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1

A case of rare recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) coexisting with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).  

PubMed

Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and is characterized by late onset proximal muscle weakness, ptosis and difficulty swallowing. It is caused by expansion mutations in the PABPN1 gene on chromosome 14q11. There is also a rare recessive form of the disease caused by homozygosity of a very small expansion mutation in the same gene. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent peripheral monofocal neuropathies. In this report a patient with both recessive OPMD and HNPP is described. The presence of two genetically unlinked neurological diagnoses in the same individual is a rare event and may have delayed the diagnoses. PMID:18358598

Marsh, Eleanor A; Robinson, David O

2008-05-01

2

Atypical hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP): the value of direct DNA diagnosis.  

PubMed Central

We report two patients with suspected hereditary liability to pressure palsies. Neurophysiological studies showed a mixed axonal-demyelinating sensory-motor polyneuropathy with focal slowing of conduction velocities at the common sites of entrapment. Morphological studies on sural nerve biopsy from the proband showed active axonal regeneration without typical tomacula. Molecular analysis confirmed the presence of a deletion of chromosome 17p11.2 in both patients. Our observation confirms the heterogeneity of hereditary liability to pressure palsies and the relevance of DNA testing for the diagnosis of this hereditary neuropathy. Images PMID:9391880

Sessa, M; Nemni, R; Quattrini, A; Del Carro, U; Wrabetz, L; Canal, N

1997-01-01

3

Progress in molecular diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth-disease type 1 (CMT 1, HMSN I) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-detection of a potential genetic mosaicism  

SciTech Connect

We tested 20 CMT 1 patients characterized according to the criteria of the European CMT consortium by Southern hybridization of MspI restricted genomic DNA with probes pVAW409R1, pVAW412Hec and pEW401HE. In 11 of the 20 CMT 1 cases (55%), we observed a duplication in 17q11.2; one patient had a dinucleotide insertion in exon 6 of the PO-gene (5%). One HNPP case had a typical 17p11.2 deletion. Analysis of CA-repeats was performed with primers RM11GT and Mfd41; SSCP-analysis of the PO, PMP22 and Cx32-genes is in progress. FISH was carried out with probe pVAW409R1. 125 interphase nuclei were analyzed for each proband by counting the signals per nucleus. Normal cells show a characteristic distribution of signals: 1 signal in 5.9% of nuclei, 2 in 86.3% and 3 in 7.8%. A duplication is indicated by a shift to 3 signals in more than approximately 60% and 2 in less than 25% of the nuclei. In contrast, the 17p11.2 deletion of the HNPP patient shifts to 82.4% of nuclei with a single hybridization signal versus 14.4% with 2 signals. We detected one case with significantly abnormal distribution of interphase nuclei hybridization signals compared to cultures of normal cells and to those with 17p11.2 duplication or deletion: 3.2% nuclei revealed 1 signal, 48.0% two signals and 48.8% 3 signals, indicating a pathogenic but moderate dosis increase compared to the throughout duplicated cases. FISH with probe pVAW409R1 is a versatile tool to detect the HNPP deletion both in interphase nuclei and in metaphase chromosomes. In CMT 1 disease interphase nuclei are required for FISH analysis due to the small duplication of 1.5 Mbp. In contrast to Southern techniques, FISH is able to detect genetic mosaicism.

Bathke, K.; Liehr. T.; Ekici, A. [Institute for Human Genetics, Erlange (Germany)] [and others

1994-09-01

4

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies presenting with sciatic neuropathy.  

PubMed

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant disorder associated with recurrent mononeuropathies following compression or trivial trauma. Reports on sciatic neuropathy as the presenting manifestation of HNPP are very scarce. We report on a 21-year-old previously healthy man who was admitted with sensorimotor deficits in his left leg. He had no history of preceding transient episodes of weakness or sensory loss. Clinical and electrophysiological examinations were consistent with sciatic neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid investigation and MRI of the nerve roots, plexus, and sciatic nerve did not indicate the underlying aetiology. When extended electrophysiological tests revealed multiple subclinical compression neuropathies in the upper limbs, HNPP was contemplated and eventually confirmed by genetic testing. PMID:25326571

Topakian, Raffi; Wimmer, Sibylle; Pischinger, Barbara; Pichler, Robert

2014-01-01

5

Detection of the CMT1A/HNPP recombination hotspot in unrelated patients of European descent.  

PubMed Central

Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease (CMT1) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are common inherited disorders of the peripheral nervous system. The majority of CMT1 patients have a 1.5Mb tandem duplication (CMT1A) in chromosome 17p11.2 while most HNPP patients have a deletion of the same 1.5 Mb region. The CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion are the reciprocal products of an unequal crossing over event between misaligned flanking CMT1A-REP elements. We analysed 162 unrelated CMT1A duplication patients and HNPP deletion patients from 11 different countries for the presence of a recombination hotspot in the CMT1A-REP sequences. A hotspot for unequal crossing over between the misaligned flanking CMT1A-REP elements was observed through the detection of novel junction fragments in 76.9% of 130 unrelated CMT1A patients and in 71.9% of 32 unrelated HNPP patients. This recombination hotspot was also detected in eight out of 10 de novo CMT1A duplication and in two de novo HNPP deletion patients. These data indicate that the hotspot of unequal crossing over occurs in several populations independently of ethnic background and is directly involved in the pathogenesis of CMT1A and HNPP. We conclude that the detection of junction fragments from the CMT1A-REP element on Southern blot analysis is a simple and reliable DNA diagnostic tool for the identification of the CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion in most patients. Images PMID:9032649

Timmerman, V; Rautenstrauss, B; Reiter, L T; Koeuth, T; Löfgren, A; Liehr, T; Nelis, E; Bathke, K D; De Jonghe, P; Grehl, H; Martin, J J; Lupski, J R; Van Broeckhoven, C

1997-01-01

6

A 1.5 Mb submicroscopic deletion in 17p11.2-p12 is frequently observed in Italian families with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies  

SciTech Connect

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent mononeuropathies that was recently associated with a 1.5 Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-p12. Duplication of the same region is known to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), a more severe peripheral neuropathy characterized by symmetrically slowed nerve conduction velocity. The CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion are reciprocal recombination products involving a repeat element (CMT1A-REP) which flanks the 1.5 Mb region involved in the duplication/deletion. Patients from 9 unrelated HNPP Italian families were clinically, electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Families were typed with a polymorphic (CA){sub n} repeat and with RFLPs corresponding to loci D17S122, D17S125 and D17S61, which all map within the deleted region. Lack of allelic transmission from affected parent to affected offspring was observed in four informative families, suggesting the presence of deletion. Southern blot analysis of EcoRI digested genomic DNA from HNPP patients and control subjects was performed using a probe mapping within the CMT1A-REP elements. A reduced hybridization signal of a 6.0 kb EcoRI fragment, mapping within the distal CMT1A-REP, was observed in all HNPP patients suggesting the loss of one copy of this fragment in the HNPP-deleted chromosome. PFGE analysis of SacII digested genomic DNA from selected HNPP subjects showed the presence of a junction fragment which has previously been found in association with the 1.5 Mb HNPP deletion. Evidence for deletion could be demonstrated in all 9 families suggesting that the 17p11.2-p12 deletion is commonly associated with HNPP.

Lorenzetti, D.; Roa, B.B.; Abbas, N.E. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01

7

A 1.5-Mb deletion in 17p11.2-p12 is frequently observed in Italian families with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.  

PubMed Central

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent mononeuropathies. A 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-p12 has been associated with HNPP. Duplication of the same 1.5-Mb region is known to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1A), a more severe peripheral neuropathy characterized by symmetrically slowed nerve conduction velocity (NCV). The CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion appear to be the reciprocal products of a recombination event involving a repeat element (CMT1A-REP) that flanks the 1.5-Mb region involved in the duplication/deletion. Patients from nine unrelated Italian families who were diagnosed with HNPP on the basis of clinical, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations were analyzed by molecular methods for DNA deletion on chromosome 17p. In all nine families, Southern analysis using a CMT1A-REP probe detected a reduced hybridization signal of a 6.0-kb EcoRI fragment mapping within the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating deletion of one copy of CMT1A-REP in these HNPP patients. Families were also typed with a polymorphic (CA)n repeat and with RFLPs corresponding to loci D17S122, D17S125, and D17S61, which all map within the deleted region. Lack of allelic transmission from affected parent to affected offspring was observed in four informative families, providing an independent indication for deletion. Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of SacII-digested genomic DNA detected junction fragments specific to the 1.5-Mb HNPP deletion in seven of nine Italian families included in this study. These findings suggest that a 1.5-Mb deletion on 17p11.2-p12 is the most common mutation associated with HNPP. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7825607

Lorenzetti, D; Pareyson, D; Sghirlanzoni, A; Roa, B B; Abbas, N E; Pandolfo, M; Di Donato, S; Lupski, J R

1995-01-01

8

A 1.5-Mb deletion in 17p11.2-p12 is frequently observed in Italian families with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies  

SciTech Connect

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent mononeuropathies. A 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-p12 has been associated with HNPP. Duplication of the same 1.5-Mb region is known to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1A), a more severe peripheral neuropathy characterized by symmetrically slowed nerve conduction velocity (NCV). The CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion appear to be the reciprocal products of a recombination event involving a repeat element (CMT1A-REP) that flanks the 1.5-Mb region involved in the duplication/deletion. Patients from nine unrelated Italian families who were diagnosed with HNPP on the basis of clinical, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations were analyzed by molecular methods for DNA deletion on chromosome 17p. In all nine families, Southern analysis using a CMT1A-REP probe detected a reduced hybridization signal of a 6.0-kb EcoRI fragment mapping within the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating deletion of one copy of CMT1A-REP in these HNPP patients. Families were also typed with a polymorphic (CA){sub n} repeat and with RFLPs corresponding to loci D17S122, D17S125, and D17S61, which all map within the deleted region. Lack of allelic transmission from affected parent to affected offspring was observed in four informative families, providing an independent indication for deletion. Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of SacII-digested genomic DNA detected junction fragments specific to the 1.5-Mb HNPP deletion in seven of nine Italian families included in this study. These findings suggest that a 1.5-Mb deletion on 17p11.2-p12 is the most common mutation associated with HNPP. 51 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Lorenzetti, D.; Pandolfo, M. [Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milan (Italy)]|[Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Pareyson, D.; Sghirlanzoni, A.; Di Donato, S. [Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milan (Italy); Roa, B.B.; Abbas, N.E.; Lupski, J.R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-01-01

9

Age associated axonal features in HNPP with 17p11.2 deletion in Japan  

PubMed Central

Objective: To clarify age related changes in the clinicopathological features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) in Japanese patients with deletion of 17p11.2, particularly concerning axonal abnormalities. Methods: Forty eight proband patients from 48 HNPP families were assessed as to clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological features, including age associated changes beyond those in controls. Results: Motor conduction studies showed age associated deterioration of compound muscle action potentials in nerves vulnerable to repetitive compression (median, ulnar, and peroneal nerves), but not in others such as the tibial nerve. Sensory conduction studies revealed more profound reduction of action potentials than motor studies with little age related change. Large myelinated fibre loss was seen in the sural nerve irrespective of age at examination. Conclusions: Irreversible axonal damage may occur at entrapment sites in motor nerves in HNPP patients, progressing with aging. Sensory nerves may show more profound axonal abnormality, but without age association. The electrophysiological features of HNPP are presumed to be a mixture of abnormalities occurring from early in life and acquired features caused by repetitive insults at entrapment sites. Unlike Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A, age associated axonal damage may not occur unless the nerves are subjected to compression. PMID:16024889

Koike, H; Hirayama, M; Yamamoto, M; Ito, H; Hattori, N; Umehara, F; Arimura, K; Ikeda, S; Ando, Y; Nakazato, M; Kaji, R; Hayasaka, K; Nakagawa, M; Sakoda, S; Matsumura, K; Onodera, O; Baba, M; Yasuda, H; Saito, T; Kira, J; Nakashima, K; Oka, N; Sobue, G

2005-01-01

10

Effectiveness of Real-Time Quantitative PCR Compare to Repeat PCR for the Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies  

PubMed Central

The majority of cases of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) and of hereditary neuropathy with a liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are the result of heterozygosity for the duplication or deletion of peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22) on 17p11.2. Southern blots, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and polymorphic marker analysis are currently used diagnostic methods. But they are time-consuming, labor-intensive and have some significant limitations. We describe a rapid realtime quantitative PCR method for determining gene copy number for the identification of DNA duplication or deletion occurring in CMT1A or HNPP and compare the results obtained with REP-PCR. Six patients with CMT1A and 14 patients with HNPP [confirmed by Repeat (REP)-PCR], and 16 patients with suspicious CMT1A and 13 patients with suspicious HNPP [negative REP-PCR], and 15 normal controls were studied. We performed REP-PCR, which amplified a 3.6 Kb region (including a 1.7 Kb recombination hotspot), using specific CMT1A-REP and real-time quantitative PCR on the LightCycler system. Using a comparative threshold cycle (Ct) method and ?-globin as a reference gene, the gene copy number of the PMP22 gene was quantified. The PMP22 duplication ratio ranged from 1.35 to 1.74, and the PMP22 deletion ratio from 0.41 to 0.53. The PMP22 ratio in normal controls ranged from 0.81 to 1.12. All 6 patients with CMT1A and 14 patients with HNPP confirmed by REP-PCR were positive by real-time quantitative PCR. Among the 16 suspicious CMT1A and 13 suspicious HNPP with negative REP-PCR, 2 and 4 samples, respectively, were positive by real-time quantitative PCR. Real-time quantitative PCR is a more sensitive and more accurate method than REP-PCR for the detection of PMP22 duplications or deletions, and it is also faster and easier than currently available methods. Therefore, we believe that the real-time quantitative method is useful for diagnosing CMT1A and HNPP. PMID:15988805

Choi, Jong Rak; Lee, Woon Hyoung; Sunwoo, Il Nam; Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Chang Hoon

2005-01-01

11

Diagnosis of CMT1A duplications and HNPP deletions by interphase FISH: Implications for testing in the cytogenetics laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1A is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by slowly progressive distal muscle wasting and weakness, decreased nerve conduction velocities, and genetic linkage to 17p12. Most (>98%) CMT1A cases are caused by a DNA duplication of a 1.5-Mb region in 17p12 containing the PMP22 gene. The reciprocal product of the CMT1A duplication is a 1.5-Mb deletion which causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). The most informative current diagnostic testing requires pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to detect DNA rearrangement-specific junction fragments. We investigated the use of interphase FISH for the detection of duplications and deletions for these disorders in the clinical molecular cytogenetics laboratory. Established cell lines or blood specimens from 23 individuals with known molecular diagnoses and 10 controls were obtained and scored using a two-color FISH assay. At least 70%, of CMT1A cells displayed three signals consistent with duplications. Using this minimum expected percentile to make a CMT1A duplication diagnosis, all patients with CMT1A showed a range of 71-92% of cells displaying at least three signals. Of the HNPP cases, 88% of cells displayed only one hybridization signal, consistent with deletions. The PMP22 locus from normal control individuals displayed a duplication pattern in {approximately}9% of cells, interpreted as replication of this locus. The percentage of cells showing replication was significantly lower than in those cells displaying true duplications. We conclude that FISH can be reliably used to diagnose CMT1A and HNPP in the clinical cytogenetics laboratory and to readily distinguish the DNA rearrangements associated with these disorders from individuals without duplication or deletion of the PMP22 locus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Shaffer, L.G.; Kennedy, G.M.; Spikes, A.S. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others] [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); and others

1997-03-31

12

Recombination hot spot in a 3.2-kb region of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A repeat sequences: new tools for molecular diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A. French CMT Collaborative Research Group.  

PubMed Central

Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) disease and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are autosomal dominant neuropathies, associated, respectively, with duplications and deletions of the same 1.5-Mb region on 17p11.2-p12. These two rearrangements are the reciprocal products of an unequal meiotic crossover between the two chromosome 17 homologues, caused by the misalignment of the CMT1A repeat sequences (CMT1A-REPs), the homologous sequences flanking the 1.5-Mb CMT1A/HNPP monomer unit. In order to map recombination breakpoints within the CMT1A-REPs, a 12.9-kb restriction map was constructed from cloned EcoRI fragments of the proximal and distal CMT1A-REPs. Only 3 of the 17 tested restriction sites were present in the proximal CMT1A-REP but absent in the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating a high degree of homology between these sequences. The rearrangements were mapped in four regions of the CMT1A-REPs by analysis of 76 CMT1A index cases and 38 HNPP patients, who where unrelated. A hot spot of crossover breakpoints, located in a 3.2-kb region, accounted for three-quarters of the rearrangements, detected after EcoRI/SacI digestion, by the presence of 3.2-kb and 7.8-kb junction fragments in CMT1A and HNPP patients, respectively. These junction fragments, which can be detected on classical Southern blots, permit molecular diagnosis. Other rearrangements can also be detected by gene dosage on the same Southern blots. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8651299

Lopes, J.; LeGuern, E.; Gouider, R.; Tardieu, S.; Abbas, N.; Birouk, N.; Gugenheim, M.; Bouche, P.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A.

1996-01-01

13

Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy: A Recurrent and Bilateral Foot Drop Case Report  

PubMed Central

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, “sausage-like” swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis. PMID:24251057

Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Rodrigues, Maria Lurdes

2013-01-01

14

Correction versus bedding: wheelchair pressure distribution measurements in children with cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Purpose Most children with cerebral palsy classification Levels IV and V in the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) are unable to walk and, therefore, spend almost all day in a sitting position in their wheelchairs. As a result of the spastic muscle contraction, malpositions of joints or a scoliosis develop, which require a decision to be made on whether to correct the posture or simply find the best soft bedding position. Methods The distribution of pressure on the seat while sitting in a wheelchair was measured with a pressure distribution measuring mat. The different distribution patterns were analyzed. Results Pressure distribution measurement allows to find a compromise between posture correction and soft bedding. Additionally, pressure-reducing seats were examined on their effectiveness. We also focused our measurements and data analyses on recognizing the causes for pain. Sometimes, the origin of the problems and pain of children in wheelchairs is not clear. Conclusions Using the above-mentioned measuring equipment, the causes of these problems can be detected much more easily than just by clinical examination. The pressure measuring mat can help to optimize the seating position for the spastically handicapped children and adapt technical aids. Examples demonstrate the most frequently occurring problems of these children in their wheelchairs which are typical for neuro-orthopedic diseases. PMID:21804890

Mitternacht, Jurgen

2010-01-01

15

Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

... happens before birth or soon after being born. Cerebral palsy causes different types of disabilities in each child. A ... able to push a toy with wheels What causes cerebral palsy? Cerebral palsy is caused by a problem in ...

16

Correction versus bedding: wheelchair pressure distribution measurements in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Most children with cerebral palsy classification Levels IV and V in the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS)\\u000a are unable to walk and, therefore, spend almost all day in a sitting position in their wheelchairs. As a result of the spastic\\u000a muscle contraction, malpositions of joints or a scoliosis develop, which require a decision to be made on whether to

Renée Lampe; Jürgen Mitternacht

2010-01-01

17

Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant\\u000a disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence,\\u000a and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment\\u000a neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction

Phillip F. Chance

2006-01-01

18

Rapid genetic screening of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies patients?  

PubMed Central

We used the allele-specific PCR-double digestion method on peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) to determine duplication and deletion mutations in the proband and family members of one family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 and one family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The proband and one subclinical family member from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 family had a PMP22 gene duplication; one patient from the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies family had a PMP22 gene deletion. Electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of the superficial peroneal nerve from the two probands demonstrated demyelination and myelin sheath hyperplasia, as well as an ‘onion-like’ structure in the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient. We observed an irregular thickened myelin sheath and ‘mouse-nibbled’-like changes in the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. In the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient, nerve electrophysiological examination revealed moderate-to-severe reductions in the motor and sensory conduction velocities of the bilateral median nerve, ulnar nerve, tibial nerve, and sural nerve. Moreover, the compound muscle action potential amplitude was decreased. In the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, the nerve conduction velocity of the bilateral tibial nerve and sural nerve was moderately reduced, and the nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve and ulnar nerve of both upper extremities was slightly reduced. PMID:25337104

Li, Xiaobo; Zi, Xiaohong; Li, Lin; Zhan, Yajing; Huang, Shunxiang; Li, Jin; Li, Xuning; Li, Xigui; Hu, Zhengmao; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Ruxu

2012-01-01

19

Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

... chemicals that trigger the kind of damage that causes cerebral palsy. Researchers also hope to find ways to prevent white matter disease--the most common cause of cerebral palsy. To make sure children are getting the right ...

20

Cerebral palsy  

MedlinePLUS

Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that can involve brain and nervous system functions, such as movement, ... and thinking. There are several different types of cerebral palsy, including spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic, hypotonic, and mixed.

21

Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

22

Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

... As we become more aware of appearance and body image , it can be tough to be in a ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Physical Therapy Body Image and Self-Esteem Cerebral Palsy: Keith's Story Contact ...

23

Bell's Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

... that makes the face look lopsided Loss of facial expression Twitching Trouble eating or drinking Trouble speaking Total or partial loss of taste Ear pain Sensitivity to sound Inability to close your eye Dry eye Bell’s palsy ... questions about your symptoms and your medical history. Facial paralysis can also be caused by a stroke, ...

24

Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... child who is living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ... does not get worse over time. Causes of Cerebral Palsy The exact causes of most cases of CP ...

25

Cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders of movement and posture resulting from non-progressive disturbances of the fetal\\u000a or neonatal brain. More than 80% of cases of CP in term infants originate in the prenatal period; in premature infants, both\\u000a prenatal or postnatal causes contribute. The most prevalent pathological lesion seen in CP is periventricular white matter\\u000a injury (PWMI)

Michael V. Johnston; Alexander H. Hoon

2006-01-01

26

Cerebral Palsy and Counseling  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Cerebral palsy is a disorder\\/symptom which can result from several underlying causes. Conditions from which cerebral palsy\\u000a may occur can arise before birth, at birth, or after birth. The usual classification of cerebral palsy is based on symptoms\\/location\\u000a of cerebral damage. Cerebral palsy affects muscle coordination and bodily movement. Cerebral palsy can be mild and hardly\\u000a recognizable or so severe

David W. McCandless

27

Cerebral Palsy.  

PubMed

The neurorehabilitation program for cerebral palsy changes over time. During the first 2 years of life, an infant stimulation program with an emphasis on more than just improving motor deficits is emphasized. The importance of involvement of a knowledgeable therapist cannot be overemphasized. Realistic expectations must be articulated firmly. Rather then cautiously attempting to correct a dysfunction that cannot be corrected, the therapist should help the patient develop compensation techniques; the severity of the disability frequently militates against the development of "normal" motor control. Educating the parents about cerebral palsy, showing how positioning can be an effective way of helping the child be mobile, and encouraging parent-child interaction are aspects of an infant stimulation program. The therapist should serve as a coach to the parents, who implement much of the actual treatment on a daily basis at home. From 2 to 5 years of age, rapid growth occurs, and muscle tone will either develop or worsen--the latter leading not only to the development of contracture but also to a decrease in mobility. In developing a program to control this muscle tone, the most important question to be answered is, Can I improve the patient's function and decrease the patient's disability by altering muscle tone? It is not uncommon for the real problem preventing the patient from performing certain functions to be lack of motor control or lack of sensation and not the abnormal muscle tone. Between 5 and 10 years of age, the child begins to approach adult height. At this time, definitive orthopedic intervention can be considered; as already noted, contracture development occurs as a result of abnormal muscle tone in combination with growth. Finally, as the child approaches the teen years, issues of sitting and hygiene are important considerations, especially in the nonambulatory patient. The problem of pain secondary to spasticity or dystonia must be addressed. PMID:11096740

Russman

2000-03-01

28

Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz  

MedlinePLUS

... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button CDC Features Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir How much do you know about cerebral palsy? Take our quiz to find out and read ...

29

Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A disease (CMT1A), heterozygosity for the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) duplication increases the gene dose from two to three, whereas, in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), heterozygosity for the PMP22 deletion reduces the gene dose from two to one. Thirty-eight Norwegian patients with CMT1, 4 patients with HNPP, 15 asymptomatic family members, and

Nina K. Aarskog; Christian A. Vedeler

2000-01-01

30

Life expectancy of children with cerebral palsy  

E-print Network

as premature.) · Just over a half of children with cerebral palsy are affected by bilateral spastic cerebral palsy. · A third of children with cerebral palsy are affected by hemiplegic spastic cerebral palsyLife expectancy of children with cerebral palsy J L Hutton, K Hemming and UKCP collaboration What

Hutton, Jane

31

Risk factors for cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is a major cause of crippling in children, but it’s etiology is poorly understood. This case control study\\u000a was done to assess some of the identified risk factors for cerebral palsy. 125 cerebral palsy cases selected from hospital\\u000a clinic and 125 age and sex matched neighbourhood controls, all aged less than 5 years and residing in Delhi (India)

Sahu Suvanand; S. K. Kapoor; V. F. Reddaiah; U. Singh; K. R. Sundaram

1997-01-01

32

Bilateral superior oblique palsies.  

PubMed Central

Eighteen consecutive cases of bilateral superior oblique palsy have been studied retrospectively. The patients were typically adults with a history of severe head trauma. All patients complained of diplopia, either vertical, torsional, or both. Other neurological sequelae were common. Central disruption of fusion was seen in three patients. Eight patients underwent surgery for torsional or vertical diplopia, and the results are briefly discussed. PMID:4016044

Lee, J; Flynn, J T

1985-01-01

33

United Cerebral Palsy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Started in 1949 by parents of children with cerebral palsy, United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) has advocated and provided support services for not only people with cerebral palsy, but also a wide range of disabilities, including Down Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and traumatic brain injury. The UCP website provides visitors with a range of resources which they have acquired from their 60 years of dealing with disability issues. The "Resources" tab near the top of the page offers visitors a "One-Stop Resource Guide" as well as a dozen topics, such as "Education," "Assistive Technology," "Disability Etiquette," and "State Resource Guides" that are covered in more depth. The "Ask Lara" blog link at the bottom of the Resources page is a great way to keep up with current news, studies, conferences, and resources that affect people with disabilities. One of the blog entries is about Bookshare, which is a free online library of digital books for those with print disabilities and visitors won't want to miss it.

34

Peripheral facial palsy in children.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to evaluate the types and clinical characteristics of peripheral facial palsy in children. The hospital charts of children diagnosed with peripheral facial palsy were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 81 children (42 female and 39 male) with a mean age of 9.2 ± 4.3 years were included in the study. Causes of facial palsy were 65 (80.2%) idiopathic (Bell palsy) facial palsy, 9 (11.1%) otitis media/mastoiditis, and tumor, trauma, congenital facial palsy, chickenpox, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, enlarged lymph nodes, and familial Mediterranean fever (each 1; 1.2%). Five (6.1%) patients had recurrent attacks. In patients with Bell palsy, female/male and right/left ratios were 36/29 and 35/30, respectively. Of them, 31 (47.7%) had a history of preceding infection. The overall rate of complete recovery was 98.4%. A wide variety of disorders can present with peripheral facial palsy in children. Therefore, careful investigation and differential diagnosis is essential. PMID:24097851

Y?lmaz, Unsal; Cubukçu, Duygu; Y?lmaz, Tuba Sevim; Ak?nc?, Gülçin; Ozcan, Muazzez; Güzel, Orkide

2014-11-01

35

Gait trainer for children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A device is developed to improve the walking ability of children with spastic cerebral palsy, who have damage to the area of their brain which controls muscle tone and that causes trouble walking by using their toes instead of applying a steady force to their heels. This device can be adjusted to a correct pressure level to the heels and

O. Urhan; H. Dincer

2001-01-01

36

Surgical rehabilitation of the planovalgus foot in cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to quantitatively determine the effects of subtalar arthrodesis on the planovalgus foot using three-dimensional (3-D) gait analysis and plantar pressure measurements. Twelve children and adolescents with planovalgus foot deformity secondary to spastic cerebral palsy participated in this outcome study. The pediatric population were evaluated preoperatively and following subtalar fusion. Seventeen feet were operated for

Ziad O. Abu-Faraj; Gerald F. Harris; Peter A. Smith

2001-01-01

37

What You Need to Know about Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

... CDC Features What You Need to Know About Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir Cerebral palsy ... with cerebral palsy get identified early. What is cerebral palsy? CP is a group of disorders that affects ...

38

Neurocysticercosis presenting as pseudobulbar palsy.  

PubMed

Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common helminthic infestation of the central nervous system (CNS) and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The common manifestations of NCC are seizures and headache. The NCC as a cause of pseudobulbar palsy is very unusual and not reported yet in the literature. A pseudobulbar palsy can occur in any disorder that causes bilateral corticobulbar disease. The common etiologies of pseudobulbar palsy are vascular, demyelinative, or motor neuron disease. We report a 38-year-old female patient who presented with partial seizures and pseudobulbar palsy. The MRI brain showed multiple small cysts with scolex in both the cerebral hemispheres and a giant intraparenchymal cyst. Our patient responded well to standard treatment of neurocysticercosis and antiepileptics. PMID:24741260

Kumar, Arinaganahalli Subbanna Praveen; Subrahmanyam, Dharanitragada Krishna Suri

2014-01-01

39

Cerebral Palsy -- Hope through Research  

MedlinePLUS

... with cerebral palsy face special health challenges? Premature aging . The majority of individuals with CP will experience ... children develop CP because of mishaps early in brain development . They are examining how neurons (nerve cells) ...

40

Genetic factors for nerve susceptibility to injuries - lessons from PMP22 deficiency  

PubMed Central

Genetic factors may be learnt from families with gene mutations that render nerve-injury susceptibility even to ordinary physical activities. A typical example is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). HNPP is caused by a heterozygous deletion of PMP22 gene. PMP22 deficiency disrupts myelin junctions (such as tight junction and adherens junctions), leading to abnormally increased myelin permeability that explains the nerve susceptibility to injury. This finding should motivate investigators to identify additional genetic factors contributing to nerve vulnerability of injury. PMID:25374586

Li, Jun

2014-01-01

41

Maternal Risk Factors for Congenital Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

delivery as the cause for the child’s cerebral palsy. Lie etCerebral palsy, low birthweight and socio-economic deprivation: inequalities in a major causecause for CP, Most studies have focused on prenatal risk factors of cerebral palsy.

Streja, Elani

2012-01-01

42

Behaviour Problems Amongst Children With Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on 6 years of work with cerebral palsied children, the thesis considers types and causes of cerebral palsy, the life pattern of the child with cerebral palsy from early years to adolescence, and the effect of the handicapped child on his parents and family. Literature on behavior disorders is reviewed, and kinds of behavior problems are…

Oswin, Maureen

43

Recent advances in dyskinetic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Dyskinetic cerebral palsy results from extrapyramidal damage, often with high handicap in movement and hard to treat. In this article, we discuss the classification of epidemiology and etiology, neuroimaging findings, treatment and prognosis of dyskinetic cerebral palsy in children. Data sources: The literature about dyskinetic cerebral palsy was reviewed. Results: Dyskinesia accounts for approximately 20 percent in all types

Mei Hou; Jian-Hui Zhao; Rong Yu

2006-01-01

44

[Emotional impact of facial palsy].  

PubMed

Facial palsy is not only a movement disorder but leads also to an emotional and communicative disorder in chronic stage but also in some patients already during the acute phase of the disease. The present review describes the current knowledge of the neurobiological and psychological fundamentals on the relation of facial movement and its emotional context. So far there is not much knowledge on the impact of a facial palsy on the interaction between facial movement, emotional processing and communicative skills of the patient. The emotional contagion seems to be reduced in patients with facial palsy. The ability to express emotions seems also to be reduced. Moreover, the patients feel to be perceived negatively. In fact, most of the expressions of patients with facial palsy are allocated with a negative affect even when the patients are smiling. Patients with facial palsy react with negative stress, anxiety and depression. The patients avoid social contacts. In turn, this reinforces the communicative disorder. The otorhinolaryngologist can use the Facial Disability Index as a simple questionnaire to detect such dysfunctions. Diagnostics that are necessary to develop a therapy program are presented in this review. Standardized therapy concepts that are not only treat the movement disorder but also the emotional context is missing so far. Finally, the review will give an outlook on potential therapy strategies. PMID:23065673

Dobel, C; Miltner, W H R; Witte, O W; Volk, G F; Guntinas-Lichius, O

2013-01-01

45

Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

2014-01-01

46

Cerebral palsy and aging  

PubMed Central

Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and old age is not well understood. Nor do we know what happens to other functional domains, such as communication and eating behavior, in adults with CP. Although the brain injury that initially causes CP by definition does not progressively worsen through the lifetime, the effects of CP manifest differently throughout the life span. The aging process must inevitably interact with the motor disorder, but we lack systematic, large-scale follow-up studies of children with CP into adulthood and through adulthood with thorough assessments performed over time. In this paper we summarize what is known of the epidemiology of CP throughout the life span, beginning with mortality and life expectancy, then survey what is known of functioning, ability, and quality of life of adults with CP. We conclude by describing a framework for future research on CP and aging that is built around the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and suggest specific tools and approaches for conducting that research in a sound manner. PMID:19740206

Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

2014-01-01

47

Novel transcriptional profile in wrist muscles from cerebral palsy patients  

E-print Network

Surgery of the spastic hand in cerebral palsy: report of thespastic muscles were defined in children with cerebral palsySpastic wrist flexors are more severely affected than wrist extensors in children with cerebral palsy.

2009-01-01

48

Medical Management of Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Cerebral palsy is a disorder of motor control due to a static lesion of the developing brain. It was described almost 150\\u000a years ago and is quite familiar to both the lay and the medical communities. Continuing advances in our understanding of the\\u000a causes and treatment of this heterogeneous disorder, when broadly understood and applied, will allow more children and

Nancy N. Dodge

49

Bone age in cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

2013-01-01

50

Facial palsy: interpretation of neurologic findings.  

PubMed

A review of the otoneurologic findings in 500 patients with facial paralysis revealed their importance for diagnosis, prognosis, and understanding the pathophysiology of Bell's palsy. Diagnosis. The presence of simultaneous bilateral palsy, facial paralysis associated with lateral rectus palsy, slowly progressive facial weakness with or without hyperkinesis, and facial paralysis that showed no recovery after six months excluded Bell's palsy from the diagnosis. Ipsilateral recurrent palsies were another indication to suspect an underlying cause, since a tumor of the facial nerve caused the paralysis in 30% of the patients with this finding. Signs such as intact forehead movement, alterations in facial sensation, and corneal hypesthesia--although often associated with lesions in the cerebral cortex, cerebellopontine angle, or internal auditory canal--were also found in patients with Bell's palsy. Prognosis. A spontaneous complete recovery following Bell's palsy occurs in about 70% of the patients; but in the presence of a dry eye or dysacousis, the prognosis for a complete recovery drops 10 and 25%, respectively. Pathophysiology. It is proposed that the wide range of neurologic findings associated with Bell's palsy is due to a viral polyneuropathy. This is a disorder that primarily involves sensory nerves, and the facial motor deficit results from involvement of the sensory fibers carried with the facial nerve within the fallopian canal. PMID:672368

May, M; Hardin, W B

1978-08-01

51

Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

2009-01-01

52

Use of Modafinil in Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

After an initial patient with cerebral palsy had an apparent dramatic reduction in spasticity when placed on modafinil, a pilot study was undertaken in 10 pediatric patients to confirm or refute the benefit of modafinil in cerebral palsy. Nine of 10 patients completed the 1-month treatment period. The study patients were treated with 50 or 100 mg of modafinil once

Daniel L. Hurst; Walter Lajara-Nanson

2002-01-01

53

Genetic Factors in Athetoid Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the cerebral palsy syndromes, athetosis is most commonly causally associated with serious perinatal complications. Genetic factors are thought to play a lesser role, although the risk of recurrence in siblings has been suggested to be as high as 10%. We have conducted a clinical study of 22 subjects with a diagnosis of athetoid cerebral palsy and a review of

David J. Amor; Jan E. Craig; Martin B. Delatycki; Dinah Reddihough

2001-01-01

54

Progressive supranuclear palsy with Lewy bodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

An autopsy case is reported which revealed not only clinical and neuropathological features of progressive supranuclear palsy, but also the presence of large numbers of Lewy bodies in the brain stem nuclei and cerebral cortex. This case seems to be progressive supranuclear palsy with Lewy bodies distributed as in Parkinson's disease. Such case has not been previously reported.

H. Mori; M. Yoshimura; M. Tomonaga; H. Yamanouchi

1986-01-01

55

New Hope for Children with Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explains the use of a unique experimental therapy for students with a type of cerebral palsy specifically called Botox. Botulinum Toxin Type A has been tried on a sizable number of students with cerebral palsy in clinical settings to reduce spastic and dystonic movements. By injecting Botox into overly tight heel cords, a normal or near…

Obringer, S. John

56

Caring for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Team Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty-one papers on caring for children with cerebral palsy are organized into four sections, including: (1) cerebral palsy and the interdisciplinary team approach; (2) management of impairments related to cerebral palsy; (3) preventing disability by optimizing function of the child with cerebral palsy; and (4) preventing handicap by creating…

Dormans, John P., Ed.; Pellegrino, Louis, Ed.

57

Rule Based Expert System for Cerebral Palsy *Rajdeep Borgohain  

E-print Network

1 Rule Based Expert System for Cerebral Palsy Diagnosis *Rajdeep Borgohain Department of Computer of Cerebral Palsy. The expert system takes user input and depending on the symptoms of the patient, diagnoses if the patient is suffering from Cerebral Palsy. The Expert System also classifies the Cerebral Palsy as mild

Sanyal, Sugata

58

Clinical Phenotypes of Different MPZ (P 0) Mutations May Include Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 1B, Dejerine–Sottas, and Congenital Hypomyelination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hereditary demyelinating peripheral neuropathies consist of a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that includes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT), Dejerine–Sottas syndrome (DSS), and congenital hypomyelination (CH). The clinical classification of these neuropathies into discrete categories can sometimes be difficult because there can be both clinical and pathologic variation and overlap between these disorders. We

Laura E Warner; Max J Hilz; Stanley H Appel; James M Killian; Edwin H Kolodny; George Karpati; Stirling Carpenter; Gordon V Watters; Calvin Wheeler; David Witt; Adria Bodell; Eva Nelis; Christine Van Broeckhoven; James R Lupski

1996-01-01

59

An Unusual Cause of Pseudomedian Nerve Palsy  

PubMed Central

We describe a patient who presented with an acute paresis of her distal right hand suggesting a peripheral median nerve lesion. However, on clinical examination a peripheral origin could not be verified, prompting further investigation. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an acute ischaemic lesion in the hand knob area of the motor cortex. Isolated hand palsy in association with cerebral infarction has been reported occasionally. However, previously reported cases presented predominantly as ulnar or radial palsy. In this case report, we present a rather rare finding of an acute cerebral infarction mimicking median never palsy. PMID:22937340

Manjaly, Zina-Mary; Luft, Andreas R.; Sarikaya, Hakan

2011-01-01

60

Psychological Assessment of the Cerebral Palsied.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In regard to efforts to rehabilitate the adult cerebral palsied for optimal individual living or vocational placement, the concensus of opinion is that an adequate vocational appraisal must be flexible to meet the needs of the individual. Rehabilitation p...

W. R. Phelps

1974-01-01

61

Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell’s palsy). Three quarters\\u000a of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections,\\u000a trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the\\u000a presence of typical symptoms

Josef Finsterer

2008-01-01

62

Effects of Cerebral Palsy on Neuropsychological Function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a muscle and movement disorder that affects children and is the result of early brain injury. The causes\\u000a and nature of the brain damage may vary considerably, which renders children with cerebral palsy a heterogeneous group. Only\\u000a recently has research begun to utilize technology to determine the nature of the brain injury and the relation to

Kathryn Straub; John E. Obrzut

2009-01-01

63

Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy  

PubMed Central

Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell’s palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell’s palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell’s palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell’s palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell’s palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae. PMID:18368417

2008-01-01

64

Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

2013-01-01

65

Attitudes and Needs of Parents of Cerebral Palsied Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article reviews the literature in the following five areas of concern for parents of cerebral palsied children: causes and effects of cerebral palsy, family dynamics, counseling, educational and vocational programs, and employment. (PHR)

Knott, Gladys P.

1979-01-01

66

Pressure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab is not inquiry-based because the teacher must explain how to calculate pressure before doing the activity, but the lab gives students a great concept of what PSI means. They usually have no idea if 10 PSI is a lot or a little. They also don't und

Horton, Michael

2009-05-30

67

Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy and the Selective Posterior Rhizotomy Procedure  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of the selective posterior rhizotomy procedure for reduction of spasticity in cerebral palsy is presented. The history of the procedure, selection of patients, operative technique, and results are described. The neurophysiologic basis for spasticity is considered, as well as the role of spasticity in the complex motor disorder of cerebral palsy. Cerebral palsy is a multifaceted disorder of

Warwick J. Peacock; Loretta A. Staudt

1990-01-01

68

Mental Imagery Abilities in Adolescents with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four visual imagery tasks were presented to three groups of adolescents with or without spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. The first group was composed of six adolescents with cerebral palsy who had associated visual-perceptual deficits (CP-PD), the second group was composed of five adolescents with cerebral palsy and no associated visual-perceptual…

Courbois, Yanick; Coello, Yann; Bouchart, Isabelle

2004-01-01

69

Cerebral Palsy In Adults Consequences of Non Progressive Pathology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disability that affects individuals throughout their lifespan. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical status of adults with cerebral palsy. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out during the period of February 2001 to June 2002, in Baghdad, Iraq. Fifty young adult men with cerebral palsy were evaluated by reviewing their medical records

Mohammed Abdulelah Mezaal; Kasid A. Nouri; Shareefa Abdool; Khalid Al Safar; Ahmed S. M. Nadeem

2009-01-01

70

Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation/NHMRC Early Career Fellowship  

E-print Network

Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation/NHMRC Early Career Fellowship http://www.cerebralpalsy.org.au The Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation (www.cpresearch.org.au) is offering a Fellowship in the areas or Australian fellowship. The Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation (mturner@cerebralpalsy.org.au) offers

Viglas, Anastasios

71

Hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Brain lesions may disturb hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP), making it difficult or even impossible for them to perform several manual activities. Most conventional treatments for hand dysfunction in CP assume that reducing the hand dysfunctions will improve the capacity to manage activities (i.e., manual ability, MA). The aim of this study was to investigate the directional relationships (direct and indirect pathways) through which hand skills influence MA in children with CP. A total of 136 children with CP (mean age: 10?years; range: 6-16?years; 35 quadriplegics, 24 diplegics, 77 hemiplegics) were assessed. Six hand skills were measured on both hands: touch-pressure detection (Semmes-Weinstein esthesiometer), stereognosis (Manual Form Perception Test), proprioception (passive mobilization of the metacarpophalangeal joints), grip strength (GS) (Jamar dynamometer), gross manual dexterity (GMD) (Box and Block Test), and fine finger dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test). MA was measured with the ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were used to determine the linear associations between observed variables. A path analysis of structural equation modeling was applied to test different models of causal relationships among the observed variables. Purely sensory impairments did seem not to play a significant role in the capacity to perform manual activities. According to path analysis, GMD in both hands and stereognosis in the dominant hand were directly related to MA, whereas GS was indirectly related to MA through its relationship with GMD. However, one-third of the variance in MA measures could not be explained by hand skills. It can be concluded that MA is not simply the integration of hand skills in daily activities and should be treated per se, supporting activity-based interventions. PMID:24782821

Arnould, Carlyne; Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

2014-01-01

72

Hand Functioning in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Brain lesions may disturb hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP), making it difficult or even impossible for them to perform several manual activities. Most conventional treatments for hand dysfunction in CP assume that reducing the hand dysfunctions will improve the capacity to manage activities (i.e., manual ability, MA). The aim of this study was to investigate the directional relationships (direct and indirect pathways) through which hand skills influence MA in children with CP. A total of 136 children with CP (mean age: 10?years; range: 6–16?years; 35 quadriplegics, 24 diplegics, 77 hemiplegics) were assessed. Six hand skills were measured on both hands: touch-pressure detection (Semmes–Weinstein esthesiometer), stereognosis (Manual Form Perception Test), proprioception (passive mobilization of the metacarpophalangeal joints), grip strength (GS) (Jamar dynamometer), gross manual dexterity (GMD) (Box and Block Test), and fine finger dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test). MA was measured with the ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were used to determine the linear associations between observed variables. A path analysis of structural equation modeling was applied to test different models of causal relationships among the observed variables. Purely sensory impairments did seem not to play a significant role in the capacity to perform manual activities. According to path analysis, GMD in both hands and stereognosis in the dominant hand were directly related to MA, whereas GS was indirectly related to MA through its relationship with GMD. However, one-third of the variance in MA measures could not be explained by hand skills. It can be concluded that MA is not simply the integration of hand skills in daily activities and should be treated per se, supporting activity-based interventions. PMID:24782821

Arnould, Carlyne; Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

2014-01-01

73

[Cerebral palsy: prenatal risk factors].  

PubMed

Prenatal risk factors causing cerebral palsy (CP), here defined as a non-progressive motor abnormality of tone or posture, are much more numerous than once believed, when a great deal of brain injury was attributed to factors surrounding delivery. Scientific advances in genetics and biochemistry, as well as clinical technical advances in, for example, amniotic fluid examination or fetal neuroimaging, has permitted us to find a multiplicity of new etiologies causing neonatal encephalopathy, most of which were formerly attributed to perinatal hypoxia-ischemia. This article reviews an expanded list of etiologies, including asphyxia, which has been found to cause only 6-10% of CP in full term infants, and periventricular leukomalacia, which is associated with 30-50% of CP in premature births. We also review a few of the genetic causes of CP, which lead to metabolic encephalopathies in come cases, to congenital anomalies in others, and sometimes to both. We discuss maternal gestational or intrapartum infections which may affect the fetus by direct in utero contagion or by other less direct means. Inborn metabolic errors affecting the fetus, such as diabetes, are touched on, as are the effects of maternal medications or recreational drugs on the fetus. Finally, we briefly cite the curious phenomenon occurring in multiple births, namely the potential of CP in the surviving infant or infants were the others have died in utero. PMID:12938060

Pascual, J M; Koenigsberger, M R

74

A Registry-Based Assessment of Cerebral Palsy and Cerebral Malformations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral malformations are 1 of the many possible causes of cerebral palsy. In this study, a population-based comprehensive cerebral palsy registry was used to identify children whose cerebral palsy could be attributed to a cerebral malformation. The clinical features of these children were then compared with other children with cerebral palsy. Children with cerebral palsy and cerebral malformation did not

Lauren Self; Michael I. Shevell

2010-01-01

75

Pretend Play of Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background and Purpose: Evaluate self-initiated pretend play of children with cerebral palsy. Method: Twenty preschool children participated in the study. Pretend play ability was measured by using the child-initiated pretend play assessment culturally adapted to Brazil. Results: There were significant negative correlations between the children's…

Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Pacciulio, Amanda Mota; dos Santos, Camila Abrao; dos Santos, Jair Licio; Stagnitti, Karen Ellen

2011-01-01

76

[Cognitive stimulation in children with cerebral palsy].  

PubMed

INTRODUCTION. Cerebral palsy is often accompanied by cognitive impairment affecting attention, visuoperception, executive functions and working memory. AIMS. To analyse the effect of cognitive stimulation treatment on the cognitive capabilities in children with cerebral palsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS. Our sample consisted of 15 children with cerebral palsy, with a mean age of 8.80 ± 2.51 years, who were classified with the aid of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) on level I (n = 6), level II (n = 4), level III (n = 2) and level V (n = 3). Cognitive impairment was evaluated by means of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV) and the Continuous Performance Test (CPT-II). Both the questionnaires for parents and teachers from the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) and the Conners rating scales (CPRS-48 and CTRS-28) were administered. A cognitive stimulation programme was carried out at a rate of two hours a week for a total of eight weeks. RESULTS. Statistically significant differences were observed after applying the cognitive stimulation treatment in the perceptive reasoning index of the WISC-IV. No differences were obtained on the Conners' and the BRIEF scores before and after the treatment. Neither were any differences found in the results on the WISC-IV according to sex or on the GMFCS. CONCLUSIONS. The cognitive performance of children with cerebral palsy improves after applying a cognitive rehabilitation programme. PMID:25354506

Muriel, V; Garcia-Molina, A; Aparicio-Lopez, C; Ensenat, A; Roig-Rovira, T

2014-11-16

77

Infantile progressive bulbar palsy with deafness  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 12-month-old boy with progressive cranial nerve palsies followed by ventilatory failure demanding artificial ventilation, generalized muscle weakness, and rapid progression to death at the age of 21 months is described. The patient had normal early development and also apparently normal hearing at presentation of illness but, after 6 months of the onset of the disease, hearing loss was documented

Konstantinos A Voudris; Angeliki Skardoutsou; Eleni A Vagiakou

2002-01-01

78

The `subcortical dementia' of progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive supranuclear palsy (Steele et al.) has a characteristic pattern of dementia: (1) forgetfulness, (2) slowing of thought processes, (3) emotional or personality changes (apathy or depression with occasional outbursts of irritability), and (4) impaired ability to manipulate acquired knowledge. In many neurological disease states associated with subcortical pathology a similar pattern of dementia exists. The neurobehavioural changes of progressive

Martin L. Albert; Robert G. Feldman; Anne L. Willis

1974-01-01

79

Computed tomography in spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-three children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with cranial CT. In 56 cases the CT findings were abnormal. The most frequent abnormality was atrophy, present in 44 patients. The frequency of pathologic CT increased with severity of the CP. Patients with CP of postnatal aetiology more often had abnormal CT than patients with other known causes. Pathologic CT

H. Pedersen; K. Taudorf; J. C. Melchior

1982-01-01

80

(iii) The foot in cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The foot in cerebral palsy is subject to the normal forces applied during walking, but its means of resisting these forces is altered as a result of the muscle weakness and spasticity inherent to this condition. Abnormal muscle activity permits the foot to deform in response to the forces applied to it, as well as causing deformities in their own

C. M. Duffy; A. P. Cosgrove

2002-01-01

81

Orthostatic tremor in progressive supranuclear palsy.  

PubMed

Patients with orthostatic tremor (OT) can be classified as having "primary OT," with or without postural arm tremor but no other abnormal neurological features, or "OT plus." We describe a patient with OT, with postural tremor of the arms and restless legs syndrome (RLS), who developed features typical of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). PSP can be accompanied by OT. PMID:17415760

de Bie, Rob M A; Chen, Robert; Lang, Anthony E

2007-06-15

82

Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education,…

Liptak, Gregory S.

2005-01-01

83

Cerebral palsy-definition, classification, etiology and early diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is a common neurodevelopmental condition encountered by pediatricians. The condition may present itself in\\u000a many diferent clinical spectra. The etiological and risk factors are many and an awareness of the interplay of multiple factors\\u000a in the causation of CP is crucial. In many cases, the cause of Cerebral palsy may not be apparent. Cerebral palsy is invariably\\u000a associated

Chitra Sankar; Nandini Mundkur

2005-01-01

84

Cerebral palsy--an increasing contributor to severe mental retardation?  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is estimated that the prevalence of nongenetic SMR associated with cerebral palsy has risen from 0.7 to about 0.9 per 1000 live births in the last decade. This is due to the predicted rise in total cerebral palsy prevalence to 2.5\\/1000 live births. This predicted prevalence of cerebral palsy is similar to that given for Western Australia in 1979-82,

A Nicholson; E Alberman

1992-01-01

85

Pathologic hip morphology in cerebral palsy and Down syndrome.  

PubMed

The pathogenesis and clinical course of hip dysplasia in cerebral palsy and Down syndrome is different than idiopathic developmental dysplasia of the hip. Unlike idiopathic developmental hip dysplasia, hip development in cerebral palsy and Down syndrome is typically normal in utero and instability develops after birth secondary to musculoskeletal disorders associated with the disease condition. For this reason, treatment protocols in Down syndrome and cerebral palsy hip dysplasia differ greatly from protocols designed to treat idiopathic hip dysplasia. The purpose of this review is to describe the pathologic hip morphology that results from cerebral palsy and Down syndrome. PMID:23764790

Schoenecker, Jonathan G

2013-01-01

86

Isolated abducens nerve palsy with hyperhomocysteinemia: Association and outcomes  

PubMed Central

Ischemic abducens nerve palsy usually presents as isolated cranial nerve palsy in the middle aged and elderly patients with known risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, carotid artery disease, etc., In this report, we describe four patients with isolated abducens nerve palsy who presented with an acute onset diplopia whose detailed history and examination were suggestive of an ischemic etiology. Detailed systemic and laboratory evaluation revealed hyperhomocysteinemia as the only potential risk factor. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of association of hyperhomocysteinemia and isolated abducens nerve palsy. PMID:24212315

Sachdeva, Virender; Mittal, Vaibhev; Pathengay, Avinash; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Gupta, Amit; Rao, Bhoompally V

2013-01-01

87

Herpes zoster ophthalmicus associated with abducens palsy  

PubMed Central

The extraocular muscle palsies associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) are transient, self-limiting conditions, usually seen in elderly patients. There are different treatment recommendations for paralytic complications, but prognosis has generally reported to be favorable. A 75-year-old male patient presented with diplopia. Clinical history revealed left facial vesicular eruptions and pain treated by oral aciclovir 1 week following symptom onset. On examination, we observed cicatricial lesions with crusts involving left hemiface, a limitation in abduction of the left eye, and a superficial punctuate keratitis (SPK) with decreased visual acuity (4/10). Examination of the right eye was unremarkable. Hess screen test confirmed left six nerve palsy. PMID:24966563

Chaker, Nibrass; Bouladi, Mejda; Chebil, Ahmed; Jemmeli, Mehdi; Mghaieth, Fatma; El Matri, Leila

2014-01-01

88

Adrenomyeloneuropathy with bulbar palsy: A rare association.  

PubMed

Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) is a variant of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), an X-linked recessive peroxisomal disorder associated with accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA). Mutations of this gene lead to abnormal peroxisomal ?-oxidation, which results in the harmful accumulation of VLCFAs in affected cells. Neurological symptoms occur due to progressive demyelination and destruction of cerebral white matter and primary adrenal insufficiency. Bulbar palsy in a case of AMN is very unusual. We report a case of a 22-year-old male with AMN who developed adrenal insufficiency at the age of 4 years successfully treated by gluco- and mineralocorticoids followed by features of myeloneuropathy with bulbar palsy. AMN with prominent bulbar symptoms emphasizes the diverse clinical manifestation of this disease. PMID:25221415

Chafale, Vishal Annaji; Lahoti, Satish Arunkumar; Biswas, Atanu; Roy, Arijit; Senapati, Asit Kumar

2014-07-01

89

Adrenomyeloneuropathy with bulbar palsy: A rare association  

PubMed Central

Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) is a variant of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), an X-linked recessive peroxisomal disorder associated with accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA). Mutations of this gene lead to abnormal peroxisomal ?-oxidation, which results in the harmful accumulation of VLCFAs in affected cells. Neurological symptoms occur due to progressive demyelination and destruction of cerebral white matter and primary adrenal insufficiency. Bulbar palsy in a case of AMN is very unusual. We report a case of a 22-year-old male with AMN who developed adrenal insufficiency at the age of 4 years successfully treated by gluco- and mineralocorticoids followed by features of myeloneuropathy with bulbar palsy. AMN with prominent bulbar symptoms emphasizes the diverse clinical manifestation of this disease.

Chafale, Vishal Annaji; Lahoti, Satish Arunkumar; Biswas, Atanu; Roy, Arijit; Senapati, Asit Kumar

2014-01-01

90

Benign recurrent VI nerve palsy in childhood.  

PubMed

The case of a child with six documented episodes of benign recurrent unilateral VI nerve palsy between the ages of 2 1/2 months and 3 years is presented. Despite the recognized self-limiting course of this disorder, its possible evolution into a comitant esotropia makes close follow-up mandatory. The practical aspects of management including maintenance occlusion therapy are stressed as well as the need for prompt surgical intervention once the acquired stabismus has become stabilized. The etiology of benign VI nerve palsy of childhood may have the same immunological basis as other cases of para-infectious neuropathy. This isolated postinfective cranial mononeuropathy easily blends into the continuum of neurological involvement seen with the Landry-Guillian-Barre syndrome. With recovery from the initial episode, the abducens nerve may have become predisposed to recurrent inflammatory episodes and recurrent loss of function. Most often these recurrences are triggered by febrile illnesses of childhood. PMID:7264848

Bixenman, W W; von Noorden, G K

1981-01-01

91

Herpes zoster ophthalmicus associated with abducens palsy.  

PubMed

The extraocular muscle palsies associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) are transient, self-limiting conditions, usually seen in elderly patients. There are different treatment recommendations for paralytic complications, but prognosis has generally reported to be favorable. A 75-year-old male patient presented with diplopia. Clinical history revealed left facial vesicular eruptions and pain treated by oral aciclovir 1 week following symptom onset. On examination, we observed cicatricial lesions with crusts involving left hemiface, a limitation in abduction of the left eye, and a superficial punctuate keratitis (SPK) with decreased visual acuity (4/10). Examination of the right eye was unremarkable. Hess screen test confirmed left six nerve palsy. PMID:24966563

Chaker, Nibrass; Bouladi, Mejda; Chebil, Ahmed; Jemmeli, Mehdi; Mghaieth, Fatma; El Matri, Leila

2014-04-01

92

Pain in persons with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the nature and scope of pain in persons with cerebral palsy (CP).Design: Standardized interviews to assess demographics, pain experiences, and the impact of pain on activities.Subjects: Ninety-three adults with CP recruited from medical clinics at the University of Washington and local residential and community housing for persons with developmental disabilities.Main Outcome Measures: Weekly and 3-month pain intensities,

Lauren Schwartz; Joyce M. Engel; Mark P. Jensen

1999-01-01

93

Acoustic neuroma surgery and delayed facial palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Delayed onset of facial palsy is possibly an underestimated but distressing complication of acoustic neuroma surgery. The\\u000a incidence of this complication reported in the literature has varied from 11.7 to 41%.This study reviewed retrospectively\\u000a 60 primary acoustic neuroma surgeries performed by a single neurotologist. The deelayed onset of facial dysfunction was defined\\u000a according to the guidelines described by of Lalwani

G. Magliulo; C. Sepe; S. Varacalli; J. Crupi

1998-01-01

94

Muscle histopathology in spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the histopathology of spastic muscles in patients with spastic cerebral palsy using specimens obtained from the gastrocnemius muscles during orthopedic operations. Though there was no disease-specific abnormality, we found changes in fiber type distribution, i.e., type-1 fiber predominance and type-2B fiber deficiency. These changes were not found in the patient with brain infarction at age 1 year 5

Jun-ichi Ito; Akiko Araki; Hajime Tanaka; Takumi Tasaki; Kazuhiko Cho; Ryoko Yamazaki

1996-01-01

95

Surgical Treatment of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1971, we have surgically treated spasticity in 109 cases of cerebral palsy with posterior rhizotomy. The best results have been obtained with functional posterior rhizotomy, an original modification of Foerster’s technique, in which the selection of the roots\\/rootlets to be sectioned is based on functional exploration of the spinal circuits involved in the maintenance of spasticity, using intra-operative electrostimulation

V. A. Fasano; G. Broggi; G. Barolat-Romana; A. Sguazzi

1978-01-01

96

Nongoitrous autoimmune thyroiditis with facial palsy  

PubMed Central

We report a case of severe hypothyroidism with nongoitrous, autoimmune thyroiditis and pituitary hyperplasia in a 13-year-old boy, who presented with sudden palsy on the left side of his face. Prednisolone and antiviral medication was administered. However, the facial palsy did not improve completely. The medications were replaced with thyroxine, and the facial palsy recovered. Endocrinological testing showed severe hypothyroidism as follows: thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level >100 µIU/mL, T4 of 1.04 µg/dL, T3 of 0.31 ng/mL, and free T4 of 0.07 ng/dL. Level of serum antithyroid peroxidase antibodies was 1,933.39 IU/mL, and that of antithyroglobulin antibodies was 848.16 IU/mL. Level of TSH receptor antibodies was >40 IU/L. Bioassay result for TSH receptor stimulating antibodies was negative. Thyroid sonography revealed no increase in the size or vascularity of the bilateral gland. Thyroid scintigraphy with 99mTc showed decreased uptake, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an enlarged pituitary gland. PMID:24904880

Lee, Hyung Jik

2013-01-01

97

How Abnormal Reflexes Influence Movements in Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some of the more frequently observed reflex patterns in cerebral palsy are examined, and descriptions are given of how they affect movement. A chart outlines: (1) desirable movement patterns; (2) typical abnormal movement of the cerebral palsied child; (3) possible physical cause of abnormal movements; and (4) activities which may facilitate…

Sellers, Jeanne Shanks

98

Cervical myelo-radiculopathy in athetoid cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cervical myelopathy complicating athetoid cerebral palsy has not been adequately highlighted in the literature. We report two cases of patients with athetoid cerebral palsy and long histories of involuntary movements who developed cervical myelo-radiculopathy. Dystonic athetoid neck movements may cause excessive axial neck rotation as well as flexion and extension movements of the spine. These repetitive exaggerated movements may result

Y. Mikawa; R. Watanabe; J. Shikata

1997-01-01

99

Model to identify potentially preventable cerebral palsy of intrapartum origin  

Microsoft Academic Search

A six stage model was applied to a geographically defined population of 210 singleton children born at term who had a diagnosis of cerebral palsy at 5 years of age. Thirty five children were identified as those most likely to have cerebral palsy of intrapartum origin; in 26 of these there was evidence of suboptimal care. It is suggested that

G. Gaffney; V. Flavell; A. Johnson; M. V. Squier; S. Sellers

1995-01-01

100

Cause of death in cerebral palsy: a descriptive study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUNDCause specific research on death certification in chronic disease has rarely involved cerebral palsy.AIMSTo evaluate cause of death information in people known to have cerebral palsy by: describing the cause of death distribution; determining case ascertainment using death certification as the data source; and analysing the choice of wording and its arrangement in the “cause of death statement”.STUDY CASES AND

Gillian Maudsley; Jane L Hutton; Peter O D Pharoah

1999-01-01

101

Characteristics and Prognosis of Epilepsy in Children With Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of the study were to describe the prevalence and characteristics of epilepsy in a population of patients with cerebral palsy in a university referral center and to determine the rate of relapse caused by discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs after a 3-year seizure-free period. A total of 178 consecutive patients with cerebral palsy and epilepsy were prospectively followed for

Dimitrios I. Zafeiriou; Eleftherios E. Kontopoulos; Ioannis Tsikoulas

1999-01-01

102

Occupational therapy for children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Occupational therapy (OT) for cerebral palsy focuses on the development of skills necessary for the performance of activities of daily living. The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether OT interventions improve outcome for children with cerebral palsy (CP).Methods: An extensive search in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED and SCISEARCH was performed. Studies with controlled and uncontrolled designs

Esther M. J. Steultjens; Joost Dekker; Lex M. Bouter; Brigitte L. M. Lambregts; Cornelia H. M. Van Den Ende

2004-01-01

103

Isolated abducens nerve palsy in hemolytic uremic syndrome.  

PubMed

Isolated abducens nerve (VI cranial nerve) palsies are reported in a dialyzed child with Escherichia coli 0157:H7-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). There were no other neurological manifestations and he made a complete recovery, suggesting that isolated abducens nerve palsy in HUS may represent a minor neurological complication. PMID:15185136

Durkan, Anne; Menascu, Shay; Langlois, Valerie

2004-08-01

104

(iv) Management of the spine in cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is the commonest cause of neuromuscular scoliosis. The effects of cerebral palsy scoliosis are to cause trunk decompensation and decrease sitting balance. These effects can often be ameliorated by orthotic management, but a small number of patients come to surgical treatment. The objectives of surgical treatment are to give the patient a balanced trunk over a level pelvis.

J. B. Williamson

2003-01-01

105

Electromechanical delay and reflex response in spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Granata KP, Ikeda AJ, Abel MF. Electromechanical delay and reflex response in spastic cerebral palsy. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2000;81:888-94. Objective: Electromechanical delay (EMD) and reflex response in patients with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) were quantified and compared with those in normally developing individuals. It was hypothesized that the increased muscle stiffness associated with spasticity must make EMD shorter than

Kevin P. Granata; Andrea J. Ikeda; Mark F. Abel

2000-01-01

106

Intrathecal Baclofen for Management of Spastic Cerebral Palsy: Multicenter Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intrathecal baclofen infusion has demonstrated effectiveness in decreasing spasticity of spinal origin. Oral antispasticity medication is minimally effective or not well tolerated in cerebral palsy. This study assessed the effectiveness of intrathecal baclofen in reducing spasticity in cerebral palsy. Candidates were screened by randomized, double-blind, intrathecal injections of baclofen and placebo. Responders were defined as those who experienced an average

Richard Gilmartin; Derek Bruce; Bruce B. Storrs; Rick Abbott; Linda Krach; John Ward; Karen Bloom; William H. Brooks; Dennis L. Johnson; Joseph R. Madsen; John F. McLaughlin; Joseph Nadell

2000-01-01

107

Sexuality and Rehabilitation for Individuals with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is one of the most common causes of chronic childhood disability. Rehabilitation planning and management is\\u000a needed for optimal outcome. The concept of sexuality counseling for persons with cerebral palsy has been proposed for a long\\u000a time but not well known.

Viroj Wiwanitkit

2008-01-01

108

Gait Classificaiton in Children with Cerebral Palsy by Bayesian Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy (CP) is generally considered as a nonprogressive neuro-developmental condition that occurs in early childhood and is associated with a motor impairment, usually affecting mobility and posture. Automatic accurate identification of cerebral palsy gait has many potential applications, for example, assistance in diagnosis, clinical decisionmaking and communication among the clinical professionals. In previous studies, support vector machine (SVM) and

Bai-ling Zhang; Yanchun Zhang; Tuan D. Pham; Rezaul K. Begg

2007-01-01

109

The application of the movement classification system in the diagnosis of children with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral Palsy is mean damage to the brain, causing non-progressive brain injury, such as hemiplegia, limbs palsy, epilepsy, involuntary movements, poor coordination. This paper proposes a movement evaluation and classification system, in view Cerebral Palsy children hand movement smoothness evaluation. In addition, the application of the movement classification system in the diagnosis of children with cerebral palsy is also discussed.

Tzyh-Chyang Chang; Jiann-Der Lee; Kai-Wei Wang; Li-Chang Liu; Ching-Yi Wu

2008-01-01

110

Design and validation of automated femoral bone morphology measurements in cerebral palsy  

E-print Network

Design and validation of automated femoral bone morphology measurements in cerebral palsy Noyeol the progress of bony deformation in patients with cerebral palsy. The purpose of the study was to develop palsy, automatic morphology quantification, statistical shape model #12;1. Introduction Cerebral palsy

Lee, Jehee

111

Peripheral facial palsy caused by the Borrelia spirochete.  

PubMed

Forty-three consecutive patients with peripheral facial palsy were examined to evaluate the incidence of facial palsy caused by the tick-borne Borrelia spirochete in a non-coastal area in the south of Sweden. Six (14%) of the patients were found to have a Borrelia infection. The incidence of Borrelia-induced facial palsy was 0.39/10,000 inhabitants, which is less than in neighbouring coastal areas but still high enough to cause serious concern when dealing with facial palsies. In contrast to Bell's palsy, a Borrelia infection can cause serious generalized illness if not properly treated. Negative Borrelia serology of the serum and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a normal CSF analysis did not exclude the Borrelia etiology. Tick bites, signs of polyneuropathy, meningeal symptoms and Borrelia-associated erythema proved to be important signs for the diagnosis. PMID:2589070

Bjerkhoel, A; Carlsson, M; Ohlsson, J

1989-01-01

112

The Effect of Long-Term Training Program on Balance in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Results of a Pilot Study for Individually Based Functional Exercises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the effects of long-term training program on balance and center of pressure (COP) for four male children (13 years of age) with cerebral palsy (CP). These children were classified into one hemiplegic (level II), one diplegic (level II) and two quadriplegic children (levels III and II) using the Gross Motor Function…

Uzun, Selda

2013-01-01

113

A patient with bilateral facial palsy associated with hypertension and chickenpox: learning points  

PubMed Central

Bilateral facial nerve paralysis is an uncommon presentation and even more so in children. There are reports of different causes of bilateral facial nerve palsy. It is well-established that hypertension and chickenpox causes unilateral facial paralysis and the importance of checking the blood pressure in children with facial nerve paralysis cannot be stressed enough. The authors report a boy with bilateral facial nerve paralysis in association with hypertension and having recently recovered from chickenpox. The authors review aspects of bilateral facial nerve paralysis as well as hypertension and chickenpox causing facial nerve paralysis. PMID:22797481

Al-Abadi, Eslam; Milford, David V; Smith, Martin

2010-01-01

114

Unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the laryngeal mask airway supreme.  

PubMed

Purpose. Hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is an exceptionally rare complication. We present the first case of unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the LMA Supreme. Clinical Features. A healthy 67-year-old female was scheduled for a hallux valgus correction under general anesthesia combined with femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. A size 4?LMA Supreme was inserted successfully at the first attempt and the cuff was inflated with air at an intracuff pressure of 60?cmH2O using cuff pressure gauge. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide (67%), and sevoflurane under spontaneous breathing. The surgery was uneventful and the duration of anesthesia was two hours. The LMA was removed as the patient woke and there were no immediate postoperative complications. The next morning, the patient complained of dysarthria and dysphasia. These symptoms were considered to be caused by the LMA compressing the nerve against the hyoid bone. Conservative treatment was chosen and the paralysis recovered completely after 5 months. Conclusion. Hypoglossal nerve injury may occur despite correct positioning of the LMA under the appropriate intracuff pressure. A follow-up period of at least 6 months should be taken into account for the recovery. PMID:25254120

Takahoko, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Hajime; Sasakawa, Tomoki; Suzuki, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Hideki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

2014-01-01

115

Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy after Use of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is an exceptionally rare complication. We present the first case of unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the LMA Supreme. Clinical Features. A healthy 67-year-old female was scheduled for a hallux valgus correction under general anesthesia combined with femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. A size 4?LMA Supreme was inserted successfully at the first attempt and the cuff was inflated with air at an intracuff pressure of 60?cmH2O using cuff pressure gauge. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide (67%), and sevoflurane under spontaneous breathing. The surgery was uneventful and the duration of anesthesia was two hours. The LMA was removed as the patient woke and there were no immediate postoperative complications. The next morning, the patient complained of dysarthria and dysphasia. These symptoms were considered to be caused by the LMA compressing the nerve against the hyoid bone. Conservative treatment was chosen and the paralysis recovered completely after 5 months. Conclusion. Hypoglossal nerve injury may occur despite correct positioning of the LMA under the appropriate intracuff pressure. A follow-up period of at least 6 months should be taken into account for the recovery.

Sasakawa, Tomoki; Suzuki, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Hideki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

2014-01-01

116

Midbrain infarction causing oculomotor nerve palsy and ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia.  

PubMed

We herein report the case of an 81-year-old woman with midbrain infarction causing pupil-sparing oculomotor nerve palsy with ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia. The lesion was located at the rostral end of the decussation of the superior cerebellar peduncle touching the dorsal side, further caudal and dorsal to causal lesions of Claude's syndrome, which presented as oculomotor palsy and contralateral cerebellar ataxia. This is the third report of midbrain infarction causing partial oculomotor nerve palsy with ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia. It may be possible to establish this entity as a new syndrome following the accumulation of more cases. PMID:25224204

Tokunaga, Makoto; Fukunaga, Kimiko; Nakanishi, Ryoji; Watanabe, Susumu; Yamanaga, Hiroaki

2014-01-01

117

Postural pattern recognition in children with unilateral cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Background Several different strategies for maintaining upright standing posture in children with cerebral palsy (CP) were observed. Purpose The purpose of the present study was to define two different postural patterns in children with unilateral CP, using moiré topography (MT) parameters. Additionally, another focus of this article was to outline some implications for managing physiotherapy in children with hemiplegia. Patients and methods The study included 45 outpatients with unilateral CP. MT examinations were performed using a CQ Elektronik System device. In addition, a weight distribution analysis on the base of support between unaffected and affected body sides was performed simultaneously. A force plate pressure distribution measurement system (PDM-S) with Foot Print software was used for these measurements. Results The cluster analysis revealed four groups: cluster 1 (n=19; 42.22%); cluster 2 (n=7; 15.56%); cluster 3 (n=9; 20.00%); and cluster 4 (n=10; 22.22%). Conclusion Based on the MT parameters (extracted using a data reduction technique), two postural patterns were described: 1) the pro-gravitational postural pattern; and 2) the anti-gravitational pattern. PMID:24600228

Domagalska-Szopa, Malgorzata; Szopa, Andrzej

2014-01-01

118

Speech Performance, Dysphagia and Oral Reflexes in Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The adequacy of biting, sucking, swallowing, and chewing as well as the presence or absence of nine infantile oral reflexes were assessed in 60 cerebral palsied individuals (ages 3 to 23). (Author/PHR)

Love, Russell J.; And Others

1980-01-01

119

Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement  

MedlinePLUS

... Disorders 4 Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement These disorders involve paralysis of one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement (the 3rd, 4th, or 6th nerve), impairing the ...

120

Bell's Palsy: Treatment with Steroids and Antiviral Drugs  

MedlinePLUS

... slight. BELL’S PALSY: TREATMENT WITH STEROIDS AND ANTIVIRAL DRUGS © 2012 American Academy of Neurology Copies of this ... is usually safe and well tolerated. Likewise, antiviral drugs are fairly well tolerated. Antiviral drugs can be ...

121

Cerebral palsy and placental infection: a case-cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The association between cerebral palsy in very preterm infants and clinical, histopathologic and microbiological indicators of chorioamnionitis, including the identification of specific micro-organisms in the placenta, was evaluated in a case-cohort study. METHODS: Children with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy at five years of age were identified from amongst participants in a long-term follow-up program of preterm infants. The

Rasiah Vigneswaran; Stacey J Aitchison; Helen M McDonald; T Yee Khong; Janet E Hiller

2004-01-01

122

Stability and Harmony of Gait in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the stability and harmony of gait in children with cerebral palsy. Seventeen children with spastic hemiplegia due to cerebral palsy (5.0 [plus or minus] 2.3 years old) who were able to walk autonomously and seventeen age-matched children with typical development (5.7 [plus or minus] 2.5 years old,…

Iosa, Marco; Marro, Tiziana; Paolucci, Stefano; Morelli, Daniela

2012-01-01

123

Computed tomographic (CT) scans in cerebral palsy (CP)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CT findings in 120 cerebral palsied children are analysed. The 72.5% positive findings are correlated with the clinical types, as well as the aetiological basis for the cerebral palsy. The spastic type, 83.3% of the total number of children, had the highest positive findings. The yield was increased in children with seizures (91.3%) and those in the postnatal group

T. M. Kolawole; P. J. Patel; A. H. Mahdi

1989-01-01

124

The lived body — experiences from adults with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective : To get a deeper understanding into how adults with cerebral palsy experience living with a disability and how they manage daily life. Design : Interviews with open-ended questions were carried out. They were analysed by one person according to the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method (EPP). Setting and subjects : Twenty-two community-living adults (35—68 years) with cerebral palsy from

Karin Sandström

2007-01-01

125

Skull base osteomyelitis presenting with an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy.  

PubMed

This is the first case of skull base osteomyelitis presenting with isolated bilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy reported in the literature. A 75-year-old man presented with tongue paralysis without any other cranial nerve palsy. He was otherwise well apart from recently having a high prostate-specific antigen level recorded. Investigations for malignancy or cerebrovascular insult were negative with the diagnosis of skull base osteomyelitis confirmed using CT. Following treatment with intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks, symptoms resolved. PMID:23853016

Kasfiki, Eirini Vasileiou; Kelly, Ciaran; Smith, John; Nicolaides, Andreas

2013-01-01

126

Acute Peripheral Facial Palsy after Chickenpox: A Rare Association  

PubMed Central

Chickenpox, resulting from primary infection by the varicella-zoster virus, is an exanthematous disease very common during childhood and with good prognosis. However, serious complications, namely, neurological syndromes, may develop during its course, especially in risk groups, including adolescents. Peripheral facial palsy is a rare neurologic complication that has been previously described. Conclusion. We report the case of a teenager with peripheral facial palsy as a complication of chickenpox, aiming to increase the awareness of this rare association. PMID:25057424

Lopes, Andreia

2014-01-01

127

Oculomotor nerve palsy secondary to aberrant posterior cerebral artery.  

PubMed

The authors report a rare case of an oculomotor nerve palsy attributed to mass effect from an aberrant posterior cerebral artery. The patient presented with complete ptosis, mydriasis and ophthalmoplegia of the affected eye. MRI demonstrated distortion of the oculomotor nerve as it traversed inferior to the non-aneurysmal P1 segment of an aberrant posterior cerebral artery. The oculomotor nerve palsy resolved spontaneously. PMID:24980999

Tan, Terence; Tee, Jin Wee; Wang, Yi Yuen

2014-01-01

128

Molecular diagnosis of PMP22 -associated neuropathies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on archival peripheral nerve tissue preparations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) syndrome type 1 and tomaculous neuropathy, also called hereditary neuropathy with liability to\\u000a pressure palsies (HNPP), represent two groups of neurological disorders with different subtypes, which can be distinguished\\u000a at the molecular level. It is known that a 1.5-mb region on chromosome 17p11.2– 12, which includes the gene for the peripheral\\u000a myelin protein 22 kDa (PMP22), is duplicated

Thomas Liehr; Holger Grehl; Bernd Rautenstrauss

1997-01-01

129

Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy: A Diagnostic Dilemma  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Bilateral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a rare condition, representing less than 2% of all cases of FNP. Majority of these patients have underlying medical conditions, ranging from neurologic, infectious, neoplastic, traumatic, or metabolic disorders. Objective. The differential diagnosis of its causes is extensive and hence can present as a diagnostic challenge. Emergency physicians should be aware of these various diagnostic possibilities, some of which are potentially fatal. Case Report. We report a case of a 43-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with sequential bilateral facial nerve paralysis which could not be attributed to any particular etiology and, hence, presented a diagnostic dilemma. Conclusion. We reinforce the importance of considering the range of differential diagnosis in all cases presenting with bilateral FNP. These patients warrant admission and prompt laboratory and radiological investigation for evaluation of the underlying cause and specific further management as relevant. PMID:23326715

Pothiawala, Sohil; Lateef, Fatimah

2012-01-01

130

Rate of decline in progressive supranuclear palsy.  

PubMed

The rate of patients' decline is critical to properly design trials of disease-modifying agents. We prospectively quantified the progression of 27 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) patients for at least 1 year to determine the rate of decline of motor, ocular-motor, neuropsychological, and neuropsychiatric features. PSP patients meeting the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and the Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy criteria were assessed using the PSP Rating Scale (PSP-RS) and modified UPDRS. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Frontal Assessment Battery assessed cognitive decline, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory assessed behavior, and the modified Schwab and England scale and UPDRS ADL assessed activities of daily living (ADL). The rate of change of each score was calculated as 1-year worsening score. Power and sample sizes were estimated. PSP patients showed a significant yearly decline in total and subtotal scores of the PSP-RS and UPDRS, as well as in MMSE, and UPDRS and Schwab and England ADL scores. In addition, they had significant deterioration of individual item scores reflecting major aspects of the disease (i.e., ocular-motor). The rate of decline reflected in the UPDRS mirrored that of the PSP-RS. The worsening of the ADL score was positively correlated with the PSP-RS progression of falls and ocular-motor subitem scores and with executive dysfunction. PSP patients showed a significant yearly decline in motor, ocular-motor, and ADL functions. Our findings suggest that using more-advanced technology to measure ocular-motor, postural instability, and ADL will be helpful in planning future therapeutic trials. PMID:24615741

Litvan, Irene; Kong, Maiying

2014-04-01

131

A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy  

PubMed Central

Background Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progressive apraxia of speech (AOS) and aphasia. Aim We aimed to investigate the clinical presentation of PSP, using a comprehensive multidimensional evaluation, and the disease response to various pharmacological treatments. Methods A 72-year-old right-handed male, with 17 years education, who first presented with aphasia, AOS, depression, apathy, and postural instability at 69 years; a complete neuropsychological evaluation, tapping the different cognitive domains, was performed. Results Testing revealed a moderate global cognitive deficit (Mini-Mental State Examination test score =20), low memory test scores (story recall, Rey’s 15-word Immediate and Delayed Recall), and poor phonemic and semantic fluency. The patient’s language was characterized by AOS, with slow speech rate, prolonged intervals between syllables and words, decreased articulatory accuracy, sound distortions, and anomia. Behavioral changes, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability, were reported. The neurological examination revealed supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, poor face miming, and a mild balance deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only widespread cortical atrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left > right frontotemporal cortical abnormalities. After 6 months, a further neuropsychological assessment showed a progression in cognitive deficits, with additional attention deficits. The patient reported frequent falls, but the neurological deficits remained unchanged. Neuroimaging tests showed the same brain involvement. Conclusion Our case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in this syndrome, demonstrating that atypical PSP can present as AOS and aphasia, without the classical features or involvement of the subcortical gray and brainstem region, commonly affected in typical PSP. PMID:24368882

Spaccavento, Simona; Del Prete, Marina; Craca, Angela; Loverre, Anna

2014-01-01

132

Abnormal Junctions and Permeability of Myelin in PMP22-Deficient Nerves  

PubMed Central

Objective The peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene is associated with the most common types of inherited neuropathies, including hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) caused by PMP22 deficiency. However, the function of PMP22 has yet to be defined. Our previous study has shown that PMP22 deficiency causes an impaired propagation of nerve action potentials in the absence of demyelination. In the present study, we tested an alternative mechanism relating to myelin permeability. Methods Utilizing Pmp22+/? mice as a model of HNPP, we evaluated myelin junctions and their permeability using morphological, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches. Results We show disruption of multiple types of cell junction complexes in peripheral nerve, resulting in increased permeability of myelin and impaired action potential propagation. We further demonstrate that PMP22 interacts with immunoglobulin domain–containing proteins known to regulate tight/adherens junctions and/or transmembrane adhesions, including junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Deletion of Jam-c or Mag in mice recapitulates pathology in HNPP. Interpretation Our study reveals a novel mechanism by which PMP22 deficiency affects nerve conduction not through removal of myelin, but through disruption of myelin junctions. PMID:24339129

Guo, Jiasong; Wang, Leiming; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Jiawen; Arpag, Sezgi; Hu, Bo; Imhof, Beat A.; Tian, Xinxia; Carter, Bruce D.; Suter, Ueli; Li, Jun

2014-01-01

133

Do concepts of causes and prevention of cerebral palsy require revision?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: My purpose was to explore the criteria of The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (Technical Bulletin No. 163) for perinatal asphyxia to be linked to subsequent cerebral palsy.Study design: Analysis of four cases of intrapartum fetal insults with subsequent cerebral palsy and a literature review are presented.Results: All of the four cerebral palsy cases had sufficient intrapartum causes

Robert C. Goodlin

1995-01-01

134

Functional recovery in cerebral palsy may be potentiated by administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is a disorder of movement and posture caused by a non-progressive lesion to the brain. The incidence of cerebral palsy is over 2 per 1000 live births in Europe. Management of cerebral palsy is primarily supportive – none of the current treatments offered attempt to correct the primary problem of a brain lesion.Neurological problems may be treated by

Sanjay Budhdeo; Shabna Rajapaksa

2011-01-01

135

Does the risk of cerebral palsy increase or decrease with increasing gestational age?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: It is generally accepted that the risk of cerebral palsy decreases with increasing gestational age of live born infants. However, recent studies have shown that cerebral palsy often has prenatal antecedents including congenital malformations, vascular insults and maternal infection. Cerebral palsy is therefore better viewed as occurring among fetuses, rather than among infants. We explored the epidemiologic implications of

K S Joseph; Alexander C Allen; Samawal Lutfi; Lynn Murphy-Kaulbeck; Michael J Vincer; Ellen Wood

2003-01-01

136

Antenatal and delivery risk factors and prevalence of cerebral palsy in Duzce (Turkey)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This cross-sectional study aimed at investigating the prevalence and the etiological factors of cerebral palsy (CP) and comparing them with normal population within the rural and urban areas of Duzce province. Of the 102 children with cerebral palsy, 98 were associated with antenatal and delivery risk factors. The mean crude prevalence of cerebral palsy was 1.1 per 1000 live births.

A. Öztürk; F. Demirci; T. Yavuz; S. Y?ld?z; Y. De?irmenci; M. Dö?o?lu; Y. Av?ar

2007-01-01

137

SPARCLEA Study of Participation and Quality of Life of Children with Cerebral Palsy Living in Europe  

E-print Network

by researchers. Children with cerebral palsy have difficulty making movements due to injury to their brain of their age Children with cerebral palsy take part in fewer activities than other children of their age Some in the study. p y y p g of children in the general population ral palsy who can self report have the same

Paxton, Anthony T.

138

FEASABILITY OF A MOBILE ROBOT WITH ALTERNATIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR A CHILD WITH CEREBRAL PALSY  

E-print Network

with cerebral palsy, with spastic and athetoid features. The child's gross motor mobility is limited to rolling1 FEASABILITY OF A MOBILE ROBOT WITH ALTERNATIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR A CHILD WITH CEREBRAL PALSY]. In the case of cerebral palsy, the most common cause of motor disability in children, the estimation ranges

Stansfield, Sharon

139

Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

140

Spastic Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlation of 129 Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective study was undertaken of 129 children with spastic cerebral palsy to clarify the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical features of cerebral palsy. Low birth weight, asphyxia, prematurity, seizures, mental development, Gross Motor Function Classification System, and MRI findings were analyzed. Significant abnormalities relevant to the cerebral palsy were evident on imaging in 123 (95.3%).

Wojciech Ku?ak; Wojciech Sobaniec; Bozena Kubas; Jerzy Walecki; Joanna Smigielska-Kuzia; Leszek Bockowski; Barbara Artemowicz; Krzysztof Sendrowski

2007-01-01

141

Computer modeling of gait abnormalities in cerebral palsy: application to treatment planning  

E-print Network

, different patients with cerebral palsy exhibit varying degrees of neurologic impairment, spasticityComputer modeling of gait abnormalities in cerebral palsy: application to treatment planning A. S, Stanford, CA, USA The treatment of gait abnormalities in persons with cerebral palsy is chal- lenging

Delp, Scott

142

Defining the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topics of neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy, as well as hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy, are of paramount importance to anyone who ventures to deliver infants. Criteria sufficient to define an acute intrapartum hypoxic event as sufficient to cause cerebral palsy have been advanced previously by both The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the International Cerebral Palsy Task Force.

Gary D. V Hankins; Michael Speer

2003-01-01

143

Analysis of etiologic factors in cerebral palsy with severe mental retardation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed the gestational, parturitional, neonatal (GPN) histories of 281 severely mentally retarded patients with cerebral palsy to define the etiology or pathogenesis of cerebral palsy in each patient. No association between type of cerebral palsy and GPN histories was found except for an increase in spastic-athetoid patients in the breech delivery subgroup. Significant findings include: increased incidence of prematurity

M. V. Durkin; E. G. Kaveggia; E. Pendleton; G. Neuhäuser; J. M. Opitz

1976-01-01

144

Perinatal complications and socio-economic differences in cerebral palsy in Sweden – a national cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There is a controversy regarding the existence of a socio-economic gradient for cerebral palsy. Perinatal emergencies and preterm birth increase the risk for the offspring to develop cerebral palsy. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of socio-economic indicators with cerebral palsy (CP) and the role of perinatal health as mediator of this association. METHODS: Register

Anders Hjern; Kristina Thorngren-Jerneck

2008-01-01

145

An Inertial Sensor-based System to Develop Motor Capacity in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

An Inertial Sensor-based System to Develop Motor Capacity in Children with Cerebral Palsy Shuo Qiao periods of time. Index Terms--Cerebral Palsy, Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Game, Motor Skills I. INTRODUCTION with cerebral palsy (CP). Typical operation of these devices requires controlled motor interaction

Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

146

Bone density and size in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy TISHYA AL WREN1  

E-print Network

Bone density and size in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy TISHYA AL WREN1 | DAVID C LEE1 properties in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP) to functional (Gross Motor Function Classification, it is important to study bone acquisition in all children with CP. Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

147

Familial risk of cerebral palsy: population based cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate risks of recurrence of cerebral palsy in family members with various degrees of relatedness to elucidate patterns of hereditability. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, linked to the Norwegian social insurance scheme to identify cases of cerebral palsy and to databases of Statistics Norway to identify relatives. Participants 2?036?741 Norwegians born during 1967-2002, 3649 of whom had a diagnosis of cerebral palsy; 22?558 pairs of twins, 1?851?144 pairs of first degree relatives, 1?699?856 pairs of second degree relatives, and 5?165?968 pairs of third degree relatives were identified. Main outcome measure Cerebral palsy. Results If one twin had cerebral palsy, the relative risk of recurrence of cerebral palsy was 15.6 (95% confidence interval 9.8 to 25) in the other twin. In families with an affected singleton child, risk was increased 9.2 (6.4 to 13)-fold in a subsequent full sibling and 3.0 (1.1 to 8.6)-fold in a half sibling. Affected parents were also at increased risk of having an affected child (6.5 (1.6 to 26)-fold). No evidence was found of differential transmission through mothers or fathers, although the study had limited power to detect such differences. For people with an affected first cousin, only weak evidence existed for an increased risk (1.5 (0.9 to 2.7)-fold). Risks in siblings or cousins were independent of sex of the index case. After exclusion of preterm births (an important risk factor for cerebral palsy), familial risks remained and were often stronger. Conclusions People born into families in which someone already has cerebral palsy are themselves at elevated risk, depending on their degree of relatedness. Elevated risk may extend even to third degree relatives (first cousins). The patterns of risk suggest multifactorial inheritance, in which multiple genes interact with each other and with environmental factors. These data offer additional evidence that the underlying causes of cerebral palsy extend beyond the clinical management of delivery. PMID:25028249

Wilcox, Allen J; Lie, Rolv T; Moster, Dag

2014-01-01

148

Laser Phototherapy As Modality of Clinical Treatment in Bell's Palsy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bell's palsy is defined as a peripheral facial nerve palsy, idiophatic, and sudden onset and is considered the most common cause of this pathology. It is caused by damage to cranial nerves VII, resulting in complete or partial paralysis of the facial mimic. May be associated with taste disturbances, salivation, tearing and hyperacusis. It is diagnosed after ruling out all possible etiologies, because its cause is not fully understood.Some researches shows that herpes virus may cause this type of palsy due to reactivation of the virus or by imunnomediated post-viral nerve demielinization. Physical therapy, corticosteroids and antiviral therapy have become the most widely accepted treatments for Bell's palsy. Therapy with low-level laser (LLLT) may induce the metabolism of injured nerve tissue for the production of proteins associated with its growth and to improve nerve regeneration. The success of the treatment of Bell's palsy by using laser phototherapy isolated or in association with other therapeutic approach has been reported on the literature. In most cases, the recovery occurs without uneventfully (complications), the acute illness is not associated with serious disorders. We will present a clinical approach for treating this condition.

Marques, A. M. C.; Soares, L. G. P.; Marques, R. C.; Pinheiro, A. L. B.; Dent, M.

2011-08-01

149

Intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma leads to sciatic nerve palsy  

PubMed Central

Background Soft tissue metastases, in particular intraneural metastasis, from any carcinomas seldom occur. To our knowledge, no case of sciatic nerve palsy due to intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma is reported in the literature. Case presentation A case is reported of a 82-year old woman with sciatic nerve palsy with intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma. Although she had undergone partial gastrectomy with T2b, N0, M0 two years ago and primary site was cured, she developed sciatic nerve palsy from the carcinoma metastasis directly to the nerve. Operative resection and Histological examination revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, the same as her primary site adenocarcinoma. Conclusions Sciatica is usually caused by a herniated disc or spinal canal stenosis. Sciatic nerve palsy may be caused by nondiscogenic etiologies that may be either intrapelvic or extrapelvic. It is important to image the entire course of the nerve to distinguish these etiologies quickly. The longer the nerve compression the less likely a palsy will recover. Surgery is a good intervention that simultaneously obtains a tissue diagnosis and decompresses the nerve. PMID:22830410

2012-01-01

150

Mastery motivation in adolescents with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to describe motivation in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) and factors associated with motivation level. The Dimensions of Mastery Questionnaire (DMQ) measures motivation in mastering challenging tasks and expressive elements. It was completed by 153 parents and 112 adolescents with CP. Adolescents (GMFCS in n=146 - I:50, II:43, III:13, IV:15, V:25) were assessed using the Leiter IQ and Gross Motor Function Measure. Parents completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Motivation scores were highest for mastery pleasure and social persistence with adults and lowest for gross motor and object-oriented persistence. Socio-demographic factors were not strongly correlated with DMQ. Higher gross motor ability (r=0.24-0.52) and fewer activity limitations (r=0.30-0.64, p<.001) were associated with persistence in cognitive, motor and social tasks, but not mastery pleasure. Higher IQ was associated with persistence in object-oriented tasks (r=0.42, p<.001). Prosocial behaviors correlated with high motivation (r=0.39-0.53, p<.001). Adolescents' motivation scores were higher than parents' scores. Adolescents with CP express high mastery pleasure, not related to abilities. High motivation was associated with fewer activity limitations and prosocial behaviors and aspects of family environment. Findings elucidate those at-risk for low motivation, which can influence treatment adherence and participation in challenging but meaningful activities. PMID:23911644

Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Lach, Lucy; Shevell, Michael; Law, Mary; Schmitz, Norbert

2013-10-01

151

Rehabilitation Outcomes of Children with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] To evaluate the results of Bobath-based rehabilitation performed at a pediatric cerebral palsy (CP) inpatient clinic. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 28 children with CP who were inpatients at a pediatric service. Inclusion criteria were: being an inpatient of our hospital aged 2–12 with a diagnosis of CP; having one permanent primary caregiver; and the caregiver having no medical or psychotic problems. All of the patients received Bobath treatment for 1 hour per day, 5 days a week. The locomotor system, neurologic and orthopedic examination, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) of the patients, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) of permanent caregivers were evaluated at the time of admission to hospital, discharge from hospital, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge. [Results] Post-admission scores of GMFM at discharge, and 1 and 3 months later showed significant increase. Social function and emotional role subscores of SF-36 had increased significantly at discharge. [Conclusion] Bobath treatment is promising and randomized controlled further studies are needed for rehabilitation technics. PMID:24648650

Yalcinkaya, Ebru Yilmaz; Caglar, Nil Say?ner; Tugcu, Betul; Tonbaklar, Aysegul

2014-01-01

152

Gait stability in children with cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as children with CP. In doing so, we tested the FPE’s sensitivity to the assumptions needed to calculate this measure, as well as the ability of the FPE to detect differences in stability between children with CP and TD children, and differences in walking speed. Participants were asked to walk at two different speeds, while gait kinematics were recorded. From these data, the FPE, as well as the error that violations of assumptions of the FPE could have caused were calculated. The results showed that children with CP walked with marked instabilities in anterior-posterior and mediolateral directions. Furthermore, errors caused by violations of assumptions in calculation of FPE were only small (~1.5 cm), while effects of walking speed (~20 cm per m/s increase in walking speed) and group (~5cm) were much larger. These results suggest that the FPE may be used to quantify gait stability in TD children and children with CP. PMID:23500163

Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

2013-01-01

153

Benign recurrent sixth nerve palsies in childhood. Secondary to immunization or viral illness.  

PubMed

Four children had benign, isolated, and recurrent sixth nerve palsies. Two of the children had palsies that occurred following immunizations. This had not been previously reported, to our knowledge. The other two patients had palsies that followed mild, febrile illnesses that were assumed to be of viral origin. In all patients the palsy resolved without other associated neurologic signs or symptoms. When a child has an atraumatic sixth nerve palsy, a tumor, hydrocephalus, and meningitis must be considered. If the neurologic examination shows no associated abnormalities, invasive testing is not indicated. The patient should be followed up closely by the ophthalmologist and pediatrician for spontaneous recovery. PMID:6838420

Werner, D B; Savino, P J; Schatz, N J

1983-04-01

154

A case of traumatic bilateral abducens and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy  

PubMed Central

Patient: Female, 47 Final Diagnosis: Traumatic bilateral abducens • unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy Symptoms: Diplopia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Incidence of unilateral abducens palsy from head trauma has been reported to be as high as 1% to 2.7%, but bilateral abducens nerve palsy is extremely rare. Case Report: We present a case in which bilateral abducens nerve and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy developed with a high Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 3 hours after head trauma due to a motor vehicle crash. Conclusions: This case highlights the occurrence and management of posttraumatic bilateral sixth nerve palsy. PMID:23847710

Selcuk, Ferda; Mut, Senem E.

2013-01-01

155

Recurrent Isolated Oculomotor Nerve Palsy after Radiation of a Mesencephalic Metastasis. Case Report and Mini Review  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Recurrent oculomotor nerve palsies are extremely rare clinical conditions. Case report: Here, we report on a unique case of a short-lasting recurrent unilateral incomplete external and complete internal oculomotor nerve palsy. The episodic palsies were probably caused by an ipsilateral mesencephalic metastasis of a breast carcinoma and occurred after successful brain radiation therapy. Discussion: While the pathogenic mechanism remains unclear, the recurrent sudden onset and disappearance of the palsies and their decreasing frequency after antiepileptic treatment suggest the occurrence of epilepsy-like brainstem seizures. A review of case reports of spontaneous reversible oculomotor nerve palsies is presented. PMID:25104947

Grabau, Olga; Leonhardi, Jochen; Reimers, Carl D.

2014-01-01

156

Diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.  

PubMed

Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis) is the most common cause of acute unilateral facial nerve paralysis. Although it is usually a self-limiting condition, it can be distressing for the patient. Many people who experience one-sided facial paralysis fear that it is a symptom of stroke. However, there are subtle differences between Bell's palsy and stroke. This article discusses potential causes of the condition and identifies the differences between Bell's palsy and stroke. In addition, appropriate strategies for the care of patients with the condition are suggested. Management includes antiviral medication, corticosteroid therapy, eye care, botulinum toxin type A injection, physiotherapy, surgery and acupuncture. Psychological and emotional care of these patients is also important because any facial disability caused by facial nerve paralysis can result in anxiety and stress. PMID:24299386

Mooney, Tracy

157

Acupuncture Treatment of Diplopia Associated With Abducens Palsy: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Abducens palsy (ie, sixth nerve palsy) is the most common single extraocular muscle palsy. The primary symptom is double vision. The treatment goal is to correct the underlying cause. If no cause is identified or the palsy is related to a well-managed chronic disease, treatment consists of patching one eye or applying a temporary prism. We report a patient whose abducens palsy resolved with four acupuncture treatments. The patient, a 58-year-old Vietnamese man with diabetes mellitus, presented to our institution's ophthalmology department with sudden onset of double vision. Ophthalmologic examination resulted in diagnosis of isolated left abducens palsy. The patient received a temporary prism for symptomatic relief. With no improvement after 2 months, he presented to our integrative medicine program inquiring about acupuncture. He received four acupuncture treatments over 11 weeks with complete resolution of his diplopia. This case is suggestive that acupuncture may be helpful treatment of patients with abducens palsy. PMID:25105074

Do, Alexander; Bauer, Brent A.

2014-01-01

158

Frontal Sinus Lymphoma Presenting As Progressive Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy  

PubMed Central

Primary frontal sinus lymphoma is a very uncommon disease. In all the previously reported cases, the presenting symptoms have been due to the tumor mass effect. We present an unusual case report of an immunocompetent patient who presented with facial palsy, and then progressively developed other cranial nerve palsies over several months. He was later diagnosed with diffuse large B cell lymphoma originating from the frontal sinus. The patient underwent chemotherapy, but eventually had to receive autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. He is currently disease-free. The clinical course, diagnostic workup, and therapeutic outcome are described. PMID:22028175

Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Min Ju; Ahn, Sanghyeon; Bae, So Young; Kim, Won Seog

2011-01-01

159

Treatment of femur fractures in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Children with cerebral palsy may have low bone density stemming from various etiologies and are, thereby, at risk for fractures.\\u000a The treatment of femur fractures in children with cerebral palsy may need to be tailored to address the management of spastic\\u000a muscle tone and multiple medical co-morbidities.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Our study is a retrospective review that evaluates the treatment of 47 femur

Arabella I. Leet; Eric D. Shirley; Chris Barker; Franck Launay; Paul D. Sponseller

2009-01-01

160

Treatment of swan neck deformity in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Swan neck deformity in patients with cerebral palsy can result from hand intrinsic muscle spasticity or overpull of the digital extensors. After accurate identification of the etiology of the deformity, surgical treatment is directed at correcting the underlying muscle imbalance. Intrinsic lengthening can be used to treat intrinsic muscle spasticity, whereas central slip tenotomy is employed when digital extensor overpull is the deforming force. Accurate diagnosis and application of the proper surgical technique are essential when treating swan neck deformity in patients with cerebral palsy. PMID:24613587

Carlson, Erik J; Carlson, Michelle Gerwin

2014-04-01

161

Isolated Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy Due to Vertebral Artery Dissection  

PubMed Central

We report the case of a patient with unilateral tongue weakness secondary to an isolated lower motor neuron hypoglossal nerve palsy that was caused by a right vertebral artery dissection in the lower neck. The patient had a boggy tongue with a deviation to the right side but an otherwise normal neurological examination. Magnetic resonance angiography showed a narrow lumen of the right vertebral artery in the neck. After initially treating the patient with aspirin in the emergency room and later with warfarin for three months, there was complete recanalization of the right vertebral artery. Only one other case of vertebral artery dissection and twelfth nerve palsy has been reported before. PMID:22031481

Mahadevappa, Karthik; Chacko, Thomas; Nair, Anil K.

2012-01-01

162

Selective dorsal rhizotomy to decrease spasticity in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Until recently, treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has consisted of physical therapy, bracing, and surgery to release and lengthen tight tendons of contracted muscles and correct muscle contractures. Selective dorsal rhizotomy is a surgical intervention that selectively cuts the spinal sensory nerve rootlets carrying the most abnormal signals, thereby reducing spasticity in all muscle groups of the affected extremities. It is not a cure for spastic cerebral palsy. Children who have this procedure can gain significant increases in knee and thigh ranges of motion and increased strength and muscle control if they have good family support and follow through with intensive postoperative physical therapy. PMID:7778904

Hendricks-Ferguson, V L; Ortman, M R

1995-03-01

163

[Gastrointestinal disorders in children with cerebral palsy and neurodevelopmental disabilities].  

PubMed

Recent data suggest that, contrary to initial expectations with improvements in perinatal medicine, the prevalence of cerebral palsy has not decreased over the last 20 years. Gastrointestinal disorders are a major chronic problem in most of children with cerebral palsy and in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. A multidisciplinary approach, with input from neurologists, gastroenterologists, nurses, dieticians and other specialists, can make a major contribution to the medical wellbeing and quality of life of these children and their caregivers. This article focuses on diagnostic methods and therapeutic options available for major nutritional and gastrointestinal problems in patients with neurological disabilities: gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and swallowing disorders. PMID:20817582

González Jiménez, D; Díaz Martin, J J; Bousoño García, C; Jiménez Treviño, S

2010-12-01

164

Sneddon syndrome presenting with unilateral third cranial nerve palsy.  

PubMed

Sneddon syndrome is a rare systemic vasculopathy affecting the skin as livedo racemosa and the central nervous system as stroke. A 31-year-old man with a history of livedo racemosa presented with a partial left third nerve palsy. Skin biopsy showed signs of endotheliitis with obliteration of dermal blood vessels due to intimal proliferation and fibrin thrombi consistent with Sneddon syndrome. The patient was treated with platelet antiaggregant therapy with complete resolution of his third nerve palsy. Clinicians should be aware of Sneddon syndrome because prompt diagnosis and treatment may prevent potential morbidity and mortality. PMID:24051423

Jiménez-Gallo, David; Albarrán-Planelles, Cristina; Linares-Barrios, Mario; González-Fernández, Julio A; Espinosa-Rosso, Raúl; Báez-Perea, José M

2014-03-01

165

Cerebral palsy: definition, assessment and rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Over the last 25 years the definition and classification of cerebral palsy (CP) have evolved, as well as the approach to rehabilitation. CP is a disorder of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitations attributed to nonprogressive disturbances of the fetal or infant brain that may also affect sensation, perception, cognition, communication, and behavior. Motor control during reaching, grasping, and walking are disturbed by spasticity, dyskinesia, hyperreflexia, excessive coactivation of antagonist muscles, retained developmental reactions, and secondary musculoskeletal malformations, together with paresis and defective programing. Weakness and hypoextensibility of the muscles are due not only to inadequate recruitment of motor units, but also to changes in mechanical stresses and hormonal factors. Two methods, the General Movements Assessment and the Test of Infant Motor Performance, now permit the early detection of CP, while the development of valid and reliable outcome measures, particularly the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), have made it possible to evaluate change over time and the effects of clinical interventions. The GMFM has further led to the development of predictive curves of motor function while the Gross Motor Classification System and the Manual Ability Classification System provide standardized means to classify the severity of the movement disability. With the emergence of the task-oriented approach, the focus of therapy in rehabilitation has shifted from eliminating deficits to enhancing function across all performance domains by emphasizing fitness, function, participation, and quality of life. There is growing evidence supporting selected interventions and interest for the therapy and social integration of adults with CP. PMID:23622163

Richards, Carol L; Malouin, Francine

2013-01-01

166

Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of lower limbs 44 showed improvement in weight bearing, standing and movement accounting for 76% improvement rate.

Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

2008-03-01

167

Diversity of Participation in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to investigate the participation of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in activities outside school and to compare their participation with a large representative sample of children. A population-based survey was conducted of children with CP born in Victoria, Australia in 1994 and 1995. Of 219 living children identified,…

Imms, Christine; Reilly, Sheena; Carlin, John; Dodd, Karen

2008-01-01

168

Lame From Birth: Early Concepts of Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deformations have been attributed to supernatural causes since antiquity. Cerebral palsy was associated with God’s wrath, witchcraft, the evil eye, or maternal imagination. Greek scholars recommended prevention by tight swaddling, a custom that persisted into modern times. In the Middle Ages, the midwife’s negligence was held responsible as was difficult teething. Morgagni described in 1769 that the neonatal brain can

Michael Obladen

2011-01-01

169

Causes and Interventions in the Area of Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Possible prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal causes of cerebral palsy are explored and a causal pathway theory is presented that provide a methodology to study the impact of the various causal factors. The role of an interdisciplinary team in assessment and program development is discussed and prevention strategies are presented. (Contains…

Griffin, Harold C.; Fitch, Christine L.; Griffin, Linda W.

2002-01-01

170

Gait Trainer for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A device is developed to improve the walking ability of children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy, who have damages to the area of their brain which controls the muscle tone and that causes trouble walking like moving by using their toes instead of applying a ...

O. Urhan, H. Dincer

2001-01-01

171

Arm Trajectories in Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy Have Increased Random Variability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dyskinetic cerebral palsy results from injury to the basal ganglia early in life. Symptoms can include hyperkinetic or dystonic arm movements that impair function. It is not known whether these movements comprise a small number of specific abnormal motor patterns or whether they are random and variable. We hypothesize that injury to the basal ganglia leads to impaired filtering and

Terence D. Sanger

2006-01-01

172

Training Guide to Cerebral Palsy Sports. Third Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This official training manual of the United States Cerebral Palsy Athletic Association includes the latest coaching and training techniques specific to all sports in the national program. The book features guidelines for coaching over a dozen sports, including soccer, swimming, cycling, and track and field. It contains everything coaches,…

Jones, Jeffery A., Ed.

173

Reproducibility of Tactile Assessments for Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A systematic review identified tactile assessments used in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but their reproducibility is unknown. Sixteen children with unilateral CP and 31 typically developing children (TDC) were assessed 2-4 weeks apart. Test-retest percent agreements within one point for children with unilateral CP (and TDC) were…

Auld, Megan Louise; Ware, Robert S.; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

2012-01-01

174

Progressive supranuclear palsy: neuropathologically based diagnostic clinical criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

All cases examined postmortem at the Mayo Clinic that met the classic neuropathological criteria for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) were identified for retrospective clinical analyses. The necropsy material was re-examined by a second neuropathologist to confirm the pathological diagnosis of PSP, yielding 12 cases. A range of clinical signs were documented in these patients, with numerous findings beyond those noted

S J Collins; J E Ahlskog; J E Parisi; D M Maraganore

1995-01-01

175

Rating Scales for Dystonia in Cerebral Palsy: Reliability and Validity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS), the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Movement Scale (BFMMS), and the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale (UDRS) in patients with bilateral dystonic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Three raters independently scored videotapes of 10 patients (five males, five females;…

Monbaliu, E.; Ortibus, E.; Roelens, F.; Desloovere, K.; Deklerck, J.; Prinzie, P.; De Cock, P.; Feys, H.

2010-01-01

176

Bathing Techniques for Children Who Have Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Helpful techniques are offered for making bathtime easier, safer, and more fun for children who have cerebral palsy. Safety in the bathtub is stressed, both for the child who needs protection from slippery surfaces and extreme water temperature, and for the caregiver who must lift and carry the child without causing injury to the lower back.…

Dunaway, Avtar; Klein, Marsha Dunn

177

Understanding Participation of Preschool-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participation in home, school, and community activities is a primary outcome of early intervention services for children with disabilities and their families. The objectives of this study were to (a) describe participation of preschool-age children with cerebral palsy (CP); (b) determine effects of sex, age, and gross motor function on intensity…

Chiarello, Lisa Ann; Palisano, Robert J.; Orlin, Margo N.; Chang, Hui-Ju; Begnoche, Denise; An, Mihee

2012-01-01

178

Predictors of Verbal Working Memory in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the present study was to examine the precursors of verbal working memory in 52 children with cerebral palsy with varying degrees of speech impairments in the first grade of special education. Following Baddeley's model of working memory, children's verbal working memory was measured by means of a forced-recognition task. As precursors…

Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; de Moor, Jan

2009-01-01

179

Tactile Assessment in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Clinimetric Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review evaluates the clinimetric properties of tactile assessments for children with cerebral palsy. Assessment of registration was reported using Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (SWMs) or exteroception. Assessment of two-point discrimination was reported using the Disk-Criminator[R] or paperclip methods; Single point localization and double…

Auld, Megan Louise; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

2011-01-01

180

Home Literacy Environment: Characteristics of Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have difficulty acquiring literacy skills. Aims: The aims…

Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; van Balkom, Hans; de Moor, Jan

2009-01-01

181

Systemic inflammation and cerebral palsy risk in extremely preterm infants.  

PubMed

The authors hypothesized that among extremely preterm infants, elevated concentrations of inflammation-related proteins in neonatal blood are associated with cerebral palsy at 24 months. In 939 infants born before 28 weeks gestation, the authors measured blood concentrations of 25 proteins on postnatal days 1, 7, and 14 and evaluated associations between elevated protein concentrations and cerebral palsy diagnosis. Protein elevations within 3 days of birth were not associated with cerebral palsy. Elevations of tumor necrosis factor-?, tumor necrosis factor-?-receptor-1, interleukin-8, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on at least 2 days were associated with diparesis. Recurrent-persistent elevations of interleukin-6, E-selectin, or insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 were associated with hemiparesis. Diparesis and hemiparesis were more likely among infants who had at least 4 of 9 protein elevations that previously have been associated with cognitive impairment and microcephaly. Repeated elevations of inflammation-related proteins during the first 2 postnatal weeks are associated with increased risk of cerebral palsy. PMID:24646503

Kuban, Karl C K; O'Shea, T Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N; Paneth, Nigel; Hirtz, Deborah; Fichorova, Raina N; Leviton, Alan

2014-12-01

182

Language Abilities Following Prematurity, Periventricular Brain Injury, and Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared language abilities in three groups of preschool children (total n=18) who were born prematurely: children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy associated with perinatal brain injury, with similar brain injury but no motor impairment, and with no brain injuries. No significant differences were observed among the groups on any…

Feldman, Heidi M.; And Others

1994-01-01

183

Quantity Concept Development in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated order of quantity concept development on a range of quantity conservation tasks. Subjects were 15 adults and children having spastic cerebral palsy from birth and attending the same special school or day unit. Found a sequence of development similar to that in children without the handicap, and scalogram analysis supported similarity…

Lister, Caroline; Juniper, Kirsten

1995-01-01

184

Childhood Educational Experiences of Women with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the childhood experiences of women with cerebral palsy (CP), from the perspectives of these women. Using the feminist biographical method, eight women with CP participated in two in-depth interviews. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 55 years and had moderate to severe athetoid or spastic CP. Four…

Freeborn, Donna; Mandleco, Barbara

2010-01-01

185

Attentional and Executive Impairments in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are reported to have learning and social problems. The aim of the present study was to examine whether children with CP have impairments in attention or executive function. Method: We examined attention and executive function with standardized neuropsychological measures in a group of children with unilateral…

Bottcher, Louise; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Uldall, Peter

2010-01-01

186

Neuropsychologic Differences Between Bilateral Dyskinetic and Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the neuropsychologic performance of 30 adolescents and adults with bilateral dyskinetic, mixed, and spastic cerebral palsy aged between 16 and 38 years. The sample was relatively homogeneous in terms of motor severity; no patients were able to walk unaided. In all subjects, we evaluated the general function of nonverbal reasoning and the following specific neuropsychologic areas: language,

Roser Pueyo; Carme Junqué; Pere Vendrell

2003-01-01

187

Bimanual Force Coordination in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study bimanual grip-force coordination was quantified using a novel "Gripper" system that records grip forces produced while holding a lower and upper unit, in combination with the lift force necessary to separate these units. Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) (aged 5-14 years, n = 12) were compared to age matched typically…

Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Klingels, K.; Feys, H.

2011-01-01

188

Stability of Motor Impairment in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classification of the quality and topographical pattern of motor impairment is used to describe cerebral palsy (CP). As an adjunct to a study characterizing the quality of life and participation of school-age children with CP, initial and follow-up classification of CP were compared. A cohort of 93 children (58 males, 35 females) were initially…

Shevell, Michael I.; Majnemer, Annette; Poulin, Chantal; Law, Mary

2008-01-01

189

Behaviour in Children with Cerebral Palsy with and without Epilepsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the study was to describe behavioural problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with and without epilepsy. The children were sampled from the Western Sweden CP register and were part of a European Union project. The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire and questions on epilepsy were answered by one parent of each child. Medical…

Carlsson, Malin; Olsson, Ingrid; Hagberg, Gudrun; Beckung, Eva

2008-01-01

190

Operant Control of Pathological Tongue Thrust in Spastic Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The behavior modification procedure, carried out at mealtime with a ten-year-old retarded boy who had spastic cerebral palsy, consisted of differential reinforcement and punishment, and resulted in substantial decreases in tongue thrust (reverse swallowing) and food expulsion, and a large increase in observed chewing. (Author/DLS)

Thompson, George A., Jr.

1979-01-01

191

Trunk recruitment during spoon use in tetraparetic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study we investigated the extent to which individuals suffering from spastic tetraparesis as a consequence of cerebral palsy tune their trunk involvement to accuracy demands in a spoon-handling task. Twenty-two participants (ten adolescents with spastic tetraparesis and 12 control participants) had to transport a spoon filled with water or sugar to a small or a large bowl

Dominique van Roon; Bert Steenbergen; Ruud G. J. Meulenbroek

2004-01-01

192

Risk Factors of Undernutrition in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study was undertaken to investigate the nutritional status of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and to identify the risk factors of undernutri- tion. Methods: Seventy-five spastic CP children, 47 boys and 28 girls, (ages, 5 months to 10 years) underwent anthropometric assessment, including body weight, recum- bent length, and knee height. Their functional status, medical condition, and

Jen-Wen Hung; Te-Jui Hsu; Pi-Chuan Wu; Chau-Peng Leong

193

Fast adjustments of ongoing movements in hemiparetic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study focuses on the ability of participants with spastic hemiparesis caused by cerebral palsy to adjust an ongoing movement. Typical symptoms associated with the disorder would lead one to expect that people with spastic hemiparesis would be unable to adjust their movements quickly and proportionally to a sudden change in the environment with their spastic arm. The results

Edwin Van Thiel; Ruud G. J. Meulenbroek; Jeroen B. J. Smeets; Wouter Hulstijn

2002-01-01

194

Novel transcriptional profile in wrist muscles from cerebral palsy patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a progressive movement disorder. Secondary to the neurological insult, muscles from CP patients often become spastic. Spastic muscle is characterized by an increased resistance to stretch, but often develops the further complication of contracture which represents a prominent disability in children with CP. This study's purpose is

Lucas R Smith; Eva Pontén; Yvette Hedström; Samuel R Ward; Henry G Chambers; Shankar Subramaniam; Richard L Lieber

2009-01-01

195

Physical fitness in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a non-progressive condition; however, certain negative side effects such as a low muscle strength and cardio respiratory endurance can develop at later stages and can get progressively worse depending on the specifics of a person's condition. Children and adolescents with CP have distinctly subnormal aerobic and anaerobic capacity in comparison with typically developing peers. Also, muscle

O. W. Verschuren

2007-01-01

196

Cerebral palsy symptoms in children decreased following massage therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty young children (mean age?=?32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine and gross motor functioning. In addition, the massage group

Tiffany Field; Shay Largie; Miguel Diego; Natasha Manigat; Jacqueline Seoanes; Joan Bornstein

2005-01-01

197

Intermittent versus Continuous Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the delivery of the same amount of intermittent versus continuous physiotherapy given to children with cerebral palsy (CP). This was organized either in an intermittent regime four times a week for 4 weeks alternating with a 6-week treatment pause, or a continuous once or twice a week regime, both…

Christiansen, Annette Sandahl; Lange, Christa

2008-01-01

198

Growth and Nutrition Disorders in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Growth and nutrition disorders are common secondary health conditions in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Poor growth and malnutrition in CP merit study because of their impact on health, including psychological and physiological function, healthcare utilization, societal participation, motor function, and survival. Understanding the etiology of…

Kuperminc, Michelle N.; Stevenson, Richard D.

2008-01-01

199

Design of an Exergaming Station for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

the play of exercise video games (exergames) by children with cerebral palsy (CP). The station combines,11]. Exergames, video games whose play requires physical activity, represent a promising way of enabling children a physical platform allowing children with CP to provide pedaling input into a game, a standard Xbox 360

Graham, Nick

200

Gait compensations caused by foot deformity in cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a complex syndrome, with multiple interactions between joints and muscles. Abnormalities in movement patterns can be measured using motion capture techniques, however determining which abnormalities are primary, and which are secondary, is a difficult task. Deformity of the foot has anecdotally been reported to produce compensatory abnormalities in more proximal lower limb joints, as well as

Julie Stebbins; Marian Harrington; Nicky Thompson; Amy Zavatsky; Tim Theologis

2010-01-01

201

Parents' perceptions of disclosure of the diagnosis of cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the paper is to propose guidelines for good practice in disclosing the diagnosis of cerebral palsy to parents. The guidelines draw on an interview study with parents of 107 children, average age 24 months, in the South East Thames region. In addition case notes were examined, and mothers completed questionnaires to measure current levels of depression and

G Baird; H McConachie; D Scrutton

2000-01-01

202

Three tendon transfer methods in reconstruction of ulnar nerve palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of 3 different tendon transfer techniques in restoring grip strength, correcting claw hand deformity, and improving hand function after irreparable ulnar nerve palsy. Method: A total of 44 patients were assessed 14 to 96 months after surgery. Twenty-four patients were reconstructed with the flexor digitorum 4-tail (FDS 4-tail) procedure, 11 with

Türker Özkan; Ka?an Özer; Ayan Gülgönen

2003-01-01

203

Physical and Sedentary Activity in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participation in regular physical activity (PA) provides health, psychological, and physiological benefits for people with and without a physical disability. This study investigated the physical and sedentary activity patterns of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). A cross-sectional, descriptive, postal survey was used, consisting of the…

Maher, Carol A.; Williams, Marie T.; Olds, Tim; Lane, Alison E.

2007-01-01

204

Portrayals of People with Cerebral Palsy in Homicide News  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through content analysis, employing qualitative and quantitative methods, Canadian media representation of people with cerebral palsy (PWCP) in public life was examined. Canadian NewsDisc, an online biographic database service, was used to examine the use of stigmatizing language such as afflicted by, afflicted with, suffered from, suffers from,…

Lucardie, Richard; Sobsey, Dick

2005-01-01

205

Hallmarks in the history of cerebral palsy: from antiquity to mid-20th century.  

PubMed

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term that has been applied over the years to a group of children with motor disability and related service requirements. The first conceptions of cerebral palsy and our knowledge about aetiology and pathogeny allow us to assume that cerebral palsy existed in the Ancient World. Although there is lack of detailed medical descriptions from before the 19th century, mentions to cerebral palsy can be found in representational art, literary sources and paleopathology; however, because of the poor medical documentation, the diagnosis of cerebral palsy must remain a more or less well-justified supposition. In the Ancient World, the first medical description of cerebral palsy was made by Hippocrates in his work "Corpus Hippocraticum". Concrete examples and definitions of cerebral palsy, however, did not emerge until the early 19th century with observations by William John Little; thus, Little was the first personality to intensely engage cerebral palsy. Towards the end of the 19th century, two more personalities emerged, adding to the historical hallmarks of cerebral palsy: William Osler and Sigmund Freud. The significant developments that have followed since then are all due to the contributions of these three personalities in the field of cerebral palsy. PMID:22658818

Panteliadis, Christos; Panteliadis, Panos; Vassilyadi, Frank

2013-04-01

206

HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY FOR CEREBRAL PALSY CHILDREN  

Microsoft Academic Search

To significantly increase the delivery of oxygen delivery to the tissues requires the use of hyperbaric conditions, that is, pressures greater than normal sea level atmospheric pressure. When tissue is damaged, the blood supply within the tissue is also damaged and too little oxygen may be available for recovery to take place. Hyperbaric medicine is not taught in most medical

Philip James

207

Operative treatment for spinal deformities in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The higher the functional impairment, the more likely patients with cerebral palsy (cP) are to develop a scoliotic deformity. This is usually long-sweeping, C-shaped, and progressive in nature, since the causes of the deformity, such as muscular weakness, imbalance, and osteoporosis, persist through adulthood. In contrast to idiopathic scoliosis, not only is the spine deformed, the patient is also sick. This multimorbidity warrants a multidisciplinary approach with close involvement of the caregivers from the beginning. Brace treatment is usually ineffective or intolerable in light of the mostly stiff and severe deformities and the poor nutritional status. The pros and cons of surgical correction need to weighed up when pelvic obliquity, subsequent loss of sitting balance, pressure sores, and pain due to impingement of the rib cage on the ileum become issues. General risks of, for example, pulmonary or urogenital infections, pulmonary failure, the need for a tracheostoma, permanent home ventilation, and death add to the particular surgery-related hazards, such as excessive bleeding, surgical site infections, pseudarthrosis, implant failure, and dural tears with leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. The overall complication rate averages around 25 %. From an orthopedic perspective, stiffness, marked deformities including sagittal profile disturbances and pelvic obliquity, as well as osteoporosis are the main challenges. In nonambulatory patients, long fusions from T2/T3 with forces distributed over all segments, low-profile anchors in areas of poor soft tissue coverage (sublaminar bands, wires), and strong lumbosacropelvic modern screw fixation in combination with meticulous fusion techniques (facetectomies, laminar decortication, use of local autologous bone) and hemostasis can be employed to keep the rate of surgical and implant-related complications at an acceptably low level. Excessive posterior release techniques, osteotomies, or even vertebrectomies in cases of very severe short-angled deformity mostly prevent anterior one- or two-stage releases. Despite improved operative techniques and implants with predictable and satisfactory deformity corrections, the comorbidities and quality-of-life related issues demand a thorough preoperative, multidisciplinary decision-making process that takes ethical and economic aspects into consideration. PMID:24432105

Hasler, Carol C

2013-11-01

208

Is prepregnancy obesity associated with risk of cerebral palsy and epilepsy in children?  

PubMed

We conducted a retrospective cohort study to investigate the association between prepregnancy obesity in women and risk of cerebral palsy and epilepsy in their children using data from the South Carolina Medicaid program. The cohort included 83,901 maternal-child pairs; 100 cases of cerebral palsy were initially identified, followed by 53 cases that had at least 2 cerebral palsy diagnoses. For confirmed epilepsy, diagnosed on at least 5 occasions or by more than 1 provider, 83,472 observations were included with 338 cases. There was no association between maternal body mass index and risk of childhood epilepsy. A significant association between increasing maternal body mass index and any diagnosis of cerebral palsy was found, and morbid obesity was associated with increased risk of any and confirmed cerebral palsy. In conclusion, there appears to be an association of maternal body mass index with cerebral palsy, but there is no evidence to support an association with epilepsy. PMID:24334343

Pan, Chun; Deroche, Chelsea B; Mann, Joshua R; McDermott, Suzanne; Hardin, James W

2014-12-01

209

Long-term results of hip arthroplasty in ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) secondary to dislocation and dysplasia is a common problem in patients with cerebral palsy. The purpose\\u000a of this study was to evaluate the results of total hip replacement (THR) in ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy. Eighteen\\u000a total hip arthroplasties were performed in 16 ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy. The patient's mean age at surgery was\\u000a 42?±?8 years (range 32–58

Kerstin Schroeder; Christian Hauck; Bernd Wiedenhöfer; Frank Braatz; Peter R. Aldinger

2010-01-01

210

Three-dimensional In Vivo Quantification of Knee Kinematics in Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is the most common disabling condition in childhood, involving a diverse group of movement and posture disorders\\u000a of varying etiologies. Yet, much is unknown about how cerebral palsy affects individual joints because currently applied techniques\\u000a cannot quantify the three-dimensional kinematic parameters at the joint level. We quantified the effects of cerebral palsy\\u000a at the knee using fast phase

Frances T. Sheehan; Andrea R. Seisler; Katharine E. Alter

2008-01-01

211

Racial, Ethnic, and Socioeconomic Disparities in the Prevalence of Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: Racial and ethnic disparities in cerebral palsy have been documented, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We determined whether low birth weight accounts for ethnic disparities in the prevalence of cerebral palsy and whether socioeconomic factors impact cerebral palsy within racial and ethnic groups. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort of 6.2 million births in California between 1991 and 2001, we compared maternal and infant characteristics among 8397 infants with cerebral palsy who qualified for services from the California Department of Health Services and unaffected infants. RESULTS: Overall, black infants were 29% more likely to have cerebral palsy than white infants (relative risk: 1.29 [95% confidence interval: 1.19–1.39]). However, black infants who were very low or moderately low birth weight were 21% to 29% less likely to have cerebral palsy than white infants of comparable birth weight. After we adjusted for birth weight, there was no difference in the risk of cerebral palsy between black and white infants. In multivariate analyses, women of all ethnicities who did not receive any prenatal care were twice as likely to have infants with cerebral palsy relative to women with an early onset of prenatal care. Maternal education was associated with cerebral palsy in a dose-response fashion among white and Hispanic women. Hispanic adolescent mothers (aged <18 years) had increased risk of having a child with cerebral palsy. CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk of cerebral palsy among black infants is primarily related to their higher risk of low birth weight. Understanding how educational attainment and use of prenatal care impact the risk of cerebral palsy may inform new prevention strategies. PMID:21339278

Xing, Guibo; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Danielson, Beate; Smith, Lloyd H.; Gilbert, William M.

2011-01-01

212

Acupuncture for sequelae of Bell's palsy: a randomized controlled trial protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  Incomplete recovery from facial palsy has a long-term impact on the quality of life, and medical options for the sequelae\\u000a of Bell's palsy are limited. Invasive treatments and physiotherapy have been employed to relieve symptoms, but there is limited\\u000a clinical evidence for their effectiveness. Acupuncture is widely used on Bell's palsy patients in East Asia, but there is\\u000a insufficient evidence

Hyo-Jung Kwon; Jong-In Kim; Myeong Soo Lee; Jun-Yong Choi; Sungkeel Kang; Jie-Yoon Chung; Young-Jin Kim; Seung-Hoon Lee; Sanghoon Lee; Dongwoo Nam; Yong-Suk Kim; Jae-Dong Lee; Do-Young Choi

2011-01-01

213

Hyperbaric oxygen for children with cerebral palsy: a randomised multicentre trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Background The use of hyperbaric oxygen for children with cerebral palsy has spread worldwide, despite little scientific evidence of efficacy. We did a randomised trial to assess the efficacy and side-effects of this form of therapy in children with cerebral palsy. Methods 111 children with cerebral palsy aged 3-12 years were randomly assigned hyperbaric oxygen (n=57) or slightly pressurised

Jean-Paul Collet; Michel Vanasse; Pierre Marois; Maxime Amar; Joanne Goldberg; Jean Lambert; Maryse Lassonde; Paule Hardy; Josée Fortin; Stéphane D Tremblay; David Montgomery; Jacques Lacroix; Ann Robinson; Annette Majnemer

2001-01-01

214

C5 palsy following anterior decompression and spinal fusion for cervical degenerative diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postoperative C5 palsy is a common complication after cervical spine decompression surgery. However, the incidence, prognosis,\\u000a and etiology of C5 palsy after anterior decompression with spinal fusion (ASF) have not yet been fully established. In the\\u000a present study, we analyzed the clinical and radiological characteristics of patients who developed C5 palsy after ASF for\\u000a cervical degenerative diseases. The cases of

Mitsuhiro HashimotoMacondo; Macondo Mochizuki; Atsuomi Aiba; Akihiko Okawa; Koichi Hayashi; Tsuyoshi Sakuma; Hiroshi Takahashi; Masao Koda; Kazuhisa Takahashi; Masashi Yamazaki

2010-01-01

215

Cerebral Palsy—Long-Term Medical, Functional, Educational, and Psychosocial Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy, typically diagnosed in childhood, clearly continues into adulthood. This study describes the long-term medical, functional, educational, and psychosocial outcomes of people with cerebral palsy. Of the 203 people with cerebral palsy diagnosed and treated at the Child Development Center in Tel Aviv between 1975 and 1994, 163 (80%; age range 8-30 years, mean age 18.9 years, and median

Ronit Mesterman; Yael Leitner; Rachel Yifat; Gabi Gilutz; Ofra Levi-Hakeini; Ora Bitchonsky; Peter Rosenbaum; Shaul Harel

2010-01-01

216

A qualitative analysis into children’s experience of living with cerebral palsy.  

E-print Network

??Introduction: Research suggests that children with disabilities are at increased risk of experiencing psychological difficulties. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability… (more)

Redford, Donna

2012-01-01

217

Relationship between static postural control and the level of functional abilities in children with cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Background: Postural control deficits can impair functional performance in children with cerebral palsy (CP) in daily living activities. Objective: To verify the relationship between standing static postural control and the functional ability level in children with CP. Method: The postural control of 10 children with CP (gross motor function levels I and II) was evaluated during static standing on a force platform for 30 seconds. The analyzed variables were the anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) displacement of the center of pressure (CoP) and the area and velocity of the CoP oscillation. The functional abilities were evaluated using the mean Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) scores, which evaluated self-care, mobility and social function in the domains of functional abilities and caregiver assistance. Results: Spearman's correlation test found a relationship between postural control and functional abilities. The results showed a strong negative correlation between the variables of ML displacement of CoP, the area and velocity of the CoP oscillation and the PEDI scores in the self-care and caregiver assistance domains. Additionally, a moderate negative correlation was found between the area of the CoP oscillation and the mobility scores in the caregiver assistance domain. We used a significance level of 5% (p <0.05). Conclusions: We observed that children with cerebral palsy with high CoP oscillation values had lower caregiver assistance scores for activities of daily living (ADL) and consequently higher levels of caregiver dependence. These results demonstrate the repercussions of impairments to the body structure and function in terms of the activity levels of children with CP such that postural control impairments in these children lead to higher requirements for caregiver assistance. PMID:25054383

Pavao, Silvia L.; Nunes, Gabriela S.; Santos, Adriana N.; Rocha, Nelci A. C. F.

2014-01-01

218

Bruxism Control in a Child with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most severe childhood disabilities due to a lesion in the developing brain. Oral conditions often observed in this pathogenic are a tendency for the delayed eruption of permanent molars, higher percentages of malocclusion and parafunctional habits, including bruxism. The significance of oral conditions observed in CP patients demonstrates the need for intensive home and professional care for these individuals. This paper presents a 7-year-old boy, with cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, who had high abrasion wear of the primary teeth related to bruxism. Dental care was carried out under oxide-induced sedation, and management of the bruxism was achieved after the use of a resin acrylic protective appliance fixed on both sides of the mandibula. The treatment performed offered efficiency advantages, was clinically viable, and should be a valuable option to practitioners considering appliance therapy to control parafunctional behavior. PMID:21991456

Oliveira, Cristiana Aroeira G. R.; de Paula, Viviane Andrade Cancio; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Primo, Laura Salignac Guimaraes; Castro, Gloria Fernanda

2011-01-01

219

Striatal phosphoproteins in Parkinson disease and progressive supranuclear palsy.  

PubMed Central

This study was undertaken to evaluate the levels of cAMP-regulated phosphoproteins in the striatum of patients with neurodegenerative diseases of the dopaminergic system. Postmortem samples of caudate nucleus and putamen from 24 control subjects, 23 patients with Parkinson disease, and 13 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy were studied with immunoblotting techniques. The levels of tyrosine hydroxylase were reduced in patients with Parkinson disease (levels were 24% and 10% of controls in caudate nucleus and putamen, respectively) and with progressive supranuclear palsy (levels were 11% and 6% of controls in caudate nucleus and putamen, respectively). Five phosphoproteins, which are present in striatal neurons and are likely to play a role in the postsynaptic actions of dopamine, were measured. These included ARPP-16, ARPP-19, ARPP-21 (cAMP-regulated phosphoproteins of Mr 16,000, 19,000, and 21,000, respectively), DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of Mr 32,000), and phosphatase inhibitor I. The levels of these phosphoproteins were inversely correlated with postmortem delay. In brains of patients with Parkinson disease or progressive supranuclear palsy with postmortem delays comparable to those of controls, the levels of these proteins as well as those of synaptic (synapsin I and synaptophysin) and glial (glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein) markers were not significantly modified. We conclude that the levels of several phosphoproteins involved in signal transduction in striatal neurons are not altered in Parkinson disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. This observation supports the view that the striatal output neurons are intact in both diseases. Images PMID:2928345

Girault, J A; Raisman-Vozari, R; Agid, Y; Greengard, P

1989-01-01

220

Outcomes after selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Object: The purpose of this article was to review the published outcomes after selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for treatment of\\u000a spastic cerebral palsy. Methods: A literature search identified all articles related to outcomes after SDR. The outcomes were reviewed according to a paradigm\\u000a developed by the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR). The quality of the evidence for each

Paul Steinbok

2001-01-01

221

Functional outcomes of strength training in spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine clinical effectiveness of strength training in children with spastic cerebral palsy.Design: Prospective before and after trial in which subjects participated in a 6-week strength training program. All received before and after isometric strength evaluation of eight muscle groups in both lower extremities with a hand-held dynamometer, 3-D gait analysis at free and fast speeds, administration of the

Diane L. Damiano; Mark F. Abel

1998-01-01

222

Functional assessment following selective posterior rhizotomy in spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory as a functional assessment tool for children with spastic cerebral palsy undergoing selective posterior rhizotomy. Sixteen patients were followed for 3–12 months following surgery. Improvement in self-care, mobility, and social functional skills were found. Overall, the patients required less caregiver assistance and needed fewer modifications for self-care. The results suggest that

Karen K. Bloom; Gregory B. Nazar

1994-01-01

223

Cognitive Profile in Young Icelandic Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We describe the cognitive profile in a complete national cohort of children with cerebral palsy (CP). One hundred and twenty-seven Icelandic children (67 females, 60 males) with CP, born between 1985 and 2000 and assessed between the ages of 4 and 6 years 6 months (mean age 5y 5mo, SD 6mo), were included in the study. IQ was measured using the…

Sigurdardottir, Solveig; Eiriksdottir, Audur; Gunnarsdottir, Eva; Meintema, Marrit; Arnadottir, Unnur; Vik, Torstein

2008-01-01

224

Assessment and treatment of children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Children with cerebral palsy are prone to development of musculoskeletal deformities. The underlying neurlogic insult may results in a loss of selective motor control, an increase in underlying muscle tone, and muscle imbalance, which can lead to abnormal deforming forces acting on the immature skeleton. The severely involved child is one who is at increased risk for developing progressive musculoskeletal deformities. Close surveillance and evaluation are key to addressing the underlying deformity and improving and maintaining overall function. PMID:24975760

Chan, Gilbert; Miller, Freeman

2014-07-01

225

Phenol block in the management of spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present series 116 cases of spastic cerebral palsy were selected; in whom perineal care and ambulation was affected.\\u000a These cases were given peripheral nerve block (obturator 110, posterior tibial 134 and median nerve 2) with 6% aqueous phenol\\u000a solution. The block relieved the spastic condition, allowed better nursing care, freed the patient from the embarrassment\\u000a of a contorted

S. L. Yadav; U. Singh; G. P. Dureja; K. K. Singh; Sanjay Chaturvedi

1994-01-01

226

Cancer mortality in cerebral palsy in California, 1988-2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale: Exposure to lifestyle, occupational, and environmental risk factors for cancer are undoubtedly different in cerebral palsy (CP) than in the general population, and these and other differences may result in a specific pattern of cancer mortality in CP. Objective: To study the cancer mortality of CP in California. Study group: 40,482 CP cases (contributing 357,928 person- years) among 210,155

Jordan Brooks; David Strauss; Sharon Shumway; Robert M. Shavelle; Scott Kush; Annie J Sasco

2008-01-01

227

Overstretching of sarcomeres may not cause cerebral palsy muscle contracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

To answer the question whether the muscle contracture in patients with cerebral palsy is caused by overstretching of in-series sarcomeres we studied the active and passive force–length relationship of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) in relation to its operating length range in 14 such patients with a flexion deformity of the wrist.Force–length relationship was measured intra-operatively using electrical stimulation,

Mark J. C. Smeulders; Michiel Kreulen; J. Joris Hage; Peter A. Huijing; Chantal M. A. M. van der Horst

2004-01-01

228

Major surgical procedures in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

There are 3 surgical procedures that patients with cerebral palsy (CP) undergo that may be considered major procedures: femoral osteotomies combined with pelvic osteotomies, spine fusion, and intrathecal baclofen pump implant for the treatment of spasticity. Many complications are known to occur at a higher rate in this population, and some may be avoided with prior awareness of the preoperative pathophysiology of the patient with CP. PMID:24491650

Theroux, Mary C; DiCindio, Sabina

2014-03-01

229

Effect of serial casting in spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  Cerebral palsy (CP) is a range of non progressive syndromes of posture and motor impairment due to an insult to developing\\u000a brain. Spasticity and incoordination are major causes of disability in these children which can be managed by different modalities\\u000a like casting, botulinum toxin, surgery etc. Cast application in spastic equinus is a well established procedure in CP but\\u000a cast

Shweta Jain; Navnendra Mathur; Mrinal Joshi; Rajeshwari Jindal; Sunil Goenka

2008-01-01

230

Causal Mechanisms Underlying Periventricular Leukomalacia and Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Periventricula r leukomalacia is a major neuropathological substrate underlying most of the neurologic morbidity in cerebral palsy. Etiopathogenesis of periventricular leukomalacia is believed to be multifactorial, involving hypoxic-ischemic insults and inflammatory processes. While emphasis was previously placed on hypoxia\\/ische mia, epidemiological, clinical, experimental and other studies conducted over the last decade have provided evidence for an important role of infective\\/inf

Hazim Kadhim; Guillaume Sebire; Andre Kahn; Philippe Evrard; Bernard Dan

2005-01-01

231

Subacute Cervical Myelopathy in a Child with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 12-year-old girl with a spastic dystonic tetraparesis due to cerebral palsy showed a subacute cervical myelopathy. X-ray films of the cervical spine demonstrated a subluxation of C4 on C5. Myelography and computerized tomography of the cervical spine performed under general anesthesia demonstrated only a minimal rotation of C3 with respect to C4 and a rather narrow cervical canal. In

L. Angelini; G. Broggi; N. Nardocci; M. Savoiardo

1982-01-01

232

Cerebral Palsy: Effects of Early Brain Injury on Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The term cerebral palsy (CP) was originally coined more than a century ago and loosely translated as brain paralysis. A precise\\u000a definition has remained elusive because CP is not a single diagnosis but an umbrella term describing nonprogressive brain\\u000a lesions involving motor and postural abnormalities that are noted during early development [1]. Recently, the executive committee\\u000a for the definition of

Silja Pirilä; Jaap J. van der Meere

233

Combination of Citicoline and Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Background: The most common cause of physical disability in children is cerebral palsy. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of citicoline in combination to physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone, to improve the functional outcome in pediatric cerebral palsy. Methods: The clinical trial was performed on 50 pediatric patients aged 18-75 months with spastic diplegia or quadriplegic cerebral palsy. Patients were assessed in two groups: case group, under treatment, using injection of citicoline (10 mg/kg) every other day for 3 months and physiotherapy. Gross motor function classification system (GMFCS) levels were assessed in all patients before and after treatment. Results: Patient's mean age was 38.7 ± 17.2 months, and 52% were girls. Differences in the frequency of GMFCS levels between groups were not statistically significant, before (P = 0.09) and after (P = 0.47) treatment. In case group improving in GMFCS, level was occurred in 9/11 with level 2 to level 1, 3/5 with level 3 to other levels and 3/7 with level 4 to other levels. In the control group improving in GMFCS, level was occurred in 3/9 with level 2 to level 1, 3/10 with level 3 to other levels, and 2/4 with level 4 other levels. GMFCS level in 64% of cases was improved, whereas in control group, 32% was improved (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Results demonstrated that citicoline in combination to physiotherapy appears to be a promising agent to improve gross motor function in patients with cerebral palsy versus physiotherapy alone. Although, further studies are need to be done.

Nasiri, Jafar; Kargar, Mehran

2014-01-01

234

A case presentation of bilateral simultaneous Bell’s palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bilateral simultaneous facial paralysis is an extremely rare clinical entity. Unlike the unilateral form, bilateral facial paralysis seldom falls into Bell’s category. It is most often a special finding in a symptom complex of a systemic disease; many of them are potentially life-threatening, and therefore the condition warrants urgent medical intervention. Lyme disease, Guillian-Barre syndrome, Bell’s palsy, leukemia, sarcoidosis, bacterial

Rahmi Kilic; Ali Ozdek; Sevim Felek; M. Asim Safak; Erdal Samim

2003-01-01

235

Scapular deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: a new finding  

Microsoft Academic Search

While most obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients recover arm and hand function, the residual nerve weakness leads to muscle\\u000a imbalances about the shoulder which may cause bony deformities. In this paper we describe abnormalities in the developing\\u000a scapula and the glenohumeral joint. We introduce a classification for the deformity which we term Scapular Hypoplasia, Elevation\\u000a and Rotation. Multiple anatomic parameters

Rahul K. Nath; Melia Paizi

2007-01-01

236

Grip Force Coordination during Bimanual Tasks in Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate coordination of fingertip forces during an asymmetrical bimanual task in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Twelve participants (six males, six females; mean age 14y 4mo, SD 3.3y; range 9-20y;) with unilateral CP (eight right-sided, four left-sided) and 15 age-matched typically…

Islam, Mominul; Gordon, Andrew M.; Skold, Annika; Forssberg, Hans; Eliasson, Ann-Christin

2011-01-01

237

PO.14 Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by synovial cyst  

Microsoft Academic Search

An 85-year-old lady presented with a 12-month history of progressive intermittent speech difficulties. At review, wasting and fasciculations of the right side of the tongue was noted. A diagnosis of isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy was made. An MRI demonstrated a lobulated non-enhancing mass centred on the right hypoglossal canal with both intra and extracranial spread in keeping with a synovial

R Hewett; G E Stewart

2011-01-01

238

Ultrastructure of neurofibrillary tangles in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ultrastructure of neurofibrillary tangles was investigated on the subcortical neurons of an autopsy case of progressive supranuclear palsy. The patient was a 64-year-old female and suffered from her illness for 9 years. Two kinds of ultrastructure were observed in the subcortical neurofibrillary tangles, i.e. the 150 A straight tubules and the 220 A twisted tubules. They appeared separately in each

M. Tomonaga

1977-01-01

239

Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis: CT and MR findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by absence of conjugate\\u000a horizontal eye movements and progressive scoliosis developing in childhood and adolescence. We present a child with clinical\\u000a and neuroimaging findings typical of HGPPS. CT and MRI of the brain demonstrated pons hypoplasia, absence of the facial colliculi,\\u000a butterfly configuration of the medulla and

Rodrigo C. Bomfim; Daniel G. F. Távora; Mauro Nakayama; Rômulo L. Gama

2009-01-01

240

Frequent detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Bell's palsy.  

PubMed

The cause of Bell's palsy (BP) remains unknown despite various hints to an infectious etiology. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common pathogen of the respiratory tract causing pharyngitis, tracheobronchitis or pneumonia. Neurological complications are the most frequent extrapulmonary manifestation. So far, only a few case reports suggested an association between cranial nerve palsy and M. pneumoniae infection. Patients with a BP who were admitted to the Department of Otorhinolaryngology or Neurology of the University of Wuerzburg between 2000 and 2002 were tested serologically for the presence of antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi, herpes viruses (HSV-1/2, VZV) and M. pneumoniae. The diagnosis of mycoplasmal infection was made when at least one of the following criteria was met: a threefold rise or more in the titer of antibody of M. pneumoniae in paired sample or a microparticle agglutination assay (MAG) of > or =1:40 and the detection of IgA and/or IgM antibodies in the acute phase serum. Ninety-one consecutive patients could be included. Fifteen patients showed a reactivation of a VZV ( n=12) or of a HSV-1 ( n=3) infection. In six cases the immunoblot revealed specific antibody bands for B. burgdorferi. In 24 patients (26.4%) a seroconversion of M. pneumoniae could be detected. Only two patients complained of mild respiratory symptoms. According to our results, M. pneumoniae is frequently associated with Bell's palsy. Thus, a routine screening for this pathogen, even in the absence of respiratory symptoms, is necessary. PMID:14576947

Völter, C; Helms, J; Weissbrich, B; Rieckmann, P; Abele-Horn, M

2004-08-01

241

[Spasticity in children cerebral palsy: diagnosis and treatment strategies].  

PubMed

Spasticity in children cerebral palsy has its own peculiarities due to the presence of pathological tonic reflexes, pathological sinkinetic activity during arbitrary movements, disturbance of coordinative interactions of muscle synergists and antagonists, increase of total reflex excitability. Physiotherapeutic methods, massage, therapeutic exercises, kinesitherapy, biological feedback training (BFT), methods of orthopedic correction, neurosurgery are widely used in the treatment of spasticity. The use of botulinum toxin type A is a new effective approach to the treatment of spasticity that improves motor functions and quality of life of children with children cerebral palsy. It is being used in the treatment of children and adolescence in a polyclinic unit of the Moscow psychoneurological hospital since 2001. The experience of treatment with botulinum and wide implementation of this method indicated that botulinum toxin injections in the complex treatment of spasticity allow to optimize approaches to treatment of children and adolescence with children cerebral palsy and to increase significantly the quality of medical-social rehabilitation of patients. PMID:23330188

Kurenkov, A L; Batysheva, T T; Vinogradov, A V; Ziuziaeva, E K

2012-01-01

242

Effects of administration of high dose hydrocortisone on Bell's palsy.  

PubMed

As an improved maintenance therapy for Bell's palsy, Stennert recently introduced large-dose steroid administration in the early stage of the disease with i.v. infusion of low-molecular dextran. The steroid administration aims at improving the microcirculation. This therapy achieved a 96% complete healing rate. However, because of side-effects such as hepatic and renal disorders or gastric ulcer, this therapy has not been widely used. In the present study, we investigated an improved treatment method based on Stennert's method. It has a much lower incidence of side effects, and can be used in routine clinical practice. The medicines employed in our therapy were hydrocortisone sodium succinate (Solu-cortef), hydroxymethylated starch (Hespander) and D-mannitol (Manitol). Subjects were 53 Bell's palsy patients for whom treatment could be started within 2 weeks from the onset of the disease. Curative rate in the patients who received large-dose administration of Solu-cortef was 96.2% in the 24th week, and the therapy was considered to be applicable in routine clinical practice for Bell's palsy. PMID:8740822

Watanabe, S; Kenmochi, M; Kinoshita, H; Kato, I

1996-01-01

243

Scapular deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: a new finding.  

PubMed

While most obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients recover arm and hand function, the residual nerve weakness leads to muscle imbalances about the shoulder which may cause bony deformities. In this paper we describe abnormalities in the developing scapula and the glenohumeral joint. We introduce a classification for the deformity which we term Scapular Hypoplasia, Elevation and Rotation. Multiple anatomic parameters were measured in bilateral CT images and three-dimensional CT reconstruction of the shoulder girdle of 30 obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients (age range 10 months-10.6 years). The affected scapulae were found to be hypoplastic by an average of 14% while the ratio of the height to the width of the body of scapula (excluding acromion) were not significantly changed, the acromion was significantly elongated by an average of 19%. These parameters as well as subluxation of the humeral head (average 14%) and downward rotation in the scapular plane were found to correlate with the area of scapula visible over the clavicle. This finding provides a classification tool for diagnosis and objective evaluation of the bony deformity and its severity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients. PMID:17262175

Nath, Rahul K; Paizi, Melia

2007-03-01

244

Electroglottography in elderly patients with vocal-fold palsy.  

PubMed

The incidence of dysphonia in healthy elderly people is high. In individuals with iatrogenic vocal-fold paresis following thyroid surgery, serious aggravation of vocal skills contributes to impaired quality of life and requires proper management. Electroglottography is a common method for providing noninvasive measurements of glottal activity, yielding reliable indicators of glottal closing instants. The purpose of the study was to determine how electroglottography measures change with voice recovery in elderly speakers with vocal-fold palsy, compared with healthy elderly individuals, and which coefficient best represents dysphonia. An electroglottograph with Speech Studio 1.04 software was used to record and analyze the data. Electroglottography data were collected from 12 patients aged 65-78 years (mean=71.3, S.D.=3.8, median=71) and 10 healthy speakers aged 65-77 years (mean=70.9, S.D.=3.9, median=72). The findings show that the distribution of values of % irregularity differs between the groups of patients and controls. % Irregularity and closing quotient significantly correlate with the perceptual degree of dysphonia. Electroglottography can objectify dysphonia in elderly patients with vocal-fold palsy and is a suitable noninvasive tool for tracking the elderly patients' long-term progress. % Irregularity best represents the vocal-fold dysfunction in elderly patients with a vocal-fold palsy. PMID:18504110

Zagólski, Olaf

2009-09-01

245

A diagnostic approach for cerebral palsy in the genomic era.  

PubMed

An ongoing challenge in children presenting with motor delay/impairment early in life is to identify neurogenetic disorders with a clinical phenotype, which can be misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy (CP). To help distinguish patients in these two groups, conventional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain has been of great benefit in "unmasking" many of these genetic etiologies and has provided important clues to differential diagnosis in others. Recent advances in molecular genetics such as chromosomal microarray and next-generation sequencing have further revolutionized the understanding of etiology by more precisely classifying these disorders with a molecular cause. In this paper, we present a review of neurogenetic disorders masquerading as cerebral palsy evaluated at one institution. We have included representative case examples children presenting with dyskinetic, spastic, and ataxic phenotypes, with the intent to highlight the time-honored approach of using clinical tools of history and examination to focus the subsequent etiologic search with advanced neuroimaging modalities and molecular genetic tools. A precise diagnosis of these masqueraders and their differentiation from CP is important in terms of therapy, prognosis, and family counseling. In summary, this review serves as a continued call to remain vigilant for current and other to-be-discovered neurogenetic masqueraders of cerebral palsy, thereby optimizing care for patients and their families. PMID:25280894

Lee, Ryan W; Poretti, Andrea; Cohen, Julie S; Levey, Eric; Gwynn, Hilary; Johnston, Michael V; Hoon, Alexander H; Fatemi, Ali

2014-12-01

246

Food pattern and nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES To assess the food intake pattern and the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 90 children from two to 12.8 years with cerebral palsy in the following forms: hemiplegia, diplegia, and tetraplegia. Nutritional status was assessed by weight, height, and age data. Food intake was verified by the 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire. The ability to chew and/or swallowing, intestinal habits, and physical activity were also evaluated. RESULTS For 2-3 year-old age group, the mean energy intake followed the recommended range; in 4-6 year-old age group with hemiplegia and tetraplegia, energy intake was below the recommended limits. All children presented low intake of carbohydrates, adequate intake of proteins and high intake of lipids. The tetraplegia group had a higher prevalence of chewing (41%) and swallowing (12.8%) difficulties compared to 14.5 and 6.6% of children with hemiplegia, respectively. Most children of all groups had a daily intestinal habit. All children presented mild physical activity, while moderate activity was not practiced by any child of the tetraplegia group, which had a significantly lower height/age Z score than those with hemiplegia (-2.14 versus -1.05; p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS The children with cerebral palsy presented inadequate dietary pattern and impaired nutritional status, with special compromise of height. Tetraplegia imposes difficulties regarding chewing/swallowing and moderate physical activity practice. PMID:24142317

Lopes, Patricia Ayrosa C.; Amancio, Olga Maria S.; Araujo, Roberta Faria C.; Vitalle, Maria Sylvia de S.; Braga, Josefina Aparecida P.

2013-01-01

247

Isolated III cranial nerve palsy: a Hodgkin's lymphoma?  

PubMed

A 69-year-old woman developed ptosis and diplopia due to an isolated pupil-involving left oculomotor nerve palsy. General examination was unremarkable. Initial workup showed a mild increase in cerebrospinal fluid proteins. Imaging studies were remarkable for a left oculomotor nerve enhancement in brain MRI and hyperfixation along the nerve's pathway in full body single-photon emission CT. Assuming the possible diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis, the patient was started on high-dose methylprednisolone. Three months later she developed pancytopenia. A bone marrow biopsy was performed and histopathology revealed infiltration by Hodgkin's lymphoma. Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine protocol chemotherapy was started and full haematological remission obtained after four cycles, despite mild oculomotor nerve palsy persisted. Isolated oculomotor palsy as the first presenting manifestation of a lymphoma is rare and alternative differential diagnosis must be considered in the absence of other lymphoma manifestations. In this case as with many rare initial manifestations of common diseases watchful waiting was crucial to the correct diagnosis and treatment strategy. PMID:24759607

Meireles, Joana; Garrett, Maria Carolina; Abreu, Pedro

2014-01-01

248

Abstract --Cerebral palsy is a non-progressive neurological disorder caused by disturbances to the developing brain.  

E-print Network

Abstract -- Cerebral palsy is a non-progressive neurological disorder caused by disturbances forms of therapy for children with cerebral palsy are effective in minimizing symptoms, many children Cerebral palsy describes a group of permanent physical disorders caused by disturbances to the fetal

249

Effect of High-frequency, Low-magnitude Vibration on Bone and Muscle in Children With Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

with cerebral palsy (CP) have decreased strength, low bone mass, and an increased propensity to fracture. High II, prospective randomized cross-over study. Key Words: cerebral palsy, mechanical loading and osteoporosis later in life.1­3 The children with disabilities, such as cerebral palsy (CP), are particu- larly

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

250

Services for Children with Cerebral Palsy; A Guide for Public Health Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Directed to persons in voluntary or official agencies and to planning groups whose decisions determine or affect the extent, coverage, content, and operation of community services to children who are handicapped by cerebral palsy, this guide has as its objectives (1) to present background information on cerebral palsy as it affects the individual…

American Public Health Association, Inc., New York, NY. Program Area Committee on Child Health.

251

Musculoskeletal pain in adults with cerebral palsy compared with the general population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine prevalence and localization of musculo-skeletal pain in adults with cerebral palsy com- pared with the general population and to investigate variables potentially associated with pain. Design: A postal survey. Subjects: Persons with cerebral palsy and no intellectual disabilities, 18 years or more, living in Norway. Methods: A multidimensional questionnaire, including items on musculo-skeletal pain, was sent to

Reidun Jahnsen; Lisbeth Villien; Geir Aamodt; Johan K Stanghelle; Inger Holm

2004-01-01

252

Effects of pectin liquid on gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The use of thickeners is a standard therapy for decreasing episodes of regurgitation or vomiting in infants. However, it remains to be investigated whether thickener is effective for vomiting and\\/or chronic respiratory symptoms in children with cerebral palsy. METHODS: We enrolled 18 neurologically impaired children caused by cerebral palsy, with gastroesophageal reflux disease. In the first part of this

Reiko Miyazawa; Takeshi Tomomasa; Hiroaki Kaneko; Hirokazu Arakawa; Nobuzo Shimizu; Akihiro Morikawa

2008-01-01

253

Conductive Education to Promote Behavioural Initiative in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We would like to thank Babara Godwin and Kay Xu for their help in translating this article. Cerebral palsy is one of the major conditions that cause severe disability in children and constitutes a relatively large percentage of disabled children. The definition of cerebral palsy is non-progressive brain damage that occurs for various reasons in the period from pregnancy through

Julie Yali Gao

254

Certified cause of death in children and young adults with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The status of 732 children suffering from cerebral palsy from the South East Thames region (births from 1970-9) was ascertained at the end of 1989, and copies of death certificates of the 73 children who have died, aged 4 weeks to nearly 16 years, were obtained. Infantile cerebral palsy (ICD Code 343-) was coded as the underlying cause of death

P M Evans; E Alberman

1991-01-01

255

Case gender and severity in cerebral palsy varies with intrauterine growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There is an unexplained excess of cerebral palsy among male babies. There is also variation in the proportion of more severe cases by birth weight. It has recently been shown that the rate of cerebral palsy increases as intrauterine size deviates up or down from an optimum about one standard deviation heavier than population mean weight-for-gestation.Aims: To determine whether

S Jarvis; S V Glinianaia; C Arnaud; J Fauconnier; A Johnson; V McManus; M Topp; P Uvebrant; C Cans; I Kra?geloh-Mann

2005-01-01

256

Effect of severity of disability on survival in north east England cerebral palsy cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIMSTo investigate the effect of motor and cognitive disabilities on the survival of people on the North of England Collaborative Cerebral Palsy Survey, and compare this with other published results.METHODSThe cerebral palsy cohort consists of 1960–1990 births in Northumberland, Newcastle, and North Tyneside health districts. Survival and cause of death were analysed in relation to data on birth, disabilities, and

J L Hutton; A F Colver; P C Mackie

2000-01-01

257

Bell's Palsy in Children: Role of the School Nurse in Early Recognition and Referral  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bell's palsy is the most common condition affecting facial nerves. It is an acute, rapidly progressing, idiopathic, unilateral facial paralysis that is generally self-limiting and non-life threatening that occurs in all age groups (Okuwobi, Omole, & Griffith, 2003). The school nurse may be the first person to assess facial palsy and muscle…

Gordon, Shirley C.

2008-01-01

258

Horseback Riding as Therapy for Children with Cerebral Palsy: Is There Evidence of Its Effectiveness?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A systematic review of the literature on horseback riding therapy as an intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) was carried out. The terms horse, riding, hippotherapy, horseback riding therapy, equine movement therapy, and cerebral palsy were searched in electronic databases and hand searched. Retrieved articles were rated for methodological quality using PEDro scoring to assess the internal

Laurie Snider; Nicol Korner-Bitensky; Catherine Kammann; Sarah Warner; Maysoun Saleh

259

European study of frequency of participation of adolescents with and without cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Children with cerebral palsy participate less in everyday activities than children in the general populations. During adolescence, rapid physical and psychological changes occur which may be more difficult for adolescents with impairments. Within the European SPARCLE project we measured frequency of participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy by administering the Questionnaire of Young People's Participation to 667 adolescents with cerebral palsy or their parents from nine European regions and to 4666 adolescents from the corresponding general populations. Domains and single items were analysed using respectively linear and logistic regression. Adolescents with cerebral palsy spent less time with friends and had less autonomy in their daily life than adolescents in the general populations. Adolescents with cerebral palsy participated much less in sport but played electronic games at least as often as adolescents in the general populations. Severity of motor and intellectual impairment had a significant impact on frequency of participation, the more severely impaired being more disadvantaged. Adolescents with an only slight impairment participated in some domains as often as adolescents in the general populations. Regional variation existed. For example adolescents with cerebral palsy in central Italy were most disadvantaged according to decisional autonomy, while adolescents with cerebral palsy in east Denmark and northern England played sports as often as their general populations. Participation is an important health outcome. Personal and environmental predictors of participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy need to be identified in order to design interventions directed to such predictors; and in order to inform the content of services. PMID:24412031

Michelsen, Susan I.; Flachs, Esben M.; Damsgaard, Mogens T.; Parkes, Jacqueline; Parkinson, Kathryn; Rapp, Marion; Arnaud, Catherine; Nystrand, Malin; Colver, Allan; Fauconnier, Jerome; Dickinson, Heather O.; Marcelli, Marco; Uldall, Peter

2014-01-01

260

Engaging children in healthcare technology design: developing rehabilitation technology for children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a case study of users’ involvement in the design and evaluation of two devices for upper limb rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy to use in their homes. The devices comprise a computer game and a force feedback interface, designed to stimulate children with cerebral palsy to undertake fun arm exercises that are beneficial in terms of

Andrew Patrick Hayes Weightman; Nick Preston; Raymond Holt; Matthew Allsop; Martin Levesley; Bipinchandra Bhakta

2010-01-01

261

Growth of an NGO: The Indian Institute of Cerebral Palsy from 1974 to 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Indian Institute for Cerebral Palsy (IICP) has been providing education and other services in Kolkata, Eastern India, for children and young adults with cerebral palsy and related disabilities for over 30 years. IICP started by providing education for just two children, and was highly dependent on western expertise. Described is the history of…

Sen, Reena; Goldbart, Juliet; Kaul, Sudha

2008-01-01

262

The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child): Evidence of Construct Validity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child) is the first health condition-specific questionnaire designed for measuring QOL in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, its construct validity has not yet been confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Hence, this study assessed the construct validity of the caregiver…

Chen, Kuan-Lin; Wang, Hui-Yi; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Lu, Lu; Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Huang, Chien-Yu

2013-01-01

263

Arithmetic Difficulties in Children with Cerebral Palsy Are Related to Executive Function and Working Memory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Although it is believed that children with cerebral palsy are at high risk for learning difficulties and arithmetic difficulties in particular, few studies have investigated this issue. Methods: Arithmetic ability was longitudinally assessed in children with cerebral palsy in special (n = 41) and mainstream education (n = 16) and…

Jenks, Kathleen M.; de Moor, Jan; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.

2009-01-01

264

"I Do Lots of Things": Children with Cerebral Palsy's Competence for Everyday Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored how children with cerebral palsy describe competent performance in everyday activities and sought to better understand the processes by which the children developed competence. Five children with cerebral palsy aged six to 17 years participated in a three-step procedure that included two observations, one semi-structured…

Kramer, Jessica M.; Hammel, Joy

2011-01-01

265

Communicating about Loss: Experiences of Older Australian Adults with Cerebral Palsy and Complex Communication Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Loss and grief is a universal human experience, yet little is known about how older adults with a lifelong disability, such as cerebral palsy, and complex communication needs (CCN) experience loss and manage the grieving process. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 Australian participants with cerebral palsy and CCN to determine the types…

Dark, Leigha; Balandin, Susan; Clemson, Lindy

2011-01-01

266

Psychological Problems in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Cross-Sectional European Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To describe psychological symptoms in 8-12-year-old children with cerebral palsy; to investigate predictors of these symptoms and their impact on the child and family. Design: A cross-sectional multi-centre survey. Participants: Eight hundred and eighteen children with cerebral palsy, aged 8-12 years, identified from population-based…

Parkes, Jackie; White-Koning, Melanie; Dickinson, Heather O.; Thyen, Ute; Arnaud, Catherine; Beckung, Eva; Fauconnier, Jerome; Marcelli, Marco; McManus, Vicki; Michelsen, Susan I.; Parkinson, Kathryn; Colver, Allan

2008-01-01

267

Understanding Mealtime Changes for Adults with Cerebral Palsy and the Implications for Support Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Changes in the swallowing capabilities of adults with cerebral palsy as they age may impact on their health, safety, and well-being. Method: Thirty-two adults with cerebral palsy aged between 30 and 69 years participated in in-depth interviews about their experiences of changes in their swallowing and related management of their…

Balandin, Susan; Hemsley, Bronwyn; Hanley, Leah; Sheppard, Justine Joan

2009-01-01

268

Effects of Frequency of Feedback on the Learning of Motor Skill in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of frequency of knowledge of results (KR) on the learning of dart in individuals with cerebral palsy type I. Twenty-four individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) between the ages of 5 and 17 were chosen for this study. They were put into 3 homogenous groups according to their records after 20…

Hemayattalab, Rasool; Rostami, Leila Rashidi

2010-01-01

269

Effect of Translucency on Transparency and Symbol Learning for Children with and without Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the concept of iconicity, the iconicity hypothesis was emphasized for decades. The aims of this study were to explore the effect of translucency on transparency and symbol learning for children with and without cerebral palsy. Twenty children with cerebral palsy and forty typical peers participated in the study. Ten symbols with high…

Huang, Chih-Hsiung; Chen, Ming-Chung

2011-01-01

270

Electropalatography in the Description and Treatment of Speech Disorders in Five Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some children with cerebral palsy have articulation disorders that are resistant to conventional speech therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the visual feedback method of electropalatography (EPG) could be an effective tool for treating five children (mean age of 9.4 years) with dysarthria and cerebral palsy and to explore…

Nordberg, Ann; Carlsson, Goran; Lohmander, Anette

2011-01-01

271

Achilles Tendon Length and Medial Gastrocnemius Architecture in Children With Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

Achilles Tendon Length and Medial Gastrocnemius Architecture in Children With Cerebral Palsy with cerebral palsy (CP) and equinus gait, with or without contracture. We also examined a small number and normalized muscle fascicle lengths throughout the range of motion. Conclusions: Children with spastic CP

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

272

Muscle force production and functional performance in spastic cerebral palsy: Relationship of cocontraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Damiano DL, Martellotta TL, Sullivan DJ, Granata KP, Abel MF. Muscle force production and functional performance in spastic cerebral palsy: relationship of cocontraction. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2000;81:895-900. Objective: To determine cocontraction's relation to strength and motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Design: Prospective evaluation with a convenience sample of 10 subjects. Setting: Pediatric rehabilitation center at

Diane L. Damiano; Tracy L. Martellotta; Daniel J. Sullivan; Kevin P. Granata; Mark F. Abel

2000-01-01

273

Alterations of hamstring muscle properties in patients with varying severity of spastic cerebral palsy  

E-print Network

: How does the altered neuronal input of muscle contraction associated with spastic cerebral palsy: Spastic muscle in cerebral palsy is in a pathologic state that has fundamentally different mechanicalAlterations of hamstring muscle properties in patients with varying severity of spastic cerebral

Gleeson, Joseph G.

274

Upper extremity rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy using accelerometer feedback on a multitouch display  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is a non-progressive neurological disorder caused by disturbances to the developing brain. Physical and occupational therapy, if started at a young age, can help minimizing complications such as joint contractures, and can improve limb range of motion and coordination. While current forms of therapy for children with cerebral palsy are effective in minimizing symptoms, many children find them

Alan Dunne; Son Do-Lenh; G. O. Laighin; Chia Shen; P. Bonato

2010-01-01

275

A method for quantifying dynamic muscle dysfunction in children and young adults with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy (CP) is caused by a lesion to the brain resulting in adaptations to the structure and function of the muscles and compromised mobility. Spastic cerebral palsy is commonly assessed by the limb kinematics and kinetics measured in a gait laboratory. However, these measures do not directly quantify the patterns of muscle dysfunction that occur during movements. Recent studies

James Wakeling; Roisin Delaney; Israel Dudkiewicz

2007-01-01

276

Analysis and modeling of upper and lower extremity dynamics in children with cerebral palsy using walkers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a condition characterized by a motor disorder that is usually diagnosed during the early stages of life. It occurs from brain damage and has symptoms including postural instability and abnormal muscle tone. A large number of CP patients have spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (lower extremities (LEs) affected more severely than the upper extremities (UEs)) and many

Kelly M B Strifling

2006-01-01

277

Intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with cerebral palsy: Efficacy and complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Murphy NA, Nicole Irwin MC, Hoff C. Intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with cerebral palsy: efficacy and complications. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2002;83:1721-5. Objectives: To describe the efficacy of intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy in the management of spasticity in young children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to identify risk factors for complications. Design: Consecutive case series of 25 implanted ITB

Nancy A. Murphy; Melanie C. Nicole Irwin; Charles Hoff

2002-01-01

278

A prospective, longitudinal study of growth, nutrition and sedentary behaviour in young children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood, occurring in one in 500 children. It is caused by a static brain lesion in the neonatal period leading to a range of activity limitations. Oral motor and swallowing dysfunction, poor nutritional status and poor growth are reported frequently in young children with cerebral palsy and may

Kristie L Bell; Roslyn N Boyd; Sean M Tweedy; Kelly A Weir; Richard D Stevenson; Peter SW Davies

2010-01-01

279

Botulinum Toxin for Spasticity in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Comprehensive Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND.Spasticity is a prevalent disabling clinical symptom for children with cerebral palsy. Treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin in children with cerebral palsy was first reported in 1993. Botulinum toxin provides a focal, controlled muscle weakness with reduction in spasticity. Interpretation of the literature is difficult because of the paucity of reliable measures of spasticity and challenges with measuring meaningful

Kristie Bjornson; Ross Hays; Cathy Graubert; Robert Price; Francine Won; John F. McLaughlin; Morty Cohen

2008-01-01

280

Efficacy of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation in Improving Ankle Kinetics During Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) applied to the triceps surae muscle is claimed to be effective in improving gait in children with cerebral palsy. The main aim of this study was to determine the effect of NMES on the triceps surae muscle in improving the gait and function of children with cerebral palsy. Twelve children with spastic diplegia or hemiplegia were

Nerita N. C. Chan; Andrew W. Smith; Sing Kai Lo

2004-01-01

281

Botulinum Toxin A Injection for Spasticity in Diplegic-Type Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Botulinum toxin type A can be both safe and effective in relieving spasticity in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy. In our prospective study, we evaluated the functional effect of botulinum toxin A in spastic diplegic-type cerebral palsy. Patients were examined on enrollment and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Passive dorsiflexion of the ankle joint was measured using

Ozlem El; Ozlen Peker; Can Kosay; Leyla Iyilikci; Ozgur Bozan; Haluk Berk

2006-01-01

282

Intensive dysarthria therapy for older children with cerebral palsy: findings from six cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with cerebral palsy often have speech, language and communication difficulties that affect their access to social and educational activities. Speech and language therapy to improve the intelligibility of the speech of children with cerebral palsy has long been advocated, but there is a dearth of research investigating therapy effectiveness. To begin to explore the possible effectiveness of therapy focussing

Lindsay Pennington; Claire Smallman; Faith Farrier

2006-01-01

283

Magnetic resonance neurography of peroneal palsy in crossed-legs habit: case report.  

PubMed

"Drop foot" palsy attributed to the prolonged and repetitive maintenance of the crossed-leg posture has been occasionally reported. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of magnetic resonance imaging evidence of peroneal nerve abnormalities related to right drop-foot palsy in a tall healthy subject with habit of prolonged daily leg crossing. PMID:23321843

Righini, Andrea; Re, Thomas J; Manzini, Claudio; Parazzini, Cecilia; Doneda, Chiara; Saporito, Tommaso

2013-01-01

284

Youths with Cerebral Palsy and Their Satisfaction with Recreational Services: Implications for Inclusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This cross-sectional study compared satisfaction with recreational services for 89 youths with cerebral palsy and their parents to that for 71 able-bodied youths and their parents. Participants completed a satisfaction rating and took part in a semistructured interview addressing areas requiring change. Persons with cerebral palsy and their mothers and fathers were significantly less satisfied than were participants in the

Joyce Magill-Evans; Johanna Darrah; Robin Adkins

2003-01-01

285

Usability of an adaptable video game platform for children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virtual reality is a recent technology incorporated in upper extremity therapy programs for children with cerebral palsy. However, the systems currently being used cannot be graded to meet the skill level of children with cerebral palsy who have severely impaired upper extremities. These systems are often expensive, making them impractical for the clinical and home settings. ldquoHands-Uprdquo was designed as

Brooke M. Odle; Amanda Irving; Richard Foulds

2009-01-01

286

The Physical Fitness of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy. Project UNIQUE II. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The final report describes a 2-year project of the State University of New York, College at Brockport, to study the physical fitness of nonretarded and retarded adolescents with cerebral palsy. The UNIQUE Physical Fitness Test was administered to 203 cerebral palsied adolescents throughout the United States and from segregated and nonsegregated…

Winnick, Joseph P.; Short, Francis X.

287

Epidural hematoma accompanied by oculomotor nerve palsy due to sphenoid sinusitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spontaneous epidural hematoma (EDH) is rarely mentioned in the literature as an intracranial complication of sinusitis. We report a 17-year-old female patient who developed spontaneous EDH accompanied by isolated oculomotor nerve palsy as a complication of sphenoid sinusitis. Sphenoid sinusitis could be considered as the causative disease in a patient with spontaneous EDH accompanied by isolated oculomotor nerve palsy without

Kyu-Sup Cho; Won-Ho Cho; Hak-Jin Kim; Hwan-Jung Roh

2011-01-01

288

Theory of Mind and Irony Comprehension in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main goal of the present study was to characterise the pragmatic abilities of French children with cerebral palsy through their understanding of irony and other people's mental states. We predicted that children with cerebral palsy would have difficulty understanding false-belief and ironic remarks, due to the executive dysfunction that…

Caillies, Stephanie; Hody, Anais; Calmus, Arnaud

2012-01-01

289

Bell’s palsy and choreiform movements during peginterferon ? and ribavirin therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neuropsychiatric side effects of long-term recombinant interferon-? therapy consist of a large spectrum of symptoms. In the literature, cranial neuropathy, especially Bell's palsy, and movement disorders, have been reported much less often than other neurotoxic effects. We report a case of Bell's palsy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C during peginterferon-? and ribavirin therapy. The patient subsequently developed clinically

Sener Barut; Hatice Karaer; Erol Oksuz; Ayse Nazli Basak

2009-01-01

290

Intensive Dysarthria Therapy for Older Children with Cerebral Palsy: Findings from Six Cases  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with cerebral palsy often have speech, language and communication difficulties that affect their access to social and educational activities. Speech and language therapy to improve the intelligibility of the speech of children with cerebral palsy has long been advocated, but there is a dearth of research investigating therapy…

Pennington, Lindsay; Smallman, Claire; Farrier, Faith

2006-01-01

291

Resolution of brachial plexus palsy due to hemangioma after intravenous corticosteroid therapy.  

PubMed

The authors report a 7-day-old girl born with a hemangioma involving the right side of the scalp and neck who developed ipsilateral brachial plexus palsy at 5 days of age. Imaging studies confirmed the presence of a cavernous hemangioma in the vicinity of the brachial plexus. She was treated with intravenous corticosteroids and her palsy resolved in 5 days. Only 1 prior case of hemangioma producing brachial plexus palsy has been reported; this patient was not treated with corticosteroids and had a partial recovery. The authors believe that the quick recovery after initiating systemic steroids was due to relief of nerve compression (neuropraxia) resulting from shrinkage of the cavernous hemangioma. The purpose of this article is to describe an uncommon cause of neonatal brachial plexus palsy and to report the effectiveness of early intravenous corticosteroid treatment in a patient with brachial plexus palsy due to a cavernous hemangioma. PMID:18660479

Naqvi, Ali H; Alfonso, Daniel T; Flores, Patricia; Grossman, John A I; Restrepo, Ricardo; Alfonso, Israel

2008-08-01

292

Theory of mind and irony comprehension in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The main goal of the present study was to characterise the pragmatic abilities of French children with cerebral palsy through their understanding of irony and other people's mental states. We predicted that children with cerebral palsy would have difficulty understanding false-belief and ironic remarks, due to the executive dysfunction that accompanies the motor disorders of cerebral palsy. We conducted an experiment in which children with cerebral palsy and typically developing matched controls performed theory-of-mind and executive function tasks. They then listened to ironic stories and answered questions about the speakers' beliefs and attitudes. The groups differed significantly on second-order theory of mind, irony comprehension and working memory, indicating pragmatic difficulties in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:22522196

Caillies, Stéphanie; Hody, Anaïs; Calmus, Arnaud

2012-01-01

293

Anterior Knee Pain in Patients with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for anterior knee pain in patients with cerebral palsy. Methods This prospective study investigated the risk factors for anterior knee pain in 127 ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy in terms of walking pain, resting pain, and provocative pain. Demographic data analysis and physical examination for measuring the knee flexion contracture and unilateral and bilateral popliteal angles were performed. Patellar height was measured on radiographs, and patella alta was identified. The risk factors for anterior knee pain were analyzed using multivariate analysis with a generalized estimating equation. Results Seventy-seven patients were found to have patella alta based on the radiographic measurements (60.6%). Overall, sixteen patients (12.6%) had either unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain. Of these, 6 patients showed a visual analogue scale (VAS) ? 3, 9 patients showed 3 < VAS ? 7, and one patient showed a VAS > 7. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for walking pain and resting pain with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.14) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.15), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, knee flexion contracture was a significant protective factor with an OR of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.98). Conclusions Approximately 12.6% of ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy were found to have anterior knee pain in our hospital-based cohort study. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for anterior knee pain while walking and resting.

Choi, Young; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Kyoung Min; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, In Hyeok; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon

2014-01-01

294

[Botox in combined treatment of cerebral palsy in children].  

PubMed

Ten patients with cerebral palsy (CP) were treated with botox (botulinum toxin, type A). The next forms of the disease were observed in the patients: a spastic dysplegia, a spastic hemiplegia, a spastic-hyperkinetic form of CP. Botox was injected into the damaged muscles in a dose of 100-300 Units. Therapeutical effect was found in 90% of the patients, an average duration of the medical effect was 6-12 months. Because of the small cohort of the patients treated with botox there was made a preliminary conclusion about the high efficiency and safety of botox for CP treatment. The need of further clinical observations was emphasized. PMID:11195541

Kalinina, L V; Sologubov, E G; Luzinovich, V M; Dutikova, E M

2000-01-01

295

Selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic cerebral palsy: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The purpose of this report is to review the historical development, current operative techniques, selection criteria, outcomes,\\u000a and complications of selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for treatment of spastic cerebral palsy (CP).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  This review is based on a review of literature and personal observations.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  SDR has evolved from the 1960s onwards into a standard neurosurgical procedure for spastic CP.

Paul Steinbok

2007-01-01

296

Better Walking Performance in Older Children With Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often walk with a slower speed and a higher energy cost. Their walking performance and choice\\u000a of mobility method may vary in different environments. Independent mobility is important for activity and participation.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Questions\\/purposes  We described walking performance at different distances and environments in relation to gross motor function, CP subtype,\\u000a and age.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and Methods  We performed

Elisabet Rodby-Bousquet RPT; Gunnar Hägglund

297

Evaluation and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.  

PubMed

Brachial plexus birth palsy can result in permanent lifelong deficits and unfortunately continues to be relatively common despite advancements in obstetric care. The diagnosis can be made shortly after birth by physical examination, noting a lack of movement in the affected upper extremity. Treatment begins with passive range-of-motion exercises to maintain flexibility and tactile stimulation to provide sensory reeducation. Primary surgery consists of microsurgical nerve surgery, whereas secondary surgery consists of alternative microsurgical procedures, tendon transfers, or osteotomies, all of which improve outcomes in the short term. However, the long-term outcomes of current treatment recommendations remain unknown. PMID:24684916

Abzug, Joshua M; Kozin, Scott H

2014-04-01

298

Back pain in mothers of cerebral palsied children.  

PubMed

Background. Cerebral palsy (CP) leads to varying degrees of movement restrictions, imposing on the parents (especially mothers) a number of additional responsibilities. The burden of long-term care for a disabled child can lead to severe pain in various locations and of various intensity. Therefore, it is important to identify their risk factors and provide training for parents of CP children to educate them how to offer care not only to aid rehabilitation of their child, but also to avoid hazards to their own health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of back pain and its underlying causes in mothers of children with cerebral palsy. Material and methods. The study enrolled 179 mothers of CP children aged 3-18 years. The intensity, frequency and functional consequences of the pain were described according to the criteria formulated by Jackson and Moskowitz. The children's functional status was assessed on the basis of their medical records, the GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System) scale and an interview with their mothers. Pain intensity in the mother was compared with the functional status of the child and the level of his/her independence as well as other factors related to the daily care of a child with cerebral palsy. The nonparametric chi-square (x2) test was used for the statistical analyses, with the level of significance at p <0.05. Results. Most of the mothers caring for a CP child on a daily basis suffered from back pain of various location and intensity. The intensity of the pain was determined by the child's locomotor skills and independence level, the necessity of lifting the child several times a day, the number of additional tasks performed by the mother and the age and body weight of the child. At the same time, pain intensity was independent of maternal age, the possibility of having a replacement caregiver and (lack of) prior instruction on appropriate behaviours in their daily care for the disabled child. Conclusions. 1. Long-term daily care of children with cerebral palsy promotes the development of back pain in their mothers. 2. The incidence and intensity of pain depends primarily on the child's functional status and independence level, body weight, age, the need for repeatedly lifting the disabled child throughout the day and the number of additional tasks performed by the mother. PMID:25406923

Czupryna, Krzysztof; Nowotny-Czupryna, Olga; Nowotny, Janusz

2014-10-01

299

Incidence and management of diaphragmatic palsy in patients after cardiac surgery  

PubMed Central

Background: Diaphragm is the most important part of the respiratory system. Diaphragmatic palsy following cardiac surgery is not uncommon and can cause deterioration of pulmonary functions and attendant pulmonary complications. Objectives: Aim of this study was to observe the incidence of diaphragmatic palsy after off pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) as compared to conventional CABG and to assess the efficacy of chest physiotherapy on diaphragmatic palsy in post cardiac surgical patients. Design and Setting: An observational prospective interventional study done at a tertiary care cardiac centre. Patients: 2280 consecutive adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery from February 2005 to august 2005. Results: 30 patients out of 2280 (1.31%) developed diaphragmatic palsy. Patients were divided based on the presence or absence of symptoms viz. breathlessness at rest or exertion or with the change of posture along with hypoxemia and / or hypercapnia. Group I included 14 patients who were symptomatic (CABG n=13, post valve surgery n=1), While Group II included 16 asymptomatic patients (CABG n=12, post valve surgery n=4), 9 patients (64%) from Group I (n=14) and 4 patients (25%) from group II showed complete recovery from diaphragmatic palsy as demonstrated ultrasonographically. Conclusion: The incidence of diaphragmatic palsy was remarkably less in our adult cardiac surgical patients because most of the cardiac surgeries were performed off pump and intensive chest physiotherapy beginning shortly after extubation helped in complete or near complete recovery of diaphragmatic palsy. Chest Physiotherapy led to marked improvement in functional outcome following post cardiac surgery diaphragmatic palsy. We also conclude that ultrasonography is a simple valuable bed-side tool for rapid diagnosis of diaphragmatic palsy PMID:19742255

Mehta, Yatin; Vats, Mayank; Singh, Ajmer; Trehan, Naresh

2008-01-01

300

Surgical correction of equinus deformity in children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Equinus is the most common deformity in cerebral palsy. However, despite the large volume of published studies, there are\\u000a poor levels of evidence to support surgical intervention. This study was undertaken to examine the current evidence base for\\u000a the surgical management of equinus deformity in cerebral palsy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A systematic review of the literature using “equinus deformity”, “cerebral palsy” and “orthopaedic

Benjamin J. Shore; Nathan White; H. Kerr Graham

2010-01-01

301

Chinese scalp acupuncture for cerebral palsy in a child diagnosed with stroke in utero.  

PubMed

A 6-year-old patient with cerebral palsy was treated with Chinese scalp acupuncture. The Speech I, Speech II, Motor, Foot motor and sensory, and Balance areas were stimulated once a week, then every other week for 15 sessions. His dysarthria, ataxia, and weakness of legs, arms, and hands showed significant improvement from each scalp acupuncture treatment, and after 15 sessions, the patient had recovered completely. This case report demonstrates that Chinese scalp acupuncture can satisfactorily treat a child with cerebral palsy. More research and clinical trials are needed so that the potential of scalp acupuncture to treat cerebral palsy can be fully explored and utilized. PMID:24278796

Hao, Jason Jishun; Zhongren, Sun; Xian, Shi; Tiansong, Yang

2012-03-01

302

Temporary bilateral oculomotor nerve palsy as the sole presenting sign of a pituitary mass  

PubMed Central

A 65-year-old patient presented with isolated bilateral third nerve palsy. Neuroimaging demonstrated a 2 cm pituitary mass with extension into the cavernous sinus on the right. The patient went on to experience spontaneous complete resolution of symptoms with associated radiological shrinkage of the mass. Bilateral third nerve palsy is a very rare presenting sign, with only one previous case reported in the literature secondary to a pituitary adenoma. Spontaneous resolution of non-functioning pituitary tumours is reported to occur in approximately 10% of cases. However, there are only a small number of reports to date involving spontaneous regression of tumours with corresponding resolution of cranial nerve palsies. PMID:22110556

Liniker, Elizabeth; Hyatt, Penny

2009-01-01

303

Mirror book therapy for the treatment of idiopathic facial palsy.  

PubMed

We conducted a retrospective chart review to determine the effectiveness of treating idiopathic facial palsy with mirror book therapy in conjunction with facial physical rehabilitation. We compared outcomes in 15 patients who underwent mirror book therapy in addition to standard therapy with those of 10 patients who underwent standard rehabilitation therapy without the mirror book. Before and after treatment, patients in both groups were rated according to the Facial Grading System (FGS), the Facial Disability Index-Physical (FDIP), and the Facial Disability Index-Social (FDIS). Patients in the mirror therapy group had a mean increase of 24.9 in FGS score, 22.0 in FDIP score, and 25.0 in FDIS score, all of which represented statistically significant improvements over their pretreatment scores. Those who did not receive mirror book therapy had mean increases of 20.8, 19.0, 14.6, respectively; these, too, represented significant improvements over baseline, and thus there was no statistically significant difference in improvement between the two groups. Nevertheless, our results show that patients who used mirror book therapy in addition to standard facial rehabilitation therapy experienced significant improvements in the treatment of idiopathic facial palsy. While further studies are necessary to determine if it has a definitive, statistically significant advantage over standard therapy, we recommend adding this therapy to the rehabilitation program in view of its ease of use, low cost, and lack of side effects. PMID:25255351

Barth, Jodi Maron; Stezar, Gincy L; Acierno, Gabriela C; Kim, Thomas J; Reilly, Michael J

2014-09-01

304

Occipital Condyle Fracture With Isolated Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy  

PubMed Central

Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs) with selective involvement of the hypoglossal canal are rare. OCFs usually occur after major trauma and combine multiple fractures. We describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neck pain and a tongue deviation to the right side after a traffic accident. Severe limitations were detected during active and passive range of neck motion in all directions. A physical examination revealed a normal gag reflex and normal mobility of the palate, larynx, and shoulder girdle. He had normal taste and general sensation in his tongue. However, he presented with a tongue deviation to the right side on protrusion. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study revealed piecemeal deglutition due to decreased tongue mobility but no aspiration of food. Plain X-ray film findings were negative, but a computed tomography study with coronal reconstruction demonstrated a right OCF involving the hypoglossal canal. An electrodiagnostic study revealed evidence of right hypoglossal nerve palsy. We report a rare case of isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by an OCF. PMID:25379499

Yoon, Jin Won; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok

2014-01-01

305

Congenital suprabulbar palsy: a distinct clinical syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology.  

PubMed

Congenital suprabulbar palsy is clinically characterized by problems of feeding, swallowing, drooling, and dysarthria. Epilepsy, delayed motor, cognitive, and language development, as well as learning disabilities may co-exist. Aetiology of the syndrome is diverse, yet studies often attribute it to specific entities. We report on nine patients (seven males, two females; age range 2 to 20 years), highlighting the heterogeneous causes of suprabulbar palsy using neuroimaging and emphasizing the need for systematic investigation for early detection and management. We identified patients with symmetrical infarcts involving the perisylvian region, apart from already-recognized conditions, such as congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS; a neuronal migration disorder) and Worster-Drought syndrome. CBPS simulates Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome in adults because of staged stroke but differs in many respects. Anoxia or ischemia to the developing brain could be a common plausible aetiology. Studies with large groups of patients are required to differentiate the various subgroups and identify essential criteria for diagnosis. PMID:15344522

Suresh, Poovathinal A; Deepa, Cherukunnathu

2004-09-01

306

Occipital condyle fracture with isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy.  

PubMed

Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs) with selective involvement of the hypoglossal canal are rare. OCFs usually occur after major trauma and combine multiple fractures. We describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neck pain and a tongue deviation to the right side after a traffic accident. Severe limitations were detected during active and passive range of neck motion in all directions. A physical examination revealed a normal gag reflex and normal mobility of the palate, larynx, and shoulder girdle. He had normal taste and general sensation in his tongue. However, he presented with a tongue deviation to the right side on protrusion. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study revealed piecemeal deglutition due to decreased tongue mobility but no aspiration of food. Plain X-ray film findings were negative, but a computed tomography study with coronal reconstruction demonstrated a right OCF involving the hypoglossal canal. An electrodiagnostic study revealed evidence of right hypoglossal nerve palsy. We report a rare case of isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by an OCF. PMID:25379499

Yoon, Jin Won; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok; Lee, Ju Kang

2014-10-01

307

Arterial Structure and Function in Ambulatory Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Are Not Different from Healthy Controls  

PubMed Central

Physical inactivity in youth with cerebral palsy (CP) places them at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The current study assessed indices of arterial health in adolescents with CP, classified as levels I-II of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) (n = 11, age 13.2 ± 2.1?yr), in comparison to age- and sex-matched controls (n = 11, age 12.4 ± 2.3?yr). Groups were similar in anthropometric measurements, resting blood pressures, and heart rates. There were no group differences in brachial flow-mediated dilation (11.1 ± 7.8 versus 6.1 ± 3.6), carotid intima-media thickness (0.42 ± 0.04 versus 0.41 ± 0.03?mm), and distensibility (0.008 ± 0.002 versus 0.008 ± 0.002?mmHg) or central (4.3 ± 0.6 versus 4.1 ± 0.9?m/s) and peripheral pulse wave velocity (7.1 ± 1.7 versus 7.6 ± 1.1?m/s); CP versus healthy controls, respectively. Vigorous intensity physical activity (PA) was lower in the CP group (CP: 38 ± 80?min versus controls: 196 ± 174?min); groups were similar in light and moderate intensity PA levels. Arterial health of ambulatory youth with CP is not different from a control group despite lower vigorous PA levels. Similar studies need to examine individuals with more pronounced mobility limitations (GMFCS level III–V). PMID:22778755

Martin, Audra A.; Cotie, Lisa M.; Timmons, Brian W.; Gorter, Jan Willem; MacDonald, Maureen J.

2012-01-01

308

Claude's syndrome associated with supranuclear horizontal gaze palsy caused by dorsomedial midbrain infarction.  

PubMed

Claude's syndrome caused by dorsal midbrain lesion is characterized by ipsilateral third nerve palsy and contralateral ataxia. To date, reports in the literature concerning Claude's syndrome associated with the midbrain paresis of horizontal gaze are rare. A 62-year-old man suddenly developed left third cranial nerve palsy, right lateral gaze palsy, and right ataxia. Intact Bell's phenomenon and preserved right horizontal oculocephalic reflex suggested the lateral gaze palsy in the right eye was supranuclear in nature. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an infarction in the left dorsomedial midbrain. Although the red nucleus has often been suggested as the lesion site responsible for Claude's syndrome, a lesion of the superior cerebellar peduncle just below and medial to the red nucleus could be responsible for this syndrome. This case demonstrates neurological heterogeneity of midbrain infarction. PMID:16252618

Fong, Chin-Shih

2005-09-01

309

The goals of orthopedic tratment in cerebral palsy: improved function or quality of life?  

PubMed

The paper presents the orthopedic treatment phylosophy of spastic cerebral palsy children. The indications for surgery are established on the functional basis, dependent on the type paresis. PMID:17679890

Marciniak, Witold

2002-01-31

310

Gait changes following myofascial structural integration (Rolfing) observed in 2 children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Children with spastic cerebral palsy experience difficulty with ambulation. Structural changes in muscle and fascia may play a role in abnormal gait. Myofascial structural integration (Rolfing) is a manual therapy that manipulates muscle and soft tissues to loosen fascia layers, reposition muscles, and facilitate alignment. This study aimed to document (1) gait characteristics of 2 children with cerebral palsy and (2) effects of myofascial structural integration on their gait. Children received 3 months of weekly therapy sessions by an experienced practitioner. Gait parameters were recorded at baseline and after treatment using an electronic walkway. Children with cerebral palsy demonstrated abnormal velocity and cadence, decreased step length and single support times, and increased double support time. After treatment, both children demonstrated improvement for 3 months in cadence and double support time. The objective gait analyses demonstrated temporary improvements after myofascial structural integration in children with spastic cerebral palsy. PMID:24989994

Hansen, Alexis B; Price, Karen S; Loi, Elizabeth C; Buysse, Christina A; Jaramillo, Theresa M; Pico, Elaine L; Feldman, Heidi M

2014-10-01

311

Efficacy of intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy: A randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIntractable spasticity can be treated effectively with continuous infusion of intrathecal baclofen. Because evidence for its use in the treatment of children with spastic cerebral palsy is lacking, we conducted a randomised controlled trial.

Marjanke A. Hoving; Elisabeth P. M. van Raak; Geert H. J. J. Spincemaille; Liesbeth J. Palmans; Jules G. Becher; Johan S. H. Vles

2009-01-01

312

The relationship between gross motor function and manual ability in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

A retrospective cohort study was conducted to describe the relationship between gross motor function and manual ability in children with cerebral palsy and explore differences between cerebral palsy subtypes and associated comorbidities. Children with cerebral palsy born between 1999 and 2008 were included from the Registre de la Paralyse Cérébrale de Québec identifying 332 children. The overall agreement between Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification Scale Levels was moderate (kappa 0.457, standard error 0.034) with a strong positive correlation (Spearman rho of 0.820, standard error 0.023). This agreement was moderate among children with spastic quadriparesis and dysketic cerebral palsy, fair in children with spastic diplegia, and poor in children with spastic hemiplegia. Children with cognitive impairment showed a higher correlation than those without cognitive impairment. The correlation between gross motor function and manual ability in children with CP varies based on neurologic subtype and cognitive level. PMID:23112248

Oskoui, Maryam; Majnemer, Annette; Dagenais, Lynn; Shevell, Michael I

2013-12-01

313

The Evaluation and Cultivation of Spatial and Linguistic Abilities in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

The work of the Cerebral Palsy project (members: Seymour Papert, Sylvia Weir, Jose Valente and Gary Drescher) over the past eighteen months is summarized, and the next phase of activity is outlined. The issues to be ...

Weir, Sylvia

1979-10-01

314

Restless Leg Syndrome in Different Types of Demyelinating Neuropathies: A Single-Center Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Methods: Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Results: Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). Conclusions: our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy. Citation: Luigetti M; Del Grande A; Testani E; Bisogni G; Losurdo A; Giannantoni NM; Mazza S; Sabatelli M; Della Marca G. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):945-949. PMID:23997707

Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

2013-01-01

315

Why is there a modifying effect of gestational age on risk factors for cerebral palsy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate risk factors for cerebral palsy in relation to gestational age.Design: Three case-control studies within a geographically defined cohort.Setting: The former Oxfordshire Health Authority.Participants: A total of 235 singleton children with cerebral palsy not of postnatal origin, born between 1984 and 1993, identified from the Oxford Register of Early Childhood Impairment; 646 controls matched for gestation in three

C Greenwood; P Yudkin; S Sellers; L Impey; P Doyle

2005-01-01

316

EVect of severity of disability on survival in north east England cerebral palsy cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims—To investigate the eVect of motor and cognitive disabilities on the survival of people on the North of England Col- laborative Cerebral Palsy Survey, and compare this with other published results. Methods—The cerebral palsy cohort con- sists of 1960-1990 births in Northumber- land, Newcastle, and North Tyneside health districts. Survival and cause of death were analysed in relation to data

J L Hutton; A F Colver; P C Mackie

317

Improvements in Muscle Symmetry in Children with Cerebral Palsy After Equine-Assisted Therapy (Hippotherapy)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the effect of hippotherapy (physical therapy utilizing the movement of a horse) on muscle activity in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Design: Pretest\\/post-test control group. Setting\\/location: Therapeutic Riding of Tucson (TROT), Tucson, AZ. Subjects: Fifteen (15) children ranging from 4 to 12 years of age diagnosed with spastic cere- bral palsy. Interventions: Children meeting inclusion criteria were

William Benda; Nancy H. McGibbon; Kathryn L. Grant

2003-01-01

318

Effects of Prolonged Standing on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged standing on gait characteristics in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Six children with spastic cerebral palsy participated in this study with an average age of 6.5 years (SD = 2.5, range = 4.0-9.8 years). A reverse baseline design (A-B-A) was used over a 9-week period. During…

Salem, Yasser; Lovelace-Chandler, Venita; Zabel, Reta J.; McMillan, Amy Gross

2010-01-01

319

Potentially asphyxiating conditions and spastic cerebral palsy in infants of normal birth weight  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to examine the association of cerebral palsy with conditions that can interrupt oxygen supply to the fetus as a primary pathogenetic event.STUDY DESIGN: A population-based case-control study was performed in four California counties, 1983 through 1985, comparing birth records of 46 children with disabling spastic cerebral palsy without recognized prenatal brain lesions and 378 randomly selected

Karin B. Nelson; Judith K. Grether

1998-01-01

320

Validity of gait parameters for hip flexor contracture in patients with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Psoas contracture is known to cause abnormal hip motion in patients with cerebral palsy. The authors investigated the clinical relevance of hip kinematic and kinetic parameters, and 3D modeled psoas length in terms of discriminant validty, convergent validity, and responsiveness. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with cerebral palsy (mean age 6.9 years) and 28 normal children (mean age 7.6 years) were

Sun Jong Choi; Chin Youb Chung; Kyoung Min Lee; Dae Gyu Kwon; Sang Hyeong Lee; Moon Soek Park

2011-01-01

321

Treadmill training with partial body weight support in nonambulatory patients with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the potential role of treadmill training with partial body weight support in nonambulatory children with cerebral palsy.Study Design: Open, nonrandomized, baseline-treatment study.Setting: An outpatient rehabilitation clinic.Subjects: Ten children with cerebral palsy. Six children (group A) were nonambulatory, and four children (group B) either required continuous physical help (two cases) or were able to walk short distances with

Martin R. Schindl; Claudia Forstner; Helmut Kern; Stefan Hesse

2000-01-01

322

Cranial osteopathy for children with cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesTo estimate the effect of cranial osteopathy on the general health and wellbeing, including physical functioning, of children with cerebral palsy.DesignPragmatic randomised controlled trial.Participants142 children from Greater London and the South West of England, aged 5–12 years with cerebral palsy.InterventionParticipants were randomised to six sessions of cranial osteopathy with a registered osteopath or a waiting list with partial attention control

Katrina Wyatt; Vanessa Edwards; Linda Franck; Nicky Britten; Siobhan Creanor; Andrew Maddick; Stuart Logan

2011-01-01

323

Motor palsies of cranial nerves (excluding VII) after vaccination: reports to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.  

PubMed

We reviewed cranial nerve palsies, other than VII, that have been reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We examined patterns for differences in vaccine types, seriousness, age, and clinical characteristics. We identified 68 reports of cranial nerve palsies, most commonly involving the oculomotor (III), trochlear (IV), and abducens (VI) nerves. Isolated cranial nerve palsies, as well as palsies occurring as part of a broader clinical entity, were reported. Forty reports (59%) were classified as serious, suggesting that a cranial nerve palsy may sometimes be the harbinger of a broader and more ominous clinical entity, such as a stroke or encephalomyelitis. There was no conspicuous clustering of live vs. inactivated vaccines. The patient age range spanned the spectrum from infants to the elderly. Independent data may help to clarify whether, when, and to what extent the rates of cranial nerve palsies following particular vaccines may exceed background levels. PMID:24231288

Woo, Emily Jane; Winiecki, Scott K; Ou, Alan C

2014-02-01

324

Borreliosis as a cause of peripheral facial palsy: a multi-center study.  

PubMed

Borreliosis is known to be a common cause of peripheral facial palsy in Stockholm and its vicinity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency and characteristics of borreliosis among patients with peripheral facial palsy in different parts of Sweden. All serological tests were performed in one laboratory. Ten Swedish Ear Nose and Throat clinics participated in a prospective 1-year study of patients seeking medical attention for acute peripheral facial palsy. Twenty-eight (6%) out of totally 446 patients fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of borreliosis. The frequency varied between 1 and 16% and was highest along the southeast coast of Sweden whereas no case was reported from the northern part of the country. Borreliosis was more common among children with facial palsy than among adults. The infection occurred during all seasons although it appears to be less frequent during the spring months. Only a minority of the borrelial patients had a history of a preceding tick bite or erythema migrans. The fairly low overall frequency of this secondary stage of borreliosis in the study may be a result of better knowledge of the disease and earlier treatment of its early manifestations. In Sweden's endemic areas borreliosis is a common cause of peripheral facial palsy, and therefore all patients with facial palsy in these regions should be examined for borrelial infection. PMID:7478454

Engervall, K; Carlsson-Nordlander, B; Hederstedt, B; Berggren, D; Bjerkhoel, A; Carlborg, A; Grenner, J; Hanner, P; Högmo, A; Isholt, R M

1995-01-01

325

Os Odontoideum as a Rare but Possible Complication in Children With Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy: A Clinical and Neuroradiologic Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors describe a 12-year-old boy with dyskinetic (athetoid-dystonic subtype) cerebral palsy and os odontoideum. Dystonic and choreoathetotic components in cerebral palsy are movement disorders that are difficult to treat and cause major disability. Dystonic posturing causes excessive flexion, extension, and rotation of the neck. Repetitive abnormal movements in patients with this type of cerebral palsy give rise to a

Antonio Trabacca; Franca Dicuonzo; Leonarda Gennaro; Michele Palma; Marilena Cacudi; Luciana Losito; Marta De Rinaldis

2011-01-01

326

Therapeutic Potential of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Background. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a severe disabling disease with worldwide incidence being 2 to 3 per 1000 live births. CP was considered as a noncurable, nonreparative disorder, but stem cell therapy offers a potential treatment for CP. Objective. The present study evaluates the safety and efficacy of autologous bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BMMNCs) transplantation in CP patient. Material and Methods. In the present study, five infusions of autologous stem cells were injected intrathecally. Changes in neurological deficits and improvements in function were assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS-E&R) scale. Results. Significant motor, sensory, cognitive, and speech improvements were observed. Bowel and bladder control has been achieved. On the GMFCS-E&R level, the patient was promoted from grade III to I. Conclusion. In this study, we report that intrathecal infusion of autologous BMMNCs seems to be feasible, effective, and safe with encouraging functional outcome improvements in CP patient. PMID:23259143

Purandare, Chaitanya; Shitole, D. G.; Belle, Vaijayantee; Kedari, Aarti; Bora, Neeta; Joshi, Meghnad

2012-01-01

327

Hip fusion as hip salvage procedure in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The treatment of the spastic hip in Cerebral Palsy (CP) remains a challenge especially in cases of advance changes. Many options are available and the key for a good outcome is to find the best surgical procedure to an individualized patient. The hip fusion is one of the surgical options. The authors presented a group of spastic CP with painful chronic hip subluxation and dislocation treated with hip fusion with a mean follow-up period of 14.5 years. Surgical technique, post-operative management and outcomes were shown, also with the observations done regarding the evolution of the contralateral hip after the hip fusion. They concluded that the hip arthrodesis is an option for patients with spastic CP with painful subluxation or dislocated hips with the goal of pain relief maintain or improve functional status, and facilitating the care. The best candidate is a young ambulatory patient with normal contralateral hip and normal spinal alignment. PMID:25207734

Fucs, Patricia M De Moraes Barros; Yamada, Helder H

2014-01-01

328

ABSTRACT: The motions of lower-limb extension, adduction, and internal rotation are frequently coupled in persons with cerebral palsy (CP) and are  

E-print Network

coupled in persons with cerebral palsy (CP) and are commonly referred to as an extension synergy. However ABNORMAL COUPLING OF KNEE AND HIP MOMENTS DURING MAXIMAL EXERTIONS IN PERSONS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY DARRYL G, such as walking, because the ob- Abbreviations: A/D, analog-to-digital; CP, cerebral palsy; EMG, electro- myogram

Delp, Scott

329

When the Sensory Handicapped Child Has Cerebral Palsy. Part I: Physical Management. Part II: Deaf-Blind Curriculum and the Child with Cerebral Palsy. Working Papers in Developmental Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper addresses issues involved in the management of and curriculum for children with sensory impairments combined with cerebral palsy. The first part details typical deformities and their causes in children with cerebral palsy, and describes (with illustrations) techniques for therapeutic handling and positioning in daily living tasks at home…

Fieber, Nancy M.

330

Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

Buesch, Francisca Eugster

2010-01-01

331

Physical activity and fantasies in the life of an adult with cerebral palsy: the motivator, looking for love  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many people with cerebral palsy experience personal and social barriers to engaging in physical activity that may lead to sedentary living. To understand why such inactivity may occur, we examined the meanings and experiences of physical activity in the life of an adult with cerebral palsy (David, aged 27). In this case study, we interviewed David about his life and

Cadeyrn J. Gaskin; Mark B. Andersen; Tony Morris

2011-01-01

332

Electrophysiological characteristics of lesions in facial palsies of different etiologies. A study using electrical and magnetic stimulation techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using magnetic stimulation techniques in addition to conventional electrical stimulation, the entire facial motor pathway can be assessed electrophysiologically. To study the diagnostic yield of these examinations, 174 patients with facial palsies of a variety of etiologies were examined (85 Bell's palsies, 24 Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), 19 Lyme borreliosis, 17 zoster oticus, 12 meningeal affections, 10 brain-stem disorders and 7

K. M. Rösler; M. R. Magistris; F. X. Glocker; A. Kohler; G. Deuschl; C. W. Hess

1995-01-01

333

The Use of Computers and Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices by Children and Young with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to determine the use of computers and assistive devices amongst children with cerebral palsy (CP) and establish the satisfaction level of both users and educational staff. The study was carried out with 30 children with cerebral palsy. A questionnaire was designed to characterize the use of new technologies and…

Garcia, Thais Pousada; Loureiro, Javier Pereira; Gonzalez, Betania Groba; Riveiro, Laura Nieto; Sierra, Alejandro Pazos

2011-01-01

334

Classification of Speech and Language Profiles in 4-Year-Old Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Prospective Preliminary Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In this study, the authors proposed and tested a preliminary speech and language classification system for children with cerebral palsy. Method: Speech and language assessment data were collected in a laboratory setting from 34 children with cerebral palsy (CP; 18 male, 16 female) with a mean age of 54 months (SD = 1.8). Measures of…

Hustad, Katherine C.; Gorton, Kristin; Lee, Jimin

2010-01-01

335

Physical Activity in the Life of a Woman with Cerebral Palsy: Physiotherapy, Social Exclusion, Competence, and Intimacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although physical activity can have substantial mental and physical health benefits, people with cerebral palsy usually lead sedentary lives. To understand, at an individual level, this inactivity, we interviewed a 29-year-old minimally active woman with cerebral palsy (Alana) about the meanings and experiences of physical activity throughout her…

Gaskin, Cadeyrn J.; Andersen, Mark B.; Morris, Tony

2012-01-01

336

Quantifying muscle activity in non-ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy before and after selective dorsal rhizotomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is a condition that results in varying degrees of functional deficits. The goal of this study was to develop an objective measure of muscle activity during a prescribed voluntary motor task in non-ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy. While performing a simultaneous hip\\/knee flexion task from the supine position, followed by return to the starting position, electromyographic and

Julie E. Perry; Brian L. Davis; Mark G. Luciano

2001-01-01

337

Magnesium sulfate for tocolysis and risk of spastic cerebral palsy in premature children born to women without preeclampsia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Our aim was to examine magnesium sulfate tocolysis and cerebral palsy in infants born prematurely to women without preeclampsia. Study Design: We conducted a retrospective case-control study of infants with birth weights 3 hours after admission, and had survived to age 2 years. Results: Among 170 children with cerebral palsy and 288 control subjects, similar proportions of case mothers

Judith K. Grether; Jenny Hoogstrate; Eileen Walsh-Greene; Karin B. Nelson

2000-01-01

338

Do the hamstrings and adductors contribute to excessive internal rotation of the hip in persons with cerebral palsy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with cerebral palsy frequently walk with excessive internal rotation of the hip. Spastic medial hamstrings or adductors are presumed to contribute to the excessive internal rotation in some patients; however, the capacity of these muscles to produce internal rotation during walking in individuals with cerebral palsy has not been adequately investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine

Allison S Arnold; Deanna J Asakawa; Scott L Delp

2000-01-01

339

Cerebral Palsy: General Information. Fact Sheet Number 2 = La Paralisis Cerebral: Informacion General. Fact Sheet Number 18.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is offered in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy: spastic, athetoid,…

Interstate Research Associates, McLean, VA.

340

Association of cerebral palsy with Apgar score in low and normal birthweight infants: population based cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To assess the association of Apgar score 5 minutes after birth with cerebral palsy in both normal weight and low birthweight children, and also the association with the cerebral palsy subdiagnoses of quadriplegia, diplegia, and hemiplegia.Design Population based cohort study.Setting The Medical Birth Registry of Norway was used to identify all babies born between 1986 and 1995. These data

Kari Kveim Lie; Else-Karin Grøholt; Anne Eskild

2010-01-01

341

The effect of walking speed on hamstrings length and lengthening velocity in children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with cerebral palsy often walk with reduced knee extension in terminal swing, which can be associated with short length or slow lengthening velocity of hamstrings muscles during gait. This study investigated the role of two factors that may contribute to such short and slow hamstrings: walking speed and spasticity. 17 children with spastic cerebral palsy and 11 matched typically

Marjolein M. van der Krogt; Caroline A. M. Doorenbosch; Jaap Harlaar

2009-01-01

342

Upper Extremity Function and Occupational Performance in Children With Spastic Cerebral Palsy Following Lower Extremity Botulinum Toxin Injections  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the effect of botulinum toxin A injections to the lower extremities of spastic cerebral palsy children on upper limb body function and occupational performance. A total of 16 children with spastic cerebral palsy, aged 2 to 8 years, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I-IV, referred to a child neurology outpatient clinic for botulinum toxin A injections to

Tal Keren-Capelovitch; Tal Jarus; Aviva Fattal-Valevski

2010-01-01

343

Effect of Cardiorespiratory Training on Aerobic Fitness and Carryover to Activity In Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The question under consideration was does cardiorespiratory training improve aerobic fitness in children with cerebral palsy and is there any carryover into activity? The study design consisted of a systematic review of randomized trials using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Participants were children of school age with cerebral palsy.…

Butler, Jane M.; Scianni, Aline; Ada, Louise

2010-01-01

344

Evaluation of a Device to Exercise Hip Extensor Muscles in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Clinical and Field Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research includes the effectiveness of a tricycle (hip extensor tricycle) designed to isolate and exercise the hip extensor muscles in children with cerebral palsy. Five children diagnosed with cerebral palsy were given hip extensor tricycles for home use during an 8-week test period. The hip extensor strength and gait pattern of the subjects were recorded at 2-week intervals. Additional

Donald S. Bloswick; Eric M. King; Don Brown; Judith R. Gooch; Monica Peters

1994-01-01

345

Resting position of the head and malocclusion in a group of patients with cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Cerebral palsy are found as a result of these disorders, along with associated neuromuscular functional alterations that affect the resting position of the head. In this context, the resting position of the head could be responsible for several skeletal and dental occlusal disorders among patients with cerebral palsy. Objective: To assess the presence of malocclusions in patients with cerebral palsy, define the most frequent types of malocclusions, and evaluate how the resting position of the head may be implicated in the development of such malocclusions. Study design: Forty-four patients aged between 12-55 years (18 males and 26 females) were studied. Occlusal conditions, the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), changes in the resting position of the head, and breathing and swallowing functions were assessed. Results: Orthodontic treatment was required by 70.8% of the patients, the most frequent malocclusions being molar class II, open bite and high overjet. These individuals showed altered breathing and swallowing functions, as well as habit and postural disorders. The resting position of the head, especially the hyperextended presentation, was significantly correlated to high DAI scores. Conclusions: The results obtained suggest that patients with cerebral palsy are more susceptible to present malocclusions, particularly molar class II malocclusion, increased open bite, and high overjet. Such alterations in turn are more common in patients with a hyperextended position of the head. Key words:Cerebral palsy, malocclusion, head position, disabled patients. PMID:24596627

Martinez-Mihi, Victoria; Orellana, Lorena M.; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier

2014-01-01

346

Viper bite causing an isolated lower motor neuron-type of facial palsy.  

PubMed

We describe an unusual case of viper (Daboia russelii) bite in a 48-year-old man from the state of Karnataka in southern India. He presented in a hypotensive state with a left lower motor neuron-type of facial palsy, necrosis at the site of the bite and acute renal failure. His laboratory parameters revealed renal failure and deranged coagulation parameters. He was treated with intravenous antibiotics and polyvalent antiserum venom, and dialysed in view of the renal failure. His renal function and coagulation abnormalities improved, and the facial palsy recovered with the treatment. The snake bite located away from the face, the facial palsy occurring a few hours after the venom injection and the rapid recovery following antivenin administration, support that the palsy was a direct result of systemic envenomation. To the best of our knowledge, an isolated lower motor neuron-type of facial palsy as a manifestation of systemic toxicity of a viper bite, has not been previously reported. PMID:19907878

Baig, W W; Prabhu, A R; Kumar, C

2009-10-01

347

Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetry of Facial Muscles in Healthy Patients with Facial Palsy  

PubMed Central

Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not yet been established systematically to detect structural muscular changes after facial nerve lesion. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate quantitative assessment of MRI muscle volume data for facial muscles. Methods: Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with facial palsy were recruited. Using manual or semiautomatic segmentation of 3T MRI, volume measurements were performed for the frontal, procerus, risorius, corrugator supercilii, orbicularis oculi, nasalis, zygomaticus major, zygomaticus minor, levator labii superioris, orbicularis oris, depressor anguli oris, depressor labii inferioris, and mentalis, as well as for the masseter and temporalis as masticatory muscles for control. Results: All muscles except the frontal (identification in 4/10 volunteers), procerus (4/10), risorius (6/10), and zygomaticus minor (8/10) were identified in all volunteers. Sex or age effects were not seen (all P > 0.05). There was no facial asymmetry with exception of the zygomaticus major (larger on the left side; P = 0.012). The exploratory examination of 5 patients revealed considerably smaller muscle volumes on the palsy side 2 months after facial injury. One patient with chronic palsy showed substantial muscle volume decrease, which also occurred in another patient with incomplete chronic palsy restricted to the involved facial area. Facial nerve reconstruction led to mixed results of decreased but also increased muscle volumes on the palsy side compared with the healthy side. Conclusions: First systematic quantitative MRI volume measures of 5 different clinical presentations of facial paralysis are provided. PMID:25289366

Volk, Gerd F.; Karamyan, Inna; Klingner, Carsten M.; Reichenbach, Jurgen R.

2014-01-01

348

Most frequent gait patterns in diplegic spastic cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To identify gait patterns in a large group of children with diplegic cerebral palsy and to characterize each group according to age, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level, Gait Deviation Index (GDI) and previous surgical procedures. METHODS: One thousand eight hundred and five patients were divided in seven groups regarding observed gait patterns: jump knee, crouch knee, recurvatum knee, stiff knee, asymmetric, mixed and non-classified. RESULTS: The asymmetric group was the most prevalent (48.8%). The jump knee (9.6 years old) and recurvatum (9.4 years old) groups had mean age lower than the other groups. The lowest GDI (43.58) was found in the crouch group. There were more children classified within GMFCS level III in the crouch and mixed groups. Previous surgical procedures on the triceps surae were more frequent in stiff knee and mixed groups. The jump knee group received less and the stiff-knee group more surgical procedures at hamstrings than others. CONCLUSIONS: The asymmetrical cases were the most frequent within a group of diplegic patients. Individuals with crouch gait pattern were characterized by the lowest GDI and the highest prevalence of GMFCS III, while patients with stiff knee exhibited a higher percentage of previous hamstring lengthening in comparison to the other groups. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study. PMID:25246849

de Morais, Mauro Cesar; Kawamura, Catia Miyuki; Lopes, Jose Augusto Fernandes; Neves, Daniella Lins; Cardoso, Michelle de Oliveira; Caiafa, Jordana Brandao

2014-01-01

349

A holistic approach to the management of Erb's palsy  

PubMed Central

A 4.5-month-old female baby, presenting with complete paralysis of right upper limb with typical waiter's tip deformity, diagnosed as Erb's palsy was brought to Sri Ganapati Sachchidananda Hospital. Patient was treated with an integrated approach of physiotherapy and Ayurvedic treatment with an intention of aiding faster recovery of the patient to lead a near normal life. As per Ayurvedic classics, this condition can be correlated to Ekangavata (Vata effecting any one part of the body), which is Apatarpana in nature (diseases with deprived growth of body tissue). Hence, the choice of treatment is Santarpana Chikitsa (nourishing treatment). Santarpana Bahyopakramas (nourishing external treatment modalities) such as Ashwagandhabalalakshadi Taila (Ayurvedic medicated oil) Abhyanga (oleation therapy) and Shastikashali Anna Lepa (application of processed rice paste) were administered along with electrical stimulation (physiotherapy modality), both galvanic and faradic current in three sessions. Appreciable results were observed in the form of reduction of disparity in length and mid-arm circumference of right upper limb compared to unaffected left upper limb and the muscle power too improved from zero to four, facilitating patient to near normal movement. PMID:24459391

Srilakshmi, Dasari; Chaganti, Sreelakshmi

2013-01-01

350

Spastic Velocity Threshold Constrains Functional Performance in Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate a quantitative, velocity-based assessment of spasticity in the quadriceps and hamstrings muscles of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to show the effects of spasticity in constraining knee velocities during fast gait. Design A quantitative comparison of neuromuscular and biomechanical performance in patients with CP and controls without CP. Setting Movement analysis laboratory within a university clinical referral center. Participants A convenience sample of 18 ambulatory patients with CP and 11 control subjects without CP. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Spastic threshold velocity recorded from electromyographic response during passive isovelocity knee movement was compared with knee angular velocity during fast walking, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) scores, and Ashworth Scale score. Results Patients with measurable spasticity showed slower peak knee angular velocity during walking than patients without spasticity (P<.005). A significant correlation existed between spastic threshold velocity and peak knee angular velocity during fast walking (r=.85, P<.001). Spastic threshold velocity correlated significantly with GMFM (r=.58, P<.05) but not with Ashworth score. Conclusions The velocity dependency of spasticity can be measured by electromyograph and dynamometer to determine spastic threshold velocity. Spastic threshold velocity correlated with limitations in joint angular velocity during walking and functional performance. PMID:13680575

Tuzson, Ann E.; Abel, Mark F.

2006-01-01

351

Everyday life and social consequences of cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The disclosure of diagnosis for a child with cerebral palsy (CP) is a highly stressful experience to the parents. The experience can be alleviated by clarity, empathy, and an emphasis on the child's resources and abilities. Despite chronic stress many families function well and manage to strengthen the child and family's resources through spousal and family support, maintenance of hope for further development, and active care taking. The caregiver burden can be divided into an objective burden (socio-structural constraints) and a subjective burden (emotional distress). The subjective burden of care seems less important, as illustrated by the quote: "We are tired, not sad." Quality of life is similar in 8- to 12-year-old European children with CP and controls, whereas participation in daily life was lower for children with CP. Participation varies significantly among countries implying that some countries can improve in this area. In a study from Denmark only 29% of adults with CP were employed (versus 88% of controls), 25% were cohabitating, and 20% had children. These long-term achievements could be predicted from development quotient, CP type, and motor impairment at age 5. The goal of habilitation is integration into society, which is not achieved for the majority. PMID:23622165

Uldall, Peter

2013-01-01

352

Prevalance of Obesity in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Obesity are epidemic among children and adolescents. There is worldwide tendency of increasing prevalence of obesity in children. Cerebral palsy (CP) is leading cause of childhood disability.studies have proposed mechanism of children with disability leading towards obesity and related health risks. So this study is aimed at determining whether such trend of obesity exists in children with CP in terms of BMI and WHR. Study Design: Cross -sectional study. Materials and Methods: Participants: 40 children diagnosed as CP age 2-18 years, GMFCS I-IV. Procedure: BMI; kg/m2 was calculated from height and weight. WHR was calculated by measuring waist circumference and hip circumference. BMI percentiles were reported according to sex-specific age group standards for growth set by the WHO growth charts. Results: Out of total CP subjects 40% were found to be underweight, 45%, 7.5% and 7.5% were found to be normal, overweight and obese respectively according to BMI. Whereas 20%, 20% 60% were found to be at high risk, moderate risk and high risk of obesity respectively according to WHR. Conclusion: In our patient population, analysis of BMI and WHR suggests that children with CP have a high rate of overweight and are at risk of overweight, particularly of central obesity.

Bansal, Ankita; Diwan, Jasmin; Vyas, Neeta

2014-01-01

353

Intrinsic connectivity network disruption in progressive supranuclear palsy  

PubMed Central

Objective Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) has been conceptualized as a large-scale network disruption, but the specific network targeted has not been fully characterized. We sought to delineate the affected network in patients with clinical PSP. Methods Using task-free fMRI, we mapped intrinsic connectivity to the dorsal midbrain tegmentum (dMT), a region which shows focal atrophy in PSP. Two healthy control groups (1 young, 1 older) were used to define and replicate the normal connectivity pattern, and patients with PSP were compared to an independent matched healthy control group on measures of network connectivity. Results Healthy young and older subjects showed a convergent pattern of connectivity to the dMT, including brainstem, cerebellar, diencephalic, basal ganglia, and cortical regions involved in skeletal, oculomotor, and executive control. Patients with PSP showed significant connectivity disruptions within this network, particularly within cortico-subcortical and cortico-brainstem interactions. Patients with more severe functional impairment showed lower mean dMT network connectivity scores. Interpretation This study defines a PSP-related intrinsic connectivity network in the healthy brain and demonstrates the sensitivity of network-based imaging methods to PSP-related physiological and clinical changes. PMID:23536287

Gardner, Raquel C.; Boxer, Adam L.; Trujillo, Andrew; Mirsky, Jacob B.; Guo, Christine C.; Gennatas, Efstathios D.; Heuer, Hilary W.; Fine, Eric; Zhou, Juan; Kramer, Joel H.; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William W.

2013-01-01

354

Saccadic Palsy after Cardiac Surgery: Serial Neuroimaging Findings during a 6-Year Follow-Up  

PubMed Central

Background Patients who develop horizontal and vertical saccadic palsy after cardiac surgery have rarely been described. Although most such patients exhibit distinct neurological deficits, their brain MRI findings are almost normal. In addition, functional neuroimaging of such patients has never been reported. Case Report A 43-year-old woman with dysarthria, dysphagia, and horizontal and vertical saccadic palsy after cardiac surgery was followed up for about 6 years; serial brain MRIs has been performed during this period, including susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) and [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Multiple microbleeds in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brainstem, and glucose hypometabolism in the brainstem, cerebellum, and multiple cortical areas. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of saccadic palsy after cardiac surgery with serial SWI and [18F]-FDG-PET performed to explore the possible cerebral lesions. PMID:25324889

Kim, Eun-Joo; Choi, Kwang-Dong; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Jong S.

2014-01-01

355

Common peroneal nerve palsy secondary to peroneus longus abscess: case report.  

PubMed

Muscle abscess presenting as nerve palsy is rare and has not been previously reported in the common peroneal nerve (CPN). The objective of this case report is to describe the diagnosis and treatment of an uncommon presentation of peroneal abscess in the leg of an otherwise healthy man. We present a case of CPN palsy in a 50-year-old immunocompetent man with no other comorbid medical condition secondary to peroneus longus abscess. The diagnosis was suggested by magnetic resonance imaging examination and confirmed by intraoperative findings. After surgical drainage of the abscess, the patient made a complete recovery. A review of the literature confirms that peroneus longus abscess giving rise to CPN palsy has not been described. Early diagnosis and surgical drainage of the compressing abscess can produce a favorable outcome. PMID:22342606

Agrawal, Mayank; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Wangchuk, Tsering; Sural, Sumit; Dhal, Anil

2012-01-01

356

3-Methyl glutaconic aciduria in Iraqi Jewish children may be misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

It is generally accepted that patients with cerebral palsy suffer from a static encephalopathy causing a non-progressive disorder of posture and/or movement. We describe 7 patients from 5 families who were initially diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Eventually, excessive excretion of urinary 3-methyl glutaconic acid (3-MGA) was found. The data of our 7 patients are quite similar to the clinical description of Costeff et al (1989): Jewish-Iraqi origin (7/7), consanguinity (2/7), involuntary movements (5/7), ataxia (6/7), pyramidal involvement (6/7) and optic atrophy (6/7). The cognitive functions were intact in 5/7 and 2/7 showed mild to moderate mental retardation. The mean delay in the definitive diagnosis was 9 years. Cerebral palsy-like symptoms accompanied by optic atrophy and extrapyramidal signs should call for extensive metabolic evaluation including the determination of urinary 3-MGA. PMID:9553953

Straussberg, R; Brand, N; Gadoth, N

1998-02-01

357

Functional and fixed orthodontic treatment in a child with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Cerebral palsy is a permanent neuromuscular motor disorder that results from injury in the developing brain during the prenatal or postnatal period. Common functional and craniofacial problems related to cerebral palsy include impaired swallowing, chewing, and speech; maxillary transverse deficiency; excessive anterior facial height; and Class II malocclusion. This article reports the treatment of a 12-year-old girl with ataxic cerebral palsy; she had a dental and skeletal Class II malocclusion, maxillary transverse deficiency, and severe crowding in both arches. Treatment included rapid maxillary expansion with simultaneous functional therapy and fixed orthodontic extraction therapy in a period of 2 years 3 months. Vertical control was maintained by a vertical chincap. An acceptable occlusion and improvements in facial esthetics, speech, and oral function were achieved. PMID:24703291

??can, Hakan Necip; Metin-Gürsoy, Gamze; Kale-Varlik, Selin

2014-04-01

358

Social cognitive deficits and their neural correlates in progressive supranuclear palsy  

PubMed Central

Although progressive supranuclear palsy is defined by its akinetic rigidity, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy and falls, cognitive impairments are an important determinant of patients’ and carers’ quality of life. Here, we investigate whether there is a broad deficit of modality-independent social cognition in progressive supranuclear palsy and explore the neural correlates for these. We recruited 23 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (using clinical diagnostic criteria, nine with subsequent pathological confirmation) and 22 age- and education-matched controls. Participants performed an auditory (voice) emotion recognition test, and a visual and auditory theory of mind test. Twenty-two patients and 20 controls underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging to analyse neural correlates of social cognition deficits using voxel-based morphometry. Patients were impaired on the voice emotion recognition and theory of mind tests but not auditory and visual control conditions. Grey matter atrophy in patients correlated with both voice emotion recognition and theory of mind deficits in the right inferior frontal gyrus, a region associated with prosodic auditory emotion recognition. Theory of mind deficits also correlated with atrophy of the anterior rostral medial frontal cortex, a region associated with theory of mind in health. We conclude that patients with progressive supranuclear palsy have a multimodal deficit in social cognition. This deficit is due, in part, to progressive atrophy in a network of frontal cortical regions linked to the integration of socially relevant stimuli and interpretation of their social meaning. This impairment of social cognition is important to consider for those managing and caring for patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. PMID:22637582

Calder, Andrew J.; Peers, Polly V.; Lawrence, Andrew D.; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Pereira, Joao M.; Hodges, John R.; Rowe, James B.

2012-01-01

359

Stiff-knee gait in cerebral palsy: how do patients adapt to uneven ground?  

PubMed

Patients with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to reduced toe clearance mostly caused by a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). The aim of this study was to investigate adaptive mechanism to an uneven surface in stiff-knee walkers with cerebral palsy. Sixteen patients with bilateral cerebral palsy, GMFCS I-II and stiff-knee gait, mean age 14.1 (SD=6.2) years, were compared to 13 healthy controls with mean age 13.5 (SD=4.8) years. Gait analysis including EMG was performed under even and uneven surface conditions. Similar strategies to improve leg clearance were found in patients as well as in controls. Both adapted with significantly reduced speed and cadence, increased outward foot rotation, knee and hip flexion as well as anterior pelvic tilt. Therefore cerebral palsy and stiff-knee gait did not affect the adaptation capacity on the uneven surface. On the uneven surface an average increase in knee flexion of 7° (SD=3°) and 12° (SD=5°) was observed in controls and patients with cerebral palsy, respectively. Although rectus femoris activity was increased in patients with cerebral palsy, they were able to increase their knee flexion during swing. The results of this study suggest that walking on uneven surface has the potential to improve knee flexion in stiff-knee walkers. Therefore training on uneven surface could be used as a conservative treatment regime alone, in combination with Botulinum neurotoxin or in the rehabilitation of surgery. PMID:24485919

Böhm, Harald; Hösl, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Döderlein, Leonhard

2014-04-01

360

Incidence and Risk Factors of C5 Palsy following Posterior Cervical Decompression: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background C5 palsy is a serious but poorly understood complication after posterior cervical decompression that could lead to muscle weakness, brachialgia and numbness of the upper limbs. The incidence of C5 palsy varies greatly between studies. The risk factors are inconclusive and even conflicting. Object To perform a systematic review on the incidence and risk factors of C5 palsy after posterior cervical decompression. Materials and Methods Four databases, PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Cochrane CENTRAL, were searched to identify eligible studies. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled odd ratio (RR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) with its 95% confidence interval (95%CI). Results Of the 589 pre-recruited studies, 25 were included in this study for systematic review. The pooled incidence of C5 palsy after posterior decompression was 5.8% (95%CI: 4.4–7.2%). The incidence after open-door laminoplasty, double-door laminoplasty and laminectomy was 4.5%, 3.1% and 11.3%, respectively. The significant risk factors of C5 palsy were OPLL (OR, 2.188; 95%CI, 1.307–3.665), narrower intervertebral foramen (SMD, ?0.972; 95%CI, ?1.398 to ?0.545), laminectomy (vs. open-door laminoplasty, OR, 2.988; 95%CI, 1.298–6.876), excessive spinal cord drift (SMD, 1.289, 95%CI, 0,197–2.381) and male gender (OR, 1.54; 95%CI, 1.036–2.301). Conclusions The results of this systematic review suggest that patients with excessive spinal cord drift, preexisting intervertebral foramenal stenosis, OPLL, laminectomy and male gender are at high risk for postoperative C5 palsy, and risk-reduction options should be considered for such patients. PMID:25162509

Tian, Ye; Liang, Lei; Wang, Ce; Yang, Lili; Yuan, Wen

2014-01-01

361

Abnormalities of the Oculomotor Nerve in Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles and Congenital Oculomotor Palsy  

PubMed Central

Purpose High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now directly demonstrate innervation to extraocular muscles and quantify optic nerve size. A quantitative MRI technique was developed to study the oculomotor nerve (CN3) and applied to congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles (CFEOM) and congenital oculomotor palsy. Methods The subarachnoid portions of the CN3s were imaged with a 1.5-T MRI scanner and conventional head coils, acquiring heavily T2-weighted oblique axial planes 1-mm thick and parallel to the optic chiasm. Thirteen normal subjects, 14 with CFEOM, and 3 with congenital CN3 palsy were included. Digital image analysis was used to measure CN3 diameter, which was correlated with motility findings. Results In CFEOM, CN3 diameter was bilaterally subnormal in eight subjects, unilaterally subnormal in three subjects, and normal in three subjects. Mean ± SD CN3 diameter in CFEOM was 1.14 ± 0.61 mm, significantly smaller than the diameter in normal subjects, which measured 2.01 ± 0.36 mm (P < 0.001). CN3 diameter variably correlated with clinical function. One subject with congenital CN3 palsy showed bilateral CN3 hypoplasia, but CN3 diameter was normal in two other subjects with congenital CN3 palsy. Conclusions Unilateral or bilateral hypoplasia of CN3 is quantitatively demonstrable using MRI in many cases of CFEOM and occasionally in congenital CN3 palsy. Variations in CN3 diameter in CFEOM and congenital CN3 palsy suggest mechanistic heterogeneity of these disorders that may be clarified by further imaging and genetic studies. PMID:17389489

Lim, Key Hwan; Engle, Elizabeth C.; Demer, Joseph L.

2008-01-01

362

Intrathecal baclofen treatment in dystonic cerebral palsy: a randomized clinical trial: the IDYS trial  

PubMed Central

Background Dystonic cerebral palsy is primarily caused by damage to the basal ganglia and central cortex. The daily care of these patients can be difficult due to dystonic movements. Intrathecal baclofen treatment is a potential treatment option for dystonia and has become common practice. Despite this widespread adoption, high quality evidence on the effects of intrathecal baclofen treatment on daily activities is lacking and prospective data are needed to judge the usefulness and indications for dystonic cerebral palsy. The primary aim of this study is to provide level one clinical evidence for the effects of intrathecal baclofen treatment on the level of activities and participation in dystonic cerebral palsy patients. Furthermore, we hope to identify clinical characteristics that will predict a beneficial effect of intrathecal baclofen in an individual patient. Methods/Design A double blind placebo-controlled multi-center randomized clinical trial will be performed in 30 children with dystonic cerebral palsy. Patients aged between 4 and 25 years old with a confirmed diagnosis of dystonic cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Functioning Classification System level IV or V, with lesions in the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia or central cortex and who are eligible for intrathecal baclofen treatment will be included. Group A will receive three months of continuous intrathecal baclofen treatment and group B will receive three months of placebo treatment, both via an implanted pump. After this three month period, all patients will receive intrathecal baclofen treatment, with a follow-up after nine months. The primary outcome measurement will be the effect on activities of and participation in daily life measured by Goal Attainment Scaling. Secondary outcome measurements on the level of body functions include dystonia, spasticity, pain, comfort and sleep-related breathing disorders. Side effects will be monitored and we will study whether patient characteristics influence outcome. Discussion The results of this study will provide data for evidence-based use of intrathecal baclofen in dystonic cerebral palsy. Trial registration Nederlands Trial Register, NTR3642 PMID:24165282

2013-01-01

363

Neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy in very preterm babies: case-control study.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To identify neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy among very preterm babies and in particular the associations independent of the coexistence of antenatal and intrapartum factors. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Oxford health region. SUBJECTS: Singleton babies born between 1984 and 1990 at less than 32 weeks' gestation who survived to discharge from hospital: 59 with cerebral palsy and 234 randomly selected controls without cerebral palsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse neonatal factors expressed as odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Factors associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy after adjustment for gestational age and the presence of previously identified antenatal and intrapartum risk factors were patent ductus arteriosus (odds ratio 2.3; 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.5), hypotension (2.3; 1.3 to 4.7), blood transfusion (4.8; 2.5 to 9.3), prolonged ventilation (4.8; 2.5 to 9.0), pneumothorax (3.5; 1.6 to 7.6), sepsis (3.6; 1.8 to 7.4), hyponatraemia (7.9; 2.1 to 29.6) and total parenteral nutrition (5.5; 2.8 to 10.5). Seizures were associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy (10.0; 4.1 to 24.7), as were parenchymal damage (32; 12.4 to 84.4) and appreciable ventricular dilatation (5.4; 3.0 to 9.8) detected by cerebral ultrasound. CONCLUSION: A reduction in the rate of cerebral palsy in very preterm babies requires an integrated approach to management throughout the antenatal, intrapartum, and neonatal periods. PMID:9040385

Murphy, D. J.; Hope, P. L.; Johnson, A.

1997-01-01

364

Impact of an educational program on parental knowledge of cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  To investigate parental knowledge of cerebral palsy, and to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on it.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  From May 2003 to April 2004, 26 parents of newly diagnosed children with cerebral palsy were interviewed. After the interview,\\u000a each parent was administered a structured educational program and re-interviewed after three months. The pre and post intervention\\u000a responses were compared using

Sunil Karande; Shailesh Patil; Madhuri Kulkarni

2008-01-01

365

The psoas muscle as cause of low back pain in infantile cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Psoas muscle spasticity is hypothesised as a rare cause of low back pain in patients with infantile cerebral palsy. The authors describe a new manoeuvre for the study of psoas tenderness and ultrasound (US)-guided transabdominal botulinum toxin injection technique. A possible causal relationship between psoas tension and low back pain was found incidentally in two examined cases. In subsequent patients, botulinum toxin was injected and, in cases of disappearance of symptoms, the psoas tendon was sectioned at the pelvic brim with definitive disappearance of pain. The relationship between psoas tension and low back pain in patients with infantile cerebral palsy seems likely, given the result in the four patients. PMID:19384481

Camoriano, R.; Valle, M.; Boero, S.

2008-01-01

366

Great toe metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis for hallux valgus deformity in ambulatory adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Hallux valgus deformity is a common sequel of spastic cerebral palsy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Twenty ambulatory patients (24 feet) suffering hallux valgus deformity, with painful forefoot and restricted footwear, secondary\\u000a to spastic cerebral palsy acquired perinatally, were treated with great toe metatarsophalangeal (MTP) arthrodesis using percutaneous\\u000a K-wires for fixation. The mean age at the time of surgery was 16.2 years (range 14–18 years). They were

Sherif N. G. Bishay; Mustafa H. El-Sherbini; Ashraf A. Lotfy; Hatem M. Abdel-Rahman; Hany N. Iskandar; Mohsen M. El-Sayed

2009-01-01

367

Deleterious cognitive and motoric effects of haloperidol in an adolescent with cerebral palsy: a case report.  

PubMed

This case report describes a 15-year-old male patient with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Function Classification System Level III, who developed severe new cognitive and motoric impairments after the administration of haloperidol. He received this dopamine antagonist and typical antipsychotic medication for an acute postoperative episode of agitation. He improved when he received the dopamine agonists amantadine and carbidopa/levodopa. This case suggests that dopamine blockade may be deleterious for individuals with cerebral palsy. Potential explanations for the events observed in this case are also presented. PMID:24332231

Mortimer, Diane; Gelfius, Carl D; Potts, Michelle A

2013-12-01

368

Adductor release and chemodenervation in children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study in 16 children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  A pilot study with short-term outcomes of a combined surgical and medical intervention for management of generalized lower\\u000a limb spasticity, hip displacement and contractures of adductors in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A prospective cohort study of 16 children (9 boys and 7 girls) aged 2–6 years with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy was performed.\\u000a At entry, 5 were classified as

Abhay Khot; Samuel Sloan; Sameer Desai; Adrienne Harvey; Rory Wolfe; H. Kerr Graham

2008-01-01

369

[Hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by hypoplasia of the atlas and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament].  

PubMed

A 50-year-old woman developed discomfort of oral cavity and dysarthria. Her tongue showed a slight left-deviation and atrophy in the left side in a month. Examination with X-p, CT, and MRI showed hypoplasia of the atlas and high cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) from C1 to C5. Thus, combination of congenital hypoplasia of the atlas and acquired high cervical OPLL reduced a function of hypoglossal nerve, which resulted in the palsy. In a case of unilateral hypoglossal palsy, a possible lesion of foramen magnum should be considered. PMID:12833884

Deguchi, Kentaro; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Koji; Ota, Taisei; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Ida, Kentaro; Ota, Kosuke; Abe, Koji

2003-05-01

370

Long-term effects on speech of chronic cerebellar stimulation in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Chronic cerebellar stimulation (CCS) of the anterior lobe is undertaken for relief or motor dysfunction in cerebral palsy, but the long-term effect on speech and voice has been uncertain. The present study evaluated speech before cerebellar stimulation and between one year and two years, seven months following stimulation in nine patients with congenital cerebral palsy and one patient with traumatic brain damage. Severity of dysarthria was not significantly altered as assessed by a panel of listeners. No patient demonstrated deteriorations in speech. Only two of the 10 patients showed small positive changes in the majority of parameters evaluated including rate, articulation, and voice. PMID:7278173

Wolfe, V I; Ratusnik, D L; Penn, R D

1981-08-01

371

Isolated Upgaze Palsy in a Patient with Vertebrobasilar Artery Dolichoectasia; a Case Report  

PubMed Central

Purpose To report isolated upgaze palsy in a patient with a dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery. Case Report We report a 48-year-old man who showed upgaze palsy and convergence insufficiency. The left vertebral artery and basilar artery were shown to be greatly expanded, elongated and tortuous in cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The vertebrobasilar artery runs along the sulcus basilaris superior to the pontomesencephalic junction. Conclusion A dolichoectatic basilar artery may result in compression of midbrain structures related to vertical gaze. PMID:24982741

Ortak, Huseyin; Tas, Ufuk; Aksoy, Durdane Bekar; Ayan, Erdogan

2014-01-01

372

Peripheral seventh nerve palsy due to transorbital intracranial penetrating pontine injury.  

PubMed

The case of a child injured by a knitting needle penetrating transorbitally and intracranially, resulting in carotid cavernous fistula and pontine injury, is reported. After receiving medical and endovascular treatment, the only remaining abnormal neurological manifestation was right peripheral facial nerve palsy. The clinical sequences of events and the demonstration of a pontine lesion leading to peripheral facial palsy are presented. Facial nuclear injury with a penetrating trauma is an extremely rare condition. It is important to identify the anatomical regions injured in penetrating traumas. The lesions must be identified by computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, clinical and laboratory investigation. PMID:16283198

Cosan, T Erhan; Adapinar, Baki; Cakli, Hamdi; Gurbuz, M Kezban

2006-04-01

373

High Mega Jugular Bulb Presenting with Facial Nerve Palsy and Severe Headache  

PubMed Central

We present a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient with symptomatic high mega jugular bulb requiring surgery. We review her medical file, preoperative and postoperative imaging, audiograms, and surgical report. High jugular bulb was diagnosed with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Symptoms of facial nerve palsy and headache were abolished after surgical procedure. Headache and facial nerve palsy can be caused by high mega jugular bulb. Surgery is indicated in such symptomatic cases and leads to relief of signs and symptoms of disease. PMID:21772806

Filipovic, Boris; Gjuric, Mislav; Hat, Josip; Gluncic, Ivo

2010-01-01

374

Combined ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus in a case of cerebral infarction.  

PubMed

We report a patient with acute cerebral infarction of the left paramedian thalamus, upper mesencephalon and cerebellum who exhibited ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus. The site of the infarction was considered to be the paramedian thalamopeduncular and cerebellar regions, which are supplied by the superior cerebellar artery containing direct perforating branches or both the superior cerebellar artery and the superior mesencephalic and posterior thalamosubthalamic arteries. Contralateral and monocular downbeat nystagmus is very rare. Our case suggests that the present downbeat nystagmus was due to dysfunction of cerebellar-modulated crossed oculovestibular fibers of the superior cerebellar peduncle or bilateral downbeat nystagmus with one-sided oculomotor nerve palsy. PMID:24926263

Matsuzono, Kosuke; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko; Abe, Koji

2014-01-01

375

Cerebral Palsy and Growth Failure at 6 to 7 Years  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between severity of cerebral palsy (CP) and growth to 6 to 7 years of age among children with moderate to severe (Mod/Sev) hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). It was hypothesized that children with Mod/Sev CP would have poorer growth, lower cognitive scores, and increased rehospitalization rates compared with children with no CP (No CP). METHODS: Among 115 of 122 surviving children followed in the hypothermia trial for neonatal HIE, growth parameters and neurodevelopmental status at 18 to 22 months and 6 to 7 years were available. Group comparisons (Mod/Sev CP and No CP) with unadjusted and adjusted analyses for growth <10th percentile and z scores by using Fisher’s exact tests and regression modeling were conducted. RESULTS: Children with Mod/Sev CP had high rates of slow growth and cognitive and motor impairment and rehospitalizations at 18 to 22 months and 6 to 7 years. At 6 to 7 years of age, children with Mod/Sev CP had increased rates of growth parameters <10th percentile compared with those with No CP (weight, 57% vs 3%; height, 70% vs 2%; and head circumference, 82% vs 13%; P < .0001). Increasing severity of slow growth was associated with increasing age (P < .04 for weight, P < .001 for length, and P < .0001 for head circumference). Gastrostomy feeds were associated with better growth. CONCLUSIONS: Term children with HIE who develop Mod/Sev CP have high and increasing rates of growth <10th percentile by 6 to 7 years of age. These findings support the need for close medical and nutrition management of children with HIE who develop CP. PMID:24019415

Stephens, Bonnie E.; McDonald, Scott A.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Pappas, Athina; Hintz, Susan R.; Shankaran, Seetha; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Das, Abhik

2013-01-01

376

Characterization of tau oligomeric seeds in progressive supranuclear palsy  

PubMed Central

Background Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy which is primarily defined by the deposition of tau into globose-type neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Tau in its native form has important functions for microtubule dynamics. Tau undergoes alternative splicing in exons 2, 3, and 10 which results in six different isoforms. Products of splicing on exon 10 are the most prone to mutations. Three repeat (3R) and four repeat (4R) tau, like other disease-associated amyloids, can form oligomers which may then go on to further aggregate and form fibrils. Recent studies from our laboratory and others have provided evidence that tau oligomers, not NFTs, are the most toxic species in neurodegenerative tauopathies and seed the pathological spread of tau. Results Analysis of PSP brain sections revealed globose-type NFTs, as well as both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated tau oligomers. Analysis of PSP brains via Western blot and ELISA revealed the presence of increased levels of tau oligomers compared to age-matched control brains. Oligomers were immunoprecipitated from PSP brain and were capable of seeding the oligomerization of both 3R and 4R tau isoforms. Conclusions This is the first time tau oligomers have been characterized in PSP. These results indicate that tau oligomers are an important component of PSP pathology, along with NFTs. The ability of PSP brain-derived tau oligomers to seed 3R and 4R tau suggests that these oligomers represent the pathological species responsible for disease propagation and the presence of oligomers in a pure neurodegenerative tauopathy implies a common neuropathological process for tau seen in diseases with other amyloid proteins. PMID:24927818

2014-01-01

377

Aculaser therapy for the treatment of cerebral palsy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensoryneural deafness and speech disorders. In all 500 children were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 4 years from December 2006 till December 2010. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for a minimum of 08 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 342 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 294 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 252 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 182 children showing 72% success rate, out of 96 children with Cortical Blindness 60 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 210 children with Hearing Difficulties, 126 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 380 children with Speech Disorders 244 showed improvement reflecting 64 % improvement rate, out of 192 children with Hemiplegia 142 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 152 children with Quadriplegia 104 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 116 children with Paraplegia of lower limbs 88 showed improvement in weight bearing, standing and movement accounting for 76% improvement rate.

Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Ammad, Haseeb U.

2012-03-01

378

Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: Incidence, prevalence, and temporal trends.  

PubMed

Epidemiological knowledge of the incidence, prevalence, and temporal changes of neonatal brachial plexuses palsy (NBPP) should assist the clinician, avert unnecessary interventions, and help formulate evidence-based health policies. A summary of 63 publications in the English language with over 17 million births and 24,000 NBPPs is notable for six things. First, the rate of NBPP in the US and other countries is comparable: 1.5 vs. 1.3 per 1000 total births, respectively. Second, the rate of NBPP may be decreasing: 0.9, 1.0 and 0.5 per 1,000 births for publications before 1990, 1990-2000, and after 2000, respectively. Third, the likelihood of not having concomitant shoulder dystocia with NBPP was 76% overall, though it varied by whether the publication was from the US (78%) vs. other countries (47%). Fourth, the likelihood of NBPP being permanent (lasting at least 12 months) was 10-18% in the US-based reports and 19-23% in other countries. Fifth, in studies from the US, the rate of permanent NBPP is 1.1-2.2 per 10,000 births and 2.9-3.7 per 10,000 births in other nations. Sixth, we estimate that approximately 5000 NBPPs occur every year in the US, of which over 580-1050 are permanent, and that since birth, 63,000 adults have been afflicted with persistent paresis of their brachial plexus. The exceedingly infrequent nature of permanent NBPP necessitates a multi-center study to improve our understanding of the antecedent factors and to abate the long-term sequela. PMID:24863027

Chauhan, Suneet P; Blackwell, Sean B; Ananth, Cande V

2014-06-01

379

Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy.  

PubMed

Background and purpose - The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods - Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991-2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10-20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results - At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9-19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23-25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (? 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation - Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

2014-12-01

380

Joint-Position Sense and Kinesthesia in Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Examine joint-position sense and kinesthesia in all extremities in participants with diplegic or hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Design: Survey of joint-position sense and kinesthesia differences between aged-matched controls and 2 groups with CP. Setting: University movement assessment laboratory. Participants: Population-based sample of participants with CP, diplegia (n=21), hemiplegia (n=17), and age-matched volunteers (n=21) without neurologic disease. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Joint-position sense and kinesthesia were measured in the transverse plane (forearm pronation/supination and hip internal/external rotation) using a custom built device. For joint-position sense, participants actively rotated the tested limb to align the distal end with 10 target positions first with the limb and targets visible to assess their ability to perform the task motorically. The task was then repeated with vision of the limb occluded, with targets remaining visible. Joint-position sense error was determined by the magnitude and direction of the rotation errors for each limb in the vision and no vision conditions. Kinesthesia was evaluated by the ability to detect passive limb rotation without vision. Results: No group differences were detected in the vision condition. Indicative of joint-position sense deficits, a significant increase in errors was found in the no vision condition in all limbs except the dominant upper limb for both groups with CP. Joint-position sense errors were systematically biased toward the direction of internal rotation. Kinesthesia deficits were evident on the nondominant upper limb in diplegia and hemiplegia, and bilaterally in the lower limbs in hemiplegia. In hemiplegia, joint-position sense and kinesthesia deficits were noted on the dominant limbs, but were significantly worse on the nondominant limbs. Conclusions: These results indicate that people with CP have proprioception deficits in all limbs. PMID:19254610

Wingert, Jason R.; Burton, Harold; Sinclair, Robert J.; Brunstrom, Janice E.; Damiano, Diane L.

2008-01-01

381

Early Diagnosis and Early Intervention in Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews the opportunities and challenges for early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy (CP). CP describes a group of disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation that is attributed to disturbances that occurred in the fetal or infant brain. Therefore, the paper starts with a summary of relevant information from developmental neuroscience. Most lesions underlying CP occur in the second half of gestation, when developmental activity in the brain reaches its summit. Variations in timing of the damage not only result in different lesions but also in different neuroplastic reactions and different associated neuropathologies. This turns CP into a heterogeneous entity. This may mean that the best early diagnostics and the best intervention methods may differ for various subgroups of children with CP. Next, the paper addresses possibilities for early diagnosis. It discusses the predictive value of neuromotor and neurological exams, neuroimaging techniques, and neurophysiological assessments. Prediction is best when complementary techniques are used in longitudinal series. Possibilities for early prediction of CP differ for infants admitted to neonatal intensive care and other infants. In the former group, best prediction is achieved with the combination of neuroimaging and the assessment of general movements, in the latter group, best prediction is based on carefully documented milestones and neurological assessment. The last part reviews early intervention in infants developing CP. Most knowledge on early intervention is based on studies in high-risk infants without CP. In these infants, early intervention programs promote cognitive development until preschool age; motor development profits less. The few studies on early intervention in infants developing CP suggest that programs that stimulate all aspects of infant development by means of family coaching are most promising. More research is urgently needed. PMID:25309506

Hadders-Algra, Mijna

2014-01-01

382

Risk of Cerebral Palsy among the Offspring of Immigrants  

PubMed Central

Background Cerebral palsy (CP) has a multifactorial etiology, and placental vascular disease may be one major risk factor. The risk of placental vascular disease may be lower among some immigrant groups. We studied the association between immigrant status and the risk of CP. Methods We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of all singleton and twin livebirths in Ontario between 2002–2008, and who survived ?28 days after birth. Each child was assessed for CP up to age 4 years, based on either a single inpatient or ?2 outpatient pediatric diagnoses of CP. Relative to non-immigrants (n?=?566,668), the risk of CP was assessed for all immigrants (n?=?177,390), and further evaluated by World region of origin. Cox proportional hazard ratios (aHR) were adjusted for maternal age, income, diabetes mellitus, obesity, tobacco use, Caesarean delivery, year of delivery, physician visits, twin pregnancy, preterm delivery, as well as small- and large-for-gestational age birthweight. Results There were 1346 cases of CP, with a lower rate among immigrants (1.45 per 1000) than non-immigrants (1.92 per 1000) (aHR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67 to 0.88). Mothers from East Asia and the Pacific (aHR 0.54, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.77) and the Caribbean (aHR 0.58, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.93) were at a significantly lower risk of having a child with CP. Whether further adjusting for preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, placental abruption or placental infraction, or upon using a competing risk analysis that further accounted for stillbirth and neonatal death, these results did not change. Conclusions Immigration and ethnicity appear to attenuate the risk of CP, and this effect is not fully explained by known risk factors. PMID:25019202

Ray, Joel G.; Redelmeier, Donald A.; Urquia, Marcelo L.; Guttmann, Astrid; McDonald, Sarah D.; Vermeulen, Marian J.

2014-01-01

383

Pressure Sores  

MedlinePLUS

... may form. Pressure sores are also called bedsores, pressure ulcers and decubitus ulcers. Symptoms What are the symptoms of a ... put in a vein) or orally (by mouth). Prevention How can pressure sores be prevented? The most ...

384

Air Pressure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Air pressure is pushing on us all the time although we do not usually notice it. In this activity, students learn about the units of pressure and get a sense of just how much air pressure is pushing on them.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

385

Cosmetic appreciation of lateralization of peripheral facial palsy: 'preference for left or right, true or mirror image?'.  

PubMed

There have been several studies in the past depicting asymmetry in 'normal' human faces. Evidence supports the fact that the right hemisphere is superior in the recognition of emotions expressed by the human face and indicates a right hemispheric specialization for processing emotional information. The primary aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in cosmetic appreciation of a left peripheral facial palsy compared to a right peripheral facial palsy? Pictures of patients with a facial palsy with House-Brackmann II-VI were reversed as a mirror image and offered as a pair of pictures, together with the true image. Forty-two patients and 24 medical professionals familiar with facial palsy were asked to choose the most attractive photograph. The primary 'end' point was the most attractive side in the pictures chosen by medical professionals and patients. The secondary 'end' points consisted of the preferences for the mirror or true image, and influences of the House-Brackmann score and age. Medical professionals preferred the photographs from patients with a right and left peripheral facial palsy (PFP) in, respectively, a mean of 44 % (41-48 %) and 56 % (52-59 %) of the pictures (p = 0.02). When comparing mirror and true image, patients with a left-sided facial palsy chose their mirror and true image as most attractive in 90 and 10 %, respectively (p < 0.05). Patients with a right-sided facial palsy chose their mirror and true image in 30 and 70 %, respectively (p > 0.05). Subanalysis of patients with a PFP House-Brackmann score V and VI showed that medical professionals did not have a significant preference for a left nor right-sided facial palsy. Patients with a left-sided facial palsy chose their mirror image in all cases and patients with a right-sided palsy chose their mirror and true image in resp. 33 and 67 %. The House-Brackmann score (p = 0.52) and age (p = 0.73) of the patients did not influence preferences. This study, demonstrating that medical professionals find a right-sided facial palsy cosmetically less attractive than a left-sided, has clinical relevance. Patients, especially with a left-sided facial palsy, tend to choose for their mirror image, although this choice seems to be influenced by hemispheric specialization and familiarity. PMID:24173239

Pouwels, Sjaak; Ingels, Koen; van Heerbeek, Niels; Beurskens, Carien

2014-09-01

386

How Often Do Perinatal Events at Full Term Cause Cerebral Palsy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the contribution of perinatal events to cerebral palsy in children born at full term. Methods: The delivery records of a cohort of babies born at full term in one tertiary care hospital over an 11-year period were reviewed. The obstetric history and neonatal chart of each baby admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit was then examined.

Savas M. Menticoglou

2008-01-01

387

Cerebral palsy in the surviving twin associated with infant death of the co-twin  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUNDMonozygotic twins are at greater risk of dying and of serious morbidity than dizygotic twins, and both are at greater risk than singletons. This is only partly explained by the higher proportion of low birthweight infants among twins.AIMTo compare, in same sex and different sex twins, birth weight specific neonatal death rates and cerebral palsy prevalence rates in the surviving

P O D Pharoah

2001-01-01

388

Prevalence and disabilities in 4 to 8 year olds with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A register of children born between 1970 and 1979 in the South East Thames Regional Health Authority, and diagnosed as having pre-, peri-, and postnatal cerebral palsy, was set up between 1978 and 1981. We report the 527 children born between 1970 and 1974 for whom ascertainment is virtually complete. The estimated prevalence was 2.2 per 1000, with 7.4% multiple

P Evans; M Elliott; E Alberman; S Evans

1985-01-01

389

Life expectancy for children with cerebral palsy and mental retardation: Implications for life care planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Physicians may be asked by attorneys or other patient advocates to help plan for the long-term needs of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and developmental disability (DD). The first step in such planning is to thoroughly examine the literature dealing with life expectancy in these populations. This review paper comprehensively reviews the literature relating to survival in children with

Richard T. Katz

2003-01-01

390

A Systematic Review of Common Physiotherapy Interventions in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This systematic review focused on the common conventional physiotherapy interventions used with children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 4 to 18 years, and critically appraised the recent evidence of each of these interventions using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The search strategy yielded 34 articles after…

Martin, Liz; Baker, Richard; Harvey, Adrienne

2010-01-01

391

Recent advances in physical and occupational therapy for children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research and conceptual frameworks that emphasize family centered care and participation in family, school, and community life have contributed to advances in provision of health care by physical therapists and occupational therapists to children with cerebral palsy (CP) and their families. This article provides a contemporary perspective on physical and occupational therapy for children with CP. Topics include conceptual

Robert J Palisano; Laurie M Snider; Margo N Orlin

2004-01-01

392

Dissecting Aneurysm of Vertebral Artery Manifestating as Contralateral Abducens Nerve Palsy  

PubMed Central

Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern. PMID:23634273

Jeon, Jin Sue; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

2013-01-01

393

Functional Seating for School-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy: An Evidence-Based Tutorial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This tutorial is designed to teach speech-language pathologists (SLPs) best practices to support functional seating of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in the classroom and in school-based therapy sessions. This tutorial teaches SLPs to (a) recognize the positive effects of seating intervention, (b) identify the characteristics of…

Costigan, F. Aileen; Light, Janice

2011-01-01

394

The IHF Plan: The Individual with Cerebral Palsy and His Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background information, principles of service, and priorities for action preface a five year plan of operation to provide services for the cerebral palsied. Rationales, objectives, methods, timetables, financing, and programs are discussed for the following priorities: prevention and early care, comprehensive services for teenagers and adults;…

United Cerebral Palsy Association, New York, NY.

395

The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

2011-01-01

396

Index of mechanical work in gait of children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The pathological gait of children with cerebral palsy involves higher mechanical work, which limits their ability to function properly in society. Mechanical work is directly related to walking speed and, although a number of studies have been carried out in this field, few of them analysed the effect of the speed. The study aimed to develop standards for mechanical work during gait of children with cerebral palsy depending on the walking speed. The study covered 18 children with cerebral palsy and 14 healthy children. The BTS Smart software and the author's software were used to evaluate mechanical work, kinetic, potential and rotational energy connected with motion of the children body during walk. Compared to healthy subjects, mechanical work in children with cerebral palsy increases with the degree of disability. It can be expressed as a linear function of walking speed and shows strong and statistically significant correlations with walking gait. A negative statistically significant correlation between the degree of disability and walking speed can be observed. The highest contribution to the total mechanical energy during gait is from mechanical energy of the feet. Instantaneous value of rotational energy is 700 times lower than the instantaneous mechanical energy. An increase in walking speed causes the increase in the effect of the index of kinetic energy on total mechanical work. The method described can provide an objective supplementation for doctors and physical therapists to perform a simple and immediate diagnosis without much technical knowledge. PMID:25308510

Dziuba, Alicja Katarzyna; Tylkowska, Ma?gorzata; Jaroszczuk, Sebastian

2014-01-01

397

Use of Headphones to Improve Visual Attention of a Child with Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, involving a 10-year-old child with cerebral palsy and autism, found that the use of headphones resulted in an increase in on-task behavior whether stimuli were presented in an audiovisual mode, an audio-only mode, or a visual-only mode. Preference was for the auditory only or the mixed audiovisual stimuli. (DB)

Milligen, P. C.; McLaughlin, T. F.

1990-01-01

398

Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices as a Measure of Cognitive Functioning in Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Cognitive dysfunction is frequent in Cerebral Palsy (CP). CP motor impairment and associated speech deficits often hinder cognitive assessment, with the result being that not all CP studies consider cognitive dysfunction. Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices is a simple, rapid test which can be used in persons with severe motor…

Pueyo, R.; Junque, C.; Vendrell, P.; Narberhaus, A.; Segarra, D.

2008-01-01

399

Medical Expenditures Attributable to Cerebral Palsy and Intellectual Disability among Medicaid-Enrolled Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study estimated medical expenditures attributable to cerebral palsy (CP) among children enrolled in Medicaid, stratified by the presence of co-occurring intellectual disability (ID), relative to children without CP or ID. The MarketScan[R] Medicaid Multi-State database was used to identify children with CP for 2003-2005 by using the…

Kancherla, Vijaya; Amendah, Djesika D.; Grosse, Scott D.; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn; Van Naarden Braun, Kim

2012-01-01

400

Psychological Well-Being among Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about the proportion of mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who experience distress, particularly in terms of depressed and anxious moods. The present study aimed to address this issue by examining the level of maternal anxious and depressed moods. The associations between maternal psychological well-being and…

Barlow, J. H.; Cullen-Powell, L. A.; Cheshire, A.

2006-01-01

401

Assessment of Quality of Life Needs of Children With Mild Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to assess the quality of life and psychosocial needs of children with mild hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) as part of improving overall clinical management. Children aged 5 to 17 years old (N = 20), with mild hemiplegic CP, completed the Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQL™) inventory short form; a subsample of children and their parents also completed

Laura J. Spincola Moore; John P. Allegrante; Michael Palma; Jennifer Lewin; Michelle G. Carlson

2010-01-01

402

Effect of Functional Electrical Stimulation on asymmetries in gait of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purpose The gait of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy is often characterised by toe walking and asymmetry in other temporal spatial parameters.Persistent toe walking impairs balance, resulting in shortening of the musculo-tendinous unit and reduced function. Current interventions to maintain range of movement at the ankle and improve walking patterns show mixed results. An alternative may be Functional

S Durham; L Eve; C Stevens; D Ewins

2004-01-01

403

Developing and Validating the Communication Function Classification System for Individuals with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The purpose of this study was to create and validate the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP), for use by a wide variety of individuals who are interested in CP. This paper reports the content validity, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability of the CFCS for children with CP.…

Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Paneth, Nigel; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Kent, Raymond D.; Lillie, Janet; Eulenberg, John B.; Chester, Ken, Jr.; Johnson, Brenda; Michalsen, Lauren; Evatt, Morgan; Taylor, Kara

2011-01-01

404

The Use of Standing Frames for Contracture Management for Nonmobile Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to determine whether static weight-bearing in a standing frame affected hamstring length and ease of activities of daily living (ADLs) in nonambulant children with cerebral palsy (CP). A convenient sample of nonambulant children with CP was recruited for this one-group quasi-experimental study. Participants stood in…

Gibson, Susan K.; Sprod, Judy A.; Maher, Carol A.

2009-01-01

405

Effect of a Soft Boston Orthosis on pulmonary mechanics in severe cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Spinal braces such as the Soft Boston Orthosis (SBO) help stabilize scoliosis and improve sitting, positioning, and head control in individuals with cerebral palsy. However, their impact on pulmonary mechanics in this population has not been studied. We examined the effect of a Soft Boston Orthosis on the pulmonary mechanics and gas exchange in 12 children and young adults (5-23 years of age) with severe cerebral palsy. Pulmonary resistance, compliance, tidal volume, minute ventilation, work of breathing, oxygen saturation, and end-tidal CO2 tension were measured with the subjects seated both with and without the orthosis and in the supine position without the orthosis. There were no significant differences in the measured parameters when comparing subjects with and without their orthoses in the sitting or in the supine position. As would be expected in individuals with severe cerebral palsy, pulmonary resistance was increased (7.33 cm H2O/L/s) and compliance was decreased (0.12 L/cm H2O) compared to reported normal values. Work of breathing was greatest in the sitting position without the orthosis (1.2 dynes/cm), suggesting that the improved positioning achieved with the orthosis may decrease the work of breathing. We conclude that the application of a Soft Boston Orthosis does not impact negatively on pulmonary mechanics and gas exchange in young people with severe cerebral palsy. PMID:10406051

Leopando, M T; Moussavi, Z; Holbrow, J; Chernick, V; Pasterkamp, H; Rempel, G

1999-07-01

406

Self-Concept of Children with Cerebral Palsy Compared with that of Children without Impairment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether the self-concept of children with cerebral palsy (CP) differed from that of children without impairment. Forty-seven children (24 males, 23 females; mean age 11y 8mo [SD 2y 6mo]) with spastic diplegia or hemiplegia were matched with children without impairment. The level of disability of the children with CP was…

Shields, Nora; Loy, Yijun; Murdoch, Alison; Taylor, Nicholas F.; Dodd, Karen J

2007-01-01

407

Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To test a model of child, family, and service determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Participants were 288 children with CP, age range 6 to 12 years (mean 9y 8mo, SD 2y), and their parents from seven children's hospitals. The sample comprised 166 (57.6%)…

Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Orlin, Margo; Oeffinger, Donna; Polansky, Marcy; Maggs, Jill; Bagley, Anita; Gorton, George

2011-01-01

408

Construct Validity of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the construct validity of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A total of 170 QUEST assessments from a convenience sample of 94 children with CP involved in clinical and research treatment programmes (54 males, 40 females; mean age 6y 10mo, SD…

Thorley, Megan; Lannin, Natasha; Cusick, Anne; Novak, Iona; Boyd, Roslyn

2012-01-01

409

Impairment of vertical motion detection and downgaze palsy due to rostral midbrain infarction  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present two cases with acute onset of vertical gaze palsy, mainly consisting of impaired downgaze and apraxia of downward head movements, together with neuropsychological deficits (hypersomnia, impaired attention and disorders of memory and affective control). CT and MRI revealed bilateral post-ischaemic lesions in the dorsomedial thalamus and the mesodiencephalic junction, dorsomedial to the red nucleus, thus being restricted to

W. Heide; M. Fahle; E. Koenig; J. Dichgans; G. Schroth

1990-01-01

410

Five new consanguineous families with horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis and novel ROBO3 mutations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ROBO3 gene on chromosome 11. We clinically evaluated seven individuals with HGPPS from five previously unreported consanguineous families. We sequenced ROBO3 in all affected individuals, additional unaffected members of each family, and ethnic controls. All affected individuals had

Khaled K. Abu-Amero; Hesham al Dhalaan; Zayed al Zayed; Ali Hellani; Thomas M. Bosley

2009-01-01

411

Neuromuscular Adaptations to Eccentric Strength Training in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To determine the neuromuscular outcomes of an eccentric strength-training programme for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: In this randomised, parallel-group trial with waiting control, 14 participants with CP (six males, eight females; mean age 11y, SD 2y range 9-15y), diagnosed with upper-limb spasticity were…

Reid, Siobhan; Hamer, Peter; Alderson, Jacqueline; Lloyd, David

2010-01-01

412

Predicting Speech Intelligibility with a Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method: Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and…

Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

2014-01-01

413

Outcome Assessments in Children with Cerebral Palsy, Part II: Discriminatory Ability of Outcome Tools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discriminatory ability of several pediatric outcome tools was assessed relative to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level in patients with cerebral palsy. Five hundred and sixty-two patients (400 with diplegia, 162 with hemiplegia; 339 males, 223 females; age range 4-18y, mean 11y 1mo [SD 3y 7mo]), classified as GMFCS Levels I to…

Bagley, Anita M; Gorton, George; Oeffinger, Donna; Barnes, Douglas; Calmes, Janine; Nicholson, Diane; Damiano, Diane; Abel, Mark; Kryscio, Richard; Rogers, Sarah; Tylkowski, Chester

2007-01-01

414

Ocular Rotation Axes during Dynamic Bielschowsky Head-Tilt Testing in Unilateral Trochlear Nerve Palsy  

E-print Network

PURPOSE. To explain the positive Bielschowsky head-tilt (BHT) sign in unilateral trochlear nerve palsy (u (dynamic BHT). Three- dimensional eye movements were recorded with dual search coils. Normal data were of the covered paretic or unaffected eye during dynamic BHT are a direct consequence of the nasal deviation

Haslwanter, Thomas

415

Unmet Health Care Needs in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with potentially severe health conditions such as cerebral palsy (CP) are at risk for unmet health care needs. We sought to determine whether children with CP had significantly greater unmet health care needs than children with other special health care needs (SHCN), and whether conditions associated with CP increased the odds of unmet…

Jackson, Katie E.; Krishnaswami, Shanthi; McPheeters, Melissa

2011-01-01

416

Mixed multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy: a clinical and pathological report of one case  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a patient who showed pathological features of both multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) at autopsy. The clinical features included severe cerebellar ataxia, autonomic failure, and rigid-akinetic parkinsonism. The clinical diagnosis was MSA. Pathological examination showed severe neuronal loss with gliosis in the putamen, substantia nigra, inferior olive, and the pontine nucleus, and numerous glial

Masashi Takanashi; Satoshi Ohta; Shuji Matsuoka; Hideo Mori; Yoshikuni Mizuno

2002-01-01

417

Parenting and Social Functioning of Children With and Without Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the associations between parenting dimensions and the social functioning of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP). The primary hypothesis was that controlling for cognitive ability, specific parenting dimensions would be associated with higher social functioning, including larger social networks, higher-quality friendships, and healthier social adjustment in children with and without CP. Participants: Forty-one children with cerebral

Sean D. Cunningham; Seth Warschausky; Pamela Dixon Thomas

2009-01-01

418

Intra- and Inter-Observer Reliability of the Trunk Impairment Scale for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Standardized scales to evaluate qualities of trunk movements in children with dysfunction are sparse. An examination of the reliability of scales that may be useful in the clinic is important. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Standardized scales are…

Saether, Rannei; Jorgensen, Lone

2011-01-01

419

Design of a Device to Exercise Hip Extensor Muscles in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often have weak hip extensor muscles and gait-related difficulties. Current therapeutic techniques do not provide sufficient exercise for this muscle group. In addition to calisthenics, therapists use a traditional tricycle to strengthen leg muscles, yet the mechanics of traditional tricycles are not effective in exercising hip extensor muscles. A new therapeutic tricycle was designed specifically

Glade H. Howell; Don R. Brown; Donald S. Bloswick; Jeffrey Bean; Judith L. Gooch

1993-01-01

420

Bungee jumper's foot drop peroneal nerve palsy caused by bungee cord jumping.  

PubMed

Peroneal nerve injury is a common peripheral neuropathy from a variety of conditions and injuries. We encountered a case of peroneal nerve palsy in a professional bungee cord jumper. Review of the literature showed no previous report of this particular injury in bungee cord jumping. PMID:8214873

Torre, P R; Williams, G G; Blackwell, T; Davis, C P

1993-11-01

421

Predictors of Reading Comprehension in Children with Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predictors of reading comprehension were evaluated in 41 children with cerebral palsy and 74 typically developing children between the ages of 6 and 12 years. Regression analyses were conducted to determine the relative contributions of measures of phonemic awareness, receptive vocabulary, and general reasoning to variance in reading comprehension. All three independent variables were statistically significant predictors of reading comprehension

Shana Asbell; Jacobus Donders; Marie Van Tubbergen; Seth Warschausky

2010-01-01

422

An Exploration of Loneliness: Communication and the Social Networks of Older People with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: There is a large body of research focusing on the experiences of loneliness of older adults, yet little is known about the loneliness experiences of older adults with lifelong disability. In this paper, the authors present some findings from a larger qualitative study on the loneliness experiences of older people with cerebral palsy.…

Ballin, Liora; Balandin, Susan

2007-01-01

423

Intelligibility of 4-Year-Old Children with and without Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The authors examined speech intelligibility in typically developing (TD) children and 3 groups of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who were classified into speech/language profile groups following Hustad, Gorton, and Lee (2010). Questions addressed differences in transcription intelligibility scores among groups, the effects of utterance…

Hustad, Katherine C.; Schueler, Brynn; Schultz, Laurel; DuHadway, Caitlin

2012-01-01

424

Locomotor Tests Predict Community Mobility in Children and Youth with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ambulatory children and youth with cerebral palsy have limitations in locomotor capacities and in community mobility. The ability of three locomotor tests to predict community mobility in this population (N = 49, 27 boys, 6-16 years old) was examined. The tests were a level ground walking test, the 6-min-Walk-Test (6MWT), and two tests of advanced…

Ferland, Chantale; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree

2012-01-01

425

Context Therapy: A New Intervention Approach for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To describe the development of context therapy, a new intervention approach designed for a randomized controlled trial. Method: Therapists were trained to change task and environmental factors to achieve parent-identified functional goals for children with cerebral palsy. Therapists did not provide any remediation strategies to change the…

Darrah, Johanna; Law, Mary C.; Pollock, Nancy; Wilson, Brenda; Russell, Dianne J.; Walter, Stephen D.; Rosenbaum, Peter; Galuppi, Barb

2011-01-01

426

A Neurocognitive Perspective on Developmental Disregard in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A common problem in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) is the asymmetrical development of arm and hand capacity caused by the lack of use of the affected upper limb, or developmental disregard. In this paper, we provide a neuropsychological model that relates developmental disregard to attentional processes and motor learning. From this…

Houwink, Annemieke; Aarts, Pauline B. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Steenbergen, Bert

2011-01-01

427

Emergent Literacy Activities, Instructional Adaptations and School Absence of Children with Cerebral Palsy in Special Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the present study was to get an overview of the emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to normally developing peers. The results showed that there were differences between the groups regarding the amount of emergent literacy instruction. While time…

Peeters, Marieke; de Moor, Jan; Verhoeven, Ludo

2011-01-01

428

Arithmetic Performance of Children with Cerebral Palsy: The Influence of Cognitive and Motor Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP) often show difficulties in arithmetic compared to their typically developing peers. The present study explores whether cognitive and motor variables are related to arithmetic performance of a large group of primary school children with CP. More specifically, the relative influence of non-verbal…

van Rooijen, Maaike; Verhoeven, Ludo; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Becher, Jules G.; Steenbergen, Bert

2012-01-01

429

Health, Functioning, and Participation of Adolescents and Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Review of Outcomes Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With medical advances, more individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) syndromes who reside in developed countries are surviving to adolescence and adulthood. However, there continues to be a paucity of research examining long-term health, functional activities, and participatory outcomes over their life-course. This article reviews the current…

Frisch, Dana; Msall, Michael E.

2013-01-01

430

Children with Severe Cerebral Palsy: An Educational Guide. Guides for Special Education No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide, intended to help teachers, parents, and community workers throughout the world develop educational services for children with severe cerebral palsy, is published in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, and Chinese. The 11 practitioner-contributed chapters stress specific intervention techniques based on the practitioners' own experiences…

Rye, Henning, Ed.; Skjorten, Miriam Donath, Ed.

431

Digital Games and Assistive Technology: Improvement of Communication of Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aims to analyze the frequency of occurrence of different forms of communication in nonspeaking children during activities with digital games. The participants in this study were three children with multiple disabilities, whose limitations were due to cerebral palsy. All the children had severe oral communication disabilities. Three…

Ferreira, Maria Inês Jesus; Travassos, Xisto Lucas; Sampaio, Renelson; Pereira-Guizzo, Camila de Sousa

2013-01-01

432

Teaching Postural Reactions to Students with Severe Cerebral Palsy: An Evaluation of Theory and Technique.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The theoretical basis and effectiveness of a neuromotor intervention were investigated across seven cerebral palsied, severely disabled children, (2 1/2-12 years old). Results suggested a training effect in the data of three children. Theoretical relationships among abnormal tonic reflexes and normal motor patterns were not supported by the data.…

Noonan, Mary Jo

1984-01-01

433

Changes in Trunk and Head Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy after Hippotherapy: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hippotherapy (HPOT) is a therapy that uses horse movement. This pilot investigation objectively evaluated the efficacy of HPOT in improving head/trunk stability in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The participants were six children with spastic diplegia and six children without disability. Head and trunk stability was challenged by using a…

Shurtleff, Tim L.; Engsberg, Jack R.

2010-01-01

434

Muscle activation characteristics of stance balance control in children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies were conducted to investigate muscle recruitment of children with spastic cerebral palsy in response to unexpected perturbation of balance in stance. The aim of the studies was to investigate neural and non-neural mechanical contributions to muscle responses differences these children display when maintaining balance. In the first study, muscle responses of children with spastic diplegia were compared to

P. A Burtner; C Qualls; M. H Woollacott

1998-01-01

435

Development of Non-Verbal Intellectual Capacity in School-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are at greater risk for a limited intellectual development than typically developing children. Little information is available which children with CP are most at risk. This study aimed to describe the development of non-verbal intellectual capacity of school-age children with CP and to examine the…

Smits, D. W.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J. W.; van Schie, P. E.; Becher, J. G.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M. J.

2011-01-01

436

Oromotor Dysfunction and Communication Impairments in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Register Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To report the prevalence, clinical associations, and trends over time of oromotor dysfunction and communication impairments in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Multiple sources of ascertainment were used and children followed up with a standardized assessment including motor speech problems, swallowing/chewing difficulties,…

Parkes, Jackie; Hill, Nan; Platt, Mary Jane; Donnelly, Caroline

2010-01-01

437

Relationship between Gross Motor Capacity and Daily-Life Mobility in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between gross motor capacity and daily-life mobility in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to explore the moderation of this relationship by the severity of CP. Method: Cross-sectional analysis in a cohort study with a clinic-based sample of children with CP (n=116; 76 males, 40…

Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Gorter, Jan Willem; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; van Schie, Petra Em; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Lindeman, Eline; Jongmans, Marian J.

2010-01-01

438

Muscle Force and Range of Motion as Predictors of Standing Balance in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with cerebral palsy frequently receive therapeutic intervention to remediate standing balance deficits. Evaluation of the impairments associated with poor balance could facilitate more effective treatment programs. This study evaluated the relationship between lower extremity force production, range of motion and standing balance in…

Lowes, Linda Pax; Westcott, Sarah L.; Palisano, Robert J.; Effgen, Susan K.; Orlin, Margo N.

2004-01-01

439

Use of botulinum toxin injection in 17 children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of botulinum toxin was studied in 17 children with spastic cerebral palsy to determine its efficacy and tolerability. Eleven ambulatory and 6 nonambulatory patients were included. All children were undergoing a physiotherapy program with monitoring of their baseline states for 3 months before botulinum toxin injection. The effect was evident within 72 hours. The peak effect was noticed

Virginia Wong

1998-01-01

440

Reference Values for Anaerobic Performance and Agility in Ambulatory Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to provide reference values of anaerobic performance and agility in a group of children and adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A total of 300 children (184 males, 116 females) with spastic CP were recruited from 26 rehabilitation centres in six different countries. Of these, 215 were classified at…

Verschuren, Olaf; Bloemen, Manon; Kruitwagen, Cas; Takken, Tim

2010-01-01

441

Manual skill, hand skill asymmetry, and neuropsychological test performance in schoolchildren with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bilateral hand skill assessment with a computerised version of the Peg Moving Task, and neuropsychological testing, were performed in 30 children aged 7 to 8 years with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and without mental retardation, diplegia (n = 10), right hemiplegia (n = 10), or left hemiplegia (n = 10), and in 30 controls. Compared to controls: (i) 30% of

Gilberto Nunes Filho; Lígia Souza; Luiz Guilherme Nunes; Lucia Willadino Braga; Georges Dellatolas

2005-01-01

442

Long-Term Outcome after Selective Posterior Rhizotomy in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A retrospective analysis of data collected prospectively was performed to determine the long-term outcome of lumbosacral selective posterior rhizotomy (SPR) in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The study population comprised children with spastic CP, who had SPR more than 4 years prior to the time of the study and had quantitative standardized assessments of lower limb spasticity (Ashworth scale),

Shahid M. Gul; Paul Steinbok; Kim McLeod

1999-01-01

443

Assessment of Specific Characteristics of Abnormal General Movements: Does It Enhance the Prediction of Cerebral Palsy?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: Abnormal general movements at around 3 months corrected age indicate a high risk of cerebral palsy (CP). We aimed to determine whether specific movement characteristics can improve the predictive power of definitely abnormal general movements. Method: Video recordings of 46 infants with definitely abnormal general movements at 9 to 13 weeks…

Hamer, Elisa G.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

2011-01-01

444

Behavioural and Emotional Symptoms of Preschool Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Population-Based Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To describe behavioural and emotional symptoms among Icelandic preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Children with congenital CP, assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist/1 1/2-5 (CBCL/1 1/2-5) and Caregiver-Teacher Report Form (C-TRF), were enrolled in the study. A comparison group was recruited from the general population.…

Sigurdardottir, Solveig; Indredavik, Marit S.; Eiriksdottir, Audur; Einarsdottir, Katrin; Gudmundsson, Halldor S.; Vik, Torstein

2010-01-01

445

Bilateral spastic cerebral palsy—Prevalence through four decades, motor function and growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim was to depict changes in the prevalence and severity of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP) over a 40-year period. Another objective was to characterise the group born in 1991–1998 with respect to gross motor function, spasticity and growth. Data were obtained from the CP register of western Sweden and rehabilitation records.

Kate Himmelmann; Eva Beckung; Gudrun Hagberg; Paul Uvebrant

2007-01-01

446

Intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy: a cost-effectiveness analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a Dutch national study, we recently established the effectiveness and safety of continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion (CITB) in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Because prospective studies on the cost-effectiveness of CITB in children with spastic CP are lacking, we conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis alongside our prospective national study. We compared the costs and health effects of CITB

M. A. Hoving; S M A A Evers; A J H A Ament; E P M van Raak; J. S. H. Vles; J. G. Becher; R. Vermeulen; O. F. Brouwer; C. G. Maathuis; C. E. Catsman-Berrevoets; J. Gerritsen; M. J. Geerts; P. H. Jongerius; O. F. Nieuwenhuizen; J. J. Rotteveel; L. A. Speth; H. Stroink; E. G. van der Ziel

2008-01-01

447

Matching Accuracy in Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy during Unimanual and Bimanual Movements with (Mirror) Visual Feedback  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the present study participants with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) were asked to match the position of a target either with the impaired arm only (unimanual condition) or with both arms at the same time (bimanual condition). The target was placed at 4 different locations scaled to the individual maximum reaching distance. To test the…

Smorenburg, Ana R. P.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

2012-01-01

448

Participation and Enjoyment of Leisure Activities in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to characterize participation in leisure activities in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and identify determinants of greater involvement. Ninety-five children of school age (9y 7mo [SD 2y 1mo]) with CP were recruited, and participation was evaluated with the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment in a…

Majnemer, Annette; Shevell, Michael; Law, Mary; Birnbaum, Rena; Chilingaryan, Gevorg; Rosenbaum, Peter; Poulin, Chantal

2008-01-01

449

Variation between Centers in Electrophysiologic Techniques Used in Lumbosacral Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy for Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extent of variation between centers in the electrophysiologic techniques used in lumbosacral selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for spastic cerebral palsy was studied using a questionnaire survey. Nineteen centers completed the questionnaire, and the responses were analyzed for those 16 centers in which the extent of dorsal root section was guided by intraoperative electrophysiologic responses. Consistent techniques included: use of

Paul Steinbok; John R. Kestle

1996-01-01

450

Enabling the Children with Cerebral Palsy to Interact Seluk ARTUT, PhD  

E-print Network

Enabling the Children with Cerebral Palsy to Interact Sel�uk ARTUT, PhD Sabanci University Abstract Spastic Children Foundation - www.tscv.org.tr) institution. Keywords Human Computer Interaction, Cerebral of children between the ages of 4 to 7 living with Cerebral Palsyn (CP) who are studying at the TSCF (Turkish

Yanikoglu, Berrin

451

Predictors of Cerebral Palsy in Very Preterm Infants: The EPIPAGE Prospective Population-Based Cohort Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the independent role of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, and several other neonatal and obstetric factors, as potential predictors of cerebral palsy (CP) in a large population-based cohort of very preterm infants. Method: As part of EPIPAGE, a population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data…

Beaino, Ghada; Khoshnood, Babak; Kaminski, Monique; Pierrat, Veronique; Marret, Stephane; Matis, Jacqueline; Ledesert, Bernard; Thiriez, Gerard; Fresson, Jeanne; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Zupan-Simunek, Veronique; Arnaud, Catherine; Burguet, Antoine; Larroque, Beatrice; Breart, Gerard; Ancel, Pierre-Yves

2010-01-01

452

Longitudinal Study of Motor Performance and Its Relation to Motor Capacity in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the course of motor performance and analyse its relationship with motor capacity over a period of 3 years in 104 children (66 males, 38 females; 43% of those initially invited) with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 9, 11, and 13 years at the start of the study. Forty-one had hemiplegia, 42 diplegia, 21…

van Eck, Mirjam; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Becher, Jules G.

2009-01-01

453

Gaze Behaviour during Interception in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Anticipatory gaze behaviour during interceptive movements was investigated in children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy (SUCP), and related to the side of the intracerebral lesion. Five children with lesions of the right hemisphere (RHL) and five children with lesions of the left hemisphere (LHL) had to walk towards and intercept a ball that…

van Kampen, P. M.; Ledebt, A.; Smorenburg, A. R. P.; Vermeulen, R. J.; Kelder, M. E.; van der Kamp, J.; Savelsbergh, G. J. P.

2012-01-01

454

MRI findings and sensorimotor development in infants with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The correlation between MRI findings and sensorimotor development was investigated in a group of 48 infants with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The ages at MRI examination and cognitive assessment were fairly homogeneous (mean 15 months and 17 months, respectively). The following MRI parameters were scored: size of lateral ventricles, extension of white matter lesions and of white matter reduction,

Giovanni Cioni; M. Cristina Di Paoo; Barbara Bertuccelli; Paola B. Paolicelli; Raffaello Canapicchi

1997-01-01

455

Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

2012-01-01

456

Ambulatory Activity of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Which Characteristics Are Important?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To assess ambulatory activity of children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 7 to 13 years, and identify associated characteristics. Method: Sixty-two children with spastic CP (39 males, 23 females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 1y 8mo; age range 7-13y), classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I to III, participated.…

van Wely, Leontien; Becher, Jules G.; Balemans, Astrid C. J.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

2012-01-01

457

Classification of Topographical Pattern of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy: A Registry Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used data from a population-based cerebral palsy (CP) registry and systematic review to assess the amount of heterogeneity between registries in topographical patterns when dichotomised into unilateral (USCP) and bilateral spastic CP (BSCP), and whether the terms diplegia and quadriplegia provide useful additional epidemiological…

Reid, Susan M.; Carlin, John B.; Reddihough, Dinah S.

2011-01-01

458

Production and Perception of Mandarin Tone in Adults with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary objective of the present study was to document tone production and intelligibility deficits in Mandarin-speaking persons with cerebral palsy (CP). Spastic, athetoid, and mixed types of CP were studied, along with a control group, to investigate the possibility of tone production and intelligibility deficits that were differentially…

Jeng, Jing-Yi; Weismer, Gary; Kent, Ray D.

2006-01-01

459

Epilepsy in patients with spastic cerebral palsy: correlation with MRI findings at 5 years of age  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between epilepsy and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with spastic cerebral palsy at five years of age. We studied 14 patients with congenital anomaly and 116 with perinatal injury. The patients with perinatal injury were subdivided into two groups; those with preterm type injury alone (group P),

Akihisa Okumura; Fumio Hayakawa; Toru Kato; Kuniyoshi Kuno; Kazuyoshi Watanabe

1999-01-01

460

Effect of Task Constraint on Reaching Performance in Children with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of the study were to examine the effect of task constraint on the reaching performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and to examine the correlations between the reaching performance and postural control. Eight children with CP and 16 typically developing (TD) children participated in the study. They performed a…

Ju, Yun-Huei; You, Jia-Yuan; Cherng, Rong-Ju

2010-01-01

461

Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy, Their Cognitive Functioning, and Social Participation: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

White matter lesions are often seen in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Evidence points to specific impairment of attentional, visuospatial, and executive functions; although both attention and executive functions are relatively unexplored in spastic CP. The few recent studies on language functions in mild or moderate CP point to well-functioning language. The presence of specific cognitive impairments may, in

Louise Bottcher

2010-01-01

462

Energy Efficiency in Gait, Activity, Participation, and Health Status in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the study was to establish if a relationship exists between the energy efficiency of gait, and measures of activity limitation, participation restriction, and health status in a representative sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Secondary aims were to investigate potential differences between clinical subtypes and gross motor…

Kerr, Claire; Parkes, Jackie; Stevenson, Mike; Cosgrove, Aidan P.; McDowell, Brona C.

2008-01-01

463

Functional Changes in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with multiple handicaps, including cerebral palsy (CP), often lose or regress in their functional ability through adolescence and young adulthood. The purpose of this study was to examine functional and psychosocial changes in children, adolescents, and young adults with CP. A retrospective chart review and a prospective telephone…

Krakovsky, Gina; Huth, Myra Martz; Lin, Li; Levin, Ron S.

2007-01-01

464

A Predictive Mathematical Model of Muscle Forces for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine if our previously developed muscle model could be used to predict forces of the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae muscles of children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Twenty-two children with CP (12 males, 10 females; mean age 10y, SD 2y, range 7-13y; Gross Motor Function…

Lee, Samuel C. K.; Ding, Jun; Prosser, Laura A.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A.

2009-01-01

465

Changes in gait patterns after operations in children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have utilised a scoring system with the aid of a specially designed worksheet to measure gait ability in spastic children with cerebral palsy before and after corrective soft tissue operations. Postoperatively, there were obvious improvements in gait especially in the mobility of the leg and the foot. Comparison between a visually assessed score and objectively recorded values using foot-switches

L. E. Larsson; M. Miller; R. Norlin; H. Tkaczuk

1986-01-01

466

Twenty Weeks of Computer-Training Improves Sense of Agency in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with cerebral palsy (CP) show alteration of perceptual and cognitive abilities in addition to motor and sensory deficits, which may include altered sense of agency. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether 20 weeks of internet-based motor, perceptual and cognitive training enhances the ability of CP children to determine whether they…

Ritterband-Rosenbaum, A.; Christensen, M. S.; Nielsen, J. B.

2012-01-01

467

Stationary Cycling and Children with Cerebral Palsy: Case Reports for Two Participants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These case reports describe a stationary cycling intervention and outcomes for two child participants (P1 and P2) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. Each child completed a 12-week, 30-session cycling intervention consisting of strengthening and cardiorespiratory fitness phases. P1 exhibited higher training intensities, particularly during the…

Siebert, Kara L.; DeMuth, Sharon K.; Knutson, Loretta M.; Fowler, Eileen G.

2010-01-01

468

Selective Functional Posterior Rhizotomy for Treatment of Spastic Cerebral Palsy in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifty consecutive children are described with spastic cerebral palsy treated with selective functional lumbar and sacral rhizotomy and followed for a minimum of 6 months. In all patients, spasticity improved postoperatively, but this was not necessarily accompanied by a functional improvement. Eighteen children who could not walk preoperatively were able to do so after rhizotomy. All 17 children who could

Paul Steinbok; Ann Reiner; Richard D. Beauchamp; Douglas D. Cochrane; Robert Keyes

1992-01-01

469

Trends in perinatal mortality and cerebral palsy in Western Australia, 1967 to 1985  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To analyse the trends in stillbirths, neonatal deaths, and cerebral palsy in all infants born in Western Australia from 1967 to 1985. To relate these trends to changes in perinatal care, particularly in relation to avoidance of intrapartum asphyxia in term infants and the increased survival of low birthweight infants. DESIGN--Descriptive epidemiological study calculating population rates for perinatal deaths and

F. J. Stanley; L. Watson

1992-01-01

470

Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

2012-01-01

471

Relationship between vision and motor impairment in children with spastic cerebral palsy: new evidence from electrophysiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to measure visual acuity (VA) by the sweep visual evoked potential method (sVEP) and relate it to the degree of motor impairment in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP). Monocular VA was estimated in 37 SCP children aged from 6 to 48 months, classified as tetraplegic ( n = 14), diplegic (n =

Solange Rios Salomão; Adriana Berezovsky; Filomena Maria de Haro; Dora Fix Ventura

2003-01-01

472

Functional Assessment Following Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy in Children With Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to describe outcomes of intrathecal baclofen therapy for 29 patients with cerebral palsy, focusing on impairments, functional limitations, and disability. Patients received individualized rehabilitation and were followed up to 24 months. The primary outcome measures were the Ashworth Scale and the functional skills and caregiver assistance scales of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory

Yasser Awaad; Hassan Tayem; Sharon Munoz; Steven Ham; Anne Marie Michon; Rania Awaad

2003-01-01

473

Mirror Visual Feedback Induces Lower Neuromuscular Activity in Children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the effects of mirror feedback information on neuromuscular activation during bimanual coordination in eight children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and a matched control group. The "mirror box" creates a visual illusion, which gives rise to a visual perception of a zero lag, symmetric movement between the two…

Feltham, Max G.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

2010-01-01

474

Psychiatric Disorders among Children with Cerebral Palsy at School Starting Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present population study was to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP), as well as the impact of comorbid conditions. A cohort of children with CP born 2001-2003, and living in the Western Health Region of Norway were evaluated at school starting age. Parents were interviewed with the…

Bjorgaas, H. M.; Hysing, M.; Elgen, I.

2012-01-01

475

The variability of goniometric measurements in ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the variability of six goniometric measurements commonly used in the assessment of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Three experienced paediatric physiotherapists recorded three consecutive measurements of six joint ranges from 12 children with spastic CP. A fourth measurement was recorded 1 week later. The order of measurement with regards to both joint measurement and tester, was randomised

Brona C. McDowell; Vera Hewitt; Andrea Nurse; Tina Weston; Richard Baker

2000-01-01

476

Selective dorsal rhizotomy as a treatment option for children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is the most common motor disorder originating in childhood and spasticity is the most frequent manifestation. The treatment strategies to reduce spasticity and thereby ameliorate the attendant gait abnormalities have included physiotherapy, orthoses, antispastic medications, orthopaedic surgery and neurosurgery. Of these, the neurosurgical procedure known as selective dorsal rhizotomy has gained widespread exposure, and indeed acceptance, over the

Christopher L Vaughan; Nivedita Subramanian; Monica E Busse

1998-01-01

477

The Relationship between Manual Ability and Ambulation in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship between gross motor function and manual ability in 120 adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) (15.2, SD 2.1 years, 59.8% male). Adolescents were evaluated using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS). A neurologist classified CP subtype. Most…

Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Shevell, Michael; Poulin, Chantal; Lach, Lucyna; Law, Mary; Schmitz, Norbert

2013-01-01

478

Interrater Reliability of Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Tardieu Scale in Children With Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resistance to passive movement in children with spastic cerebral palsy was assessed by two raters using the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Modified Tardieu Scale. Four muscle groups in the lower limbs were tested using a standardized procedure. Interrater reliability of the scales was evaluated by the intraclass correlation coefficient. Seventeen children, with a mean age of 7 years 9

Winnie Ka Ling Yam; Milan So Mei Leung

2006-01-01

479

Videofluoroscopic assessment of dysphagia in children with severe spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Very little has been published about the characteristics and sequelae of dysphagia in children with neurological impairment. The swallowing difficulties encountered by children with spastic cerebral palsy are particularly debilitating and potentially lethal. However, aggressive evaluation and management of their feeding is typically deferred until they are medically or nutritionally compromised. Reports of the use of videofluoroscopy to analyze the

Penny L. Mirrett; John E. Riski; Judith Glascott; Valen Johnson

1994-01-01

480

VALIDITY OF THE PENDULUM TEST TO MEASURE QUADRICEPS SPASTICITY IN CHILDREN DIAGNOSED WITH CEREBRAL PALSY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stiff-knee gait pattern of children diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP) is assumed to be caused by spasticity of the quadriceps which interferes with knee flexion normally occurring during the swing phase of walking. In current clinical practice, the ability to assess quadriceps spasticity is limited by the lack of an objective and reliable test that discriminates the role spasticity

Henry Dulin White II

2007-01-01

481

The Effects of Lower Extremity Strengthening on the Gait of Children with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction Cerebral palsy (CP) is a condition resulting from damage to the brain. This damage can occur either in-utero, during childbirth, or after birth in the first months of life. The causes of brain damage range from uterine infection, trauma during or after childbirth, to illness or infection as an infant. Current research estimates that 70% of CP cases originate

Rebecca Fritzler; Marki James

2006-01-01

482

Development of spasticity with age in a total population of children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The development of spasticity with age in children with cerebral palsy (CP) has, to our knowledge, not been studied before. In 1994, a register and a health care program for children with CP in southern Sweden were initiated. In the programme the child's muscle tone according to the modified Ashworth scale is measured twice a year until six years

Gunnar Hägglund; Philippe Wagner

2008-01-01

483

Anticipatory planning deficits and task context effects in hemiparetic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (HCP) display deviant motor output, predominantly on one side of the body. The question pursued here is whether HCP participants have the ability to anticipate the forthcoming perceptual-motor demands of the goal of an action sequence. Such anticipatory planning was necessary to successfully perform the tasks that were studied. In experiment I, HCP participants had

Marcel Mutsaarts; Bert Steenbergen; Harold Bekkering

2006-01-01

484

Selective dorsal rhizotomy as a treatment option for children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is the most common motor disorder originating in childhood and spasticity is the most frequent manifestation. The treatment strategies to reduce spasticity and thereby ameliorate the attendant gait abnormalities have included physiotherapy, orthoses, antispastic medications, orthopaedic surgery and neurosurgery. Of these, the neurosurgical procedure known as selective dorsal rhizotomy has gained widespread exposure, and indeed acceptance, over the

Christopher L. Vaughan; Nivedita Subramanian; Monica E. Busse

485

An autosomal recessive form of spastic cerebral palsy (CP) with microcephaly and mental retardation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy (CP) is defined as any nonprogressive motor deficits resulting from cerebral abnormalities that occur in the prenatal or perinatal period. Symptoms become apparent during the first year of life. Genetic forms of CP account for about 2% in European populations but are thought to cause a substantial proportion in consanguineous families. We have identified a large consanguineous family

Anna Rajab; Seung-Yun Yoo; Aiman Abdulgalil; Salem Kathiri; Riaz Ahmed; Ganeshwaran H. Mochida; Adria Bodell; A. James Barkovich; Christopher A. Walsh

2006-01-01

486

Home literacy predictors of early reading development in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the present 1-year long longitudinal study was to determine which home literacy variables were effective in stimulating early reading skills of children with cerebral palsy (CP) directly or indirectly via the reading precursors. Parents of 35 children with CP completed questionnaires regarding aspects of the home literacy environment (HLE). The reading precursors: Vocabulary, Syntactic skills and phonological

Marieke Peeters; Ludo Verhoeven; J. M. H. de Moor; Hans van Balkom; J. F. J. van Leeuwe

2009-01-01

487

Home Literacy Predictors of Early Reading Development in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the present 1-year long longitudinal study was to determine which home literacy variables were effective in stimulating early reading skills of children with cerebral palsy (CP) directly or indirectly via the reading precursors. Parents of 35 children with CP completed questionnaires regarding aspects of the home literacy environment…

Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; de Moor, Jan; van Balkom, Hans; van Leeuwe, Jan

2009-01-01

488

Changes in endurance and walking ability through functional physical training in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility and effect of a functional physical training program on aerobic endurance and walking ability of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS: Thirteen children (8-13 years, Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II, with normal intelligence or mild retardation) participated in this study. A functional physical training program addressing aerobic endurance, walking distance, walking velocity,

Hetty Gorter; Lian Holty; Eugène E. A. Rameckers; J. W. H. Elvers; Rob A. B. Oostendorp

2009-01-01

489

Effects of botulinum toxin A on calf muscles in children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin A injection for the management of spastic calf muscles in children with cerebral palsy.Data sources: We reviewed all relevant literature indexed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro and the Cochrane Registered Trials, and also hand reviewed abstracts.Methods: Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials that compared botulinum toxin A injection with any type of

Yun Hyung Koog; Byung-II Min

2010-01-01

490

Longitudinal study of motor performance and its relation to motor capacity in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the course of motor performance and analyse its relationship with motor capacity over a period of 3 years in 104 children (66 males, 38 females; 43% of those initially invited) with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 9, 11, and 13 years at the start of the study. Forty-one had hemiplegia, 42 diplegia,

MIRJAM VAN ECK; ANNET J DALLMEIJER; JEANINE M VOORMAN; JULES G BECHER

2009-01-01

491

Impact of malnutrition on gastrointestinal disorders and gross motor abilities in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often demonstrate abnormal feeding behaviours, leading to reduced food consumption and malnutrition. Moreover, most of them present with gastrointestinal disorders, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and\\/or chronic constipation (CC), and poor motor function rehabilitation. The aim of our study was to assess the possible relationship between malnutrition and gastrointestinal problems and to evaluate the

Angelo Campanozzi; Guglielmo Capano; Erasmo Miele; Alfonso Romano; Goffredo Scuccimarra; Ennio Del Giudice; Caterina Strisciuglio; Roberto Militerni; Annamaria Staiano

2007-01-01

492

Integrating Neurodevelopmental Treatment and Sensory Integration-Theory and Practice in the Client with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The client with cerebral palsy often shows signs of problems integrating sensory information in combination with a motor disorder. This may be, in part, due to the initial insult or cause of the CP, but may be made worse by the lack of independent movement and absence of typical development that helps children learn to integrate sensory inputs. Medical issues

Carolyn Murray-Slutsky

493

Bilateral perisylvian ulegyria: clinicopathological study of patients presenting with pseudobulbar palsy and epilepsy.  

PubMed

Structural abnormalities related with pseudobulbar palsy have been gaining attention because of their characteristic symptoms and unique pathogenesis. We present five cases of bilateral perisylvian ulegyria (BPU) presenting epilepsy and pseudobulbar palsy with pathogenesis different from previously reported syndromes. All patients showed medically intractable seizures, complex partial seizures with secondary generalization and clinical symptoms of pseudobulbar palsy, including dysarthria, limitation of tongue movement and drooling. MRI revealed BPU in all patients, and BPU associated with hippocampal sclerosis in four patients. Intracranial EEG recording with subdural grip and stripe was helpful for localizing the area of ictal generation. Resective surgeries, including the temporal lobe, central area and parietal lobe, were performed depending on the localizing information. The surgical outcome was favorable after 9.8 years of follow-up. Characteristic features of ulegyria were confirmed on pathological examination. Ulegyria is considered to be another important perinatal or postnatal structural abnormality which can explain the etiological heterogeneity for pseudobulbar palsy, which results from bilateral perisylvian lesions. Awareness of this disorder can provide a useful strategy for evaluation and treatment which differs from that in perisylvian polymicrogyria. PMID:16771181

Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Lee, Min-Cheol; Lee, Ji-Shin; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Woo, Young-Jong; Kim, Jae-Hyoo; Jung, Shin; Palmini, Andre; Kim, Seung U

2006-06-01

494

Loss of insight in frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Loss of insight is one of the core features of frontal\\/behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FTD shares many clinical and pathological features with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The aim of this study was to investigate awareness of cognitive deficits in FTD, CBD and PSP using a multidimensional approach to assessment, which examines metacognitive knowledge of the

F. M. O'Keeffe; B. Murray; R. F. Coen; P. M. Dockree; M. A. Bellgrove; H. Garavan; T. Lynch; I. H. Robertson

2007-01-01

495

Efficacy of Intensive Versus Nonintensive Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Metaanalysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A commonly used treatment for cerebral palsy in children is so-called "conventional therapy", which includes physiotherapy or the neurodevelopmental approach. Although more intensive rehabilitative treatment is thought to be more effective than less intensive interventions, this assumption has not been proven. In this study we compared the…

Arpino, Carla

2010-01-01

496

Clinimetric Properties of the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the criterion-related validity and clinimetric properties of the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation (APCP) for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Eighty-two children with CP (age range, two to five years and 11 months) and their caregivers participated in this study. The APCP consists of diversity and intensity…

Chen, Chia-ling; Chen, Chung-yao; Shen, I-hsuan; Liu, I-Shu; Kang, Lin-ju; Wu, Ching-yi

2013-01-01

497

Change in Ambulatory Ability of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to determine the probability that a child with cerebral palsy (CP) will lose or gain ambulatory ability through adolescence and young adulthood. We analyzed retrospectively data from 1987 to 2002 on Californians with CP initially aged 10 years (SD 0.9y; n=7550 [4304 males, 3246 females]) and 25 years (SD 0.8y; n=5721 [3261 males,…

Day, Steven M.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Strauss, David J.; Shavelle, Robert M.; Reynolds, Robert J.

2007-01-01

498

Conductive Education: A Functional Skills Program for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conductive education (CE) is an educational approach for children with cerebral palsy. This paper describes the history of conductive education, and the characteristics of current programs that exist in many countries. The underlying principles and the unique techniques used in CE programs are described. These include the role of the conductor or…

Bourke-Taylor, Helen; O'Shea, Roberta; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

2007-01-01

499

A video game for an upper limb rehabilitation robotic system for children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a video game for the rehabilitation of the pronation and supination movements of children with cerebral palsy. It is used as an interface for a robot that is currently under development. The game was programmed in LabVIEW and MATLAB is used for analyzing the results. It simulates a formula one racecar on a racetrack. Its objective is

J. E. Cifuentes-Zapien; J. A. Valdez-Aguilar; F. J. Rojas-Correa; J. E. Chong-Quero; A. Pineda-Olivares

2011-01-01

500

TouchTone: an electronic musical instrument for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy often lack the physical skills to explore their environment independently, express feelings, communicate, and successfully participate in social activities. Creative music therapy aims to improve this situation by specifically addressing the emotional and social needs of these children. However, to be successful at these levels, the children need to have basic control over the musical

Soumitra Bhat

2010-01-01