradient is high, which in turn causes instability and heavy storms, especially during the summer. An ULL-s diameter is about a couple hundred km-s, so it looks like a miniature cyclone. Our former studies focused mainly on the cold drops' statistics and meteorology, as well as a few case studies. Since ULL's occur rarely, we developed a new ULL-recognition process to increase the number of samples available. In our current studies first of all, we gathered 150 days when cold drops occurred in the past 15 years. 6 different meteorological parameters - 500 hPa height, 500 hPa temperature, temperature advection, 300 hPa wind speed, potential temperature of the 2 potential vorticity unit and isentropic potential vorticity of 315 K potential temperature level were investigated in our studied. Interactions of these variables were deeply investigated. In all cases of above mentioned ULLs. Predictability of the intensity and geographical position of the ULLs were made both in deterministic and ensemble models. For supporting operational activity in the Hungarian Meteorological Service a new ensemble plume containing 500 hPa temperature, potential temperature of 300 hPa, potential isentropic temperature at 315 K level and 300 hPa windspeed was developed.

  12. Prediction of Sublimation Pressures of Low Volatility Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Bruce Douglas

    Sublimation pressures are required for solid-vapor phase equilibrium models in design of processes such as supercritical fluid extraction, sublimation purification and vapor epitaxy. The objective of this work is to identify and compare alternative methods for predicting sublimation pressures. A bibliography of recent sublimation data is included. Corresponding states methods based on the triple point (rather than critical point) are examined. A modified Trouton's rule is the preferred method for estimating triple point pressure in the absence of any sublimation data. Only boiling and melting temperatures are required. Typical error in log_{10} P _{rm triple} is 0.3. For lower temperature estimates, the slope of the sublimation curve is predicted by a correlation based on molar volume. Typical error is 10% of slope. Molecular dynamics methods for surface modeling are tested as estimators of vapor pressure. The time constants of the vapor and solid phases are too different to allow the vapor to come to thermal equilibrium with the solid. The method shows no advantages in prediction of sublimation pressure but provides insight into appropriate models and experimental methods for sublimation. Density-dependent augmented van der Waals equations of state based on hard-sphere distribution functions are examined. The perturbation term is almost linear and is well fit by a simple quadratic. Use of the equation provides reasonable fitting of sublimation pressures from one data point. Order-of-magnitude estimation is possible from melting temperature and solid molar volume. The inverse -12 fluid is used to develop an additional equation of state. Sublimation pressure results, including quality of pressure predictions, are similar to the hard-sphere results. Three-body (Axilrod -Teller) interactions are used to improve results.

  13. An empirical investigation on thermal characteristics and pressure drop of Ag-oil nanofluid in concentric annular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasian Arani, A. A.; Aberoumand, H.; Aberoumand, S.; Jafari Moghaddam, A.; Dastanian, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an experimental study on Silver-oil nanofluid was carried out in order to present the laminar convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor in a concentric annulus with constant heat flux boundary condition. Silver-oil nanofluid prepared by Electrical Explosion of Wire technique with no nanoparticles agglomeration during nanofluid preparation process and experiments. The average sizes of particles were 20 nm. Nanofluids with various particle Volume fractions of 0.011, 0.044 and 0.171 vol% were employed. The nanofluid flowing between the tubes is heated by an electrical heating coil wrapped around it. The effects of different parameters such as flow Reynolds number, tube diameter ratio and nanofluid particle concentration on heat transfer coefficient are studied. Results show that, heat transfer coefficient increased by using nanofluid instead of pure oil. Maximum enhancement of heat transfer coefficient occurs in 0.171 vol%. In addition the results showed that, there are slight increases in pressure drop of nanofluid by increasing the nanoparticle concentration of nanofluid in compared to pure oil.

  14. Two-phase flow pressure drop and heat transfer during condensation in microchannels with uniform and converging cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching Yi; Pan, Chin

    2010-09-01

    This study experimentally investigates steam condensation in rectangular microchannels with uniform and converging cross-sections and a mean hydraulic diameter of 135 µm. The steam flow in the microchannels was cooled by water cross-flowing along its bottom surface, which is different from other methods reported in the literature. The flow patterns, two-phase flow pressure drop and condensation heat transfer coefficient are determined. The microchannels with the uniform cross-section design have a higher heat transfer coefficient than those with the converging cross-section under condensation in the mist/annular flow regimes, although the latter work best for draining two-phase fluids composed of uncondensed steam and liquid water, which is consistent with the result of our previous study. From the experimental results, dimensionless correlations of condensation heat transfer for the mist and annular flow regions and a two-phase frictional multiplier are developed for the microchannels with both types of cross-section designs. The experimental data agree well with the obtained correlations, with the maximum mean absolute errors of 6.4% for the two-phase frictional multiplier and 6.0% for the condensation heat transfer.

  15. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings

    PubMed Central

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A.; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Methods Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. Results The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001). The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001). Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an

  16. Event terms in the response spectra prediction equation and their deviation due to stress drop variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, H.; Nakano, K.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the characteristics of strong ground motions separated from acceleration Fourier spectra and acceleration response spectra of 5% damping calculated from weak and moderate ground motions observed by K-NET, KiK-net, and the JMA Shindokei Network in Japan using the generalized spectral inversion method. The separation method used the outcrop motions at YMGH01 as reference where we extracted site responses due to shallow weathered layers. We include events with JMA magnitude equal to or larger than 4.5 observed from 1996 to 2011. We find that our frequency-dependent Q values are comparable to those of previous studies. From the corner frequencies of Fourier source spectra, we calculate Brune's stress parameters and found a clear magnitude dependence, in which smaller events tend to spread over a wider range while maintaining the same maximum value. We confirm that this is exactly the case for several mainshock-aftershock sequences. The average stress parameters for crustal earthquakes are much smaller than those of subduction zone, which can be explained by their depth dependence. We then compared the strong motion characteristics based on the acceleration response spectra and found that the separated characteristics of strong ground motions are different, especially in the lower frequency range less than 1Hz. These differences comes from the difference between Fourier spectra and response spectra found in the observed data; that is, predominant components in high frequency range of Fourier spectra contribute to increase the response in lower frequency range with small Fourier amplitude because strong high frequency component acts as an impulse to a Single-Degree-of-Freedom system. After the separation of the source terms for 5% damping response spectra we can obtain regression coefficients with respect to the magnitude, which lead to a new GMPE as shown in Fig.1 on the left. Although stress drops for inland earthquakes are 1/7 of the subduction

  17. High-pressure phase transitions - Examples of classical predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebonovic, Vladan

    1992-09-01

    The applicability of the Savic and Kasanin (1962-1967) classical theory of dense matter to laboratory experiments requiring estimates of high-pressure phase transitions was examined by determining phase transition pressures for a set of 19 chemical substances (including elements, hydrocarbons, metal oxides, and salts) for which experimental data were available. A comparison between experimental and transition points and those predicted by the Savic-Kasanin theory showed that the theory can be used for estimating values of transition pressures. The results also support conclusions obtained in previous astronomical applications of the Savic-Kasanin theory.

  18. Neural network/acoustic emission burst pressure prediction for impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1997-08-01

    Acoustic emission signal analysis has been used to measure the effect impact damage has on the burst pressure of 146 mm (5.75 in.) diameter graphite/epoxy and the organic polymer, Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential acoustic emission amplitude distribution collected during low level hydroproof tests to known burst pressures using backpropagation artificial neural networks. Impact damage conditions ranging from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination were included in this work. A simulated (inert) propellant was also cast into a series of the vessels from each material class, before impact loading, to provide boundary conditions during impact that would simulate those found on solid rocket motors. The results of this research effort demonstrate that a quantitative assessment of the effects that impact damage has on burst pressure can be made for both organic polymer/epoxy and graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Here, an artificial neural network analysis of the acoustic emission parametric data recorded during low pressure hydroproof testing is used to relate burst pressure to the vessel`s acoustic signature. Burst pressure predictions within 6.0% of the actual failure pressure are demonstrated for a series of vessels.

  19. Foot Drop

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Foot Drop Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Foot Drop? Foot drop describes the inability to raise ...

  20. Transition length prediction for flows with rapidly changing pressure gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W.J.; Walker, G.J.; Gostelow, J.P.

    1996-10-01

    A new method for calculating intermittency in transitional boundary layers with changing pressure gradients is proposed and tested against standard turbomachinery flow cases. It is based on recent experimental studies, which show the local pressure gradient parameter to have a significant effect on turbulent spot spreading angles and propagation velocities (and hence transition length). This can be very important for some turbomachinery flows. On a turbine blade suction surface, for example, it is possible for transition to start in a region of favorable pressure gradient and finish in a region of adverse pressure gradient. Calculation methods that estimate the transition length from the local pressure gradient parameter at the start of transition will seriously overestimate the transition length under these conditions. Conventional methods based on correlations of zero pressure gradient transition date are similarly inaccurate. The new calculation method continuously adjusts the spot growth parameters in response to changes in the local pressure gradient through transition using correlations based on data given in the companion paper by Gostelow et al. (1996). Recent experiment correlations of Gostelow et al. (1994a) are used to estimate the turbulent spot generation rate at the start of transition. The method has been incorporated in a linear combination integral computation and tested with good results on cases that report both the intermittency and surface pressure distribution data. It has resulted in a much reduced sensitivity to errors in predicting the start of the transition zone, and can be recommended for engineering use in calculating boundary layer development on axial turbomachine blades.

  1. Burst Pressure Prediction of Multiple Cracks in Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, N. A.; Alang, N. A.; Murad, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Available industrial code such as ASME B1G, modified ASME B1G and DNV RP-F101 to assess pipeline defects appear more conservative for multiple crack like- defects than single crack-like defects. Thus, this paper presents burst pressure prediction of pipe with multiple cracks like defects. A finite element model was developed and the burst pressure prediction was compared with the available code. The model was used to investigate the effect of the distance between the cracks and the crack length. The coalescence diagram was also developed to evaluate the burst pressure of the multiple cracks. It was found as the distance between crack increases, the interaction effect comes to fade away and multiple cracks behave like two independent single cracks.

  2. Theoretical Predictions of Phase Transitions at Ultra-high Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boates, Brian

    2013-06-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the high-pressure phase diagrams of important planetary materials such as CO2, MgSiO3, and MgO. For CO2, we predict a series of distinct liquid phases over a wide pressure (P) and temperature (T) range, including a first-order transition to a dense polymer liquid. We have computed finite-temperature free energies of liquid and solid CO2 phases to determine the melting curve beyond existing measurements and investigate possible phase separation transitions. The interaction of these phase boundaries with the mantle geotherm will also be discussed. Furthermore, we find evidence for a vast pressure-temperature regime where molten MgSiO3 decomposes into liquid SiO2 and solid MgO, with a volume change of approximately 1.2 percent. The demixing transition is driven by the crystallization of MgO ? the reaction only occurs below the high-pressure MgO melting curve. The predicted transition pressure at 10,000 K is in close proximity to an anomaly reported in recent laser-driven shock experiments of MgSiO3. We also present new results for the high-pressure melting curve of MgO and its B1-B2 solid phase transition, with a triple point near 364 GPa and 12,000 K.

  3. Theoretical prediction of physical and chemical characteristics of the first drop'' of condensate from superheated geothermal steam: Implications for corrosion and scaling in turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, P. . Dipartimento Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche); Corsi, R. ); Guidi, M.; Marini, L. )

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes a method for computing: (1) the chemical composition of the first drop of condensate which forms at dew-point temperature through expansion of superheated steam, and (2) the saturation index of the drop with respect to relevant solid phases, such as halite, amorphous silica, boric acid, borax and sal ammoniac. Boiling-point elevation is taken into account in these calculations. Preliminary application to some wells in the Larderello geothermal field indicate that: (1) the high concentration of HCl in the steam causes both the low pH and very high TDS of the first drop; (2) the lower the dew-point temperature, the higher the TDS of the first drop; (3) for a given chemical composition, the lower the steam pressure, the higher the risk of corrosion and scaling in the steam path.

  4. Predicting burst pressures in filament-wound composite pressure vessels by using acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Eric V. K.

    1992-12-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis was used to generate equations for predicting burst pressures in 14.6 cm dia. fiberglass-epoxy and 45.7 cm dia. graphite-epoxy pressure vessels from acoustic emission (AE) data taken during hydroproof. Using the AE energy and amplitude measurements as the primary independent variables, the less accurate of the two linear equations was able to predict burst pressures to within +/- 0.841 MPa of the value given by the 95 percent prediction interval. Moreover, this equation included the effects of two bottles that contained simulated manufacturing defects. Because the AE data used to generate the burst-pressure equations were both taken at or below 25 percent of the expected burst pressures, it is anticipated that by using this approach, it would be possible to lower proof pressures in larger filament-wound composite pressure vessels such as rocket motor cases. This would minimize hydroproof damage to the composite structure and the accompanying potential for premature failure in service.

  5. Use of a Poroelastic Model to Predict Intramuscular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, D. A.; Odegard, G. M.; Kaufman, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of individual muscle tension in a clinical setting has yet to be achieved. Previous investigators have suggested that the tension in skeletal muscle, comprised of approximately 70% fluid, could be determined using interstitial muscle fluid pressure (IMP). A computational model is needed to aid in understanding IMP distribution in muscles of varying geometry and contractile states without exhaustive testing. The first aim of this study was to determine a set of transversely isotropic material properties (i.e., permeability, relaxed modulus, and drained Poisson’s ratio) for excised skeletal muscle using inverse finite element analysis with a poroelastic constitutive formulation on tension data from either longitudinal or transverse uniaxial load-relaxation tests of skeletal muscle tissue. The second aim was to compare pore pressure estimated from a model to experimental pressure measurements to assess its ability to accurately predict IMP. Results of this study indicated that skeletal muscle was transversely isotropic under load-relaxation as demonstrated by significant differences in the drained Poisson’s ratio. It was also noted that the drained Poisson’s ratios under both longitudinal and transverse loading were negative in these tests of excised muscle tissue. Pore pressure calculated with this model provided a good prediction of the development of IMP. These results point to the benefit of using a poroelastic model of skeletal muscle to predict IMP. PMID:25541627

  6. Heat transfer and pressure drop correlations of microchannel heat exchangers with S-shaped and zigzag fins for carbon dioxide cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Tri Lam; Kato, Yasuyoshi; Nikitin, Konstantin; Ishizuka, Takao

    2007-11-15

    A new microchannel heat exchanger (MCHE) with S-shaped fins was developed using the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) FLUENT code. The MCHE provided 6-7 times lower pressure drop while maintaining heat-transfer performance that was almost equivalent to that of a conventional MCHE with zigzag fins. This study was done to confirm the simulation results of thermal-hydraulic performance using a supercritical carbon dioxide loop, and to propose empirical correlations of Nusselt numbers and pressure-drop factors for a new MCHE with S-shaped fins and a conventional one with zigzag fins. This study is also intended to confirm the independence of Pr obtained in the previous study by widely varying Pr from 0.75 to 2.2. Experimental results show that the pressure-drop factor of the MCHEs with S-shaped fins is 4-5 times less than that of MCHE with zigzag fins, although Nu is 24-34% less, depending on the Re within its range. The Nusselt number correlations are expressed, respectively as Nu{sub S-shaped} {sub fins} = 0.1740 Re{sup 0.593}Pr{sup 0.430} and Nu{sub zigzag} {sub fins} = 0.1696 Re{sup 0.629}Pr{sup 0.317} for the MCHE with S-shaped and zigzag fins, and their pressure-drop factors are given as f{sub S-shaped} {sub fins} = 0.4545 Re{sup -0.340} and f{sub zigzag} {sub fins} = 0.1924 Re{sup -0.091}. The Nu correlation of the MCHE with S-shaped fins reproduces the experimental data of overall heat transfer coefficients with a standard deviation (1 sigma) of {+-}2.3%, although it is {+-}3.0% for the MCHE with zigzag fins. The calculated pressure drops obtained from pressure-drop factor correlations agree with the experimental data within a standard deviation of {+-}16.6% and {+-}13.5% for the MCHEs with S-shaped and zigzag fins, respectively. (author)

  7. Drop Coalescence during Emulsion Formation in a High-Pressure Homogenizer for Tetradecane-in-Water Emulsion Stabilized by Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Ganesan; Goel, Parul

    2001-06-15

    The present study investigates the effects of homogenizer pressure, surfactant concentration, ionic strength, and dispersed phase fraction on the coalescence rate of tetradecane-in-water emulsions during their formation in a high-pressure homogenizer. Experiments were conducted in a recirculating system consisting of a Rannie laboratory-scale single-stage homogenizer and a stirred vessel for tetradecane-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The initial evolution of the number concentration of droplets in the stirred tank was measured when subjected to a negative stepchange in the homogenizer pressure. The average drop coalescence rate constant in the homogenizer was inferred by fitting the experimental evolution of the number concentration of drops to a simple model accounting for the coalescence in the homogenizer under the assumption of a quasi steady state in the homogenizer. The residence time of the emulsion in the homogenizer was evaluated from the analysis of radial turbulent flow between disks. The step down homogenizer pressure was varied in the range 20.7-48.3 MPa, the drop size in the range 174-209 nm, the dispersed phase fraction in the range 5%-15%, SDS concentration in the range 0.0033-0.25 wt%, and ionic strength in the range 0.01-0.1 M. The coalescence rate constants were found to be in the range from 3.34x10(-17) to 2.43x10(-16) m(3) s(-1). The coalescence rate constant was found to be higher for higher homogenizer pressures, smaller drop sizes, lower dispersed phase fractions, and lower SDS concentrations and was insensitive to variations in ionic strength. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11374938

  8. High pressure electrides: a predictive chemical and physical theory.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mao-Sheng; Hoffmann, Roald

    2014-04-15

    Electrides, in which electrons occupy interstitial regions in the crystal and behave as anions, appear as new phases for many elements (and compounds) under high pressure. We propose a unified theory of high pressure electrides (HPEs) by treating electrons in the interstitial sites as filling the quantized orbitals of the interstitial space enclosed by the surrounding atom cores, generating what we call an interstitial quasi-atom, ISQ. With increasing pressure, the energies of the valence orbitals of atoms increase more significantly than the ISQ levels, due to repulsion, exclusion by the atom cores, effectively giving the valence electrons less room in which to move. At a high enough pressure, which depends on the element and its orbitals, the frontier atomic electron may become higher in energy than the ISQ, resulting in electron transfer to the interstitial space and the formation of an HPE. By using a He lattice model to compress (with minimal orbital interaction at moderate pressures between the surrounding He and the contained atoms or molecules) atoms and an interstitial space, we are able to semiquantitatively explain and predict the propensity of various elements to form HPEs. The slopes in energy of various orbitals with pressure (s > p > d) are essential for identifying trends across the entire Periodic Table. We predict that the elements forming HPEs under 500 GPa will be Li, Na (both already known to do so), Al, and, near the high end of this pressure range, Mg, Si, Tl, In, and Pb. Ferromagnetic electrides for the heavier alkali metals, suggested by Pickard and Needs, potentially compete with transformation to d-group metals. PMID:24702165

  9. Orthostatic blood pressure regulation predicts classroom effort in children.

    PubMed

    Carapetian, Stephanie; Siedlarz, Monika; Jackson, Sandra; Perlmuter, Lawrence C

    2008-04-01

    The increase in orthostatic systolic blood pressure associated with the shift in posture from lying to standing requires several compensatory mechanisms to ensure adequate cerebral perfusion. Decreased efficiency in the various mechanisms controlling orthostatic blood pressure regulation can result in dizziness, lightheadedness, and syncope. The degree of effectiveness of orthostatic systolic blood pressure regulation (OBPR) serves as a marker for a variety of problems including fatigue, depression, anxiety, reduced attention, impulsive behavior and reduced volition. In normal children, an insufficient increase in systolic blood pressure in response to upright posture is predictive of mild cognitive and affective problems. The present study examined orthostatic systolic blood pressure regulation in relation to yearlong teachers' evaluations of academic grades and effort in 7-11 year old children. Poorer systolic blood pressure regulation in response to orthostasis was associated with reduced levels of classroom effort, while academic grades were spared. Converging evidence from clinical as well as experimental studies suggests that the linkage between (OBPR) and effort may be partially mediated by sympathetic dysfunction, altered release of neurotransmitters, or reduced cerebral blood flow. PMID:18280600

  10. Prediction of helicopter rotor noise from measured blade surface pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Succi, G. P.; Brieger, J. T.

    The current techniques of helicopter rotor noise prediction attempt to describe the details of the noise field precisely and remove the empiricisms and restrictions inherent in previous methods. These techniques require detailed inputs of the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and blade surface pressure distribution. The purpose of this paper is to review those techniques in general and the Farassat/Nystrom analysis in particular. The predictions of the Farassat/Nystrom noise computer program, using both measured and calculated blade surface pressure data, are compared to measured noise level data. This study is based on a contract from NASA to Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. (BBN) with measured data from the AH-lG Helicopter Operational Loads Survey flight test program supplied by Bell Helicopter Textron.

  11. A new generalized correlation for accurate vapor pressure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hui; Yang, Wenming

    2012-08-01

    An accurate knowledge of the vapor pressure of organic liquids is very important for the oil and gas processing operations. In combustion modeling, the accuracy of numerical predictions is also highly dependent on the fuel properties such as vapor pressure. In this Letter, a new generalized correlation is proposed based on the Lee-Kesler's method where a fuel dependent parameter 'A' is introduced. The proposed method only requires the input parameters of critical temperature, normal boiling temperature and the acentric factor of the fluid. With this method, vapor pressures have been calculated and compared with the data reported in data compilation for 42 organic liquids over 1366 data points, and the overall average absolute percentage deviation is only 1.95%.

  12. Prediction of mean arterial blood pressure with linear stochastic models.

    PubMed

    Genc, Sahika

    2011-01-01

    A model-based approach that integrates known portion of the cardiovascular system and unknown portion through a parameter estimation to predict evolution of the mean arterial pressure is considered. The unknown portion corresponds to the neural portion that acts like a controller that takes corrective actions to regulate the arterial blood pressure at a constant level. The input to the neural part is the arterial pressure and output is the sympathetic nerve activity. In this model, heart rate is considered a proxy for sympathetic nerve activity. The neural portion is modeled as a linear discrete-time system with random coefficients. The performance of the model is tested on a case study of acute hypotensive episodes (AHEs) on PhysioNet data. TPRs and FPRs improve as more data becomes available during estimation period. PMID:22254409

  13. Prediction of blade vortex interaction noise from measured blade pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The impulsive nature of noise due to the interaction of a rotor blade with a tip vortex is studied. The time signature of this noise is calculated theoretically based on the measured blade surface pressure fluctuation of an operational load survey rotor in slow descending flight and is compared with the simultaneous microphone measurement. Particularly, the physical understanding of the characteristic features of a waveform is extensively studied in order to understand the generating mechanism and to identify the important parameters. The interaction trajectory of a tip vortex on an acoustic planform is shown to be a very important parameter for the impulsive shape of the noise. The unsteady nature of the pressure distribution at the very leading edge is also important to the pulse shape. The theoretical model using noncompact linear acoustics predicts the general shape of interaction impulse pretty well except for peak amplitude which requires more continuous pressure information along the span at the leading edge.

  14. A critical review of forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of Al2O3, TiO2 and CuO nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Deepak; Choudhary, Rajesh; Subudhi, Sudhakar

    2016-04-01

    Nanofluid is the colloidal suspension of nanosized solid particles like metals or metal oxides in some conventional fluids like water and ethylene glycol. Due to its unique characteristics of enhanced heat transfer compared to conventional fluid, it has attracted the attention of research community. The forced convection heat transfer of nanofluid is investigated by numerous researchers. This paper critically reviews the papers published on experimental studies of forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of Al2O3, TiO2 and CuO based nanofluids dispersed in water, ethylene glycol and water-ethylene glycol mixture. Most of the researchers have shown a little rise in pressure drop with the use of nanofluids in plain tube. Literature has reported that the pumping power is appreciably high, only at very high particle concentration i.e. more than 5 %. As nanofluids are able to enhance the heat transfer at low particle concentrations so most of the researchers have used less than 3 % volume concentration in their studies. Almost no disagreement is observed on pressure drop results of different researchers. But there is not a common agreement in magnitude and mechanism of heat transfer enhancement. Few studies have shown an anomalous enhancement in heat transfer even at low particle concentration. On the contrary, some researchers have shown little heat transfer enhancement at the same particle concentration. A large variation (2-3 times) in Nusselt number was observed for few studies under similar conditions.

  15. The effect of passive mixing on pressure drop and oxygen mass fraction using opposing channel flow field design in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anant Bir

    This study investigates a flow field with opposing channel design. Previous studies on flow field designs have been focused on improving fuel utilization which often leads to increased pressure drop. This increased pressure drop is typical because standard designs employ either a single flow channel to clear blockages or dead end condition to force the flow through the gas diffusion layer. The disadvantage with these designs is the increased resistance to the flow which requires higher pressure, which becomes a parasitic loss that lowers the system efficiency. For this study the focus was to reduce the pressure drop by providing a less resistive path to the flow. To achieve a less resistive path, the inlet channel was split into two opposing channels. These channels are then recombined only to be split again for the next leg. Therefore, the split channel design should reduce the pressure drop which reduces the parasitic load and ultimately contributes to higher system efficiency. In addition the recombining of the streams at each leg should induce mixing. Having opposing channels should also increase cross flow under the lands to reduce mass transfer loses. The cathode side of the fuel cell is especially sensitive to the mass transport losses since air (oxygen mixed with nitrogen) is used for supplying oxygen unlike the anode side which uses pure hydrogen. To test the hypothesis of having benefits from an opposing channel design, both an experimental and analytical approach was taken. For the experiment, a serpentine flow field and opposing channel flow field plates were compared over several flow rates with compressed air. To test the hypothesis of increased mass transfer, the two flow fields were modeled using a CFD software package, COMSOL. It was found that the opposing channel configuration for high flow rate with multiple entry and exit conditions exhibited significant improvement over the single serpentine channel. Pressure drop was ⅓ less than the

  16. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles. [for combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  17. The generalized liquid drop model alpha-decay formula: Predictability analysis and superheavy element alpha half-lives

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta-Schubert, N. Reyes, M.A.

    2007-11-15

    The predictive accuracy of the generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) formula for alpha-decay half-lives has been investigated in a detailed manner and a variant of the formula with improved coefficients is proposed. The method employs the experimental alpha half-lives of the well-known alpha standards to obtain the coefficients of the analytical formula using the experimental Q{sub {alpha}} values (the DSR-E formula), as well as the finite range droplet model (FRDM) derived Q{sub {alpha}} values (the FRDM-FRDM formula). The predictive accuracy of these formulae was checked against the experimental alpha half-lives of an independent set of nuclei (TEST) that span approximately the same Z, A region as the standards and possess reliable alpha spectroscopic data, and were found to yield good results for the DSR-E formula but not for the FRDM-FRDM formula. The two formulae were used to obtain the alpha half-lives of superheavy elements (SHE) and heavy nuclides where the relative accuracy was found to be markedly improved for the FRDM-FRDM formula, which corroborates the appropriateness of the FRDM masses and the GLDM prescription for high Z, A nuclides. Further improvement resulted, especially for the FRDM-FRDM formula, after a simple linear optimization over the calculated and experimental half-lives of TEST was used to re-calculate the half-lives of the SHE and heavy nuclides. The advantage of this optimization was that it required no re-calculation of the coefficients of the basic DSR-E or FRDM-FRDM formulae. The half-lives for 324 medium-mass to superheavy alpha decaying nuclides, calculated using these formulae and the comparison with experimental half-lives, are presented.

  18. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels from Acoustic Emission Amplitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Walker, James L., II; Rowell, Ginger H.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were taken during hydroproof for three sets of ASTM standard 5.75 inch diameter filament wound graphite/epoxy bottles. All three sets of bottles had the same design and were wound from the same graphite fiber; the only difference was in the epoxies used. Two of the epoxies had similar mechanical properties, and because the acoustic properties of materials are a function of their stiffnesses, it was thought that the AE data from the two sets might also be similar; however, this was not the case. Therefore, the three resin types were categorized using dummy variables, which allowed the prediction of burst pressures all three sets of bottles using a single neural network. Three bottles from each set were used to train the network. The resin category, the AE amplitude distribution data taken up to 25 % of the expected burst pressure, and the actual burst pressures were used as inputs. Architecturally, the network consisted of a forty-three neuron input layer (a single categorical variable defining the resin type plus forty-two continuous variables for the AE amplitude frequencies), a fifteen neuron hidden layer for mapping, and a single output neuron for burst pressure prediction. The network trained on all three bottle sets was able to predict burst pressures in the remaining bottles with a worst case error of + 6.59%, slightly greater than the desired goal of + 5%. This larger than desired error was due to poor resolution in the amplitude data for the third bottle set. When the third set of bottles was eliminated from consideration, only four hidden layer neurons were necessary to generate a worst case prediction error of - 3.43%, well within the desired goal.

  19. Violence and vulnerability of female migrants in drop houses in Arizona: the predictable outcome of a chain reaction of violence.

    PubMed

    Simmons, William Paul; Menjívar, Cecilia; Téllez, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    This qualitative research study examines the experiences of immigrant women crossing the U.S./Mexico border and the proliferation of "drop houses" in Arizona as a new phenomenon, one that is often marked by kidnappings and sexual assault. Little research has been published on the violence women face on their journey, and the drop houses have almost completely escaped scholarly analysis. We argue that the drop houses must be seen as a consequence of a "state of emergency" declared by policy makers that led to changes in U.S. national and local immigration policies that fueled what we call a "chain reaction of violence." PMID:25724379

  20. Environmental correction factors for predicting room sound pressure levels

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, A.C.C.

    1998-10-01

    ARI Standard 885 provides a method for calculating sound pressure levels in room below plenums containing air-handling devices. An important step in the calculation is the correction of the sound power for the device from values provided by the manufacturer to values appropriate for use in occupied spaces. This correction is called the environmental adjustment factor. It compensates for the fact that sound power measured for a source placed outdoors or in a hemi-free field has been found to be greater at low frequencies than the sound power measured for the same source in a reverberation room. When making predictions of sound pressure level in a room using such sound power levels, one has to estimate the reduction in sound power caused by the room. Estimated reductions provided in ARI 885 were examined during ASHRAE research project RP-755 and found to be too large. Lower values are suggested in this paper.

  1. Prediction of Airplane Sonic-Boom Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; McLean, F. Edward; Middleton, Wilbur D.

    1965-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the sensitivity of supersonic-transport design and operation to sonic-boom considerations and shows the necessity for a study of these problems early in the development program. Methods of predicting pressure signatures are outlined and examples of the correlation of these estimates with wind-tunnel and flight measurements are shown. Estimates of sonic-boom characteristics for a representative supersonic transport show that in the critical transonic acceleration portion of the flight, overpressures somewhat lower than estimated by the use of far-field assumptions may be expected. Promising design possibilities for the achievement of further overpressure reductions are explored.

  2. Prediction of Transitional Flows in the Low Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, George; Xiong, Guohua

    1998-01-01

    Current turbulence models tend to give too early and too short a length of flow transition to turbulence, and hence fail to predict flow separation induced by the adverse pressure gradients and streamline flow curvatures. Our discussion will focus on the development and validation of transition models. The baseline data for model comparisons are the T3 series, which include a range of free-stream turbulence intensity and cover zero-pressure gradient to aft-loaded turbine pressure gradient flows. The method will be based on the conditioned N-S equations and a transport equation for the intermittency factor. First, several of the most popular 2-equation models in predicting flow transition are examined: k-e [Launder-Sharina], k-w [Wilcox], Lien-Leschiziner and SST [Menter] models. All models fail to predict the onset and the length of transition, even for the simplest flat plate with zero-pressure gradient(T3A). Although the predicted onset position of transition can be varied by providing different inlet turbulent energy dissipation rates, the appropriate inlet conditions for turbulence quantities should be adjusted to match the decay of the free-stream turbulence. Arguably, one may adjust the low-Reynolds-number part of the model to predict transition. This approach has so far not been very successful. However, we have found that the low-Reynolds-number model of Launder and Sharma [1974], which is an improved version of Jones and Launder [1972] gave the best overall performance. The Launder and Sharma model was designed to capture flow re-laminarization (a reverse of flow transition), but tends to give rise to a too early and too fast transition in comparison with the physical transition. The three test cases were for flows with zero pressure gradient but with different free-stream turbulent intensities. The same can be said about the model when considering flows subject to pressure gradient(T3C1). To capture the effects of transition using existing turbulence

  3. Design prediction for long term stress rupture service of composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ernest Y.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive stress rupture studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress rupture life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median strength). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress rupture test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress rupture equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, strength drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.

  4. Predicted novel hydrogen hydrate structures under pressure from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Guangrui; Lyakhov, Andriy; Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem; Dong, Xiao

    2014-03-01

    Gas hydrates are systems of prime importance. In particular, hydrogen hydrates are potential materials of icy satellites and comets, and may be used for hydrogen storage. We explore the H2O-H2 system at pressures in the range 0 ~ 100 GPa with ab initio variable-composition evolutionary simulations. According to our calculation and previous experiments, the H2O-H2 system undergoes a series of transformations with pressure, and adopts the known open-network clathrate structures (sII, C0), dense ``filled ice'' structures (C1, C2) and two novel hydrogen hydrate phases. One of these structures is based on the hexagonal ice framework and has the same H2O:H2 ratio (2:1) as the C0 phase at low pressures and similar enthalpy (we name this phase Ih-C0). The other newly predicted hydrate phase has a 1:2 H2O:H2 ratio and structure based on cubic ice. This phase (which we name C3) is predicted to be thermodynamically stable above 38 GPa when including van der Waals interactions and zero-point vibrational energy. This is the hydrogen-richest hydrate and this phase has the highest gravimetric densities (18 wt.%) of extractable hydrogen among all known materials. We thank the DARPA (Grants No. W31P4Q1310005 and No. W31P4Q1210008), National Science Founda- tion (EAR-1114313, DMR-1231586), AFOSR (FA9550- 13-C-0037), DOE (DE-AC02-98CH10886), CRDF Global (UKE2-7034-KV-11) for financial support. We thank Purdue University Teragrid for providing computational resources and technical support for this work (Charge No.: TG-DMR110058).

  5. A New Method to Predict the Epidemiology of Fungal Keratitis by Monitoring the Sales Distribution of Antifungal Eye Drops in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Marlon Moraes; de Angelis, Rafael; Lima, Acacio Souza; Viana de Carvalho, Glauco Dreyer; Ibrahim, Fuad Moraes; Malki, Leonardo Tannus; de Paula Bichuete, Marina; de Paula Martins, Wellington; Rocha, Eduardo Melani

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Fungi are a major cause of keratitis, although few medications are licensed for their treatment. The aim of this study is to observe the variation in commercialisation of antifungal eye drops, and to predict the seasonal distribution of fungal keratitis in Brazil. Methods Data from a retrospective study of antifungal eye drops sales from the only pharmaceutical ophthalmologic laboratory, authorized to dispense them in Brazil (Opthalmos) were gathered. These data were correlated with geographic and seasonal distribution of fungal keratitis in Brazil between July 2002 and June 2008. Results A total of 26,087 antifungal eye drop units were sold, with a mean of 2.3 per patient. There was significant variation in antifungal sales during the year (p<0.01). A linear regression model displayed a significant association between reduced relative humidity and antifungal drug sales (R2 = 0.17,p<0.01). Conclusions Antifungal eye drops sales suggest that there is a seasonal distribution of fungal keratitis. A possible interpretation is that the third quarter of the year (a period when the climate is drier), when agricultural activity is more intense in Brazil, suggests a correlation with a higher incidence of fungal keratitis. A similar model could be applied to other diseases, that are managed with unique, or few, and monitorable medications to predict epidemiological aspects. PMID:22457787

  6. Effect of magnetic field on the forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of a magnetic nanofluid in a miniature heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashjaee, Mehdi; Goharkhah, Mohammad; Khadem, Leila Azizi; Ahmadi, Reza

    2014-12-01

    The effect of an external magnetic field on the forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of water based Fe3O4 nanofluid (ferrofluid) in a miniature heat sink is studied experimentally. The heat sink with the dimensions of 40 mm (L) × 40 mm (W) × 10 mm (H) consists of an array of five circular channels with diameter and length of 4 and 40 mm, respectively. It is heated from the bottom surface with a constant heat flux while the other surfaces are insulated. The heat sink is also influenced by an external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet. The local convective coefficients are measured at various flow rates (200 < Re < 900), magnetic field intensities (B < 1,400 G), and particle volume fractions (φ = 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 %). Results show that using ferrofluid results in a maximum of 14 % improvement in heat transfer compared to the pure water, in the absence of magnetic field. This value grows up to 38 % when a magnetic field with the strength of 1,200 G is applied to the ferrofluid. On the other hand, it is observed that the significant heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is always accompanied by a pressure drop penalty. The optimum operating condition is obtained based on the maximum heat transfer enhancement per pressure loss.

  7. Experimental study on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of four types of plate fin-and-tube heat exchanger surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H. J.; Li, W.; Li, H. Z.; Xin, R. C.; Tao, W. Q.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, air side heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of twelve three-row plate fin-and-tube heat exchanger cores of four types of fin configurations have been experimentally investigated. The heat transfer and friction factor correlations for the twelve cores are provided in a wide range of Reynolds number. It is found that in the range of Reynolds number tested, the Nusselt number of the slotted fin surface is the largest and that of the plain plate fin is the lowest while the Nusselt numbers of two types of wavy fins are somewhere in between.

  8. Study on measurement of the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes of a boiler with relationship between air velocity and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Shen, F.; Lin, W.; Chen, L.; Zhang, D.; Wang, Q.; Ke, J.; Quan, W.

    1999-07-01

    According to the theoretical relationship between air velocity and pressure drop in different solid-air mass flow in vertical pipes with the condition of upward air-solid flowing, the experimental research on measuring the coal powder concentration is directed against the pneumatic pipes of a boiler's combustion system in the energy industry. Through analyzing the experimental results, a mathematical model for measuring the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes is obtained. Then, the error analysis is done, and the method of on-line measurement and its function are provided.

  9. Predicting the Drop Performance of Solder Joints by Evaluating the Elastic Strain Energy from High-Speed Ball Pull Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Taehoon; Kim, Yunsung; Kim, Jina; Lee, Jaehong; Jung, Byungwook; Moon, Jungtak; Choe, Heeman

    2009-03-01

    Despite being expensive and time consuming, board-level drop testing has been widely used to assess the drop or impact resistance of the solder joints in handheld microelectronic devices, such as cellphones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). In this study, a new test method, which is much simpler and quicker, is proposed. The method involves evaluating the elastic strain energy and relating it to the impact resistance of the solder joint by considering the Young’s modulus of the bulk solder and the fracture stress of the solder joint during a ball pull test at high strain rates. The results show that solder joints can be ranked in order of descending elastic strain energy as follows: Sn-37Pb, Sn-1Ag-0.5Cu, Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu, and Sn-4Ag-0.5Cu. This order is consistent with the actual drop performances of the samples.

  10. Drop dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The drop dynamics module is a Spacelab-compatible acoustic positioning and control system for conducting drop dynamics experiments in space. It consists basically of a chamber, a drop injector system, an acoustic positioning system, and a data collection system. The principal means of collecting data is by a cinegraphic camera. The drop is positioned in the center of the chamber by forces created by standing acoustic waves generated in the nearly cubical chamber (about 12 cm on a side). The drop can be spun or oscillated up to fission by varying the phse and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The system is designed to perform its experiments unattended, except for start-up and shutdown events and other unique events that require the attention of the Spacelab payload specialist.

  11. Noninvasive estimation of transmitral pressure drop across the normal mitral valve in humans: importance of convective and inertial forces during left ventricular filling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that color M-mode (CMM) images could be used to solve the Euler equation, yielding regional pressure gradients along the scanline, which could then be integrated to yield the unsteady Bernoulli equation and estimate noninvasively both the convective and inertial components of the transmitral pressure difference. BACKGROUND: Pulsed and continuous wave Doppler velocity measurements are routinely used clinically to assess severity of stenotic and regurgitant valves. However, only the convective component of the pressure gradient is measured, thereby neglecting the contribution of inertial forces, which may be significant, particularly for nonstenotic valves. Color M-mode provides a spatiotemporal representation of flow across the mitral valve. METHODS: In eight patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, high-fidelity left atrial and ventricular pressure measurements were obtained synchronously with transmitral CMM digital recordings. The instantaneous diastolic transmitral pressure difference was computed from the M-mode spatiotemporal velocity distribution using the unsteady flow form of the Bernoulli equation and was compared to the catheter measurements. RESULTS: From 56 beats in 16 hemodynamic stages, inclusion of the inertial term ([deltapI]max = 1.78+/-1.30 mm Hg) in the noninvasive pressure difference calculation significantly increased the temporal correlation with catheter-based measurement (r = 0.35+/-0.24 vs. 0.81+/-0.15, p< 0.0001). It also allowed an accurate approximation of the peak pressure difference ([deltapc+I]max = 0.95 [delta(p)cathh]max + 0.24, r = 0.96, p<0.001, error = 0.08+/-0.54 mm Hg). CONCLUSIONS: Inertial forces are significant components of the maximal pressure drop across the normal mitral valve. These can be accurately estimated noninvasively using CMM recordings of transmitral flow, which should improve the understanding of diastolic filling and function of the heart.

  12. Experimental investigation of two-phase flow pressure drop transients in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell reactant channels and their impact on the cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rupak; Kandlikar, Satish G.

    2014-12-01

    Fuel cells experience transients, which constitute a significant part of the drive cycle. Fuel cell response during these transients depends on the rates of reaction kinetics as well as mass transport delays. In the current work, an in situ setup is used to investigate the effect of changing load and temperature conditions on the two-phase flow in the fuel cell. Pressure drop and voltage response from the cell are used to characterize the two-phase flow and performance of the cell. The effect of changing load is simulated by changing the current by 20 A cm-2 (0.4 A cm-2) over a time period of 300 s, while the effect of changing cell temperature is studied by increasing/decreasing the cell temperature by 40 °C over 900 s. The results show that several minutes are required after a transient event for the two-phase flow to return to a new steady state condition. Transient effects are more prominent at the lower temperature of 40 °C, at which condition there is more liquid water present in the channels. Overshoot behavior, commonly seen in current and voltage response from fuel cells, has been observed for two-phase pressure drop during transient load changes.

  13. High Pressure, Transport Properties of Fluids: Theory and Data from Levitated Fluid-Drops at Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Ohaska, K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to derive a set of consistent mixing rules for calculating diffusivities and thermal diffusion factors over a thermodynamic regime encompassing the subcritical and supercritical ranges. These should serve for modeling purposes, and therefore for accurate simulations of high pressure phenomena such as fluid disintegration, turbulent flows and sprays. A particular consequence of this work will be the determination of effective Lewis numbers for supercritical conditions, thus enabling the examination of the relative importance of heat and mass transfer at supercritical pressures.

  14. Clinical evaluation of clobetasone butyrate eye drops in the treatment of anterior uveitis and its effects on intraocular pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Eilon, L A; Walker, S R

    1981-01-01

    Clobetasone butyrate has been formulated as a new steroid preparation of use in ophthalmology and has been compared with prednisolone phosphate and betamethasone phosphate in the treatment of anterior uveitis. The results from 4 double-blind, between-patient studies have shown that all 3 treatments are effective in reducing the signs and symptoms of this intraocular disease. 87% of those patients receiving clobetasone butyrate had a good or satisfactory response, but no differences in therapeutic efficacy were observed between these 3 steroid treatments. Clobetasone butyrate had little effect on intraocular pressure when compared with dexamethasone or hydrocortisone, both of which cause a significant rise in intraocular pressure. PMID:7028089

  15. Prediction of Solids Circulation Rate of Cork Particles in an Ambient-Pressure Pilot-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yue; Turton, Richard; Famouri, Parviz; Boyle, Edward J.

    2009-01-07

    Circulating fluidized beds (CFB) are currently used in many industrial processes for noncatalytic and catalytic because its effective control is the key to smooth operation of a CFB system. This paper presents a method for solids flow metering from pressure drop measurements in the standpipe dense phase. A model based on the Ergun equation is developed to predict the solids flow rate and voidage in the dense phase of the standpipe. The profile of the solids flow rate under unsteady state is also presented. With the use of this method, the dynamic response time at different locations along the standpipe of a pilot-scale fluidized bed operating at ambient conditions with 812 mu m cork particles is estimated successfully. Through the use of a pressure balance analysis, solids flow models for the standpipe, riser, and other sections of the flow loop are combined to give an integrated CFB model.

  16. Deliberate practice predicts performance over time in adolescent chess players and drop-outs: a linear mixed models analysis.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Anique B H; Smits, Niels; Rikers, Remy M J P; Schmidt, Henk G

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the longitudinal relation between deliberate practice and performance in chess was examined using a linear mixed models analysis. The practice activities and performance ratings of young elite chess players, who were either in, or had dropped out of the Dutch national chess training, were analysed since they had started playing chess seriously. The results revealed that deliberate practice (i.e. serious chess study alone and serious chess play) strongly contributed to chess performance. The influence of deliberate practice was not only observable in current performance, but also over chess players' careers. Moreover, although the drop-outs' chess ratings developed more slowly over time, both the persistent and drop-out chess players benefited to the same extent from investments in deliberate practice. Finally, the effect of gender on chess performance proved to be much smaller than the effect of deliberate practice. This study provides longitudinal support for the monotonic benefits assumption of deliberate practice, by showing that over chess players' careers, deliberate practice has a significant effect on performance, and to the same extent for chess players of different ultimate performance levels. The results of this study are not in line with critique raised against the deliberate practice theory that the factors deliberate practice and talent could be confounded. PMID:18433518

  17. Ply level failure prediction of carbon fibre reinforced laminated composite panels subjected to low velocity drop-weight impact using adaptive meshing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Umar; Myler, Peter

    2014-09-01

    This work is concerned with physical testing and numerical simulations of flat and round nose drop-weight impact of carbon fibre-reinforced laminate composite panels to predict ply level failure. Majority of the existing studies on impact of composites by spherical nose impactors are experimental, computational models are simplified, and based on classical laminated plate theories where contributions of through-thickness stresses are neglected. Present work considers flat nose impact and contributions from through-thickness stresses and is mainly simulation based. A computational model was developed in ABAQUS™ software using adaptive meshing techniques. Simulation produced (2D model) stresses were numerically integrated using MATALB™ code to predict through-thickness (3D) stresses. Through-the-thickness stresses were then utilised in advanced failure criteria coded in MATLAB™ software to predict ply level failures. Simulation produced results demonstrate that the computational model can efficiently and effectively predict ply-by-ply failure status of relatively thick laminates.

  18. Analysis of Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop for a Gas Flowing Through a set of Multiple Parallel Flat Plates at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einstein, Thomas H.

    1961-01-01

    Equations were derived representing heat transfer and pressure drop for a gas flowing in the passages of a heater composed of a series of parallel flat plates. The plates generated heat which was transferred to the flowing gas by convection. The relatively high temperature level of this system necessitated the consideration of heat transfer between the plates by radiation. The equations were solved on an IBM 704 computer, and results were obtained for hydrogen as the working fluid for a series of cases with a gas inlet temperature of 200 R, an exit temperature of 5000 0 R, and exit Mach numbers ranging from 0.2 to O.8. The length of the heater composed of the plates ranged from 2 to 4 feet, and the spacing between the plates was varied from 0.003 to 0.01 foot. Most of the results were for a five- plate heater, but results are also given for nine plates to show the effect of increasing the number of plates. The heat generation was assumed to be identical for each plate but was varied along the length of the plates. The axial variation of power used to obtain the results presented is the so-called "2/3-cosine variation." The boundaries surrounding the set of plates, and parallel to it, were assumed adiabatic, so that all the power generated in the plates went into heating the gas. The results are presented in plots of maximum plate and maximum adiabatic wall temperatures as functions of parameters proportional to f(L/D), for the case of both laminar and turbulent flow. Here f is the Fanning friction factor and (L/D) is the length to equivalent diameter ratio of the passages in the heater. The pressure drop through the heater is presented as a function of these same parameters, the exit Mach number, and the pressure at the exit of the heater.

  19. Effect of Interfacial Turbulence and Accommodation Coefficient on CFD Predictions of Pressurization and Pressure Control in Cryogenic Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga; Hylton, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Laminar models agree closely with the pressure evolution and vapor phase temperature stratification but under-predict liquid temperatures. Turbulent SST k-w and k-e models under-predict the pressurization rate and extent of stratification in the vapor but represent liquid temperature distributions fairly well. These conclusions seem to equally apply to large cryogenic tank simulations as well as small scale simulant fluid pressurization cases. Appropriate turbulent models that represent both interfacial and bulk vapor phase turbulence with greater fidelity are needed. Application of LES models to the tank pressurization problem can serve as a starting point.

  20. Modeling the shear rate and pressure drop in a hydrodynamic cavitation reactor with experimental validation based on KI decomposition studies.

    PubMed

    Badve, Mandar P; Alpar, Tibor; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Gogate, Parag R; Csoka, Levente

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the shear rate and pressure variation in a complex flow field created in a hydrodynamic cavitation reactor (stator and rotor assembly) has been depicted in the present study. The design of the reactor is such that the rotor is provided with surface indentations and cavitational events are expected to occur on the surface of the rotor as well as within the indentations. The flow characteristics of the fluid have been investigated on the basis of high accuracy compact difference schemes and Navier-Stokes method. The evolution of streamlining structures during rotation, pressure field and shear rate of a Newtonian fluid flow have been numerically established. The simulation results suggest that the characteristics of shear rate and pressure area are quite different based on the magnitude of the rotation velocity of the rotor. It was observed that area of the high shear zone at the indentation leading edge shrinks with an increase in the rotational speed of the rotor, although the magnitude of the shear rate increases linearly. It is therefore concluded that higher rotational speeds of the rotor, tends to stabilize the flow, which in turn results into less cavitational activity compared to that observed around 2200-2500RPM. Experiments were carried out with initial concentration of KI as 2000ppm. Maximum of 50ppm of iodine liberation was observed at 2200RPM. Experimental as well as simulation results indicate that the maximum cavitational activity can be seen when rotation speed is around 2200-2500RPM. PMID:24924259

  1. Does Parental Educational Level Predict Drop-Out from Upper Secondary School for 16- to 24-Year-Olds when Basic Skills Are Accounted For? A Cross Country Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundetrae, Kjersti

    2011-01-01

    Drop-out from upper secondary school is considered a widespread problem, closely connected with youth unemployment. The aim of the current study was to examine whether parents' level of education predicted drop-out for 16-24-year-olds when accounting for basic skills. For this purpose, data from the Norwegian (n = 996) and American (n = 641)…

  2. A Numerical Procedure for Flow Distribution and Pressure Drops for U and Z Type Configurations Plate Heat Exchangers with Variable Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, R.; Lecuona, A.; Ventas, R.; Vereda, C.

    2012-11-01

    In Plate Heat Exchangers it is important to determine the flow distribution and pressure drops, because they affect directly the performance of a heat exchanger [1]. This work proposes an incompressible, one-dimensional, steady state, discrete model allowing for variable overall momentum coefficients to determine these magnitudes. The model consists on a modified version of the Bajura and Jones [2] model for dividing and combining flow manifolds. The numerical procedure is based on the finite differences approximation approach proposed by Datta and Majumdar [3]. A linear overall momentum coefficient distribution is used in the dividing manifold, but the model is not limited to linear distributions. Comparisons are made with experimental, numerical and analytical data, yielding good results.

  3. Heat transfer and pressure drop in a compact pin-fin heat exchanger with pin orientation at 18 deg to the flow direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a novel, compact heat exchanger in helium gas were measured at 3.5 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 450 to 12,000. The pin-fin specimen consisted of pins, 0.51 mm high and spaced 2.03 mm on centers, spanning a channel through which the helium flows; the angle of the row of pins to the flow direction was 18 deg. The specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes up to 74 W/sq cm and insulated on the back side. Correlations were developed for the friction factor and Nusselt number. The Nusselt number compares favorably to those of past studies of staggered pin-fins, when the measured temperatures are extrapolated to the temperature of the wall-fluid interface.

  4. Parallelization of Catalytic Packed-Bed Microchannels with Pressure-Drop Microstructures for Gas-Liquid Multiphase Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Sunao; Ohtaki, Kenichiro; Matsumoto, Sohei; Inoue, Tomoya

    2012-06-01

    High-throughput and stable treatments are required to achieve the practical production of chemicals with microreactors. However, the flow maldistribution to the paralleled microchannels has been a critical problem in achieving the productive use of multichannel microreactors for multiphase flow conditions. In this study, we newly designed and fabricated a glass four-channel catalytic packed-bed microreactor for the scale-up of gas-liquid multiphase chemical reactions. We embedded microstructures generating high pressure losses at the upstream side of each packed bed, and experimentally confirmed the efficacy of the microstructures in decreasing the maldistribution of the gas-liquid flow to the parallel microchannels.

  5. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer D.; Morton, Dana K.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  6. Overall heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in a typical tubular exchanger employing alumina nano-fluid as the tube side hot fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabeel, A. E.; Abdelgaied, Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    Nano-fluids are used to improve the heat transfer rates in heat exchangers, especially; the shell-and-tube heat exchanger that is considered one of the most important types of heat exchangers. In the present study, an experimental loop is constructed to study the thermal characteristics of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger; at different concentrations of Al2O3 nonmetallic particles (0.0, 2, 4, and 6 %). This material concentrations is by volume concentrations in pure water as a base fluid. The effects of nano-fluid concentrations on the performance of shell and tube heat exchanger have been conducted based on the overall heat transfer coefficient, the friction factor, the pressure drop in tube side, and the entropy generation rate. The experimental results show that; the highest heat transfer coefficient is obtained at a nano-fluid concentration of 4 % of the shell side. In shell side the maximum percentage increase in the overall heat transfer coefficient has reached 29.8 % for a nano-fluid concentration of 4 %, relative to the case of the base fluid (water) at the same tube side Reynolds number. However; in the tube side the maximum relative increase in pressure drop has recorded the values of 12, 28 and 48 % for a nano-material concentration of 2, 4 and 6 %, respectively, relative to the case without nano-fluid, at an approximate value of 56,000 for Reynolds number. The entropy generation reduces with increasing the nonmetallic particle volume fraction of the same flow rates. For increase the nonmetallic particle volume fraction from 0.0 to 6 % the rate of entropy generation decrease by 10 %.

  7. Overall heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in a typical tubular exchanger employing alumina nano-fluid as the tube side hot fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabeel, A. E.; Abdelgaied, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Nano-fluids are used to improve the heat transfer rates in heat exchangers, especially; the shell-and-tube heat exchanger that is considered one of the most important types of heat exchangers. In the present study, an experimental loop is constructed to study the thermal characteristics of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger; at different concentrations of Al2O3 nonmetallic particles (0.0, 2, 4, and 6 %). This material concentrations is by volume concentrations in pure water as a base fluid. The effects of nano-fluid concentrations on the performance of shell and tube heat exchanger have been conducted based on the overall heat transfer coefficient, the friction factor, the pressure drop in tube side, and the entropy generation rate. The experimental results show that; the highest heat transfer coefficient is obtained at a nano-fluid concentration of 4 % of the shell side. In shell side the maximum percentage increase in the overall heat transfer coefficient has reached 29.8 % for a nano-fluid concentration of 4 %, relative to the case of the base fluid (water) at the same tube side Reynolds number. However; in the tube side the maximum relative increase in pressure drop has recorded the values of 12, 28 and 48 % for a nano-material concentration of 2, 4 and 6 %, respectively, relative to the case without nano-fluid, at an approximate value of 56,000 for Reynolds number. The entropy generation reduces with increasing the nonmetallic particle volume fraction of the same flow rates. For increase the nonmetallic particle volume fraction from 0.0 to 6 % the rate of entropy generation decrease by 10 %.

  8. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  9. Pore pressure prediction from well logs: Methods, modifications, and new approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jincai

    2011-09-01

    Pore pressures in most deep sedimentary formations are not hydrostatic; instead they are overpressured and elevated even to more than double of the hydrostatic pressure. If the abnormal pressures are not accurately predicted prior to drilling, catastrophic incidents, such as well blowouts and mud volcanoes, may take place. Pore pressure calculation in a hydraulically-connected formation is introduced. Fracture gradient prediction methods are reviewed, and the minimum and maximum fracture pressures are proposed. The commonly used empirical methods for abnormal pore pressure prediction from well logs are then reviewed in this paper. Eaton's resistivity and sonic methods are then adapted using depth-dependent normal compaction equations for pore pressure prediction in subsurface formations. The adapted methods provide a much easier way to handle normal compaction trendlines. In addition to the empirical methods, the theoretical pore pressure modeling is the fundamental to understand the mechanism of the abnormal pressure generation. A theoretical pore pressure-porosity model is proposed based on the primary overpressure generation mechanism — compaction disequilibrium and effective stress-porosity-compaction theory. Accordingly, pore pressure predictions from compressional velocity and sonic transit time are obtained using the new theoretical model. Case studies in deepwater oil wells illustrate how to improve pore pressure prediction in sedimentary formations.

  10. Liquid drops impacting superamphiphobic coatings.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xu; Schellenberger, Frank; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-06-25

    The dynamics of liquid drops impacting superamphiphobic coatings is studied by high-speed video microscopy. Superamphiphobic coatings repel water and oils. The coating consists of a fractal-like hydrophobized silica network. Mixtures of ethanol-water and glycerin-water are chosen to investigate the influence of interfacial tension and viscosity on spreading and retraction dynamics. Drop spreading is dominated by inertia. At low impact velocity, the drops completely rebound. However, the contact time increases with impact velocity, whereas the restitution coefficient decreases. We suggest that the drop temporarily impales the superamphiphobic coating, although the drop completely rebounds. From an estimate of the pressure, it can be concluded that impalement is dominated by depinning rather than sagging. With increasing velocity, the drops partially pin, and an increasing amount of liquid remains on the coating. A time-resolved study of the retraction dynamics reveals two well-separated phases: a fast inertia-dominated phase followed by a slow decrease of the contact diameter of the drop. The crossover occurs when the diameter of the retracting drop matches the diameter of the drop before impact. We suggest that the depth of impalement increases with impact velocity, where impalement is confined to the initial impact zone of the drop. If the drop partially pins on the coating, the depth of impalement exceeds a depth, preventing the whole drop from being removed during the retraction phase. PMID:23697383

  11. Flow rate/pressure drop data gathered from testing a sample of the Space Shuttle Strain Isolation Pad (SIP): Effects of ambient pressure combined with tension and compression conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springfield, R. D.; Lawing, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tests were conducted on a sample of strain isolation pad (SIP) typical of that used in the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system to determine the characteristics of SIP internal flow. Data obtained were pressure drop as a function of flow rate for a range of ambient pressures representing various points along the Shuttle trajectory and for stretched and compressed conditions of the SIP. Flow was in the direction of the weave parallel to most of the fibers. The data are plotted in several standard engineering formats in order to be of maximum utility to the user. In addition to providing support to the Space Shuttle Program, these data are a source of experimental information on flow through fiberous (rather than the more usual sand bed type) porous media.

  12. Prediction of attenuation of the 28 GHz COMSTAR beacon signal using radar and measured rain drop spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1977-01-01

    Disdrometer measurements and radar reflectivity measurements were injected into a computer program to estimate the path attenuation of the signal. Predicted attenuations when compared with the directly measured ones showed generally good correlation on a case by case basis and very good agreement statistically. The utility of using radar in conjunction with disdrometer measurements for predicting fade events and long term fade distributions associated with earth-satellite telecommunications is demonstrated.

  13. Subjective Stress and Coping Resources Interact To Predict Blood Pressure Reactivity in Black College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Rodney

    2003-01-01

    Examined the effects of subjective stress and coping resources on blood pressure reactivity among black college students. The interactive effects of subjective stress and coping resources predicted diastolic blood pressure reactivity. Higher levels of problem-focused coping related to more marked diastolic blood pressure changes under conditions…

  14. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of a forearm blood pressure measurement method in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Marie-Ève; Cloutier, Lyne; Poirier, Paul

    2015-04-01

    For blood pressure assessment, it has been reported that forearm blood pressure measurement appears to be as valid as an upper-arm blood pressure measurement method in individuals with severe obesity when correlated to the intra-arterial method, considered as the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for the presence of systemic hypertension in 25 severely obese patients from 352 blood pressure measurements were calculated. The sensitivity (0.98) and the positive predictive value (0.93) for hypertension on forearm blood pressure measurements are excellent, indicating that the forearm approach is a promising alternative to systemic hypertension diagnosis in severe obesity. PMID:25757220

  15. Comparison of Two-dimensional Measurement Techniques for Predicting Knee Angle and Moment during a Drop Vertical Jump

    PubMed Central

    Mizner, Ryan L.; Chmielewski, Terese L.; Toepke, John J.; Tofte, Kari B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of two dimensional (2D) video-based techniques and three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis to assess potential knee injury risk factors during jump landing. Design Observational study Setting Research Laboratory Participants Thirty-six female athletes in cutting and pivoting sports. Assessment Athletes performed a drop vertical jump during which movement was recorded with a motion analysis system and a digital video camera positioned in the frontal plane. Main Outcome Measures The 2D variables were the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA), the angle formed between thigh and leg, and the knee:ankle separation ratio, the distance between knee joints divided by the distance between ankles. The 3D variables were knee abduction angle and external abduction moment. All variables were assessed at peak knee flexion. Linear regression assessed the relationship between the 2D and 3D variables. In addition, intraclass correlation coefficients determined rater reliability for the 2D variables and compared the 2D measurements made from digital video to the same measurements from the motion analysis. Results The knee:ankle separation ratio accounted for a higher variance of 3D knee abduction angle (r2 =0.350) and knee abduction moment (r2=0.394) when compared to the FPPA (r2=0.145, 0.254). The digital video measures had favorable rater reliability (ICC:0.89–0.94) and were comparable to the motion analysis system (ICC≥0.92). Conclusion When compared to the FPPA, the knee:ankle separation ratio had better association with previously cited knee injury risk factors in female athletes. The 2D measures have adequate consistency and validity to merit further clinical consideration in jump landing assessments. PMID:22544058

  16. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: measurement principle and static calibration.

    PubMed

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 °C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min(-1). The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l(-1) min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min(-1), equal to 2.0 V l(-1) min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min(-1) and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min(-1), up to 5.7 V l(-1) min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min(-1) and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min(-1). The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min(-1) with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l(-1) min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min(-1) with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l(-1) min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min(-1), corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l(-1) min. PMID:21361616

  17. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 °C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min-1, equal to 2.0 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min-1 and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min-1, up to 5.7 V l-1 min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min-1 and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min-1 with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l-1 min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min-1 with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l-1 min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min-1, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l-1 min.

  18. Renal Nerve Stimulation-Induced Blood Pressure Changes Predict Ambulatory Blood Pressure Response After Renal Denervation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mark R; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Gal, Pim; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Heeg, Jan-Evert; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Lau, Elizabeth O Y; Persu, Alexandre; Staessen, Jan A; Ramdat Misier, Anand R; Steinberg, Jonathan S; Elvan, Arif

    2016-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) response to renal denervation (RDN) is highly variable and its effectiveness debated. A procedural end point for RDN may improve consistency of response. The objective of the current analysis was to look for the association between renal nerve stimulation (RNS)-induced BP increase before and after RDN and changes in ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) after RDN. Fourteen patients with drug-resistant hypertension referred for RDN were included. RNS was performed under general anesthesia at 4 sites in the right and left renal arteries, both before and immediately after RDN. RNS-induced BP changes were monitored and correlated to changes in ambulatory BP at a follow-up of 3 to 6 months after RDN. RNS resulted in a systolic BP increase of 50±27 mm Hg before RDN and systolic BP increase of 13±16 mm Hg after RDN (P<0.001). Average systolic ABPM was 153±11 mm Hg before RDN and decreased to 137±10 mm Hg at 3- to 6-month follow-up (P=0.003). Changes in RNS-induced BP increase before versus immediately after RDN and changes in ABPM before versus 3 to 6 months after RDN were correlated, both for systolic BP (R=0.77, P=0.001) and diastolic BP (R=0.79, P=0.001). RNS-induced maximum BP increase before RDN had a correlation of R=0.61 (P=0.020) for systolic and R=0.71 (P=0.004) for diastolic ABPM changes. RNS-induced BP changes before versus after RDN were correlated with changes in 24-hour ABPM 3 to 6 months after RDN. RNS should be tested as an acute end point to assess the efficacy of RDN and predict BP response to RDN. PMID:27432864

  19. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Measurement Using Phase Contrast MRI for Estimating the Post-Stenotic Pressure Drop: In Vitro Validation and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Lee, Sang Joon; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Dae-Hee; Kim, Young-Hak

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the measurement of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been introduced as an alternative index for quantifying energy loss through the cardiac valve, experimental verification and clinical application of this parameter are still required. Objectives The goal of this study is to verify MRI measurements of TKE by using a phantom stenosis with particle image velocimetry (PIV) as the reference standard. In addition, the feasibility of measuring TKE with MRI is explored. Methods MRI measurements of TKE through a phantom stenosis was performed by using clinical 3T MRI scanner. The MRI measurements were verified experimentally by using PIV as the reference standard. In vivo application of MRI-driven TKE was explored in seven patients with aortic valve disease and one healthy volunteer. Transvalvular gradients measured by MRI and echocardiography were compared. Results MRI and PIV measurements of TKE are consistent for turbulent flow (0.666 < R2 < 0.738) with a mean difference of −11.13 J/m3 (SD = 4.34 J/m3). Results of MRI and PIV measurements differ by 2.76 ± 0.82 cm/s (velocity) and −11.13 ± 4.34 J/m3 (TKE) for turbulent flow (Re > 400). The turbulence pressure drop correlates strongly with total TKE (R2 = 0.986). However, in vivo measurements of TKE are not consistent with the transvalvular pressure gradient estimated by echocardiography. Conclusions These results suggest that TKE measurement via MRI may provide a potential benefit as an energy-loss index to characterize blood flow through the aortic valve. However, further clinical studies are necessary to reach definitive conclusions regarding this technique. PMID:26978529

  20. Effect of interfacial turbulence and accommodation coefficient on CFD predictions of pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tanks are to a large extent affected by heat and mass transport across the liquid-vapor interface. These mechanisms are, in turn, controlled by the kinetics of the phase change process and the dynamics of the turbulent recirculating flows in the liquid and vapor phases. In this paper, the effects of accommodation coefficient and interfacial turbulence on tank pressurization and pressure control simulations are examined. Comparison between numerical predictions and ground-based measurements in two large liquid hydrogen tank experiments, performed in the K-site facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are used to show the impact of accommodation coefficient and interfacial and vapor phase turbulence on evolution of pressure and temperatures in the cryogenic storage tanks. In particular, the self-pressurization comparisons indicate that: (1) numerical predictions are essentially independent of the magnitude of the accommodation coefficient; and (2) surprisingly, laminar models sometimes provide results that are in better agreement with experimental self-pressurization rates, even in parametric ranges where the bulk flow is deemed fully turbulent. In this light, shortcomings of the present CFD models, especially, numerical treatments of interfacial mass transfer and turbulence, as coupled to the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) interface capturing scheme, are underscored and discussed.

  1. Prediction of load threshold of fibre-reinforced laminated composite panels subjected to low velocity drop-weight impact using efficient data filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Umar; Myler, Peter

    This work is concerned with physical testing of carbon fibrous laminated composite panels with low velocity drop-weight impacts from flat and round nose impactors. Eight, sixteen, and twenty-four ply panels were considered. Non-destructive damage inspections of tested specimens were conducted to approximate impact-induced damage. Recorded data were correlated to load-time, load-deflection, and energy-time history plots to interpret impact induced damage. Data filtering techniques were also applied to the noisy data that unavoidably generate due to limitations of testing and logging systems. Built-in, statistical, and numerical filters effectively predicted load thresholds for eight and sixteen ply laminates. However, flat nose impact of twenty-four ply laminates produced clipped data that can only be de-noised involving oscillatory algorithms. Data filtering and extrapolation of such data have received rare attention in the literature that needs to be investigated. The present work demonstrated filtering and extrapolation of the clipped data using Fast Fourier Convolution algorithm to predict load thresholds. Selected results were compared to the damage zones identified with C-scan and acceptable agreements have been observed. Based on the results it is proposed that use of advanced data filtering and analysis methods to data collected by the available resources has effectively enhanced data interpretations without resorting to additional resources. The methodology could be useful for efficient and reliable data analysis and impact-induced damage prediction of similar cases' data.

  2. Prediction of drop-on-demand (DOD) pattern size in pulse voltage-applied electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing of Ag colloid ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Kim, Beomsoo; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Hwang, Jungho

    2014-12-01

    Drop-on-demand printing is receiving a great deal of interest in industrial applications; however, the desired pattern sizes are realized by trial and error, through repeated printing experiments with varied materials (ink and suspended particles), operating conditions (voltage, flow rate, nozzle-to-plate distance, etc.), and substrate wettability. Since this approach requires a great deal of time, cost, and effort, a more convenient and efficient method that will predict pattern sizes with a minimal number of experiments is needed. In this study, we patterned a series of Ag dots and lines using a pulsed voltage-applied electrohydrodynamic jet printing system and measured their sizes with an optical microscope. We then applied a model suggested by Stringer and Derby (J Eur Ceram Soc 29:913-918, 2009) and Gao and Sonin (Proc R Soc Lond Ser A 444:533-554, 1994) to predict the pattern sizes, comparing these predictions with the measured sizes. Finally, we demonstrated our methodology on disconnected line repairing.

  3. Habitual intake of fruit juice predicts central blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Pase, Matthew P; Grima, Natalie; Cockerell, Robyn; Pipingas, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Despite a common perception that fruit juice is healthy, fruit juice contains high amounts of naturally occurring sugar without the fibre content of the whole fruit. Frequent fruit juice consumption may therefore contribute to excessive sugar consumption typical of the Western society. Although excess sugar intake is associated with high blood pressure (BP), the association between habitual fruit juice consumption and BP is unclear. The present study investigated the association of fruit juice consumption with brachial and central (aortic) BP in 160 community dwelling adults. Habitual fruit juice consumption was measured using a 12 month dietary recall questionnaire. On the same day, brachial BP was measured and central (aortic) BP was estimated through radial artery applanation. Frequency of fruit juice consumption was classified as rare, occasional or daily. Those who consumed fruit juice daily, versus rarely or occasionally, had significantly higher central systolic BP (F (2, 134) = 6.09, p <0.01), central pulse pressure (F (2, 134) = 4.16, p <0.05), central augmentation pressure (F (2, 134) = 5.98, p <0.01) and central augmentation index (F (2, 134) = 3.29, p <0.05) as well as lower pulse pressure amplification (F (2, 134) = 4.36, p <0.05). There were no differences in brachial BP. Central systolic BP was 3-4 mmHg higher for those who consumed fruit juice daily rather than rarely or occasionally. In conclusion, more frequent fruit juice consumption was associated with higher central BPs. PMID:25278432

  4. A Comparison of Measured and Predicted XV-15 Tiltrotor Surface Acoustic Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Burley, Casey L.; Prichard, Devon S.

    1997-01-01

    Predicted XV-15 exterior surface acoustic pressures are compared with previously published experimental data. Surface acoustic pressure transducers were concentrated near the tip-path-plane of the rotor in airplane mode. The comparison emphasized cruise conditions which are of interest for tiltrotor interior noise - level flight for speeds ranging from 72 m/s to 113 m/s. The predictions were produced by components of the NASA Langley Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Code (TRAC) system of computer codes. Comparisons between measurements and predictions were made in both the time and frequency domains, as well as overall sound pressure levels. In general, the predictions replicated the measured data well. Discrepancies between measurements and predictions were noted. Some of the discrepancies were due to poor correlation of the measured data with the rotor tach signal. In other cases limitations of the predictive methodology have been indicated.

  5. Comparison of three computational models for predicting pressurization characteristics of cryogenic tank during discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wang; Yanzhong, Li; Kang, Zhu; Yonghua, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In order to select an effective approach to predict the pressurization characteristics of cryogenic tank during rocket launching, three computational models, defined as 0-D, 1-D and CFD models, are used to obtain the pressure evolution and thermal performance of a cryogenic tank during pressurized discharge period. Several pressurization cases are computed by all of the three models to evaluate their predictive abilities and effects, respectively. The comparative study shows that for the case with a diffuser-type injector at the tank inlet, the consistent results by the three models are obtained in the most of period, except that 1-D model has a peak departure prediction of pressure value at the beginning of process. All of the three models can be used to predict the pressurization performance, and their predictive abilities could be validated with one another. The CFD model is the unique suitable model to display the pressurization performance including physical distribution in radial direction especially for the system with no-diffuser-type injector. Based on the analysis, the application selection of three models for different cases is accomplished. The 0-D model is the priority selection for a simple pressure prediction of tank ullage, even for the situation that severe temperature distribution exists in the ullage range. The 1-D model is the optimal selection as considering both the convenience and the time consumption for the constant-pressure cases. But it is not recommended in a constant-inlet flux cases for its distinct predicting deviation at the beginning of the process. When the detailed distributions within the tank are concerned, the CFD model is the unique selection. The results of this paper may be beneficial to the model selection and optimization analysis of a pressurization system.

  6. Prediction of inviscid stagnation pressure losses in supersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azevedo, David J.; Liu, Ching Shi; Rae, William J.

    1990-01-01

    An effort is made to quantify the stagnation pressure losses associated with shock-wave systems that may be present in such high Mach number flows as those of scramjet hypersonic diffusers. If the shock-related contribution turns out to be much larger than that attributable to viscous effects, a designer could introduce methods for the minimization of the shock system's scale; in particular, the size of the normal shock should be reduced. The angles presently treated may be approached during vehicle maneuvering or other transients.

  7. Spectral models for ground motion prediction in the L'Aquila region (central Italy): evidence for stress-drop dependence on magnitude and depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacor, F.; Spallarossa, D.; Oth, A.; Luzi, L.; Puglia, R.; Cantore, L.; Mercuri, A.; D'Amico, M.; Bindi, D.

    2016-02-01

    between seismic moment and local magnitude that improves the existing ones and extends the validity range to 3.0-5.8. We find a significant stress drop increase with seismic moment for events with Mw larger than 3.75, with so-called scaling parameter ε close to 1.5. We also observe that the overall offset of the stress-drop scaling is controlled by earthquake depth. We evaluate the performance of the proposed parametric models through the residual analysis of the Fourier spectra in the frequency range 0.5-25 Hz. The results show that the considered stress-drop scaling with magnitude and depth reduces, on average, the standard deviation by 18 per cent with respect to a constant stress-drop model. The overall quality of fit (standard deviation between 0.20 and 0.27, in the frequency range 1-20 Hz) indicates that the spectral model calibrated in this study can be used to predict ground motion in the L'Aquila region.

  8. Workbook for predicting pressure wave and fragment effects of exploding propellant tanks and gas storage vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. E.; Kulesz, J. J.; Ricker, R. E.; Bessey, R. L.; Westine, P. S.; Parr, V. B.; Oldham, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Technology needed to predict damage and hazards from explosions of propellant tanks and bursts of pressure vessels, both near and far from these explosions is introduced. Data are summarized in graphs, tables, and nomographs.

  9. Prediction of Composite Pressure Vessel Failure Location using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreger, Steven T.; Taylor, F. Tad; Ortyl, Nicholas E.; Grant, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Ten composite pressure vessels were instrumented with fiber Bragg grating sensors in order to assess the strain levels of the vessel under various loading conditions. This paper and presentation will discuss the testing methodology, the test results, compare the testing results to the analytical model, and present a possible methodology for predicting the failure location and strain level of composite pressure vessels.

  10. Pressure Ulcers in Adults: Prediction and Prevention. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This package includes a clinical practice guideline, quick reference guide for clinicians, and patient's guide to predicting and preventing pressure ulcers in adults. The clinical practice guideline includes the following: overview of the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers; clinical practice guideline (introduction, risk assessment tools…

  11. Drop-on-demand sample introduction system coupled with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow for direct molecular analysis of complex liquid microvolume samples.

    PubMed

    Schaper, J Niklas; Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Shelley, Jacob T; Bings, Nicolas H; Hieftje, Gary M

    2012-11-01

    One of the fastest developing fields in analytical spectrochemistry in recent years is ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS). This burgeoning interest has been due to the demonstrated advantages of the method: simple mass spectra, little or no sample preparation, and applicability to samples in the solid, liquid, or gaseous state. One such ADI-MS source, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA), is capable of direct analysis of solids just by aiming the source at the solid surface and sampling the produced ions into a mass spectrometer. However, direct introduction of significant volumes of liquid samples into this source has not been possible, as solvent loads can quench the afterglow and, thus, the formation of reagent ions. As a result, the analysis of liquid samples is preferably carried out by analyzing dried residues or by desorbing small amounts of liquid samples directly from the liquid surface. In the former case, reproducibility of sample introduction is crucial if quantitative results are desired. In the present study, introduction of liquid samples as very small droplets helps overcome the issues of sample positioning and reduced levels of solvent intake. A recently developed "drop-on-demand" (DOD) aerosol generator is capable of reproducibly producing very small volumes of liquid (∼17 pL). In this paper, the coupling of FAPA-MS and DOD is reported and applications are suggested. Analytes representing different classes of substances were tested and limits of detections were determined. Matrix tolerance was investigated for drugs of abuse and their metabolites by analyzing raw urine samples and quantification without the use of internal standards. Limits of detection below 2 μg/mL, without sample pretreatment, were obtained. PMID:23025277

  12. Drop-on-demand sample introduction system coupled with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow for direct molecular analysis of complex liquid micro-volume samples

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, J. Niklas; Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Shelley, Jacob T.; Bings, Nicolas H.

    2012-01-01

    One of the fastest developing fields in analytical spectrochemistry in recent years is ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS). This burgeoning interest has been due to the demonstrated advantages of the method: simple mass spectra, little or no sample preparation, and applicability to samples in the solid, liquid, or gaseous state. One such ADI-MS source, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA), is capable of direct analysis of solids just by aiming the source at the solid surface and sampling the produced ions into a mass spectrometer. However, direct introduction of significant volumes of liquid samples into this source has not been possible, as solvent loads can quench the afterglow and, thus, the formation of reagent ions. As a result, the analysis of liquid samples is preferably carried out by analyzing dried residues or by desorbing small amounts of liquid samples directly from the liquid surface. In the former case, reproducibility of sample introduction is crucial if quantitative results are desired. In the present study, introduction of liquid samples as very small droplets helps overcome the issues of sample positioning and reduced levels of solvent intake. A recently developed “drop-on-demand” (DOD) aerosol generator is capable of reproducibly producing very small volumes of liquid (~17 pL). In this paper, the coupling of FAPA-MS and DOD is reported and applications are suggested. Analytes representing different classes of substances were tested and limits of detections were determined. Matrix tolerance was investigated for drugs of abuse and their metabolites by analyzing raw urine samples and quantification without the use of internal standards. Limits of detection below 2 µg/mL, without sample pretreatment, were obtained. PMID:23025277

  13. Repeated Blood Pressure Measurements in Childhood in Prediction of Hypertension in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Oikonen, Mervi; Nuotio, Joel; Magnussen, Costan G; Viikari, Jorma S A; Taittonen, Leena; Laitinen, Tomi; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Jokinen, Eero; Jula, Antti; Cheung, Michael; Sabin, Matthew A; Daniels, Stephen R; Raitakari, Olli T; Juonala, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension may be predicted from childhood risk factors. Repeated observations of abnormal blood pressure in childhood may enhance prediction of hypertension and subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood compared with a single observation. Participants (1927, 54% women) from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study had systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements performed when aged 3 to 24 years. Childhood/youth abnormal blood pressure was defined as above 90th or 95th percentile. After a 21- to 31-year follow-up, at the age of 30 to 45 years, hypertension (>140/90 mm Hg or antihypertensive medication) prevalence was found to be 19%. Carotid intima-media thickness was examined, and high-risk intima-media was defined as intima-media thickness >90th percentile or carotid plaques. Prediction of adulthood hypertension and high-risk intima-media was compared between one observation of abnormal blood pressure in childhood/youth and multiple observations by improved Pearson correlation coefficients and area under the receiver operating curve. When compared with a single measurement, 2 childhood/youth observations improved the correlation for adult systolic (r=0.44 versus 0.35, P<0.001) and diastolic (r=0.35 versus 0.17, P<0.001) blood pressure. In addition, 2 abnormal childhood/youth blood pressure observations increased the prediction of hypertension in adulthood (0.63 for 2 versus 0.60 for 1 observation, P=0.003). When compared with 2 measurements, third observation did not provide any significant improvement for correlation or prediction (P always >0.05). A higher number of childhood/youth observations of abnormal blood pressure did not enhance prediction of adult high-risk intima-media thickness. Compared with a single measurement, the prediction of adult hypertension was enhanced by 2 observations of abnormal blood pressure in childhood/youth. PMID:26553229

  14. Can the Foot Posture Index or their individual criteria predict dynamic plantar pressures?

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Raquel; Martínez-Nova, Alfonso; Escamilla-Martínez, Elena; Pedrera-Zamorano, Juan Diego

    2012-07-01

    The Foot Posture Index (FPI) quantifies foot posture through the evaluation of six individual criteria. The objective of the present study was then to establish the plantar pressure differences between types of feet, and to study the capacity of the whole FPI value and the six individual criteria to predict the pattern of plantar pressures. In a sample of 400 healthy subjects (201 men and 199 women), the FPI was evaluated and plantar pressures were measured in 10 zones using the Footscan(®) platform. Five plantar pressures measurements were made for each foot, using for the study the mean of these measurements for each subject's left foot. The hallux and the lesser toes had lower pressure indices in highly supinated feet, with the values increasing progressively toward the highly pronated feet (p<0.001 and p=0.019 respectively). The fifth metatarsal head (MTH) values were greater in highly supinated feet, and decreased in the highly pronated feet (p<0.001). The FPI value predicts low variability of plantar pressures, mainly in the heel and midfoot, while the individual criteria predict higher variability in the forefoot. The talonavicular prominence and the calcaneal frontal plane position was the most influential criterion, explaining 8.5% of the hallux pressure and 11.1% of the fifth MTH pressure. Neither talar head palpation nor the supra and infra malleolar curvature predicted any of the plantar pressures variables. The FPI can distinguish three groups of feet--pronated, neutral, and supinated. Its individual criteria predict moderate or low plantar pressures variability, with the talonavicular prominence being the most influential criterion. PMID:22727718

  15. Predicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP)

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Richard; Gill, Paramjit; Martin, Una; Godwin, Marshall; Hanley, Janet; Heneghan, Carl; Hobbs, F.D. Richard; Mant, Jonathan; McKinstry, Brian; Myers, Martin; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict the difference between ambulatory/home and clinic blood pressure readings (the home–clinic difference). A linear regression model predicting the home–clinic blood pressure difference was derived in 2 data sets measuring automated clinic and ambulatory/home blood pressure (n=991) using candidate predictors identified from a literature review. The model was validated in 4 further data sets (n=1172) using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive measurements during a single visit), and a diagnosis of hypertension. Increasing age, clinic blood pressure level, and pulse pressure were associated with a white coat effect. The model showed good calibration across data sets (Pearson correlation, 0.48–0.80) and performed well-predicting ambulatory hypertension (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.79 [systolic]; 0.87; 0.85–0.89 [diastolic]). Used as a triaging tool for ambulatory monitoring, the model improved classification of a patient’s blood pressure status compared with other guideline recommended approaches (93% [92% to 95%] classified correctly; United States, 73% [70% to 75%]; Canada, 74% [71% to 77%]; United Kingdom, 78% [76% to 81%]). This study demonstrates that patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient’s ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment. PMID:27001299

  16. Trailing edge noise prediction from measured surface pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, T. F.; Hodgson, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    Trailing edge (TE) noise is investigated for the case of a two-dimensional airfoil embedded in a uniform low Mach number flow, and the usefulness of several TE noise theories is examined by applying them to the measured data. The TE noise spectra and directivity are quantitatively determined for the case of a high Reynolds number and a fully turbulent boundary layer. Parameters include angle of attack, flow velocity and TE bluntness. Evanescent wave theories by Chase (1975) and Chandiramani (1974) are compared to the present results and show good agreement. Agreement of the near field pressure scatter phenomenon analysis with measurements implies that the basic assumptions used in the analysis are correct, i.e., the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) flow passes the trailing edge into the wake region. No hydrodynamic wake shedding activity is confirmed for the two-sided TBL flow, and a method incorporating the principles of the coherent output power method is used to determine the sound field. The near field edge scatter model is found to not only establish optimum sizing of edge treatment for noise control, but also to separate and identify the scattered field from the incident hydrodynamic field.

  17. Trailing edge noise prediction from measured surface pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, T. F.; Hodgson, T. H.

    1981-09-01

    Trailing edge (TE) noise is investigated for the case of a two-dimensional airfoil embedded in a uniform low Mach number flow, and the usefulness of several TE noise theories is examined by applying them to the measured data. The TE noise spectra and directivity are quantitatively determined for the case of a high Reynolds number and a fully turbulent boundary layer. Parameters include angle of attack, flow velocity and TE bluntness. Evanescent wave theories by Chase (1975) and Chandiramani (1974) are compared to the present results and show good agreement. Agreement of the near field pressure scatter phenomenon analysis with measurements implies that the basic assumptions used in the analysis are correct, i.e., the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) flow passes the trailing edge into the wake region. No hydrodynamic wake shedding activity is confirmed for the two-sided TBL flow, and a method incorporating the principles of the coherent output power method is used to determine the sound field. The near field edge scatter model is found to not only establish optimum sizing of edge treatment for noise control, but also to separate and identify the scattered field from the incident hydrodynamic field.

  18. Prediction of light aircraft interior sound pressure level using the room equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The room equation is investigated for predicting interior sound level. The method makes use of an acoustic power balance, by equating net power flow into the cabin volume to power dissipated within the cabin using the room equation. The sound power level transmitted through the panels was calculated by multiplying the measured space averaged transmitted intensity for each panel by its surface area. The sound pressure level was obtained by summing the mean square sound pressures radiated from each panel. The data obtained supported the room equation model in predicting the cabin interior sound pressure level.

  19. Discussion of determination and prediction of CO/sub 2/ minimum miscibility pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, L.W.; Josendal, V.A.

    1980-05-01

    This work discusses Yellig and Metcalfe's previous work on the determination and prediction of CO/sub 2/ minimum miscibility pressures (J. Petrol. Technol., Jan 1980 (Pa 274,557)). Improvements in the techniques for determining minimum miscibility pressure in laboratory slim-tube experiments are offered. Data from investigation of several different crude oils are included. The conclusion is that any such prediction technique must take oil composition into consideration, and that this composition must be related to CO/sub 2/ density and minimum miscibility pressure in practices.

  20. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the ``liquid drop'' approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-10-01

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the ``liquid drop'' model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were

  1. Prediction of Severe Eye Injuries in Automobile Accidents: Static and Dynamic Rupture Pressure of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Eric A.; Voorhies, Katherine D.; Herring, Ian P.; Rath, Amber L.; Duma, Stefan M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the static and dynamic rupture pressures of 20 human and 20 porcine eyes. This study found the static test results show an average rupture pressure for porcine eyes of 1.00 ± 0.18 MPa while the average rupture pressure for human eyes was 0.36 ± 0.20 MPa. For dynamic loading, the average porcine rupture pressure was 1.64 ± 0.32 MPa, and the average rupture pressure for human eyes was 0.91 ± 0.29 MPa. Significant differences are found between average rupture pressures from all four groups of tests (p = 0.01). A risk function has been developed and predicts a 50% risk of globe rupture at 1.02 MPa, 1.66 MPa, 0.35 MPa, and 0.90 MPa internal pressure for porcine static, porcine dynamic, human static, and human dynamic loading conditions, respectively. PMID:15319124

  2. Wettability and spontaneous penetration of a water drop into hydrophobic pores.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunho; Liang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The penetration of a water drop into hydrophobic pores reflects its instability on a porous surface. To understand the mechanism of penetration and to predict the behavior of such a drop, an investigation was conducted through experimental study combined theoretical analysis. Water drops with volumes from 0.5 to 15μL were examined on Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates containing pores of 800μm and less in diameter. Results showed a critical condition at which a drop starts to penetrate into a certain sized pore. The critical condition presents a parabolic relationship between the volume of a water drop and the size of a hydrophobic pore. This behavior was due to a net force resulting from Laplace pressure, and capillary pressure. This force was found to be affected by the porosity, wetting angle, and there after the critical condition. The finding of this research will be beneficial for future design of structured surfaces. PMID:27267040

  3. A field evaluation of the predictive value of a hand-held drum pressure detection device.

    PubMed

    Pannell, Michael A; Brandt, Michael T; Boatright, Daniel T

    2004-05-01

    According to Environmental Protection Agency estimates, 20% of hazardous waste drums currently managed in the 6500 known, uncontrolled Superfund removal or remediation sites contain some degree of elevated internal pressurization. This estimate increases to 90% during the summer months, and, overall, up to 5% of the drums stored in active treatment, storage, and disposal facilities may be pressurized. The ability to identify pressurized drums in real-time would enhance worker health and safety, reduce the potential for environmental contamination, and minimize property damage. A prototype hand-held drum pressure detection device was field tested at an active Resource Conservation and Recovery Act mixed waste operation using acoustic resonance spectroscopy technology to identify pressurized drums. The waste operation used a drum venting system that measured the actual drum pressure of retrieved drums. Drum venting system data were analyzed to quantify the ability of the drum pressure detection device to correctly identify drums with elevated internal pressure. After 456 drums were measured, the dichotomous pressure data (pressurized vs. nonpressurized) were analyzed. The relationship between the drum venting system and drum pressure detection device pressure data was found to be statistically significant. With alpha and beta values of 0.05, the negative predictive value was 0.94, the positive predictive value was 0.47, the sensitivity was 0.82, and the specificity was 0.77. Although capable of identifying nonpressurized drums, this instrument may not be appropriate for general use. Study results and critical improvements necessary to improve the instrument's predictive value, specificity, and sensitivity are presented. PMID:15238340

  4. Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Tools for Elderly: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hi; Lee, Young-Shin; Kwon, Young-Mi

    2016-04-01

    Preventing pressure ulcers is one of the most challenging goals existing for today's health care provider. Currently used tools which assess risk of pressure ulcer development rarely evaluate the accuracy of predictability, especially in older adults. The current study aimed at providing a systemic review and meta-analysis of 29 studies using three pressure ulcer risk assessment tools: Braden, Norton, and Waterlow Scales. Overall predictive validities of pressure ulcer risks in the pooled sensitivity and specificity indicated a similar range with a moderate accuracy level in all three scales, while heterogeneity showed more than 80% variability among studies. The studies applying the Braden Scale used five different cut-off points representing the primary cause of heterogeneity. Results indicate that commonly used screening tools for pressure ulcer risk have limitations regarding validity and accuracy for use with older adults due to heterogeneity among studies. PMID:26337859

  5. CFD predictions of near-field pressure signatures of a low-boom aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouladi, Kamran; Baize, Daniel G.

    1992-01-01

    A three dimensional Euler marching code has been utilized to predict near-field pressure signatures of an aircraft with low boom characteristics. Computations were extended to approximately six body lengths aft of the aircraft in order to obtain pressure data at three body lengths below the aircraft for a cruise Mach number of 1.6. The near-field pressure data were extrapolated to the ground using a Whitham based method. The distance below the aircraft where the pressure data are attained is defined in this paper as the 'separation distance.' The influences of separation distances and the still highly three-dimensional flow field on the predicted ground pressure signatures and boom loudness are presented in this paper.

  6. Prediction of pressure fluctuation in sounding rockets and manifolded recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudadio, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The determination of altitude by means of barometric sensors in sounding rocket applications is discussed. A method for predicting the performance of such sensing systems is needed. A method is developed for predicting the pressure-time response of a volume subjected to subsonic air flow through from one to four passages. The pressure calculation is based on one-dimensional gas flow with friction. A computed program has been developed which solves the differential equations using a self-starting predictor-corrector integration technique. The input data required are the pressure sensing system dimensions, pressure forcing function(s) at the inlet port(s), and a trajectory over the time of analysis (altitude-velocity-time), if the forcing function is trajectory dependent. The program then computes the pressure-temperature history of the gas in the manifold over the time interval specified.

  7. Reliable prediction of electric spark sensitivity of nitramines: a general correlation with detonation pressure.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Pouretedal, Hamid Reza; Semnani, Abolfazl

    2009-08-15

    For nitramines, a general correlation has been introduced to predict electric spark sensitivity through detonation pressure. New method uses maximum obtainable detonation pressure as a fundamental relation so that it can be corrected for some nitramines which have some specific molecular structure. There is no need to use crystal density and heat of formation of nitramine explosives for predicting detonation pressure and electric spark sensitivity. The predicted electric spark sensitivities are compared with calculated results on the basis of quantum mechanical computations for some nitramines that latter can be applied. The root mean square (rms) deviations from experiment for new method and the predicted results of complicated quantum mechanical method are 1.18 and 3.49J, respectively. PMID:19188021

  8. Model for drop coalescence in a locally isotropic turbulent flow field.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2004-04-01

    The proposed model views drop coalescence in a turbulent flow field as a two-step process consisting of formation of a doublet due to drop collisions followed by coalescence of the individual droplets in a doublet due to the drainage of the intervening film of continuous phase under the action of colloidal (van der Waals and electrostatic) and random turbulent forces. The turbulent flow field was assumed to be locally isotropic. A first-passage-time analysis was employed for the random process of intervening continuous-phase film thickness between the two drops of a doublet in order to evaluate the first two moments of coalescence-time distribution of the doublet. The average drop coalescence time of the doublet was dependent on the barrier for coalescence due to the net repulsive force (net effect of colloidal repulsive and turbulent attractive forces). The predicted average drop coalescence time was found to be smaller for larger turbulent energy dissipation rates, smaller surface potentials, larger drop sizes, larger ionic strengths, and larger drop size ratios of unequal-sized drop pairs. The predicted average drop coalescence time was found to decrease whenever the ratio of average turbulent force to repulsive force barrier became larger. The calculated coalescence-time distribution was broader, with a higher standard deviation, at lower energy dissipation rates, higher surface potentials, smaller drop sizes, and smaller size ratios of unequal drop pairs. The model predictions of average coalescence-rate constants for tetradecane-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in a high-pressure homogenizer agreed fairly well with the inferred experimental values as reported by Narsimhan and Goel (J. Colloid Interface Sci. 238 (2001) 420-432) at different homogenizer pressures and SDS concentrations. PMID:14985038

  9. Evaluation of pressure extracted from NCEP and CMC global numerical weather prediction models against in-situ and GPT pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, M.; Chai, N.; Santos, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    An earlier investigation by Urquhart et al (2011) demonstrated that ray traced hydrostatic zenith delays from NCEP's Re-Analysis I (NCEP) dataset proved to exhibit higher variability when compared to those from the Canadian Meteorological Centre's (CMC) Global Deterministic Prediction System (GDPS) and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). This investigation expands on the original by analyzing the variation of the zenith hydrostatic delay (as ray traced through the NWP) and the extracted pressure at the surface for 35 IGS reference stations for the entire year of 2010. Two NWP's were selected, NCEP's Re-Analysis I and CMC's GDPS. NCEP was selected since it forms the basis for the UNB-VMF1 service, and CMC's GDPS was selected due to availability. Both models have global coverage, but NCEP's grid resolution is 2.5 x 2.5 degrees as compared to CMC's (GDPS) 0.6 x 0.6 degrees. The location within the NWP is defined by the location of the IGS reference stations. The position of the reference stations are defined by the IGS weekly solutions where week 52's coordinate values for the year 2010 were used. The height was then adjusted by the defined meteorological sensor offset as defined the IGS stations's respective log. The investigation is based on the following comparisons: 1. Extracted Pressure from the NWP (NCEP and CMC (GDPS)) compared to measured pressure from the site, and also from pressure derived from GPT model. 2. Raytraced hydrostatic zenith delay compared to the Saastamoinen hydrostatic zenith computed from the measured site pressure. Results indicate good agreement between pressure extracted from the NWP and in-situ pressure and larger differences with respect to GPT.

  10. Prediction of peak pressure from clinical and radiological measurements in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guldemond, Nick A; Leffers, Pieter; Walenkamp, Geert HIM; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Sanders, Antal P; Nieman, Fred HM; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W

    2008-01-01

    Background Various structural and functional factors of foot function have been associated with high local plantar pressures. The therapist focuses on these features which are thought to be responsible for plantar ulceration in patients with diabetes. Risk assessment of the diabetic foot would be made easier if locally elevated plantar pressure could be indicated with a minimum set of clinical measures. Methods Ninety three patients were evaluated through vascular, orthopaedic, neurological and radiological assessment. A pressure platform was used to quantify the barefoot peak pressure for six forefoot regions: big toe (BT) and metatarsals one (MT-1) to five (MT-5). Stepwise regression modelling was performed to determine which set of the clinical and radiological measures explained most variability in local barefoot plantar peak pressure in each of the six forefoot regions. Comprehensive models were computed with independent variables from the clinical and radiological measurements. The difference between the actual plantar pressure and the predicted value was examined through Bland-Altman analysis. Results Forefoot pressures were significant higher in patients with neuropathy, compared to patients without neuropathy for the whole forefoot, the MT-1 region and the MT-5 region (respectively 138 kPa, 173 kPa and 88 kPa higher: mean difference). The clinical models explained up to 39 percent of the variance in local peak pressures. Callus formation and toe deformity were identified as relevant clinical predictors for all forefoot regions. Regression models with radiological variables explained about 26 percent of the variance in local peak pressures. For most regions the combination of clinical and radiological variables resulted in a higher explained variance. The Bland and Altman analysis showed a major discrepancy between the predicted and the actual peak pressure values. Conclusion At best, clinical and radiological measurements could only explain about 34

  11. Prediction of pressure and flow transients in a gaseous bipropellant reaction control rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowsky, J. J.; Mcmanus, H. N., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic model is developed to predict pressure and flow transients in a gaseous hydrogen-oxygen reaction control rocket engine feed system. The one-dimensional equations of momentum and continuity are reduced by the method of characteristics from partial derivatives to a set of total derivatives which describe the state properties along the feedline. System components, e.g., valves, manifolds, and injectors are represented by pseudo steady-state relations at discrete junctions in the system. Solutions were effected by a FORTRAN IV program on an IBM 360/65. The results indicate the relative effect of manifold volume, combustion lag time, feedline pressure fluctuations, propellant temperature, and feedline length on the chamber pressure transient. The analytical combustion model is verified by good correlation between predicted and observed chamber pressure transients. The developed model enables a rocket designer to vary the design parameters analytically to obtain stable combustion for a particular mode of operation which is prescribed by mission objectives.

  12. Unsteady blade surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller - Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady three dimensional Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flowfield of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (take-off) the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  13. Unsteady blade-surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller: Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady 3-D Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flow field of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (takeoff), the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  14. Acoustic predictions using measured pressures from a model rotor in the DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visintainer, Joseph A.; Burley, Casey L.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Liu, Sandy R.

    1991-01-01

    A contemporary design, 4-bladed United Technologies model rotor with pressure-instrumented blades was tested in the Duits-Nederslandse Windtunnel. Simultaneous acoustic and pressure measurements were made for a wide range of operating conditions. Microphones were optimally positioned at a number of locations in the flow forward of the rotor to measure rotor thickness noise, high-speed impulsive noise (both in the rotor plane), and blade-vortex interaction noise (forward and 25 deg below the rotor plane). The blade surface pressure data are used as aerodynamic input to WOPWOP, which is a state-of-the-art rotor noise prediction program that predicts rotor thickness and loading noise. The predicted results using WOPWOP are compared to the measured noise levels for cases where either thickness noise, blade-vortex interaction noise, or high-speed impulsive noise is the dominant noise mechanism. The comparisons show regions of good agreement, as well as areas where further improvement is necessary.

  15. Predicting S-wave velocities for unconsolidated sediments at low effective pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate S-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important in performing a reliable elastic inversion for gas hydrate-bearing sediments and in evaluating velocity models for predicting S-wave velocities, but few S-wave velocities are measured at low effective pressure. Predicting S-wave velocities by using conventional methods based on the Biot-Gassmann theory appears to be inaccurate for laboratory-measured velocities at effective pressures less than about 4-5 megapascals (MPa). Measured laboratory and well log velocities show two distinct trends for S-wave velocities with respect to P-wave velocity: one for the S-wave velocity less than about 0.6 kilometer per second (km/s) which approximately corresponds to effective pressure of about 4-5 MPa, and the other for S-wave velocities greater than 0.6 km/s. To accurately predict S-wave velocities at low effective pressure less than about 4-5 MPa, a pressure-dependent parameter that relates the consolidation parameter to shear modulus of the sediments at low effective pressure is proposed. The proposed method in predicting S-wave velocity at low effective pressure worked well for velocities of water-saturated sands measured in the laboratory. However, this method underestimates the well-log S-wave velocities measured in the Gulf of Mexico, whereas the conventional method performs well for the well log velocities. The P-wave velocity dispersion due to fluid in the pore spaces, which is more pronounced at high frequency with low effective pressures less than about 4 MPa, is probably a cause for this discrepancy.

  16. Validation of Finite Element Predictions of Cartilage Contact Pressure in the Human Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Maas, Steve A.; Peters, Christopher L.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Methods to predict contact stresses in the hip can provide an improved understanding of load distribution in the normal and pathologic joint. The objectives of this study were to develop and validate a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for predicting cartilage contact stresses in the human hip using subject-specific geometry from computed tomography image data, and to assess the sensitivity of model predictions to boundary conditions, cartilage geometry, and cartilage material properties. Loads based on in vivo data were applied to a cadaveric hip joint to simulate walking, descending stairs and stair-climbing. Contact pressures and areas were measured using pressure sensitive film. CT image data were segmented and discretized into FE meshes of bone and cartilage. FE boundary and loading conditions mimicked the experimental testing. Fair to good qualitative correspondence was obtained between FE predictions and experimental measurements for simulated walking and descending stairs, while excellent agreement was obtained for stair-climbing. Experimental peak pressures, average pressures, and contact areas were 10.0 MPa (limit of film detection), 4.4-5.0 MPa and 321.9-425.1 mm2, respectively, while FE predicted peak pressures, average pressures and contact areas were 10.8-12.7 MPa, 5.1-6.2 MPa and 304.2-366.1 mm2, respectively. Misalignment errors, determined as the difference in root mean squared error before and after alignment of FE results, were less than 10%. Magnitude errors, determined as the residual error following alignment, were approximately 30% but decreased to 10-15% when the regions of highest pressure were compared. Alterations to the cartilage shear modulus, bulk modulus, or thickness resulted in ±25% change in peak pressures, while changes in average pressures and contact areas were minor (±10%). When the pelvis and proximal femur were represented as rigid, there were large changes, but the effect depended on the particular loading

  17. Prediction of the characteristics of two types of pressure waves in the cochlea: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Masayoshi; Wada, Hiroshi

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the characteristics of two types of cochlear pressure waves, so-called fast and slow waves. A two-dimensional finite-element model of the organ of Corti (OC), including fluid-structure interaction with the surrounding lymph fluid, was constructed. The geometry of the OC at the basal turn was determined from morphological measurements of others in the gerbil hemicochlea. As far as mechanical properties of the materials within the OC are concerned, previously determined mechanical properties of portions within the OC were adopted, and unknown mechanical features were determined from the published measurements of static stiffness. Time advance of the fluid-structure scheme was achieved by a staggered approach. Using the model, the magnitude and phase of the fast and slow waves were predicted so as to fit the numerically obtained pressure distribution in the scala tympani with what is known about intracochlear pressure measurement. When the predicted pressure waves were applied to the model, the numerical result of the velocity of the basilar membrane showed good agreement with the experimentally obtained velocity of the basilar membrane documented by others. Thus, the predicted pressure waves appeared to be reliable. Moreover, it was found that the fluid-structure interaction considerably influences the dynamic behavior of the OC at frequencies near the characteristic frequency.

  18. Coupling of Low Speed Fan Stator Vane Unsteady Pressures to Duct Modes: Measured versus Predicted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Envia, Edmane

    1999-01-01

    Uniform-flow annular-duct Green's functions are the essential elements of the classical acoustic analogy approach to the problem of computing the noise generated by rotor-stator interaction inside the fan duct. This paper investigates the accuracy of this class of Green's functions for predicting the duct noise levels when measured stator vane unsteady surface pressures are used as input to the theoretical formulation. The accuracy of the method is evaluated by comparing the predicted and measured acoustic power levels for the NASA 48 inch low speed Active Noise Control Fan. The unsteady surface pressures are measured,by an array of microphones imbedded in the suction and pressure sides of a single vane, while the duct mode levels are measured using a rotating rake system installed in the inlet and exhaust sections of the fan duct. The predicted levels are computed using properly weighted integrals of measured surface pressure distribution. The data-theory comparisons are generally quite good particularly when the mode cut-off criterion is carefully interpreted. This suggests that, at least for low speed fans, the uniform-flow annular-duct Green's function theory can be reliably used for prediction of duct mode levels if the cascade surface pressure distribution is accurately known.

  19. Exploding Water Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Water has the unusual property that it expands on freezing, so that ice has a specific gravity of 0.92 compared to 1.0 for liquid water. The most familiar demonstration of this property is ice cubes floating in a glass of water. A more dramatic demonstration is the ice bomb shown in Fig. 1. Here a cast iron flask is filled with water and tightly stoppered. The flask is then cooled, either by leaving it outdoors in winter or by immersing it in a cryogenic fluid, until the water freezes. As the water freezes and expands, the pressure inside the flask increases dramatically, eventually becoming sufficient to fracture the metal walls of the enclosure. A related, but much less familiar, phenomenon is the explosive fracturing of small water drops upon freezing. That water drops can fracture in this way has been known for many years, and the phenomenon has been described in detail in the atmospheric sciences literature, where it is seen as relevant to the freezing of raindrops as they fall through cold air. Carefully controlled experiments have been done documenting how the character and frequency of fracture is affected by such variables as drop size, rate of cooling, chemistry of dissolved gases, etc. Here I describe instead a simple demonstration of fracture suitable for video analysis and appropriate for study at the introductory physics level. Readers may also be interested in other characteristics of freezing and fragmenting water drops, for example, charge separation upon fracture and the appearance of spikes and bulges on the surface.

  20. Predicting electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure waveforms with different Echo State Network architectures.

    PubMed

    Fong, Allan; Mittu, Ranjeev; Ratwani, Raj; Reggia, James

    2014-01-01

    Alarm fatigue caused by false alarms and alerts is an extremely important issue for the medical staff in Intensive Care Units. The ability to predict electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure waveforms can potentially help the staff and hospital systems better classify a patient's waveforms and subsequent alarms. This paper explores the use of Echo State Networks, a specific type of neural network for mining, understanding, and predicting electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure waveforms. Several network architectures are designed and evaluated. The results show the utility of these echo state networks, particularly ones with larger integrated reservoirs, for predicting electrocardiogram waveforms and the adaptability of such models across individuals. The work presented here offers a unique approach for understanding and predicting a patient's waveforms in order to potentially improve alarm generation. We conclude with a brief discussion of future extensions of this research. PMID:25954359

  1. Osmotic pressure of ionic liquids in an electric double layer: Prediction based on a continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Gi Jong; Ahn, Myung Mo; Kang, In Seok

    2015-12-01

    An analysis has been performed for the osmotic pressure of ionic liquids in the electric double layer (EDL). By using the electromechanical approach, we first derive a differential equation that is valid for computing the osmotic pressure in the continuum limit of any incompressible fluid in EDL. Then a specific model for ionic liquids proposed by Bazant et al. [M. Z. Bazant, B. D. Storey, and A. A. Kornyshev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 046102 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.046102] is adopted for more detailed computation of the osmotic pressure. Ionic liquids are characterized by the correlation and the steric effects of ions and their effects are analyzed. In the low voltage cases, the correlation effect is dominant and the problem becomes linear. For this low voltage limit, a closed form formula is derived for predicting the osmotic pressure in EDL with no overlapping. It is found that the osmotic pressure decreases as the correlation effect increases. The osmotic pressures at the nanoslit surface and nanoslit centerline are also obtained for the low voltage limit. For the cases of moderately high voltage with high correlation factor, approximate formulas are derived for estimating osmotic pressure values based on the concept of a condensed layer near the electrode. In order to corroborate the results predicted by analytical studies, the full nonlinear model has been solved numerically.

  2. The preoperative intraocular pressure level predicts the amount of underestimated intraocular pressure after LASIK for myopia

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, E; Takahashi, H; Okazaki, K; Park, M; Tanito, M

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the statistical significance of the parameters that affect underestimation of intraocular pressure (IOP) after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia. Methods: In this prospective case series study, patient age, axial length, preoperative corneal curvature, preoperative central corneal thickness (CCT), preoperative IOP, and ablation depth were studied to determine whether they affect the underestimation of IOP in the right eyes of 100 consecutive patients who underwent LASIK. Results: The preoperative IOP was the most important parameter for an amount of underestimated Goldmann applanation tonometric IOP (GAT) and non-contact tonometric IOP (ncIOP) at 1 month (r = 0.654, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.427, and r = 0.694, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.481, respectively) and 3 months (r = 0.637, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.406, and r = 0.726, p<0.0001, R2 = 0.527, respectively). Patient age was statistically significant for underestimating the GAT at 1 month, and both the ablation depth and CCT were statistically significant parameters for underestimating the ncIOP at 1 month and at 3 months by stepwise multiple regression analysis (F>4.000). However, these parameters had small bivariate correlation coefficients, and were considered as minor parameters. Conclusion: Preoperative IOP is the most important parameter that affects an underestimation of IOP after LASIK for myopia. Eyes with a higher true IOP have a larger underestimation of the IOP after LASIK for myopia. From these results, the importance of the modulus of elasticity on IOP measurements was discussed. PMID:15665345

  3. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  4. Prediction of pore-water pressure response to rainfall using support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babangida, Nuraddeen Muhammad; Mustafa, Muhammad Raza Ul; Yusuf, Khamaruzaman Wan; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear complex behavior of pore-water pressure responses to rainfall was modelled using support vector regression (SVR). Pore-water pressure can rise to disturbing levels that may result in slope failure during or after rainfall. Traditionally, monitoring slope pore-water pressure responses to rainfall is tedious and expensive, in that the slope must be instrumented with necessary monitors. Data on rainfall and corresponding responses of pore-water pressure were collected from such a monitoring program at a slope site in Malaysia and used to develop SVR models to predict pore-water pressure fluctuations. Three models, based on their different input configurations, were developed. SVR optimum meta-parameters were obtained using k-fold cross validation and a grid search. Model type 3 was adjudged the best among the models and was used to predict three other points on the slope. For each point, lag intervals of 30 min, 1 h and 2 h were used to make the predictions. The SVR model predictions were compared with predictions made by an artificial neural network model; overall, the SVR model showed slightly better results. Uncertainty quantification analysis was also performed for further model assessment. The uncertainty components were found to be low and tolerable, with d-factor of 0.14 and 74 % of observed data falling within the 95 % confidence bound. The study demonstrated that the SVR model is effective in providing an accurate and quick means of obtaining pore-water pressure response, which may be vital in systems where response information is urgently needed.

  5. Evaluation of turbulence models for prediction of separated turbulent boundary layer under unsteady adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junshin; You, Donghyun

    2014-11-01

    Predicitive capabilites of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) techniques for separated flow under unsteady adverse pressure gradients have been assessed using SST k - ω model and Spalart-Allmaras model by comparing their results with direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. Both DNS and RANS have been conducted with a zero pressure gradient, a steady adverse pressure gradient, and an unsteady adverse pressure gradient, respectively. Comparative studies show that both RANS models predict earlier separation and fuller velocity profiles at the reattachment zone than DNS in the unsteady case, while reasonable agreements with DNS are observed for steady counterparts. Causes for differences in the predictive capability of RANS for steady and unsteady cases, are explained by examining the Reynolds stress term and eddy viscosity term in detail. The Reynolds stress and eddy viscosity are under-predicted by both RANS models in the unsteady case. The origin of the under-prediction of the Reynolds stress with both RANS models is revealed by investigating Reynolds stress budget terms obtained from DNS. Supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699 and the Brain Korea 21+ program.

  6. Predicting Structural Behavior of Filament Wound Composite Pressure Vessel Using Three Dimensional Shell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavi, M.; Venkat, R.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials with their higher specific strength, moduli and tailorability characteristics will result in reduction of weight of the structure. The composite pressure vessels with integrated end domes develop hoop stresses that are twice longitudinal stresses and when isotropic materials like metals are used for development of the hardware and the material is not fully utilized in the longitudinal/meridional direction resulting in over weight components. The determination of a proper winding angles and thickness is very important to decrease manufacturing difficulties and to increase structural efficiency. In the present study a methodology is developed to understand structural characteristics of filament wound pressure vessels with integrated end domes. Progressive ply wise failure analysis of composite pressure vessel with geodesic end domes is carried out to determine matrix crack failure, burst pressure values at various positions of the shell. A three dimensional finite element analysis is computed to predict the deformations and stresses in the composite pressure vessel. The proposed method could save the time to design filament wound structures, to check whether the ply design is safe for the given input conditions and also can be adapted to non-geodesic structures. The results can be utilized to understand structural characteristics of filament wound pressure vessels with integrated end domes. This approach can be adopted for various applications like solid rocket motor casings, automobile fuel storage tanks and chemical storage tanks. Based on the predictions a composite pressure vessel is designed and developed. Hydraulic test is performed on the composite pressure vessel till the burst pressure.

  7. Electrokinetics of isolated electrified drops.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Rohit; Berry, Joseph D; Harvie, Dalton J E; Davidson, Malcolm R

    2016-04-14

    Using a recently developed multiphase electrokinetic model, we simulate the transient electrohydrodynamic response of a liquid drop containing ions, to both small and large values of electric field. The temporal evolution is found to be governed primarily by two dimensionless groups: (i) Ohnesorge number (Oh), a ratio of viscous to inertio-capillary effects, and (ii) inverse dimensionless Debye length (κ), a measure of the diffuse regions of charge that develop in the drop. The effects of dielectric polarization dominate at low Oh, while effects of separated charge gain importance with increase in Oh. For small values of electric field, the deformation behaviour of a drop is shown to be accurately described by a simple analytical expression. At large electric fields, the drops are unstable and eject progeny drops. Depending on Oh and κ this occurs via dripping or jetting; the regime transitions are shown by a Oh-κ phase map. In contrast to previous studies, we find universal scaling relations to predict size and charge of progeny drops. Our simulations suggest charge transport plays a significant role in drop dynamics for 0.1 ≤ Oh ≤ 10, a parameter range of interest in microscale flows. PMID:26954299

  8. Simplified combustion noise theory yielding a prediction of fluctuating pressure level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The first order equations for the conservation of mass and momentum in differential form are combined for an ideal gas to yield a single second order partial differential equation in one dimension and time. Small perturbation analysis is applied. A Fourier transformation is performed that results in a second order, constant coefficient, nonhomogeneous equation. The driving function is taken to be the source of combustion noise. A simplified model describing the energy addition via the combustion process gives the required source information for substitution in the driving function. This enables the particular integral solution of the nonhomogeneous equation to be found. This solution multiplied by the acoustic pressure efficiency predicts the acoustic pressure spectrum measured in turbine engine combustors. The prediction was compared with the overall sound pressure levels measured in a CF6-50 turbofan engine combustor and found to be in excellent agreement.

  9. Prediction of fluctuating pressure environments associated with plume-induced separated flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    The separated flow environment induced by underexpanded rocket plumes during boost phase of rocket vehicles has been investigated. A simple semi-empirical model for predicting the extent of separation was developed. This model offers considerable computational economy as compared to other schemes reported in the literature, and has been shown to be in good agreement with limited flight data. The unsteady pressure field in plume-induced separated regions was investigated. It was found that fluctuations differed from those for a rigid flare only at low frequencies. The major difference between plume-induced separation and flare-induced separation was shown to be an increase in shock oscillation distance for the plume case. The prediction schemes were applied to PRR shuttle launch configuration. It was found that fluctuating pressures from plume-induced separation are not as severe as for other fluctuating environments at the critical flight condition of maximum dynamic pressure.

  10. Direct Pressure Monitoring Accurately Predicts Pulmonary Vein Occlusion During Cryoballoon Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidou, Ioanna; Wooden, Shannnon; Jones, Brian; Deering, Thomas; Wickliffe, Andrew; Dan, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) is an established therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF). Pulmonary vein (PV) occlusion is essential for achieving antral contact and PV isolation and is typically assessed by contrast injection. We present a novel method of direct pressure monitoring for assessment of PV occlusion. Transcatheter pressure is monitored during balloon advancement to the PV antrum. Pressure is recorded via a single pressure transducer connected to the inner lumen of the cryoballoon. Pressure curve characteristics are used to assess occlusion in conjunction with fluoroscopic or intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) guidance. PV occlusion is confirmed when loss of typical left atrial (LA) pressure waveform is observed with recordings of PA pressure characteristics (no A wave and rapid V wave upstroke). Complete pulmonary vein occlusion as assessed with this technique has been confirmed with concurrent contrast utilization during the initial testing of the technique and has been shown to be highly accurate and readily reproducible. We evaluated the efficacy of this novel technique in 35 patients. A total of 128 veins were assessed for occlusion with the cryoballoon utilizing the pressure monitoring technique; occlusive pressure was demonstrated in 113 veins with resultant successful pulmonary vein isolation in 111 veins (98.2%). Occlusion was confirmed with subsequent contrast injection during the initial ten procedures, after which contrast utilization was rapidly reduced or eliminated given the highly accurate identification of occlusive pressure waveform with limited initial training. Verification of PV occlusive pressure during CBA is a novel approach to assessing effective PV occlusion and it accurately predicts electrical isolation. Utilization of this method results in significant decrease in fluoroscopy time and volume of contrast. PMID:23485956

  11. Direct pressure monitoring accurately predicts pulmonary vein occlusion during cryoballoon ablation.

    PubMed

    Kosmidou, Ioanna; Wooden, Shannnon; Jones, Brian; Deering, Thomas; Wickliffe, Andrew; Dan, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) is an established therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF). Pulmonary vein (PV) occlusion is essential for achieving antral contact and PV isolation and is typically assessed by contrast injection. We present a novel method of direct pressure monitoring for assessment of PV occlusion. Transcatheter pressure is monitored during balloon advancement to the PV antrum. Pressure is recorded via a single pressure transducer connected to the inner lumen of the cryoballoon. Pressure curve characteristics are used to assess occlusion in conjunction with fluoroscopic or intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) guidance. PV occlusion is confirmed when loss of typical left atrial (LA) pressure waveform is observed with recordings of PA pressure characteristics (no A wave and rapid V wave upstroke). Complete pulmonary vein occlusion as assessed with this technique has been confirmed with concurrent contrast utilization during the initial testing of the technique and has been shown to be highly accurate and readily reproducible. We evaluated the efficacy of this novel technique in 35 patients. A total of 128 veins were assessed for occlusion with the cryoballoon utilizing the pressure monitoring technique; occlusive pressure was demonstrated in 113 veins with resultant successful pulmonary vein isolation in 111 veins (98.2%). Occlusion was confirmed with subsequent contrast injection during the initial ten procedures, after which contrast utilization was rapidly reduced or eliminated given the highly accurate identification of occlusive pressure waveform with limited initial training. Verification of PV occlusive pressure during CBA is a novel approach to assessing effective PV occlusion and it accurately predicts electrical isolation. Utilization of this method results in significant decrease in fluoroscopy time and volume of contrast. PMID:23485956

  12. Heat transfer and pressure measurements and comparison with prediction for the SSME two-stage turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. G.; Kim, J.

    1992-01-01

    Time averaged Stanton number and surface pressure distributions are reported for the first stage vane row, the first stage blade row, and the second stage vane row of the Rocketdyne Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) two-stage fuel-side turbine. Unsteady pressure envelope measurements for the first blade are also reported. These measurements were made at 10 percent, 50 percent, and 90 percent span on both the pressure and suction surfaces of the first stage components. Additional Stanton number measurements were made on the first stage blade platform, blade tip, and shroud, and at 50 percent span on the second vane. A shock tube was used as a short duration source of heated and pressurized air to which the turbine was subjected. Platinum thin film heat flux gages were used to obtain the heat flux measurements, while miniature silicon diaphragm flush-mounted pressure transducers were used to obtain the pressure measurements. The first stage vane Stanton number distributions are compared with predictions obtained using a version of STAN5 and quasi-3D Navier-Stokes solution. This same quasi-3D N-S code was also used to obtain predictions for the first blade and the second vane.

  13. “Buzz-saw” noise: Prediction of the rotor-alone pressure field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, A.; Schwaller, P. J. G.; Fisher, M. J.; Tester, B. J.

    2012-10-01

    Public expectations of lower environmental noise levels, and increasingly stringent legislative limits on aircraft noise, result in noise being a critical technical issue in the development of jet engines. Noise at take-off, when the engines are at high-power operating conditions, is a key reference level for engine noise certification. "Buzz-saw" noise is the dominant fan tone noise from modern high-bypass-ratio turbofan aircraft engines during take-off. Rotor-alone tones are the key component of buzz-saw noise. The rotor-alone pressure field is cut-off at subsonic fan tip speeds; buzz-saw noise is associated with supersonic fan tip speeds, or equivalently, high power engine operating conditions. A recent series of papers has described new work concerning the prediction of buzz-saw noise. The prediction method is based on modelling the nonlinear propagation of one-dimensional sawtooth waveforms. A sawtooth waveform is a simplified representation of the rotor-alone pressure field. Previous validation of the prediction method focussed entirely on reproducing the spectral characteristics of buzz-saw noise; this was dictated at that time by the availability of spectral data only for comparison between measurement and prediction. In this paper, full validation of the method by comparing measurement and prediction of the rotor-alone pressure field is published for the first time. It is shown that results from the modelling based on a one-dimensional sawtooth waveform capture the essential features of the rotor-alone pressure field as it propagates upstream inside a hard-walled inlet duct. This verifies that predictions of the buzz-saw noise spectrum, which are in good agreement with the measured data, are based on a model which reproduces the key physics of the noise generation process. Validation results for the rotor-alone pressure field in an acoustically lined inlet duct are also shown. Comparisons of the measured and predicted rotor-alone pressure field are more

  14. Instabilities of volatile films and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa

    2008-12-01

    We report on instabilities during spreading of volatile liquids, with emphasis on the novel instability observed when isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is deposited on a monocrystalline silicon (Si) wafer. This instability is characterized by emission of drops ahead of the expanding front, with each drop followed by smaller, satellite droplets, forming the structures which we nickname "octopi" due to their appearance. A less volatile liquid, or a substrate of larger heat conductivity, suppress this instability. In addition, we examine the spreading of drops of water (DIW)-IPA mixtures on both Si wafers and plain glass slides, and describe the variety of contact line instabilities which appear. We find that the decrease of IPA concentration in mixtures leads to transition from "octopi" to mushroom-like instabilities. Through manipulation of our experimental set up, we also find that the mechanism responsible for these instabilities appears to be mostly insensitive to both the external application of convection to the gas phase, and the doping of the gas phase with vapor in order to create the saturated environment. In order to better understand the "octopi" instability, we develop a theoretical model for evaporation of a pure liquid drop on a thermally conductive solid substrate. This model includes all relevant physical effects, including evaporation, thermal conductivity in both liquid and solid, (thermocapillary) Marangoni effect, vapor recoil, disjoining pressure, and gravity. The crucial ingredient in this problem is the evaporation model, since it influences both the motion of the drop contact line, and the temperature profiles along the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interfaces. We consider two evaporation models: the equilibrium "lens" model and the non-equilibrium one-sided (NEOS) model. Along with the assumption of equilibrium at the liquid-gas interface, the "lens" model also assumes that evaporation proceeds in a (vapor) diffusion-limited regime, therefore bringing

  15. Building a Chemical Intuition Under Pressure: Prediction of Alkali Metal Polyhydrides and Subhydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Eva

    2013-06-01

    Stabilization of solid phases with unusual combinations or stoichiometries, and unexpected electronic structures may be achieved by applying external pressure. The prediction of these structures using our chemical intuition (developed at 1 atmosphere) would be exceedingly difficult, making automated structure search techniques prudent. For this reason, we have written XtalOpt, an open-source evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction. Whereas at 1 atmosphere the classic alkali hydrides combine in a one-to-one ratio, M+H-, under pressure non-classic stoichiometries MHn(n > 1) and MmH (m > 1) are preferred. For example, theoretical work has predicted that LiH6 and NaH9 become particularly stable phases at about 100 and 25 GPa, respectively. And the potassium, rubidium and cesium polyhydrides all contain the H3-anion, the simplest exaple of a three centered four electron bond. The alkaline-earth polyhydrides are considered as well. Chemical trends relating the stabilization pressure to the ionization potential, and the nature of the hydrogenic sublattice to the strength of the metal-hydride interaction can be made. These hydrogen-rich materials with nontraditional stoichiometries are computed to undergo an insulator to metal transition at pressures attainable in diamond anvil cells. It may be that these systems are superconductors at experimentally achievable pressures. The metal-rich region of the alkali/hydrogen phase diagram under pressure shows that alkali-metal subhydrides may also be stabilized under pressure. We acknowledge the NSF (DMR-1005413) for financial support.

  16. The effects of pressure gradients on convective heat flux predictions in engine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, I.-Ping

    1991-02-01

    Accurate convective heat transfer predictions inside engines is important to improvements in performance, reduction of harmful exhaust emissions, and structural and material design. Current heat transfer models used in engine simulations do not incorporate the effects of pressure gradients. In this study, wall functions that use local pressure gradients to correct the friction velocity, wall shear stress, and heat flux were developed. The pressure-gradient-corrected (PGC) model predictions of nondimensional velocity and temperature were validated by experimental data available in the literature and were also compared with other models. Results showed reasonable agreement with the experimental data for both accelerated and decelerated flows before flow separation. The drag law relations predicted by the PGC wall function gave good trend analysis of skin coefficient variation over the local Reynolds number for different local pressure gradient conditions. The piecewise linear correlations between the skin friction coefficient and the Stanton number for different pressure gradients were observed. The PGC model wall function parameters which include a modified friction velocity, wall shear stress, and heat flux were calculated using the engine hydrodynamic simulation code KIVA-II. The predictions exhibited appropriate response to a variety of engine flow and operating conditions. The PGC model wall function predictions of friction velocity and wall shear stress were compared with two different models for a flat-piston and a deep-bowl engine at the same operating conditions and location. The wall heat flux predictions from the PGC model were compared with four different models for the different flow, geometry, and operating conditions from a flat-piston engine and a deep-bowl piston engine. Results of different model predictions were compared with experimental data. For the flat-piston engine, the PGC model predictions underestimated peaks and valleys in the compression

  17. Numerical prediction of pressure fluctuations in a prototype pump turbine base on PANS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. T.; Li, Y.; Gao, Y.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y. L.

    2016-05-01

    Unsteady flow and pressure fluctuations within a prototypel pump turbine are numerically studied using a nonlinear Partial Averaged Navier Stokes (PANS) model. Pump turbine operating at different conditions with guide vanes opening angle 6° is simulated. Results revealed that the predictions of performance and relative peak-to-peak amplitude by PANS approach agree well with the experimental data. The amplitude of the pressure fluctuation in the vaneless space at turbine mode on a “S” curve increases with the decrease of the flow rate, and it has maximum value when it runs close to runaway line at turbine braking mode. The amplitude of the pressure fluctuation in the vaneless space at turbine braking mode on a “S” curve decreases with the reduce of the flow rate. The above high pressure fluctuations should be avoided during the design of pump turbines especially those operating at high-head condition.

  18. Systematic prediction of high-pressure melting curves of transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hieu, Ho Khac

    2014-10-28

    The pressure effects on melting temperatures of transition metals have been studied based on the combination of the modified Lindemann criterion with statistical moment method in quantum statistical mechanics. Numerical calculations have been performed for five transition metals including Cu, Pd, Pt, Ni, and Mn up to pressure 100 GPa. Our results are in good and reasonable agreements with available experimental data. This approach gives us a relatively simple method for qualitatively calculating high-pressure melting temperature. Moreover, it can be used to verify future experimental and theoretical works. This research proposes the potential of the combination of statistical moment method and the modified Lindemann criterion on predicting high-pressure melting of materials.

  19. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, M. A.; van de Streek, J.; Fabbiani, F. P. A.; Hidber, P.; Grassmann, O.

    2015-07-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib.

  20. Static Magnetowetting of Ferrofluid Drops.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Carlo; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Talbot, Delphine; Massart, René; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Abou-Hassan, Ali

    2016-08-01

    We report results of a comprehensive study of the wetting properties of sessile drops of ferrofluid water solutions at various concentrations deposited on flat substrates and subjected to the action of permanent magnets of different sizes and strengths. The amplitude and the gradient of the magnetic field experienced by the ferrofluid are changed by varying the magnets and their distance to the surface. Magnetic forces up to 100 times the gravitational one and magnetic gradients up to 1 T/cm are achieved. A rich phenomenology is observed, ranging from flattened drops caused by the magnetic attraction to drops extended normally to the substrate because of the normal traction of the magnetic field. We find that the former effect can be conveniently described in terms of an effective Bond number that compares the effective drop attraction with the capillary force, whereas the drop's vertical elongation is effectively expressed by a dimensionless number S, which compares the pressure jump at the ferrofluid interface because of the magnetization with the capillary pressure. PMID:27385506

  1. On the feasibility of tilt test outcome early prediction using ECG and pressure parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno-Blanes, FJ; Rojo-Álvarez, JL; Caamaño, AJ; Flores-Yepes, JA; García-Alberola, A.

    2011-12-01

    The tilt test is a valuable clinical tool for vasovagal syncope (VVS) diagnostic, and its early prediction from simple ECG and blood pressure-based parameters has widely been studied in the literature. However, no practical system is currently used in the clinical setting for the early prediction of the tilt test outcome. The objectives of this study were (1) to benchmark the early prediction performance of all the previously proposed parameters, when nonlinearly combined; (2) to try to improve this performance with the inclusion of additional information and processing techniques. We analyzed a database of 727 consecutive cases of tilt test. Previously proposed features were measured from heart rate and systolic/diastolic pressure tachograms, in several representative signal segments. We aimed to improve the prediction performance: first, using new nonlinear features (detrended fluctuation analysis and sample entropy); second, using a multivariable nonlinear classifier (support vector machine); and finally, including additional physiological signals (stroke volume). The predictive performance of the nonlinearly combined previously proposed features was limited [area under receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) 0.57 ± 0.12], especially at the beginning of the test, which is the most clinically relevant period. The improvement with additional available physiological information was limited too. We conclude that the use of a system for tilt test outcome prediction with current knowledge and processing should be considered with caution, and that further effort has to be devoted to understand the mechanisms of VVS.

  2. Prediction of space shuttle fluctuating pressure environments, including rocket plume effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, K. J.; Robertson, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary estimates of space shuttle fluctuating pressure environments have been made based on prediction techniques developed by Wyle Laboratories. Particular emphasis has been given to the transonic speed regime during launch of a parallel-burn space shuttle configuration. A baseline configuration consisting of a lightweight orbiter and monolithic SRB, together with a typical flight trajectory, have been used as models for the predictions. Critical fluctuating pressure environments are predicted at transonic Mach numbers. Comparisons between predicted environments and wind tunnel test results, in general, showed good agreement. Predicted one-third octave band spectra for the above environments were generally one of three types: (1) attached turbulent boundary layer spectra (typically high frequencies); (2) homogeneous separated flow and shock-free interference flow spectra (typically intermediate frequencies); and (3) shock-oscillation and shock-induced interference flow spectra (typically low frequencies). Predictions of plume induced separated flow environments were made. Only the SRB plumes are important, with fluctuating levels comparable to compression-corner induced separated flow shock oscillation.

  3. DONBOL: A computer program for predicting axisymmetric nozzle afterbody pressure distributions and drag at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    A Neumann solution for inviscid external flow was coupled to a modified Reshotko-Tucker integral boundary-layer technique, the control volume method of Presz for calculating flow in the separated region, and an inviscid one-dimensional solution for the jet exhaust flow in order to predict axisymmetric nozzle afterbody pressure distributions and drag. The viscous and inviscid flows are solved iteratively until convergence is obtained. A computer algorithm of this procedure was written and is called DONBOL. A description of the computer program and a guide to its use is given. Comparisons of the predictions of this method with experiments show that the method accurately predicts the pressure distributions of boattail afterbodies which have the jet exhaust flow simulated by solid bodies. For nozzle configurations which have the jet exhaust simulated by high-pressure air, the present method significantly underpredicts the magnitude of nozzle pressure drag. This deficiency results because the method neglects the effects of jet plume entrainment. This method is limited to subsonic free-stream Mach numbers below that for which the flow over the body of revolution becomes sonic.

  4. Equilibrium shapes of acoustically levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C.-J.

    1986-05-01

    The quantitative determination of the shape of liquid drops levitated in an ultrasonic standing wave has provided experimental data on the radiation pressure-induced deformations of freely suspended liquids. Within the limits of small deviations from the spherical shape and small drop diameter relative to the acoustic wavelength, an existing approximate theory yields a good agreement with experimental evidence. The data were obtained for millimeter and submillimeter drops levitated in air under 1 g, where g is the sea level gravitational acceleration.

  5. Assessing Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Scales- A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Seong-Hi; LEE, Hea Shoon

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to present a scientific reason for pressure ulcer risk scales: Cubbin& Jackson modified Braden, Norton, and Waterlow, as a nursing diagnosis tool by utilizing predictive validity of pressure sores. Methods: Articles published between 1966 and 2013 from periodicals indexed in the Ovid Medline, Embase, CINAHL, KoreaMed, NDSL, and other databases were selected using the key word “pressure ulcer”. QUADAS-II was applied for assessment for internal validity of the diagnostic studies. Selected studies were analyzed using meta-analysis with MetaDisc 1.4. Results: Seventeen diagnostic studies with high methodological quality, involving 5,185 patients, were included. In the results of the meta-analysis, sROC AUC of Braden, Norton, and Waterflow scale was over 0.7, showing moderate predictive validity, but they have limited interpretation due to significant differences between studies. In addition, Waterlow scale is insufficient as a screening tool owing to low sensitivity compared with other scales. Conclusion: The contemporary pressure ulcer risk scale is not suitable for uninform practice on patients under standardized criteria. Therefore, in order to provide more effective nursing care for bedsores, a new or modified pressure ulcer risk scale should be developed upon strength and weaknesses of existing tools. PMID:27114977

  6. Correlations to predict frictional pressure loss of hydraulic-fracturing slurry in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.; Zhoi, Y.X.; Bailey, M.; Hernandez, J.

    2009-08-15

    Compared with conventional-tubing fracturing, coiled-tubing (CT) fracturing has several advantages. CT fracturing has become an effective stimulation technique for multizone oil and gas wells. It is also an attractive production-enhancement method for multiseam coalbed-methane wells, and wells with bypassed zones. The excessive frictional pressure loss through CT has been a concern in fracturing. The small diameter of the string limits the cross-sectional area open to flow. Furthermore, the tubing curvature causes secondary flow and results in extra flow resistance. This increased frictional pressure loss results in high surface pumping pressure. The maximum possible pump rate and sand concentration, therefore, have to be reduced. To design a CT fracturing job properly, it is essential to predict the frictional pressure loss through the tubing accurately. This paper presents correlations for the prediction of frictional pressure loss of fracturing slurries in straight tubing and CT. They are developed on the basis of full-scale slurry-flow tests with 11/2-in. CT and slurries prepared with 35 lbm/1,000 gal of guar gel. The extensive experiments were conducted at the full-scale CT-flow test facility. The proposed correlations have been verified with the experimental data and actual field CT-fracturing data. Case studies of wells recently fractured are provided to demonstrate the application of the correlations. The correlations will be useful to the CT engineers in their hydraulics design calculations.

  7. Predicted and measured effects of pressure and crossflow velocity on composite propellant burning rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model for prediction of burning rates of composite (ammonium perchlorate oxidizer) solid propellants as a function of pressure and crossflow velocity was developed. Included in this model is the capability for treatment of multimodal oxidizer particle sizes and metalized formulations. In addition, an experimental device for measuring the effects of crossflow velocity on propellant burning rate was developed and used to characterize a series of AP/HTPB propellants with systematically varied formulation parameters. Model predictions of zero-crossflow burning rate versus pressure characteristics were found to be in agreement with data, while the agreement between erosive burning predictions and data is, in general, good. The experimental data indicate that the dominant factor influencing the sensitivity of composite propellant burning rate to crossflow is the base (no-crossflow) burning rate versus pressure characteristics of the propellant (lower base burning rate leading to increased crossflow sensitivity). Finally, the model was used to examine the effects of motor scaling on erosive burning: erosive burning is predicted to diminish with increasing motor size, in agreement with experience.

  8. Alternate drop pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of alternate drop pulse polarography is presented. An experimental evaluation of alternate drop pulse polarography shows complete compensation of the capacitative background due to drop expansion. The capillary response phenomenon was studied in the absence of faradaic reaction and the capillary response current was found to depend on the pulse width to the -0.72 power. Increased signal-to-noise ratios were obtained using alternate drop pulse polarography at shorter drop times.

  9. A Sequential Dynamic Bayesian Network for Pore Pressure Prediction and Quantification of Uncertainty.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, R. H.; Wooff, D. A.; Hobbs, R. W.; Swarbrick, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Pore pressure prediction is vital when drilling a well, as unexpected overpressure can cause drilling challenges and uncontrolled hydrocarbon leakage. One cause of overpressure is when pore fluid is trapped during burial and takes on part of the lithostatic load. Predictions often use porosity-based techniques, such as the Eaton Ratio method and equivalent depth method. These rely on an idealised compaction trend and use a single wireline log as a proxy for porosity. Such methods do not account for the many sources of uncertainty, or for the multivariate nature of the system. We propose a sequential dynamic Bayesian network (SDBN) as a solution to these issues. The SDBN models the quantities in the system (such as pressures, porosity, lithology, wireline logs, fluid properties and so on) using conditional probability distributions to capture their joint behaviour. A compaction model is central to the SDBN, relating porosity to vertical effective stress, with uncertainty in the relationship, so that the logic is similar to that of the equivalent depth method. The probability distribution for porosity depends on VES and lithology, with much more uncertainty in sandstone-like rocks than in shales to reflect a general lack of understanding of sandstone compaction. The distributions of the wireline logs depend on porosity and lithology, along with other quantities, and so when they are observed the SDBN learns about porosity and lithology and in turn VES and pore pressure, using Bayes theorem. The probability distribution for each quantity in the SDBN is updated in light of any data, so that rather than giving a single-valued prediction for pore pressure, the SDBN gives a prediction with uncertainty that takes into account the whole system, knowledge and data. The dynamic nature of the SDBN enables it to use the bulk density to calculate total vertical stress, and to account for the dissipation of pore pressure. The vertical correlation in the SDBN means it is suited to

  10. Draft tube pressure pulsation predictions in Francis turbines with transient Computational Fluid Dynamics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melot, M.; Nennemann, B.; Désy, N.

    2014-03-01

    An automatic Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) procedure that aims at predicting Draft Tube Pressure Pulsations (DTPP) at part load is presented. After a brief review of the physics involved, a description of the transient numerical setup is given. Next, the paper describes a post processing technique, namely the separation of pressure signals into synchronous, asynchronous and random pulsations. Combining the CFD calculation with the post-processing technique allows the quantification of the potential excitation of the mechanical system during the design phase. Consequently it provides the hydraulic designer with a tool to specifically target DTPP and thus helps in the development of more robust designs for part load operation of turbines.

  11. Characterization and Prediction of Subsurface Pneumatic PressureVariations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    1998-01-02

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is being investigated as the proposed site for geologic disposal of high level nuclear waste. A massive data collection effort for characterization of the unsaturated zone is being carried out at the site. The USGS is monitoring the subsurface pressure variations due to barometric pumping in several boreholes. Numerical models are used to simulate the observed subsurface pressure variations. Data inversion is used to characterize the unsaturated system and estimate the pneumatic diffusivity of important geologic features. Blind predictions of subsurface response and subsequent comparison to recorded data have built confidence in the models of Yucca Mountain.

  12. Electrohydrodynamics of a particle-covered drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouriemi, Malika; Vlahovska, Petia

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a drop nearly-completely covered with a particle monolayer in a uniform DC electric field. The weakly conducting fluid system consists of a silicon oil drop suspended in castor oil. A broad range of particle sizes, conductivities, and shapes is explored. In weak electric fields, the presence of particles increases drop deformation compared to a particle-free drop and suppresses the electrohydrodynamic flow. Very good agreement is observed between the measured drop deformation and the small deformation theory derived for surfactant-laden drops (Nganguia et al., 2013). In stronger electric fields, where drops are expected to undergo Quincke rotation (Salipante and Vlahovska, 2010), the presence of the particles greatly decreases the threshold for rotation and the stationary tilted drop configuration observed for clean drop is replaced by a spinning drop with either a wobbling inclination or a very low inclination. These behaviors resemble the predicted response of rigid ellipsoids in uniform electric fields. At even stronger electric fields, the particles can form dynamic wings or the drop implodes. The similar behavior of particle-covered and surfactant-laden drops provides new insights into understanding stability of Pickering emulsions. Supported by NSF-CBET 1437545.

  13. Prediction of blade-vortex interaction noise using measured blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Mahendra C.; Liu, Sandy R.; Boxwell, Donald A.

    1987-01-01

    In the study reported here, blade-vortex interaction noise was predicted using a simplified model of blade pressures measured on a one-seventh scale model AH-1/OLS main rotor. The methods used for the acoustic prediction are based on the acoustic analogy and have been developed by Nakamura (1981) and by Brentner, Nystrom, and Farassat (referred to as the WOPWOP method). The waveforms predicted by the two methods are in good agreement with each other and with the measurements in terms of the number of pulses, the pulse widths, and the separation times between the pulses. The peak amplitude of the dominant pulse may, however, be underpredicted by up to 40 percent, depending on flight conditions. Ways of improving the accuracy of the prediction methods are suggested.

  14. Injector Element which Maintains a Constant Mean Spray Angle and Optimum Pressure Drop During Throttling by Varying the Geometry of Tangential Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P. (Inventor); Myers, William Neill (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the optimum inlet geometry of a liquid rocket engine swirl injector includes obtaining a throttleable level phase value, volume flow rate, chamber pressure, liquid propellant density, inlet injector pressure, desired target spray angle and desired target optimum delta pressure value between an inlet and a chamber for a plurality of engine stages. The tangential inlet area for each throttleable stage is calculated. The correlation between the tangential inlet areas and delta pressure values is used to calculate the spring displacement and variable inlet geometry. An injector designed using the method includes a plurality of geometrically calculated tangential inlets in an injection tube; an injection tube cap with a plurality of inlet slots slidably engages the injection tube. A pressure differential across the injector element causes the cap to slide along the injection tube and variably align the inlet slots with the tangential inlets.

  15. Predictive capacity of risk assessment scales and clinical judgment for pressure ulcers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Agreda, J Javier Soldevilla

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review with meta-analysis was completed to determine the capacity of risk assessment scales and nurses' clinical judgment to predict pressure ulcer (PU) development. Electronic databases were searched for prospective studies on the validity and predictive capacity of PUs risk assessment scales published between 1962 and 2010 in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, German, and Greek. We excluded gray literature sources, integrative review articles, and retrospective or cross-sectional studies. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to the guidelines of the Critical Appraisal Skills Program. Predictive capacity was measured as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. When 2 or more valid original studies were found, a meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model and sensitivity analysis. We identified 57 studies, including 31 that included a validation study. We also retrieved 4 studies that tested clinical judgment as a risk prediction factor. Meta-analysis produced the following pooled predictive capacity indicators: Braden (RR = 4.26); Norton (RR = 3.69); Waterlow (RR = 2.66); Cubbin-Jackson (RR = 8.63); EMINA (RR = 6.17); Pressure Sore Predictor Scale (RR = 21.4); and clinical judgment (RR = 1.89). Pooled analysis of 11 studies found adequate risk prediction capacity in various clinical settings; the Braden, Norton, EMINA (mEntal state, Mobility, Incontinence, Nutrition, Activity), Waterlow, and Cubbin-Jackson scales showed the highest predictive capacity. The clinical judgment of nurses was found to achieve inadequate predictive capacity when used alone, and should be used in combination with a validated scale. PMID:24280770

  16. Prediction of acid lactic-bacteria growth in turkey ham processed by high hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, S.P.; Rosenthal, A.; Gaspar, A.; Aragão, G.M.F.; Slongo-Marcusi, A.

    2013-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been investigated and industrially applied to extend shelf life of meat-based products. Traditional ham packaged under microaerophilic conditions may sometimes present high lactic acid bacteria population during refrigerated storage, which limits shelf life due to development of unpleasant odor and greenish and sticky appearance. This study aimed at evaluating the shelf life of turkey ham pressurized at 400 MPa for 15 min and stored at 4, 8 and 12 °C, in comparison to the non pressurized product. The lactic acid bacteria population up to 107 CFU/g of product was set as the criteria to determine the limiting shelf life According to such parameter the pressurized sample achieved a commercial viability within 75 days when stored at 4 °C while the control lasted only 45 days. Predictive microbiology using Gompertz and Baranyi and Roberts models fitted well both for the pressurized and control samples. The results indicated that the high hydrostatic pressure treatment greatly increased the turkey ham commercial viability in comparison to the usual length, by slowing down the growth of microorganisms in the product. PMID:24159279

  17. Predicting the size of droplets produced through Laplace pressure induced snap-off.

    PubMed

    Barkley, Solomon; Scarfe, Samantha J; Weeks, Eric R; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2016-09-21

    Laplace pressure driven snap-off is a technique that is used to produce droplets for emulsions and microfluidics purposes. Previous predictions of droplet size have assumed a quasi-equilibrium low flow limit. We present a simple model to predict droplet sizes over a wide range of flow rates, demonstrating a rich landscape of droplet stability depending on droplet size and growth rate. The model accounts for the easily adjusted experimental parameters of geometry, interfacial tension, and the viscosities of both phases. PMID:27535011

  18. Evaluation of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) for unsteady air loads prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appa, Kari; Smith, Michael J. C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper evaluates the capability of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) code to predict unsteady aerodynamic pressures, lift and moment distributions, and generalized forces for general wing-body configurations in supersonic flow. Stability derivatives are computed and correlated for the X-29 and an Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, and a flutter analysis is carried out for a wing wind tunnel test example. Most results are shown to correlate well with test or published data. Although the emphasis of this paper is on evaluation, an improvement in the CPM code's handling of intersecting lifting surfaces is briefly discussed. An attractive feature of the CPM code is that it shares the basic data requirements and computational arrangements of the doublet lattice method. A unified code to predict unsteady subsonic or supersonic airloads is therefore possible.

  19. Deformation and secondary breakup of drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiang, L.-P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Drop properties during and after secondary breakup in the bag, multimode and shear breakup regimes were observed for shock wave initiated disturbances in air at normal temperature and pressure. Test liquids included water, n-heptane, ethyl alcohol and glycerol mixtures to yield Weber numbers of 15-600. Ohnesorge numbers of 0.0025-0.039, liquid/gas density ratios of 579-985 and Reynolds numbers of 1060-15080. Measurements included pulsed shadowgraphy and double-pulsed holography to find drop sizes and velocities after breakup. Drop size distributions after breakup satisfied Simmons' universal root normal distribution in all three breakup regimes, after removing the core (or drop-forming) drop from the drop population for shear breakup. The size and velocity of the core drop after shear breakup then was correlated successfully based on the observation that the end of drop stripping corresponded to a constant Eotvos number. The relative velocities of the drop liquid were significantly reduced during secondary breakup, due both to large drag coefficients during the drop deformation stage and reduced relaxation times of smaller drops. These effects were correlated successfully based on a simplified phenomenological theory.

  20. Coalescence dynamics of viscous conical drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiakai; Fang, Shengyang; Corvalan, Carlos M.

    2016-02-01

    When two oppositely charged drops come into light contact, a liquid meniscus bridge with double-cone geometry forms between the drops. Recent experiments have demonstrated the existence of a critical cone angle above which the meniscus bridge pinches off and the drops do not coalesce. This striking behavior—which has implications for processes ranging from the coarsening of emulsions to electrospray ionization in mass spectrometry—has been studied theoretically and experimentally for inertial liquid drops. Little is known, however, about the influence of the liquid viscosity on the critical cone angle. Here, we use high-fidelity numerical simulations to gain insight into the coalescence dynamics of conical drops at intermediate Reynolds numbers. The simulations, which account for viscous, inertial, and surface tension effects, predict that the critical cone angle increases as the viscosity of the drops decreases. When approaching the inertial regime, however, the predicted critical angle quickly stabilizes at approximately 27∘, as observed in experiments.

  1. Analytic Formulation and Numerical Implementation of an Acoustic Pressure Gradient Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seongkyu; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, Fereidoun

    2007-01-01

    The scattering of rotor noise is an area that has received little attention over the years, yet the limited work that has been done has shown that both the directivity and intensity of the acoustic field may be significantly modified by the presence of scattering bodies. One of the inputs needed to compute the scattered acoustic field is the acoustic pressure gradient on a scattering surface. Two new analytical formulations of the acoustic pressure gradient have been developed and implemented in the PSU-WOPWOP rotor noise prediction code. These formulations are presented in this paper. The first formulation is derived by taking the gradient of Farassat's retarded-time Formulation 1A. Although this formulation is relatively simple, it requires numerical time differentiation of the acoustic integrals. In the second formulation, the time differentiation is taken inside the integrals analytically. The acoustic pressure gradient predicted by these new formulations is validated through comparison with the acoustic pressure gradient determined by a purely numerical approach for two model rotors. The agreement between analytic formulations and numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observers case.

  2. Analytic Formulation and Numerical Implementation of an Acoustic Pressure Gradient Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seongkyu; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.; Morris, Philip J.

    2008-01-01

    Two new analytical formulations of the acoustic pressure gradient have been developed and implemented in the PSU-WOPWOP rotor noise prediction code. The pressure gradient can be used to solve the boundary condition for scattering problems and it is a key aspect to solve acoustic scattering problems. The first formulation is derived from the gradient of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation. This formulation has a form involving the observer time differentiation outside the integrals. In the second formulation, the time differentiation is taken inside the integrals analytically. This formulation avoids the numerical time differentiation with respect to the observer time, which is computationally more efficient. The acoustic pressure gradient predicted by these new formulations is validated through comparison with available exact solutions for a stationary and moving monopole sources. The agreement between the predictions and exact solutions is excellent. The formulations are applied to the rotor noise problems for two model rotors. A purely numerical approach is compared with the analytical formulations. The agreement between the analytical formulations and the numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observer cases.

  3. Predicted Sizes of Pressure-supported HI Clouds in the Outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Using data from the ALFALFA AGES Arecibo HI survey of galaxies and the Virgo cluster X-ray pressure profiles from XMM-Newton, we investigate the possibility that starless dark HI clumps, also known as “dark galaxies,” are supported by external pressure in the surrounding intercluster medium. We find that the starless HI clump masses, velocity dispersions, and positions allow these clumps to be in pressure equilibrium with the X-ray gas near the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We predict the sizes of these clumps to range from 1 to 10 kpc, in agreement with the range of sizes found for spatially resolved HI starless clumps outside of Virgo. Based on the predicted HI surface density of the Virgo sources, as well as a sample of other similar resolved ALFALFA HI dark clumps with follow-up optical/radio observations, we predict that most of the HI dark clumps are on the cusp of forming stars. These HI sources therefore mark the transition between starless HI clouds and dwarf galaxies with stars.

  4. Nonlinear oscillations of inviscid free drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patzek, T. W.; Benner, R. E., Jr.; Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    The present analysis of free liquid drops' inviscid oscillations proceeds through solution of Bernoulli's equation to obtain the free surface shape and of Laplace's equation for the velocity potential field. Results thus obtained encompass drop-shape sequences, pressure distributions, particle paths, and the temporal evolution of kinetic and surface energies; accuracy is verified by the near-constant drop volume and total energy, as well as the diminutiveness of mass and momentum fluxes across drop surfaces. Further insight into the nature of oscillations is provided by Fourier power spectrum analyses of mode interactions and frequency shifts.

  5. Comparison of theoretical and observed pressure profiles in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez M, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two-phase water-steam flow conditions in geothermal wells are studied aimed at predicting pressure drops in these wells. Five prediction methods were selected to be analyzed and compared with each other and with actual pressure measurements. These five correlations were tested on five wells: three in New Zealand, one in Mexico, and one in the Philippines.

  6. Measured and predicted pressure distributions on the AFTI/F-111 mission adaptive wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Lannie D.; Mccain, William E.; Rose, Lucinda A.

    1988-01-01

    Flight tests have been conducted using an F-111 aircraft modified with a mission adaptive wing (MAW). The MAW has variable-camber leading and trailing edge surfaces that can change the wing camber in flight, while preserving smooth upper surface contours. This paper contains wing surface pressure measurements obtained during flight tests at Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center. Upper and lower surface steady pressure distributions were measured along four streamwise rows of static pressure orifices on the right wing for a leading-edge sweep angle of 26 deg. The airplane, wing, instrumentation, and test conditions are discussed. Steady pressure results are presented for selected wing camber deflections flown at subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.90 and an angle-of-attack range of 5 to 12 deg. The Reynolds number was 26 million, based on the mean aerodynamic chord. The MAW flight data are compared to MAW wind tunnel data, transonic aircraft technology (TACT) flight data, and predicted pressure distributions. The results provide a unique database for a smooth, variable-camber, advanced supercritical wing.

  7. Attracting Water Drops

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Ron Garan perform the Attracting Water Drops experiment from Chabad Hebrew Academy in San Diego, Calif. This research determines if a free-floating water drop can be att...

  8. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  9. Ternary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterbichler, Hannes; Planchette, Carole; Brenn, Günter

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently proposed to use drop collisions for producing advanced particles or well-defined capsules, or to perform chemical reactions where the merged drops constitute a micro-reactor. For all these promising applications, it is essential to determine whether the merged drops remain stable after the collision, forming a single entity, or if they break up. This topic, widely investigated for binary drop collisions of miscible and immiscible liquid, is quite unexplored for ternary drop collisions. The current study aims to close this gap by experimentally investigating collisions between three equal-sized drops of the same liquid arranged centri-symmetrically. Three drop generators are simultaneously operated to obtain controlled ternary drop collisions. The collision outcomes are observed via photographs and compared to those of binary collisions. Similar to binary collisions, a regime map is built, showing coalescence and bouncing as well as reflexive and stretching separation. Significant differences are observed in the transitions between these regimes.

  10. Pressure and fluid saturation prediction in a multicomponent reservoir, using combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

    2002-06-10

    This paper presents a method for combining seismic and electromagnetic measurements to predict changes in water saturation, pressure, and CO{sub 2} gas/oil ratio in a reservoir undergoing CO{sub 2} flood. Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO{sub 2} flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity, and electrical conductivity during a CO{sub 2} injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed differences in compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization, using Archie's law, provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity, and the electrical conductivity. The rock-properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. Electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation; estimated changes in water saturation are used along with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO{sub 2} relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. This velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio. Resulting images of the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio show CO{sub 2}-rich zones that are well correlated to the location of injection perforations, with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO{sub 2}. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected

  11. Preeclampsia Prediction in Type 1 Diabetes and Diurnal Blood Pressure Methodology.

    PubMed

    Lauszus, Finn Friis

    2016-01-01

    the measurements to be considered are reproducibility, consistency, precision, and trend over scale of measurement. Studies on these issues suggest that consistency and precision depend on which monitor is used. During pregnancy, the reproducibility and specificity depend on the timing and whether measurements are performed repeatedly. Over- and underestimations of blood pressure are typical for 24-h monitoring in high- as well as low risk pregnancies. Preeclampsia is associated with urinary albumin excretion rate, reduced night/day ratio, and elevated diurnal blood pressure from first trimester and onwards. However, due to blunting of the diurnal variation, the night/day rhythm provides no good prediction of preeclampsia. Diurnal measurement is a valuable estimate of blood pressure in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values. PMID:27292175

  12. Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving (STEPPS): program efficacy and personality features as predictors of drop-out -- an Italian study.

    PubMed

    Alesiani, Roberta; Boccalon, Silvia; Giarolli, Laura; Blum, Nancee; Fossati, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    In this study we present a clinical application of the STEPPS model in an Italian sample of severely affected patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) or personality disorder (PD) with prominent borderline features in comorbidity with a mood disorder. The aims of this work are: 1) to confirm our preliminary results in a larger sample and at a 12-month follow-up, and 2) to identify predictors of drop-out vs completion of STEPPS in order to understand which characteristics of patients make them suitable or not for this treatment. The sample is composed of 32 subjects recruited from a population of inpatients of the Mood Disorders Center, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hospital San Raffaele-Turro, Milan. To confirm STEPPS efficacy at 12-month follow-up, we selected the following outcome criteria: reduction in the number of hospitalizations related to self-harm acts; reduction in the number of suicidal attempts; reduction of perceived emotional intensity levels; changes in cognitive filter scores; changes in the scores on self-report questionnaires. To identify predictors of drop-out vs completion, we analysed the following variables: demographic features (sex, marital status, school level achieved, and job status); Axis-I diagnosis; Axis-II categorical and dimensional diagnosis; and personality features. Seventeen (53%) subjects completed the treatment successfully. The drop-out rate was 47%. Patients who completed the program show a significant decrease in the number of hospitalizations, both at the end of the treatment and at 12-month follow-up. Friedman ANOVA test shows a significant decrease in suicidal attempts during and after STEPPS, and at 12-month follow-up. Analysis of drop-outs showed no significant differences with regard to sex, marital status, school level and job status between the two groups. Axis-I and Axis-II categorical diagnoses did not discriminate between the two groups. Those patients who dropped differ significantly from

  13. ICU Blood Pressure Variability May Predict Nadir of Respiratory Depression After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Anne S. M.; Costa, Paulo H. M.; de Lima, Carlos E. B.; Pádua, Luiz E. M.; Campos, Luciana A.; Baltatu, Ovidiu C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical stress induces alterations on sympathovagal balance that can be determined through assessment of blood pressure variability. Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is associated with postoperative respiratory depression. In this study we aimed at investigating ICU blood pressure variability and other perioperative parameters that could predict the nadir of postoperative respiratory function impairment. Methods: This prospective observational study evaluated 44 coronary artery disease patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). At the ICU, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was monitored every 30 min for 3 days. MAP variability was evaluated through: standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CV), variation independent of mean (VIM), and average successive variability (ASV). Respiratory function was assessed through maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressures and peak expiratory flow (PEF) determined 1 day before surgery and on the postoperative days 3rd to 7th. Intraoperative parameters (volume of cardioplegia, CPB duration, aortic cross-clamp time, number of grafts) were also monitored. Results: Since, we aimed at studying patients without confounding effects of postoperative complications on respiratory function, we had enrolled a cohort of low risk EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation) with < 2. Respiratory parameters MIP, MEP, and PEF were significantly depressed for 4–5 days postoperatively. Of all MAP variability parameters, the ASV had a significant good positive Spearman correlation (rho coefficients ranging from 0.45 to 0.65, p < 0.01) with the 3-day nadir of PEF after cardiac surgery. Also, CV and VIM of MAP were significantly associated with nadir days of MEP and PEF. None of the intraoperative parameters had any correlation with the postoperative respiratory depression. Conclusions: Variability parameters ASV, CV, and VIM of the MAP

  14. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  15. The role of the anchoring conditions in the electro rheological behavior of a nematic constrained by two coaxial cylinders and submitted by a pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Sánchez, Daniel; Reyes Cervantes, Juan Adrián

    We study a nematic liquid crystal (LC) filling the region between two coaxial cylinders subjected to the simultaneous action of both a pressure gradient applied parallel to the axis of the cylinders and a radial low frequency electric field. For the LC 4'-n-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB), we consider soft anchoring boundary conditions to obtain the configuration of the director and the velocity profile and the pressure gradient for nonslip boundary conditions. Finally, we calculate the effective viscosity, the first normal stress difference, and the dragging forces on the cylinders.

  16. Base pressure prediction in bluff-body potential-flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, W. W. H.; Parkinson, G. V.

    2000-11-01

    In a recent study by Yeung & Parkinson (1997), a wake width was proposed which allowed the bluff-body potential-flow model by Parkinson & Jandali (1970) to be extended to include the flow around an oblique flat plate. By incorporating this wake width in the momentum equation originally derived by Eppler (1954) for separated flow, the drag of the plate is related to its inclination and base pressure through a simple analytical condition. It allows the base pressure, which is usually treated as an empirical input, to be determined theoretically and thus the model becomes self-contained. Predictions of the base pressure, drag and width of wake are found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. When applied to the symmetrical flow around a wedge of arbitrary vertex angle, similar agreement with experimental measurements is obtained as well. It is also demonstrated that this condition is compatible with the free-streamline models by Wu (1962) and Wu & Wang (1964) such that the corresponding predictions are in good agreement with experiment.

  17. Computational Prediction of Pressure and Thermal Environments in the Flame Trench With Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Christoph; Sozer, Emre; Barad, Michael F.; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin C.; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Vu, Bruce T.; Parlier, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    One of the key objectives for the development of the 21st Century Space Launch Com- plex is to provide the exibility needed to support evolving launch vehicles and spacecrafts with enhanced range capacity. The launch complex needs to support various proprietary and commercial vehicles with widely di erent needs. The design of a multi-purpose main ame de ector supporting many di erent launch vehicles becomes a very challenging task when considering that even small geometric changes may have a strong impact on the pressure and thermal environment. The physical and geometric complexity encountered at the launch site require the use of state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools to predict the pressure and thermal environments. Due to harsh conditions encountered in the launch environment, currently available CFD methods which are frequently employed for aerodynamic and ther- mal load predictions in aerospace applications, reach their limits of validity. This paper provides an in-depth discussion on the computational and physical challenges encountered when attempting to provide a detailed description of the ow eld in the launch environ- ment. Several modeling aspects, such as viscous versus inviscid calculations, single-species versus multiple-species ow models, and calorically perfect gas versus thermally perfect gas, are discussed. The Space Shuttle and the Falcon Heavy launch vehicles are used to study di erent engine and geometric con gurations. Finally, we provide a discussion on traditional analytical tools which have been used to provide estimates on the expected pressure and thermal loads.

  18. Intelligent Prediction of Fan Rotation Stall in Power Plants Based on Pressure Sensor Data Measured In-Situ

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaogang; Wang, Songling; Liu, Jinlian; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Blower and exhaust fans consume over 30% of electricity in a thermal power plant, and faults of these fans due to rotation stalls are one of the most frequent reasons for power plant outage failures. To accurately predict the occurrence of fan rotation stalls, we propose a support vector regression machine (SVRM) model that predicts the fan internal pressures during operation, leaving ample time for rotation stall detection. We train the SVRM model using experimental data samples, and perform pressure data prediction using the trained SVRM model. To prove the feasibility of using the SVRM model for rotation stall prediction, we further process the predicted pressure data via wavelet-transform-based stall detection. By comparison of the detection results from the predicted and measured pressure data, we demonstrate that the SVRM model can accurately predict the fan pressure and guarantee reliable stall detection with a time advance of up to 0.0625 s. This superior pressure data prediction capability leaves significant time for effective control and prevention of fan rotation stall faults. This model has great potential for use in intelligent fan systems with stall prevention capability, which will ensure safe operation and improve the energy efficiency of power plants. PMID:24854057

  19. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening.

    PubMed

    Neumann, M A; van de Streek, J; Fabbiani, F P A; Hidber, P; Grassmann, O

    2015-01-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib. PMID:26198974

  20. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, M. A.; van de Streek, J.; Fabbiani, F. P. A.; Hidber, P.; Grassmann, O.

    2015-01-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib. PMID:26198974

  1. VTOL in ground effect flows for closely spaced jets. [to predict pressure and upwash forces on aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migdal, D.; Hill, W. G., Jr.; Jenkins, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a series of in ground effect twin jet tests are presented along with flow models for closely spaced jets to help predict pressure and upwash forces on simulated aircraft surfaces. The isolated twin jet tests revealed unstable fountains over a range of spacings and jet heights, regions of below ambient pressure on the ground, and negative pressure differential in the upwash flow field. A separate computer code was developed for vertically oriented, incompressible jets. This model more accurately reflects fountain behavior without fully formed wall jets, and adequately predicts ground isobars, upwash dynamic pressure decay, and fountain lift force variation with height above ground.

  2. Prediction of blade-vortex interaction noise from measured blade pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The impulsive nature of noise due to the interaction of a rotor blade with a tip vortex is studied. The time signature of this noise is calculated theoretically based on the measured blade surface pressure fluctuation of an operational load survey rotor in slow descending flight and is compared with the simultaneous microphone measurement. Particularly, the physical understanding of the characteristic features of a waveform is extensively studied in order to understand the generating mechanism and to identify the important parameters. The interaction trajectory of a tip vortex on an acoustic planform is shown to be a very important parameter for the impulsive shape of the noise. The unsteady nature of the pressure distribution at the very leading edge is also important to the pulse shape. The theoretical model using noncompact liner acoustics predicts the general shape of interaction impulse pretty well except for peak amplitude which requires more continuous information along the span at the leading edge.

  3. Francis turbine draft tube modelling for prediction of pressure fluctuations on prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alligné, S.; Landry, C.; Favrel, A.; Nicolet, C.; Avellan, F.

    2015-12-01

    The prediction of pressure fluctuations amplitudes on Francis turbine prototype is a challenge for hydro-equipment industry since it is subjected to guarantees to ensure smooth and reliable operation of the hydro units. The European FP7 research project Hyperbole aims to setup a methodology to transpose the pressure fluctuations measured on the reduced scale model to the prototype generating units. This paper presents this methodology which relies on an advanced modelling of the draft tube cavitation flow, and focuses on the transposition to the prototype of the draft tube model parameters identified on the reduced scale model. Different modelling assumptions of the draft tube are considered and their influence on the eigenmodes and the forced response of the system are presented.

  4. Predicting the pressure driven flow of gases through micro-capillaries and micro-orifices

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.L.; Carlson, R.W.; Fischer, L.E.

    1994-11-01

    A large body of experimentally measured gas flow rates were obtained from the literature and then compared to the predictions obtained with constitutive flow equations. This was done to determine whether the equations apply to the predictions of gas flow rates from leaking containment vessels used to transport radioactive materials. The experiments consisted of measuring the volumetric pressure-driven flow of gases through micro-capillaries and micro-orifices. The experimental results were compared to the predictions obtained with the equations given in ANSI N14.5 the American National Standard for Radioactive Materials-Leakage Tests on Package for Shipment. The equations were applied to both (1) the data set according to the recommendations given in ANSI N14.5 and (2) globally to the complete data set. It was found that: The continuum and molecular flow equation provided good agreement between the experimental and calculated flow rates for flow rates less than about 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s. The choked flow equation resulted in over-prediction of the flow rates for flow rates less than about 1 atm-cm{sup 3}/s. For flow rates higher than 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s, the molecular and continuum flow equation over-predicted the measured flow rates and the predictions obtained with the choked flow equation agreed well with the experimental values. Since the flow rates of interest for packages used to transport radioactive materials are almost always less than 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s, it is suggested that the continuum and molecular flow equation be used for gas flow rate predictions related to these applications.

  5. Night-time blood pressure: a role in the prediction and prevention of diabetes?

    PubMed

    Rutter, Martin K

    2016-02-01

    This commentary discusses and reviews the implications of two studies published in this issue of Diabetologia by Hermida et al (DOIs: 10.1007/s00125-015-3748-8 and 10.1007/s00125-015-3749-7 ) suggesting that high nocturnal blood pressure could have a role in the prediction of diabetes and act as a therapeutic target to prevent diabetes. This overview addresses the clinical implications of this work and new research that is likely to advance this field. It also provides a framework for interpreting claims of causality from observational studies and clinical trials. PMID:26631216

  6. Blade-vortex interaction noise predictions using measured blade surface pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegenbein, Perry R.; Oh, Byung K.

    1987-01-01

    The generation of helicopter noise by blade-vortex interactions during descent under impulsive conditions is investigated analytically. A noise-prediction technique is developed on the basis of the dipole source term of the Ffowcs-Williams/Hawkings equation and applied to data from simultaneous blade-pressure and acoustic measurements obtained by Cowan et al. (1986) on a 10-ft-diameter 4-blade rotor model in a wind tunnel. Preliminary results show that input-blade-airload azimuth resolution of 1 deg or better and computational azimuth step size of 2 deg or less are required to achieve good agreement between predicted and recorded acoustic time histories. The need for more sophisticated methods to model chordwise input data and for a more extensive experimental data base is indicated.

  7. The prediction of steady, three-dimensional flow in pressurized water-stream generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulme, G.; Phelps, P. J.; Spalding, D. B.; Tatchell, D. G.

    A calculation procedure is described for three dimensional flow and heat transfer in stea generators. Options are provided to calculate slip between the phases, and to treat the flow as homogeneous (i.e., phase velocities equal). Typical homogeneous-flow results are shown for a steam generator of the type used in pressurized-water reactors. The predicted effect of removing the flow-distribution plate is illustrated. These results, and others reported elsewhere, show that practical, three dimensional predictions of steam generator flow phenomena can now be made. These can be utilised by designers and operators to: improve performance at the design stage by, for example, examining effects of flow distributing devices on performance; analyze the effects of changes in operating conditions, or deterioration, which occur during use; or, examine the causes of failure in use, and the effectiveness of proposed cures.

  8. Eddy current signal deconvolution technique for the improvement of steam generator tubing burst pressure predictions.

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, M. C.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Kupperman, D. S.; Reifman, J.; Morman, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Eddy current techniques are extremely sensitive to the presence of axial cracks in nuclear power plant steam generator tube walls, but they are equally sensitive to the presence of dents, fretting, support structures, corrosion products, and other artifacts. Eddy current signal interpretation is further complicated by cracking geometries more complex than a single axial crack. Although there has been limited success in classifying and sizing defects through artificial neural networks, the ability to predict tubing integrity has, so far, eluded modelers. In large part, this lack of success stems from an inability to distinguish crack signals from those arising from artifacts. We present here a new signal processing technique that deconvolves raw eddy current voltage signals into separate signal contributions from different sources, which allows signals associated with a dominant crack to be identified. The signal deconvolution technique, combined with artificial neural network modeling, significantly improves the prediction of tube burst pressure from bobbin-coil eddy current measurements of steam generator tubing.

  9. Prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B. Z.; Yurchenko, E. V.; Morozov, A. M.; Chistyakov, D. A.

    2014-04-01

    A new method has been proposed for prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The method is based on the test results for materials in two conditions, namely, aged at temperatures of temper embrittlement and annealed after irradiation. The prediction is based on the McLean's equation and the dependencies describing thermally activated and radiation-enhanced phosphorus diffusion. Experimental studies have been carried out for estimation of thermal ageing of the WWER-1000 RPV 2Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel. The ductile to brittle transition temperature shift ΔTk due to phosphorus segregation has been estimated on the basis of experimental data processed by the proposed method for the time t = 5 × 105 h (more than 60 years of operation) for the base and weld metals of the WWER-1000 RPV.

  10. Deformation of a nearly hemispherical conducting drop due to an electric field: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, L. T.; Tsakonas, C.; Duffy, B. R.; Mottram, N. J.; Sage, I. C.; Brown, C. V.; Wilson, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    We consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation due to an electric field of a pinned nearly hemispherical static sessile drop of an ionic fluid with a high conductivity resting on the lower substrate of a parallel-plate capacitor. Using both numerical and asymptotic approaches, we find solutions to the coupled electrostatic and augmented Young-Laplace equations which agree very well with the experimental results. Our asymptotic solution for the drop interface extends previous work in two ways, namely, to drops that have zero-field contact angles that are not exactly π/2 and to higher order in the applied electric field, and provides useful predictive equations for the changes in the height, contact angle, and pressure as functions of the zero-field contact angle, drop radius, surface tension, and applied electric field. The asymptotic solution requires some numerical computations, and so a surprisingly accurate approximate analytical asymptotic solution is also obtained.

  11. Dilational Viscoelasticity of Adsorption Layers Measured by Drop and Bubble Profile Analysis: Reason for Different Results.

    PubMed

    Fainerman, V B; Kovalchuk, V I; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R

    2016-06-01

    The dilational viscoelasticity of adsorption layer was measured at different frequencies of drop and bubble surface area oscillations for aqueous C12EO5 solutions. The modulus values obtained by the two experimental protocols are the same for Π < 15 mN/m, while for higher surface pressures the values from drop experiments exceed those from bubble profile analysis. The nature of this phenomenon was studied using stress deformation experiments. At high surfactant concentrations the magnitude of surface tension variations is essentially higher for drops as compared with bubbles, leading to an increased viscoelasticity modulus for oscillating drops. The observed effects are analyzed quantitatively using a diffusion controlled exchange of matter model. The viscoelasticity moduli for a number of surfactants (different CnEOm and Tritons, C13DMPO, and SDS) are reported, and it is shown that the discrepancies between the data obtained by the two methods for many surfactants agree well with the predictions made here. PMID:27164467

  12. Comparison of the anti-inflammatory activity and effect on intraocular pressure of fluoromethalone, clobetasone butyrate and betamethasone phosphate eye drops.

    PubMed

    Kadom, A H; Forrester, J V; Williamson, T H

    1986-01-01

    The effect of fluoromethalone 0.1% suspension (FML), clobetasone butyrate 0.1% (Eumovate) and betamethasone phosphate 0.1% (Betnesol) in post-operative inflammation was studied in 60 eyes (50 patients) in a randomized trial. No significant differences were noted, although two patients required higher penetration steroids than FML or Eumovate. Betnesol seemed to have a greater tendency to cause raised intraocular pressure than FML. In this series, however, the authors are unable to comment on differences between Eumovate and Betnesol. PMID:3547254

  13. Pressure fluctuation prediction of a model pump turbine at no load opening by a nonlinear k-ε turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. T.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Wu, Y. L.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a new nonlinear k-ε turbulence model based on RNG k-ε turbulence model and Wilcox's k-ω turbulence model was proposed to simulate the unsteady flow and to predict the pressure fluctuation through a model pump turbine for engineering application. Calculations on a curved rectangular duct proved that the nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is applicable for high pressure gradient flows and large curvature flows. The numerically predicted relative pressure amplitude (peak to peak) in time domain to the pump turbine head at no load condition is very close to the experimental data. It is indicated that the prediction of the pressure fluctuation is valid by the present nonlinear k-ε method. The high pressure fluctuation in this area is the main issue for pump turbine design, especially at high head condition.

  14. Predicting the June 2013 European Flooding based on Precipitation, Soil Moisture and Sea Level Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Monica; Dima, Mihai; Lohmann, Gerrit; Scholz, Patrick; Rimbu, Norel

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades Europe has experienced heavy floods with major consequences for thousands of people and billions of Euros worth of damage. In particular, the summer 2013 flood in Central Europe showed how vulnerable modern society is to hydrological extremes and emphasizes once more the need for improved forecast methods of such extreme climatic events. Based on a multiple linear regression model, it is shown here that 55% of the June 2013 Elbe River extreme discharge could have been predicted using May precipitation, soil moisture and sea level pressure. Moreover, our model was able to predict more than 75% of the total Elbe River discharge for June 2013 (in terms of magnitude) by incorporating also the amount of precipitation recorded during the days prior the flood, but the predicted discharge for the June 2013 event was still underestimated by 25%. Given that all predictors used in the model are available at the end of each month, the forecast scheme can be used to predict extreme events and to provide early warnings for upcoming floods. The forecast methodology could be efficient for other rivers also, depending on their location and their climatic background.

  15. Drop impact on a fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Gil; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drop impact on a thin fiber. Using high-speed videography, we analyze the dynamics of droplet collision with a fiber. Based on the systematic experiments, we identify three outcomes of collision: capturing, single drop falling, and splitting. The outcomes are presented in a regime map, where the regime boundaries are explained through a scale analysis of forces. We also measure the liquid retention on the fiber after the droplet impact. By considering a liquid film on the fiber, we develop a mechanical model that predicts the residual water mass. Our model reveals that the residual mass depends critically on the fiber thickness and less on the impact speed. Our study can be extended to predicting the remaining droplet, critical problems in air filtration, water collection, and fiber coating.

  16. Micro-explosion of compound drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Kuei; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Introducing water into spray combustion systems, by either water-in-oil emulsification or supplementary water injection, is one of the major techniques for combustion improvement and NOx reduction. Plentiful researches are available on combustion of water-in-oil emulsion fuel drops. The emulsified liquid is a heterogeneous mixture of immiscible liquids. One component forms the continuous phase and the other component forms the discrete phase. The discrete phase consists of globules of the one fluid that are suspended in the continuous phase fluid. Water-in-oil emulsions are commonly considered for combustion applications because emulsions can result in micro-explosion, thereby reducing the average drop diameter to enhance liquid vaporization, and suppressing the formation of soot and NOx. However, the water addition generally does not exceed about 20% for smooth engine operations[!, 21. The combustion characteristics and micro-explosion of emulsion drop were studied by many researchers. The micro-explosion of water in fuel emulsion drops was caused by very fast growth of superheated water vapor bubbles, its superheat limits must be lower than the boiling point temperature of the fuel. These bubbles were primarily governed by the pressure difference between the superheated vapor and the liquid, and by the inertia imparted to the liquid by the motion of the bubble surface[3 6 In this study, we used a coaxial nozzle to generation the multi-component drop. The different type of water-in-oil fuel drops called the compound drops. Unlike an emulsion drop, a compound drop consists of a water core and a fuel shell, which can originate from the phase separation of emulsion[7, 81 or a water drop colliding with a fuel drop[9, 101 Burning and micro-explosion of compound drops have been found to be distinct from those of emulsion drops[9-111 Wang et al.[9 , 101 studied the combustion characteristics of collision merged alkane-water drops. The merged drops appeared in adhesive

  17. Mathematical Equations to Predict Positive Airway Pressures for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Macario; Riaz, Muhammad; Tahoori, Armin; Certal, Victor; Kushida, Clete A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To systematically review the international literature for mathematical equations used to predict effective pressures for positive airway pressure (PAP) devices. Methods. Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library were searched through June 27, 2015. The PRISMA statement was followed. There was no language limitation. Results. 709 articles were screened, fifty were downloaded, and twenty-six studies presented equations that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. In total, there were 4,436 patients in the development phases and 3,489 patients in the validation phases. Studies performed multiple linear regressions analyses as part of the equation(s) development and included the following variables: physical characteristics, polysomnography data, behavioral characteristics, and miscellaneous characteristics, which were all predictive to a variable extent. Of the published variables, body mass index (BMI) and mean oxygen saturation are the most heavily weighted, while BMI (eighteen studies), apnea-hypopnea index (seventeen studies), and neck circumference (eleven studies) were the variables most frequently used in the mathematical equations. Ten studies were from Asian countries and sixteen were from non-Asian countries. Conclusion. This systematic review identified twenty-six unique studies reporting mathematical equations which are summarized. Overall, BMI and mean oxygen saturation are the most heavily weighted. PMID:26294977

  18. Prediction of pressure loss and heat transfer in internal cooling passages.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, K; Parneix, S; von Wolfersdorf, J; Semmler, K

    2001-05-01

    This paper reports CFD-simulations of the turbulent flow, pressure loss and heat transfer occurring in ribbed passages. The channel section is rectangular, with an aspect ratio of 2.04. Ribs are square cross-section, their height is 10% of the channel height, and their inclination is varied from 90 degrees to 33 degrees. Reynolds number is 30,000. Three turbulence models (k-epsilon wall functions and 2-layer, V2F) are used and compared to the experimental data of Cho et al. All three models accurately predict the pressure losses due to the ribs and the qualitative heat transfer distribution on the ribbed wall. However, only the V2F model can accurately reproduce the absolute heat transfer levels, this at all inclination angles. The correlation developed by Han and co-workers for smaller rib-heights under-predicts the friction factor and wall heat transfer level on the current configuration. This shows the danger of using a correlation outside of its application range. PMID:11460660

  19. Homogenizing surface pressure time-series from operational numerical weather prediction models for geodetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobslaw, H.

    2016-07-01

    Global surface pressure grids from 14.5 years of 6-hourly analyses out of both the operational ECMWF weather prediction model and ERA-Interim are mapped to a common reference orography by means of ECMWF's mean sea-level pressure diagnostic. The approach reduces both relative biases and residual variability by about one order of magnitude and thereby achieves a consistency among both data sets at the level of about 1 hPa. Remaining differences rather reflect temperature biases and also resolution limitations of the reanalysis data set, but are not anymore related to the local roughness in orography or to changes in the spatial resolution of the operational model. The presented reduction method therefore allows to obtain surface pressure time series with the long-time consistency of a reanalysis from an operational numerical weather model with much higher resolution and much shorter latency, making the results suitable for geodetic near realtime applications requiring continuously updated time series that are homogeneous over many years.

  20. Vapor pressure and boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors: Predictive models with statistical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, A.A.; McNally, T.W.; Fricke, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibria and boiling point elevation of slash pine kraft black liquors over a wide range of solid concentrations (up to 85% solids) has been studied. The liquors are from a statistically designed pulping experiment for pulping slash pine in a pilot scale digester with four cooking variables of effective alkali, sulfidity, cooking time, and cooking temperature. It was found that boiling point elevation of black liquors is pressure dependent, and this dependency is more significant at higher solids concentrations. The boiling point elevation data at different solids contents (at a fixed pressure) were correlated to the dissolved solids (S/(1 {minus} S)) in black liquor. Due to the solubility limit of some of the salts in black liquor, a change in the slope of the boiling point elevation as a function of the dissolved solids was observed at a concentration of around 65% solids. An empirical method was developed to describe the boiling point elevation of each liquor as a function of pressure and solids mass fraction. The boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors was correlated quantitatively to the pulping variables, using different statistical procedures. These predictive models can be applied to determine the boiling point rise (and boiling point) of slash pine black liquors at processing conditions from the knowledge of pulping variables. The results are presented, and their utility is discussed.

  1. Sleep Complaints Predict Increases in Resting Blood Pressure Following Marital Separation

    PubMed Central

    Krietsch, Kendra N.; Mason, Ashley E.; Sbarra, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although marital separation and divorce are associated with many negative health outcomes, few studies examine the psychophysiological mechanisms that may give rise to these outcomes. This study examined changes in resting blood pressure (BP) as a function of sleep complaints in recently divorced adults. Method Recently separated adults (n = 138; 38 men) completed a self-report measure of sleep complaints and a resting blood pressure (BP) assessment in the laboratory at three occasions across 7.5 months. Results Multilevel analyses revealed that although sleep complaints were not associated with concurrent BP, sleep complaints predicted significant increases in both systolic and diastolic BP at the subsequent laboratory visit. In addition, time since the separation from an ex-partner moderated the association between sleep complaints at baseline and resting systolic blood pressure (SBP) 3 months later. People who reported high sleep complaints 10 weeks or more after their separation demonstrated greater increases in SBP. Conclusions In recently separated adults, greater sleep complaints may index increased risk for future increases in BP. This work helps pinpoint one potential mechanistic pathway linking marital separation with an important, health-relevant biological outcome. PMID:25020156

  2. Can we predict the presence of coronary lesions from blood pressure measurement? A new clinical method.

    PubMed

    El Tahlawi, Mohammad; Abdelbaset, Mohammad; Gouda, Mohammad; Hussein, Ikhlas

    2015-04-01

    The roles of arterial function and structure in cardiovascular physiology have expanded with the development of a variety of parameters that evaluate arterial stiffness. Markers of arterial stiffness have been correlated with cardiovascular outcomes. We aimed to find a simple, clinical, noninvasive method to predict atherosclerosis that leads to the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). We aimed to find a simple, clinical, noninvasive method to predict atherosclerosis that leads to the development of CAD. We included 100 cases that underwent coronary angiography in our center owing to different indications. The blood pressure in all cases was measured by two different observers. The oscillatory systolic blood pressure (OSBP) was defined as the point at which the mercury began to oscillate to a minimum level of 1 mm Hg. The auscultatory systolic blood pressure (AUSBP) was defined as the first Korotkoff sound. The difference between OSBP and AUSBP was calculated and called the oscillatory gap (OG). The correlation between the OG and the presence of coronary lesion in coronary angiography was statistically calculated. The study populations had a mean age of 57.3±9 years. The mean±s.d. OG was 14.44±10.44. There was a highly significantly positive correlation between the OG and the presence of coronary artery lesions (r=0.399 and P-value <0.000). There was also a significantly positive correlation between the presence of hypertension and the OG (r=0.376 and P-value <0.000). The difference between OSBP and AUSBP could be used as a simple method to detect atherosclerotic arterial changes. This method could indicate the degree of arterial stiffness. There was a significantly positive correlation between this new indicator of arterial stiffness and the presence of CAD. Any patient with a wide gap between OSBP and AUSBP should be treated early with antihypertensive drugs and statins before the development of CAD. PMID:25567772

  3. Drag on Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  4. Analytical Evaluation of Drop Tests Performed on Nine 18-Inch Diameter Standardized DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer David; Morton, Dana Keith; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Ware, Arthur Gates; Smith, Nancy Lynn

    2000-07-01

    During fiscal year 1999, a total of nine 18-inch diameter test canisters were fabricated at the Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to represent the standardized Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) canister design. Various "worst case" internal loadings were incorporated. Seven of the test canisters were 15-foot long and weighed approximately 6000 pounds, while two were 10-foot long and weighed 3000 and 3800 pounds. Seven of the test canisters were dropped from thirty feet onto an essentially unyielding flat surface and one of the test canisters was dropped from 40-inches onto a 6-inch diameter puncture post. The final test canister was dropped from 24 inches onto a 2-inch thick vertically oriented steel plate, and then tipped over to impact another 2-inch thick vertically oriented steel plate. This last test was attempting to represent a canister dropping onto another larger container such as a repository disposal container. All drop testing was performed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The nine test canisters experienced varying degrees of damage to their skirts, lifting rings, and pressure boundary components (heads and main body). However, all of the canisters were shown to have maintained their pressure boundary (through pressure testing), and the four worst damaged canisters were also shown to be leaktight (via helium leak testing performed at the INEEL). Pre-drop and post-drop test canister finite element modeling was performed at the INEEL in support of the canister drop test program. All model evaluations were performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit software. The finite element models representing the test canisters accurately (though at times, slightly conservatively) predicted the actual test canister responses during the defined drop events.This paper will discuss highlights of the drop testing program and will give detailed comparisons of analysis versus actual test results.

  5. Predictive Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Models: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension to 80 years will require accurate predictions of neutron irradiation-induced increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature ( T) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high fluence conditions that are far outside the existing database. Remarkable progress in mechanistic understanding of irradiation embrittlement has led to physically motivated T correlation models that provide excellent statistical fi ts to the existing surveillance database. However, an important challenge is developing advanced embrittlement models for low fl ux-high fl uence conditions pertinent to extended life. These new models must also provide better treatment of key variables and variable combinations and account for possible delayed formation of late blooming phases in low copper steels. Other issues include uncertainties in the compositions of actual vessel steels, methods to predict T attenuation away from the reactor core, verifi cation of the master curve method to directly measure the fracture toughness with small specimens and predicting T for vessel annealing remediation and re-irradiation cycles.

  6. Pressure Loss Predictions of the Reactor Simulator Subsystem at NASA GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Terry V.

    2015-01-01

    Testing of the Fission Power System (FPS) Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is being conducted at NASA GRC. The TDU consists of three subsystems: the Reactor Simulator (RxSim), the Stirling Power Conversion Unit (PCU), and the Heat Exchanger Manifold (HXM). An Annular Linear Induction Pump (ALIP) is used to drive the working fluid. A preliminary version of the TDU system (which excludes the PCU for now), is referred to as the RxSim subsystem and was used to conduct flow tests in Vacuum Facility 6 (VF 6). In parallel, a computational model of the RxSim subsystem was created based on the CAD model and was used to predict loop pressure losses over a range of mass flows. This was done to assess the ability of the pump to meet the design intent mass flow demand. Measured data indicates that the pump can produce 2.333 kg/sec of flow, which is enough to supply the RxSim subsystem with a nominal flow of 1.75 kg/sec. Computational predictions indicated that the pump could provide 2.157 kg/sec (using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model), and 2.223 kg/sec (using the k-? turbulence model). The computational error of the predictions for the available mass flow is -0.176 kg/sec (with the S-A turbulence model) and -0.110 kg/sec (with the k-epsilon turbulence model) when compared to measured data.

  7. Mold deflection effects on the prediction of packing pressure decay and shrinkage of semi-crystalline polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Franco S.; Yuan, Zhongshuang

    2015-05-01

    The beneficial effect of considering mold deflection and mold spring-back on the prediction of packing pressure decay and part shrinkage of amorphous polymers has already been demonstrated. In this paper, a similar mold deflection effect is added to the recently developed flow-induced crystallization modeling of semi-crystalline materials during injection molding. The combined effect of improved solidification rate from the crystallization modeling and improved pressure decay due to the mold deflection effect results in improved part shrink and warp predictions. Simulation results are validated against molding data of cavity pressure and shrinkage for a range of polymers.

  8. A criterion for predicting thermal stratification due to high-pressure injection in a circulating reactor loop

    SciTech Connect

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1986-09-01

    A physically based criterion for predicting thermal stratification due to high-pressure injection in the presence of loop flow is presented. The predictions are consistent with the CREARE 1/5 scale, CREARE 1/2 scale, and HDR test results.

  9. A Novel and Simple Methodology for Predicting Creep Life of Welded Pressure Component Employing Strain Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, T.; Kanapathipillai, S.; Chowdhury, M.

    2013-10-01

    Almost all of the pressure components produced at present are produced by welding and a good majority of them are used for high temperature application where creep damage can occur and requires the attention of the pressure equipment designers. An accurate creep life prediction model is required to predict the life of such pressure components. All of the creep life prediction models available today are either inaccurate or too cumbersome to apply. There is a need for an accurate creep life prediction model that would overcome the shortcomings of the existing models. Research team at UNSW have developed a creep life prediction model [Mahmood et al., in Front Mech Eng, 8(2):181-186, 2013; Mahmood et al., in Eng Integr J, 34:6-13, 2013; Mahmood et al. in Intl J Reliab Saf Eng Syst Struct D, 1(1):43-51, 2011] that accurately predicted the creep life of seamless pipes when applied to them. This paper is an extension of previous work and investigates the accuracy of the model when applied to a thick-walled pipe having a circumferential weld to predict the creep life of a welded pressure component. The paper shows that the proposed model can predict the creep life of the vessel with an error of less than 1 %.

  10. Dynamic Arterial Elastance in Predicting Arterial Pressure Increase After Fluid Challenge During Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyungseok; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Jin, Seok-Joon; Chin, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Yeong; Lee, Yoon-Kyung; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy, specific physiological conditions such as carbon dioxide insufflation and the steep Trendelenburg position can alter the cardiac workload and cerebral hemodynamics. Inadequate arterial blood pressure is associated with hypoperfusion, organ damage, and poor outcomes. Dynamic arterial elastance (Ea) has been proposed to be a useful index of fluid management in hypotensive patients. We therefore evaluated whether dynamic Ea can predict a mean arterial pressure (MAP) increase ≥ 15% after fluid challenge during pneumoperitoneum and the steep Trendelenburg position. We enrolled 39 patients receiving robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Fluid challenge was performed with 500 mL colloids in the presence of preload-dependent conditions and arterial hypotension. Patients were classified as arterial pressure responders or arterial pressure nonresponders according to whether they showed an MAP increase ≥15% after fluid challenge. Dynamic Ea was defined as the ratio between the pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to assess the arterial pressure responsiveness after fluid challenge during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Of the 39 patients, 17 were arterial pressure responders and 22 were arterial pressure nonresponders. The mean dynamic Ea before fluid challenge was significantly higher in arterial pressure responders than in arterial pressure nonresponders (0.79 vs 0.61, P < 0.001). In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, dynamic Ea showed an area under the curve of 0.810. The optimal cut-off value of dynamic Ea for predicting an MAP increase of ≥ 15% after fluid challenge was 0.74. Dynamic Ea can predict an MAP increase ≥ 15% after fluid challenge during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. This result suggests that evaluation of arterial pressure responsiveness using dynamic Ea helps to

  11. Dynamics of rotating and oscillating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Trinh, E. H.; Croonquist, A. P.; Elleman, D. D.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of rotation and oscillation is investigated of a freely suspended liquid drop under the influence of surface tension and positioned inside an experimental apparatus by acoustic forces in the low acceleration environment of Spacelab 3. After a drop was observed to be spherical and stably located at the center of the chamber, it was set into rotation or oscillation by acoustic torque or modulated radiation pressure force.

  12. Generalized Charts for Determination of Pressure Drop of a High-speed Compressible Fluid in Heat-exchanger Passages I : Air Heated in Smooth Passages of Constant Area with Constant Wall Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valerino, Michael F

    1948-01-01

    In the present paper an analysis is made of the compressible-flow variations occurring in heat-exchanger passages. The results of the analysis describe the flow and heating characteristics for which specific flow passages can be treated as segments of generalized flow systems. The graphical representation of the flow variations in the generalized flow systems can then be utilized as working charts to determine directly the pressure changes occurring in any specific flow passage. On the basis of these results, working charts are constructed to handle the case of air heated at constant wall temperature under turbulent-flow conditions. A method is given of incorporating the effect on the heat-exchanger flow process of high temperature differential between passage wall and fluid as based on recent NACA experimental data. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and the chart pressure-drop values for passage-wall average temperatures as high as 1752 degrees R (experimental limit) and for flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.32 to 1.00 (choke) at the passage exit.

  13. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  14. Axisymmetric Liquid Hanging Drops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meister, Erich C.; Latychevskaia, Tatiana Yu

    2006-01-01

    The geometry of drops hanging on a circular capillary can be determined by numerically solving a dimensionless differential equation that is independent on any material properties, which enables one to follow the change of the height, surface area, and contact angle of drops hanging on a particular capillary. The results show that the application…

  15. Drop Tower Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  16. Development of a simple model for predicting the spark-induced bubble behavior under different ambient pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. C.; Zhu, X. L.; Huang, Y. F.; Liu, Z.; Yan, K.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a simple model was developed to predict the dynamics of a spark-induced bubble under different ambient pressures. This work helps in developing a deep-towed plasma sparker, as the model can predict the dynamics of bubbles subjected to very high ambient pressures (about 20 MPa) which normally are difficult to obtain experimentally. Experimental results indicate that the maximum bubble radius for a fixed discharge energy decreases as a power-law function of the ambient pressure up to 1.0 MPa; the bubble period also decreases quickly with increasing ambient pressure. For a constant value of the ratio of bubble energy to discharge energy, the modeling results for both maximum radius and bubble period are in good agreement with the experimental results. Both sets of results indicate that the bubble period is proportional to the maximum radius under different ambient pressures.

  17. Mathematical modeling to predict the sub-bandage pressure on a conical limb for multi-layer bandaging.

    PubMed

    Sikka, M P; Ghosh, S; Mukhopadhyay, A

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of the compression treatment by a medical compression bandage is dependent on the pressure generated at the interface between the bandage and the skin. This pressure is called interface pressure or sub-bandage pressure. The performance of a bandage depends upon the level of interface pressure applied by the bandage and the sustenance of this pressure over time. The interface pressure exerted by the bandage depends on several other factors like limb shape or size, application technique, physical and structural properties of the bandage, physical activities taken by the patient, etc. The current understanding of how bandages apply pressure to a limb is based on the Law of Laplace, which states that tension in the walls of a container is dependent on both the pressure of the container's content and its radius. This concept was translated mathematically into equation relating pressure to tension and radius by Thomas. In addition, a modified equation was generated by multiplying the model with a constant that represents the number of bandage layers in order to use the model to estimate the pressure applied by multi-layer bandages. This simple multiplication adjustment was questioned by researchers. They had doubts about the model validity and whether it can be used to predict the sub-bandage pressure applied by pressure garments. One of the questions that were raised regarding the bandage thickness affecting the sub-bandage pressure has been recently explored by Al Khaburi where he used the thin and thick cylinder shell theory to study the effect of Multi Component Bandage's (MCB) thickness on the sub-bandage pressure. The model by Al Khaburi and the earlier models developed for pressure prediction are all based on calculations considering the cylindrical limb shapes although the human limb normally is wider at the calf and reduces in circumference towards the ankle. So in our approach, the bandage is assumed to take a conical shape during application

  18. Predicting physical stability in pressurized metered dose inhalers via dwell and instantaneous force colloidal probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Dexter; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Colloidal probe microscopy (CPM) is a quantitative predictive tool, which can offer insight into particle behavior in suspension pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). Although CPM instantaneous force measurements, which involve immediate retraction of the probe upon sample contact, can provide information on inter-particle attractive forces, they lack the ability to appropriately imitate all critical particle pMDI interactions (e.g., particle re-dispersion after prolonged pMDI storage). In this paper, two novel dwell force techniques - indentation and deflection dwell - were employed to mimic long-term particle interactions present in pMDIs, using particles of various internal structures and a model liquid propellant (2H,3H perfluoropentane) as a model system. Dwell measurements involve particle contact for an extended period of time. In deflection dwell mode the probe is held at a specific position, while in indentation dwell mode the probe is forced into the sample with a constant force for the entirety of the contact time. To evaluate the applicability of CPM to predict actual pMDI physical stability, inter-particle force measurements were compared with qualitative and quantitative bulk pMDI measurement techniques (visual quality and light scattering). Measured instantaneous attractive (snap-in) and adhesive (max-pull) forces decreased as a function of increasing surface area, while adhesive forces measured by indentation dwell decreased as a function of dwell contact time for particles containing voids. Instantaneous force measurements provided information on the likelihood of floccule formation, which was predictive of partitioning rates, while indentation dwell force measurements were predictive of formulation re-dispersibility after prolonged storage. Dwell force measurements provide additional information on particle behavior within a pMDI not obtainable via instantaneous measurements. PMID:25058596

  19. Prediction of Downwash and Dynamic Pressure at the Tail from Free-flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eujen, E

    1942-01-01

    The present measurements form a continuation of earlier flight tests published in a previous report for predicting the downwash at the tail of an airplane. The method makes use of the tail itself as integrating contact surface to the extent that, beginning from the measurement of the self-alignment of the elevator, the mean downwash angle and dynamic pressure at the tail are determined. The instrumental accuracy is considerably improved if the elevator is completely separate from the controls during the tests, because the effect of friction on the self-alignment of the elevator is then reduced to a minimum and a finer elevator weight balance is rendered possible. The structural design of the push-rod uncoupling mechanism is also described.

  20. Formulation of a General Technique for Predicting Pneumatic Attenuation Errors in Airborne Pressure Sensing Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a mathematical model derived from the Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and continuity, which may be accurately used to predict the behavior of conventionally mounted pneumatic sensing systems subject to arbitrary pressure inputs. Numerical techniques for solving the general model are developed. Both step and frequency response lab tests were performed. These data are compared with solutions of the mathematical model and show excellent agreement. The procedures used to obtain the lab data are described. In-flight step and frequency response data were obtained. Comparisons with numerical solutions of the math model show good agreement. Procedures used to obtain the flight data are described. Difficulties encountered with obtaining the flight data are discussed.

  1. Maternal Characteristics, Mean Arterial Pressure and Serum Markers in Early Prediction of Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Kuc, Sylwia; Koster, Maria P. H.; Franx, Arie; Schielen, Peter C. J. I.; Visser, Gerard H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In a previous study, we have described the predictive value of first-trimester Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A (PAPP-A), free β-subunit of human Chorionic Gonadotropin (fβ-hCG), Placental Growth Factor (PlGF) and A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 12 (ADAM12) for early onset preeclampsia (EO-PE; delivery <34 weeks). The objective of the current study was to obtain the predictive value of these serum makers combined with maternal characteristics and first-trimester maternal mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) in a large series of patients, for both EO-PE and late onset PE (LO-PE; delivery ≥ 34 weeks). Methods This was a nested case-control study, using stored first-trimester maternal serum from women who developed EO-PE (n = 68) or LO-PE (n = 99), and 500 uncomplicated singleton pregnancies. Maternal characteristics, MAP, and pregnancy outcome were collected for each individual woman and used to calculate prior risks for PE in a multiple logistic regression model. Models containing prior PE risks, serum markers, and MAP were developed for the prediction of EO-PE and LO-PE. The model-predicted detection rates (DR) for fixed 10% false-positive rates were calculated for EO-PE and LO-PE with or without the presence of a small-for-gestational age infant (SGA, birth weight <10th centile). Results The best prediction model included maternal characteristics, MAP, PAPP-A, ADAM12, and PlGF, with DR of 72% for EO-PE and 49% for LO-PE. Prediction for PE with concomitant SGA was better than for PE alone (92% for EO-PE and 57% for LO-PE). Conclusion First-trimester MAP, PAPP-A, ADAM12, and PlGF combined with maternal characteristics and MAP are promising markers in the risk assessment of PE, especially for EO-PE complicated by SGA. PMID:23717445

  2. Echocardiographic Assessment of Estimated Right Atrial Pressure and Size Predicts Mortality in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Christopher; Alassas, Khadija; Burger, Charles; Safford, Robert; Pagan, Ricardo; Duello, Katherine; Kumar, Preetham; Zeiger, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated mean right atrial pressure (RAP) measured by cardiac catheterization is an independent risk factor for mortality. Prior studies have demonstrated a modest correlation with invasive and noninvasive echocardiographic RAP, but the prognostic impact of estimated right atrial pressure (eRAP) has not been previously evaluated in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 121 consecutive patients with PAH based on right-sided heart catheterization and echocardiography was performed. The eRAP was calculated by inferior vena cava diameter and collapse using 2005 and 2010 American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) definitions. Accuracy and correlation of eRAP to RAP was assessed. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis by eRAP, right atrial area, and Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL Registry) risk criteria as well as univariate and multivariate analysis of echocardiographic findings was performed. RESULTS: Elevation of eRAP was associated with decreased survival time compared with lower eRAP (P < .001, relative risk = 7.94 for eRAP > 15 mm Hg vs eRAP ≤ 5 mm Hg). Univariate analysis of echocardiographic parameters including eRAP > 15 mm Hg, right atrial area > 18 cm2, presence of pericardial effusion, right ventricular fractional area change < 35%, and at least moderate tricuspid regurgitation was predictive of poor survival. However, multivariate analysis revealed that eRAP > 15 mm Hg was the only echocardiographic risk factor that was predictive of mortality (hazard ratio = 2.28, P = .037). CONCLUSIONS: Elevation of eRAP by echocardiography at baseline assessment was strongly associated with increased risk of death or transplant in patients with PAH. This measurement may represent an important prognostic component in the comprehensive echocardiographic evaluation of PAH. PMID:25211049

  3. Simplified versus geometrically accurate models of forefoot anatomy to predict plantar pressures: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Scott; Erdemir, Ahmet; Woodburn, James; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2016-01-25

    Integration of patient-specific biomechanical measurements into the design of therapeutic footwear has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in patients with diabetic foot disease. The addition of numerical simulations intended to optimise intervention design may help to build on these advances, however at present the time and labour required to generate and run personalised models of foot anatomy restrict their routine clinical utility. In this study we developed second-generation personalised simple finite element (FE) models of the forefoot with varying geometric fidelities. Plantar pressure predictions from barefoot, shod, and shod with insole simulations using simplified models were compared to those obtained from CT-based FE models incorporating more detailed representations of bone and tissue geometry. A simplified model including representations of metatarsals based on simple geometric shapes, embedded within a contoured soft tissue block with outer geometry acquired from a 3D surface scan was found to provide pressure predictions closest to the more complex model, with mean differences of 13.3kPa (SD 13.4), 12.52kPa (SD 11.9) and 9.6kPa (SD 9.3) for barefoot, shod, and insole conditions respectively. The simplified model design could be produced in <1h compared to >3h in the case of the more detailed model, and solved on average 24% faster. FE models of the forefoot based on simplified geometric representations of the metatarsal bones and soft tissue surface geometry from 3D surface scans may potentially provide a simulation approach with improved clinical utility, however further validity testing around a range of therapeutic footwear types is required. PMID:26708965

  4. Catenation of carbon in LaC2 predicted under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Su, Chuanxun; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Guangtao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hui; Ma, Yanming

    2016-06-01

    Carbon has the capability of forming various bonding states that affect the structures and properties of transition metal carbides. In this work, structural search was performed to explore the structural diversity of LaC2 at pressures of 0.0-30.0 GPa. Five stable structures of LaC2 reveal a variety of carbon structural units ranging from a dimer to bent C3, zigzag C4 and armchair polymer chains. A series of pressure-induced structural transformations are predicted, I4/mmm (i.e. experimental α phase) →C2/c→Pnma→Pmma, which involve the catenation of carbon from a dimer to zigzag C4 units and further to armchair polymer chains. The bent C3 unit appears in a novel Immm structure. This structure is the theoretical ground state of LaC2 under ambient conditions, but is kinetically inaccessible from the experimental α phase. LaC2 becomes thermodynamically metastable relative to La2C3 + diamond above 17.1 GPa, and eventually decomposes into constituent elements above 35.6 GPa. The presented results indicate that catenation of carbon can be realized even in simple inorganic compounds under nonambient conditions. PMID:27166981

  5. Prediction of magnetic moment collapse in ZrFe{sub 2} under hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenxu; Zhang, Wanli

    2015-04-28

    Electronic structure and magnetic properties of ZrFe{sub 2} in the cubic Laves phase are investigated by calculations based on density functional theory. The magnetic moment decreases with the increase of the hydrostatic pressure in an unusual way: Two-step magnetic collapse is predicted. The first one is a continuous change from 1.53 μ{sub B}/Fe to 0.63 μ{sub B}/Fe at about 3.6 GPa, and the other is from 0.25 μ{sub B}/Fe to the nonmagnetic state at about 15 GPa in a first order manner under the local spin density approximation of the exchange correlation potential. A metastable state with intermediate spin moment about 0.15 μ{sub B}/Fe may exist before that. We understand this process by the changes of density of states during it. The magnetic moment decreases under the pressure in the vicinity of the experimental lattice constant with dlnm/dp=−0.038 GPa{sup −1}. The spontaneous volume magnetostriction is 3.6%, which is huge enough to find potential applications in magnetostriction actuators and sensors. We suggest that the Invar effect of this compound may be understood when considering the magnetic moment variation according to the magnetostrictive model of Invar.

  6. Renal Resistive Index Predicts Postoperative Blood Pressure Outcome in Primary Aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Yoshitsugu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Morimoto, Ryo; Kudo, Masataka; Ono, Yoshikiyo; Nezu, Masahiro; Takase, Kei; Seiji, Kazumasa; Ishidoya, Shigeto; Arai, Yoichi; Funamizu, Yasuharu; Miki, Takashi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Sasano, Hironobu; Satoh, Fumitoshi

    2016-03-01

    The renal resistive index (RI) calculated by Doppler ultrasonography has been reported to be correlated with renal structural changes and outcomes in patients with essential hypertension or renal disease. However, little is known about this index in primary aldosteronism. In this prospective study, we examined the utility of this index to predict blood pressure (BP) outcome after adrenalectomy in patients with primary aldosteronism. We studied 94 patients with histopathologically proven aldosteronoma who underwent surgery. Parameters on renal function, including renal flow indices, were examined and followed up for 12 months postoperatively. The renal RI of the main, hilum, and interlobar arteries was significantly higher in patients with aldosteronoma compared with 100 control patients. BP, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and urinary albumin excretion significantly decreased after adrenalectomy. The resistive indices of all compartment arteries were significantly reduced 1 month after adrenalectomy and remained stable for 12 months. Patients whose interlobar RI was in the highest tertile at baseline had higher systolic BP after adrenalectomy than those whose RI was in the lowest tertile. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the RI of the interlobar and hilum arteries could be an independent predictive marker for intractable hypertension (systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg, increased BP, taking ≥3 antihypertensive agents, or increased number of agents) even after adrenalectomy. Therefore, in patients with aldosteronoma, the renal RI indicates partially reversible renal hemodynamics and renal structural damages that would influence postoperative BP outcome. PMID:26865201

  7. Challenges in Dynamic Pressure and Stress Predictions at No-Load Operation in Hydraulic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nennemann, B.; Morissette, J. F.; Chamberland-Lauzon, J.; Monette, C.; Braun, O.; Melot, M.; Coutu, A.; Nicolle, J.; Giroux, A. M.

    2014-03-01

    Some of the potentially most damaging continuous operating conditions for hydraulic turbines are the no-load (NL) conditions. At NL conditions the flow passes through the turbine without power generation, but with non-negligible flow rate, and therefore all the potential energy in the flow has to be dissipated. This takes place through a mechanism where the runner channels are partially pumping, thus generating large scale unsteady vortex structures which, by their nature, break down into smaller and smaller vortices until energy dissipation occurs at the smallest scales. This type of flow, dominated by its turbulent character, is inherently difficult to simulate by means of numerical methods since turbulence model and numerical dissipation have a major influence. The resulting dynamic loads on the runner are largely of stochastic nature, exciting a broad band of frequencies and thus, almost always interact with at least one deformation mode. The presented investigations are aimed at predicting the effect of the unsteady NL pressure loads on the fatigue life of a Francis turbine runner. A combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and finite element analysis (FEA) methods has been employed. The results from transient CFD simulations are presented. Comparison of the results with prototype strain gauge measurements at no load conditions shows that the stochastic nature and the approximate range of the dynamic stresses can be predicted.

  8. Drop Tower Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, William A. Toby

    2014-10-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in The Physics Teacher1 in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at the drop tower in Bremen, Germany. Using these drop towers, one can briefly investigate various physical systems operating in this near zero-g environment. The resulting "Drop Tower Physics" is a new and exciting way to challenge students with a physical example that requires solid knowledge of many basic physics principles, and it forces them to practice the scientific method. The question is, "How would a simple toy, like a pendulum, behave when it is suddenly exposed to a zero-g environment?" The student must then postulate a particular behavior, test the hypothesis against physical principles, and if the hypothesis conforms to these chosen physical laws, the student can formulate a final conclusion. At that point having access to a drop tower is very convenient, in that the student can then experimentally test his or her conclusion. The purpose of this discussion is to explain the response of these physical systems ("toys") when the transition is made to a zero-g environment and to provide video demonstrations of this behavior to support in-class discussions of Drop Tower Physics.

  9. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation to predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Mi; Choi, Soo Joo; Kim, Myung Hee; Park, Mi Hye; Heo, Burn Young

    2013-01-01

    Background During carotid endarterectomy (CEA), hemodynamic stability and adequate fluid management are crucial to prevent perioperative cerebral stroke, myocardial infarction and hyperperfusion syndrome. Both pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV), dynamic preload indices derived from the arterial waveform, are increasingly advocated as predictors of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of PPV and SVV for predicting fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing CEA. Methods Twenty seven patients undergoing CEA were enrolled in this study. PPV, SVV and cardiac output (CO) were measured before and after fluid loading of 500 ml of hydroxyethyl starch solution. Fluid responsiveness was defined as an increase in CO ≥ 15%. The ability of PPV and SVV to predict fluid responsiveness was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Both PPV and SVV measured before fluid loading are associated with changes in CO caused by fluid expansion. The ROC analysis showed that PPV and SVV predicted response to volume loading (area under the ROC curve = 0.854 and 0.841, respectively, P < 0.05). A PPV ≥ 9.5% identified responders (Rs) with a sensitivity of 71.4% and a specificity of 90.9%, and a SVV ≥ 7.5% identified Rs with a sensitivity of 92.9% and a specificity of 63.6%. Conclusions Both PPV and SVV values before volume loading are associated with increased CO in response to volume expansion. Therefore, PPV and SVV are useful predictors of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing CEA. PMID:24101958

  10. Pressure Loss Predictions of the Reactor Simulator Subsystem at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Terry V.

    2016-01-01

    Testing of the Fission Power System (FPS) Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center. The TDU consists of three subsystems: the reactor simulator (RxSim), the Stirling Power Conversion Unit (PCU), and the heat exchanger manifold (HXM). An annular linear induction pump (ALIP) is used to drive the working fluid. A preliminary version of the TDU system (which excludes the PCU for now) is referred to as the "RxSim subsystem" and was used to conduct flow tests in Vacuum Facility 6 (VF 6). In parallel, a computational model of the RxSim subsystem was created based on the computer-aided-design (CAD) model and was used to predict loop pressure losses over a range of mass flows. This was done to assess the ability of the pump to meet the design intent mass flow demand. Measured data indicates that the pump can produce 2.333 kg/sec of flow, which is enough to supply the RxSim subsystem with a nominal flow of 1.75 kg/sec. Computational predictions indicated that the pump could provide 2.157 kg/sec (using the Spalart-Allmaras (S?A) turbulence model) and 2.223 kg/sec (using the k- turbulence model). The computational error of the predictions for the available mass flow is ?0.176 kg/sec (with the S-A turbulence model) and -0.110 kg/sec (with the k- turbulence model) when compared to measured data.

  11. Drop impact of suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoraval, M.-J.; Boyer, F.; Sandoval Nava, E.; Dijksman, J. F.; Lohse, D.; Snoeijer, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    Drop impact studies have a wide range of applications, many of which involve complex fluids. We study here the liquid drop impact of a silver nano-particles dispersion on a solid glass surface. This dispersion is used for inkjet printing of functional electronic materials. When the impact velocity increases, the drop classically splashes into smaller droplets. However, it surprisingly stops splashing above a critical impact velocity. We combine high-speed imaging experiments with different characterizations of the dispersion to understand this transition to non-splashing.

  12. Spatial Distribution of Large Cloud Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Larsen, M.; Wiscombe, W.

    2004-01-01

    By analyzing aircraft measurements of individual drop sizes in clouds, we have shown in a companion paper (Knyazikhin et al., 2004) that the probability of finding a drop of radius r at a linear scale l decreases as l(sup D(r)) where 0 less than or equal to D(r) less than or equal to 1. This paper shows striking examples of the spatial distribution of large cloud drops using models that simulate the observed power laws. In contrast to currently used models that assume homogeneity and therefore a Poisson distribution of cloud drops, these models show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents D(r). The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. This clustering has vital consequences for rain physics explaining how rain can form so fast. It also helps explain why remotely sensed cloud drop size is generally biased and why clouds absorb more sunlight than conventional radiative transfer models predict.

  13. Experimental study on thermocapillary motion of isolated drop and coalescence problems of drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jingchang; Lin, Hai

    2011-11-01

    Thermocapillay migrations of drops under temperature gradient were studied through ground-based experiment, experiment using drop tower and space experiment in microgravity. The motion of isolated drop at moderate to large Marangoni numbers (Ma) and the interaction of drops were investigated. Experimental data show that the scaled migration velocity of isolated drop, V/VYGB, appears an obvious decrease trend with the increase of Maragoni number up to 5500. This result does not agree with some theoretical predictions. Interferometry was applied in our space experiment to visualize the whole temperature field and to get detailed informations of temperature variation around a moving drop and the thermal wake behind it. Interferometric images indicate that drop's migration very sensitively follows the direction of temperature gradient because of slow migration velocity and microgravity condition. The temperature disturbance around a leading drop and the thermal wake behind it would exist for a quite long time in the real case. The variation of temperature field would substantially affect the migration velocity of a trailing drop in both direction and value, and this would bring about coalescence problems of two or multiple drops.

  14. Rotation of ultrasonically levitated glycerol drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Leung, E. W.; Trinh, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation is used to suspend single millimeter-size glycerol drops in a rectangular chamber. Audio-frequency laterally standing waves set up in the chamber are used to torque the suspended drops. The shape evolution of the drop under the combined effect of centrifugal forces and the acoustic radiation stress, along with its angular velocity are monitored, using video imaging and light scattering techniques. The results show good qualitative agreement with the theoretically predicted shape evolution as a function of angular velocity.

  15. Prediction of B1 to B10 phase transition in LuN under pressure: An ab-initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. D.; Mukherjee, D.; Joshi, K. D.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2016-05-01

    Ab-initio total energy calculations have been performed in lutetium nitride (LuN) as a function of hydrostatic compression to understand the high pressure behavior of this compound. Our calculations predict a phase transition from ambient rocksalt type structure (B1 phase) to a tetragonal structure (B10 phase) at ~ 240 GPa. The phase transition has been identified as first order in nature with volume discontinuity of ~ 6%. The predicted high pressure phase has been found to be stable up to at least 400 GPa, the maximum pressure up to which calculations have been performed.Further, to substantiate the results of static lattice calculations analysis of lattice dynamic stability of B1 and B10 phase has been carried out at different pressures. Apart from this, we have analyzed the lattice dynamic stability CsCl type (B2) phase around the 240 GPa, the pressure reported for B1 to B2 transition in previous all-electron calculations by Gupta et al. 2013. We find that the B2 structure is lattice dynamically unstable at this pressure and remains unstable up to ~ 400 GPa, ruling out the possibility of B1 to B2 phase transition at least up to ~ 400 GPa. Further, the theoretically determined equation of state has been utilized to derive various physical quantities such as zero pressure equilibrium volume, bulk modulus, and pressure derivative of bulk modulus of B1 phase at ambient conditions.

  16. Estimation of the uncertainty in TRAC/PF1-MOD1 predictions of production reactor plenum pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, D.P. )

    1992-01-01

    The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 code (TRAC) is used to perform best-estimate analyses of certain postulated design-basis accidents (DBAs) in Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors. One of the DBAs analyzed is an instantaneous double-ended guillotine break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The TRAC analysis provides time-dependent plenum and tank bottom pressures for use as boundary conditions in a detailed analysis of a single fuel assembly. The quantification of uncertainty is an important element in determining safe operating power levels for SRS reactors. This motivates the estimation of the uncertainty in using spatial interpolations of the relatively coarse cell-average plenum pressure predictions obtained with TRAC to predict detailed reactor plenum pressure distributions. This result supports the adequacy of the {plus minus}5% plenum pressure uncertainty estimated for LOCA analyses.

  17. Failure behavior of internally pressurized flawed and unflawed steam generator tubing at high temperatures -- Experiments and comparison with model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.; Mruk, K.; Franklin, J.; Knoblich, L.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on the failure of internally pressurized steam generator tubing at high temperatures ({le} 700 C). A model was developed for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under internal pressure and temperature histories postulated to occur during severe accidents. The model was validated by failure tests on specimens with part-through-wall axial and circumferential flaws of various lengths and depths, conducted under various constant and ramped internal pressure and temperature conditions. The failure temperatures predicted by the model for two temperature and pressure histories, calculated for severe accidents initiated by a station blackout, agree very well with tests performed on both flawed and unflawed specimens.

  18. Heat loss and drag of spherical drop tube samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis techniques for three aspects of the performance of the NASA/MSFC 32 meter drop tube are considered. Heat loss through the support wire in a pendant drop sample, temperature history of a drop falling through the drop tube when the tube is filled with helium gas at various pressures, and drag and resulting g-levels experienced by a drop falling through the tube when the tube is filled with helium gas at various pressures are addressed. The developed methods apply to systems with sufficiently small Knudsen numbers for which continuum theory may be applied. Sample results are presented, using niobium drops, to indicate the magnitudes of the effects. Helium gas at one atmosphere pressure can approximately double the amount of possible undercooling but it results in an apparent gravity levels of up to 0.1 g.

  19. Drop Tower Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Ground based microgravity facilities are an important proving ground for space experiments, ground-based research and space hardware risk mitigation. An overview of existing platforms will be discussed with an emphasis on drop tower capabilities. The potential for extension to partial gravity conditions will be discussed. Input will be solicited from attendees for their potential to use drop towers in the future and the need for enhanced capabilities (e.g. partial gravity)

  20. Measuring the force of drag on air sheared sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2012-11-01

    To blow a drop along or off of a surface (i.e. to shed the drop), the drag force on the drop (based on flow conditions, drop shape, and fluid properties) must overcome the adhesion force between the drop and the surface (based on surface tension, drop shape, and contact angle). While the shedding of sessile drops by shear flow has been studied [Milne, A. J. B. & Amirfazli, A. Langmuir 25, 14155 (2009).], no independent measurements of the drag or adhesion forces have been made. Likewise, analytic predictions are limited to hemispherical drops and low air velocities. We present, therefore, measurements of the drag force on sessile drops at air velocities up to the point of incipient motion. Measurements were made using a modified floating element shear sensor in a laminar low speed wind tunnel to record drag force over the surface with the drop absent, and over the combined system of the surface and drop partially immersed in the boundary layer. Surfaces of different wettabilities were used to study the effects of drop shape and contact angles, with drop volume ranged between approximately 10 and 100 microlitres. The drag force for incipient motion (which by definition equals the maximum of the adhesion force) is compared to simplified models for drop adhesion such as that of Furmidge

  1. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Smith, Robbie E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus (10) is constructed having a cylindrical enclosure (16) within which a disc-shaped wicking element (18) is positioned. A well or recess (22) is cut into an upper side (24) of this wicking element, and a glass cover plate or slip (28) having a protein drop disposed thereon is sealably positioned on the wicking element (18), with drop (12) being positioned over well or recess (22). A flow of control fluid is generated by a programmable gradient former (16), with this control fluid having a vapor pressure that is selectively variable. This flow of control fluid is coupled to the wicking element (18) where control fluid vapor diffusing from walls (26) of the recess (22) is exposed to the drop (12), forming a vapor pressure gradient between the drop (12) and the control fluid vapor. Initially, this gradient is adjusted to draw solvent from the drop (12) at a relatively high rate, and as the critical supersaturation point is approached (the point at which crystal nucleation occurs), the gradient is reduced to more slowly draw solvent from the drop (12). This allows discrete protein molecules more time to orient themselves into an ordered crystalline lattice, producing protein crystals which, when processed by X-ray crystallography, possess a high degree of resolution.

  2. Significant interarm blood pressure difference predicts cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients: CoCoNet study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-A; Kim, Jang Young; Park, Jeong Bae

    2016-06-01

    There has been a rising interest in interarm blood pressure difference (IAD), due to its relationship with peripheral arterial disease and its possible relationship with cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to characterize hypertensive patients with a significant IAD in relation to cardiovascular risk. A total of 3699 patients (mean age, 61 ± 11 years) were prospectively enrolled in the study. Blood pressure (BP) was measured simultaneously in both arms 3 times using an automated cuff-oscillometric device. IAD was defined as the absolute difference in averaged BPs between the left and right arm, and an IAD ≥ 10 mm Hg was considered to be significant. The Framingham risk score was used to calculate the 10-year cardiovascular risk. The mean systolic IAD (sIAD) was 4.3 ± 4.1 mm Hg, and 285 (7.7%) patients showed significant sIAD. Patients with significant sIAD showed larger body mass index (P < 0.001), greater systolic BP (P = 0.050), more coronary artery disease (relative risk = 1.356, P = 0.034), and more cerebrovascular disease (relative risk = 1.521, P = 0.072). The mean 10-year cardiovascular risk was 9.3 ± 7.7%. By multiple regression, sIAD was significantly but weakly correlated with the 10-year cardiovascular risk (β = 0.135, P = 0.008). Patients with significant sIAD showed a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease, as well as an increase in 10-year cardiovascular risk. Therefore, accurate measurements of sIAD may serve as a simple and cost-effective tool for predicting cardiovascular risk in clinical settings. PMID:27310982

  3. A new phase of ThC at high pressure predicted from a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongliang; Qiu, Wujie; Ke, Xuezhi; Huai, Ping; Cheng, Cheng; Han, Han; Ren, Cuilan; Zhu, Zhiyuan

    2015-08-01

    The phase transition of thorium monocarbide (ThC) at high pressure has been studied by means of density functional theory. Through structure search, a new phase with space group P 4 / nmm has been predicted. The calculated phonons demonstrate that this new phase and the previous B2 phase are dynamically stable as the external pressure is greater than 60 GPa and 120 GPa, respectively. The transformation from B1 to P 4 / nmm is predicted to be a first-order transition, while that from P 4 / nmm to B2 is found to be a second-order transition.

  4. Usefulness of portal vein pressure for predicting the effects of tolvaptan in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Ai; Atsukawa, Masanori; Tsubota, Akihito; Kondo, Chisa; Okubo, Tomomi; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Narahara, Yoshiyuki; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate influencing factors of treatment response, then tolvaptan has been approved in Japan for liquid retention. METHODS: We herein conducted this study to clarify the influencing factors in 40 patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis complicated by liquid retention. Tolvaptan was administered at a dosage of 7.5 mg once a day for patients with conventional diuretic-resistant hepatic edema for 7 d. At the initiation of tolvaptan, the estimated hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) value which was estimated portal vein pressure was measured using hepatic venous catheterization. We analyzed the effects of tolvaptan and influencing factors associated with treatment response. RESULTS: Subjects comprised patients with a median age of 65 (range, 40-82) years. According to the Child-Pugh classification, class A was 3 patients, class B was 19, and class C was 18. Changes from the baseline in body weight were -1.0 kg (P = 2.04 × 10-6) and -1.3 kg (P = 1.83 × 10-5), respectively. The median HVPG value was 240 (range, 105-580) mmH2O. HVPG was only significant influencing factor of the weight loss effect. When patients with body weight loss of 2 kg or greater from the baseline was defined as responders, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the optimal HVPG cutoff value was 190 mmH2O in predicting treatment response. The response rate was 87.5% (7/8) in patients with HVPG of 190 mmH2O or less, whereas it was only 12.5% (2/16) in those with HVPG of greater than 190 mmH2O (P = 7.46 × 10-4). We compared each characteristics factors between responders and non-responders. As a result, HVPG (P = 0.045) and serum hyaluronic acid (P = 0.017) were detected as useful factors. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that tolvaptan in the treatment of liquid retention could be more effective for patients with lower portal vein pressure. PMID:27275103

  5. Drop pressure optimization in oil well drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellak, Abderrahmane; Benyounes, Khaled; Djeridi, Adel

    2014-10-01

    In this research work, we are interested in minimizing losses, existing when drilling an oil well. This would essentially improve the load losses by acting on the rheological parameters of the hydraulic and drilling mud. For this, rheological tests were performed using a six-speed rotary viscometer (FANN 35). We used several rheological models to accurately describe the actual rheological behavior of drilling mud oil-based, according to the Pearson's coefficient and to the standard deviation. To model the problem, we established a system of equations that describe the essential to highlight purpose and various constraints that allow for achieving this goal. To solve the problem, we developed a computer program that solves the obtained equations in Visual Basic language system. Hydraulic and rheological calculation was made for in situ application. This allowed us to estimate the distribution of losses in the well.

  6. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  7. Rotating drops of axion dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Sacha; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We consider how QCD axions produced by the misalignment mechanism could form galactic dark matter halos. We recall that stationary, gravitationally stable axion field configurations have the size of an asteroid with masses of order 10-13M⊙ (because gradient pressure is insufficient to support a larger object). We call such field configurations "drops." We explore whether rotating drops could be larger, and find that their mass could increase by a factor ˜10 . This mass is comparable to the mass of miniclusters generated from misalignment axions in the scenario where the axion is born after inflation. We speculate that misalignment axions today are in the form of drops, contributing to dark matter like a distribution of asteroids (and not as a coherent oscillating background field). We consider some observational signatures of the drops, which seem consistent with a galactic halo made of axion dark matter.

  8. Predictive power of the Braden scale for pressure sore risk in adult critical care patients: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Critical care is designed for managing the sickest patients within our healthcare system. Multiple factors associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development have been investigated in the critical care population. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus regarding which of these factors poses the greatest risk for pressure ulceration. While the Braden scale for pressure sore risk is the most commonly used tool for measuring pressure ulcer risk in the United States, research focusing on the cumulative Braden Scale score and subscale scores is lacking in the critical care population. This author conducted a literature review on pressure ulcer risk assessment in the critical care population, to include the predictive value of both the total score and the subscale scores. In this review, the subscales sensory perception, mobility, moisture, and friction/shear were found to be associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development; in contrast, the Activity and Nutrition subscales were not found to predict pressure ulcer development in this population. In order to more precisely quantify risk in the critically ill population, modification of the Braden scale or development of a critical care specific risk assessment tool may be indicated. PMID:22948495

  9. Neural Network Prediction of Failure of Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels from Strain Field Data Acquired by a Computer Vision Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Lansing, Matthew D.

    1997-01-01

    This effort used a new and novel method of acquiring strains called Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation (SDVIC) on impact damaged Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels during a proof test. To predict the burst pressure, the hoop strain field distribution around the impact location from three vessels was used to train a neural network. The network was then tested on additional pressure vessels. Several variations on the network were tried. The best results were obtained using a single hidden layer. SDVIC is a fill-field non-contact computer vision technique which provides in-plane deformation and strain data over a load differential. This method was used to determine hoop and axial displacements, hoop and axial linear strains, the in-plane shear strains and rotations in the regions surrounding impact sites in filament wound pressure vessels (FWPV) during proof loading by internal pressurization. The relationship between these deformation measurement values and the remaining life of the pressure vessels, however, requires a complex theoretical model or numerical simulation. Both of these techniques are time consuming and complicated. Previous results using neural network methods had been successful in predicting the burst pressure for graphite/epoxy pressure vessels based upon acoustic emission (AE) measurements in similar tests. The neural network associates the character of the AE amplitude distribution, which depends upon the extent of impact damage, with the burst pressure. Similarly, higher amounts of impact damage are theorized to cause a higher amount of strain concentration in the damage effected zone at a given pressure and result in lower burst pressures. This relationship suggests that a neural network might be able to find an empirical relationship between the SDVIC strain field data and the burst pressure, analogous to the AE method, with greater speed and simplicity than theoretical or finite element modeling. The process of testing SDVIC

  10. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  11. Predictive models for pressure-driven fluid infusions into brain parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Direct infusions into brain parenchyma of biological therapeutics for serious brain diseases have been, and are being, considered. However, individual brains, as well as distinct cytoarchitectural regions within brains, vary in their response to fluid flow and pressure. Further, the tissue responds dynamically to these stimuli, requiring a nonlinear treatment of equations that would describe fluid flow and drug transport in brain. We here report in detail on an individual-specific model and a comparison of its prediction with simulations for living porcine brains. Two critical features we introduced into our model-absent from previous ones, but requirements for any useful simulation-are the infusion-induced interstitial expansion and the backflow. These are significant determinants of the flow. Another feature of our treatment is the use of cross-property relations to obtain individual-specific parameters that are coefficients in the equations. The quantitative results are at least encouraging, showing a high fraction of overlap between the computed and measured volumes of distribution of a tracer molecule and are potentially clinically useful. Several improvements are called for; principally a treatment of the interstitial expansion more fundamentally based on poroelasticity and a better delineation of the diffusion tensor of a particle confined to the interstitial spaces. PMID:21891847

  12. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Intracranial Pressure Predicts Outcome Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kirkness, Catherine J.; Mitchell, Pamela H.

    2009-01-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a recently developed technique suitable for describing scaling behavior of variability in physiological signals. The purpose of this study is to explore applicability of DFA methods to intracranial pressure (ICP) signals recorded in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). In addition to establishing the degree of fit of the power-law scaling model of detrended fluctuations of ICP in TBI patients, we also examined the relationship of DFA coefficients (scaling exponent and intercept) to: 1) measures of initial neurological functioning; 2) measures of functional outcome at six month follow-up; and 3) measures of outcome, controlling for patient characteristics, and initial neurological status. In a sample of 147 moderate-to-severely injured TBI patients, we found that a higher DFA scaling exponent is significantly associated with poorer initial neurological functioning, and that lower DFA intercept and higher DFA scaling exponent jointly predict poorer functional outcome at six month follow-up, even after statistical control for covariates reflecting initial neurological condition. DFA describes properties of ICP signal in TBI patients that are associated with both initial neurological condition and outcome at six months postinjury. PMID:18990620

  13. External lumbar drain: A pragmatic test for prediction of shunt outcomes in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Chotai, Silky; Medel, Ricky; Herial, Nabeel A.; Medhkour, Azedine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The consensus on most reliable supplemental test to predict the shunt responsiveness in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is lacking. The aim of this study is to discuss the utility of external lumbar drain (ELD) in evaluation of shunt responsiveness for iNPH patients. Methods: A retrospective review of 66 patients with iNPH was conducted. All patients underwent 4-day ELD trial. ELD-positive patients were offered ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) surgery. The primary outcome evaluation parameters were gait and mini mental status examination (MMSE) assessment. The family and patient perception of improvement was accounted for in the outcome evaluation. Results: There were 38 male and 28 female with mean age of 74 years (range 45-88 years). ELD trial was positive in 86% (57/66) of patients. No major complications were encountered with the ELD trial. A total of 60 patients (57 ELD-positive, 3 ELD-negative) underwent VPS insertion. The negative ELD trial (P = 0.006) was associated with poor outcomes following shunt insertion. The positive ELD trial predicted shunt responsiveness in 96% patients (P < 0.0001, OR = 96.2, CI = 11.6-795.3). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that the ELD trial is reasonably accurate in differentiating shunt responder from non-responder in iNPH patients (area under curve = 0.8 ± 0.14, P = 0.02, CI = 0.52-1.0). The mean follow-up period was 12-months (range 0.3-3 years). The significant overall improvement after VPS was seen in 92% (55/60). The improvement was sustained in 76% of patients at mean 3-year follow-up. The number of comorbid conditions (P = 0.034, OR = 4.15, CI = 1.2-9.04), and a history of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) (P = 0.035, OR = 4.4, CI = 1.9-14.6) were the predictors of poor outcome following shunt surgery. Conclusion: The positive ELD test predicted shunt responsiveness in 96% of patients. With adequate technique, maximal results with minimal

  14. A method for predicting full scale buffet response with rigid wind tunnel model fluctuating pressure data. Volume 1: Prediction method development and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.; Benepe, D. B.; Watts, D.; Waner, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    The method requires unsteady aerodynamic forces, natural airplane modes, and the measured pressure data as input. A gust response computer program is used to calculate buffet response due to the forcing function posed by the measured pressure data. By calculating both symmetric and antisymmetric solutions, upper and lower bounds on full-scale buffet response are formed. Comparisons of predictions with flight test results are made and the effects of horizontal tail loads and static aeroelasticity are shown. Discussions are also presented on the effects of primary wing torsion modes, chordwise and spanwise phase angles, and altitude.

  15. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  16. Multiple-lobed bifurcation of rotating liquid drops levitated by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Y. J.; Xie, W. J.; Wei, B.

    2010-01-01

    It is previously predicted that the equilibrium shape of a rotating liquid drop evolves from the axisymmetric to the two-, three-, and four-lobed morphologies as the angular velocity increases. Although the two- and three-lobed shape bifurcations have been observed in experiments, the four-lobed equilibrium shape is scarcely reported. Here, we investigate the multiple-lobed shape bifurcations of rotating drops by using acoustic levitation, and in particular, follow the evolution of the four-lobed equilibrium shape. A new shape family of rotating drops characterized by five-lobed bifurcation is also observed, which is unexpected in the theoretical predictions. A numerical method is employed to simulate the shape evolution of acoustically levitated and rotating drops. And the results validate the existence of bifurcation point shifts among all the lobed-shape families due to the initial drop flattening induced by the acoustic radiation pressure, which plays a decisive role in the emergence of the five-lobed shape.

  17. Pattern formation in drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, D.; Sobac, B.; Loquet, B.; Sampol, J.

    2011-01-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood exhibits coupled physical mechanisms, such as Marangoni flow, evaporation and wettability. The final stage of a whole blood drop evaporation reveals regular patterns with a good reproducibility for a healthy person. Other experiments on anaemic and hyperlipidemic people were performed, and different patterns were revealed. The flow motion inside the blood drop is observed and analyzed with the use of a digital camera: the influence of the red blood cells (RBCs) motion is revealed at the drop periphery as well as its consequences on the final stage of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of the dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of haematology. The blood drop evaporation process is evidenced to be driven only by Marangoni flow. The same axisymetric pattern formation is observed, and can be forecast for different blood drop diameters. The evaporation mass flux can be predicted with a good agreement, assuming only the knowledge of the colloids mass concentration.

  18. Predicting temperature-dependent solid vapor pressures of explosives and related compounds using a quantum mechanical continuum solvation model.

    PubMed

    Alnemrat, Sufian; Hooper, Joseph P

    2013-03-01

    Temperature-dependent vapor pressures of solid explosives and their byproducts are calculated to an accuracy of 0.32 log units using a modified form of the conductor-like screening model for real solvents (COSMO-RS). Accurate predictions for solids within COSMO-RS require correction for the free energy of fusion as well as other effects such as van der Waals interactions. Limited experimental data on explosives is available to determine these corrections, and thus we have extended the COSMO-RS model by introducing a quantitative structure-property relationship to estimate a lumped correction factor using only information from standard quantum chemistry calculations. This modification improves the COSMO-RS estimate of ambient vapor pressure by more than 1 order of magnitude for a range of nitrogen-rich explosives and their derivatives, bringing the theoretical predictions to within typical experimental error bars for vapor pressure measurements. The estimated temperature dependence of these vapor pressures also agrees well with available experimental data, which is particularly important for estimating environmental transport and gas evolution for buried explosives or environmentally contaminated locations. This technique is then used to predict vapor pressures for a number of explosives and degradation products for which experimental data is not readily available. PMID:23398143

  19. Leidenfrost drops on liquid baths: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexei; Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Duchesne, Alexis; Brandenbourger, Martin; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Colinet, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that a liquid drop released over a very hot surface generally does not contact the surface nor boils but rather levitates over a thin vapor film generated by its own evaporation (Leidenfrost effect). In particular, the case of a hot (and flat) solid substrate has been extensively studied in recent years. In contrast, we here focus on Leidenfrost drops over a superheated liquid bath, addressing the problem theoretically and comparing our predictions with experimental results, detailed in a separate talk. We predict the geometry of the drop and of the liquid bath, based on the hydrostatic Young-Laplace and lubrication equations. A good agreement is observed with the available experimental data concerning the deformation of the liquid bath. The modeling also yields a rather complete insight into the shape of the drop. As in the case of a solid substrate, the vapor layer generally appears to be composed of a vapor pocket surrounded by a circular neck. The influences of the superheat and of the drop size are parametrically investigated. A number of scaling laws are established. Unlike the case of a solid substrate, no chimney instability was found in the range of drop size studied.

  20. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, Jaime; di G Sigalotti, Leonardo; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Pena, Franklin; ININ-IVIC Team; Cinvestav-UAM-A Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. Cinvestav-Abacus.

  1. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  2. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. PMID:25122383

  3. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  4. Dynamics of liquid drops coalescing in the inertial regime.

    PubMed

    Sprittles, James E; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D

    2014-06-01

    We examine the dynamics of two coalescing liquid drops in the "inertial regime," where the effects of viscosity are negligible and the propagation of the front of the bridge connecting the drops can be considered as "local." The solution fully computed in the framework of classical fluid mechanics allows this regime to be identified, and the accuracy of the approximating scaling laws proposed to describe the propagation of the bridge to be established. It is shown that the scaling law known for this regime has a very limited region of accuracy, and, as a result, in describing experimental data it has frequently been applied outside its limits of applicability. The origin of the scaling law's shortcoming appears to be the fact that it accounts for the capillary pressure due only to the longitudinal curvature of the free surface as the driving force for the process. To address this deficiency, the scaling law is extended to account for both the longitudinal and azimuthal curvatures at the bridge front, which, fortuitously, still results in an explicit analytic expression for the front's propagation speed. This expression is shown to offer an excellent approximation for both the fully computed solution and for experimental data from a range of flow configurations for a remarkably large proportion of the coalescence process. The derived formula allows one to predict the speed at which drops coalesce for the duration of the inertial regime, which should be useful for the analysis of experimental data. PMID:25019880

  5. Dynamics of liquid drops coalescing in the inertial regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprittles, James E.; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D.

    2014-06-01

    We examine the dynamics of two coalescing liquid drops in the "inertial regime," where the effects of viscosity are negligible and the propagation of the front of the bridge connecting the drops can be considered as "local." The solution fully computed in the framework of classical fluid mechanics allows this regime to be identified, and the accuracy of the approximating scaling laws proposed to describe the propagation of the bridge to be established. It is shown that the scaling law known for this regime has a very limited region of accuracy, and, as a result, in describing experimental data it has frequently been applied outside its limits of applicability. The origin of the scaling law's shortcoming appears to be the fact that it accounts for the capillary pressure due only to the longitudinal curvature of the free surface as the driving force for the process. To address this deficiency, the scaling law is extended to account for both the longitudinal and azimuthal curvatures at the bridge front, which, fortuitously, still results in an explicit analytic expression for the front's propagation speed. This expression is shown to offer an excellent approximation for both the fully computed solution and for experimental data from a range of flow configurations for a remarkably large proportion of the coalescence process. The derived formula allows one to predict the speed at which drops coalesce for the duration of the inertial regime, which should be useful for the analysis of experimental data.

  6. Outcome Prediction for Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury with Dynamic Features from Intracranial Pressure and Arterial Blood Pressure Signals: A Gaussian Process Approach.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Marco A F; Brennan, Thomas; Lehman, Li-Wei; King, Nicolas Kon Kam; Ang, Beng-Ti; Feng, Mengling

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has been demonstrated that tracking features describing the dynamic and time-varying patterns in brain monitoring signals provide additional predictive information beyond that derived from static features based on snapshot measurements. To achieve more accurate predictions of outcomes of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), we proposed a statistical framework to extract dynamic features from brain monitoring signals based on the framework of Gaussian processes (GPs). GPs provide an explicit probabilistic, nonparametric Bayesian approach to metric regression problems. This not only provides probabilistic predictions, but also gives the ability to cope with missing data and infer model parameters such as those that control the function's shape, noise level and dynamics of the signal. Through experimental evaluation, we have demonstrated that dynamic features extracted from GPs provide additional predictive information in addition to the features based on the pressure reactivity index (PRx). Significant improvements in patient outcome prediction were achieved by combining GP-based and PRx-based dynamic features. In particular, compared with the a baseline PRx-based model, the combined model achieved over 30 % improvement in prediction accuracy and sensitivity and over 20 % improvement in specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. PMID:27165883

  7. Comparison of experimental surface pressures with theoretical predictions on twin two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, J. R.; Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.; Burley, J. R., II

    1986-01-01

    A three-dimensional subsonic aerodynamic panel code (VSAERO) was used to predict the effects of upper and lower external nozzle flap geometry on the external afterbody/nozzle pressure coefficient distributions and external nozzle drag of nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles having parallel external sidewalls installed on a generic twin-engine high performance aircraft model. Nozzle static pressure coefficient distributions along the upper and lower surfaces near the model centerline and near the outer edges (corner) of the two surfaces were calculated, and nozzle drag was predicted using these surface pressure distributions. A comparison between the theoretical predictions and experimental wind tunnel data is made to evaluate the utility of the code in calculating the flow about these types of non-axisymmetric afterbody configurations. For free-stream Mach numbers of 0.60 and 0.90, the conditions where the flows were attached on the boattails yielded the best comparison between the theoretical predictions and the experimental data. For the Boattail terminal angles of greater than 15 deg., the experimental data for M = 0.60 and 0.90 indicated areas of separated flow, so the theoretical predictions failed to match the experimental data. Even though calculations of regions of separated flows are within the capabilities of the theoretical method, acceptable solutions were not obtained.

  8. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  9. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-01

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  10. Pore Pressure prediction in shale gas reservoirs using neural network and fuzzy logic with an application to Barnett Shale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliouane, Leila; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Boudella, Amar

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the proposed idea is to use the artificial intelligence such as the neural network and fuzzy logic to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Pore pressure is a very important parameter that will be used or estimation of effective stress. This last is used to resolve well-bore stability problems, failure plan identification from Mohr-Coulomb circle and sweet spots identification. Many models have been proposed to estimate the pore pressure from well-logs data; we can cite for example the equivalent depth model, the horizontal model for undercompaction called the Eaton's model…etc. All these models require a continuous measurement of the slowness of the primary wave, some thing that is not easy during well-logs data acquisition in shale gas formtions. Here, we suggest the use the fuzzy logic and the multilayer perceptron neural network to predict the pore pressure in two horizontal wells drilled in the lower Barnett shale formation. The first horizontal well is used for the training of the fuzzy set and the multilayer perecptron, the input is the natural gamma ray, the neutron porosity, the slowness of the compression and shear wave, however the desired output is the estimated pore pressure using Eaton's model. Data of another horizontal well are used for generalization. Obtained results clearly show the power of the fuzzy logic system than the multilayer perceptron neural network machine to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Keywords: artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, pore pressure, multilayer perecptron, Barnett shale.

  11. An assessment of discriminatory power of office blood pressure measurements in predicting optimal ambulatory blood pressure control in people with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kengne, Andre Pascal; Libend, Christelle Nong; Dzudie, Anastase; Menanga, Alain; Dehayem, Mesmin Yefou; Kingue, Samuel; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) measurements (ABPM) predict health outcomes better than office BP, and are recommended for assessing BP control, particularly in high-risk patients. We assessed the performance of office BP in predicting optimal ambulatory BP control in sub-Saharan Africans with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods Participants were a random sample of 51 T2DM patients (25 men) drug-treated for hypertension, receiving care in a referral diabetes clinic in Yaounde, Cameroon. A quality control group included 46 non-diabetic individuals with hypertension. Targets for BP control were systolic (and diastolic) BP. Results Mean age of diabetic participants was 60 years (standard deviation: 10) and median duration of diabetes was 6 years (min-max: 0-29). Correlation coefficients between each office-based variable and the 24-h ABPM equivalent (diabetic vs. non-diabetic participants) were 0.571 and 0.601 for systolic (SBP), 0.520 and 0.539 for diastolic (DBP), 0.631 and 0.549 for pulse pressure (PP), and 0.522 and 0.583 for mean arterial pressure (MAP). The c-statistic for the prediction of optimal ambulatory control from office-BP in diabetic participants was 0.717 for SBP, 0.494 for DBP, 0.712 for PP, 0.582 for MAP, and 0.721 for either SBP + DBP or PP + MAP. Equivalents in diabetes-free participants were 0.805, 0.763, 0.695, 0.801 and 0.813. Conclusion Office DBP was ineffective in discriminating optimal ambulatory BP control in diabetic patients, and did not improve predictions based on office SBP alone. Targeting ABPM to those T2DM patients who are already at optimal office-based SBP would likely be more cost effective in this setting. PMID:25838859

  12. The accuracy of the compressible Reynolds equation for predicting the local pressure in gas-lubricated textured parallel slider bearings

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Mingfeng; Bailey, Brian N.; Stoll, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The validity of the compressible Reynolds equation to predict the local pressure in a gas-lubricated, textured parallel slider bearing is investigated. The local bearing pressure is numerically simulated using the Reynolds equation and the Navier-Stokes equations for different texture geometries and operating conditions. The respective results are compared and the simplifying assumptions inherent in the application of the Reynolds equation are quantitatively evaluated. The deviation between the local bearing pressure obtained with the Reynolds equation and the Navier-Stokes equations increases with increasing texture aspect ratio, because a significant cross-film pressure gradient and a large velocity gradient in the sliding direction develop in the lubricant film. Inertia is found to be negligible throughout this study. PMID:25049440

  13. COMPARISON OF MERCURY BLOOD PRESSURE READINGS TO OSCILLOMETRIC AND CENTRAL BLOOD PRESSURE IN PREDICTING TARGET ORGAN DAMAGE IN YOUTH

    PubMed Central

    Urbina, Elaine M; Khoury, Philip R; McCoy, Connie E; Daniels, Stephen R; Dolan, Lawrence M; Kimball, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypertension (HT) is an important risk factor for target organ damage (TOD). New methods for measuring BP are replacing mercury sphygmomanometry in many clinics. We examined the utility of different BP measurement techniques in predicting subclinical TOD in adolescents and young adults. Methods Subjects in a study of the CV effects of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were evaluated (N=677, 18 ± 3.3 years, 35% male, 60% non-Caucasian, 30% T2DM). We measured adiposity, lab, left ventricular mass, carotid intima-media thickness & pulse wave. BP was measured 3 times with mercury sphygmomanometery (BPm) an oscillometric device (BPo) and central aortic BP (BPc) was derived with arterial tonometry. Subjects were stratified as normotensive (N), pre-hypertensive (P) or hypertensive (H). Results The prevalence of HT this cohort with mean BMI of 31 was highest with BPo (16%), followed by BPm (11%) and BPc (9%), p≤0.001. BPm was most consistent in differentiating left ventricular mass and pulse wave velocity among subjects in the P group as compared to the N & H groups. Mercury BP was also more sensitive and specific in predicting greater left ventricular mass, pulse wave velocity and carotid thickness than the other BP measurement techniques in logistic regression. Conclusions We conclude that mercury sphygmomanometry should remain the gold standard for evaluation of HT and the risk for TOD in adolescents and young adults. PMID:25647284

  14. Airflows generated by an impacting drop.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Ray, Bahni; Morris, Jeffrey F; Lee, Taehun; Nagel, Sidney R

    2016-03-28

    A drop impacting a solid surface with sufficient velocity will splash and emit many small droplets. However, lowering the ambient air pressure suppresses splashing completely. This effect, robustly found for different liquid and substrate properties, raises the fundamental question of how air affects a spreading drop. In a combined experimental and numerical study we characterize the flow of air induced by the drop after it hits the substrate, using a modified Schlieren optics technique combined with high-speed video imaging and Lattice-Boltzmann simulations. Our experiments reveal the emergence of air structures on different length scales. On large scales, the airflow induced in the drop's wake leads to vortex structures due to interaction with the substrate. On smaller scales, we visualize a ring structure above the outer edge of the spreading liquid generated by the spreading of the drop. Our simulations reveal the interaction between the wake vorticity and the flows originating from the rapidly escaping air from below the impacting drop. We show that the vorticity is governed by a balance between inertial and viscous forces in the air, and is unrelated to the splashing threshold. PMID:26809314

  15. Turbulent flow and pressure fluctuation prediction of the impeller in an axial-flow pump based on LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. F.; Li, Y. J.; Liu, Z. Q.; Tang, X. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Large Eddy Simulation method with sliding mesh technique has been used for analyzing the unsteady flow in an axial-flow pump at five different flow rates. The tip leakage flow in the tip-gap region and the pressure pulsations on the blade surface were examined. The results indicate that the agreement between predicted pump performance and experimental data was reasonably good. The dominate tip-leakage vortex(TLV) extended to the pressure side of the neighboring blade for all five investigated flow rates. As the flow rate increases from 0.7Qd to 1.2Qd, the angle between the dominate TLV and the blade reduced from 20 deg to 14 deg. The results also showed that the amplitude of pressure fluctuation on the near-tip zone of the blade surface increases as the flow rate farer from the design flow rate, especially on the pressure side of the blade. At the 0.7Qd operation condition, the pressure fluctuation amplitude of the monitoring point PP3 (at the near-tip zone on the pressure side of the blade close to the blade leading edge) was 8.5 times of the one at design flow rate, and the high-frequency(18fr) pulsation occurred due to tip leakage vortex. When the flow rate was more than 1.0Qd, the pressure fluctuations of PP3 was dominated by the rotation frequency(fr).

  16. Time-averaged heat transfer and pressure measurements and comparison with prediction for a two-stage turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. G.; Kim, J.; Civinskas, K. C.; Boyle, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Time-averaged Stanton number and surface-pressure distributions are reported for the first-stage vane row and the first-stage blade row of the Rocketdyne Space Shuttle Main Engine two-stage fuel-side turbine. These measurements were made at 10 percent, 50 percent, and 90 percent span on both the pressure and suction surfaces of the component. Stanton-number distributions are also reported for the second-stage vane at 50 percent span. A shock tube is used as a short-duration source of heated and pressurized air to which the turbine is subjected. Platinum thin-film gages are used to obtain the heat-flux measurements and miniature silicone-diaphragm pressure transducers are used to obtain the surface pressure measurements. The first-stage vane Stanton number distributions are compared with predictions obtained using a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes solution and a version of STAN5. This same N-S technique was also used to obtain predictions for the first blade and the second vane.

  17. Prediction of hydrodynamic properties of mixed-particle systems and theoretical analysis of loop pressure profile in a CFB unit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, M.; Meikap, B.C.; Saha, R.K.

    2008-07-15

    The hydrodynamic behaviors of mixed system of particles were investigated in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) unit consisting of fast column (riser) with an inner diameter of 0.1016 m and a height of 5.62 m. Particle mixtures containing a Geldart group-A-like fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalyst with group-B-like sand and iron ore with coal were used to study the hydrodynamic features including static pressure, voidage, and loop pressure profile. The mixed system consisting of FCC catalyst and sand contained 20, 50, and 80 mass % sand, and the coal-iron ore mixture contained 80 mass % coal. The superficial air velocity ranged between 2.01 and 4.681 m/s, and the corresponding mass fluxes were 12.5-50 kg/(m{sup 2} s). A comparison of the available experimental values for static pressure profiles at different operating conditions for mixed-particle systems shows good agreement with those predicted from the single-particle systems. Using experimental data on the loop pressure balance, a simplified theoretical analysis was performed to predict the pressure profile in the CFB loop. The deviations between the two sets of values are within reasonable limits of accuracy.

  18. Acoustic forcing of a liquid drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of systems such as acoustic levitation chambers will allow for the positioning and manipulation of material samples (drops) in a microgravity environment. This provides the capability for fundamental studies in droplet dynamics as well as containerless processing work. Such systems use acoustic radiation pressure forces to position or to further manipulate (e.g., oscillate) the sample. The primary objective was to determine the effect of a viscous acoustic field/tangential radiation pressure forcing on drop oscillations. To this end, the viscous acoustic field is determined. Modified (forced) hydrodynamic field equations which result from a consistent perturbation expansion scheme are solved. This is done in the separate cases of an unmodulated and a modulated acoustic field. The effect of the tangential radiation stress on the hydrodynamic field (drop oscillations) is found to manifest as a correction to the velocity field in a sublayer region near the drop/host interface. Moreover, the forcing due to the radiation pressure vector at the interface is modified by inclusion of tangential stresses.

  19. Common Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Measurements Do Not Improve Cardiovascular Risk Prediction in Individuals With Elevated Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Bots, Michiel L.; Groenewegen, Karlijn A.; Anderson, Todd J.; Britton, Annie R.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Engström, Gunnar; Evans, Greg W.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Hedblad, Bo; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Ikeda, Ai; Kavousi, Maryam; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Kitamura, Akihiko; Ikram, M. Arfan; Lonn, Eva M.; Lorenz, Matthias W.; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B.; Nijpels, Giel; Okazaki, Shuhei; O’Leary, Daniel H.; Polak, Joseph F.; Price, Jacqueline F.; Robertson, Christine; Rembold, Christopher M.; Rosvall, Maria; Rundek, Tatjana; Salonen, Jukka T.; Sitzer, Matthias; Stehouwer, Coen D.A.; Franco, Oscar H.; Peters, Sanne A.E.; den Ruijter, Hester M.

    2015-01-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is a marker of cardiovascular risk. It is unclear whether measurement of mean common CIMT improves 10-year risk prediction of first-time myocardial infarction or stroke in individuals with elevated blood pressure. We performed an analysis among individuals with elevated blood pressure (ie, a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and a diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mm Hg) in USE-IMT, a large ongoing individual participant data meta-analysis. We refitted the risk factors of the Framingham Risk Score on asymptomatic individuals (baseline model) and expanded this model with mean common CIMT (CIMT model) measurements. From both models, 10-year risks to develop a myocardial infarction or stroke were estimated. In individuals with elevated blood pressure, we compared discrimination and calibration of the 2 models and calculated the net reclassification improvement (NRI). We included 17 254 individuals with elevated blood pressure from 16 studies. During a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 2014 first-time myocardial infarctions or strokes occurred. The C-statistics of the baseline and CIMT models were similar (0.73). NRI with the addition of mean common CIMT was small and not significant (1.4%; 95% confidence intervals, −1.1 to 3.7). In those at intermediate risk (n=5008, 10-year absolute risk of 10% to 20%), the NRI was 5.6% (95% confidence intervals, 1.6–10.4). There is no added value of measurement of mean common CIMT in individuals with elevated blood pressure for improving cardiovascular risk prediction. For those at intermediate risk, the addition of mean common CIMT to an existing cardiovascular risk score is small but statistically significant. PMID:24614213

  20. Prediction of pressure fluctuation of a hydraulic turbine at no-load condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. J.; Wu, X. J.; Liu, J. T.; Wu, Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study characteristics of pressure fluctuation of a turbine during the starting period, a turbine with guide vanes device at no-load condition was investigated using RNG k-epsilon turbulence model. The inner flow distribution and pressure fluctuation characteristics were analyzed. Results show that the pressure fluctuations in the region between the runner and guide vanes are different around the runner inlet. The dominant frequency of pressure fluctuation in the vaneless space close to the casing outlet is the blade passing frequency, while the dominant frequency at the rest region is the twice of the blade passing frequency. The increase of amplitude of pressure fluctuation close to the casing outlet can be attribute to the large scale stall at suction side of the runner inlet.