Science.gov

Sample records for pressure drop test

  1. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  2. Testing of a 4 K to 2 K heat exchanger with an intermediate pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2015-12-01

    Most large sub-atmospheric helium refrigeration systems incorporate a heat exchanger at the load, or in the distribution system, to counter-flow the sub-atmospheric return with the super-critical or liquid supply. A significant process improvement is theoretically obtainable by handling the exergy loss across the Joule-Thompson throttling valve supplying the flow to the load in a simple but different manner. As briefly outlined in previous publications, the exergy loss can be minimized by allowing the supply flow pressure to decrease to a sub-atmospheric pressure concurrent with heat exchange flow from the load. One practical implementation is to sub-divide the supply flow pressure drop between two heat exchanger sections, incorporating an intermediate pressure drop. Such a test is being performed at Jefferson Lab's Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF). This paper will briefly discuss the theory, practical implementation and test results and analysis obtained to date.

  3. The influence of the equivalent hydraulic diameter on the pressure drop prediction of annular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kayiem, A. H. H.; Ibrahim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The flow behaviour and the pressure drop throughout an annular flow test section was investigated in order to evaluate and justify the reliability of experimental flow loop for wax deposition studies. The specific objective of the present paper is to assess and highlight the influence of the equivalent diameter method on the analysis of the hydrodynamic behaviour of the flow and the pressure drop throughout the annular test section. The test section has annular shape of 3 m length with three flow passages, namely; outer thermal control jacket, oil annular flow and inner pipe flow of a coolant. The oil annular flow has internal and external diameters of 0.0422 m and 0.0801 m, respectively. Oil was re-circulated in the annular passage while a cold water-glycol mixture was re-circulated in the inner pipe counter currently to the oil flow. The experiments were carried out at oil Reynolds number range of 2000 to 17000, covering laminar, transition and turbulent flow regimes. Four different methods of equivalent diameter of the annulus have been considered in this hydraulic analysis. The correction factor model for frictional pressure drop was also considered in the investigations. All methods addressed the high deviation of the prediction from the experimental data, which justified the need of a suitable pressure prediction correlation for the annular test section. The conventional hydraulic diameter method is a convenient substitute for characterizing physical dimension of a non-circular duct, and it leads to fairly good correlation between turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer characteristic of annular ducts.

  4. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  5. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across a Blowbox: Gin Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox. Ho...

  6. Workplace field testing of the pressure drop of particulate respirators using welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that respirator testing with a sodium chloride aerosol gave a conservative estimate of filter penetration for welding fume aerosols. A rapid increase in the pressure drop (PD) of some respirators was observed as fumes accumulated on the filters. The present study evaluated particulate respirator PD based on workplace field tests. A field PD tester was designed and validated using the TSI 8130 Automatic Filter Tester, designed in compliance with National Institute for Occupational and Safety and Health regulation 42 CFR part 84. Three models (two replaceable dual-type filters and one replaceable single-type filter) were evaluated against CO(2) gas arc welding on mild steel in confined booths in the workplace. Field tests were performed under four airborne concentrations (27.5, 15.4, 7.9, and 2.1 mg m(-3)). The mass concentration was measured by the gravimetric method, and number concentration was monitored using P-Trak (Model 8525, TSI, USA). Additionally, photos and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to visualize and analyze the composition of welding fumes trapped in the filters. The field PD tester showed no significant difference compared with the TSI tester. There was no significant difference in the initial PD between laboratory and field results. The PD increased as a function of fume load on the respirator filters for all tested models. The increasing PD trend differed by models, and PD increased rapidly at high concentrations because greater amount of fumes accumulated on the filters in a given time. The increase in PD as a function of fume load on the filters showed a similar pattern as fume load varied for a particular model, but different patterns were observed for different models. Images and elemental analyses of fumes trapped on the respirator filters showed that most welding fumes were trapped within the first layer, outer web cover, and second layer, in order, while no fumes

  7. Experimental investigation of the two-phase flow regimes and pressure drop in horizontal mini-size rectangular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elazhary, Amr Mohamed; Soliman, Hassan M.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted in order to investigate two-phase flow regimes and fully developed pressure drop in a mini-size, horizontal rectangular channel. The test section was machined in the form of an impacting tee junction in an acrylic block (in order to facilitate visualization) with a rectangular cross-section of 1.87-mm height on 20-mm width on the inlet and outlet sides. Pressure drop measurement and flow regime identification were performed on all three sides of the junction. Air-water mixtures at 200 kPa (abs) and room temperature were used as the test fluids. Four flow regimes were identified visually: bubbly, plug, churn, and annular over the ranges of gas and liquid superficial velocities of 0.04 ≤ JG ≤ 10 m/s and 0.02 ≤ JL ≤ 0.7 m/s, respectively, and a flow regime map was developed. Accuracy of the pressure-measurement technique was validated with single-phase, laminar and turbulent, fully developed data. Two-phase experiments were conducted for eight different inlet conditions and various mass splits at the junction. Comparisons were conducted between the present data and former correlations for the fully developed two-phase pressure drop in rectangular channels with similar sizes. Wide deviations were found among these correlations, and the correlations that agreed best with the present data were identified.

  8. Pressure drop testing of corrugated stainless steel pliable gas tubing (PLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bharadwaj

    An experimental program was initiated to determine the Darcy friction factor in straight corrugated stainless steel pliable gas tubing (PLT). Pressure loss tests were conducted on PLT per I.S. EN 15266:2007. A power law least-squares curve fit was used to relate pressure loss per unit length as a function of volume flow rate. The calculated coefficient of determination values for the straight PLT exceeded 0.90 indicating suitable correlation. Darcy friction factors were calculated from test data for each case and plotted on a Moody diagram as a function of Reynolds number based on the minimum PLT cross section. For Reynolds numbers less than 2300 the pressure loss data for PLT yielded an inverse relationship between the Darcy friction factor and the Reynolds number, with a proportionality coefficient of 49. The measurement uncertainty estimates for straight sections was performed with a 95% confidence level. Straight PLT flow rates for air and representative fuel gases that would yield a pressure loss Deltap = 1 mbar were calculated as a function of PLT length and diameter. Fitting pressure loss tests were performed for elbows, tees, and bullhead tees. The loss coefficients were evaluated and tabulated. The calculated coefficient of determination values for the fittings was found to be low. The measurement uncertainty was calculated using the root sum square error method and was found to be very high because of the low flow rates considered in this experiment.

  9. In vitro comparison of Günther Tulip and Celect filters: testing filtering efficiency and pressure drop.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, M; Malvé, M; Peña, E; Martínez, M A; Leask, R

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the trapping ability of the Günther Tulip and Celect inferior vena cava filters was evaluated. Thrombus capture rates of the filters were tested in vitro in horizontal position with thrombus diameters of 3 and 6mm and tube diameter of 19mm. The filters were tested in centered and tilted positions. Sets of 30 clots were injected into the model and the same process was repeated 20 times for each different condition simulated. Pressure drop experienced along the system was also measured and the percentage of clots captured was recorded. The Günther Tulip filter showed superiority in all cases, trapping almost 100% of 6mm clots both in an eccentric and tilted position and trapping 81.7% of the 3mm clots in a centered position and 69.3% in a maximum tilted position. The efficiency of all filters tested decreased as the size of the embolus decreased and as the filter was tilted. The injection of 6 clots raised the pressure drop to 4.1mmHg, which is a reasonable value that does not cause the obstruction of blood flow through the system. PMID:25553669

  10. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer D.; Morton, Dana K.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  11. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P.

    1995-02-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO{sub 2}). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 {mu} M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 {mu}m AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a {open_quotes}turn-table{close_quotes} generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS`publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced.

  12. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.965 Section 178.965 Transportation... Packagings § 178.965 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all...) Special preparation for the drop test. Large Packagings must be filled in accordance with § 178.960....

  13. 49 CFR 178.1045 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.1045 Section 178.1045... Containers § 178.1045 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all... subpart. (b) Special preparation for the drop test. Flexible Bulk Containers must be filled to...

  14. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.810 Section 178.810 Transportation... Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types... the drop test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBCs intended to contain solids must be...

  15. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.603 Section 178.603 Transportation... Packagings and Packages § 178.603 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the... than flat drops, the center of gravity of the test packaging must be vertically over the point...

  16. Pressure Drop in Radiator Air Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R

    1921-01-01

    This report describes a method for measuring the drop in static pressure of air flowing through a radiator and shows (1) a reason for the discrepancy noted by various observers between head resistance and drop in pressure; (2) a difference in degree of contraction of the jet in entering a circular cell and a square cell; (3) the ratio of internal frictional resistance to total head resistance for two representative types; (4) the effect of smoothness of surface on pressure gradient; and (5) the effects of supplying heat to the radiator on pressure gradient. The fact that the pressure gradients are found to be approximately proportional to the square of the rate of flow of air appears to indicate turbulent flow, even in the short tubes of the radiator. It was found that the drop in the static pressure in the air stream through a cellular radiator and the pressure gradient in the air tubes are practically proportional to the square of the air flow in a given air density; that the difference between the head resistance per unit area and the fall of static pressure through the air tubes in radiators is apparent rather than real; and that radiators of different types differ widely in the amount of contraction of the jet at entrance. The frictional resistance was found to vary considerably, and in one case to be two-thirds of the head resistance in the type using circular cells and one-half of the head resistance of the radiator type using square cells of approximately the same dimensions.

  17. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  18. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  19. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  20. Predicting Pressure Drop In Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1990-01-01

    Theory developed to predict drop in pressure based on drag of individual fibers. Simple correlation method for data also developed. Helps in predicting flow characteristics of many strain-isolation pad (SIP) glow geometries in Shuttle Orbiter tile system. Also helps in predicting venting characteristics of tile assemblies during ascent and leakage of hot gas under tiles during descent. Useful in study of mechanics of flows through fibrous and porous media, and procedures applicable to purged fiberglass insulation, dialysis filters, and other fibrous and porous media.

  1. CPAS Preflight Drop Test Analysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Megan E.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Romero, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) drop test program, the CPAS Analysis Team has developed a simulation and analysis process to support drop test planning and execution. This process includes multiple phases focused on developing test simulations and communicating results to all groups involved in the drop test. CPAS Engineering Development Unit (EDU) series drop test planning begins with the development of a basic operational concept for each test. Trajectory simulation tools include the Flight Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) for single bodies, and the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulation for the mated vehicle. Results are communicated to the team at the Test Configuration Review (TCR) and Test Readiness Review (TRR), as well as at Analysis Integrated Product Team (IPT) meetings in earlier and intermediate phases of the pre-test planning. The ability to plan and communicate efficiently with rapidly changing objectives and tight schedule constraints is a necessity for safe and successful drop tests.

  2. Routines for Computing Pressure Drops in Venturis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Quay, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    A set of computer-program routines has been developed for calculating pressure drops and recoveries of flows through standard venturis, nozzle venturis, and orifices. Relative to prior methods used for such calculations, the method implemented by these routines offers greater accuracy because it involves fewer simplifying assumptions and is more generally applicable to wide ranges of flow conditions. These routines are based on conservation of momentum and energy equations for real nonideal fluids, the properties of which are calculated by curve-fitting subroutines based on empirical properties data. These routines are capable of representing cavitating, choked, non-cavitating, and unchoked flow conditions for liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. For a computation of flow through a given venturi, nozzle venturi, or orifice, the routines determine which flow condition occurs: First, they calculate a throat pressure under the assumption that the flow is unchoked or non-cavitating, then they calculate the throat pressure under the assumption that the flow is choked or cavitating. The assumption that yields the higher throat pressure is selected as the correct one.

  3. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... qualification of all packaging design types and performed periodically as specified in § 178.601(e). For other than flat drops, the center of gravity of the test packaging must be vertically over the point of... result in failure of the packaging must be used. The number of drops required and the...

  4. Method for reducing pressure drop through filters, and filter exhibiting reduced pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Sappok, Alexander; Wong, Victor

    2014-11-18

    Methods for generating and applying coatings to filters with porous material in order to reduce large pressure drop increases as material accumulates in a filter, as well as the filter exhibiting reduced and/or more uniform pressure drop. The filter can be a diesel particulate trap for removing particulate matter such as soot from the exhaust of a diesel engine. Porous material such as ash is loaded on the surface of the substrate or filter walls, such as by coating, depositing, distributing or layering the porous material along the channel walls of the filter in an amount effective for minimizing or preventing depth filtration during use of the filter. Efficient filtration at acceptable flow rates is achieved.

  5. Flow rate/pressure drop data gathered from testing a sample of the Space Shuttle Strain Isolation Pad (SIP): Effects of ambient pressure combined with tension and compression conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springfield, R. D.; Lawing, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tests were conducted on a sample of strain isolation pad (SIP) typical of that used in the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system to determine the characteristics of SIP internal flow. Data obtained were pressure drop as a function of flow rate for a range of ambient pressures representing various points along the Shuttle trajectory and for stretched and compressed conditions of the SIP. Flow was in the direction of the weave parallel to most of the fibers. The data are plotted in several standard engineering formats in order to be of maximum utility to the user. In addition to providing support to the Space Shuttle Program, these data are a source of experimental information on flow through fiberous (rather than the more usual sand bed type) porous media.

  6. CC Pressure Test

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1990-07-12

    The inner vessel heads including bypass and beam tubes had just been welded into place and dye penetrant checked. The vacuum heads were not on at this time but the vacuum shell was on covering the piping penetrating into the inner vessel. Signal boxes with all feed through boards, the instrumentation box, and high voltage boxes were all installed with their pump outs capped. All 1/4-inch instrumentation lines were terminated at their respective shutoff valves. All vacuum piping used for pumping down the inner vessel was isolated using o-ring sealed blind flanges. PV215A (VAT Series 12), the 4-inch VRC gate valve isolating the cyropump, and the rupture disk had to be removed and replaced with blind flanges before pressurizing due to their pressure limitations. Stresses in plates used as blind flanges were checked using Code calcualtions. Before the CC test, vacuum style blanks and clamps were hydrostatically pressure tested to 150% of the maximum test pressure, 60 psig. The Code inspector and Research Division Safety had all given their approval to the test pressure and procedure prior to filling the vessel with argon. The test was a major success. Based on the lack of any distinguishable pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages, the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 3 hrs.). A major leak in the instrumentation tubing was discovered at half of the maximum test pressure and was quickly isolated by crimping and capping with a compression fitting. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The 44 psig relief valve located just outside the cleanroom had to be capped until the pressure in the vessel indicated 38 psi. This was to allow higher supply pressures and hence, higher flows through the pressurizing line. Also, in order to get pressure readings at the cryostat without exposing any personnel to the potentially dangerous stored energy near the maximum test pressure, a camera was installed

  7. ECN Pressure Test

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-07-18

    This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

  8. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    SciTech Connect

    Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Childress, P.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Smith, J.V.

    1986-09-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests were designed to confirm the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. Work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory included (1) precise physical measurements of the internal poison rod configuration before assembly, (2) canister assembly and welding, (3) nondestructive examination (an initial hydrostatic pressure test and an x-ray profile of the internals before and after each drop test), (4) addition of a simulated fuel load, (5) instrumentation of the canister for each drop test, (6) fabrication of a cask simulation vessel with a developed and tested foam impact limiter, (7) use of refrigeration facilities to cool the canister to well below freezing prior to three of the drops, (8) recording the drop test with still, high-speed, and normal-speed photography, (9) recording the accelerometer measurements during impact, (10) disassembly and post-test examination with precise physical measurements, and (11) preparation of the final report.

  9. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered acceptable test liquids. Test... specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, drop height must be determined according to packing group, as follows...: 0.8 m (2.6 feet). (ii) Where the materials to be transported have a specific gravity exceeding...

  10. Orion Parachute Drop Test, July 18

    NASA Video Gallery

    A C-17 plane dropped a test version of Orion from an altitude of 25,000 feet above the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in southwestern Arizona on July 18, 2012. This test was the second to use an Ori...

  11. 49 CFR 178.1045 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Testing of Flexible Bulk... Flexible Bulk Container design types and performed periodically as specified in § 178.1035(e) of this subpart. (b) Special preparation for the drop test. Flexible Bulk Containers must be filled to...

  12. Static, Drop, and Flight Tests on Musselman Type Airwheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, William C; Beard, Albert P

    1932-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to obtain quantitative information on the shock-reducing and energy-dissipating qualities of a set of 30 by 13-6 Musselman type airwheels. The investigation consisted of static, drop, and flight tests. The static tests were made with inflation pressures of approximately 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 pounds per square inch and loadings up to 9,600 pounds. The drop tests were with the inflation pressures approximately 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 pounds per square inch and loadings of 1,840, 2,440, 3,050, and 3,585 pounds. The flight tests were made with VE-7 airplane weighing 2,153 pounds, with the tires inflated to 5, 10, and 15 pounds per square inch. The landing gears used in conjunction with airwheels were practically rigid structures. The results of the tests showed that the walls of the tires carried a considerable portion of the load, each tire supporting a load of 600 pounds with a depression of approximately 6 inches. The shock-reducing qualities, under severe tests, and the energy dissipating characteristics of the tires, under all tests, were poor. The latter was evidenced by the rebound present in all landings made. In the severe drop tests, the free rebound reached as much as 60 per cent of the free drop. The results indicate that a shock-reducing and energy-dissipating mechanism should be used in conjunction with airwheels.

  13. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  14. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  15. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of anti-freeze. Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at... is performed with water: (i) Where the materials to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding...) Where the materials to be transported have a specific gravity exceeding 1.2, the drop height must...

  16. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  17. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  18. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of anti-freeze. Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at... is performed with water: (i) Where the materials to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding...) Where the materials to be transported have a specific gravity exceeding 1.2, the drop height must...

  19. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  20. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  1. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  2. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  3. Pressure drop in tubing in aircraft instrument installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wildhack, W A

    1937-01-01

    The theoretical basis of calculation of pressure drop in tubing is reviewed briefly. The effect of pressure drop in connecting tubing upon the operation and indication of aircraft instruments is discussed. Approximate equations are developed, and charts and tables based upon them are presented for use in designing installations of altimeters, air-speed indicators, rate-of-climb indicators, and air-driven gyroscopic instruments.

  4. Determination of pressure drop coefficient by CFD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skočilasová, Blanka; Skočilas, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with method applied to the verification of the turbulence models. The turbulence models were used in the simulation of the Newtonian fluid turbulent flow in the circular tube. The principle of the method is in the comparison of the pressure drop obtained by the simulation and the analytic solution. The parameters of the fluid flow were varied with the specified Reynolds number range. The pressure drop of inserted element in the pipe is evaluated.

  5. The effect of pressure drop on respirator faceseal leakage.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Larry; Weber, Robert

    2005-07-01

    Users of particulate air-purifying respirators are typically told to change their filters when breathing resistance becomes uncomfortable. It has been proposed that a noticeable increase in breathing resistance (pressure drop) may increase airflow through respirator faceseal leaks. This logic has been extended to suggest that respirator user exposure to contaminants may increase because of this theoretical increase in air leakage. Procedures similar to those of previous investigators were used to study this issue. Repeated faceseal leak rate measurements were made at -5.6 through -20.1 mm water pressure drops across the faceseal. Subjects were divided into two groups, representing acceptable fit or unacceptable fit, based on leak rate criteria prescribed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Subjects with acceptable fit did not experience an increase in faceseal leak rate with increased pressure drop. Leak rates for subjects with unacceptable fit were highly variable and did not show an association with pressure drop. Results of this study do not support the concept of increased faceseal leakage with increased pressure drop. The evidence does not suggest increased risk of contaminant exposure through the face seal as pressure drop increases. PMID:16020096

  6. Effect of External Pressure Drop on Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentung, Ku; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of the pressure drop on the operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP). Because the evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) both contain two-phase fluid, a thermodynamic constraint exists between the temperature difference and the pressure drop for these two components. As the pressure drop increases, so will the temperature difference. The temperature difference in turn causes an increase of the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, resulting in a higher CC temperature. Furthermore, the heat leak strongly depends on the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core. Tests were conducted by installing a valve on the vapor line so as to vary the pressure drop, and by charging the LHP with various amounts of fluid. Test results verify that the LHP operating temperature increases with an increasing differential pressure, and the temperature increase is a strong function of the fluid inventory in the loop.

  7. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  8. Pressure drop and heat transfer in inverted film boiling hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, James

    Two-phase boiling hydrogen pressure drop and heat transfer is studied in the context of high velocity upflow in a constant, high heat flux, steady state, internal pipe flow environment. These data were generated by NASA in the early and mid 1960s in support of the manned space flight programs. Measurements taken were local pressure, temperature, and voltage drop. System measurements included mass flow rate, and test section inlet and discharge pressure and temperature. This effort establishes the nature of the flow as inverted film boiling, which has been studied to some degree. In this structure, the wall temperatures are too hot to allow liquid to remain at the surface. Therefore, a vapor film is established at the wall throughout the flow. The approach of this analysis is to reverse-engineer the data to determine mass quality, void fraction, and velocity slip. This is accomplished by applying a one-dimensional, five-equation model, with pressure gradient being the one combined equation for the liquid and vapor phases. Other major assumptions are that all of the vapor is at the mean film temperature, and the liquid core experiences no sensible heating. The resulting velocity slips are correlated for high and low pressure conditions, with the cutoff established at 600 kPa. Good agreement is achieved between the pressures predicted using the slip correlations and the measured pressures. Results are in general significantly better than those from the homogeneous equilibrium model. Various established heat transfer coefficient models are also applied to these data. It is shown that pre-critical heat flux models fail absolutely to predict the heat transfer coefficient. It is further shown that film boiling models that focus on buoyancy fail as well. While all forced convection film boiling models are within a reasonable range of the data, recommendations for appropriate models are made. The range of pipe inlet conditions are 188 kPa to 1265 kPa, mass fluxes from 327

  9. Discrete Element Modeling of Drop Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuannian; Tonon, Fulvio

    2012-09-01

    A discrete element code with impact model has been developed and calibrated to simulate the dynamic behavior of rock materials, with special regard to rock fragmentation upon impact during rock-fall analysis. The paper summarizes the discrete element code, the calibration algorithms developed to identify the model microparameters, and the impact model. Experimental work on drop tests is then used to validate the code on modeling impact fragmentation. It has been found that the developed discrete element code and impact model can reasonably simulate rock fragmentation in drop tests. The use of the discrete element code and impact model can provide good reference results in evaluating impact fragmentation in rock-fall analysis.

  10. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  11. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  12. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  13. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  14. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  15. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  16. Reducing cyclone pressure drop with evasés

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are widely used to separate particles from gas flows and as air emissions control devices. Their cost of operation is proportional to the fan energy required to overcome their pressure drop. Evasés or exit diffusers potentially could reduce exit pressure losses without affecting collection...

  17. Microseismicity Induced by Fluid Pressure Drop (Laboratory Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeny; Melchaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Pore pressure change in saturated porous rocks may result in its fracturing (Maury et Fourmaintraux, 1993) and corresponding microseismic event occurrences. Microseismicity due to fluid injection is considered in numerous papers (Maxwell, 2010, Shapiro et al., 2005). Another type of the porous medium fracturing is related with rapid pore pressure drop at some boundary. The mechanism of such fracturing was considered by (Khristianovich, 1985) as a model of sudden coal blowing and by (Alidibirov, Panov, 1998) as a model of volcano eruptions. If the porous saturated medium has a boundary where it directly contacted with fluid under the high pressure (in a hydraulic fracture or in a borehole), and the pressure at that boundary is dropped, the conditions for tensile cracks can be achieved at some distance from the boundary. In the paper, the results of experimental study of saturated porous sample fracturing due to pore pressure rapid drop are discussed. The samples (82 mm high, ∅60 mm) were made of quartz sand, which was cemented by "liquid glass" glue with mass fraction 1%. The sample (porosity 35%, uniaxial unconfined compression strength 2.5 MPa) was placed in a mould and saturated by oil. The upper end of the sample contacted with the mould upper lid, the lower end contacted with fluid. The fluid pressure was increased to 10 MPa and then discharged through the bottom nipple. The pressure increases/drops were repeated 30-50 times. Pore pressure and acoustic emission (AE) were registered by transducers mounted into upper and bottom lids of the mould. It was found, that AE sources (corresponded to microfracturing) were spreading from the open end to the closed end of the sample, and that maximal number of AE events was registered at some distance from the opened end. The number of AE pulses increased with every next pressure drop, meanwhile the number of pulses with high amplitudes diminished. It was found that AE maximal rate corresponded to the fluid pressure

  18. Controlling Vapor Pressure In Hanging-Drop Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Smith, Robbie

    1988-01-01

    Rate of evaporation adjusted to produce larger crystals. Device helps to control vapor pressure of water and other solvents in vicinity of hanging drop of solution containing dissolved enzyme protein. Well of porous frit (sintered glass) holds solution in proximity to drop of solution containing protein or enzyme. Vapor from solution in frit controls evaporation of solvent from drop to control precipitation of protein or enzyme. With device, rate of nucleation limited to decrease number and increase size (and perhaps quality) of crystals - large crystals of higher quality needed for x-ray diffraction studies of macromolecules.

  19. Pressure-drops control strategy in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Thalasso, F; Razo-Flores, E; Ancia, R; Naveau, H P; Nyns, E J

    2001-01-29

    This paper presents a strategy to control pressure-drops (head loss) in a biofilter designed according to the "Mist-Foam" concept. This concept is based on the mixing of the gaseous substrate and a liquid nutrient solution with an atomization nozzle to generate a mist passing subsequently through a synthetic polyurethane foam. In this type of bioreactor, the microbial growth reduces progressively the empty bed volume of the biofilter and causes an increase in the pressure-drops. This phenomenon can result in a complete clogging of the biofilter. The strategy of pressure-drops control presented here consists of successive interruption of the liquid flow, automatically controlled, resulting in a drying effect of the biomass. Tested during a 160 days experiment, this system has permitted to reduce and stabilize the pressure-drops in a biofilter in which the carrier exhibited a high likelihood of clogging. PMID:11118687

  20. Experimental Investigation of Oscillatory Flow Pressure and Pressure Drop Through Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Wang, Meng; Gedeon, David

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate the oscillatory flow pressure and pressure drop through complex geometries. These experiments were conducted at the CSU-SLRE facility which is a horizontally opposed, two-piston, single-acting engine with a split crankshaft driving mechanism. Flow through a rectangular duct, with no insert (obstruction), was studied first. Then four different inserts were examined: Abrupt, Manifold, Diverging Short and Diverging Long. The inserts were mounted in the center of the rectangular duct to represent different type of geometries that could be encountered in Stirling machines. The pressure and pressure drop of the oscillating flow was studied for: 1) different inserts, 2) different phase angle between the two pistons of the engine (zero, 90 lead, 180, and 90 lag), and 3) for different piston frequencies (5, 10, 15, and 20 Hz). It was found that the pressure drop of the oscillatory flow increases with increasing Reynolds number. The pressure drop was shown to be mainly due to the gas inertia for the case of oscillatory flow through a rectangular duct with no insert. On the other hand, for the cases with different inserts into the rectangular duct, the pressure drop has three sources: inertia, friction, and local losses. The friction pressure drop is only a small fraction of the total pressure drop. It was also shown that the dimensionless pressure drop decreases with increasing kinetic Reynolds number.

  1. Drop pressure optimization in oil well drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellak, Abderrahmane; Benyounes, Khaled; Djeridi, Adel

    2014-10-01

    In this research work, we are interested in minimizing losses, existing when drilling an oil well. This would essentially improve the load losses by acting on the rheological parameters of the hydraulic and drilling mud. For this, rheological tests were performed using a six-speed rotary viscometer (FANN 35). We used several rheological models to accurately describe the actual rheological behavior of drilling mud oil-based, according to the Pearson's coefficient and to the standard deviation. To model the problem, we established a system of equations that describe the essential to highlight purpose and various constraints that allow for achieving this goal. To solve the problem, we developed a computer program that solves the obtained equations in Visual Basic language system. Hydraulic and rheological calculation was made for in situ application. This allowed us to estimate the distribution of losses in the well.

  2. PRESSURE DROP EVALUATION OF THE HYDROGEN CIRCULATION SYSTEM FOR JSNS

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Kato, T.; Futakawa, M.

    2010-04-09

    In J-PARC, an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a proton beam of 1 MW has selected supercritical hydrogen with a temperature of around 20 K and the pressure of 1.5 MPa as a moderator material. A hydrogen-circulation system, which consists of two pumps, an ortho-para hydrogen converter, a heater, an accumulator and a helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, has been designed to provide supercritical hydrogen to the moderators and remove the nuclear heating there. A hydrogen-circulation system is cooled through the heat exchanger by a helium refrigerator with the refrigeration power of 6.45 kW at 15.5 K. It is important for the cooling design of the hydrogen-circulation system to understand the pressure drops through the equipments. In this work, the pressure drop through each component was analyzed by using a CFD code, STAR-CD. The correlation of the pressure drops through the components that can describe the analytical results within 14% differences has been derived. It is confirmed that the pressure drop in the hydrogen circulation system would be estimated to be 37 kPa for the circulation flow rate of 160 g/s by using the correlations derived here, and is sufficiently lower than the allowable pump head of 100 kPa.

  3. Pressure Drop Evaluation of the Hydrogen Circulation System for Jsns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Kato, T.; Futakawa, M.

    2010-04-01

    In J-PARC, an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a proton beam of 1 MW has selected supercritical hydrogen with a temperature of around 20 K and the pressure of 1.5 MPa as a moderator material. A hydrogen-circulation system, which consists of two pumps, an ortho-para hydrogen converter, a heater, an accumulator and a helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, has been designed to provide supercritical hydrogen to the moderators and remove the nuclear heating there. A hydrogen-circulation system is cooled through the heat exchanger by a helium refrigerator with the refrigeration power of 6.45 kW at 15.5 K. It is important for the cooling design of the hydrogen-circulation system to understand the pressure drops through the equipments. In this work, the pressure drop through each component was analyzed by using a CFD code, STAR-CD. The correlation of the pressure drops through the components that can describe the analytical results within 14% differences has been derived. It is confirmed that the pressure drop in the hydrogen circulation system would be estimated to be 37 kPa for the circulation flow rate of 160 g/s by using the correlations derived here, and is sufficiently lower than the allowable pump head of 100 kPa.

  4. The effect of pressure on annular flow pressure drop in a small pipe

    SciTech Connect

    de Bertodano, M.A.L.; Beus, S.G.; Shi, Jian-Feng

    1996-09-01

    New experimental data was obtained for pressure drop and entrainment for annular up-flow in a vertical pipe. The 9.5 mm. pipe has an L/D ratio of 440 to insure fully developed annular flow. The pressure ranged from 140 kPa to 660 kPa. Therefore the density ratio was varied by a factor of four approximately. This allows the investigation of the effect of pressure on the interfacial shear models. Gas superficial velocities between 25 and 126 m/s were tested. This extends the range of previous data to higher gas velocities. The data were compared with well known models for interfacial shear that represent the state of the art. Good results were obtained when the model by Asali, Hanratty and Andreussi was modified for the effect of pressure. Furthermore an equivalent model was obtained based on the mixing length theory for rough pipes. It correlates the equivalent roughness to the film thickness.

  5. PRESSURE DROP REDUCTION BY ELECTRICAL ENHANCEMENT OF FABRIC FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses economic studies of electrostatic augmentation of fabric filtration (ESFF) that indicate that the reduced rate of pressure drop rise can lead to lower capital and operating costs. (ESFF has been evaluated in the laboratory and at various pilot scales over the ...

  6. 14 CFR 29.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit drop test. 29.725 Section 29.725 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Landing Gear § 29.725 Limit drop test. The limit drop test must be conducted...

  7. 14 CFR 27.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit drop test. 27.725 Section 27.725 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Landing Gear § 27.725 Limit drop test. The limit drop test must be conducted...

  8. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  9. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  10. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  11. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  12. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  13. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  14. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  15. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  16. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  17. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  18. Effect of flameholder pressure drop on emissions and performance of premixed-prevaporized combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerr, R. A.; Lyons, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to determine the effects of flameholder pressure drop on the emissions and performance of lean premixed-prevaporized combustors. A conical flameholder mounted in a diverging duct was tested with two values of flameholder blockage. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons were measured for combustor entrance conditions of 600 to 800 K air temperature, 0.3 MPa to 0.5 MPa pressure, and 20 m/sec to 35 m/sec reference velocity. Jet A fuel was injected at flow rates corresponding to an equivalence ratio range from 0.8 down to the lean stability limit. Emission results for the high-blockage flameholder were a substantial improvement over the low-blockage emission results. A correlation of combustion efficiency with flameholder pressure drop was developed for pressure drops less than 9 percent.

  19. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  20. Effect of bed pressure drop on performance of a CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Shi Yang; Guangxi Yue; Jun Su; Zhiping Fu

    2009-05-15

    The effect of bed pressure drop and bed inventory on the performances of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler was studied. By using the state specification design theory, the fluidization state of the gas-solids flow in the furnace of conventional CFB boilers was reconstructed to operate at a much lower bed pressure drop by reducing bed inventory and control bed quality. Through theoretical analysis, it was suggested that there would exist a theoretical optimal value of bed pressure drop, around which the boiler operation can achieve the maximal combustion efficiency and with significant reduction of the wear of the heating surface and fan energy consumption. The analysis was validated by field tests carried out in a 75 t/h CFB boiler. At full boiler load, when bed pressure drop was reduced from 7.3 to 3.2 kPa, the height of the dense zone in the lower furnace decreased, but the solid suspension density profile in the upper furnace and solid flow rate were barely influenced. Consequently, the average heat transfer coefficient in the furnace was kept nearly the same and the furnace temperature increment was less than 17{sup o}C. It was also found that the carbon content in the fly ash decreased first with decreasing bed pressure drop and then increased with further increasing bed pressure drop. The turning point with minimal carbon content was referred to as the point with optimal bed pressure drop. For this boiler, at the optimum point the bed pressure was around 5.7 kPa with the overall excess air ratio of 1.06. When the boiler was operated around this optimal point, not only the combustion efficiency was improved, but also fan energy consumption and wear of heating surface were reduced. 23 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Ares I Upper Stage Parachute Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  2. Ares I Upper Stage Parachute Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  3. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  4. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  5. Flexible and precise drop test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stämpfli, Rolf; Brühwiler, Paul A.

    2009-11-01

    A drop test system with flexibility in the choice of falling object has been constructed and characterized. Using the guided free fall principle, the system enables the study of impacts of a large range of objects on a wide selection of anvils, with high control of the position and orientation of the object. The latter is demonstrated with falls of a standard aluminium headform in mountaineering helmets on a kerbstone anvil, for which visual inspection with a high-speed camera confirms the desired accuracy. Impacts of a flat falling body on cylindrical polystyrene foam samples are used to derive stress-strain curves for materials of different density and for multilayer samples. In this case, the effects of striker orientation and placement on the resultant data are discussed, and the reproducibility of the data serves as an additional confirmation of the accuracy of the measurement apparatus and procedures. A check on the improvement in the level of positional and orientational striking precision achievable is obtained via an inter-laboratory comparison.

  6. A steady state pressure drop model for screen channel liquid acquisition devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, J. W.; Darr, S. R.; McQuillen, J. B.; Rame, E.; Chato, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the derivation of a simplified one dimensional (1D) steady state pressure drop model for flow through a porous liquid acquisition device (LAD) inside a cryogenic propellant tank. Experimental data is also presented from cryogenic LAD tests in liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) to compare against the simplified model and to validate the model at cryogenic temperatures. The purpose of the experiments was to identify the various pressure drop contributions in the analytical model which govern LAD channel behavior during dynamic, steady state outflow. LH2 pipe flow of LAD screen samples measured the second order flow-through-screen (FTS) pressure drop, horizontal LOX LAD outflow tests determined the relative magnitude of the third order frictional and dynamic losses within the channel, while LH2 inverted vertical outflow tests determined the magnitude of the first order hydrostatic pressure loss and validity of the full 1D model. When compared to room temperature predictions, the FTS pressure drop is shown to be temperature dependent, with a significant increase in flow resistance at LH2 temperatures. Model predictions of frictional and dynamic losses down the channel compare qualitatively with LOX LADs data. Meanwhile, the 1D model predicted breakdown points track the trends in the LH2 inverted outflow experimental results, with discrepancies being due to a non-uniform injection velocity across the LAD screen not accounted for in the model.

  7. Flange weld pressure testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, C. F.

    1977-01-01

    Device allows localized high-pressure proof test. Use of tool eliminates need to block off far end of pipe; only small amount of pressurizing gas is needed; only small area needs to be cleared of personnel for proof test.

  8. Drop Tests of the Closure Ring for the 9975 Package

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.C

    1999-09-29

    The drop tests of the closure ring for 9975 packages, described here, were performed to answer questions raised by the regulatory authority as a result of deformation of the closure ring and drum rim observed during drop tests conducted in September 1998.

  9. 14 CFR 23.725 - Limit drop tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Landing Gear... than 18.7 inches. (b) If the effect of wing lift is provided for in free drop tests, the landing gear... be determined in a rational or conservative manner, during the drop test, using a landing gear...

  10. Review of Singular Cooling Inlet and Linear Pressure Drop for ITER Coils Cable in Conduit Conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicollet, S.; Bessette, D.; Cloez, H.; Decool, P.; Lacroix, B.; Lebailly, C. A.; Serries, J. P.

    2006-04-01

    New tests and measurements performed (Othello Facility, EFDA Task) on TF mock up cooling inlet and different central spirals (characteristics: hydraulic outer diameter and perforation ratio) are presented, as well as the new model of singular and linear friction factor. The ITER Coils CICC hydraulic length pressure drop is determined in operating conditions (m=8 g/s, P=0.6 MPa and T=5 K): the important result is an increase in linear pressure drop for the TF (290 Pa/m) and CS (430 Pa/m), in comparison with prototype model coils TFMC (100 Pa/m) and CSMC (180 Pa/m). The main reason is the reduction of the central spiral diameter and associated increase of friction factor and bundle to total mass flow ratio α (from 1/3 up to 2/3 typically). The ratio of singular cooling inlet to CICC linear pressure drop is estimated: TF mock up ratio (3 m) is lower than previous CS mock up tested (12 m), due to design changes. The cryogenic power necessary to compensate the CICC pressure drop is calculated for the 4 primary loop circuits: typically 2.3 kW at 5 K for TF winding system represents 40% of the whole average TF winding magnet heat loads during operation.

  11. Numerical Analysis including Pressure Drop in Oscillating Water Column Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    das Neves Gomes, Mateus; Domingues dos Santos, Elizaldo; Isoldi, Liércio André; Rocha, Luiz Alberto Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    The wave energy conversion into electricity has been increasingly studied in the last years. There are several proposed converters. Among them, the oscillatingwater column (OWC) device has been widespread evaluated in literature. In this context, the main goal of this work was to perform a comparison between two kinds of physical constraints in the chimney of the OWC device, aiming to represent numerically the pressure drop imposed by the turbine on the air flow inside the OWC. To do so, the conservation equations of mass,momentumand one equation for the transport of volumetric fraction were solved with the finite volume method (FVM). To tackle thewater-air interaction, the multiphase model volume of fluid (VOF)was used. Initially, an asymmetric constraint inserted in chimney duct was reproduced and investigated. Subsequently, a second strategywas proposed,where a symmetric physical constraint with an elliptical shapewas analyzed. Itwas thus possible to establish a strategy to reproduce the pressure drop in OWC devices caused by the presence of the turbine, as well as to generate its characteristic curve.

  12. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    SciTech Connect

    Box, W D; Aaron, W S; Shappert, L B; Childress, P C; Quinn, G J; Smith, J V

    1987-01-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests confirmed the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. This report presents the data generated and the results obtained from a series of four drop tests that included two drops with the test assembly in the vertical position and two drops with the assembly in the horizontal position.

  13. KC-135 zero-gravity two phase flow pressure drop: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Anne; Reinarts, Thomas R.; Best, Frederick R.; Hill, Wayne S.

    1991-01-01

    Two-phase flow, thermal management systems are currently being considered as an alternative to conventional, single phase systems for future space missions because of their potential to reduce overall system mass, size, and pumping power requirements. Knowledge of flow regime transitions, heat transfer characteristics, and pressure drop correlations is necessary to design and develop two-phase systems. This work is concerned with microgravity, two-phase flow pressure drop experiments. The data are those of a recent experiment (Hill and Best 1990) funded by the U.S. Air Force and conducted by Foster-Miller in conjunction with Texas A&M University. A boiling and condensing experiment was built in which R-12 was used as the working fluid. A Foster-Miller two phase pump was used to circulate a freon mixture and allow separate measurements of the vapor and liquid flow streams. The experimental package was flown five times aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which simulates 0-``g'' conditions by its parabolic flight trajectory. Test conditions included stratified and annual flow regimes in 1-``g'' which became bubbly, slug or annular flow regimes in 0-``g''. A portion of the current work outlines a methodology to analyze data for two-phase, 0-g experimental studies. A technique for correcting the raw pressure drop data collected from the test package is given. The Corrected pressure drop measurements are compared with predictive model. The corrected pressure drop measurements show no statistically significant difference between the 1-``g'' and 0-``g'' tests for mass flow rates between 0.00653 and 0.0544 kg/s in an 8 mm ID tube. An annular flow model gave the best overall predictions of pressure drop. The homogeneous, and Beattle and Whalley (1982) models showed good agreement with the pressure drops measured for the slug and bubbly/slug flow conditions. The two-phase multiplier deduced from the data appeared to follow the Martinelli-Nelson trend but at lower values than for

  14. Pressure drop of He II flow through a porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports on measurements of He II pressure drop across two porous SiO2 ceramic filter materials. These materials vary only in porosity, having values of 0.94 and 0.96. The average fiber diameter in both cases is approximately 5 microns. The experiment consists of a glass tube containing a piece of this sponge in one end. The tube is rapidly displaced downward in a bath of helium and the liquid levels are allowed to equilibrate over time producing variable velocities up to 10 cm/sec. The results are compared with those previously obtained using fine mesh screens. Good qualitative agreement is observed for turbulent flow; however, the behavior in the laminar flow regime is not fully understood.

  15. Orion Drop Test - Dec. 13, 2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    Testing continues at NASA Langley Research Center as the 18,000-pound (8,165 kg) Orion test article took its eight and final splash of the year into the Hydro Impact Basin on Dec. 13. This test sim...

  16. Orion MPCV Phase 1 Drop Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers conducted the first test as part of Phase 1 of the Orion MPCV boilerplate test article at NASA's Langley Research Center, on Oct. 18. The 18,000-pound (8,165 kg) test article -- represent...

  17. Blood Pressure Drop Prediction by using HRV Measurements in Orthostatic Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Giovanna; Melillo, Paolo; Stranges, Saverio; De Pietro, Giuseppe; Pecchia, Leandro

    2015-11-01

    Orthostatic Hypotension is defined as a reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure within 3 minutes of standing, and may cause dizziness and loss of balance. Orthostatic Hypotension has been considered an important risk factor for falls since 1960. This paper presents a model to predict the systolic blood pressure drop due to orthostatic hypotension, relying on heart rate variability measurements extracted from 5 minute ECGs recorded before standing. This model was developed and validated with the leave-one-out cross-validation technique involving 10 healthy subjects, and finally tested with an additional 5 healthy subjects, whose data were not used during the training and cross-validation process. The results show that the model predicts correctly the systolic blood pressure drop in 80 % of all experiments, with an error rate below the measurement error of a sphygmomanometer digital device. PMID:26345451

  18. Pressure drop of slush nitrogen flow in converging-diverging pipes and corrugated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Okuyama, Jun; Nakagomi, Kei; Takahashi, Koichi

    2012-12-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are solid-liquid, two-phase fluids. As a functional thermal fluid, there are high expectations for use of slush fluids in various applications such as fuels for spacecraft engines, clean-energy fuels to improve the efficiency of transportation and storage, and as refrigerants for high-temperature superconducting equipment. Experimental flow tests were performed using slush nitrogen to elucidate pressure-drop characteristics of converging-diverging (C-D) pipes and corrugated pipes. In experimental results regarding pressure drop in two different types of C-D Pipes, i.e., a long-throated pipe and a short-throated pipe, each having an inner diameter of 15 mm, pressure drop for slush nitrogen in the long-throated pipe at a flow velocity of over 1.3 m/s increased by a maximum of 50-60% as compared to that for liquid nitrogen, while the increase was about 4 times as compared to slush nitrogen in the short-throated pipe. At a flow velocity of over 1.5 m/s in the short-throated pipe, pressure drop reduction became apparent, and it was confirmed that the decrease in pressure drop compared to liquid nitrogen was a maximum of 40-50%. In the case of two different types of corrugated pipes with an inner diameter of either 12 mm or 15 mm, a pressure-drop reduction was confirmed at a flow velocity of over 2 m/s, and reached a maximum value of 37% at 30 wt.% compared to liquid nitrogen. The greater the solid fractions, the smaller the pipe friction factor became, and the pipe friction factor at the same solid fraction showed a constant value regardless of the Reynolds number. From the observation of the solid particles' behavior using a high-speed video camera and the PIV method, the pressure-drop reduction mechanisms for both C-D and corrugated pipes were demonstrated.

  19. Gas-liquid pressure drop in vertical internally wavy 90 bend

    SciTech Connect

    Benbella, Shannak; Al-Shannag, Mohammad; Al-Anber, Zaid A.

    2009-01-15

    Experiments of air water two-phase flow pressure drop in vertical internally wavy 90 bend have been carried out. The tested bends are flexible and made of stainless steel with inner diameter of 50 mm and various curvature radiuses of 200, 300, 400 and 500 mm. The experiments were performed under the following conditions of two-phase parameters; mass flux from 350 to 750 kg/m{sup 2} s. Gas quality from 1% to 50% and system pressure from 4 to 7.5 bar. The results demonstrate that the effect of the above-mentioned parameters is very significant at high ranges of mass flow quality. Due to the increasing of two-phase flow resistance, energy dissipations, friction losses and interaction of the two-phases in the vertical internally wavy 90 bend the total pressure drops are perceptible about 2-5 times grater than that in smooth bends. Based on the mass and energy balance as well as the presented experimental results, new empirical correlation has been developed to calculate the two-phase pressure drop and hence the two-phase friction factor of the tested bends. The correlation includes the relevant primary parameter, fit the data well, and is sufficiency accurate for engineering purposes. (author)

  20. 14 CFR 29.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., assuming that the mass of the rotorcraft acts at the center of gravity and exerts a force of 1.0g downward... acts at the center of gravity and exerts a force of 1g downward with the rotorcraft in the maximum nose... the drop test (i.e., the acceleration dv/dt in g's recorded in the drop test plus 1.0)....

  1. Condensation pressure drop of R22, R134a and R410A in a single circular microtube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Chang-Hyo; Oh, Hoo-Kyu

    2012-08-01

    The condensation pressure drop characteristics for pure refrigerants R22, R134a, and a binary refrigerant mixture R410A without lubricating oil in a single circular microtube were investigated experimentally. The test section consists of 1,220 mm length with horizontal copper tube of 3.38 mm outer diameter and 1.77 mm inner diameter. The experiments were conducted at refrigerant mass flux of 450-1,050 kg/m2s, and saturation temperature of 40°C. The main experimental results showed that the condensation pressure drop of R134a is higher than that of R22 and R410A for the same mass flux. The experimental data were compared against 14 two-phase pressure drop correlations. A new pressure drop model that is based on a superposition model for refrigerants condensing in the single circular tube is presented.

  2. Analysis of MHD Pressure Drop in Liquid LiPb Flow in Chinese ITER DFLL-TBM with Insulating Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongli; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Hongyan

    2008-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the Chinese Dual Functional Liquid Lithium-lead Test Blanket Module (DFLL-TBM) proposed for ITER is discussed in this paper. Electrical insulation between the coolant channel surfaces and the liquid metal is required to reduce the MHD pressure drop to a manageable level. Insulation can be provided by a thin insulating coating, such as Al2O3, which can also serve as a tritium barrier layer, at the channel surfaces in contact with LiPb. The coating's effectiveness for reducing the MHD pressure drop is analysed through three-dimensional numerical simulation. A MHD-based commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software FLUENT is used to simulate the LiPb flow. The effect on the MHD pressure drop due to cracks or faults in the coating layer is also considered. The insulating performance requirement for the coating material in DFLL-TBM design is proposed according to the analysis.

  3. Vertical Drop Testing and Simulation of Anthropomorphic Test Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 14 vertical impact tests were conducted using Hybrid III 50th Percentile and Hybrid II 50th Percentile Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) at NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of conducting these tests was threefold: to compare and contrast the impact responses of Hybrid II and Hybrid III ATDs under two different loading conditions, to compare the impact responses of the Hybrid III configured with a nominal curved lumbar spine to that of a Hybrid III configured with a straight lumbar spine, and to generate data for comparison with predicted responses from two commercially available ATD finite element models. The two loading conditions examined were a high magnitude, short duration acceleration pulse, and a low magnitude, long duration acceleration pulse, each created by using different paper honeycomb blocks as pulse shape generators in the drop tower. The test results show that the Hybrid III results differ from the Hybrid II results more for the high magnitude, short duration pulse case. The comparison of the lumbar loads for each ATD configuration show drastic differences in the loads seen in the spine. The analytical results show major differences between the responses of the two finite element models. A detailed discussion of possible sources of the discrepancies between the two analytical models is also provided.

  4. X-38 Drop Model: Testing Parafoil Landing System during Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  5. X-38 Drop Model: Used to Test Parafoil Landing System during Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  6. Novel cyclone pressure drop and emissions with heterogeneous particulate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New cyclone designs equally effective at controlling emissions that have smaller pressure losses would reduce both the financial and the environmental cost of procuring electricity. Tests were conducted with novel and industry standard 30.5 cm diameter cyclones at inlet velocities from 8 to 18 m s-...

  7. Novel cyclone empirical pressure drop and emissions with heterogeneous particulate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New cyclone designs equally effective at controlling emissions that have smaller pressure losses would reduce both the financial and the environmental cost of procuring electricity. Tests were conducted with novel and industry standard 30.5 cm diameter cyclones at inlet velocities from 8 to 18 m s-...

  8. Vertical Drop Test of a YS-11 Fuselage Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minegishi, Masakatsu; Kumakura, Ikuo; Iwasaki, Kazuo; Shoji, Hirokazu; Yoshimoto, Norio; Terada, Hiroyuki; Sashikuma, Hirofumi; Isoe, Akira; Yamaoka, Toshihiro; Katayama, Noriaki; Hayashi, Toru; Akaso, Tetsuya

    The Structures and Materials Research Center of the National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan (NAL) and Kawasaki Heavy Industories, Ltd. (KHI) conducted a vertical drop test of a fuselage section cut from a NAMIC YS-11 transport airplane at NAL vertical drop test facility in December 2001. The main objectives of this program were to obtain background data for aircraft cabin safety by drop test of a full-scale fuselage section and to develop computational method for crash simulation. The test article including seats and anthropomorphic test dummies was dropped to a rigid impact surface at a velocity of 6.1 m/s (20 ft/s). The test condition and result were considered to be severe but potentially survivable. A finite element model of this test article was also developed using the explicit nonlinear transient-dynamic analysis code, LS-DYNA3D. An outline of analytical method and comparison of analysis result with drop test data are presented in this paper.

  9. An experimental investigation of pressure drop of aqueous foam in laminar tube flow

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, B.F.; Sobolik, K.B.

    1987-04-01

    This report is the first of two detailing pressure-drop and heat-transfer measurements made at the Foam Flow Heat Transfer Loop. The work was motivated by a desire to extend the application of aqueous foam from petroleum drilling to geothermal drilling. Pressure-drop measurements are detailed in this report; a forthcoming report (SAND85-1922) will describe the heat-transfer measurements. The pressure change across a 2.4-m (8-ft) length of the 2.588-cm (1.019-in.) ID test section was measured for liquid volume fractions between 0.05 and 0.35 and average velocities between 0.12 and 0.80 m/s (0.4 and 2.6 ft/s). The resulting pressure-drop/flow-rate data were correlated to a theoretical model for a Bingham plastic. Simple expressions for the dynamic viscosity and the yield stress as a function of liquid volume fraction were estimated.

  10. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this section, the peak resultant accelerations at the location of the accelerometers mounted in the... 225g, and not more than 275g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse are less than ten percent (zero to...

  11. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this section, the peak resultant accelerations at the location of the accelerometers mounted in the... 225g, and not more than 275g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse are less than ten percent (zero to...

  12. Preliminary Analysis of Liquid Metal MHD Pressure Drop in the Blanket for the FDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-yan; Wu, Yi-can; He, Xiao-xong

    2002-10-01

    Preliminary analysis and calculation of liquid metal Li17Pb83 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the blanket for the FDS have been presented to evaluate the significance of MHD effects on the thermal-hydraulic design of the blanket. To decrease the liquid metal MHD pressure drop, Al2O3 is applied as an electronically insulated coating onto the inner surface of the ducts. The requirement for the insulated coating to reduce the additional leakage pressure drop caused by coating imperfections has been analyzed. Finally, the total liquid metal MHD pressure drop and magnetic pump power in the FDS blanket have been given.

  13. Prediction of Frictional Pressure Drop During Water Permeation Through Packed Beds of Granular Particulates

    SciTech Connect

    KING, WILLIAM D.; ALEMAN, SEBASTIAN E.; HAMM, L. LARRY; PETTIS, MYRA A.

    2005-10-25

    A methodology has been developed based on the Kozeny-Carman equation to predict frictional pressure drops during water permeation of packed columns containing essentially noncompressible, but highly irregular particles. The resulting model accurately predicts pressure drop as a function of liquid flow rate and resin particle size for this system. A total of five particle sieve cuts across the range -20 to +70 mesh were utilized for testing using deionized water as the mobile phase. The Rosin-Rammler equation was used to fit the raw particle size data (wet sieve analysis) for the as-received resin sample and generate a continuous cumulative distribution function based on weight percent passing through the sieve. Probability distribution functions were calculated from the cumulative distribution for each particle sieve cut tested. Nine particle diameter definitions (i.e., number mean, volume mean, etc.) were then selected from the distribution function for each sample to represent the average spherically-equivalent particle diameter as input to the Kozeny-Carman equation. Nonlinear least squares optimization of the normalized pressure drop residuals were performed by parameter estimation of particle shape factor and bed porosity for all samples simultaneously using a given average particle diameter definition. Good fits to the full experimental data set were obtained when utilizing the number mean and the number median diameters. However, the shape factor and porosity values of 0.88 and 0.40, respectively, obtained from fitting the data using the number mean diameter were more consistent with experimental observations.

  14. Pressure drop and thrust predictions for transonic micronozzle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J.; Groll, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the expansion of xenon, argon, krypton, and neon gases through a Laval nozzle is studied experimentally and numerically. The pressurized gases are accelerated through the nozzle into a vacuum chamber in an attempt to simulate the operating conditions of a cold-gas thruster for attitude control of a micro-satellite. The gases are evaluated at several mass flow rates ranging between 0.178 mg/s and 3.568 mg/s. The Re numbers are low (8-256) and the estimated values of Kn number lie between 0.33 and 0.02 (transition and slip-flow regime). Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and continuum-based simulations with a no-slip boundary condition are performed. The DSMC and the experimental results show good agreement in the range Kn > 0.1, while the Navier-Stokes results describe the experimental data more accurately for Kn < 0.05. Comparison between the experimental and Navier-Stokes results shows high deviations at the lower mass flow rates and higher Kn numbers. A relation describing the deviation of the pressure drop through the nozzle as a function of Kn is obtained. For gases with small collision cross sections, the experimental pressure results deviate more strongly from the no-slip assumption. From the analysis of the developed function, it is possible to correct the pressure results for the studied gases, both in the slip-flow and transition regimes, with four gas-independent accommodation coefficients. The thrust delivered by the cold-gas thruster and the specific impulse is determined based on the numerical results. Furthermore, an increase of the thickness of the viscous boundary layer through the diffuser of the micronozzle is observed. This results in a shock-less decrease of the Mach number and the flow velocity, which penalizes thrust efficiency. The negative effect of the viscous boundary layer on thrust efficiency can be lowered through higher values of Re and a reduction of the diffuser length.

  15. Design, manufacture, and testing of the Armstrong Hall drop tower decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Jaime Andres

    A decelerator was needed for the Armstrong Hall Microgravity tower. Three designs were considered as concepts and the one chosen was an airbag. The airbag is 5 feet tall and 4.5 feet in diameter due to floor constraints. The deceleration was controlled by designing the vent system to provide the needed vent area as a function of time. This dynamics vent area controls the rate at which volume is expelled from the airbag. The volume expelled depends on the pressure inside the airbag, thus, a direct relation between the vent area and the deceleration profile was determined. The airbag and associated infrastructure was designed, manufactured, and tested. This system includes an airbag with a cushion on top to prevent wear, cart and rails, a drop package, and a latch and release system. More than forty tests were done with different drop height and drop weight combinations culminating in three drops of 200 lbs from the third floor. The drop weight was varied by adjusting the water level in a plastic barrel in the drop package. Pressure measurements inside the bag and vent were taken using two pressure transducers. The pressure transducers sampled the pressure at one of the exit vents and at the center of the bottom of the airbag. The signals were low-pass filtered for noise and scaled for pressure. The pressure traces were processed to find the mean deceleration. The deceleration was found to be independent of drop weight, only depending on drop height. The traces were also integrated to find a momentum per unit area. This value was then compared to the momentum of the drop package. From these two results an effective impact area can be found. It was found that the cushion not only reduced wear but also increased the effective impact area substantially. This increase in area reduced the value of the mean deceleration by reducing the pressure inside the airbag. The airbag proved to work well for the drops, decelerating the package and preventing a direct hit with the

  16. Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Peter; Parker, Gary; Novak, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

  17. Resonances, radiation pressure and optical scattering phenomena of drops and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, P. L.; Goosby, S. G.; Langley, D. S.; Loporto-Arione, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic levitation and the response of fluid spheres to spherical harmonic projections of the radiation pressure are described. Simplified discussions of the projections are given. A relationship between the tangential radiation stress and the Konstantinov effect is introduced and fundamental streaming patterns for drops are predicted. Experiments on the forced shape oscillation of drops are described and photographs of drop fission are displayed. Photographs of critical angle and glory scattering by bubbles and rainbow scattering by drops are displayed.

  18. 14 CFR 23.725 - Limit drop tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... assumed wing lift to the airplane weight, but not more than 0.667. (c) The limit inertia load factor must... test. (e) The limit inertia load factor must be determined from the drop test in paragraph (b) of this... paragraph (e) may not be more than the limit inertia load factor used in the landing conditions in § 23.473....

  19. 14 CFR 23.725 - Limit drop tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... assumed wing lift to the airplane weight, but not more than 0.667. (c) The limit inertia load factor must... test. (e) The limit inertia load factor must be determined from the drop test in paragraph (b) of this... paragraph (e) may not be more than the limit inertia load factor used in the landing conditions in § 23.473....

  20. 14 CFR 23.725 - Limit drop tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... assumed wing lift to the airplane weight, but not more than 0.667. (c) The limit inertia load factor must... test. (e) The limit inertia load factor must be determined from the drop test in paragraph (b) of this... paragraph (e) may not be more than the limit inertia load factor used in the landing conditions in § 23.473....

  1. 14 CFR 23.725 - Limit drop tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... assumed wing lift to the airplane weight, but not more than 0.667. (c) The limit inertia load factor must... test. (e) The limit inertia load factor must be determined from the drop test in paragraph (b) of this... paragraph (e) may not be more than the limit inertia load factor used in the landing conditions in § 23.473....

  2. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux. This document consists solely of the plato file index from 11/87 to 11/90.

  3. Analytical Evaluation of Drop Tests Performed on Nine 18-Inch Diameter Standardized DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer David; Morton, Dana Keith; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Ware, Arthur Gates; Smith, Nancy Lynn

    2000-07-01

    During fiscal year 1999, a total of nine 18-inch diameter test canisters were fabricated at the Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to represent the standardized Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) canister design. Various "worst case" internal loadings were incorporated. Seven of the test canisters were 15-foot long and weighed approximately 6000 pounds, while two were 10-foot long and weighed 3000 and 3800 pounds. Seven of the test canisters were dropped from thirty feet onto an essentially unyielding flat surface and one of the test canisters was dropped from 40-inches onto a 6-inch diameter puncture post. The final test canister was dropped from 24 inches onto a 2-inch thick vertically oriented steel plate, and then tipped over to impact another 2-inch thick vertically oriented steel plate. This last test was attempting to represent a canister dropping onto another larger container such as a repository disposal container. All drop testing was performed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The nine test canisters experienced varying degrees of damage to their skirts, lifting rings, and pressure boundary components (heads and main body). However, all of the canisters were shown to have maintained their pressure boundary (through pressure testing), and the four worst damaged canisters were also shown to be leaktight (via helium leak testing performed at the INEEL). Pre-drop and post-drop test canister finite element modeling was performed at the INEEL in support of the canister drop test program. All model evaluations were performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit software. The finite element models representing the test canisters accurately (though at times, slightly conservatively) predicted the actual test canister responses during the defined drop events.This paper will discuss highlights of the drop testing program and will give detailed comparisons of analysis versus actual test results.

  4. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 2

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux.

  5. Modeling and experimental validation on pressure drop in a reverse-flow cyclone separator at high inlet solid loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuezhi; Liu, Jie; Xu, Xiang; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-08-01

    High inlet solid loading is one of the most important features of cyclone separators in high density circulating fluidized beds (CFB). In this work, the effect of high solid loading on pressure drop in a reverse-flow cyclone was experimentally studied. The particles used were sand and γ-Al2O3. An extended range of inlet solid loadings ( M), up to 30 kg of solids/ kg of air was tested at different inlet air velocities ( V in=16˜24 m/s), well beyond the solid loading range reported before. The experiments showed that, in the tested range of solid loadings, the cyclone pressure drop decreased dramatically with increasing solid loading when M<7.5 kg/kg and then almost remained constant. A new semi-empirical model for predicting cyclone pressure drop was also developed. The calculated and experimental results showed good agreement for particle free flow and particle laden flow.

  6. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, F.X.; Crowley, C.J.; Qureshi, Z.H.

    1992-06-01

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  7. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, F.X.; Crowley, C.J. ); Qureshi, Z.H. )

    1992-01-01

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  8. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, F. X.; Crowley, C. J.; Qureshi, Z. H.

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  9. 14 CFR 27.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... reaction that would exist at the nose wheel, assuming that the mass of the rotorcraft acts at the center of..., assuming that the mass of the rotorcraft acts at the center of gravity and exerts a force of lg downward... introduced into the drop test by appropriate energy absorbing devices or by the use of an effective mass....

  10. 14 CFR 27.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... reaction that would exist at the nose wheel, assuming that the mass of the rotorcraft acts at the center of..., assuming that the mass of the rotorcraft acts at the center of gravity and exerts a force of lg downward... introduced into the drop test by appropriate energy absorbing devices or by the use of an effective mass....

  11. 14 CFR 27.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... reaction that would exist at the nose wheel, assuming that the mass of the rotorcraft acts at the center of..., assuming that the mass of the rotorcraft acts at the center of gravity and exerts a force of lg downward... introduced into the drop test by appropriate energy absorbing devices or by the use of an effective mass....

  12. Pressure drop control using multiple orifice system in compressible pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heuydong; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Matsuo, Shigeru; Raghunathan, S. R.

    2001-10-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of an orifice system in producing pressure drops and the effect of compressibility on the pressure drop, computations using the mass-averaged implicit Navier-Stokes equations were applied to the axisymmetric pipe flows with the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 20.0. The standard k- ɛ turbulence model was employed to close the governing equations. Numerical calculations were carried out for some combinations of the multiple orifice configurations. The present CFD data showed that the orifice systems, which have been applied to incompressible flow regime to date, could not be used for the high operating pressure ratio flows. The orifice interval did not strongly affect the total pressure drop, but the orifice area ratio more than 2.5 led to relatively high pressure drops. The total pressure drop rapidly increased in the range of the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 4.0, but it nearly did not increase when the operating pressure ratio was over 4.0. In the compressible pipe flows through double and triple orifice systems, the total pressure drop was largely due to shock losses.

  13. LLNL small-scale drop-hammer impact sensitivity test

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives and other energetic materials is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. This testing is typically done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing ``ERL Type 12 Drop Weight Impact Sensitivity Apparatus``, or ``Drop Hammer Machine``, and the methods used to determine the impact sensitivity of energetic materials, Also discussed are changes made to both the machine and methods since the inception of impact sensitivity testing at LLNL in 1956. The accumulated data for the materials tested in not listed here, the exception being the discussion of those specific materials (primary calibrants: PETN, RDX, Comp-B3,and TNT; secondary calibrants: K-6, RX-26-AF, and TATB) used to calibrate the machine.

  14. Low pressure drop airborne molecular contaminant filtration using open-channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Ding, Lefei; Joriman, Jon; Zastera, Dustin; Seguin, Kevin; Empson, James

    2006-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for AMC is offered by granular filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of adsorbents extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the low pressure drop AMC filters currently offered tend to be quiet costly and contaminant nonspecific. Many of these low pressure drop filters are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCNs), can still offer good filter life and removal efficiency, with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and full fan unit filters this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for AMC removal in a wide range of applications.

  15. Compressibility Effects on Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Smooth Cylindrical Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N

    1944-01-01

    An analysis is made to simplify pressure-drop calculations for nonadiabatic and adiabatic friction flow of air in smooth cylindrical tubes when the density changes due to heat transfer and pressure drop are appreciable. Solutions of the equation of motion are obtained by the use of Reynolds' analogy between heat transfer and skin friction. Charts of the solutions are presented for making pressure-drop calculations. A technique of using the charts to determine the position of a normal shock in a tube is described.

  16. LHe Flow Regime/Pressure Drop for D0 Solenoid at Steady State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-03-03

    This paper describes in a note taking format what was learned from several sources on two phase liquid helium flow regimes and pressure drops as applied to the D-Zero solenoid upgrade project. Calculations to estimate the steady state conditions for the D-Zero solenoid at 5, 10 and 15 g/s are also presented. For the lower flow rates a stratified type regime can be expected with a pressure drop less than 0.5 psi. For the higher flow rate a more homogeneous flow regime can be expected with a pressure drop between 0.4 to 1.5 psi.

  17. Laboratory manual for static pressure drop experiments in LMFBR wire wrapped rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.J.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-07-01

    Purpose of this experiment is to determine both interior and edge subchannel axial pressure drops for a range of Reynolds numbers. The subchannel static pressure drop is used to calculate subchannel and bundle average friction factors, which can be used to verify existing friction factor correlations. The correlations for subchannel friction factors are used as input to computer codes which solve the coupled energy, continuity, and momentum equations, and are also used to develop flow split correlations which are needed as input to codes which solve only the energy equation. The bundle average friction factor is used to calculate the overall bundle pressure drop, which determines the required pumping power.

  18. Development of the Sasquatch Drop Test Footprint Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bledsoe, Kristin J.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is the parachute system for NASA s Orion spacecraft. CPAS is currently in the design and testing phase of development. The test program consists of numerous drop tests, wherein a test article rigged with parachutes is extracted or released from an aircraft. During such tests, range safety is paramount, as is the recoverability of the parachutes and test article. It is crucial to establish an aircraft release point that will ensure that the article and all items released from it will land in safe locations. Early in the CPAS project, a legacy tool (previously used on the X-38 project) was used to determine a safe release point and to predict the landing locations (the footprint) of the payload and all released objects. Due to increasing test complexity and the need for a more flexible tool, a new footprint predictor tool, called Sasquatch, was created in MATLAB. This tool takes in a simulated trajectory for the test article, information about all released objects, and atmospheric wind data (simulated or actual) to calculate the trajectories of the released objects. Dispersions are applied to the landing locations of those objects, taking into account the variability of winds, aircraft release point, and object descent rate. A safe aircraft release point is determined based on the landing locations of the payload and released objects. The release point, landing locations, and dispersions are plotted on a simple map of the drop zone for easy reference. To date, Sasquatch has been used for thirteen drop tests. Comparing the predictions with actual test results has allowed for significant improvements in the tool s predictive capabilities, especially the incorporation of a well-correlated horizontal throw model. Intended future improvements to the tool include tighter dispersions on the landing locations, Monte Carlo capability, direct input from trajectory simulations, and a graphical user interface.

  19. Experimental study on the flow patterns and the two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal impacting T-Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; Malandrone, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper analyzes the experimental results concerning the flow patterns and pressure drops in two-phase flow through a horizontal impacting T-junction, whose outlet pipes are aligned and perpendicular to the inlet pipe. The test section consists of plexiglass pipes with inner diameter of 10 mm. A mixture of water and air at ambient temperature and pressures up to 2.4 bar flows through the T-junction, with different splitting of flow rates in the two outlet branches; superficial velocities of air and water in the inlet pipe have been varied up to a maximum of 35 m/s and 3.5 m/s respectively. The flow patterns occurring in the inlet and branch pipes are compared with the predictions of the Baker and Taitel - Dukler maps. The pressure drops along the branches have been measured relatively to different splitting of the flow rate through the two branches and the pressure loss coefficients in the junction have been evaluated. Friction pressure drops have allowed us to evaluate two-phase friction multipliers, which have then been compared to the predictions of Lockhart-Martinelli, and Friedel correlations. Local pressure drops have been extrapolated at the junction centre and analyzed; the two-phase multiplier has been evaluated and compared with the predictions of Chisholm correlation; the value of the empirical coefficient that minimizes the discrepancy has also been evaluated.

  20. Coefficient of restitution of sports balls: A normal drop test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, Adli; Ismail, K. A.

    2012-09-01

    Dynamic behaviour of bodies during impact is investigated through impact experiment, the simplest being a normal drop test. Normally, a drop test impact experiment involves measurement of kinematic data; this includes measurement of incident and rebound velocity in order to calculate a coefficient of restitution (COR). A high speed video camera is employed for measuring the kinematic data where speed is calculated from displacement of the bodies. Alternatively, sensors can be employed to measure speeds, especially for a normal impact where there is no spin of the bodies. This paper compares experimental coefficients of restitution (COR) for various sports balls, namely golf, table tennis, hockey and cricket. The energy loss in term of measured COR and effects of target plate are discussed in relation to the material and construction of these sports balls.

  1. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 8

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of tables of temperature measurements.

  2. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 4

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  3. 14 CFR 27.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... gravity and exerts a force of 1.0g downward and 0.25g forward. W=W T for tailwheel units (lbs.), equal to..., assuming that the mass of the rotorcraft acts at the center of gravity and exerts a force of lg downward..., during impact, on the mass used in the drop test (i.e., the acceleration dv/dt in g's recorded in...

  4. Cyclone optimization based on a new empirical model for pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, G.; Leith, D. ); Dirgo, J. ); Feldman, H. )

    1991-01-01

    An empirical model for predicting pressure drop across a cyclone, developed by Dirgo is presented. The model was developed through a statistical analysis of pressure drop data for 98 cyclone designs. The model is shown to perform better than the pressure drop models of Shepherd and Lapple, Alexander, First, Stairmand, and Barth. This model is used with the efficiency model of Iozia and Leith to develop an optimization curve which predicts the minimum pressure drop and the dimension ratios of the optimized cyclone for a given aerodynamic cut diameter, d{sub 50}. The effect of variation in cyclone height, cyclone diameter, and flow on the optimization is determined. The optimization results are used to develop a design procedure for optimized cyclones.

  5. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  6. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  7. Effects of pressure drop and superficial velocity on the bubbling fluidized bed incinerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Jehng; Chen, Suming; Lei, Perng-Kwei; Wu, Chung-Hsing

    2007-12-01

    Since performance and operational conditions, such as superficial velocity, pressure drop, particles viodage, and terminal velocity, are difficult to measure on an incinerator, this study used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to determine numerical solutions. The effects of pressure drop and superficial velocity on a bubbling fluidized bed incinerator (BFBI) were evaluated. Analytical results indicated that simulation models were able to effectively predict the relationship between superficial velocity and pressure drop over bed height in the BFBI. Second, the models in BFBI were simplified to simulate scale-up beds without excessive computation time. Moreover, simulation and experimental results showed that minimum fluidization velocity of the BFBI must be controlled in at 0.188-3.684 m/s and pressure drop was mainly caused by bed particles. PMID:18074287

  8. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the [open quotes]sources[close quotes] and [open quotes]targets[close quotes] requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  9. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the {open_quotes}sources{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}targets{close_quotes} requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  10. Liquid-metal pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhibi; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-08-01

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used as a heat transfer enhancement method in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This paper investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post design beamline mirror with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in literature about pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information about the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even more sparse. Due to this the authors considered the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry, which is very similar to that of the pin-post, to examine the pressure drop correlation with liquid metals over pin fins. The cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank was studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. Study lead to two major variables to influence the pressure drop: fluid properties, viscosity and density, and the relative length of the posts. Correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the prediction of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  11. Liquid-metal, pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L. )

    1995-02-01

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This article investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post crystal with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in the literature on pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information on the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even rarer. Because the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry is very similar to that of the pin post, the pressure drop correlation data for the cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank are studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. The emphasis of this article is on the influence of two variables on the pressure drop: viscosity and density of fluid. The difference and correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the predication of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  12. Pressure Drop in Tortuosity/Kinking of the Internal Carotid Artery: Simulation and Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Daming; Hu, Shen; Liu, Jiachun; Zhou, Zhilun; Lu, Jun; Qi, Peng; Song, Shiying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Whether carotid tortuosity/kinking of the internal carotid artery leads to cerebral ischemia remains unclear. There is very little research about the hemodynamic variation induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking in the literature. The objective of this study was to research the blood pressure changes induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking. Methods. We first created a geometric model of carotid tortuosity/kinking. Based on hemodynamic boundary conditions, the hemodynamics of carotid tortuosity and kinking were studied via a finite element simulation. Then, an in vitro system was built to validate the numerical simulation results. The mean arterial pressure changes before and after carotid kinking were measured using pressure sensors in 12 patients with carotid kinking. Results. Numerical simulation revealed that the pressure drops increased with increases in the kinking angles. Clinical tests and in vitro experiments confirmed the numerical simulation results. Conclusions. Carotid kinking leads to blood pressure reduction. In certain conditions, kinking may affect the cerebral blood supply and be associated with cerebral ischemia. PMID:27195283

  13. Study of Critical Heat Flux and Two-Phase Pressure Drop Under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdollahian, Davood; Quintal, Joseph; Barez, Fred; Zahm, Jennifer; Lohr, Victor

    1996-01-01

    The design of the two-phase flow systems which are anticipated to be utilized in future spacecraft thermal management systems requires a knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in reduced gravities. This program was funded by NASA headquarters in response to NRA-91-OSSA-17 and was managed by Lewis Research Center. The main objective of this program was to design and construct a two-phase test loop, and perform a series of normal gravity and aircraft trajectory experiments to study the effect of gravity on the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and onset of instability. The test loop was packaged on two aircraft racks and was also instrumented to generate data for two-phase pressure drop. The normal gravity tests were performed with vertical up and downflow configurations to bound the effect of gravity on the test parameters. One set of aircraft trajectory tests was performed aboard the NASA DC-9 aircraft. These tests were mainly intended to evaluate the test loop and its operational performance under actual reduced gravity conditions, and to produce preliminary data for the test parameters. The test results were used to demonstrate the applicability of the normal gravity models for prediction of the two-phase friction pressure drop. It was shown that the two-phase friction multipliers for vertical upflow and reduced gravity conditions can be successfully predicted by the appropriate normal gravity models. Limited critical heat flux data showed that the measured CHF under reduced gravities are of the same order of magnitude as the test results with vertical upflow configuration. A simplified correlation was only successful in predicting the measured CHF for low flow rates. Instability tests with vertical upflow showed that flow becomes unstable and critical heat flux occurs at smaller powers when a parallel flow path exists. However, downflow tests and a single reduced gravity instability experiment indicated that the system actually became more stable with a

  14. Preliminary investigation of labyrinth packing pressure drops at onset of swirl-induced rotor instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. H.; Vohr, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Backward and forward subsynchronous instability was observed in a flexible model test rotor under the influence of swirl flow in a straight-through labyrinth packing. The packing pressure drop at the onset of instability was then measured for a range of operating speeds, clearances and inlet swirl conditions. The trend in these measurements for forward swirl and forward instability is generally consistent with the short packing rotor force formulations of Benchert and Wachter. Diverging clearances were also destabilizing and had a forward orbit with forward swirl and a backward orbit with reverse swirl. A larger, stiff rotor model system is now being assembled which will permit testing steam turbine-type straight-through and hi-lo labyrinth packings. With calibrated and adjustable bearings in this new apparatus, direct measure of the net destabilizing force generated by the packings can be made.

  15. Preliminary Drop Testing Results to Validate an Analysis Methodology for Accidental Drop Events of Containers for Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer David; Morton, Dana Keith; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Ware, Arthur Gates

    2001-07-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, operating from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), developed the standardized Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister. During the development of this canister, more than twenty drop tests were completed, evaluating high strain behavior, puncture resistance, maintenance of containment, and other canister responses. Computer analyses of these drop-test specimens/canisters employed the ABAQUS/Explicit software. A pre-drop analysis was performed for each test specimen to predict the deformed shape and resulting material straining. Typically, a postdrop analysis was also performed to better match actual test specifics (actual impact angle, test specimen material properties, etc.). The purpose for this analysis effort was to determine the capability of current analysis techniques to accurately predict the deformed shape of a standardized DOE SNF canister subjected to a defined drop event, without actually having to perform a drop test for every drop event of interest. Those analytical efforts yielded very accurate predictions for nearly all of the drop tests. However, it was noted, during one small-scale test, that the calculated deformed shape of the test specimen depended on the modeled frictional behavior as it impacted the essentially unyielding flat surface. In order to calculate the correct deformed shape, the modeled frictional behavior had to be changed to an unanticipated value. This paper will report the results of a preliminary investigation that determined the appropriate frictional modeling for a variety of impact angles. That investigation included drop testing performed at the INEEL from September 2000 to January 2001.

  16. Experimental microbubble generation by sudden pressure drop and fluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco Gutierrez, Fernando; Figueroa Espinoza, Bernardo; Aguilar Corona, Alicia; Vargas Correa, Jesus; Solorio Diaz, Gildardo

    2014-11-01

    Mass and heat transfer, as well as chemical species in bubbly flow are of importance in environmental and industrial applications. Microbubbles are well suited to these applications due to the large interface contact area and residence time. The objective of this investigation is to build devices to produce microbubbles using two methods: pressure differences and fluidics. Some characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of both methods are briefly discussed, as well as the characterization of the bubbly suspensions in terms of parameters such as the pressure jump and bubble equivalent diameter distribution. The authors acknowledge the support of Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología.

  17. Clinical outcomes of combined flow-pressure drop measurements using newly developed diagnostic endpoint: Pressure drop coefficient in patients with coronary artery dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Effat, Mohamed A; Peelukhana, Srikara Viswanath; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To combine pressure and flow parameter, pressure drop coefficient (CDP) will result in better clinical outcomes in comparison to the fractional flow reserve (FFR) group. METHODS: To test this hypothesis, a comparison was made between the FFR < 0.75 and CDP > 27.9 groups in this study, for the major adverse cardiac events [major adverse cardiac events (MACE): Primary outcome] and patients’ quality of life (secondary outcome). Further, a comparison was also made between the survival curves for the FFR < 0.75 and CDP > 27.9 groups. Two-tailed χ2 test proportions were performed for the comparison of primary and secondary outcomes. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to compare the survival curves of FFR < 0.75 and CDP > 27.9 groups (MedcalcV10.2, Mariakerke, Belgium). Results were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. RESULTS: The primary outcomes (%MACE) in the FFR < 0.75 group (20%, 4 out of 20) was not statistically different (P = 0.24) from the %MACE occurring in CDP > 27.9 group (8.57%, 2 out of 35). Noteworthy is the reduction in the %MACE in the CDP > 27.9 group, in comparison to the FFR < 0.75 group. Further, the secondary outcomes were not statistically significant between the FFR < 0.75 and CDP > 27.9 groups. Survival analysis results suggest that the survival time for the CDP > 27.9 group (n = 35) is significantly higher (P = 0.048) in comparison to the survival time for the FFR < 0.75 group (n = 20). The results remained similar for a FFR = 0.80 cut-off. CONCLUSION: Based on the above, CDP could prove to be a better diagnostic end-point for clinical revascularization decision-making in the cardiac catheterization laboratories. PMID:27022460

  18. Pressure drop characteristics of cryogenic mixed refrigerant at macro and micro channel heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Jeong, Sangkwon; Hwang, Gyuwan

    2012-12-01

    Mixed Refrigerant-Joule Thomson (MR-JT) refrigerators are widely used in various kinds of cryogenic systems these days. The temperature glide effect is one of the major features of using mixed refrigerants since a recuperative heat exchanger in a MR-JT refrigerator is utilized for mostly two-phase flow. Although a pressure drop estimation for a multi-phase and multi-component fluid in the cryogenic temperature range is necessarily required in MR-JT refrigerator heat exchanger designs, it has been rarely discussed so far. In this paper, macro heat exchangers and micro heat exchangers are compared in order to investigate the pressure drop characteristics in the experimental MR-JT refrigerator operation. The tube in tube heat exchanger (TTHE) is a well-known macro-channel heat exchanger in MR-JT refrigeration. Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHEs) have been developed as a compact heat exchanger with micro size channels. Several two-phase pressure drop correlations are examined to discuss the experimental pressure measurement results. The result of this paper shows that cryogenic mixed refrigerant pressure drop can be estimated with conventional two-phase pressure drop correlations if an appropriate flow pattern is identified.

  19. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Boiling Nitrogen in Square Pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Nakayama, Tadashi; Takahashi, Koichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Aoki, Itsuo

    Pressure drop and forced convection heat transfer were studied in the boiling nitrogen flow in a horizontal square pipe with a side of 12 mm at inlet pressure between 0.1 and0.15 MPa with a mass flux between 70 and 2000 kg/m2-s and with a heat flux of 5, 10 and 20 kW/m2. Accordingly, the flow and heat transfer mechanisms specific to square pipe were elucidated, and the applicability to cryogenic fluids of pressure drop and heat transfer models originally proposed for room temperature fluids was clarified.

  20. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures. PMID:27182751

  1. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; et al

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  2. Active control of static pressure drop caused by hydraulic servo-actuator engage

    SciTech Connect

    Janlovic, J.

    1994-12-31

    Pressure drop caused by propagation of expansion waves in the source pipeline of fast high cyclic hydraulic actuator produces possible anomalies in its function. To prevent pressure drop it is possible to minimize wave effects by active control of actuator servo-valve throttle leakage. In the paper is presented synthesis of possible discrete active control of hydraulic actuator and its servo-valve for prevention expansion wave pressure drop. Control synthesis is based on static pressure increasing with decreasing of fluid flow velocity, which can be realized by lower throttle leakage. Some of the effects of assumed control are shown on corresponding diagrams of control valve throttle motion, piston displacement and its corresponding linear velocity.

  3. X-38 Drop Model: Landing Sequence Collage from Cessna Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This sequence of photographs shows a 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38 gliding to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  4. Digital antimicrobial susceptibility testing using the MilliDrop technology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Boitard, L; Broyer, P; Chareire, A-C; Bourne-Branchu, P; Mahé, P; Tournoud, M; Franceschi, C; Zambardi, G; Baudry, J; Bibette, J

    2016-03-01

    We present the MilliDrop Analyzer (MDA), a droplet-based millifluidic system for digital antimicrobial susceptibility testing (D-AST), which enables us to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) precisely and accurately. The MilliDrop technology was validated by using resazurin for fluorescence readout, for comparison with standard methodology, and for conducting reproducibility studies. In this first assessment, the susceptibility of a reference Gram-negative strain Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 to gentamicin, chloramphenicol, and nalidixic acid were tested by the MDA, VITEK®2, and broth microdilution as a reference standard. We measured the susceptibility of clinically relevant Gram-positive strains of Staphylococcus aureus to vancomycin, including vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA), and vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA) strains. The MDA provided results which were much more accurate than those of VITEK®2 and standard broth microdilution. The enhanced accuracy enabled us to reliably discriminate between VSSA and hVISA strains. PMID:26803821

  5. A Validated All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model and Lewis Number Effects for a Binary Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1999-01-01

    The differences between subcritical liquid drop and supercritical fluid drop behavior are discussed. Under subcritical, evaporative high emission rate conditions, a film layer is present in the inner part of the drop surface which contributes to the unique determination of the boundary conditions; it is this film layer which contributes to the solution's convective-diffusive character. In contrast, under supercritical condition as the boundary conditions contain a degree of arbitrariness due to the absence of a surface, and the solution has then a purely diffusive character. Results from simulations of a free fluid drop under no-gravity conditions are compared to microgravity experimental data from suspended, large drop experiments at high, low and intermediary temperatures and in a range of pressures encompassing the sub-and supercritical regime. Despite the difference between the conditions of the simulations and experiments (suspension vs. free floating), the time rate of variation of the drop diameter square is remarkably well predicted in the linear curve regime. The drop diameter is determined in the simulations from the location of the maximum density gradient, and agrees well with the data. It is also shown that the classical calculation of the Lewis number gives qualitatively erroneous results at supercritical conditions, but that an effective Lewis number previously defined gives qualitatively correct estimates of the length scales for heat and mass transfer at all pressures.

  6. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  7. Analysis of MHD Pressure Drop in the Packed Pebble Bed-Based Blanket for the Fds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyan; Wu, Yican; He, Xiaoxiong

    2003-06-01

    The Fusion-Driven Sub-critical System as a multifunctional hybrid reactor has been investigated in ASIPP. The liquid metal LiPb flow through a packed pebble bed-based blanket is considered to be one of the blanket candidates. In this contribution, the MHD pressure drop of liquid metal flow through the packed pebble bed has been calculated and analyzed under various conditions including (a) the size of the packed pebbles; (b) the ratio of occupied room by the packed pebbles to that of liquid metal; and (c) whether the pebbles surface is insulated or not Furthermore, asymptotic techniques to analyze large Hartmann parameter flow and interaction parameter flow are employed and an analytical model has been developed for the calculations of MHD pressure drop of liquid metal flow in a packed pebble bed. The appropriate method for calculating the MHD effects on the pressure drop through the packed pebble bed-based blanket for the FDS has been presented.

  8. Effect of superficial velocity on vaporization pressure drop with propane in horizontal circular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novianto, S.; Pamitran, A. S.; Nasruddin, Alhamid, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    Due to its friendly effect on the environment, natural refrigerants could be the best alternative refrigerant to replace conventional refrigerants. The present study was devoted to the effect of superficial velocity on vaporization pressure drop with propane in a horizontal circular tube with an inner diameter of 7.6 mm. The experiments were conditioned with 4 to 10 °C for saturation temperature, 9 to 20 kW/m2 for heat flux, and 250 to 380 kg/m2s for mass flux. It is shown here that increased heat flux may result in increasing vapor superficial velocity, and then increasing pressure drop. The present experimental results were evaluated with some existing correlations of pressure drop. The best prediction was evaluated by Lockhart-Martinelli (1949) with MARD 25.7%. In order to observe the experimental flow pattern, the present results were also mapped on the Wang flow pattern map.

  9. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  10. Pressure drop measurements on supercritical helium cooled cable in conduit conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, M. A.; Huang, Y.; Vansciver, S. W.

    1988-08-01

    Forced flow cable-in-conduit conductors with large cooled surface areas provide excellent stability margins at the price of high frictional losses and large pumping power requirements. For extensive projects such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design cooperation, it is essential to know the pressure drops to be expected from different conductor geometries and operating conditions. To measure these pressure drops a flow loop was constructed to circulate supercritical helium through different conductors. The loop is surrounded by a 5 K radiation shield to allow for stable operation at the required temperatures. A coil heat exchanger immersed in a helium bath is used to remove the heat generated by the pump. Pressure drops are measured across 1 meter lengths of the conductors for various mass flow rates. Friction factor versus Reynolds number plots are used to correlate the data.

  11. An improved correlation of the pressure drop in stenotic vessels using Lorentz's reciprocal theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chang-Jin; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Noda, Shigeho; He, Ying; Himeno, Ryutaro

    2015-02-01

    A mathematical model of the human cardiovascular system in conjunction with an accurate lumped model for a stenosis can provide better insights into the pressure wave propagation at pathological conditions. In this study, a theoretical relation between pressure drop and flow rate based on Lorentz's reciprocal theorem is derived, which offers an identity to describe the relevance of the geometry and the convective momentum transport to the drag force. A voxel-based simulator V-FLOW VOF3D, where the vessel geometry is expressed by using volume of fluid (VOF) functions, is employed to find the flow distribution in an idealized stenosis vessel and the identity was validated numerically. It is revealed from the correlation that the pressure drop of NS flow in a stenosis vessel can be decomposed into a linear term caused by Stokes flow with the same boundary conditions, and two nonlinear terms. Furthermore, the linear term for the pressure drop of Stokes flow can be summarized as a correlation by using a modified equation of lubrication theory, which gives favorable results compared to the numerical ones. The contribution of the nonlinear terms to the pressure drop was analyzed numerically, and it is found that geometric shape and momentum transport are the primary factors for the enhancement of drag force. This work paves a way to simulate the blood flow and pressure propagation under different stenosis conditions by using 1D mathematical model.

  12. Summary report for ITER Task-T19: MHD pressure drop and heat transfer study for liquid metal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Claude B.; Hua, Thanh Q.; Natesan, Ken; Kirillov, Igor R.; Vitkovski, Ivan V.; Anisimov, Aleksandr M.

    1995-03-01

    A key feasibility issue for the ITER Vanadium/Lithium breeding blanket is the question of insulator coatings. Design calculations show that an electrically insulating layer is necessary to maintain an acceptably low MHD pressure drop. To begin experimental investigations of the MHD performance of candidate insulator materials and the technology for putting them in place, a new test section was prepared. Aluminum oxide was chosen as the first candidate insulating material because it may be used in combination with NaK in the ITER vacuum vessel and/or the divertor. Details on the methods used to produce the aluminum oxide layer as well as the microstructures of the coating and the aluminide sublayer are presented and discussed. The overall MHD pressure drop, local MHD pressure gradient, local transverse MHD pressure difference, and surface voltage distributions in both the circumferential and the axial directions are reported and discussed. The positive results obtained here for high-temperature NaK have two beneficial implications for ITER. First, since NaK may be used in the vacuum vessel and/or the divertor, these results support the design approach of using electrically insulating coatings to substantially reduce MHD pressure drop. Secondly, while Al2O3/SS is not the same coating/base material combination which would be used in the advanced blanket, this work nonetheless shows that it is possible to produce a viable insulating coating which is stable in contact with a high temperature alkali metal coolant.

  13. Low pressure drop filtration of airborne molecular organic contaminants using open-channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Joriman, Jon; Ding, Lefei; Weineck, Gerald; Seguin, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Besides airborne acids and bases, airborne organic contaminants such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), perfluoroalkylamines and condensables are of primary concern in these applications. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for organics is offered by granular carbon filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of activated carbon extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the lower pressure drop AMC filters currently offered are quite expensive and are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCN's), offer good filter life and removal efficiency with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and fan filter units (FFUs) this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for the removal of airborne organics in a wide range of applications.

  14. Fundamental study of transpiration cooling. [pressure drop and heat transfer data from porous metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Dutton, J. L.; Benson, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Isothermal and non-isothermal pressure drop data and heat transfer data generated on porous 304L stainless steel wire forms, sintered spherical stainless steel powder, and sintered spherical OFHC copper powder are reported and correlated. Pressure drop data was collected over a temperature range from 500 R to 2000 R and heat transfer data collected over a heat flux range from 5 to 15 BTU/in2/sec. It was found that flow data could be correlated independently of transpirant temperature and type (i.e., H2, N2). It was also found that no simple relation between heat transfer coefficient and specimen porosity was obtainable.

  15. Measurements of pressure drop and heat transfer in turbulent pipe flows of particulate slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. V.; Choi, U. S.; Kasza, K. E.

    1988-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under sponsorhip of DOE, Office of Buildings and Community Systems, has been conducting a comprehensive, long-range program to develop high-performance advanced energy transmission fluids for use in district heating and cooling (DHC) systems. The current study focuses on the development of phase-change slurries as advanced energy transmission fluids. The objectives are: (1) to establish proof-of-concept of enhanced heat transfer by a slurry, with and without phase change, relative to heat transfer in a pure carrier liquid; (2) to investigate the effect of particle volumetric loading, size, and flow rate on the slurry pressure drip and heat transfer behavior with and without friction-reducing additives; and (3) to generate pressure drop and heat transfer data needed for the development and design of improved DHC systems. Two types of phase-change materials were used in the experiments: ice slush for cooling, and cross-linked, high- density polyethylene (X-HDPE) particles with diameters of 1/8 and 1/20 in. (3.2 and 1.3 mm) for heating. The friction-reducing additive used in the tests was Separan AP-272 at 65 wppm. This report describes the test facility, discusses the experimental procedures, and presents significant experimental results on flow and heat transfer characteristics of the non-melting slurry flows.

  16. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer Characteristics of The Fluid Flow through an Array of Interrupted, Parallel-Plate Heat Transfer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Sadanari; Yagi, Yoshinao

    A scale-up modeling technique was used to examine the effect of the geometrical properties of interrupted surfaces on the heat transfer and pressure drop performance of compact heat exchangers having off-set-strip and slotted fins. The test cores, each consisting of a number of machined copper finns, were tested in a subsonic wind tunnel. The heat transfer and the pressure drop for each test core was measured for various fin lengths (in flow direction) and slot distances. Flow visualization and local turbulence intensity and pressure measurements within each test core were also performed to gain insight into the mechanisms of heat transfer augmentation in compact heat exchangers with interrupted surfaces. The effect of the geometrical properties of the fins as well as the Reynolds number on the heat transfer rate and the pressure drop were determined and those results were interpreted in terms of observed flow structure. Basic heat transfer and pressure drop data are presented in terms of Colburn j-factors and Fanning friction factors plotted versus Reynolds number. An empirical correlation for heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics for off-set-strip fins are presented.

  17. Model calibration for pressure drop in a pulse-jet cleaned fabric filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, John L.; David, Leith

    A model based on Darcy's law allows prediction of pressure drop in a pulse-jet cleaned fabric filter. The model considers the effects of filtration velocity, dust areal density added during one filtration cycle, and pulse pressure. Data used to calibrate the model were collected in experiments with three fabric surface treatments and three dusts conducted at three filtration velocities, for a total of 27 different experimental conditions. The fabric used was polyester felt with untreated, singed, or PTFE-laminated surface. The dusts used were granite, limestone and fly ash. Filtration velocities were 50,75 and 100 mm s -1. Dust areal density added during one filtration cycle was constant, as was pulse pressure. Under these conditions, fabric surface treatment alone largely determined the values for two of the three constants in the model; the third constant depends on pressure drop characteristics of the venturi at the top of each filter bag.

  18. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  19. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer of Water Flowing Shell-Side of Multitube Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yukio; Hashizume, Kenichi

    Experimental studies on heat transfer augmentation in water-flowing shell sides of counter flow multitube exchangers are presented. Various kinds of augmented tube bundles have been examined to obtain the characteristics of pressure drop and heat transfer. Data for a smooth tube bundle were a little different from those for the tube side. The pressure drop in the shell side depended on Re-0.4 and deviated from the tube side pressure drop to within +30%, while the shell side heat transfer coefficient depended on Re0.8 but about 35%. larger than that of the tube side. Furthermore the augmented tube bundles have been evaluated and compared using 21 evaluation criteria. Enhanced tube bundles, low-finned tube bundles and those with twisted tapes inserted had especially good performances. The ratios of increase in heat transfer were larger than those in pressure drop. In case of low-finned tube bundles, there seem to exist an optimum fin-pitch and an optimum relation between the fin-pitch and the pitch of twisted tapes inserted.

  20. Effects of Fin Shape on Condensation Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop inside Herringbone Micro Fin Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Akio; Otsubo, Yusuke; Ohtsuka, Satoshi

    Experiments of in-tube condensation of R410A have been carried out for as mooth tube, a h elical micro fin tube and five types of herringbone micro fin tubes. In the herringbone micro fin tube, the micro fins work to remove liquid at fin-diverging parts and collect liquid at fin-converging parts. In the high mass velocity region, heat transfer coefficient of all the herringbone tubes is about 2-4 times higher than that of the helical micro fin tube. In the low mass velocity region, however, the heat transfer coefficients of the herringbone micro fin tubes are equal to or smaller than those of the helical micro fin tube. Up to the fin height of 0.18 mm, the heat transfer coefficient is higher for higher fin, whereas that of ah igher fin tube is saturated. The pressure drop increases with increasing fin height. The helix angle strongly affects the heat transfer and pressure drop. Higher helix angle causes higher heat transfer coefficient and higher pressure drop. In the case of the herringbone tube which has shorter fin and/or smaller helix angle, pressure drops are equal to or lower than that of the helical micro fin tube, whereas those of other tubes are higher.

  1. An experimental study of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of divergent wavy minichannels using nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, A.; Sarangan, J.; Suresh, S.; Devahdhanush, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of an array of wavy divergent minichannels and the results were compared with wavy minichannels with constant cross-section. The experiment was conducted in hydro dynamically developed and thermally developing laminar and transient regimes. The minichannel heat sink array consisted of 15 rectangular channels machined on a 30 × 30 mm2 and 11 mm thick Aluminium substrate. Each minichannel was of 0.9 mm width, 1.8 mm pitch and the depth was varied from 1.3 mm at entrance to 3.3 mm at exit for the divergent channels. DI water and 0.5 and 0.8 % concentrations of Al2O3/water nanofluid were used as working fluids. The Reynolds number was varied from 700 to 3300 and the heat flux was maintained at 45 kW/m2. The heat transfer and pressure drop of these minichannels were analyzed based on the experimental results obtained. It was observed that the heat transfer performance of divergent wavy minichannels was 9 % higher and the pressure drop was 30-38 % lesser than that of the wavy minichannels with constant cross-section, in the laminar regime. Hence, divergent channel flows can be considered one of the better ways to reduce pressure drop. The performance factor of divergent wavy minichannels was 115-126 % for water and 110-113 % for nanofluids.

  2. Pressure drop and pumping power for fluid flow through round tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinek, D.

    1973-01-01

    Program, written for Hewlett-Packard 9100A electronic desk computer provides convenient and immediate solution to problem of calculating pressure drop and fluid pumping power for flow through round tubes. Program was designed specifically for steady-state analysis and assumes laminar flow.

  3. New Results in Two-Phase Pressure Drop Calculations at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braisted, Jon; Kurwitz, Cable; Best, Frederick

    2004-02-01

    The mass, power, and volume energy savings of two-phase systems for future spacecraft creates many advantages over current single-phase systems. Current models of two-phase phenomena such as pressure drop, void fraction, and flow regime prediction are still not well defined for space applications. Commercially available two-phase modeling software has been developed for a large range of acceleration fields including reduced-gravity conditions. Recently, a two-phase experiment has been flown to expand the two-phase database. A model of the experiment was created in the software to determine how well the software could predict the pressure drop observed in the experiment. Of the simulations conducted, the computer model shows good agreement of the pressure drop in the experiment to within 30%. However, the software does begin to over-predict pressure drop in certain regions of a flow regime map indicating that some models used in the software package for reduced-gravity modeling need improvement.

  4. Prediction of pressure drop in fluid tuned mounts using analytical and computational techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasher, William C.; Khalilollahi, Amir; Mischler, John; Uhric, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A simplified model for predicting pressure drop in fluid tuned isolator mounts was developed. The model is based on an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and was made more general through the use of empirical coefficients. The values of these coefficients were determined by numerical simulation of the flow using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package FIDAP.

  5. In vivo validation of the in silico predicted pressure drop across an arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Browne, Leonard D; Griffin, Philip; Bashar, Khalid; Walsh, Stewart R; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T

    2015-06-01

    The creation of an arteriovenous fistula offers a unique example of vascular remodelling and adaption. Yet, the specific factors which elicit remodelling events which determine successful maturation or failure have not been unambiguously determined. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations are increasingly been employed to investigate the interaction between local hemodynamics and remodelling and can potentially be used to assist in clinical risk assessment of maturation or failure. However, these simulations are inextricably linked to their prescribed boundary conditions and are reliant on in vivo measurements of flow and pressure to ensure their validity. The study compares in vivo measurements of the pressure distribution across arteriovenous fistulae against a representative numerical model. The results of the study indicate relative agreement (error ≈ 8-10%) between the in vivo and CFD prediction of the mean pressure drop across the AVFs. The large pressure drop across the AVFs coincided with a palpable thrill (perivascular vibration) in vivo and fluctuations were observed in the numerical pressure drop signal due to flow instabilities arising at the anastomosis. This study provides a benchmark of the pressure distribution within an AVF and validates that CFD solutions are capable of replicating the abnormal physiological flow conditions induced by fistula creation. PMID:25753016

  6. Analyses of MHD Pressure Drop in a Curved Bend for Different Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Kameel; Rafique, Muhammad; Majid, Asad

    In this research we have analyzed liquid-metal flow in a curved bend in the presence of a magnetic field, which acts in two transverse directions. The magnetic field along the x-axis varied as B0(R + x)-1, while the magnetic field in y-direction is kept constant. The duct has conducting vanadium walls and liquid metal (lithium, sodium and potassium) have been used as a coolant. Magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) equations in three dimensions have been developed in the modified toroidal coordinate system. Then these coupled set of equations are solved by using finite difference techniques and an extended SIMPLER algorithm approach and an estimation of MHD pressure drop has been made for three different liquid metals, namely lithium, sodium and potassium. The results for a curved bend indicate an immense axial MHD pressure drop. The axial MHD pressure drop for three liquid metals, increases for an increase in both kinds of magnetic fields. It has been found that the MHD pressure drop is maximum in the case of sodium and minimum in the case of lithium In this paper a detailed comparative analysis has been carried out to find a suitable fluid for the cooling of high heat flux components of a fusion reactor, which is compatible with liquid metal lithium blanket and can also remove the 5 MW m-2 heat flux falling on the limiter or diverter plate. We finally concluded that from MHD pressure drop point of view that liquid lithium is the best choice for cooling of high heat flux components of a fusion reactor

  7. Intercooler cooling-air weight flow and pressure drop for minimum drag loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, J George; Valerino, Michael F

    1944-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the drag losses in airplane flight of cross-flow plate and tubular intercoolers to determine the cooling-air weight flow and pressure drop that give a minimum drag loss for any given cooling effectiveness and, thus, a maximum power-plant net gain due to charge-air cooling. The drag losses considered in this analysis are those due to (1) the extra drag imposed on the airplane by the weight of the intercooler, its duct, and its supports and (2) the drag sustained by the cooling air in flowing through the intercooler and its duct. The investigation covers a range of conditions of altitude, airspeed, lift-drag ratio, supercharger-pressure ratio, and supercharger adiabatic efficiency. The optimum values of cooling air pressure drop and weight flow ratio are tabulated. Curves are presented to illustrate the results of the analysis.

  8. Antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic air filter with high filtration efficiency and low pressure drop.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kyoung Mi; Park, Hyun-Seol; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrated an antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic (ES) air filter. Antimicrobial natural-product Sophora flavescens nanoparticles were produced using an aerosol process, and were continuously deposited onto the surface of air filter media. For the electrostatic activation of the filter medium, a corona discharge electrification system was used before and after antimicrobial treatment of the filter. In the antimicrobial treatment process, the deposition efficiency of S. flavescens nanoparticles on the ES filter was ~12% higher than that on the pristine (Non-ES) filter. In the evaluation of filtration performance using test particles (a nanosized KCl aerosol and submicron-sized Staphylococcus epidermidis bioaerosol), the ES filter showed better filtration efficiency than the Non-ES filter. However, antimicrobial treatment with S. flavescens nanoparticles affected the filtration efficiency of the filter differently depending on the size of the test particles. While the filtration efficiency of the KCl nanoparticles was reduced on the ES filter after the antimicrobial treatment, the filtration efficiency was improved after the recharging process. In summary, we prepared an antimicrobial ES air filter with >99% antimicrobial activity, ~92.5% filtration efficiency (for a 300-nm KCl aerosol), and a ~0.8 mmAq pressure drop (at 13 cm/s). This study provides valuable information for the development of a hybrid air purification system that can serve various functions and be used in an indoor environment. PMID:26172593

  9. The oceanic response of the Turkish Straits System to an extreme drop in atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Jeffrey W.; Jarosz, Ewa; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Beşiktepe, Åükrü

    2014-06-01

    Moorings across all four entry/exit sections of the Dardanelles Strait and the Bosphorus Strait simultaneously measured the response of the Turkish Straits System to the passage of a severe cyclonic storm that included an atmospheric pressure drop of more than 30 mbar in less than 48 h. The bottom pressure response at the Aegean Sea side of the Dardanelles Strait was consistent with an inverted barometer response, but the response at the other sections did not follow an inverted barometer, leading to a large bottom pressure gradient through the Turkish Straits System. Upper-layer flow toward the Aegean Sea was reversed by the storm and flow toward the Black Sea was greatly enhanced. Bottom pressure across the Sea of Marmara peaked 6 h after the passage of the storm's minimum pressure. The response on the Dardanelles side was a combination of sea elevation and pycnocline depth rise, and the response on the Bosphorus side was an even greater sea elevation rise and a drop in pycnocline depth. The peak in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara was followed by another reverse in the flow through the Dardanelles Strait as flow was then directed away from the Sea of Marmara in both straits. A simple conceptual model without wind is able to explain fluctuations in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara to a 0.89-0.96 level of correlation. This stresses the importance of atmospheric pressure dynamics in driving the mass flux of the Turkish Strait System for extreme storms.

  10. Spacewedge #3 Being Loaded onto Cessna for Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members load a Spacewedge subscale research model into a Cessna aircraft for flight testing in 1996. The Spacewedge was drop-launched from the Cessna and then glided back to a soft landing under a steerable parafoil. From October 1991 to December 1996, NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (after 1994, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) conducted a research program know as the Spacecraft Autoland Project. This Project was designed to determine the feasibility of the autonomous recovery of a spacecraft using a ram-air parafoil system for the final stages of flight, including a precision landing. The Johnson Space Center and the U.S. Army participated in various phases of the program. The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory developed the software for Wedge 3 under contract to the Army. Four generic spacecraft (each called a Spacewedge or simply a Wedge) were built; the last one was built to test the feasibility of a parafoil for delivering Army cargoes. Technology developed during this program has applications for future spacecraft recovery systems, such as the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle demonstrator. The Spacewedge program demonstrated precision flare and landing into the wind at a predetermined location. The program showed that a flexible, deployable system using autonomous navigation and landing was a viable and practical way to recover spacecraft. NASA researchers conducted flight tests of the Spacewedge at three sites near Dryden, a hillside near Tehachapi, the Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards Air Force Base, and the California City Airport Drop Zone. During the first phase of testing 36 flights were made. Phase II consisted of 45 flights using a smaller parafoil. A third Phase of 34 flights was conducted primarily by the Army and resulted in the development of an Army guidance system for precision offset cargo delivery. The wedge used during the Army phase was not called a Spacewedge but simply a Wedge. The Spacewedge was a flattened

  11. Pressure drop of two-phase plug flow in round mini-channels: Influence of surface wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong

    2008-09-15

    In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of two-phase plug flows in round mini-channels was investigated for three different tube materials, i.e., glass, polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. Air and water were used as the test fluids. In the wet-plug flow regime (wet wall condition at the gas portions), the pressure drop was reasonably predicted by the homogeneous flow model or by the correlations of Mishima and Hibiki [K. Mishima, T. Hibiki, Some characteristics of air-water two-phase flow in small diameter vertical tubes, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 22 (1996) 703-712] and Chisholm [D. Chisholm, A theoretical basis for the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation for two-phase flow, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 10 (1967) 1767-1778]. On the other hand, in the dry-plug flow regime (dry wall condition at the gas portions), the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. To take into account the effect of the moving contact lines, a modified Lockhart-Martinelli type correlation was proposed, which fitted the measured pressure-drop data within the mean deviation of 6%. (author)

  12. Pressure drop of two-phase dry-plug flow in round mini-channels: Effect of moving contact line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong

    2010-01-15

    In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of the two-phase dry-plug flow (dry wall condition at the gas portions) in round mini-channels was investigated. The air-water mixtures were flowed through the round mini-channels made of polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. In the dry-plug flow regime, the pressure drop measured became larger either by increasing the liquid superficial velocity or by decreasing the gas superficial velocity due to the increase of the number of the moving contact lines in the test section. In such a case, the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. Therefore, a pressure drop model of dry-plug flow was proposed through modification of the dynamic contact angle analysis taking account of the energy dissipation by the moving contact lines, which represents the experimental data within the mean deviation of 4%. (author)

  13. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements in an air/molten salt direct-contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of experimental data with a recently published model of heat exchange in irrigated packed beds. Heat transfer and pressure drop were measured in a 150 mm (ID) column with a 610-mm bed of metal Pall rings. Molten nitrate salt and preheated air were the working fluids with a salt inlet temperature of approximately 440{degree}C and air inlet temperatures of approximately 230{degree}C. A comparison between the experimental data and the heat transfer model is made on the basis of heat transfer from the salt. For the range of air and salt flow rates tested, 0.3 to 1.2 kg/m{sup 2} s air flow and 6 to 18 kg/m{sup 2} s salt flow, the data agree with the model within 22% standard deviation. In addition, a model for the column pressure drop was validated, agreeing with the experimental data within 18% standard deviation over the range of column pressure drop from 40 to 1250 Pa/m. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage center section including the wheel wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested to measure structural, seat, and anthropomorphic dummy response to vertical crash loads. The specimen had nominally zero pitch, roll and yaw at impact with a sink speed of 20 ft/sec. Results from this drop test and other drop tests of different transport sections will be used to prepare for a full-scale crash test of a B-720.

  15. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... continuous hours at a pressure equal to 125 percent, or more, of the maximum operating pressure and, in...

  16. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... continuous hours at a pressure equal to 125 percent, or more, of the maximum operating pressure and, in...

  17. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... continuous hours at a pressure equal to 125 percent, or more, of the maximum operating pressure and, in...

  18. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... continuous hours at a pressure equal to 125 percent, or more, of the maximum operating pressure and, in...

  19. Pressure drop and temperature rise in He II flow in round tubes, Venturi flowmeters and valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walstrom, P. L.; Maddocks, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Pressure drops in highly turbulent He II flow were measured in round tubes, valves, and Venturi flowmeters. Results are in good agreement with single-phase flow correlations for classical fluids. The temperature rise in flow in a round tube was measured, and found to agree well with predictions for isenthalpic expansion. Cavitation was observed in the venturis under conditions of low back pressure and high flow rate. Metastable superheating of the helium at the venturi throat was observed before the helium made a transition to saturation pressure.

  20. Pressure Drop Across Woven Screens Under Uniform and Nonuniform Flow Conditions. [flow characteristics of water through Dutch twill and square weave fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, M.; Omori, S.; Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the experimental pressure drop and velocity data for water flowing through woven screens. The types of materials used are dutch twill and square weave fabrics. Pressure drop measures were made at four locations in a rectangular channel. The data are presented as change in pressure compared with the average entry velocity and the numerical relationship is determined by dividing the volumetric flow rate by the screen area open to flow. The equations of continuity and momentum are presented. A computer program listing an extension of a theoretical model and data from that computer program are included.

  1. Swirls and splashes: pressure dependence of the airflow created by drop impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Mauser, Kelly W.; Ray, Bahni; Lee, Taehun; Nagel, Sidney R.; JFI; Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 6063 Collaboration; Department of Mechanical Engineering, CCNY, NY 10031 Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    A drop impacting a solid surface with sufficient velocity will splash and emit many small droplets. However, removing the ambient air suppresses splashing completely. The transition between splashing and non-splashing occurs gradually: decreasing the air pressure systematically delays and eventually fully inhibits the occurrence of a splash. The mechanism by which the surrounding gas affects the drop dynamics remains unknown. We use modified Schlieren optics combined with high-speed video imaging to visualize the airflow created by the rapid spreading of the drop after it hits the substrate. We observe the generation of a vortex ring that is initially bound to the outer edge of the spreading liquid and subsequently detaches from the liquid to form a beautiful toroidal vortex sheet that expands and curls up into a roll. We have studied the dynamics of this vortex as a function of gas pressure and find that the sheet gets progressively smaller as the air pressure is decreased. This suggests a weakening of the vortex strength at low pressure. We acknowledge support from NSF MRSEC and PREM grants.

  2. Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of boiling water in sub-hundred micron channel

    SciTech Connect

    Bhide, R.R.; Singh, S.G.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Duttagupta, S.P.; Agrawal, Amit

    2009-09-15

    The current work focuses on the pressure drop, heat transfer and stability in two phase flow in microchannels with hydraulic diameter of less than one hundred microns. Experiments were conducted in smooth microchannels of hydraulic diameter of 45, 65 {mu}m, and a rough microchannel of hydraulic diameter of 70 {mu}m, with deionised water as the working fluid. The local saturation pressure and temperature vary substantially over the length of the channel. In order to correctly predict the local saturation temperature and subsequently the heat transfer characteristics, numerical techniques have been used in conjunction with the conventional two phase pressure drop models. The Lockhart-Martinelli (liquid-laminar, vapour-laminar) model is found to predict the two phase pressure drop data within 20%. The instability in two phase flow is quantified; it is found that microchannels of smaller hydraulic diameter have lesser instabilities as compared to their larger counterparts. The experiments also suggest that surface characteristics strongly affect flow stability in the two phase flow regime. The effect of hydraulic diameter and surface characteristics on the flow characteristics and stability in two phase flow is seldom reported, and is of considerable practical relevance. (author)

  3. Estimation of inspiratory pressure drop in neonatal and pediatric endotracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Jarreau, P H; Louis, B; Dassieu, G; Desfrere, L; Blanchard, P W; Moriette, G; Isabey, D; Harf, A

    1999-07-01

    Endotracheal tubes (ETTs) constitute a resistive extra load for intubated patients. The ETT pressure drop (DeltaP(ETT)) is usually described by empirical equations that are specific to one ETT only. Our laboratory previously showed that, in adult ETTs, DeltaP(ETT) is given by the Blasius formula (F. Lofaso, B. Louis, L. Brochard, A. Harf, and D. Isabey. Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. 146: 974-979, 1992). Here, we also propose a general formulation for neonatal and pediatric ETTs on the basis of adimensional analysis of the pressure-flow relationship. Pressure and flow were directly measured in seven ETTs (internal diameter: 2.5-7.0 mm). The measured pressure drop was compared with the predicted drop given by general laws for a curved tube. In neonatal ETTs (2.5-3.5 mm) the flow regime is laminar. The DeltaP(ETT) can be estimated by the Ito formula, which replaces Poiseuille's law for curved tubes. For pediatric ETTs (4.0-7.0 mm), DeltaP(ETT) depends on the following flow regime: for laminar flow, it must be calculated by the Ito formula, and for turbulent flow, by the Blasius formula. Both formulas allow for ETT geometry and gas properties. PMID:10409556

  4. Effects of phosphoric acid sprayed into an incinerator furnace on the flue gas pressure drop at fabric filters.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Hwang, In-Hee; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2016-06-01

    Fabric filters are widely used to remove dust from flue gas generated by waste incineration. However, a pressure drop occurs at the filters, caused by growth of a dust layer on the filter fabric despite regular cleaning by pulsed-jet air. The pressure drop at the fabric filters leads to energy consumption at induced draft fan to keep the incinerator on negative pressure, so that its proper control is important to operate incineration facility efficiently. The pressure drop at fabric filters decreased whenever phosphoric acid wastewater (PAW) was sprayed into an incinerator for treating industrial waste. Operational data obtained from the incineration facility were analyzed to determine the short- and long-term effects of PAW spraying on the pressure drop. For the short-term effect, it was confirmed that the pressure drop at the fabric filters always decreased to 0.3-1.2kPa within about 5h after spraying PAW. This effect was expected to be obtained by about one third of present PAW spraying amount. However, from the long-term perspective, the pressure drop showed an increase in the periods of PAW spraying compared with periods for which PAW spraying was not performed. The pressure drop increase was particularly noticeable after the initial PAW spraying, regardless of the age and type of fabric filters used. These results suggest that present PAW spraying causes a temporary pressure drop reduction, leading to short-term energy consumption savings; however, it also causes an increase of the pressure drop over the long-term, degrading the overall operating conditions. Thus, appropriate PAW spraying conditions are needed to make effective use of PAW to reduce the pressure drop at fabric filters from a short- and long-term point of view. PMID:27040089

  5. Microfluidic analysis of pressure drop and flow behavior in hypertensive micro vessels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruiqing; Li, Fen; Lv, Jiaqi; He, Ying; Lu, Detang; Yamada, Takashi; Ono, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The retinal arterial network is the only source of the highly nutrient-consumptive retina, thus any insult on the arteries can impair the retinal oxygen and nutrient supply and affect its normal function. The aim of this work is to study the influences of vascular structure variation on the flow and pressure characteristics via microfluidic devices. Two sets of micro-channel were designed to mimic the stenosed microvessels and dichotomous branching structure in the retinal arteries. Three working fluids including red blood cell (RBC) suspension were employed to investigate the pressure drop in the stenosed channel. The flow behaviors of RBC suspensions inside the micro channels were observed using high speed camera system. Pressure drop of different working fluids and RBC velocity profiles in the stenosed channel were obtained. Moreover, hematocrit levels of RBC suspensions inside the bifurcated channels were analyzed from the sequential images of RBC flow. The results of the flow in the stenosed channel show that RBCs drift from the center of the channels, and RBC velocity is influenced not only by the inlet flow rate but also the interaction between RBCs. The measured pressure drops in the stenosed channel increase notably with the increase of fluid viscosity. Furthermore, the dimensionless pressure drop due to the stenosis decreases with Reynolds number. On the other hand, the results of flow through the bifurcated channels show that as the ratio of the daughter-branch width to the mother-channel width increases, the ratio of hematocrit in two connected branches (Ht/Hd) decreases, which is in favorable agreement with the available analysis results. PMID:26004808

  6. Transient Pressure Test Article Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vibbart, Charles M.

    1989-01-01

    The Transient Pressure Test Article (TPTA) test program is being conducted at a new test facility located in the East Test Area at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility, along with the special test equipment (STE) required for facility support, was constructed specifically to test and verify the sealing capability of the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) field, igniter, and nozzle joints. The test article consists of full scale RSRM hardware loaded with inert propellant and assembled in a short stack configuration. The TPTA is pressurized by igniting a propellant cartridge capable of inducing a pressure rise rate which stimulates the ignition transient that occurs during launch. Dynamic loads are applied during the pressure cycle to simulate external tank attach (ETA) strut loads present on the ETA ring. Sealing ability of the redesigned joints is evaluated under joint movement conditions produced by these combined loads since joint sealing ability depends on seal resilience velocity being greater than gap opening velocity. Also, maximum flight dynamic loads are applied to the test article which is either pressurized to 600 psia using gaseous nitrogen (GN2) or applied to the test article as the pressure decays inside the test article on the down cycle after the ignition transient cycle. This new test facility is examined with respect to its capabilities. In addition, both the topic of test effectiveness versus space vehicle flight performance and new aerospace test techniques, as well as a comparison between the old SRM design and the RSRM are presented.

  7. Characteristics of pebble packing and evaluation of sweep gas pressure drop into the in-pile mock-up on fusion blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Nakamichi, Masaru; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Sagawa, Hisashi; Kanzawa, Toru; Suzuki, Tatsushi; Saito, Minoru

    1994-09-01

    The characteristics of pebble packing and the sweep gas pressure drop have been investigated for the design of the in-pile mock-up in Japan Materials Testing Reactor, and the results obtained are the following. The packing fraction of single diameter pebbles is kept at constant, i.e., about 63%, under the condition that the ratio of tube inside diameter to pebble diameter is above 10. The pebble distribution in the bed is not homogeneous, i.e., the mixture of close packing and loose packing zones both in the middle of bed and near wall. The packing fraction is about 77% for two-size pebble packing consisting of Ø1 and 5 mm pebbles. The measured pressure drops agree with those predicted by the Kozeny-Carman equation within the range of (+25)-(-60)%. The pressure drop is not affected by moisture concentration (< 100 ppm) and does not change for tests lasting as long as 300 hours.

  8. Heat transfer and pressure drop performance of a finned-tube heat exchanger proposed for use in the NASA Lewis Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A segment of the heat exchanger proposed for use in the NASA Lewis Altitude Wind Tunnel (AWT) facility has been tested under dry and icing conditions. The heat exchanger has the largest pressure drop of any component in the AWT loop. It is therefore critical that its performance be known at all conditions before the final design of the AWT is complete. The heat exchanger segment is tested in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in order to provide an icing cloud environment similar to what will be encountered in the AWT. Dry heat transfer and pressure drop data are obtained and compared to correlations available in the literature. The effects of icing sprays on heat transfer and pressure drop are also investigated.

  9. Insertion device for pressure testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howland, B. T.; Maurin, A. L.

    1969-01-01

    Test device which introduces either pressure or vacuum into a test pipe or tube, is insertable into the tested item where it secures itself into position and requires no external support. The unit has an operating range from zero to 25,000 psig and to any vacuum level that available equipment can reach.

  10. Analysis of single phase flow pressure drop and heat transfer in a horizontal rifled tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Soo Poey; Wahab, Abas Abdul; Ariffin, Saparudin; Kiow, Lee Woon

    2012-06-01

    Analysis by using Fluent® has been carried out to investigate the pressure drop and heat transfer of single phase flow (Reynolds number ranging from 2.0×104 - 1.4×105) in a 2 meter long of rifled tube and smooth tube which are heated at the outer wall at constant temperature. The rifled tube or also known as spiral internally ribbed tube which is used in this investigation has an outside diameter 45.0 mm and inside equivalent diameter of 33.1 mm while the smooth tube has an outside diameter 45.0 mm and inside diameter 34.1 mm. The working fluid that is used in this investigation is water. In this analysis, realizable k-epsilon model has been chosen to solve the fully developed turbulence flow in both the tubes. The result from simulation shows that the pressure drop in rifled tube is about 1.69-2.0 times higher than in the smooth tube while the heat transfer coefficient of water in the rifle tube is 0.97-1.27 times than in the smooth tube. The high pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in rifled tube comparing to smooth tube is due to the helical rib in the rifled tube which not only acted as rough surface, but also causes swirling effect near the wall which enhance heat transfer. The present study has proved that although the rifled tube produces high pressure drop but it is good in heat transfer enhancement through the ratio of heat flux to the pumping power. Correlations have been proposed for the single phase friction factor and Nusselt number of the rifled tube.

  11. Final Report: Drop Testing of Aged Stems on the SP981 Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.B.

    1999-08-11

    Free fall drop testing of unloaded SP981 reservoirs was conducted by Savannah River Technology Center in the Materials Test Facility. The testing consisted of dropping eight aged and two unaged reservoirs on their stems at impact angles of 88 degrees and 70 degrees from heights of approximately 4 and 6 foot above a hardened steel surface.

  12. Pressure drop in fully developed, duct flow of dispersed liquid-vapor mixture at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics of steady, fully developed dispersed liquid-vapor flow in a straight duct at 0-g is simulated by flowing water containing n-butyl benzoate droplets. Water and benzoate are immiscible and have identical density at room temperature. The theoretical basis of the simulation is given. Experiments showed that, for a fixed combined flow rate of water and benzoate, the frictional pressure drop is unaffected by large changes in the volume fraction of benzoate drops and their size distribution. Measured power spectra of the static wall pressure fluctuations induced by the turbulent water-benzoate flow also revealed that their dynamics is essentially unaltered by the presence of the droplets. These experimental findings, together with the theoretical analysis, led to the conclusion that the pressure drop in fully developed, dispersed liquid-vapor flow in straight ducts of constant cross section at 0-g is identical to that due to liquid flowing alone at the same total volumetric flow rate of the liquid-vapor mixture and, therefore, can be readily determined.

  13. Equivalent particle diameter and length scale for pressure drop in porous metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dukhan, Nihad; Patel, Pragnesh

    2008-04-15

    The internal architecture of metal foam is significantly different from that of traditional porous media. This provides a set of challenges for understanding the fluid flow in this relatively new class of materials. This paper proposes that despite the geometrical differences between metal foam and traditional porous media, the Ergun correlation is a good fit for the linear pressure drop as a function of the Darcian velocity, provided that an appropriate equivalent particle diameter is used. The paper investigates an appropriate particle diameter considering the physics of energy dissipation, i.e. the viscous shear and the form drag. The above approach is supported by wind tunnel steady-state unidirectional pressure drop measurements for airflow through several isotropic open-cell aluminum foam samples having different porosities and pore densities. For each foam sample, the equivalent particle diameter correlated well with the surface area per unit volume of the foam. This was also very well valid for previous porous metal pressure drop data in the open literature. (author)

  14. Analytical Evaluation of Preliminary Drop Tests Performed to Develop a Robust Design for the Standardized DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister

    SciTech Connect

    A.G. Ware; D.K. Morton; N.L. Smith; S.D. Snow; T.E. Rahl

    1999-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a design concept for a set of standard canisters for the handling, interim storage, transportation, and disposal in the national repository, of DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The standardized DOE SNF canister has to be capable of handling virtually all of the DOE SNF in a variety of potential storage and transportation systems. It must also be acceptable to the repository, based on current and anticipated future requirements. This expected usage mandates a robust design. The canister design has four unique geometries, with lengths of approximately 10 feet or 15 feet, and an outside nominal diameter of 18 inches or 24 inches. The canister has been developed to withstand a drop from 30 feet onto a rigid (flat) surface, sustaining only minor damage - but no rupture - to the pressure (containment) boundary. The majority of the end drop-induced damage is confined to the skirt and lifting/stiffening ring components, which can be removed if de sired after an accidental drop. A canister, with its skirt and stiffening ring removed after an accidental drop, can continue to be used in service with appropriate operational steps being taken. Features of the design concept have been proven through drop testing and finite element analyses of smaller test specimens. Finite element analyses also validated the canister design for drops onto a rigid (flat) surface for a variety of canister orientations at impact, from vertical to 45 degrees off vertical. Actual 30-foot drop testing has also been performed to verify the final design, though limited to just two full-scale test canister drops. In each case, the analytical models accurately predicted the canister response.

  15. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem - Air drop test vehicle/B-52 design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Drobnik, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The air drop development test program for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System required the design of a large drop test vehicle that would meet all the stringent requirements placed on it by structural loads, safety considerations, flight recovery system interfaces, and sequence. The drop test vehicle had to have the capability to test the drogue and the three main parachutes both separately and in the total flight deployment sequence and still be low-cost to fit in a low-budget development program. The design to test large ribbon parachutes to loads of 300,000 pounds required the detailed investigation and integration of several parameters such as carrier aircraft mechanical interface, drop test vehicle ground transportability, impact point ground penetration, salvageability, drop test vehicle intelligence, flight design hardware interfaces, and packaging fidelity.

  16. Vertical Drop Test of a YS-11 Fuselage Section (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Kazuo; Kumakura, Ikuo; Minegishi, Masakutsu; Shoji, Hirokazu; Yoshimoto, Norio; Miyaki, Hiromitsu; Terada, Hiroyuki; Isoe, Akira; Yamaoka, Toshihiro; Katayama, Noriaki; Hayashi, Toru; Akaso, Tetsuya; Kosaka, Hideyuki

    The Structures and Materials Research Center of the National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan (NAL) and Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) conducted the 2nd vertical drop test of a fuselage section cut from a NAMC YS-11 transport airplane in July 2002. The main objective of this test program was to obtain background data for aircraft cabin safety by drop test of a full-scale fuselage section and to develop computational tool for crash simulation of aircraft fuselage structure. The test article including seats and anthropomorphic test dummies was dropped to a rigid impact surface by free-fall method at a velocity of 7.6m/s (25ft/s). The impact environment and the resultant response of the fuselage structure and the passenger dummies were considered to be severe but potentially survivable. A description of the results of the 1st drop test and the 2nd drop test is presented in this paper.

  17. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... case of a pipeline that is not visually inspected for leakage during the test, for at least...

  18. Internally damped, self-arresting vertical drop-weight impact test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R. (Inventor); Prasad, Chunchu B. (Inventor); Stockum, Robert W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A vertical dropped-weight impact test machine has a dropped-weight barrel vertically supported on upper and lower support brackets. The dropped-weight barrel is chambered to receive a dropped-weight assembly having a latch pin at its upper end, a damping unit in the middle, and a tup at its lower end. The tup is adapted for gathering data during impact testing. The latch pin releasably engages a latch pin coupling assembly. The latch pin coupling assembly is attached to a winch via a halyard for raising and lowering the dropped-weight assembly. The lower end of the dropped-weight barrel is provided with a bounce-back arresting mechanism which is activated by the descending passage of the dropped-weight assembly. After striking the specimen, the dropped-weight assembly rebounds vertically and is caught by the bounce-back arresting mechanism. The damping unit of the dropped-weight assembly serves to dissipate energy from the rebounding dropped-weight assembly and prevents the dropped-weight assembly from rebounding from the self-arresting mechanism.

  19. Internally damped, self-arresting vertical drop-weight impact test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R. (Inventor); Prasad, Chunchu B. (Inventor); Waters, Jr., William A. (Inventor); Stockum, Robert W. (Inventor); Water, Manfred A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A vertical dropped-weight impact test machine has a dropped-weight barrel vertically supported on upper and lower support brackets. The dropped-weight barrel is chambered to receive a dropped-weight assembly having a latch pin at its upper end, a damping unit in the middle, and a tup at its lower end. The tup is adapted for gathering data during impact testing. The latch pin releasably engages a latch pin coupling assembly. The latch pin coupling assembly is attached to a winch via a halyard for raising and lowering the dropped-weight assembly. The lower end of the dropped-weight barrel is provided with a bounce-back arresting mechanism which is activated by the descending passage of the dropped-weight assembly. After striking the specimen, the dropped-weight assembly rebounds vertically and is caught by the bounce-back arresting mechanism. The damping unit of the dropped-weight assembly serves to dissipate energy from the rebounding dropped-weight assembly and prevents the dropped-weight assembly from rebounding from the self-arresting mechanism.

  20. Effects of sudden expansion and contraction flow on pressure drops in the Stirling engine regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, K.; Yamashita, I.; Hirata, K.

    1998-07-01

    The flow losses in the regenerators greatly influence the performance of the Stirling engine. The losses mainly depend on fluid friction through the regenerator matrix, but are also generated in sudden expansion and contraction flow at the regenerator ends. The latter losses can't be neglected in the case of small area ratio (entrance area/cross-sectional area in regenerator). The pressure drops in regenerators are usually estimated assuming a uniform velocity distribution of working gas in the matrices. The estimation results, however, are generally smaller than practical data. The cross-sectional flow areas of the heater and cooler of typical Stirling engines are smaller than the cross- sectional area of the regenerator. The effects of the small flow passage on the velocity distribution of working fluid in the matrix, that is, a flow transition from tubes or channels to a regenerator matrix, can be often confirmed by the discolored matrix. Especially, the lack of a uniform distribution of velocity in the matrix causes increased flow loss and decreased thermal performance. So, it is necessary to understand the quantitative effects of the sudden change in flow area at the regenerator ends on the velocity distribution and pressure drop. In this paper, using matrices made of stacks of wire screens, the effects of the entrance and exit areas and the length of the regenerator on pressure drops are examined by an unidirectional steady flow apparatus. The experimental data are arranged in an empirical equation. The lack of a uniformity of velocity distribution is visualized using smoke-wire methods. The empirical equation presented is applied to the estimation of pressure loss in an actual engine regenerator. The applicability of the equation is examined by comparison of estimated value with engine data in pressure loss.

  1. Theoretical analysis of pressure-drop type instabilities in an upflow boiling system with an exit restriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Kakaç, S.; Liu, H. T.; Sarma, P. K.

    In this work, two-phase flow pressure-drop type instabilities in an upflow boiling system are studied theoretically. Dynamic simulations of the pressure-drop type instabilities require the knowledge of the steady state characteristics of the system in terms of the pressure drop versus the mass flow rate. In a boiling system with an exit restriction at the outlet of the boiling channel, the pressure drop through the system concentrates at the exit restriction. Therefore, the correlation of the pressure drop of the two-phase mixture flowing through the exit restriction (i.e. a sharp-edged orifice) is essential in the calculation of the total pressure drop of the system. A model for the exit restriction is developed and compared with the experimental results covering a wide range of vapor quality with different heat inputs and inlet subcoolings. The drift-flux model is adopted to predict the steady state characteristics of the boiling system. The dynamic oscillations of the quasi-static pressure-drop type instabilities in the boiling system are simulated and good predictions of the system stability boundary and oscillatory characteristics are obtained when compared with the experimental results.

  2. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy: A Recurrent and Bilateral Foot Drop Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Rodrigues, Maria Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, “sausage-like” swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis. PMID:24251057

  3. Determination of the cathode and anode voltage drops in high power low-pressure amalgam lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Vasiliev, A. I. Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V.; Startsev, A. Yu.; Kudryavtsev, N. N.

    2011-12-15

    For the first time, cathode and anode drops of powerful low-pressure amalgam lamps were measured. The lamp discharge current is 3.2 A, discharge current frequency is 43 kHz, linear electric power is 2.4 W/cm. The method of determination of a cathode drop is based on the change of a lamp operating voltage at variation of the electrode filament current at constant discharge current. The total (cathode plus anode) drop of voltage was measured by other, independent ways. The maximum cathode fall is 10.8 V; the anode fall corresponding to the maximal cathode fall is 2.4 V. It is shown that in powerful low pressure amalgam lamps the anode fall makes a considerable contribution (in certain cases, the basic one) to heating of electrodes. Therefore, the anode fall cannot be neglected, at design an electrode and ballast of amalgam lamps with operating discharge current frequency of tens of kHz.

  4. Extraction of essential oils from Algerian myrtle leaves using instant controlled pressure drop technology.

    PubMed

    Berka-Zougali, Baya; Hassani, Aicha; Besombes, Colette; Allaf, Karim

    2010-10-01

    In the present work, the new extraction process of Détente Instantanée Contrôlée DIC (French, for instant controlled pressure drop) was studied, developed, quantitatively and qualitatively compared to the conventional hydrodistillation method for the extraction of essential oils from Algerian myrtle leaves. DIC was used as a thermomechanical treatment, DIC subjecting the product to a high-pressure saturated steam. The DIC cycle ends with an abrupt pressure drop towards vacuum, and this instantly leads to an autovaporization of myrtle volatile compounds. An immediate condensation in the vacuum tank produced a micro-emulsion of water and essential oils. Thus, an ultra-rapid cooling of residual leaves occurred, precluding any thermal degradation. An experimental protocol was designed with 3 independent variables: saturated steam pressure between 0.1 and 0.6 MPa, resulting in a temperature between 100 and 160°C, a total thermal processing time between 19 and 221 s, and between 2 and 6 DIC cycles. The essential oils yield was defined as the main dependent variable. This direct extraction gave high yields and high quality essential oil, as revealed by composition and antioxidant activity (results not shown). After this treatment, the myrtle leaves were recovered and hydrodistilled in order to quantify the essential oil content in residual DIC-treated samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed some modification of the structure with a slight destruction of cell walls after DIC treatment. PMID:20813373

  5. Development of a new pressure dependent threshold superheated drop detector for neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeian, Peiman; Raisali, Gholamreza; Akhavan, Azam; Ghods, Hossein; Hajizadeh, Bardia

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a set of superheated drop detectors operated at different pressures is developed and fabricated by adding an appropriate amount of Freon-12 liquid on the free surface of the detector. The fabricated detectors have been used for determination of the threshold pressure for 2.89 MeV neutrons of a neutron generator in order to estimate the thermodynamic efficiency. Finally, knowing the thermodynamic efficiency of the detector and in a similar manner, the threshold pressure for 241Am-Be neutrons is determined and accordingly, the maximum neutron energy of the source spectrum is estimated. The maximum neutron energy of the 241Am-Be is estimated as 10.97±2.11 MeV. The agreement between this measured maximum energy and the reported value of the 241Am-Be neutron source shows that the method developed to apply pressure on the superheated drop detectors can be used to control the energy threshold of these detectors.

  6. High-pressure creep tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Lamoureux, J.; Hales, C.

    1986-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, presently being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA, uses high-pressure hydrogen as a working fluid; its long-term effects on the properties of alloys are relatively unknown. Hence, creep-rupture testing of wrought and cast high-temperature alloys in high-pressure hydrogen is an essential part of the research supporting the development of the Stirling cycle engine. Attention is given to the design, development, and operation of a 20 MPa hydrogen high-temperature multispecimen creep-rupture possessing high sensitivity. This pressure vessel allows for the simultaneous yet independent testing of six specimens. The results from one alloy, XF-818, are presented to illustrate how reported results are derived from the raw test data.

  7. Numerical investigation of cavitation flow inside spool valve with large pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; Pan, Dingyi; Xie, Fangfang; Shao, Xueming

    2015-12-01

    Spool valves play an important role in fluid power system. Cavitation phenomena happen frequently inside the spool valves, which cause structure damages, noise and lower down hydrodynamic performance. A numerical tools incorporating the cavitation model, are developed to predict the flow structure and cavitation pattern in the spool valve. Two major flow states in the spool valve chamber, i.e. flow-in and flow-out, are studies. The pressure distributions along the spool wall are first investigated, and the results agree well with the experimental data. For the flow-in cases, the local pressure at the throttling area drops much deeper than the pressure in flow-out cases. Meanwhile, the bubbles are more stable in flow-in cases than those in flow-out cases, which are ruptured and shed into the downstream.

  8. Evaluation of static pressure drops and PM10 and TSP emissions for modified 1D-3D cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, G.A.; Baker, R.V.; Hughs, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Five modifications of a standard 1D3D cyclone were tested and compared against the standard 1D3D design in the areas of particulate emissions and static pressure drop across the cyclone. The modifications to the 1D3D design included a 2D2D inlet, a 2D2D air outlet, a D/3 trash exit, an expansion chamber with a D/3 trash exit, and a tapered air outlet duct. The 1D3D modifications that exhibited a significant improvement in reducing both PM10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) emissions were the designs with the 2D2D inlet and air exhaust combined with either the conical D/3 tail cone or the expansion chamber. In reference to the standard 1D3D cyclone, the average reduction in PM10 emissions was 24 to 29% with a 29 to 35% reduction observed in TSP emissions. The modifications with the tapered air outlets did not show any significant improvements in controlling PM10 emissions. However, the modification with the tapered air outlet/expansion chamber combination exhibited statistical significance in reducing TSP emissions by 18% compared to the 1D3D cyclone. All modifications tested exhibited lower static pressure drops than the standard 1D3D.

  9. 14 CFR 23.843 - Pressurization tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pressurization tests. 23.843 Section 23.843... Pressurization § 23.843 Pressurization tests. (a) Strength test. The complete pressurized cabin, including doors... in § 23.365(d). (b) Functional tests. The following functional tests must be performed: (1) Tests...

  10. 14 CFR 23.843 - Pressurization tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pressurization tests. 23.843 Section 23.843... Pressurization § 23.843 Pressurization tests. (a) Strength test. The complete pressurized cabin, including doors... in § 23.365(d). (b) Functional tests. The following functional tests must be performed: (1) Tests...

  11. 14 CFR 23.843 - Pressurization tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pressurization tests. 23.843 Section 23.843... Pressurization § 23.843 Pressurization tests. (a) Strength test. The complete pressurized cabin, including doors... in § 23.365(d). (b) Functional tests. The following functional tests must be performed: (1) Tests...

  12. Predicting Equations for Evaporation Pressure Drop Inside Horizontal Smooth and Grooved Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Atsushi; Uchida, Mari; Shikazono, Naoki

    A new prediction method for evaporation pressure drop inside horizontal smooth and grooved tubes is proposed. These tubes had an outer diameter of 7mm, and the working fluids were R407C (HFC-32/HFC-125/HFC-134a, 23/25/52 mass%) and R410A (HFC-32/HFC-125, 50/50 mass%). The previous and present experimental data were correlated by Lockhart-Martinelli method, where Colburn and Carnavos equations were utilized for predicting single phase pressure drop of smooth and grooved tubes, respectively. Different numerical constants were adopted for smooth and grooved tubes to calculate the L-M pressure parameter φ L.Inorder to express the gravitational effect, a damping function for φ L was introduced. The proposed damping function was expressed as a function of Froude number for both smooth and grooved tubes. It is confirmed that 95% of the predicted results are within the accuracy of ±30% for both smooth and grooved tubes.

  13. Water management of proton exchange membrane fuel cell based on control of hydrogen pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mancun; Pei, Pucheng; Zha, Hongshan; Xu, Huachi

    2014-12-01

    Flooding experiments in various conditions are developed and the hydrogen pressure drop is investigated on a two-piece PEM fuel cell in this study. A two-level characteristic of hydrogen pressure drop is observed and analyzed in combination with water droplet accumulation in channels. Based on the characteristic, the flooding process can be divided into four continuous periods, which are the proper period, the humid period, the transitional period and the flooding period. The voltage shows the segmented tendency during these periods. Experimental results show that current and temperature have little influence on the growth rate of the two levels, while the effects of pressure and hydrogen stoichiometry are remarkable. The growth rate can be calculated through the channel dimensions and matches the experimental results well. Hydrogen purge is not a fundamental method to solve flooding. The end of the humid period should be the boundary before flooding. The moist section can be obtained in the beginning part of the humid period. In this section PEM fuel cell is neither flooding nor dehydration by adjusting the cell temperature, which is verified by two additional experiments. This water management is convenient and swift for PEM fuel cell applications and the fault diagnosis.

  14. Simulating New Drop Test Vehicles and Test Techniques for the Orion CEV Parachute Assembly System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Aaron L.; Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Ray, Eric; Moore, Jim W.; Olson, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is engaged in a multi-year design and test campaign to qualify a parachute recovery system for human use on the Orion Spacecraft. Test and simulation techniques have evolved concurrently to keep up with the demands of a challenging and complex system. The primary simulations used for preflight predictions and post-test data reconstructions are Decelerator System Simulation (DSS), Decelerator System Simulation Application (DSSA), and Drop Test Vehicle Simulation (DTV-SIM). The goal of this paper is to provide a roadmap to future programs on the test technique challenges and obstacles involved in executing a large-scale, multi-year parachute test program. A focus on flight simulation modeling and correlation to test techniques executed to obtain parachute performance parameters are presented.

  15. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  16. Pressure drop considerations of a lithium cooled fusion breeder tokamak reactor blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.P.C.

    1983-12-06

    Liquid lithium was selected as one of the coolants for the 1983 fusion breeder blanket used on the magnetically confined tokamak fusion reactor, and as a result, the thermal-hydraulic calculations were dominated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) considerations. The applicable sets of MHD equations for the engineering thermal-hydraulic design were reviewed and compared. Special attention was given to the MHD calculations for the fertile material zone, a packed bed of composite beryllium and thorium balls, since this region can dominate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of this blanket module. To keep the pressure drops acceptable, fertile fuel balls were omitted in the inboard blanket.

  17. Dysfunctional vestibular system causes a blood pressure drop in astronauts returning from space.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Emma; Migeotte, Pierre-François; Kornilova, Ludmila; Delière, Quentin; Fransen, Erik; Glukhikh, Dmitrii; Moore, Steven T; Clément, Gilles; Diedrich, André; MacDougall, Hamish; Wuyts, Floris L

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge for the human body to maintain stable blood pressure while standing. The body's failure to do so can lead to dizziness or even fainting. For decades it has been postulated that the vestibular organ can prevent a drop in pressure during a position change--supposedly mediated by reflexes to the cardiovascular system. We show--for the first time--a significant correlation between decreased functionality of the vestibular otolith system and a decrease in the mean arterial pressure when a person stands up. Until now, no experiments on Earth could selectively suppress both otolith systems; astronauts returning from space are a unique group of subjects in this regard. Their otolith systems are being temporarily disturbed and at the same time they often suffer from blood pressure instability. In our study, we observed the functioning of both the otolith and the cardiovascular system of the astronauts before and after spaceflight. Our finding indicates that an intact otolith system plays an important role in preventing blood pressure instability during orthostatic challenges. Our finding not only has important implications for human space exploration; they may also improve the treatment of unstable blood pressure here on Earth. PMID:26671177

  18. Dysfunctional vestibular system causes a blood pressure drop in astronauts returning from space

    PubMed Central

    Hallgren, Emma; Migeotte, Pierre-François; Kornilova, Ludmila; Delière, Quentin; Fransen, Erik; Glukhikh, Dmitrii; Moore, Steven T.; Clément, Gilles; Diedrich, André; MacDougall, Hamish; Wuyts, Floris L.

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge for the human body to maintain stable blood pressure while standing. The body’s failure to do so can lead to dizziness or even fainting. For decades it has been postulated that the vestibular organ can prevent a drop in pressure during a position change – supposedly mediated by reflexes to the cardiovascular system. We show – for the first time – a significant correlation between decreased functionality of the vestibular otolith system and a decrease in the mean arterial pressure when a person stands up. Until now, no experiments on Earth could selectively suppress both otolith systems; astronauts returning from space are a unique group of subjects in this regard. Their otolith systems are being temporarily disturbed and at the same time they often suffer from blood pressure instability. In our study, we observed the functioning of both the otolith and the cardiovascular system of the astronauts before and after spaceflight. Our finding indicates that an intact otolith system plays an important role in preventing blood pressure instability during orthostatic challenges. Our finding not only has important implications for human space exploration; they may also improve the treatment of unstable blood pressure here on Earth. PMID:26671177

  19. Results of the first thirty foot drop test of the MOSAIK KfK cask

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, K.B.; Salzbrenner, R.; Wellman, G.; Uncapher, W.; Bobbe, J.

    1991-01-01

    The MOSAIK KfK cask, a ductile cast iron (DCI) nuclear material transportation cask donated to Sandia by Gesellschaft fur NuklearService (GNS), was drop tested on June 25, 1990 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Conditions of the test were; a 30 ft. drop without impact limiters onto an unyielding target, cask metal temperature {minus}16F or below, and a 0.75 inch deep flaw machined into the cask wall at the location of the highest tensile stress. The drop test was successful as judged by inspection of the machined flaw which showed no crack initiation. This drop test, in the first in a series, was designed to demonstrate the viability of using a fracture mechanics approach to design cask fabricated from ferritic materials. In addition, the test demonstrated that a DCI cask can withstand severe impacts under accident-type conditions without failing in a brittle mode. The drop test parameters were designed to produce high decelerations and yield-level stresses in the cask wall. The measured rigid body deceleration was approximately 800 gs. This compares with decelerations of 100 to 300 gs for drop tests of casks with impact limiters. The time to peak load was 1.2 to 2.8 msec., compared to 20 to 40 msec for casks dropped with impact limiters. The maximum strain during the drop test was 1400 microstrain, which equates to a maximum tensile stress of about 37000 psi. This level of stress slightly exceeds the static yield strength and is about 80% of the dynamic yield strength. The test results of this initial drop test are discussed in detail in this paper.

  20. SOL Tests Create Unfair Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Katie

    2000-01-01

    A seventh-grader explains why the Virginia Standards of Learning tests unfairly pressure her and her teachers. She wants her free reading time restored and wishes politicians would worry more about students understanding--not just memorizing--facts. She praises teachers who go beyond the SOL. (MLH)

  1. Effects of slitted fins on the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a compact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.; Yun, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    A compact heat exchanger which consists of air-cooled aluminum fins and copper tubes circulating refrigerant has been used in a cooling system for a long time. There are two key parameters to be seriously considered for a design of the heat exchanger and its performance improvement. These are the heat transfer rate and pressure drop coefficient which varies with the change of the tube size, its arrangement and the fin configuration. In here, a numerical study was carried to understand the effect of the fin configuration on the heat transfer and pressure drop of the heat exchanger. The diameter and the arrangement of tubes were fixed but three different types of the fin configuration were used to see its effect on the heat transfer capacity and the static pressure drop. The calculation results were compared with that of a flat plate fin. From the comparison, it was found that the slitted fins have higher pressure drop; however, they have higher heat transfer rate. It means that the simpler of the fin configuration, the lower pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients are obtained. It is mainly due to the discretisation of the thermal boundary layer on the fin surface to maximize the heat transfer to air. The slitted sides of fins act like obstacles in the airflow path. From the experimental result, it was found that the same trend in the variation of the heat transfer rate and the pressure drop with the change of the fin configuration was obtained.

  2. Prediction of two-phase pressure drop in heat exchanger for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The overall efficiency of a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocooler is governed by the performance of the recuperative heat exchanger. In the heat exchanger, the hot stream of the mixed refrigerant undergoes condensation at high pressure while the cold stream gets evaporated at low pressure. The pressure drop in the low pressure stream is crucial since it directly influences the achievable refrigeration temperature. However, experimental and theoretical studies related to two-phase pressure drop in mixtures at cryogenic temperatures, are limited. Therefore, the design of an efficient MR J-T cryocooler is a challenging task due to the lack of predictive tools. In the present work, the existing empirical correlations, which are commonly used for the prediction of pressure drop in the case of pure refrigerants, evaporating at near ambient conditions, are assessed for the mixed refrigerants. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop in the evaporating cold stream of the tube-in-tube helically coiled heat exchanger. The predicted frictional pressure drop in the heat exchanger is compared with the experimental data. The suggested empirical correlations can be used to predict the hydraulic performance of the heat exchanger.

  3. Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle for Testing the Crew Exploration Vehicle's Parachute Assembly System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubey, Daniel P.; Thiele, Sara R.; Gruseck, Madelyn L.; Evans, Carol T.

    2010-01-01

    Though getting astronauts safely into orbit and beyond has long been one of NASA?s chief goals, their safe return has always been equally as important. The Crew Exploration Vehicle?s (CEV) Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is designed to safely return astronauts to Earth on the next-generation manned spacecraft Orion. As one means for validating this system?s requirements and testing its functionality, a test article known as the Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle (PC-DTV) will carry a fully-loaded yet truncated CPAS Parachute Compartment (PC) in a series of drop tests. Two aerodynamic profiles for the PC-DTV currently exist, though both share the same interior structure, and both have an Orion-representative weight of 20,800 lbf. Two extraction methods have been developed as well. The first (Cradle Monorail System 2 - CMS2) uses a sliding rail technique to release the PC-DTV midair, and the second (Modified DTV Sled; MDS) features a much less constrained separation method though slightly more complex. The decision as to which aerodynamic profile and extraction method to use is still not finalized. Additional CFD and stress analysis must be undertaken in order to determine the more desirable options, though at present the "boat tail" profile and the CMS2 extraction method seem to be the favored options in their respective categories. Fabrication of the PC-DTV and the selected extraction sled is set to begin in early October 2010 with an anticipated first drop test in mid-March 2011.

  4. Pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, liquid-vapor annular flows in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of frictional pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, annular liquid-vapor flows in zero gravity using simulation experiments conducted on earth is described. The scheme extends the authors' earlier work on dispersed flows. The simulation experiments used two immiscible liquids of identical density, namely, water and n-butyl benzoate. Because of the lack of rigorous analytical models for turbulent, annular flows, the proposed scheme resorts to existing semiempirical correlations. Results based on two different correlations are presented and compared. Others may be used. It was shown that, for both dispersed and annular flow regimes, the predicted frictional pressure gradients in 0-g are lower than those in 1-g under otherwise identical conditions. The physical basis for this finding is given.

  5. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy presenting with hand drop in a young child.

    PubMed

    Sobreira, Inês; Sousa, Cátia; Raposo, Ana; Soares, M Rita; Soudo, Ana; Dias, Ana Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) results from the deletion of the PMP22 gene in chromosome 17p11.2. Clinically, it presents with painless pressure palsies, typically in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life, being a rare entity in childhood. We present the case study of a six-year-old male child who presented with left hand drop that he kept for over four weeks. Electrophysiological studies suggested HNPP and genetic studies confirmed it. With this paper, we pretend to create awareness to this entity as a diagnosis to be considered in a child with painless monoparesis and to emphasize the importance of electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis. PMID:22953141

  6. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy Presenting with Hand Drop in a Young Child

    PubMed Central

    Sobreira, Inês; Sousa, Cátia; Raposo, Ana; Soares, M. Rita; Soudo, Ana; Dias, Ana Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) results from the deletion of the PMP22 gene in chromosome 17p11.2. Clinically, it presents with painless pressure palsies, typically in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life, being a rare entity in childhood. We present the case study of a six-year-old male child who presented with left hand drop that he kept for over four weeks. Electrophysiological studies suggested HNPP and genetic studies confirmed it. With this paper, we pretend to create awareness to this entity as a diagnosis to be considered in a child with painless monoparesis and to emphasize the importance of electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis. PMID:22953141

  7. Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristic of zinc-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonage, B. K.; Mohanan, P.

    2015-04-01

    Development of alternative working fluids with enhanced thermal properties is very much needed to replace conventional fluids. Colloidal solution of some base fluid with solid nanoparticles dispersed in it, which is called as nanofluid, is emerging as a promising alternative heat transfer fluid. Zinc, being ecofriendly material, is selected as dispersed phase in water to develop zinc-water (Zn-H2O) nanofluid. Zn-H2O nanofluid is synthesized by single step method and characterized. Thermophysical properties are estimated by available theoretical models. Estimated properties proved that nanofluid is having enhanced thermophysical properties compared to the base fluid due to which nanofluid can become potential working fluid for heat exchanging devices. Synthesized nanofluid is circulated through heat transfer loop to assess its performance in turbulent flow regime and at constant wall temperature condition. Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop are estimated from experimental results and both are considered as performance evaluation criteria for heat transfer performance assessment. 83 % increase in Nusselt number with 9 % increase in pressure drop is observed for the nanofluid compared to water.

  8. Pressure Drop Correlations of Single-Phase and Two-Phase Flow in Rolling Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xia-xin Cao; Chang-qi Yan; Pu-zhen Gao; Zhong-ning Sun

    2006-07-01

    A series of experimental studies of frictional pressure drop for single phase and two-phase bubble flow in smooth rolling tubes were carried out. The tube inside diameters were 15 mm, 25 mm and 34.5 mm respectively, the rolling angles of tubes could be set as 10 deg. and 20 deg., and the rolling periods could be set as 5 s, 10 s and 15 s. Combining with the analysis of single-phase water motion, it was found that the traditional correlations for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient were not suitable for the rolling condition. Based on the experimental data, a new correlation for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient under rolling condition was presented, and the calculations not only agreed well with the experimental data, but also could display the periodically dynamic characteristics of frictional coefficients. Applying the new correlation to homogeneous flow model, two-phase frictional pressure drop of bubble flow in rolling tubes could be calculated, the results showed that the relative error between calculation and experimental data was less than {+-} 25%. (authors)

  9. A simple expression for pressure drops of water and other low molecular liquids in the flow through micro-orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Ushida, Akiomi; Narumi, Takatsune

    2015-12-01

    Flows are generally divided into two types: shear flows and shear-free elongational (extensional) flows. Both are necessary for a thorough understanding of the flow properties of a fluid. Shear flows are easy to achieve in practice, for example, through Poiseuille or Couette flows. Shear-free elongational flows are experimentally hard to achieve, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the flow properties of fluids in micro-devices. Nevertheless, flows through micro-orifices are useful for probing the properties of elongational flows at high elongational rates; although these flows exhibit shear and elongation, the elongation is dominant and the shear is negligible in the central region of the flows. We previously reported an anomalous reduction in pressure drops in the flows of water, a 50/50 mixture of glycerol and water, and silicone oils through micro-orifices. In the present paper, we rearrange the data presented in the previous paper and reveal a simple relationship where the pressure drop is proportional to the velocity through the micro-orifices, independent of the orifice diameter and the viscosity of the liquids tested. We explain our observations by introducing a "fluid element" model, in which fluid elements are formed on entering the orifice. The model is based on the idea that low molecular liquids, including water, generate strong elongational stress, similar to a polymer solution, in the flow through micro-orifices.

  10. Multi-Terrain Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section was retrofitted with four identical blocks of deployable honeycomb energy absorber and crash tested on two different surfaces: soft soil, and water. The drop tests were conducted at the 70-ft. drop tower at the Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility of NASA Langley. Water drop tests were performed into a 15-ft-diameter pool of water that was approximately 42-in. deep. For the soft soil impact, a 15-ft-square container filled with fine-sifted, unpacked sand was located beneath the drop tower. All drop tests were vertical with a nominally flat attitude with respect to the impact surface. The measured impact velocities were 37.4, and 24.7-fps for soft soil and water, respectively. A fuselage section without energy absorbers was also drop tested onto water to provide a datum for comparison with the test, which included energy absorbers. In order to facilitate this type of comparison and to ensure fuselage survivability for the no-energy-absorber case, the velocity of the water impact tests was restricted to 25-fps nominal. While all tests described in this paper were limited to vertical impact velocities, the implications and design challenges of utilizing external energy absorbers during combined forward and vertical impact velocities are discussed. The design, testing and selection of a honeycomb cover, which was required in soft surface and water impacts to transmit the load into the honeycomb cell walls, is also presented.