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1

Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.  

PubMed

A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged. PMID:25175852

Kim, Kyoung-Eun

2014-11-15

2

Molecular genetic analysis of the 17p11.2 region in patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is in most cases associated with an interstitial deletion of the same 1.5-Mb region at 17p11.2 that is duplicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) patients. Unequal crossing-over following misalignment at flanking repeat sequences (CMT1A-REP), either leads to tandem duplication in CMT1A patients or deletion in HNPP patients. With the use of polymorphic

Vincent Timmerman; Ann Löfgren; Eric Guern; Ping Liang; Peter Jonghe; Jean-Jacques Martin; Damienne Verhalle; Wim Robberecht; Riadh Gouider; Alexis Brice; Christine Broeckhoven

1996-01-01

3

Sonographic Evaluation of the Peripheral Nerves in Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that affects peripheral nerves by repeated focal pressure. HNPP can be diagnosed by clinical findings, electrodiagnostic studies, histopathological features, and genetic analysis. Ultrasonography is increasingly used for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases; however, sonographic features of HNPP have not been clearly defined. We report the sonographic findings and comparative electrodiagnostic data in a 73-year-old woman with HNPP, confirmed by genetic analysis. The cross-sectional areas of peripheral nerves were enlarged at typical nerve entrapment sites, but enlargement at non-entrapment sites was uncommon. These sonographic features may be helpful for diagnosis of HNPP when electrodiagnostic studies are suspicious of HNPP and/or gene study is not compatible. PMID:24639934

Kim, Se Hwa; Yoon, Joon Shik; Park, Bum Jun

2014-01-01

4

An abnormal mRNA produced by a novel PMP22 splice site mutation associated with HNPP  

PubMed Central

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant, demyelinating neuropathy. Point mutations in the PMP22 gene are a rare cause of HNPP. A novel PMP22 splice site mutation (c.179+1 G?C) is reported in an HNPP family. By reverse transcriptase?polymerase chain reaction experiments, this mutation was shown to cause the synthesis of an abnormal mRNA in which a premature stop codon probably produces a truncated non?functional protein. PMID:16199442

Bellone, E; Balestra, P; Ribizzi, G; Schenone, A; Zocchi, G; Maria, E Di; Ajmar, F; Mandich, P

2006-01-01

5

Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies  

PubMed Central

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5?Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis. PMID:25506001

Cho, Sun-Mi; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Sang Guk; Yang, Jin-Young

2014-01-01

6

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies presenting with sciatic neuropathy.  

PubMed

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant disorder associated with recurrent mononeuropathies following compression or trivial trauma. Reports on sciatic neuropathy as the presenting manifestation of HNPP are very scarce. We report on a 21-year-old previously healthy man who was admitted with sensorimotor deficits in his left leg. He had no history of preceding transient episodes of weakness or sensory loss. Clinical and electrophysiological examinations were consistent with sciatic neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid investigation and MRI of the nerve roots, plexus, and sciatic nerve did not indicate the underlying aetiology. When extended electrophysiological tests revealed multiple subclinical compression neuropathies in the upper limbs, HNPP was contemplated and eventually confirmed by genetic testing. PMID:25326571

Topakian, Raffi; Wimmer, Sibylle; Pischinger, Barbara; Pichler, Robert

2014-01-01

7

[Analysis of the clinical, electrophysiological and genetic features of a family affected with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies].  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To delineate the clinical, electrophysiological and genetics features of a family where 4 members were affected with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). METHODS Clinical features of the 4 patients were summarized. Electrophysiological examination and genetic analysis were carried out. RESULTS All of the patients showed recurrent motor and sensory disturbances after minor traction or constriction. Electrophysiology study revealed that the prolonged latency and reduced conduction velocity of peripheral nerve were general and with multiple sites of affection. The nerve locations liable to entrapment showed conduction block. A deletion mutation of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene was identified by genetic analysis. CONCLUSION HNPP usually affects areas where nerves are liable to entrapment, and presents with motor and sensory disturbances of the innervated areas. Electrophysiological study reveals general nervous demyelination. Genetic analysis can clarify the diagnosis of HNPP. PMID:25636095

Qi, Faying; Che, Fengyuan

2015-02-10

8

Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies  

MedlinePLUS

... disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... 2007 What is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies? Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies ...

9

Overlap Phenotype between CMT1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies Caused by the Novel Small In-frame Deletion c.407_418del12 in PMP22 Gene.  

PubMed

We report monozygotic twins, who presented with a clinical picture of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1) with bilateral foot drop, pes cavus, thoracic kyphosis, and scoliosis. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) showed up in one of them. Neurography showed demyelinating neuropathy, typical for CMT1, and transient conduction block in the ulnar nerve correlating with clinical ulnar palsy due to minor mechanical stress in only one of them. Genetic analysis revealed novel small de novo deletion c.407_418del12 in the PMP22 gene. Our patient shows the rarely reported combination of CMT1A and HNPP, caused by an in-frame deletion in the PMP22 gene. HNPP is in the majority of cases correlated with heterozygous deletion of the whole PMP22 gene or other mutations leading to functional haploinsufficiency. The cases give further evidence that pathogenesis of HNPP is not completely understood and can obviously result from existence of a defective protein, too. The intrafamiliar phenotypic variability, even in monozygotic twins, confirms the well-known fact that factors apart from genetics contribute to the clinical course. PMID:25265422

Vill, Katharina; Kuhn, Marius; Gläser, Dieter; Müller-Felber, Wolfgang

2015-02-01

10

PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies  

PubMed Central

PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

2014-01-01

11

Recombination hot spot in 3.2-kb region of the Charcot-Marie Tooth type 1A repeat sequences: New tools for molecular diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A  

SciTech Connect

Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) disease and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are autosomal dominant neuropathies, associated, respectively, with duplications and deletions of the same 1.5-Mb region on 17p11.2-p12. These two rearrangements are the reciprocal products of an unequal meiotic crossover between the two chromosome 17 homologues, caused by the misalignment of the CMT1A repeat sequences (CMT1A-REPs), the homologous sequences flanking the 1.5-Mb CMT1A/HNPP monomer unit. In order to map recombination breakpoints within the CMT1A-REPs, a 12.9-kb restriction map was constructed from cloned EcoRI fragments of the proximal and distal CMT1A-REPs. Only 3 of the 17 tested restriction sites were present in the proximal CMT1A-REP but absent in the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating a high degree of homology between these sequences. The rearrangements were mapped in four regions of the CMT1A-REPs by analysis of 76 CMT1A index cases and 38 HNPP patients, who were unrelated. A hot spot of crossover breakpoints located in a 3.2-kb region accounted for three-quarters of the rearrangements, detected after EcoRI/SacI digestion, by the presence of 3.2-kb and 7.8-kb junction fragments in CMT1A and HNPP patients, respectively. These junction fragments, which can be detected on classical Southern blots, permit molecular diagnosis. Other rearrangements can also be detected by gene dosage on the same Southern blots. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Lopes, J.; LeGuern, E.; Gouider, R.; Tardieu, S.; Abbas, N. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France)] [and others

1996-06-01

12

Isolation of novel genes from the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion critical region in 17p11.2-p12.  

PubMed

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with a 1.5-Mb tandem DNA duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-p12, while hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion at this locus. The 1.5-Mb CMT1A monomer unit duplicated in CMT1A and deleted in HNPP is flanked by low-copy repeats termed CMT1A-REPs. Both diseases appear to be caused by an altered copy number of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), which lies within the critical region. To identify additional genes rapidly, we used a cosmid contig of this region and reciprocal probing of arrayed chromosome 17-specific cosmid and cDNA libraries. Three cDNA clones were identified within the CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion region and one just proximal to the critical region. The cDNA for human heme A:farnesyltransferase (COX10) mapped 10 kb centromeric to the distal CMT1A-REP. The other two cDNA clones from within the critical interval mapped to cosmid 126D1 at the mfd41 (D17S261) DNA marker, and their conceptual translation showed homology to 60S ribosomal protein L9 (RPL9) and chromosomal protein RMSA-1 (RMSA-1). A gene that is homologous to human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (hPPARA) was identified near the proximal CMT1A-REP. PMID:9027492

Murakami, T; Sun, Z S; Lee, C C; Lupski, J R

1997-01-01

13

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: a SacI polymorphism in the proximal CMT1A-REP elements may lead to genetic misdiagnosis.  

PubMed

A male patient with clinical signs and symptoms of a demyelinating neuropathy was shown to have a duplication of the 1.5-Mb region on chromosome 17p11.2 by means of two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This duplication is typical for the vast majority of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) cases. Analysis of DNA extracted from peripheral blood used to detect an EcoRI/SacI 3. 2-kb junction fragment with probe pLR7.8 confirmed the CMT1A duplication, but also revealed a 7.8-kb fragment usually observed in patients with a hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Both fragments observed in one patient canot result from one unequal crossover. In EcoRI/SacI Southern hybridization experiments with probe pLR7.8 DNA of his healthy parents also revealed a 7.8-kB restriction fragment. A subsequent two-color FISH analysis, however, indicated a normal status for interphase nuclei of the parents. Hence we hypothesize that the 7.8-kb fragment observed in our patient and his parents is not the product of unequal crossover during meiosis but due to a polymorphism of the SacI site in a proximal CMT1A-REP element. PMID:9933299

Fuchs, C; Liehr, T; Ozbey, S; Ekici, A; Grehl, H; Rautenstrauss, B

1998-12-01

14

Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy: A Recurrent and Bilateral Foot Drop Case Report  

PubMed Central

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, “sausage-like” swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis. PMID:24251057

Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Rodrigues, Maria Lurdes

2013-01-01

15

Correction versus bedding: wheelchair pressure distribution measurements in children with cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Purpose Most children with cerebral palsy classification Levels IV and V in the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) are unable to walk and, therefore, spend almost all day in a sitting position in their wheelchairs. As a result of the spastic muscle contraction, malpositions of joints or a scoliosis develop, which require a decision to be made on whether to correct the posture or simply find the best soft bedding position. Methods The distribution of pressure on the seat while sitting in a wheelchair was measured with a pressure distribution measuring mat. The different distribution patterns were analyzed. Results Pressure distribution measurement allows to find a compromise between posture correction and soft bedding. Additionally, pressure-reducing seats were examined on their effectiveness. We also focused our measurements and data analyses on recognizing the causes for pain. Sometimes, the origin of the problems and pain of children in wheelchairs is not clear. Conclusions Using the above-mentioned measuring equipment, the causes of these problems can be detected much more easily than just by clinical examination. The pressure measuring mat can help to optimize the seating position for the spastically handicapped children and adapt technical aids. Examples demonstrate the most frequently occurring problems of these children in their wheelchairs which are typical for neuro-orthopedic diseases. PMID:21804890

Mitternacht, Jürgen

2010-01-01

16

Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP for short) is a disorder ... part of the brain is involved. How Does Cerebral Palsy Affect People? The three types of cerebral palsy ...

17

Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

18

Application of multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis to define a small deletion encompassing PMP22 exons 4 and 5 in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies arises as a result of defects at the chromosome 17p11.2-12 locus and in 84% of cases a 1.5Mb deletion containing the PMP22 gene is detected by analysis that utilises polymorphic (CA)n repeat markers which flank this gene. We report the clinical and electrophysiological findings observed in a kindred with three members affected by

Ian J Sutton; A Paul Mocroft; Victoria H Lindley; Richard M Barber; R Jane Bryon; John B Winer; Fiona MacDonald

2004-01-01

19

Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... disorders appear in the first few years of life. CP is caused by problems with the motor ... birth, or in the first few months of life. Symptoms & Complications Symptoms of cerebral palsy include: • difficulty ...

20

Bell's Palsy  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... The 7 th nerve extends from the brain stem to a very narrow canal in the skull. ... to Bell’s palsy. It also disproportionately affects pregnant women, diabetics, and patients suffering from the flu or ...

21

Bell's Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

... also associated with the infectious agent that causes Lyme disease . Of course, this doesn't mean that everyone who has a viral infection or Lyme disease will develop Bell's palsy — most people don't. ...

22

Aging and Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

Networker, 1993

1993-01-01

23

Progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two female cases of progressive supranuclear palsy (“heterogeneous system degeneration”) with histological findings are reported. Clinically, vertical gaze palsy, dystonia, akinesia, pseudobulbar palsy and mental impairment were prominent. Pathologically, widespread appearance of neurofibrillary tangles of the subcortical type in the brain stem and basal ganglia was associated with neuronal loss and gliosis in the substantia nigra, subthalamic nuclei and pallidum.

K. Jellinger

1971-01-01

24

An unusual cause of radial nerve palsy.  

PubMed

Neurapraxia frequently occurs following traction injury to the nerve intraoperatively, leading to radial nerve palsy which usually recovers in 5-30 weeks. In our case, we had operated a distal one-third of humeral shaft fracture and fixed it with 4.5 mm limited contact dynamic compression plate. The distal neurovascular status of the limb was assessed postoperatively in the recovery room and was found to be intact and all the sensory-motor functions of the radial nerve were normal. On the second postoperative day, following the suction drain removal and dressing, patient developed immediate radial nerve palsy along with wrist drop. We reviewed the literature and found no obvious cause for the nerve palsy and concluded that it was due to traction injury to the radial nerve while removing the suction drain in negative pressure. PMID:24889983

Agrawal, Hemendra Kumar; Khatkar, Vipin; Garg, Mohit; Singh, Balvinder; Jaiman, Ashish; Sharma, Vinod Kumar

2014-06-01

25

Screening and Diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

... Palsy (CP) Share Compartir Screening and Diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy Diagnosing cerebral palsy (CP) at an early age is important to ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Cerebral Palsy Information Page to learn more about how CP ...

26

Histological Perspective of Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

Page 1 Histological Perspective of Cerebral Palsy Lucas Smith 18 November 2008 #12;Page 2 Cerebral Palsy Background Incidence of 2 per 1,000 live births in developed nations Spectrum Disease - Orthotics/Braces - Baclofen - BOTOX - Surgery Graham H, Selber P. Musculoskeletal aspects of cerebral palsy

Gleeson, Joseph G.

27

Cerebral palsy and multiple births  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: To compare the birthweight specific prevalence of cerebral palsy in singleton and multiple births. METHODS: Registered births of babies with cerebral palsy born to mothers resident in the counties of Merseyside and Cheshire during the period 1982 to 1989 were ascertained. RESULTS: The crude prevalence of cerebral palsy was 2.3 per 1000 infant survivors in singletons, 12.6 in twins,

P O Pharoah; T Cooke

1996-01-01

28

Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.  

PubMed

Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is considered to be the result of a trauma during the delivery, even if there remains some controversy surrounding the causes. Although most babies recover spontaneously in the first 3 months of life, a small number remains with poor recovery which requires surgical brachial plexus exploration. Surgical indications depend on the type of lesion (producing total or partial palsy) and particularly the nonrecovery of biceps function by the age of 3 months. In a global palsy, microsurgery will be mandatory and the strategy for restoration will focus first on hand reinnervation and secondarily on providing elbow flexion and shoulder stability. Further procedures may be necessary during growth in order to avoid fixed contractured deformities or to give or increase strength of important muscle functions like elbow flexion or wrist extension. The author reviews the history of obstetrical brachial plexus injury, epidemiology, and the specifics of descriptive and functional anatomy in babies and children. Clinical manifestations at birth are directly correlated with the anatomical lesion. Finally, operative procedures are considered, including strategies of reconstruction with nerve grafting in infants and secondary surgery to increase functional capacity at later ages. However, normal function is usually not recovered, particularly in total brachial plexus palsy. PMID:23622302

Romaña, M C; Rogier, A

2013-01-01

29

Familial progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A progressive extrapyramidal syndrome and dementia occurred in three members of one family. The age of onset was in the seventh decade and the affected individuals showed many of the clinical features of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Necropsy of one individual revealed the neuropathological features of PSP. We propose that this family has a familial form of PSP and review

J Brown; P Lantos; M Stratton; P Roques; M Rossor

1993-01-01

30

Data and Statistics for Cerebral Palsy  

MedlinePLUS

... CDC.gov . Cerebral Palsy (CP) Share Compartir Data & Statistics for Cerebral Palsy Prevalence and Characteristics Cerebral palsy ( ... Facts Treatment Services (IDEA) Causes Screening & Diagnosis Data & Statistics Tracking & Research Articles & Key Findings My Story Links ...

31

United Cerebral Palsy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Started in 1949 by parents of children with cerebral palsy, United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) has advocated and provided support services for not only people with cerebral palsy, but also a wide range of disabilities, including Down Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and traumatic brain injury. The UCP website provides visitors with a range of resources which they have acquired from their 60 years of dealing with disability issues. The "Resources" tab near the top of the page offers visitors a "One-Stop Resource Guide" as well as a dozen topics, such as "Education," "Assistive Technology," "Disability Etiquette," and "State Resource Guides" that are covered in more depth. The "Ask Lara" blog link at the bottom of the Resources page is a great way to keep up with current news, studies, conferences, and resources that affect people with disabilities. One of the blog entries is about Bookshare, which is a free online library of digital books for those with print disabilities and visitors won't want to miss it.

32

Peripheral facial palsy in children.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to evaluate the types and clinical characteristics of peripheral facial palsy in children. The hospital charts of children diagnosed with peripheral facial palsy were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 81 children (42 female and 39 male) with a mean age of 9.2 ± 4.3 years were included in the study. Causes of facial palsy were 65 (80.2%) idiopathic (Bell palsy) facial palsy, 9 (11.1%) otitis media/mastoiditis, and tumor, trauma, congenital facial palsy, chickenpox, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, enlarged lymph nodes, and familial Mediterranean fever (each 1; 1.2%). Five (6.1%) patients had recurrent attacks. In patients with Bell palsy, female/male and right/left ratios were 36/29 and 35/30, respectively. Of them, 31 (47.7%) had a history of preceding infection. The overall rate of complete recovery was 98.4%. A wide variety of disorders can present with peripheral facial palsy in children. Therefore, careful investigation and differential diagnosis is essential. PMID:24097851

Y?lmaz, Unsal; Cubukçu, Duygu; Y?lmaz, Tuba Sevim; Ak?nc?, Gülçin; Ozcan, Muazzez; Güzel, Orkide

2014-11-01

33

Progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a •Unfortunately, no drug treatment has been shown to benefit patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) more than modestly\\u000a or briefly. The multiplicity of neuronal systems and synaptic physiologies that degenerate in this disorder makes a neurotransmitter-specific\\u000a approach, such as neurotransmitter replacement or reuptake inhibition, unlikely to succeed. Nevertheless, some of these are\\u000a worth trying in nearly every

Lawrence I. Golbe

2001-01-01

34

The Effect of Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Benefits of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with cerebral palsy could differ from those in otherwise healthy children. We examined the effects of OSA treatment by comparing a group of children with cerebral palsy treated with adenotonsillectomy or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by nasal mask with controls who…

Hsiao, Kai Hsun; Nixon, Gillian M.

2008-01-01

35

Neurocysticercosis presenting as pseudobulbar palsy  

PubMed Central

Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common helminthic infestation of the central nervous system (CNS) and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The common manifestations of NCC are seizures and headache. The NCC as a cause of pseudobulbar palsy is very unusual and not reported yet in the literature. A pseudobulbar palsy can occur in any disorder that causes bilateral corticobulbar disease. The common etiologies of pseudobulbar palsy are vascular, demyelinative, or motor neuron disease. We report a 38-year-old female patient who presented with partial seizures and pseudobulbar palsy. The MRI brain showed multiple small cysts with scolex in both the cerebral hemispheres and a giant intraparenchymal cyst. Our patient responded well to standard treatment of neurocysticercosis and antiepileptics. PMID:24741260

Kumar, Arinaganahalli Subbanna Praveen; Subrahmanyam, Dharanitragada Krishna Suri

2014-01-01

36

Bell's Palsy (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... usually needed, but doctors do sometimes test for Lyme disease, an infection that can cause weakness of the ... of these agents. Facial nerve palsy caused by Lyme disease is treated with antibiotics. Steroids can be used ...

37

Differences in standing balance between patients with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Maintaining standing postural balance is important for walking and handling abilities in patients with cerebral palsy. This study included 23 patients with cerebral palsy (seven with spastic diplegia and 16 with spastic hemiplegia), aged from 7 to 16 years of age. Standing posture balance measurements were performed using an AMTI model OR6-7 force platform with the eyes open and closed. Patients with diplegic cerebral palsy exhibited greater center of pressure displacement areas with the eyes open and greater center of pressure sway in the medial-lateral direction with the eyes open and closed compared with hemiplegic patients. Thus, diplegic patients exhibited weaker postural balance control ability and less standing stability compared with hemiplegic cerebral palsy patients. PMID:25206558

Rojas, Valeska Gatica; Rebolledo, Guillermo Méndez; Muñoz, Eduardo Guzman; Cortés, Natalia Ibarra; Gaete, Caterine Berrios; Delgado, Carlos Manterola

2013-01-01

38

Life expectancy of children with cerebral palsy  

E-print Network

Life expectancy of children with cerebral palsy J L Hutton, K Hemming and UKCP collaboration What is UKCP? Information about the physical effects of cerebral palsy on the everyday lives of children with cerebral palsy which collect information about children within specific local areas. They are the Mersey

Hutton, Jane

39

Isolated, Contralateral Trochlear Nerve Palsy Associated with a Ruptured Right Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm  

PubMed Central

Trochlear nerve palsy associated with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is known to be a rare malady. We report here on a patient who suffered with left trochlear nerve palsy following rupture of a right posterior communicating artery aneurysm. A 56-year-woman visited our emergency department with stuporous mental change. Her Hunt-and-Hess grade was 3 and the Fisher grade was 4. Cerebral angiography revealed a ruptured aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery. The aneurysm was clipped via a right pterional approach on the day of admission. The patient complained of diplopia when she gazed to the left side, and the ophthalmologist found limited left inferolateral side gazing due to left superior oblique muscle palsy on day 3. Elevated intracranial pressure, intraventricular hemorrhage or a dense clot in the basal cisterns might have caused this trochlear nerve palsy. PMID:20539802

Son, Seong; Yoo, Chan Jong; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Jae Myoung

2010-01-01

40

Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

2014-01-01

41

Dystonia in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: To document the nature, distribution, and frequency of dystonic symptoms in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). METHODS: Charts and videotapes of all clinically diagnosed patients with PSP seen between 1983 and 1993 were reviewed and the occurrence, nature, and distribution of all dystonic symptoms were recorded. RESULTS: Of 83 identified cases 38 had some dystonic features. Twenty (24%) had blepharospasm

C L Barclay; A E Lang

1997-01-01

42

Torsional problems in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Lower limb rotational problems in the patient with cerebral palsy represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the clinician. A literature review suggests that increased muscle tone may be the cause of these problems. This article proposes a simple diagnostic plan and discusses the various treatment plans and options. PMID:6714858

King, H A; Staheli, L T

1984-01-01

43

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum.  

E-print Network

??abstractProgressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) has been used to denote a unifying disorder with progressive parkinsonism with early falls, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, pseudobulbar dysfunction and… (more)

L. Donker Kaat (Laura)

2011-01-01

44

Isolated Bilateral Fourth Cranial Nerve Palsies as the Presenting Sign of Hydrocephalus  

PubMed Central

Midbrain lesions leading to bilateral fourth nerve palsies are typically accompanied by other brainstem symptomatology. Here we report a case of a 29-year-old man with hydrocephalus and significant third ventricle dilation applying pressure on the dorsal midbrain and having as only manifestation isolated, bilateral fourth cranial nerve palsies. This finding, reported now for the first time, could be attributed to a partially working ventriculoperitoneal shunt previously placed to this patient, which was able to sporadically relieve the increases of the intraventricular pressure on the midbrain that would normally lead to other manifestations. PMID:21829403

Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Hunter, David G.; Cestari, Dean M.

2011-01-01

45

Electrophysical study of peroneal palsy.  

PubMed

The diagnostic yield of different electrophysiological criteria was examined to establish whether a peroneal palsy was due to compression of the nerve in the region of the capitulum fibulae. Slowing of sensory conduction along the segment of the nerve across the capitulum fibulae localized the lesion in 64% of 47 consecutive patients with a history indicating or suggesting compression of the nerve in the vicinity of the capitulum fibulae and there were no false positive findings in 18 patients whose peroneal palsy was not due to compression at the capitulum fibulae. In 20% of the patients with slowing along the segment across the capitulum, conduction velocity was normal when measured from the superior retinaculum to the popliteal fossa. Slowing along motor fibres (m. extensor digitorum brevis) localized the site of the lesion in one-third of the patients. Differences in amplitude and in split-up of the sensory responses recorded in the popliteal fossa as compared with those recorded distal to the capitulum fibulae were of limited diagnostic value because of many false positive findings among patients whose peroneal palsy was not due to compression of the nerve at the capitulum fibulae. PMID:4376162

Singh, N; Behse, F; Buchthal, F

1974-11-01

46

Third nerve palsy associated with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome.  

PubMed

Preeclampsia can cause myriad organ dysfunction, including cranial nerve palsies that pose diagnostic and management dilemmas. We present an unusual case of third nerve palsy, (presenting as diplopia, ptosis) with hypertension, hyperreflexia, proteinuria, easy bruising in a parturient at 34 + 6/52 weeks of twins gestation. She was treated as for severe preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome; intravenous magnesium sulphate and labetalol commenced and emergent cesarean delivery performed under general anesthesia due to concerns of low platelets and for airway protection should her glascow coma scale (GCS) deteriorate. Postoperatively, stroke, aneurysm and intra-cerebral causes of third nerve palsy were excluded, with subsequent recovery of symptoms upon blood pressure normalization. The eye signs are postulated to be due to two preeclamptic mechanisms involving disordered cerebral autoregulation: (1) hyperperfusion and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier that occurs with rising hypertension, causing fluid/blood product extravasation into brain parenchyma, or (2) focal reactive vasoconstriction and local hypoperfusion, contributed to by endothelial dysfunction. PMID:23478950

Chutatape, Anuntapon; Teoh, Wendy H L

2013-10-01

47

New Hope for Children with Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explains the use of a unique experimental therapy for students with a type of cerebral palsy specifically called Botox. Botulinum Toxin Type A has been tried on a sizable number of students with cerebral palsy in clinical settings to reduce spastic and dystonic movements. By injecting Botox into overly tight heel cords, a normal or near…

Obringer, S. John

48

Progressive supranuclear palsy with Lewy bodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

An autopsy case is reported which revealed not only clinical and neuropathological features of progressive supranuclear palsy, but also the presence of large numbers of Lewy bodies in the brain stem nuclei and cerebral cortex. This case seems to be progressive supranuclear palsy with Lewy bodies distributed as in Parkinson's disease. Such case has not been previously reported.

H. Mori; M. Yoshimura; M. Tomonaga; H. Yamanouchi

1986-01-01

49

Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

2009-01-01

50

Rule Based Expert System for Cerebral Palsy *Rajdeep Borgohain  

E-print Network

1 Rule Based Expert System for Cerebral Palsy Diagnosis *Rajdeep Borgohain Department of Computer of Cerebral Palsy. The expert system takes user input and depending on the symptoms of the patient, diagnoses if the patient is suffering from Cerebral Palsy. The Expert System also classifies the Cerebral Palsy as mild

Sanyal, Sugata

51

Aerobic training in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Rehabilitation is a major goal for children with cerebral palsy, although the potential to enhance cardio-respiratory fitness in such individuals remains unclear. This study thus compared current cardio-respiratory status between children with cerebral palsy and able-bodied children, and examined the ability to enhance the cardio-respiratory fitness of children with cerebral palsy by cycle ergometer training. 10 children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I and II) participated in thrice-weekly 30 min cycle ergometer training sessions for 8 weeks (mean age: 14.2±1.9 yrs). 10 additional subjects with cerebral palsy (mean age: 14.2±1.8 yrs) and 10 able-bodied subjects (mean age: 14.1±2.1 yrs) served as controls, undertaking no training. All subjects undertook a progressive cycle ergometer test of cardio-respiratory fitness at the beginning and end of the 8-week period. Cardio-respiratory parameters [oxygen intake V?O2), ventilation V ? E) and heart rate (HR)] during testing were measured by Cosmed K4 b gas analyzer. The children with cerebral palsy who engaged in aerobic training improved their peak oxygen consumption, heart rate and ventilation significantly (p<0.05) and they also showed a non-significant trend to increased peak power output. In conclusion, children with cerebral palsy can benefit significantly from cardio-respiratory training, and such training should be included in rehabilitation programs. PMID:23184482

Nsenga, A L; Shephard, R J; Ahmaidi, S; Ahmadi, S

2013-06-01

52

Peripheral myelin protein 22 gene duplication with atypical presentations: a new example of the wide spectrum of Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease.  

PubMed

Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are both autosomal-dominant disorders linked to peripheral myelin anomalies. CMT1A is associated with a Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 (PMP22) duplication, whereas HNPP is due to a PMP22 deletion on chromosome 17. In spite of this crucial difference, we report three observations of patients with the 1.4 megabase CMT1A duplication and atypical presentation (electrophysiological, clinical or pathological): a 10 year-old girl with tomaculous lesions on nerve biopsy; a 26 year-old woman with recurrent paresthesiae and block conduction on the electrophysiological study; a 46 year-old woman with transient recurrent nerve palsies mimicking HNPP. These observations highlight the wide spectrum of CMT1A and the overlap between CMT1A and HNPP (both linked to the PMP22 gene), and finally illustrate the complexity of the genotype-phenotype correlations in Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. PMID:24792522

Mathis, Stéphane; Corcia, Philippe; Tazir, Meriem; Camu, William; Magdelaine, Corinne; Latour, Philippe; Biberon, Julien; Guennoc, Anne-Marie; Richard, Laurence; Magy, Laurent; Funalot, Benoît; Vallat, Jean-Michel

2014-06-01

53

Trends in birth prevalence of cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A register of children with cerebral palsy born in the period 1966-77 to mothers resident in the Mersey region was compiled from several different data sources. There were 685 cases, with a male:female ratio of 1.4:1. The birth prevalence of cerebral palsy ranged from 1.18 to 1.97 per 1000 live births each year, with a mean of 1.51 per 1000

P O Pharoah; T Cooke; I Rosenbloom; R W Cooke

1987-01-01

54

Life expectancy of children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk factors for mortality of young children with cerebral palsy were studied using a sample of 12,709 children aged 0.5–3.5 years with cerebral palsy who had received services from the State of California between 1980 and 1995. The most powerful prognostic factors for survival were simple functional items: mobility and feeding skills. Once these were known, factors such as severity

David J. Strauss; Robert M. Shavelle; Terence W. Anderson

1998-01-01

55

Vocational rehabilitation for cerebral palsy victims  

E-print Network

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION FOR CEREBRAL PALSY VICTIMS A Thesis By JAMES HOWARD MORGAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M Untversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... May 1965 Major Subject: Management VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION FOR CEREBRAL PALSY VICTIMS A T! esis By )AMES HOWARD MORGAN Approved as to style and content by: (C i a ir man of Committee) d of Department) ( embe'r) (Member) / (Member) May l...

Morgan, James Howard

2012-06-07

56

Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell’s palsy). Three quarters\\u000a of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections,\\u000a trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the\\u000a presence of typical symptoms

Josef Finsterer

2008-01-01

57

Clinical Phenotypes of Different MPZ (P 0) Mutations May Include Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 1B, Dejerine–Sottas, and Congenital Hypomyelination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hereditary demyelinating peripheral neuropathies consist of a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that includes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT), Dejerine–Sottas syndrome (DSS), and congenital hypomyelination (CH). The clinical classification of these neuropathies into discrete categories can sometimes be difficult because there can be both clinical and pathologic variation and overlap between these disorders. We

Laura E Warner; Max J Hilz; Stanley H Appel; James M Killian; Edwin H Kolodny; George Karpati; Stirling Carpenter; Gordon V Watters; Calvin Wheeler; David Witt; Adria Bodell; Eva Nelis; Christine Van Broeckhoven; James R Lupski

1996-01-01

58

Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

2013-01-01

59

Auditory Selective Attention in Cerebral-Palsied Individuals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To examine differences between auditory selective attention abilities of normal and cerebral-palsied individuals, 23 cerebral-palsied and 23 normal subjects (5-21) were asked to repeat a series of 30 items in presence of intermittent white noise. Results indicated that cerebral-palsied individuals perform significantly more poorly when the…

Laraway, Lee Ann

1985-01-01

60

Cerebral palsy refers to a group of neurological disorders that  

E-print Network

Background Cerebral palsy refers to a group of neurological disorders that appear in infancy and affect movement and coordination. Many children with cerebral palsy have difficulty with upper extremity of virtual reality to improve motor control in children with cerebral palsy is very limited. The Game

Stansfield, Sharon

61

Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation/NHMRC Early Career Fellowship  

E-print Network

Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation/NHMRC Early Career Fellowship http://www.cerebralpalsy.org.au The Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation (www.cpresearch.org.au) is offering a Fellowship in the areas or Australian fellowship. The Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation (mturner@cerebralpalsy.org.au) offers

Viglas, Anastasios

62

Increase in cerebral palsy in normal birthweight babies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A register has been compiled of the 421 children with congenital cerebral palsy born between 1960 and 1975 from a defined geographical area of North East England (population 770 000). There was a fall in the rate of cerebral palsy among very low birthweight babies between 1964 and 1975 and also in the small group with dyskinetic cerebral palsy. The

S N Jarvis; J S Holloway; E N Hey

1985-01-01

63

Mental Imagery Abilities in Adolescents with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four visual imagery tasks were presented to three groups of adolescents with or without spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. The first group was composed of six adolescents with cerebral palsy who had associated visual-perceptual deficits (CP-PD), the second group was composed of five adolescents with cerebral palsy and no associated visual-perceptual…

Courbois, Yanick; Coello, Yann; Bouchart, Isabelle

2004-01-01

64

Motor mapping in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The measurement of motor deficits in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) has been largely based on clinical criteria. Yet functional imaging and non-invasive stimulation methods provide a means to measure directly abnormalities of the motor system. The size and location of muscles and movement representations can be determined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and functional magnetics resonance imaging. Thus the homunculus can be individually mapped in children with CP. Because size of representation within the homunculus relates to quality of motor control, measurement of the distance between body parts provides a metric that may be useful in classifying deficits. Bilateral motor control in one hemisphere, while normal in neonates, persists variably in CP, providing another physiological metric. In this study, we used TMS to measure hand and ankle representations in a convenience sample of children with spastic CP. Overlapping thumb and ankle maps were found in children with both hemiplegia and diplegia, and these maps may be from either side of the body. While more participants are required to make conclusions about disability and compression/bilaterality of the homunculus, it appears as if TMS-derived metrics relate to motor abnormalities. These abnormal motor maps also are a therapeutic target, as stimulation methods are being developed as adjuncts to physical means of rehabilitation. PMID:19740221

Wittenberg, George F

2009-10-01

65

Capecitabine and sixth cranial nerve palsy.  

PubMed

Capecitabine is an oral chemotherapeutic agent converted to 5 fluorouracil (5-FU). Neurotoxicity associated with the medication encompasses both central and peripheral nervous systems. We describe a 60 year old man with colonic carcinoma who developed diplopia due to a sixth nerve palsy following the use of capecitabine which is an orally administered prodrug of 5-FU. An MRI of brain did not reveal a space occupying lesion or vascular insult to account for his cranial nerve palsy. The sixth nerve palsy resolved spontaneously once capecitabine was withdrawn. Physicians in all walks of life are increasingly likely to come across such patients and should familiarize themselves with toxicities consequent to chemotherapy. Further research is needed to elucidate the cause of capecitabine associated neurotoxicity. PMID:20479552

Dasgupta, Sonali; Adilieje, Chineme; Bhattacharya, Amlan; Smith, Bruce; Sheikh, Moeen ul Haq

2010-01-01

66

Pathophysiology of dysarthria in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed Central

Electromyograms were recorded with hooked-wire electrodes from sixteen lip, tongue and jaw muscles in six normal and seven cerebral palsied adult subjects during a variety of speech and non-speech tasks. The recorded patterns of muscle activity fail to support a number of theories concerning the pathophysiology of dysarthria in cerebral palsy. There was no indication of weakness in individual articulator muscles. There was no evidence of uncontrolled sustained background activity or of abnormal tonic stretch reflex responses in lip or tongue muscles. Primitive or pathological reflexes could not be elicited by orofacial stimulation. No imbalance between positive and negative oral responses was observed. The view that random involuntary movement disrupts essentially normal voluntary control in athetosis was not supported. Each cerebral palsied subject displayed an idiosyncratic pattern of abnormal muscle activity which was reproduced across repetitions of the same phrase, indicating a consistent defect in motor programming. PMID:7334387

Neilson, P D; O'Dwyer, N J

1981-01-01

67

The history of facial palsy and spasm  

PubMed Central

Although Sir Charles Bell was the first to provide the anatomic basis for the condition that bears his name, in recent years researchers have shown that other European physicians provided earlier clinical descriptions of peripheral cranial nerve 7 palsy. In this article, we describe the history of facial distortion by Greek, Roman, and Persian physicians, culminating in Razi's detailed description in al-Hawi. Razi distinguished facial muscle spasm from paralysis, distinguished central from peripheral lesions, gave the earliest description of loss of forehead wrinkling, and gave the earliest known description of bilateral facial palsy. In doing so, he accurately described the clinical hallmarks of a condition that we recognize as Bell palsy. PMID:21747074

Sajadi, Mohamad-Reza M.; Tabatabaie, Seyed Mahmoud

2011-01-01

68

Extensive dural sinus thrombosis and bilateral lateral rectus palsy as an uncommon complication of chronic suppurative otitis media  

PubMed Central

Dural venous sinus thrombosis, especially of the sigmoid sinus, is a known but uncommon intracranial extradural complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. Even rarer is the simultaneous occurrence of bilateral abducens palsy in the same patient. We report the case of an adolescent male who presented with signs of raised intracranial pressure, diplopia and bilateral lateral rectus palsy associated with a history of left ear discharge and neck swelling. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis extending right up to the left internal jugular vein was confirmed on CT imaging. The patient was successfully treated with thrombolytic agents and antibiotic therapy. The pathophysiology of the concurrent complications is discussed. PMID:23355565

Balasubramanian, Anusha; Mohamad, Irfan; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

2013-01-01

69

Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies. PMID:25479779

Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

2015-02-01

70

[A case of pontine supranuclear facial palsy].  

PubMed

A 56-year-old hypertensive man suddenly developed difficulty in speaking and numbness in the right hand. On admission, he showed moderate right supranuclear facial palsy and right clumsy hand. Three weeks later, he was discharged with only right supranuclear facial palsy. MRI revealed a small infarction in the middle pons. The lesion was situated in the paramedian borderzone between the base and tegmentum. These findings suggest that supranuclear fibers to the facial nucleus descend as a separate bundle from the main pyramidal tract at the mid-pontine level. PMID:7994997

Isoe, K; Watanabe, Y; Tanaka, H; Saito, J; Fukada, M

1994-08-01

71

[Pathophysiology and treatment of spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy and spontaneous posterior interosseous nerve palsy].  

PubMed

Abstract Spontaneous anterior or posterior interosseous nerve palsy is usually treated as a part of neuralgic amyotrophy. However, recent studies have shown that many of these cases involved fascicular constriction in the affected nerves, and interfascicular neurolysis may be a better option than conservative treatment in cases that do not show spontaneous recovery within several months. Here, we review recent studies on these palsies. PMID:25475031

Ochi, Kensuke; Kato, Hiroyuki

2014-12-01

72

Pressure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page contains three Physlets that are able to share data using a connection made by a common superclass, SApplet. The ensemble walls keep track of the change in momentum, i.e., the pressure, during each time step, dt, and provides this data to the DataGraph Physlet and the DataTable Physlet.

Wolfgang Christian

73

Pressure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab is not inquiry-based because the teacher must explain how to calculate pressure before doing the activity, but the lab gives students a great concept of what PSI means. They usually have no idea if 10 PSI is a lot or a little. They also don't und

Horton, Michael

2009-05-30

74

Evaluation of force-sensing resistors for gait event detection to trigger electrical stimulation to improve walking in the child with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Force-sensing resistors (FSRs) were used to detect the transitions between five main phases of gait for the control of electrical stimulation (ES) while walking with seven children with spastic diplegia, cerebral palsy. The FSR positions within each child's insoles were customized based on plantar pressure profiles determined using a pressure-sensitive membrane array (Tekscan Inc., Boston, MA). The FSRs were placed

Brian T. Smith; Daniel J. Coiro; Richard Finson; Randal R. Betz; James McCarthy

2002-01-01

75

Allocortical neurofibrillary changes in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Silver techniques for intraneuronal cytoskeleton abnormalities (neurofibrillary tangles and neuropil threads) and extracellular A4-amyloid deposits were used to examine lesions of the cerebral cortex in six cases of progressive supranuclear palsy (three were mentally unimpaired and three showed moderate degrees of dementia). Deposits of A4-amyloid protein occurred in small numbers or were absent. Neurofibrillary tangles and neuropil threads were present

H. Braak; K. Jellinger; E. Braak; J. Bohl

1992-01-01

76

New insights into progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increased oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction have been suggested to play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we will focus on progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a rare parkinsonian disorder with tau pathology. Particular emphasis is placed on the genetic and biochemical data that has emerged, offering new perspectives

David S Albers; Sarah J Augood

2001-01-01

77

Clinical genetics of familial progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Recent studies have shown that progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) could be inherited, but the pattern of inheritance and the spectrum of the clinical findings in relatives are unknown. We here report 12 pedigrees, confirmed by pathology in four probands, with familial PSP. Pathological diagnosis was confirmed according to recently reported internationally agreed criteria. The spectrum of the clinical phenotypes

A. Rojo; R. S. Pernaute; A. Fontan; P. G. Ruiz; J. Honnorat; T. Lynch; S. Chin; I. Gonzalo; A. Rabano; A. Martinez; S. Daniel; P. Pramsteller; H. Morris; N. Wood; A. Lees; C. Tabernero; T. Nyggard; A. C. Jackson; A. Hanson; J. G. de Yebenes

1999-01-01

78

Neuropsychological Features of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is the epitome of a subcortical dementia process. Due to its relative rarity, there is only a small literature on the neuropsychological consequences of PSP. The findings to date demonstrate that PSP patients have dramatically slowed information processing and motor execution, rapid forgetting, problems in orienting attentional resources, and difficulty in planning and shifting conceptual sets.

J. Grafman; I. Litvan; M. Stark

1995-01-01

79

Cortical ballooned neurons in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the presence of ballooned neurons (BNs) in the cerebral cortex of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) using immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated neurofilament in addition to standard histologic staining methods. In six of the nine patients studied, BNs were seen in the cerebral cortex. In two of these six patients, BNs were abundant and cortical degeneration was present in

Hideo Mori; Masaya Oda; Yoshikuni Mizuno

1996-01-01

80

Narrative Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a previous study a group of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were found to have considerable difficulties with narratives, performing several standard deviations below the criteria for the Information score of the Bus Story Test (BST). To examine in depth the performance of children with CP and a control group with typically developing (TD)…

Holck, Pernille; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren; Nettelbladt, Ulrika

2011-01-01

81

Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education,…

Liptak, Gregory S.

2005-01-01

82

Cerebral Palsy Spasticity. Selective Posterior Rhizotomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have performed selective posterior rhizotomies on 60 children with cerebral palsy. The procedure involves lumbar laminectomy with stimulation of the rootlets (fascicles) of the second lumbar to the first sacral posterior roots bilaterally; those rootlets associated with an abnormal motor response, as evidenced by sustained or diffused muscular contraction, are divided leaving intact rootlets associated with a brief localized

Warwick J. Peacock; Leila J. Arens; Barbara Berman

1987-01-01

83

Pretend Play of Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background and Purpose: Evaluate self-initiated pretend play of children with cerebral palsy. Method: Twenty preschool children participated in the study. Pretend play ability was measured by using the child-initiated pretend play assessment culturally adapted to Brazil. Results: There were significant negative correlations between the children's…

Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Pacciulio, Amanda Mota; dos Santos, Camila Abrao; dos Santos, Jair Licio; Stagnitti, Karen Ellen

2011-01-01

84

Birthweight specific trends in cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A register of infants with cerebral palsy born to mothers resident in the Mersey region from 1967-84 has been maintained using various sources of information. A total of 1056 patients are registered of whom 331 (31%) have hemiplegia or mixed hemiplegia, 236 (22%) have diplegias or mixed diplegia, and 369 (35%) have quadriplegia or mixed quadriplegia. The remainder have dyskinetic

P O Pharoah; T Cooke; R W Cooke; L Rosenbloom

1990-01-01

85

Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

2013-01-01

86

Cognitive Styles of Students With Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because the Matching Familiar Figures Test has a heavy visual perceptual loading, its usefulness for measuring cognitive style was examined with cerebral palsied students, frequently characterized by ocular anomalies and visual perceptual deficits. The students' cognitive styles were qualitatively similar to nonhandicapped. Extraocular movements…

Junkala, John; Talbot, Michael L.

1982-01-01

87

[Suprascapular palsy: a complication of surgical positioning?].  

PubMed

We report a case of persisting suprascapular nerve palsy after surgery under general anaesthesia of short duration in a conventional position. Surgical exploration, eight months later, showed a suprascapular notch narrowed by a hypertrophied and calcified superior transverse ligament. Such a lesion and the practice of volley-ball by the patient are in favour of a pre-existing infraclinical neuropathy. PMID:10464535

Ould-Ahmed, M; Fourel, D; Belat, C; Aubouin, J P; Zagnoli, F; Guiavarch, M

1999-06-01

88

The `subcortical dementia' of progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive supranuclear palsy (Steele et al.) has a characteristic pattern of dementia: (1) forgetfulness, (2) slowing of thought processes, (3) emotional or personality changes (apathy or depression with occasional outbursts of irritability), and (4) impaired ability to manipulate acquired knowledge. In many neurological disease states associated with subcortical pathology a similar pattern of dementia exists. The neurobehavioural changes of progressive

Martin L. Albert; Robert G. Feldman; Anne L. Willis

1974-01-01

89

Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in Bell's palsy.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to evaluate vestibular nerve involvement in patients with Bell's palsy with ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP and cVEMP). Ten patients who were diagnosed with Bell's palsy and ten healthy controls were included. All patients underwent VEMP recordings within 6 days after their initial presentation. Patients with Bell's palsy had greater oVEMP asymmetry ratio comparing to healthy controls (-38.4 ± 28.7 % vs -1.3 ± 19.3 %, p = 0.005). As well N10 latencies of the oVEMP response were prolonged comparing to healthy controls (11.575 vs 9.72 ms). There was no difference in cVEMP asymmetry ratio or latencies between groups. We found no correlation between House-Brackmann grading scale and oVEMP asymmetry ratio (r = 0.003, p = 0.994). There are three possible explanations for increased oVEMP amplitudes on the affected side: (1) oVEMP response on the ipsilateral eye could be contaminated by facial nerve activity (blink reflex); (2) the amplitude of N10-P33 could be affected through the stapedial reflex; and (3) increased oVEMP amplitude could be the consequence of the vestibular nerve dysfunction itself, with prolonged latencies of the N10 oVEMP further supporting this explanation. The results of this study indicate possible involvement of the superior branch of the vestibular nerve in patients with Bell's palsy. PMID:24916836

Krbot Skoric, Magdalena; Adamec, Ivan; Habek, Mario

2014-10-01

90

Isolated cranial nerve palsies in multiple sclerosis  

PubMed Central

During a 10 year period 24 patients with definite multiple sclerosis with isolated cranial nerve palsies were studied (third and fourth nerve: one patient each, sixth nerve: 12 patients, seventh nerve: three patients, eighth nerve: seven patients), in whom cranial nerve palsies were the presenting sign in 14 and the only clinical sign of an exacerbation in 10 patients. MRI was carried out in 20 patients and substantiated corresponding brainstem lesions in seven patients (third nerve: one patient, sixth nerve: four patients, eighth nerve: two patients). Additional abnormal findings of electro-oculography, or masseter reflex, or blink reflex, or combinations of these were found in 20 patients and interpreted in favour of a brainstem lesion at the level of the respective cranial nerve. In 11 of 14 patients with isolated cranial nerve palsies as the presenting sign of multiple sclerosis, dissemination in space was documented by MRI, and in the remaining three by evoked potentials. In patients with multiple sclerosis with isolated cranial nerve palsies, MRI is the most sensitive method of documenting dissemination in space and electrophysiological testing the most sensitive at disclosing brainstem lesions.?? PMID:9408116

Thomke, F.; Lensch, E.; Ringel, K.; Hopf, H. C.

1997-01-01

91

The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy - Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS): Report 1  

PubMed Central

Aims: The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Design: Retrospective chart review. Results: Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36%) cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%), and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases) were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%). Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%). Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses), 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. Conclusions: In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy. PMID:25449936

Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Ambika, Selvakumar; Noronha, Veena Olma; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

2014-01-01

92

1 Rule Based Expert System for Cerebral Palsy Diagnosis  

E-print Network

The use of Artificial Intelligence is finding prominence not only in core computer areas, but also in cross disciplinary areas including medical diagnosis. In this paper, we present a rule based Expert System used in diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy. The expert system takes user input and depending on the symptoms of the patient, diagnoses if the patient is suffering from Cerebral Palsy. The Expert System also classifies the Cerebral Palsy as mild, moderate or severe based on the presented symptoms.

unknown authors

93

Clinical practice: swallowing problems in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in early childhood. The worldwide prevalence of CP is approximately 2-2.5 per 1,000 live births. It has been clinically defined as a group of motor, cognitive, and perceptive impairments secondary to a non-progressive defect or lesion of the developing brain. Children with CP can have swallowing problems with severe drooling as one of the consequences. Malnutrition and recurrent aspiration pneumonia can increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Early attention should be given to dysphagia and excessive drooling and their substantial contribution to the burden of a child with CP and his/her family. This review displays the important functional and anatomical issues related to swallowing problems in children with CP based on relevant literature and expert opinion. Furthermore, based on our experience, we describe a plan for approach of investigation and treatment of swallowing problems in cerebral palsy. PMID:21932013

Erasmus, Corrie E; van Hulst, Karen; Rotteveel, Jan J; Willemsen, Michel A A P; Jongerius, Peter H

2012-03-01

94

Neurofibrillary pathology in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the fine structure of the subcortical neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) in 2 cases of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). In case 1 (69-year-old man) about one half of the NFT in the midbrain and pons examined were composed of 13–16 nm straight filaments and the others were made up of paired helical filaments (PHF) of Alzheimer type. The NFT in

N. R. Ghatak; D. Nochlin; M. G. Hadfield

1980-01-01

95

Surgical Treatment of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1971, we have surgically treated spasticity in 109 cases of cerebral palsy with posterior rhizotomy. The best results have been obtained with functional posterior rhizotomy, an original modification of Foerster’s technique, in which the selection of the roots\\/rootlets to be sectioned is based on functional exploration of the spinal circuits involved in the maintenance of spasticity, using intra-operative electrostimulation

V. A. Fasano; G. Broggi; G. Barolat-Romana; A. Sguazzi

1978-01-01

96

Uptime in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Quantitative evaluation of function, in children with physical disabilities, has to date been mainly focused on laboratory-based measures. However, the measurement of activity in the community may have a more direct relationship with physical function, health, and well-being. We assessed the utility of a remote activity monitor, the Uptimer (National Aging Research Institute of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia), to measure one aspect of physical function, time spent in the upright position, in a consecutive cohort of 300 children with cerebral palsy who attended an orthopedic outpatient department. The Uptimer was found to be a valid and reliable tool to measure the amount of time children spent on their feet each day. Uptime was closely related to the severity of cerebral palsy and had excellent correlations with validated instruments including the Pediatric Orthopaedic Data Collection Instrument (PODCI), the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ), and the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS). Uptime complements any quantitative functional assessment of impairments in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:15308902

Pirpiris, Marinis; Graham, H Kerr

2004-01-01

97

Nongoitrous autoimmune thyroiditis with facial palsy.  

PubMed

We report a case of severe hypothyroidism with nongoitrous, autoimmune thyroiditis and pituitary hyperplasia in a 13-year-old boy, who presented with sudden palsy on the left side of his face. Prednisolone and antiviral medication was administered. However, the facial palsy did not improve completely. The medications were replaced with thyroxine, and the facial palsy recovered. Endocrinological testing showed severe hypothyroidism as follows: thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level >100 µIU/mL, T4 of 1.04 µg/dL, T3 of 0.31 ng/mL, and free T4 of 0.07 ng/dL. Level of serum antithyroid peroxidase antibodies was 1,933.39 IU/mL, and that of antithyroglobulin antibodies was 848.16 IU/mL. Level of TSH receptor antibodies was >40 IU/L. Bioassay result for TSH receptor stimulating antibodies was negative. Thyroid sonography revealed no increase in the size or vascularity of the bilateral gland. Thyroid scintigraphy with 99mTc showed decreased uptake, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an enlarged pituitary gland. PMID:24904880

Lee, Hyung Jik; Kim, Jin Kyung

2013-12-01

98

Nongoitrous autoimmune thyroiditis with facial palsy  

PubMed Central

We report a case of severe hypothyroidism with nongoitrous, autoimmune thyroiditis and pituitary hyperplasia in a 13-year-old boy, who presented with sudden palsy on the left side of his face. Prednisolone and antiviral medication was administered. However, the facial palsy did not improve completely. The medications were replaced with thyroxine, and the facial palsy recovered. Endocrinological testing showed severe hypothyroidism as follows: thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level >100 µIU/mL, T4 of 1.04 µg/dL, T3 of 0.31 ng/mL, and free T4 of 0.07 ng/dL. Level of serum antithyroid peroxidase antibodies was 1,933.39 IU/mL, and that of antithyroglobulin antibodies was 848.16 IU/mL. Level of TSH receptor antibodies was >40 IU/L. Bioassay result for TSH receptor stimulating antibodies was negative. Thyroid sonography revealed no increase in the size or vascularity of the bilateral gland. Thyroid scintigraphy with 99mTc showed decreased uptake, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an enlarged pituitary gland. PMID:24904880

Lee, Hyung Jik

2013-01-01

99

Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Effects of selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) were studied in children with spastic cerebral palsy in orthopaedic and functional fields. Methods: In a prospective study, we compared the same population before SDR and 1 year after SDR. This population included children with spastic cerebral palsy, when spasticity was responsible for a halt in the motor skill acquisitions or for orthopaedic

I. Hodgkinson; C. Bérard; M. L. Jindrich; M. Sindou; P. Mertens; J. Bérard

1997-01-01

100

Congenital horizontal gaze palsy and kyphoscoliosis in two brothers.  

PubMed Central

In a sibship of 11, two brothers with a congenital complete horizontal gaze palsy developed severe kyphoscoliosis. No-one else in the family has a gaze palsy or comparable skeletal abnormalities. Since the parents are first cousins, an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance seems likely. Images PMID:490585

Riley, E; Swift, M

1979-01-01

101

Evaluation of third nerve palsy in the emergency department.  

PubMed

Third nerve palsy is an uncommon condition that carries significant risk of serious disease due to both the variability of its presentation and its association with intracranial aneurysms. In this article, we review the existing literature on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of third nerve palsy presenting to the Emergency Department. PMID:17976817

Woodruff, Michael M; Edlow, Jonathan A

2008-10-01

102

Cerebral palsy: why we must plan for survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

The survival of children in the South East Thames region, born between 1970 and 1979 and diagnosed as having some form of cerebral palsy was investigated. Of the 732 children studied, 651 (90%) are still alive, and hence cerebral palsy must be regarded as a condition with which people live rather than a condition of which they die. Survival varies

P M Evans; S J Evans; E Alberman

1990-01-01

103

Quality of Arithmetic Education for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the quality of arithmetic education for children with cerebral palsy. The use of individual educational plans, amount of arithmetic instruction time, arithmetic instructional grouping, and type of arithmetic teaching method were explored in three groups: children with cerebral palsy (CP) in…

Jenks, Kathleen M.; de Moor, Jan; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.; Withagen, Floortje

2010-01-01

104

Intrathecal Baclofen for Management of Spastic Cerebral Palsy: Multicenter Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intrathecal baclofen infusion has demonstrated effectiveness in decreasing spasticity of spinal origin. Oral antispasticity medication is minimally effective or not well tolerated in cerebral palsy. This study assessed the effectiveness of intrathecal baclofen in reducing spasticity in cerebral palsy. Candidates were screened by randomized, double-blind, intrathecal injections of baclofen and placebo. Responders were defined as those who experienced an average

Richard Gilmartin; Derek Bruce; Bruce B. Storrs; Rick Abbott; Linda Krach; John Ward; Karen Bloom; William H. Brooks; Dennis L. Johnson; Joseph R. Madsen; John F. McLaughlin; Joseph Nadell

2000-01-01

105

Language and motor speech skills in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was to investigate associations between the severity of motor limitations, cognitive difficulties, language and motor speech problems in children with cerebral palsy. Also, the predictive power of neonatal cranial ultrasound findings on later outcome was investigated. For this purpose, 36 children (age range 1 year 10 months to 9 years 0 months) with cerebral palsy

Silja Pirila; Jaap van der Meere; Taina Pentikainen; Pirjo Ruusu-Niemi; Raija Korpela; Jenni Kilpinen; Pirkko Nieminen

2007-01-01

106

Design and validation of automated femoral bone morphology measurements in cerebral palsy  

E-print Network

Design and validation of automated femoral bone morphology measurements in cerebral palsy Noyeol the progress of bony deformation in patients with cerebral palsy. The purpose of the study was to develop palsy, automatic morphology quantification, statistical shape model #12;1. Introduction Cerebral palsy

Lee, Jehee

107

Alterations of hamstring muscle properties in patients with varying severity of spastic cerebral palsy  

E-print Network

palsy Lucas Smith Background: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder in which children experience a non: How does the altered neuronal input of muscle contraction associated with spastic cerebral palsy: Spastic muscle in cerebral palsy is in a pathologic state that has fundamentally different mechanical

Gleeson, Joseph G.

108

The Effect of Long-Term Training Program on Balance in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Results of a Pilot Study for Individually Based Functional Exercises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the effects of long-term training program on balance and center of pressure (COP) for four male children (13 years of age) with cerebral palsy (CP). These children were classified into one hemiplegic (level II), one diplegic (level II) and two quadriplegic children (levels III and II) using the Gross Motor Function…

Uzun, Selda

2013-01-01

109

Abducens nerve palsy after schwannoma resection.  

PubMed

Tumors of the posterior mediastinum are mostly neurogenic and could involve the intervertebral foramen and the medullary canal. We describe the case of a patient who underwent surgery for a nerve sheet tumor originating at the level of the right second neural root. Resection was associated with an incidental dural tear and cerebrospinal fluid leak that was promptly repaired. One week after surgery, horizontal diplopia occurred. A palsy of the left abducens nerve secondary to intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. We present the pathogenic cascade leading to this ocular complication after posterior mediastinal surgery. The surgical techniques to prevent this complication are discussed. PMID:25639411

Bobbio, Antonio; Hamelin-Canny, Emelyne; Roche, Nicolas; Taillia, Herve; Alifano, Marco

2015-02-01

110

Multiple recurrences of ipsilateral facial palsy in a patient with widening of the facial canal.  

PubMed

The incidence of facial palsy (FP) is 6-12/100,000 in children, however only one in twenty experience recurrences. This report describes the clinical approach and diagnostic considerations in a child with multiple ipsilateral FP. The first occurrence of FP in conjunction with fever occurred at age 13 months, and was succeeded by more than 20 recurrences. Imaging revealed widening of the facial canal along with thickening of the facial nerve, allowing collateral inflammation and edema to induce pressure on the nerve. This is the first case describing the association between an abnormally widened facial canal and recurrent FP in childhood. PMID:25522846

Andreassen, Christer Swan; Ovesen, Therese

2015-02-01

111

Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy after Use of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is an exceptionally rare complication. We present the first case of unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the LMA Supreme. Clinical Features. A healthy 67-year-old female was scheduled for a hallux valgus correction under general anesthesia combined with femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. A size 4?LMA Supreme was inserted successfully at the first attempt and the cuff was inflated with air at an intracuff pressure of 60?cmH2O using cuff pressure gauge. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide (67%), and sevoflurane under spontaneous breathing. The surgery was uneventful and the duration of anesthesia was two hours. The LMA was removed as the patient woke and there were no immediate postoperative complications. The next morning, the patient complained of dysarthria and dysphasia. These symptoms were considered to be caused by the LMA compressing the nerve against the hyoid bone. Conservative treatment was chosen and the paralysis recovered completely after 5 months. Conclusion. Hypoglossal nerve injury may occur despite correct positioning of the LMA under the appropriate intracuff pressure. A follow-up period of at least 6 months should be taken into account for the recovery. PMID:25254120

Sasakawa, Tomoki; Suzuki, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Hideki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

2014-01-01

112

Common peroneal nerve palsy in a UH-60 aviator.  

PubMed

A case of common peroneal nerve palsy in a UH-60 Blackhawk U.S. Army helicopter pilot is reported. A review of the literature revealed several reports of common peroneal nerve palsy, although there were no published reports of this injury secondary to performing flight duties in the UH-60 cockpit. A common practice among Blackhawk pilots is to brace the "collective" with their left knee, subjecting the common peroneal nerve to possible injury. This action should be considered as a possible cause of common peroneal nerve palsy in this select group of aviators. PMID:10377717

McGrail, M A

1999-06-01

113

Hypokinesia without decrement distinguishes progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease  

PubMed Central

Repetitive finger tapping is commonly used to assess bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease. The Queen Square Brain Bank diagnostic criterion of Parkinson's disease defines bradykinesia as ‘slowness of initiation with progressive reduction in speed and amplitude of repetitive action’. Although progressive supranuclear palsy is considered an atypical parkinsonian syndrome, it is not known whether patients with progressive supranuclear palsy have criteria-defined bradykinesia. This study objectively assessed repetitive finger tap performance and handwriting in patients with Parkinson's disease (n?=?15), progressive supranuclear palsy (n?=?9) and healthy age- and gender-matched controls (n?=?16). The motion of the hand and digits was recorded in 3D during 15-s repetitive index finger-to-thumb tapping trials. The main finding was hypokinesia without decrement in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, which differed from the finger tap pattern in Parkinson's disease. Average finger separation amplitude in progressive supranuclear palsy was less than half of that in controls and Parkinson's disease (P?palsy was nearly zero (0.01°/cycle) indicating a lack of decrement, which differed from the negative slope in patients with Parkinson's disease OFF levodopa (?0.20°/cycle, P?=?0.002). ‘Hypokinesia’, defined as <50% of control group's mean amplitude, combined with ‘absence of decrement’, defined as mean positive amplitude slope, were identified in 87% of finger tap trials in the progressive supranuclear palsy group and only 12% in the Parkinson's disease OFF levodopa group. In progressive supranuclear palsy, the mean amplitude was not correlated with disease duration or other clinimetric scores. In Parkinson's disease, finger tap pattern was compatible with criteria-defined bradykinesia, characterized by slowness with progressive reduction in amplitude and speed and increased variability in speed throughout the tap trial. In Parkinson's disease, smaller amplitude, slower speed and greater speed variability were all associated with a more severe Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score. Analyses of handwriting showed that micrographia, defined as smaller than 50% of the control group's mean script size, was present in 75% of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and 15% of patients with Parkinson's disease (P?=?0.022). Most scripts performed by patients with progressive supranuclear palsy did not exhibit decrements in script size. In conclusion, patients with progressive supranuclear palsy have a specific finger tap pattern of ‘hypokinesia without decrement’ and they do not have criteria-defined limb bradykinesia. Similarly, ‘micrographia’ and ‘lack of decrement in script size’ are also more common in progressive supranuclear palsy than in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22396397

Massey, Luke A.; Lees, Andrew J.; Brown, Peter; Day, Brian L.

2012-01-01

114

Midbrain infarction causing oculomotor nerve palsy and ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia.  

PubMed

We herein report the case of an 81-year-old woman with midbrain infarction causing pupil-sparing oculomotor nerve palsy with ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia. The lesion was located at the rostral end of the decussation of the superior cerebellar peduncle touching the dorsal side, further caudal and dorsal to causal lesions of Claude's syndrome, which presented as oculomotor palsy and contralateral cerebellar ataxia. This is the third report of midbrain infarction causing partial oculomotor nerve palsy with ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia. It may be possible to establish this entity as a new syndrome following the accumulation of more cases. PMID:25224204

Tokunaga, Makoto; Fukunaga, Kimiko; Nakanishi, Ryoji; Watanabe, Susumu; Yamanaga, Hiroaki

2014-01-01

115

Pediatric Cerebral Palsy in Africa: Where Are We?  

PubMed

Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in children worldwide. However, little is reported on this condition in the African context. Doctors from 22 countries in Africa, and representatives from a further 5 countries outside Africa, met to discuss the challenges in the evaluation and management of children with cerebral palsy in Africa and to propose service needs and further research. Basic care is limited by the poor availability of diagnostic facilities or medical personnel with experience and expertise in managing cerebral palsy, exacerbated by lack of available interventions such as medications, surgical procedures, or even regular therapy input. Relevant guidelines are lacking. In order to guide services for children with existing disabilities, to effectively target the main etiologies and to develop preventive strategies for the continent, research priorities must include multicenter collaborative studies looking at the prevalence, risk factors, and treatment of cerebral palsy. PMID:25296926

Donald, Kirsten A; Kakooza, Angelina M; Wammanda, Robinson D; Mallewa, Macpherson; Samia, Pauline; Babakir, Haydar; Bearden, David; Majnemer, Annette; Fehlings, Darcy; Shevell, Michael; Chugani, Harry; Wilmshurst, Jo M

2014-10-01

116

Neuroimaging of isolated and non-isolated third nerve palsies  

PubMed Central

A variety of aetiologies may cause third nerve palsy (TNP), and some manifestations may herald neurological emergencies. This article describes and illustrates various diseases that lead to TNP. PMID:22253341

Lo, C-P; Huang, C-F; Hsu, C-C; Kuo, C-C; Liu, C-C; Wang, Y-M; Wang, W-Y

2012-01-01

117

Speech Performance, Dysphagia and Oral Reflexes in Cerebral Palsy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The adequacy of biting, sucking, swallowing, and chewing as well as the presence or absence of nine infantile oral reflexes were assessed in 60 cerebral palsied individuals (ages 3 to 23). (Author/PHR)

Love, Russell J.; And Others

1980-01-01

118

Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement  

MedlinePLUS

... Disorders 4 Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement These disorders involve paralysis of one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement (the 3rd, 4th, or 6th nerve), impairing the ...

119

A systematic review of neuroimaging for cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The American Academy of Neurology now recommends that all cases of cerebral palsy of unknown origin undergo neuroimaging. Controversy surrounds this recommendation because of concerns about the adequacy of the supporting evidence. This article reviews the evidence provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) imaging studies in cerebral palsy and discusses the potential benefits of imaging, techniques in current use, and future directions, with a focus on improving etiologic understanding. Most (83%) children with cerebral palsy have abnormal neuroradiological findings, with white matter damage the most common abnormality. Combined gray and white matter abnormalities are more common among children with hemiplegia; isolated white matter abnormalities are more common with bilateral spasticity or athetosis, and with ataxia; isolated gray matter damage is the least common finding. About 10% of cerebral palsy is attributable to brain malformations, and 17% of cerebral palsy cases have no abnormality detectable by conventional MR or CT imaging. Although neuroimaging studies have increased our understanding of the abnormalities in brain development in cerebral palsy, they are less informative than they might be because of 4 common problems: (1) inappropriate assignment of etiology to morphologic findings, (2) inconsistent descriptions of radiologic findings, (3) uncertain relationship of pathologic findings to brain insult timing estimates, and (4) study designs that are not based on generalizable samples. Neuroimaging is not necessarily required for diagnosis of cerebral palsy because the disorder is based on clinical findings. The principal contribution of imaging is to the understanding of etiology and pathogenesis, including ruling in or out conditions that may have implications for genetic counseling, such as malformations. In the future, as more sophisticated imaging procedures are applied to cerebral palsy, specific morphologic findings may be linked to etiologic events or exposures, thus leading to potential pathways for prevention. PMID:18263759

Korzeniewski, Steven J; Birbeck, Gretchen; DeLano, Mark C; Potchen, Michael J; Paneth, Nigel

2008-02-01

120

Stability and Harmony of Gait in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the stability and harmony of gait in children with cerebral palsy. Seventeen children with spastic hemiplegia due to cerebral palsy (5.0 [plus or minus] 2.3 years old) who were able to walk autonomously and seventeen age-matched children with typical development (5.7 [plus or minus] 2.5 years old,…

Iosa, Marco; Marro, Tiziana; Paolucci, Stefano; Morelli, Daniela

2012-01-01

121

Acute Peripheral Facial Palsy after Chickenpox: A Rare Association  

PubMed Central

Chickenpox, resulting from primary infection by the varicella-zoster virus, is an exanthematous disease very common during childhood and with good prognosis. However, serious complications, namely, neurological syndromes, may develop during its course, especially in risk groups, including adolescents. Peripheral facial palsy is a rare neurologic complication that has been previously described. Conclusion. We report the case of a teenager with peripheral facial palsy as a complication of chickenpox, aiming to increase the awareness of this rare association. PMID:25057424

Lopes, Andreia

2014-01-01

122

Gait analysis of children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy?  

PubMed Central

An experiment was carried out in the key laboratory for Technique Diagnosis and Function Assessment of Winter Sports of China to investigate the differences in gait characteristics between healthy children and children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy. With permission of their parents, 200 healthy children aged 3 to 6 years in the kindergarten of Northeastern University were enrolled in this experiment. Twenty children aged 3 to 6 years with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy from Shengjing Hospital, China were also enrolled in this experiment. Standard data were collected by simultaneously recording gait information from two digital cameras. DVracker was used to analyze the standard data. The children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy had a longer gait cycle, slower walking speed, and longer support phase than did the healthy children. The support phase was longer than the swing phase in the children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. There were significant differences in the angles of the hip, knee, and ankle joint between children with cerebral palsy and healthy children at the moment of touching the ground and buffering, and during pedal extension. Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy had poor motor coordination during walking, which basically resulted in a short stride, high stride frequency to maintain speed, more obvious swing, and poor stability.

Wang, Xin; Wang, Yuexi

2012-01-01

123

Repeated facial palsies after chlorocresol inhalation.  

PubMed Central

A 42-year-old woman who experienced more than 50 attacks of left-sided facial palsies after exposure to chlorocresol was studied. Only muscles around the left side of the mouth were affected. On neurophysiological testing during chlorocresol provocation the only abnormality was a loss of motor units during maximal contraction of the left orbicularis oris muscle. This could be explained by a peripheral as well as a central effect. Extensive electrophysiological examination without chlorocresol provocation excluded a preexisting generalised nerve disorder and other diagnostic procedures did not give evidence of pathology involving the left facial nerve. A hyperreactive mechanism causing a transient block of the left facial nerve is proposed. Images PMID:3806124

Døssing, M; Wulff, C H; Olsen, P Z

1986-01-01

124

Nutritional management of children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Children with severe cerebral palsy and particularly those with oropharyngeal dysfunction are at risk of poor nutritional status. Determining the need and the mode of nutritional intervention is multifactorial and requires multiple methodologies. First-line treatment typically involves oral nutritional support for those children who are safe to consume an oral diet. Enteral tube feeding may need to be considered in children with undernutrition where poor weight gain continues despite oral nutritional support, or in those with oropharyngeal dysphagia and an unsafe swallow. Estimates for energy and protein requirements provide a starting point only, and ongoing assessment and monitoring is essential to ensure nutritional needs are being met, that complications are adequately managed and to avoid over or under feeding. PMID:24301003

Bell, K L; Samson-Fang, L

2013-12-01

125

A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy  

PubMed Central

Background Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progressive apraxia of speech (AOS) and aphasia. Aim We aimed to investigate the clinical presentation of PSP, using a comprehensive multidimensional evaluation, and the disease response to various pharmacological treatments. Methods A 72-year-old right-handed male, with 17 years education, who first presented with aphasia, AOS, depression, apathy, and postural instability at 69 years; a complete neuropsychological evaluation, tapping the different cognitive domains, was performed. Results Testing revealed a moderate global cognitive deficit (Mini-Mental State Examination test score =20), low memory test scores (story recall, Rey’s 15-word Immediate and Delayed Recall), and poor phonemic and semantic fluency. The patient’s language was characterized by AOS, with slow speech rate, prolonged intervals between syllables and words, decreased articulatory accuracy, sound distortions, and anomia. Behavioral changes, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability, were reported. The neurological examination revealed supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, poor face miming, and a mild balance deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only widespread cortical atrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left > right frontotemporal cortical abnormalities. After 6 months, a further neuropsychological assessment showed a progression in cognitive deficits, with additional attention deficits. The patient reported frequent falls, but the neurological deficits remained unchanged. Neuroimaging tests showed the same brain involvement. Conclusion Our case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in this syndrome, demonstrating that atypical PSP can present as AOS and aphasia, without the classical features or involvement of the subcortical gray and brainstem region, commonly affected in typical PSP. PMID:24368882

Spaccavento, Simona; Del Prete, Marina; Craca, Angela; Loverre, Anna

2014-01-01

126

Epidemiology of cerebral palsy in England and Scotland, 1984–9  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIMSTo report on the epidemiology of cerebral palsy in England and Scotland, to provide information on the prevalence of cerebral palsy and the severity of the disability or any co-morbidity.METHODSCerebral palsy registers were compiled from multiple sources of ascertainment covering all of Scotland and the counties of Merseyside, Cheshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire in England. All cases of cerebral

P O D Pharoah; T Cooke; M A Johnson; R King; L Mutch

1998-01-01

127

Computer modeling of gait abnormalities in cerebral palsy: application to treatment planning  

E-print Network

Computer modeling of gait abnormalities in cerebral palsy: application to treatment planning A. S, Stanford, CA, USA The treatment of gait abnormalities in persons with cerebral palsy is chal- lenging in children with cerebral palsy is challenging. Musculoskeletal surgeries and other treatments, such as tone

Delp, Scott

128

FEASABILITY OF A MOBILE ROBOT WITH ALTERNATIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR A CHILD WITH CEREBRAL PALSY  

E-print Network

1 FEASABILITY OF A MOBILE ROBOT WITH ALTERNATIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR A CHILD WITH CEREBRAL PALSY]. In the case of cerebral palsy, the most common cause of motor disability in children, the estimation ranges with cerebral palsy, with spastic and athetoid features. The child's gross motor mobility is limited to rolling

Stansfield, Sharon

129

Twins, triplets, and cerebral palsy in births in Western Australia in the 1980s  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES--To examine the rate of cerebral palsy in twins and triplets in births from 1980 to 1989 in Western Australia and to identify factors associated with increase in risk. DESIGN--Pluralities for all births in Western Australia were identified through the standardised midwives' notification system, and cases of cerebral palsy were identified from the Western Australian cerebral palsy register. MAIN OUTCOME

B Petterson; K B Nelson; L Watson

1993-01-01

130

Frontal deficits differentiate progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

The clinical differentiation of progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease can be challenging, due to overlapping clinical features and a lack of diagnostic markers. Abnormalities in cognitive function form part of the clinical spectrums of these diseases and distinctive cognitive profiles may be helpful in differentiating these diseases in the diagnostic period. A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery was administered to 12 patients with clinically diagnosed progressive supranuclear palsy and 12 patients with Parkinson's disease matched for age and disease duration. Effect size (Cohen's d) was calculated for cognitive tests that were significantly different between groups. Patients with progressive supranuclear palsy performed significantly worse than those with Parkinson's disease on measures of processing speed, verbal fluency, planning, verbal abstract reasoning, verbal memory, and made more perseverative responses on a set shifting task. Measures of executive function, manual dexterity and processing speed were most diagnostically useful (Cohen's d > 2.0) in differentiating between progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease. These findings suggest that more severe and prominent 'frontal' cognitive deficits in patients with progressive parkinsonism would be helpful in predicting progressive supranuclear palsy rather than Parkinson's disease and these findings may contribute to the development of diagnostic criteria. PMID:25223526

Lee, Young-Eun C; Williams, David R; Anderson, Jacqueline F I

2014-09-16

131

Laser Phototherapy As Modality of Clinical Treatment in Bell's Palsy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bell's palsy is defined as a peripheral facial nerve palsy, idiophatic, and sudden onset and is considered the most common cause of this pathology. It is caused by damage to cranial nerves VII, resulting in complete or partial paralysis of the facial mimic. May be associated with taste disturbances, salivation, tearing and hyperacusis. It is diagnosed after ruling out all possible etiologies, because its cause is not fully understood.Some researches shows that herpes virus may cause this type of palsy due to reactivation of the virus or by imunnomediated post-viral nerve demielinization. Physical therapy, corticosteroids and antiviral therapy have become the most widely accepted treatments for Bell's palsy. Therapy with low-level laser (LLLT) may induce the metabolism of injured nerve tissue for the production of proteins associated with its growth and to improve nerve regeneration. The success of the treatment of Bell's palsy by using laser phototherapy isolated or in association with other therapeutic approach has been reported on the literature. In most cases, the recovery occurs without uneventfully (complications), the acute illness is not associated with serious disorders. We will present a clinical approach for treating this condition.

Marques, A. M. C.; Soares, L. G. P.; Marques, R. C.; Pinheiro, A. L. B.; Dent, M.

2011-08-01

132

Heerfordt’s Syndrome Presenting with Recurrent Facial Nerve Palsy  

PubMed Central

Heerfordt’s syndrome is defined as a combination of facial palsy, parotid swelling, uveitis and fever in sarcoidosis cases. Heerfordt’s syndrome as a cause of facial palsy is very rare. We report a case of alternating facial nerve palsy in a 52-year-old female initially treated for Bell’s palsy. The patient was referred to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India, in January 2013 for clinical evaluation. She was found to have a parotid swelling and anterior intermediate uveitis. A pathoradiological evaluation suggested sarcoidosis and a final diagnosis of Heerfordt’s syndrome was made. Steroid treatment was initiated which led to an improvement in the facial palsy and uveitis as well as the disappearance of the parotid swelling with a corresponding decrease in angiotensin-converting enzyme levels. An English literature review was carried out to analyse the varied presentation of this syndrome. The analysis focused on presenting symptoms, biochemical markers and radiological findings of Heerfordt’s syndrome cases.

Chappity, Preetam; Kumar, Rajeev; Sahoo, Anjan K.

2015-01-01

133

Sudden peroneal nerve palsy in a varus arthritic knee.  

PubMed

Peroneal nerve palsy has been reported in association with traumatic and nontraumatic causes. We encountered a 75-year-old man whose peroneal nerve palsy developed suddenly following varus deformity of the arthritic knee. A review of the literature found 1 other report describing a progressive peroneal nerve palsy associated with a varus deformity of the knee due to arthritis. Our patient had progressive intractable knee pain; 3-compartment, severe degenerative changes in the knees; varus knee malalignment and laxity; right peroneal nerve palsy; and decreased sensation to light touch and pinprick on the dorsum of the right foot. The preoperative WOMAC score was 36. Nerve conduction studies confirmed acute peroneal neuropathy with conduction block at the fibular neck and secondary axonal degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee showed osteophytes and cysts surrounding the fibular neck. Although their compression could be responsible for the nerve palsy, the sudden process made this less possible. Thus, the patient underwent total knee arthroplasty of both knees without exploration of the nerve. At 5-month follow-up, the WOMAC score was 78. The patient walked with a cane with no varus thrust, and his right knee had no varus laxity in full extension. The peroneal nerve did not retain its function. Sensory examination and postoperative nerve conduction studies showed no improvement. PMID:19968227

Seyyed Hosseinzadeh, Hamid Reza; Eajazi, Alireza; Kazemi, Seyyed Morteza; Daftari Besheli, Laleh; Hassas Yeganeh, Mehrnoush; Aydanloo, Ali

2009-12-01

134

Recurrent Isolated Oculomotor Nerve Palsy after Radiation of a Mesencephalic Metastasis. Case Report and Mini Review  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Recurrent oculomotor nerve palsies are extremely rare clinical conditions. Case report: Here, we report on a unique case of a short-lasting recurrent unilateral incomplete external and complete internal oculomotor nerve palsy. The episodic palsies were probably caused by an ipsilateral mesencephalic metastasis of a breast carcinoma and occurred after successful brain radiation therapy. Discussion: While the pathogenic mechanism remains unclear, the recurrent sudden onset and disappearance of the palsies and their decreasing frequency after antiepileptic treatment suggest the occurrence of epilepsy-like brainstem seizures. A review of case reports of spontaneous reversible oculomotor nerve palsies is presented. PMID:25104947

Grabau, Olga; Leonhardi, Jochen; Reimers, Carl D.

2014-01-01

135

Behavioral abnormalities in progressive supranuclear palsy.  

PubMed

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder in which, classically, patients present with postural instability and falls, parkinsonism, and slowing of vertical saccades. PSP patients typically have deficits in cognitive functioning, difficulties with most daily activities, and present with notable behavioral disturbances-particularly apathy, impulsivity, and irritability. Using data from 154 patients meeting criteria for clinically probable PSP, domain and total scores of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory were examined and compared to demographics, disease severity, cognition, and motor features. Behavioral abnormalities were common in this cohort of PSP patients, with more than half experiencing apathy, depression, and sleeping problems, and approximately one third displaying agitation, irritability, disinhibition, and eating problems. Few clinical correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms were observed in this cohort. Given the prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PSP, these patients are expected to be frequently seen by psychiatrists and other mental health professionals for symptom management and increased quality of life. Clinical trials are clearly needed to address the neuropsychiatric morbidity in these patients. PMID:24035530

Gerstenecker, Adam; Duff, Kevin; Mast, Benjamin; Litvan, Irene

2013-12-30

136

Symptom burden in individuals with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The current study sought to (1) determine the relative frequency and severity of eight symptoms in adults with cerebral palsy (CP), (2) examine the perceived course of these eight symptoms over time, and (3) determine the associations between the severity of these symptoms and psychosocial functioning. Eighty-three adults with CP completed a measure assessing the frequency, severity, and perceived course of eight symptoms (pain, weakness, fatigue, imbalance, numbness, memory loss, vision loss, and shortness of breath). Respondents also completed measures of community integration and psychological functioning. The results indicated that pain, fatigue, imbalance, and weakness were the most common and severe symptoms reported. All symptoms were reported to have either stayed the same or worsened, rather than resolved, over time. The symptoms were more closely related to social integration than to home integration, productive activity, or psychological functioning. Memory loss was a unique predictor of social integration in the multivariate context. This study highlighted several common and problematic symptoms experienced by adults with CP. Additional research is needed to identify the most effective treatments for those symptoms that affect community integration and psychological functioning as a way to improve the quality of life of individuals with CP. PMID:21174251

Hirsh, Adam T; Gallegos, Juan C; Gertz, Kevin J; Engel, Joyce M; Jensen, Mark P

2010-01-01

137

Lip segmentation and tracking for facial palsy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed the asymmetry analyzing system for facial palsy patient's rehabilitation progress study. Using PC standard imaging device, captured 640*480 RGB image is converted into HSV space. A Lip-shape mask is extracted by thresholding. By taking 5 regions consisted in one region on lip and four regions on face skin, reasonable thresholds are determined by Fuzzy C-Means clustering. The extreme points on the lip shape mask are extracted to get the seeds for tracking. Segmented seed points are tracking by Iterative Lucas-Kanade tracking method in pyramids at 30 fps and recording simultaneously. To reduce the disk writing load on computer, we use asynchronous mode file writing, which is going to transfer to and review by clinician. Tracking shows quite reliable results, but sometimes the tracked points are following along the lip line because of the similar contrasts. Therefore, the first strategy to improve the reliability of tracking is using the high contrast points, such as left and right maximal point of lip shape. The second is clustering some points near the maximal points and eliminating outlying tracking points. The third is rechecking the lip shape using lip segmentation when the operator confirms that subject's maximal lip moving. Left and right tracking points are compared in forms of trajectory plot.

Park, MinJae; Seo, JongMo; Park, KwangSuk

2006-02-01

138

Horner's syndrome with abducens nerve palsy.  

PubMed

A 68-year-old male patient presented with a week of sudden diplopia. He had been diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer 8 months prior and had undergone chemotherapy with radiotherapy. Eight-prism diopter right esotropia in the primary position and a remarkable limitation in abduction in his right eye were observed. Other pupillary disorders and lid drooping were not found. After three weeks, the marginal reflex distance 1 was 3 mm in the right eye and 5 mm in the left eye. The pupil diameter was 2.5 mm in the right eye, and 3 mm in the left eye under room illumination. Under darkened conditions, the pupil diameter was 3.5 mm in the right eye, and 5 mm in the left eye. After topical application of 0.5% apraclonidine, improvement in the right ptosis and reversal pupillary dilatation were observed. On brain magnetic resonance imaging, enhanced lesions on the right cavernous sinus, both sphenoidal sinuses, and skull base suggested the invasion of nasopharyngeal cancer. Lesions on the cavernous sinus need to be considered in cases of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner's syndrome. PMID:22131787

Kang, Na Hee; Lim, Key Hwan; Sung, Sun Hee

2011-12-01

139

Horner's Syndrome with Abducens Nerve Palsy  

PubMed Central

A 68-year-old male patient presented with a week of sudden diplopia. He had been diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer 8 months prior and had undergone chemotherapy with radiotherapy. Eight-prism diopter right esotropia in the primary position and a remarkable limitation in abduction in his right eye were observed. Other pupillary disorders and lid drooping were not found. After three weeks, the marginal reflex distance 1 was 3 mm in the right eye and 5 mm in the left eye. The pupil diameter was 2.5 mm in the right eye, and 3 mm in the left eye under room illumination. Under darkened conditions, the pupil diameter was 3.5 mm in the right eye, and 5 mm in the left eye. After topical application of 0.5% apraclonidine, improvement in the right ptosis and reversal pupillary dilatation were observed. On brain magnetic resonance imaging, enhanced lesions on the right cavernous sinus, both sphenoidal sinuses, and skull base suggested the invasion of nasopharyngeal cancer. Lesions on the cavernous sinus need to be considered in cases of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner's syndrome. PMID:22131787

Kang, Na Hee; Sung, Sun Hee

2011-01-01

140

Quantification of cocontraction in spastic cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Antagonist cocontraction was hypothesized to limit net moment production in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). A second hypothesis was that concontraction would vary with joint angle. To test these hypotheses, surface EMG activity and moment data from the quadriceps and hamstrings muscle groups were obtained from children with CP and compared with normally developing children during isometric flexion and extension exertions. A biomechanical model was developed to predict individual moments produced by the agonist and antagonist muscle groups. Concontraction was defined as the percentage of the net moment that was negated by the antagonist moment. The model performed well in predicting the measured moment as illustrated by high R2 correlation coefficients and low prediction errors. The mean maximum moment produced was greater in normally developing children than children with CP in both flexion and extension. Antagonist cocontraction during extension was greater in children with CP (12.2 +/- 14.4%) than in normally developing children (4.9 +/- 3.8%), implying that antagonist cocontraction is one explanation for the observed extension weakness in children with CP. However, during flexion, cocontraction was not significantly different between the two groups. Cocontraction differed significantly with joint angle in both groups during flexion and in the normally developing children during extension. Although quantifying coactivation based on EMG activity alone produced similar results, it underestimated the effect of the antagonist. The quantification of cocontraction has potential applications for characterizing spastic muscle dysfunction and thereby improving clinical outcomes in children with CP. PMID:9842485

Ikeda, A J; Abel, M F; Granata, K P; Damiano, D L

1998-12-01

141

Osteoporosis in adults with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Life expectancy for the 400 000 adults with cerebral palsy (CP) in the USA is increasing. Although there is a perception of increased fractured rate in the adult with CP, it has not been well studied. Low bone mineral density is found in more than 50% of adults with a variety of disabilities, including CP. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning is commonly used to assess bone mineral density, but is limited by positioning and other artifacts in adults with CP. Novel scanning regions of interest, such as the distal femur, are not yet standardized in adults. Nutritional assessment and physical activity, the basis of most fracture prevention programs, are difficult to do in the adult with CP. A better understanding of the 'muscle-bone unit' physiology and its exploitation may lead to better treatment modifications. Clinical research trials with bisphosphonates (e.g. pamidronate), estrogen, selective estrogen receptor modulators, parathyroid hormone analogs, and growth hormone need to be targeted to the adult with CP. Longitudinal studies of fracture risk factors, genetic research in bone and neuromuscular biology, and the development of treatment surrogates for physical activity are additional areas of needed expertise. This could be facilitated by an adult CP registry and the centralization of clinical research efforts. PMID:19740209

Sheridan, Kevin J

2009-10-01

142

CEREBRAL PALSY—Diagnosis in Young Children  

PubMed Central

Definite diagnosis of cerebral palsy is usually possible during the first six months of life in the hemiplegic child, but in the paraplegic or quadriplegic it may not be clear until the second half of the first year or later. Diagnosis should include not only type, degree and extent of motor handicap, but also intelligence, personality factors, sensory deficits, seizures and other physical problems. Diagnosis depends on detecting deviations from normal growth and development, of being aware of a multitude of progressive and other lesions which may simulate, at least early, the “static” group of conditions characterized by motor deficit due to central nervous system disease. Management involves early positioning, use of special equipment (mainly improvised), sensory stimulation and experience, as well as motor training, evaluation of intelligence and special learning situations to assist in discrimination learning and lengthening of attention span. Nursery schools for mentally capable children from 18 months to 3 years of age assist in developing independence, maturity and growth of personality. Except for patients with very severe mental or physical involvement, competitive employment in adult life is not related so much to the physical handicap as to personality characteristics, traits which are formed in early years. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:13790560

Jones, Margaret Holden

1961-01-01

143

Complementary and alternative methods in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

There are no published studies specifically addressing complementary and alternative treatments in adults with cerebral palsy (CP). However, national surveys of adults with chronic disabilities document that a majority of them use such treatments, that they are willing to pay out of pocket, if necessary, and that they believe that pursuing such treatment relieves pain, reduces stress and anxiety, and leads to improved feelings of fitness and well-being. Individuals enjoy taking charge of their own health care decisions, and frequently feel more in control with these therapies than with more traditional methods. In contrast to adults, there is some information on complementary and alternative methods (CAM) in children with CP. This article discusses some of the CAM used in children that may be carried over into adulthood, as well as the pitfalls for patients and conventional physicians as they try to sort out what might be helpful and what might be harmful in this arena. Practitioners of both conventional and CAM therapies believe that exercise can be beneficial; accordingly, activities such as recreational sports, yoga, and hippotherapy may be continued from childhood into adulthood. General treatments for stress and anxiety, through such activities as yoga and meditation, though not directed at CP per se, may be more popular for adults than children. Research in this area should first identify what methods are being utilized and then subject these methods to well-designed outcome studies that take into account any associated risks. PMID:19740219

Oppenheim, William L

2009-10-01

144

Gait stability in children with cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as children with CP. In doing so, we tested the FPE’s sensitivity to the assumptions needed to calculate this measure, as well as the ability of the FPE to detect differences in stability between children with CP and TD children, and differences in walking speed. Participants were asked to walk at two different speeds, while gait kinematics were recorded. From these data, the FPE, as well as the error that violations of assumptions of the FPE could have caused were calculated. The results showed that children with CP walked with marked instabilities in anterior-posterior and mediolateral directions. Furthermore, errors caused by violations of assumptions in calculation of FPE were only small (~1.5 cm), while effects of walking speed (~20 cm per m/s increase in walking speed) and group (~5cm) were much larger. These results suggest that the FPE may be used to quantify gait stability in TD children and children with CP. PMID:23500163

Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

2013-01-01

145

Sleep abnormalities in patients with severe cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The all-night polysomnographic findings of nine patients with spastic quadriparesis (mean age 36.7 months) were analysed retrospectively and compared with those of nine age-matched controls (mean age 37.4 months). The cerebral palsy group had significantly more respiratory disturbances per hour of sleep, with five of nine being diagnosed as having obstructive sleep apnea. They also had fewer changes in body position during the night. Interictal epileptiform discharges averaged 23.3 per cent of the total arousals in the cerebral palsy group. Obstructive apnea, decreased ability to change body position, and interictal epileptiform discharges are prevalent in the sleep of patients with severe cerebral palsy, and contribute towards its disruption. PMID:8157152

Kotagal, S; Gibbons, V P; Stith, J A

1994-04-01

146

Workplace cluster of Bell’s palsy in Lima, Peru  

PubMed Central

Background We report on a workplace cluster of Bell’s palsy that occurred within a four-month period in 2011 among employees of a three-story office building in Lima, Peru and our investigation to determine the etiology and associated risk factors. Findings An outbreak investigation was conducted to identify possible common infectious or environmental exposures and included patient interviews, reviews of medical records, an epidemiologic survey, serological analysis for IgM and IgG antibodies to putative Bell’s palsy-inducing pathogens, and an environmental exposure assessment of the office building. Three cases of Bell’s palsy were reported among 65 at-risk employees, attack rate 4.6%. Although two patients had underlying risk factors, there was no clear association or common identifiable risk factor among all cases. Serologic analysis showed no evidence of recent infections, and air and water sample measures of all known chemical or neurotoxins were below maximum allowable concentrations for exposure. Conclusions An infection spread among workplace employees could not be excluded as a potential cause of this cluster; however, it was unlikely a pathogen commonly associated with individual cases of Bell’s palsy. Although a specific etiology was not identified among all cases, we believe this methodology will aid future outbreak investigations of Bell’s palsy and a better understanding of its etiology. While environmental assessments may be useful in their ability to ascertain the cause of clusters of Bell’s palsy, future investigations should prioritize focus on common infectious etiology. PMID:24885256

2014-01-01

147

Clinical Features and Outcomes of Treatment for Fourth Nerve Palsy  

PubMed Central

Purpose To evaluate the clinical features, etiology and outcomes of treatment for superior oblique (SO) palsy over a 10-year period at Labbafinejad Medical Center. Methods A complete ophthalmologic examination with particular attention to forced duction test (FDT) and tendon laxity was performed in all patients preoperatively. The palsy was divided into congenital and acquired types. Results Overall, 73 patients including 45 male (61.6%) and 28 female (38.4%) subjects with mean age of 19.7±11.7 (range, 1.5–62) years, were operated from 1997 to 2007. SO palsy was congenital in 56 (76%) and acquired in 17 (24%) cases. The most common chief complaint was ocular deviation (52.1%). FDT was positive in only 7 (9.7%) cases. Other clinical findings included amblyopia (19.2%), head tilt (13.7%), chin down position (4.1%), facial asymmetry (6.8%) and tendon laxity (2.7%). Mean preoperative vertical deviation was 16.1 prism diopters (PD) which was decreased to 1.9 PD postoperatively. Mean exotropia and esotropia were 15 and 13.9 PD respectively before the operation and both decreased to 1.5 PD of horizontal deviation postoperatively. The most common type of SO palsy based on Knapp’s classification was type 3 (42.5%). The most common operated muscle was the inferior oblique (83.6%) and the most common type of operation was inferior oblique myectomy (83.6%). The success rate for initial surgery was 84% and was increased to 96% with a second intervention. Conclusion The most common form of SO palsy requiring surgical intervention was congenital which occurred most frequently in young males. Most cases of SO palsy can be successfully treated with a single surgical procedure. PMID:22737323

Bagheri, Abbas; Fallahi, Mohammad-Reza; Abrishami, Mohammad; Salour, Hossein; Aletaha, Maryam

2010-01-01

148

Acupuncture Treatment of Diplopia Associated With Abducens Palsy: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Abducens palsy (ie, sixth nerve palsy) is the most common single extraocular muscle palsy. The primary symptom is double vision. The treatment goal is to correct the underlying cause. If no cause is identified or the palsy is related to a well-managed chronic disease, treatment consists of patching one eye or applying a temporary prism. We report a patient whose abducens palsy resolved with four acupuncture treatments. The patient, a 58-year-old Vietnamese man with diabetes mellitus, presented to our institution's ophthalmology department with sudden onset of double vision. Ophthalmologic examination resulted in diagnosis of isolated left abducens palsy. The patient received a temporary prism for symptomatic relief. With no improvement after 2 months, he presented to our integrative medicine program inquiring about acupuncture. He received four acupuncture treatments over 11 weeks with complete resolution of his diplopia. This case is suggestive that acupuncture may be helpful treatment of patients with abducens palsy. PMID:25105074

Do, Alexander; Bauer, Brent A.

2014-01-01

149

Isolated Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy Due to Vertebral Artery Dissection  

PubMed Central

We report the case of a patient with unilateral tongue weakness secondary to an isolated lower motor neuron hypoglossal nerve palsy that was caused by a right vertebral artery dissection in the lower neck. The patient had a boggy tongue with a deviation to the right side but an otherwise normal neurological examination. Magnetic resonance angiography showed a narrow lumen of the right vertebral artery in the neck. After initially treating the patient with aspirin in the emergency room and later with warfarin for three months, there was complete recanalization of the right vertebral artery. Only one other case of vertebral artery dissection and twelfth nerve palsy has been reported before. PMID:22031481

Mahadevappa, Karthik; Chacko, Thomas; Nair, Anil K.

2012-01-01

150

Sneddon syndrome presenting with unilateral third cranial nerve palsy.  

PubMed

Sneddon syndrome is a rare systemic vasculopathy affecting the skin as livedo racemosa and the central nervous system as stroke. A 31-year-old man with a history of livedo racemosa presented with a partial left third nerve palsy. Skin biopsy showed signs of endotheliitis with obliteration of dermal blood vessels due to intimal proliferation and fibrin thrombi consistent with Sneddon syndrome. The patient was treated with platelet antiaggregant therapy with complete resolution of his third nerve palsy. Clinicians should be aware of Sneddon syndrome because prompt diagnosis and treatment may prevent potential morbidity and mortality. PMID:24051423

Jiménez-Gallo, David; Albarrán-Planelles, Cristina; Linares-Barrios, Mario; González-Fernández, Julio A; Espinosa-Rosso, Raúl; Báez-Perea, José M

2014-03-01

151

Analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials in peroneal nerve palsy.  

PubMed

The peroneal nerve SEPs over the CZ' of the scalp were studied in patients with peroneal nerve palsy. The initial positive peak latencies of P27 (to popliteal fossa stimulation), P30 (to fibular neck stimulation) and P37 (to dorsum of the foot stimulation) were measured. The latency difference P30-P27 was prolonged in all patients with the fibular head lesions. In patients with the superficial peroneal nerve lesions at the foreleg, P37-P27 was prolonged whereas P30-P27 was normal. Clinical application of peroneal nerve SEPs was useful in deciding the site of the lesion causing the peroneal nerve palsy. PMID:2820182

Ito, J; Yamao, S; Kameyama, M

1987-06-01

152

Rare copy number variation in cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Recent studies have established the role of rare copy number variants (CNVs) in several neurological disorders but the contribution of rare CNVs to cerebral palsy (CP) is not known. Fifty Caucasian families having children with CP were studied using two microarray designs. Potentially pathogenic, rare (<1% population frequency) CNVs were identified, and their frequency determined, by comparing the CNVs found in cases with 8329 adult controls with no known neurological disorders. Ten of the 50 cases (20%) had rare CNVs of potential relevance to CP; there were a total of 14 CNVs, which were observed in <0.1% (<8/8329) of the control population. Eight inherited from an unaffected mother: a 751-kb deletion including FSCB, a 1.5-Mb duplication of 7q21.13, a 534-kb duplication of 15q11.2, a 446-kb duplication including CTNND2, a 219-kb duplication including MCPH1, a 169-kb duplication of 22q13.33, a 64-kb duplication of MC2R, and a 135-bp exonic deletion of SLC06A1. Three inherited from an unaffected father: a 386-kb deletion of 12p12.2-p12.1, a 234-kb duplication of 10q26.13, and a 4-kb exonic deletion of COPS3. The inheritance was unknown for three CNVs: a 157-bp exonic deletion of ACOX1, a 693-kb duplication of 17q25.3, and a 265-kb duplication of DAAM1. This is the first systematic study of CNVs in CP, and although it did not identify de novo mutations, has shown inherited, rare CNVs involving potentially pathogenic genes and pathways requiring further investigation. PMID:23695280

McMichael, Gai; Girirajan, Santhosh; Moreno-De-Luca, Andres; Gecz, Jozef; Shard, Chloe; Nguyen, Lam Son; Nicholl, Jillian; Gibson, Catherine; Haan, Eric; Eichler, Evan; Martin, Christa Lese; MacLennan, Alastair

2014-01-01

153

Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of lower limbs 44 showed improvement in weight bearing, standing and movement accounting for 76% improvement rate.

Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

2008-03-01

154

Ultrasonography for neonatal brachial plexus palsy.  

PubMed

Ultrasonography has previously been reported for use in the evaluation of compressive or traumatic peripheral nerve pathology and for its utility in preoperative mapping. However, these studies were not performed in infants, and they were not focused on the brachial plexus. The authors report a case in which ultrasonography was used to improve operative management of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP). An infant boy was born at term, complicated by right-sided shoulder dystocia. Initial clinical evaluation revealed proximal arm weakness consistent with an upper trunk injury. Unlike MRI or CT myelography that focus on proximal nerve roots, ultrasonography of the brachial plexus in the supraclavicular fossa was able to demonstrate a small neuroma involving the upper trunk (C-5 and C-6) and no asymmetry in movement of the diaphragm or in the appearance of the rhomboid muscle when compared with the unaffected side. However, the supra- and infraspinatus muscles were significantly asymmetrical and atrophied on the affected side. Importantly, ultrasound examination of the shoulder revealed posterior glenohumeral laxity. Instead of pursuing the primary nerve reconstruction first, timely treatment of the shoulder subluxation prevented formation of joint dysplasia and formation of a false glenoid, which is a common sequela of this condition. Because the muscles innervated by proximal branches of the cervical nerve roots/trunks were radiographically normal, subsequent nerve transfers were performed and good functional results were achieved. The authors believe this to be the first report describing the utility of ultrasonography in the surgical treatment planning in a case of NBPP. Noninvasive imaging, in addition to thorough history and physical examination, reduces the intraoperative time required to determine the extent and severity of nerve injury by allowing improved preoperative planning of the surgical strategy. Inclusion of ultrasonography as a preoperative modality may yield improved outcomes for children with NBPP. PMID:25216291

Joseph, Jacob Rahul; DiPietro, Michael A; Somashekar, Deepak; Parmar, Hemant A; Yang, Lynda J S

2014-11-01

155

Systemic inflammation and cerebral palsy risk in extremely preterm infants.  

PubMed

The authors hypothesized that among extremely preterm infants, elevated concentrations of inflammation-related proteins in neonatal blood are associated with cerebral palsy at 24 months. In 939 infants born before 28 weeks gestation, the authors measured blood concentrations of 25 proteins on postnatal days 1, 7, and 14 and evaluated associations between elevated protein concentrations and cerebral palsy diagnosis. Protein elevations within 3 days of birth were not associated with cerebral palsy. Elevations of tumor necrosis factor-?, tumor necrosis factor-?-receptor-1, interleukin-8, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on at least 2 days were associated with diparesis. Recurrent-persistent elevations of interleukin-6, E-selectin, or insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 were associated with hemiparesis. Diparesis and hemiparesis were more likely among infants who had at least 4 of 9 protein elevations that previously have been associated with cognitive impairment and microcephaly. Repeated elevations of inflammation-related proteins during the first 2 postnatal weeks are associated with increased risk of cerebral palsy. PMID:24646503

Kuban, Karl C K; O'Shea, T Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N; Paneth, Nigel; Hirtz, Deborah; Fichorova, Raina N; Leviton, Alan

2014-12-01

156

Surgical management of spasticity in persons with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Cerebral palsy is a disorder that primarily affects the neurologic system but secondarily affects the musculoskeletal system through the effects of spasticity, dystonia, and other movement disorders. The treatment of cerebral palsy requires a multidisciplinary approach with treatment aimed at modulating the movement disorder through oral medication, injectable drugs (phenol, botulinum toxin), and physical and occupational therapy. Treatment of the neurologic effects of the central movement disorders include selective dorsal rhizotomy, intrathecal baclofen pump placement, and potentially deep brain stimulation. Although any effect on tone is temporary, orthopedic surgery has an important role in the treatment of the musculoskeletal deformities and contractures present in the child with cerebral palsy. Orthopedic surgery improves function by lengthening the musculotendinous structures, transferring tendons, performing osteotomies to reduce dislocated joints, and normalizing rotation and fusion of selected joints to improve stability. Neurosurgical techniques are not as widely used, but may reduce spasticity in select individuals. The combined approach of managing tone and normalizing the biomechanics of the spine and upper and lower extremities through orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery and subsequent rehabilitation is the cornerstone of treatment of the child and adult with cerebral palsy. PMID:19769917

Lynn, Abigail K; Turner, Michael; Chambers, Henry G

2009-09-01

157

Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy to Decrease Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Until recently, treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has consisted of physical therapy, bracing, and surgery to release and lengthen tight tendons of contracted muscles and correct muscle contractures. Selective dorsal rhizotomy is a surgical intervention that selectively cuts the spinal sensory nerve rootlets carrying the most abnormal signals, thereby reducing spasticity in all muscle groups of

Verna L. Hendricks-Ferguson; Madeleine Rush Ortman

1995-01-01

158

Attentional and Executive Impairments in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are reported to have learning and social problems. The aim of the present study was to examine whether children with CP have impairments in attention or executive function. Method: We examined attention and executive function with standardized neuropsychological measures in a group of children with unilateral…

Bottcher, Louise; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Uldall, Peter

2010-01-01

159

Frontal atrophy correlates with behavioural changes in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Regional brain volumes were measured in 21 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 17 patients with Parkinson's disease and 23 controls using 3D MRI-based volumetry. Cortical, subcortical and ventricular volume measures were correlated with global indices of motor disability and cognitive disturbance. All MRI measures, including hippocam- pal volume, were preserved in Parkinson's disease. Patients with PSP could be

N. J. Cordato; C. Pantelis; G. M. Halliday; D. Velakoulis; S. J. Wood; G. W. Stuart; J. Currie; M. Soo; G. Olivieri; G. A. Broe; J. G. L. Morris

2002-01-01

160

Further Evidence for Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent data from our laboratory have identified a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). To extend this finding, we measured key parameters of mitochondrial function in platelet-derived cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell lines expressing mitochondrial genes from patients with PSP. We observed significant decreases in aconitase activity, cellular ATP levels, and oxygen consumption in PSP

David S. Albers; Russell H. Swerdlow; Giovanni Manfredi; Carl Gajewski; Lichuan Yang; W. Davis Parker; M. Flint Beal

2001-01-01

161

Spinal cord lesions in progressive supranuclear palsy: some new observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spinal cord was examined in two cases of progressive supranuclear palsy. In both cases, cells with neurofibrillary tangles were seen in the anterior horn, posterior horn, lateral horn, Clark's column, and intermediate gray. The tangles were most frequently observed in the posterior horn. The results suggest that the spinal cord is involved in the pathological process of progressive supranuclear

T. Kato; A. Hirano; M. N. Weinberg; A. K. Jacobs

1986-01-01

162

Ultrastructure of neurofibrillary tangles in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fine structure of neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampal gyrus, substantia nigra, pontine nuclei and locus coeruleus of the brain was postmortem studied in a case of progressive supranuclear palsy. Straight tubules and twisted tubules were observed in both the cortical and subcortical neurofibrillary tangles. Most tubules appeared separately in each neuron but a few straight tubules were mixed with

S. Yagishita; Y. Itoh; N. Amano; T. Nakano; A. Saitoh

1979-01-01

163

ORIENTING OF VISUAL ATTENTION IN PROGRESSIVE SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Orienting of visual attention was studied in 8 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and 8 parkinsonian control subjects. While maintaining fixation on the centre of a visual display, subjects made simple reaction time (RT) key press responses on detecting visual targets which appeared above, below, to the left or right, equidistant from fixation. On each trial the target

ROBERT D. RAFAL; MICHAEL I. POSNER; JOSEPH H. FRIEDMAN; ALBRECHT W. INHOFF; EMILY BERNSTEIN

1988-01-01

164

Progressive supranuclear palsy: neuropathologically based diagnostic clinical criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

All cases examined postmortem at the Mayo Clinic that met the classic neuropathological criteria for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) were identified for retrospective clinical analyses. The necropsy material was re-examined by a second neuropathologist to confirm the pathological diagnosis of PSP, yielding 12 cases. A range of clinical signs were documented in these patients, with numerous findings beyond those noted

S J Collins; J E Ahlskog; J E Parisi; D M Maraganore

1995-01-01

165

Unusual paired helical filaments in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unusual paired helical filaments (PHF) coexisting with single filaments were observed in neurofibrillary degeneration (NFD) in the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and pontine tegmentum of a typical case of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Each filament had a diameter of 10–12 nm and showed central low density and a smooth contour. The thickest portion of a pair was 22–24

S. Takauchi; T. Mizuhara; K. Miyoshi

1983-01-01

166

Study of the rostral midbrain atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rostral midbrain atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is detected by mid-sagittal plain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The shape of the atrophy looks like the bill of a hummingbird (hummingbird sign). We studied this sign to elucidate the nature of midbrain atrophy in PSP. Eight patients with PSP, 12 with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 10 normal controls were studied. Using

Naoko Kato; Kimihito Arai; Takamichi Hattori

2003-01-01

167

Robot-Assisted Task-Specific Training in Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our goal was to examine the feasibility of applying therapeutic robotics to children and adults with severe to moderate impairment due to cerebral palsy (CP). Pilot results demonstrated significant gains for both groups. These results suggest that robot-mediated therapy may be an effective tool to ameliorate the debilitating effects of CP and…

Krebs, Hermano I.; Ladenheim, Barbara; Hippolyte, Christopher; Monterroso, Linda; Mast, Joelle

2009-01-01

168

Diversity of Participation in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to investigate the participation of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in activities outside school and to compare their participation with a large representative sample of children. A population-based survey was conducted of children with CP born in Victoria, Australia in 1994 and 1995. Of 219 living children identified,…

Imms, Christine; Reilly, Sheena; Carlin, John; Dodd, Karen

2008-01-01

169

Feeding and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of our study was to identify feeding and gastrointestinal system (GIS) problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and to evaluate the relationship between these problems and the severity of CP. A total of 120 children with CP were enrolled consecutively into the study (67 males, 53 females; mean age: 6.0[plus or minus]2.4 years; range:…

Erkin, Gulten; Culha, Canan; Ozel, Sumru; Kirbiyik, Eylem Gulsen

2010-01-01

170

[Sixth nerve palsies in children. Presentation of four cases].  

PubMed

The etiology of the sixth nerve palsy in children includes multiple causes, being the acquired ones the most frequent. Due to the importance of the adequate management and possible implications of this pathology, four patients are presented for analysis and discussion. PMID:19030647

Zimmermann-Paiz, Martin A; Fang-Sung, Jen Wen

2008-10-01

171

Cerebral Palsy Litigation: Change Course or Abandon Ship.  

PubMed

The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds' labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule-the Daubert doctrine that excludes "junk science" from the courtroom-as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring's 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

Sartwelle, Thomas P; Johnston, James C

2014-09-01

172

Comparing Scanning Modes for Youths with Cerebral Palsy. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study of 22 individuals (ages 13-20) with cerebral palsy investigated the use of scanning, an interface technique that allows access to assistive devices such as communication boards, electronic augmentative communication devices, and computers by using a pointer, either a finger or a cursor. This packet of information includes the findings…

Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Angelo, Jennifer

173

Predictors of Verbal Working Memory in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the present study was to examine the precursors of verbal working memory in 52 children with cerebral palsy with varying degrees of speech impairments in the first grade of special education. Following Baddeley's model of working memory, children's verbal working memory was measured by means of a forced-recognition task. As precursors…

Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; de Moor, Jan

2009-01-01

174

Childhood Educational Experiences of Women with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the childhood experiences of women with cerebral palsy (CP), from the perspectives of these women. Using the feminist biographical method, eight women with CP participated in two in-depth interviews. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 55 years and had moderate to severe athetoid or spastic CP. Four…

Freeborn, Donna; Mandleco, Barbara

2010-01-01

175

Portrayals of People with Cerebral Palsy in Homicide News  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through content analysis, employing qualitative and quantitative methods, Canadian media representation of people with cerebral palsy (PWCP) in public life was examined. Canadian NewsDisc, an online biographic database service, was used to examine the use of stigmatizing language such as afflicted by, afflicted with, suffered from, suffers from,…

Lucardie, Richard; Sobsey, Dick

2005-01-01

176

Tactile Assessment in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Clinimetric Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review evaluates the clinimetric properties of tactile assessments for children with cerebral palsy. Assessment of registration was reported using Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (SWMs) or exteroception. Assessment of two-point discrimination was reported using the Disk-Criminator[R] or paperclip methods; Single point localization and double…

Auld, Megan Louise; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

2011-01-01

177

Aerobic Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study described the aerobic capacity [VO[subscript 2peak] (ml/kg/min)] in contemporary children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) using a maximal exercise test protocol. Twenty-four children and adolescents with CP classified at Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale (GMFCS) level I or level II and 336 typically developing…

Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim

2010-01-01

178

Language and Motor Speech Skills in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the study was to investigate associations between the severity of motor limitations, cognitive difficulties, language and motor speech problems in children with cerebral palsy. Also, the predictive power of neonatal cranial ultrasound findings on later outcome was investigated. For this purpose, 36 children (age range 1 year 10 months…

Pirila, Silja; van der Meere, Jaap; Pentikainen, Taina; Ruusu-Niemi, Pirjo; Korpela, Raija; Kilpinen, Jenni; Nieminen, Pirkko

2007-01-01

179

Understanding Participation of Preschool-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participation in home, school, and community activities is a primary outcome of early intervention services for children with disabilities and their families. The objectives of this study were to (a) describe participation of preschool-age children with cerebral palsy (CP); (b) determine effects of sex, age, and gross motor function on intensity…

Chiarello, Lisa Ann; Palisano, Robert J.; Orlin, Margo N.; Chang, Hui-Ju; Begnoche, Denise; An, Mihee

2012-01-01

180

Home Literacy Environment: Characteristics of Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have difficulty acquiring literacy skills. Aims: The aims…

Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; van Balkom, Hans; de Moor, Jan

2009-01-01

181

Reproducibility of Tactile Assessments for Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A systematic review identified tactile assessments used in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but their reproducibility is unknown. Sixteen children with unilateral CP and 31 typically developing children (TDC) were assessed 2-4 weeks apart. Test-retest percent agreements within one point for children with unilateral CP (and TDC) were…

Auld, Megan Louise; Ware, Robert S.; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

2012-01-01

182

Towards an Intelligent Wheelchair System for Users With Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes and evaluates an intelligent wheelchair, adapted for users with cognitive disabilities and mobility impairment. The study focuses on patients with cerebral palsy, one of the most common disorders affecting muscle control and coordination, thereby impairing movement. The wheelchair concept is an assistive device that allows the user to select arbitrary local destinations through a tactile screen interface.

Luis Montesano; Marta Díaz; Sonu Bhaskar; Javier Minguez

2010-01-01

183

Towards an Intelligent Wheelchair System for Cerebral Palsy Users  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes and evaluates an intelligent wheelchair, adapted for cognitively disabled subjects with mo- bility impairement. The study focused on cerebral palsy pa- tients, one of the most common congenital disorders that affect muscle control and coordination, thereby impairing movement. The wheelchair concept is an assistive device that allows the subject to select arbitrary local destinations through a tactile

Luis Montesano; Javier Minguez; Sonu Bhaskar

184

Intermittent Axillary Nerve Palsy Caused by a Humeral Exostosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report an uncommon case of intermittent axillary nerve palsy caused by a humeral exostosis in an 11-year-old boy. After excision of the cartilagenous exostosis of the proximal end of the left humerus, the pre-operative symptoms of axillary nerve compression were alleviated.

J. WITTHAUT; K. J. STEFFENS; E. KOOB

1994-01-01

185

Growth and Nutrition Disorders in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Growth and nutrition disorders are common secondary health conditions in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Poor growth and malnutrition in CP merit study because of their impact on health, including psychological and physiological function, healthcare utilization, societal participation, motor function, and survival. Understanding the etiology of…

Kuperminc, Michelle N.; Stevenson, Richard D.

2008-01-01

186

Operative Treatment of the Knee Contractures in Cerebral Palsy Patients  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Knee flexion is one of the main problems of the lower extremities in cerebral palsy patients. Many operative procedures are recommended for contractures of the knee in cerebral palsy patients. We performed simple operation and analyzed the results after operative treatment with nine years follow up. Method: 85 patients with spastic cerebral palsy were treated in period 2001 – 2010. 40 were ambulatory and 45 non ambulatory with ability to stand with support. All of them underwent same surgical procedure with distal hamstrings lengthening. Tenotomies were performed on m. semitendinosus, m. semimembranosus, m. gracillis and biceps femoris. Only m. semitendinosus was tenotomized completely, other muscles were tenotomized only on tendinous part. The patients had a plaster immobilization for five days after the surgery with the knee extended. Results: All 85 patients had improvement of the popliteal angle pre and post operative respectively. Improvement in the crouch gait was noticed in the period of rehabilitation. We had no complication with the wound. Three of the patients had overcorrection and achieved recurvatum of the knees. Conclusion: We consider this procedure very simple with satisfying improvement of standing, walking and sitting abilities in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

Bozinovski, Zoran; Popovski, Neron

2014-01-01

187

Bimanual Force Coordination in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study bimanual grip-force coordination was quantified using a novel "Gripper" system that records grip forces produced while holding a lower and upper unit, in combination with the lift force necessary to separate these units. Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) (aged 5-14 years, n = 12) were compared to age matched typically…

Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Klingels, K.; Feys, H.

2011-01-01

188

Parapharyngeal branchial cleft cyst presenting with cranial nerve palsies.  

PubMed

The authors report a case of branchial cleft cyst for which the location and presentation of the lesion were unusual. This abnormality should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions of the parapharyngeal space. The presence of multiple cranial nerve palsies in association with a mass in this region does not necessarily indicate a neoplastic lesion. PMID:8149269

Durrant, T J; Sevick, R J; Lauryssen, C; MacRae, M E

1994-04-01

189

Home literacy environment: characteristics of children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have difficulty acquiring literacy skills. \\u000aAims: The aims of the present study were to investigate whether the

Marieke Peeters; Ludo Verhoeven; L. J. M. van Balkom; J. M. H. de Moor

2009-01-01

190

Spontaneous nerve torsion: unusual cause of radial nerve palsy.  

PubMed

Spontaneous nerve torsion is a rare cause of nerve palsy. We describe a case of nerve torsion affecting the radial nerve in order to inform radiologists of the existence of this condition and subtle features on cross-sectional imaging that can suggest the diagnosis preoperatively. PMID:25244923

Endo, Yoshimi; Miller, Theodore T; Carlson, Erik; Wolfe, Scott W

2015-03-01

191

The determinants of daily function in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to identify determinants of daily function in a population-based sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP). The study took into consideration factors from the entire scope of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). Furthermore, the determinants of daily function were examined from the perspectives of capacity and performance respectively.A total of

Mei-Hui Tseng; Kuan-Lin Chen; Jeng-Yi Shieh; Lu Lu; Chien-Yu Huang

2011-01-01

192

Cerebral palsy symptoms in children decreased following massage therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty young children (mean age?=?32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine and gross motor functioning. In addition, the massage group

Tiffany Field; Shay Largie; Miguel Diego; Natasha Manigat; Jacqueline Seoanes; Joan Bornstein

2005-01-01

193

Cerebral Palsy Symptoms in Children Decreased Following Massage Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty young children (mean age = 32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine…

Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Diego, Miguel; Manigat, Natasha; Seoanes, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Joan

2005-01-01

194

Displacement of the Medial Rectus Pulley in Superior Oblique Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE. The rectus extraocular muscles pass through fibromuscular connective tissue pulleys that stabilize mus- cle paths and control the direction of muscle pull. The authors investigated whether abnormal forces associated with superior oblique palsy can cause displacement of pulleys and muscle paths. METHODS. Coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing significantly reduced superior oblique cross-sec- tional areas and lack of contractile

Robert A. Clark; Joel M. Miller; Joseph L Demer

195

Rating Scales for Dystonia in Cerebral Palsy: Reliability and Validity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS), the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Movement Scale (BFMMS), and the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale (UDRS) in patients with bilateral dystonic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Three raters independently scored videotapes of 10 patients (five males, five females;…

Monbaliu, E.; Ortibus, E.; Roelens, F.; Desloovere, K.; Deklerck, J.; Prinzie, P.; De Cock, P.; Feys, H.

2010-01-01

196

Stability of Motor Impairment in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classification of the quality and topographical pattern of motor impairment is used to describe cerebral palsy (CP). As an adjunct to a study characterizing the quality of life and participation of school-age children with CP, initial and follow-up classification of CP were compared. A cohort of 93 children (58 males, 35 females) were initially…

Shevell, Michael I.; Majnemer, Annette; Poulin, Chantal; Law, Mary

2008-01-01

197

Hallmarks in the history of cerebral palsy: from antiquity to mid-20th century.  

PubMed

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term that has been applied over the years to a group of children with motor disability and related service requirements. The first conceptions of cerebral palsy and our knowledge about aetiology and pathogeny allow us to assume that cerebral palsy existed in the Ancient World. Although there is lack of detailed medical descriptions from before the 19th century, mentions to cerebral palsy can be found in representational art, literary sources and paleopathology; however, because of the poor medical documentation, the diagnosis of cerebral palsy must remain a more or less well-justified supposition. In the Ancient World, the first medical description of cerebral palsy was made by Hippocrates in his work "Corpus Hippocraticum". Concrete examples and definitions of cerebral palsy, however, did not emerge until the early 19th century with observations by William John Little; thus, Little was the first personality to intensely engage cerebral palsy. Towards the end of the 19th century, two more personalities emerged, adding to the historical hallmarks of cerebral palsy: William Osler and Sigmund Freud. The significant developments that have followed since then are all due to the contributions of these three personalities in the field of cerebral palsy. PMID:22658818

Panteliadis, Christos; Panteliadis, Panos; Vassilyadi, Frank

2013-04-01

198

[A clinical case of progressive supranuclear palsy with long-term frontal presentation preceding the onset of gaze palsy].  

PubMed

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disorder with diverse clinical phenotypes characterized by supranuclear gaze palsy, parkinsonism with postural instability, and frontal dementia. The early and accurate diagnosis of PSP remains difficult because of the variable combination of symptoms and frequent lack of gaze abnormalities early in the disease course. Moreover, a subset of PSP shows behavioral changes as the initial presentation, which considerably overlaps with the clinical picture of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Thus, this subgroup possibly needs psychiatric assessments. Here, we describe a clinical case of PSP difficult to differentiate from FTD because the frontal presentation persisted without gaze palsy until the late stage of the clinical course. A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for the reconsideration of a diagnosis of FTD. Disinhibited and gambling behaviors inconsistent with his previous personality first appeared at around the age of 45, with gradual progression, followed by memory deficits, executive dysfunction, and a slowing of mental processes. Recurrent sexual disinhibition led him to undergo psychiatric consultation at the age of 57. Downward gaze palsy and postural instability with recurrent falls emerged 8 months after the first psychiatric examination, and he was clinically diagnosed with PSP 13 years after the initial frontal presentation. PSP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with frontal lobe symptoms, even in psychiatric practice. PMID:24992742

Yoshiike, Takuya; Ueda, Satoshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Suda, Kiyoko; Furuta, Ko; Koyama, Keiko

2014-01-01

199

Pathological tau burden and distribution distinguishes progressive supranuclear palsy-parkinsonism from Richardson's syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical syndromes associated with progressive supranuclear palsy-tau pathology now include progressive supranuclear palsy-parkinsonism (PSP-P), in addition to classic Richardson's syndrome (RS) and pure akinesia with gait freezing (PAGF). Although pathological heterogeneity of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) has also been established, attempts to correlate this with clinical findings have only rarely provided conclusive results. The aim of this study was to

David R. Williams; Janice L. Holton; Catherine Strand; Alan Pittman; Rohan de Silva; Andrew J. Lees; Tamas Revesz

2007-01-01

200

C5 palsy following anterior decompression and spinal fusion for cervical degenerative diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postoperative C5 palsy is a common complication after cervical spine decompression surgery. However, the incidence, prognosis,\\u000a and etiology of C5 palsy after anterior decompression with spinal fusion (ASF) have not yet been fully established. In the\\u000a present study, we analyzed the clinical and radiological characteristics of patients who developed C5 palsy after ASF for\\u000a cervical degenerative diseases. The cases of

Mitsuhiro HashimotoMacondo; Macondo Mochizuki; Atsuomi Aiba; Akihiko Okawa; Koichi Hayashi; Tsuyoshi Sakuma; Hiroshi Takahashi; Masao Koda; Kazuhisa Takahashi; Masashi Yamazaki

2010-01-01

201

Polychondritis presenting with oculomotor and abducens nerve palsies as the initial manifestation.  

PubMed

We treated a patient with relapsing polychondritis (RP) who presented with intermittent oculomotor and abducens nerve palsies as the first manifestation. Ear swelling and laryngeal edema emerged 7 months later, which led us to diagnose him with RP. Moderate doses of glucocorticoid resolved all symptoms. Our experience with RP accompanied by oculomotor nerve palsy suggests that RP should be considered in patients with cranial nerve palsies so that they may be promptly diagnosed and treated. PMID:24884407

Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Hanaoka, Hironari; Kuwana, Masataka; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

2014-06-01

202

Three-dimensional In Vivo Quantification of Knee Kinematics in Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Cerebral palsy is the most common disabling condition in childhood, involving a diverse group of movement and posture disorders of varying etiologies. Yet, much is unknown about how cerebral palsy affects individual joints because currently applied techniques cannot quantify the three-dimensional kinematic parameters at the joint level. We quantified the effects of cerebral palsy at the knee using fast phase contrast MRI, with the ultimate intent of improving the assessment of joint impairments associated with cerebral palsy, improving clinical outcomes, and reducing the impact of cerebral palsy on function. We addressed three questions: (1) Can patients with cerebral palsy perform the required repetitive extension task? (2) Which of the 12 degrees of freedom defining complete knee kinematics are abnormal in individual patients with cerebral palsy and is the patellar tendon moment arm abnormal in these patients? (3) Are the individual kinematic differences consistent with clinical observations? All patients were able to perform the required task. We found kinematic differences for each patient with cerebral palsy consistent with clinical findings, in comparison to an able-bodied population. Fast phase contrast MRI may allow differentiation of patellofemoral and tibiofemoral function in various functional subtypes of cerebral palsy, providing insights into its management. PMID:18196431

Seisler, Andrea R.; Alter, Katharine E.

2008-01-01

203

A qualitative analysis into children’s experience of living with cerebral palsy.  

E-print Network

??Introduction: Research suggests that children with disabilities are at increased risk of experiencing psychological difficulties. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability… (more)

Redford, Donna

2012-01-01

204

Bell's palsy in pregnancy and the puerperium: a report of five cases.  

PubMed

The incidence of idiopathic facial nerve palsy is higher during pregnancy and the puerperium than in nonpregnant women of childbearing age. An important association also exists between Bell's palsy and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. We describe three patients with idiopathic facial nerve palsy in pregnancy and two in the puerperium. Two of these were associated with hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. This case report illustrates the fact that Bell's palsy is common in pregnancy and in the peurperium and often associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. PMID:21117412

Fawale, M B; Owolabi, M O; Ogunbode, O

2010-06-01

205

Trends in Communicative Access Solutions for Children With Cerebral Palsy.  

PubMed

Access solutions may facilitate communication in children with limited functional speech and motor control. This study reviews current trends in access solution development for children with cerebral palsy, with particular emphasis on the access technology that harnesses a control signal from the user (eg, movement or physiological change) and the output device (eg, augmentative and alternative communication system) whose behavior is modulated by the user's control signal. Access technologies have advanced from simple mechanical switches to machine vision (eg, eye-gaze trackers), inertial sensing, and emerging physiological interfaces that require minimal physical effort. Similarly, output devices have evolved from bulky, dedicated hardware with limited configurability, to platform-agnostic, highly personalized mobile applications. Emerging case studies encourage the consideration of access technology for all nonverbal children with cerebral palsy with at least nascent contingency awareness. However, establishing robust evidence of the effectiveness of the aforementioned advances will require more expansive studies. PMID:24820337

Myrden, Andrew; Schudlo, Larissa; Weyand, Sabine; Zeyl, Timothy; Chau, Tom

2014-05-11

206

Sensory disorders in cerebral palsy: two-point discrimination.  

PubMed

Two-point discrimination (TPD) was measured on eight points of the upper extremities of 220 children with cerebral palsy aged between seven and 14 years. 46 had classical diplegia, 23 had mildly spastic diplegia (without adductor spasms), 86 had hemiplegia, 26 had generalized dyskinesia, 10 had right- and four had left-sided hemiathetosis and 25 had quadriplegia. TPD was decreased in all cases compared with normal controls: slightly more for the classical forms of diplegia and on the paretic side of those with hemiplegia, slightly less in athetoid children. This adds further evidence to the authors' previous observations that sensory disorder is an integral part of the clinical picture of cerebral palsy. PMID:8495821

Lesný, I; Stehlík, A; Tomásek, J; Tománková, A; Havlícek, I

1993-05-01

207

Acetabular augmentation for progressive hip subluxation in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Between 1969 and 1981, 20 acetabular augmentations were performed on 17 cerebral palsied patients with progressive hip instability. Average follow-up was 41.5 months, with a range from 24 to 147 months. Evaluation of results was based on assessment of hip stability, center edge (CE) angle, range of motion, and postoperative complications. Eighteen hips were rated good, one fair, and one poor. Stability was achieved in 19 hips. The CE angle was increased from a preoperative mean of -17 degrees to a follow-up mean of 50 degrees. There was no significant difference between preoperative and follow-up hip range of motion. The only complication encountered was a supracondylar femur fracture sustained after spica cast immobilization. Acetabular augmentation can be used effectively in the treatment of progressive hip instability in patients with cerebral palsy. PMID:6470113

Zuckerman, J D; Staheli, L T; McLaughlin, J F

1984-08-01

208

[Radial nerve palsy as a presenting feature of neuralgic amyotrophy].  

PubMed

A 28-year-old man noticed weakness in his left arm when he woke up. He was diagnosed as left radial nerve palsy and managed conservatively at a local hospital. A few days later, severe pain of the brachium appeared. Although severe pain improved in a year, dysesthesia and muscle atrophy remained. On admission, muscle weakness and atrophy were found in muscles innervated predominantly by the left radial nerve. In addition, needle-electromyography and computed tomography revealed the involvement of muscles innervated by the left suprascapular, long thoracic and axillary nerves, and we diagnosed the patient as neuralgic amyotrophy. Neuralgic amyotrophy should be kept in mind in diagnosing acute onset, painful radial palsy. PMID:23603548

Tsuboi, Hirofumi; Sugeno, Naoto; Nishiyama, Ayumi; Tateyama, Maki; Aoki, Masashi

2013-01-01

209

Cerebral Palsy: Effects of Early Brain Injury on Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The term cerebral palsy (CP) was originally coined more than a century ago and loosely translated as brain paralysis. A precise\\u000a definition has remained elusive because CP is not a single diagnosis but an umbrella term describing nonprogressive brain\\u000a lesions involving motor and postural abnormalities that are noted during early development [1]. Recently, the executive committee\\u000a for the definition of

Silja Pirilä; Jaap J. van der Meere

210

Outcomes after selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Object: The purpose of this article was to review the published outcomes after selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for treatment of\\u000a spastic cerebral palsy. Methods: A literature search identified all articles related to outcomes after SDR. The outcomes were reviewed according to a paradigm\\u000a developed by the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR). The quality of the evidence for each

Paul Steinbok

2001-01-01

211

Progressive supranuclear palsy: a clinicopathological study of 21 cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The symptoms and signs used to diagnose progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) should be easily identifiable by neuropathologists\\u000a and neurologists as well as by movement disorder experts. The presence, at the time of death, of symptoms and signs that are\\u000a used in published clinical criteria for the diagnosis of this disorder was searched for in 21 pathologically confirmed typical\\u000a PSP cases.

M. Verny; K. A. Jellinger; J.-J. Hauw; C. Bancher; I. Litvan; Y. Agid

1996-01-01

212

Ultrastructure of neurofibrillary tangles in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ultrastructure of neurofibrillary tangles was investigated on the subcortical neurons of an autopsy case of progressive supranuclear palsy. The patient was a 64-year-old female and suffered from her illness for 9 years. Two kinds of ultrastructure were observed in the subcortical neurofibrillary tangles, i.e. the 150 A straight tubules and the 220 A twisted tubules. They appeared separately in each

M. Tomonaga

1977-01-01

213

Grip Force Coordination during Bimanual Tasks in Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate coordination of fingertip forces during an asymmetrical bimanual task in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Twelve participants (six males, six females; mean age 14y 4mo, SD 3.3y; range 9-20y;) with unilateral CP (eight right-sided, four left-sided) and 15 age-matched typically…

Islam, Mominul; Gordon, Andrew M.; Skold, Annika; Forssberg, Hans; Eliasson, Ann-Christin

2011-01-01

214

Clinical Characteristics of Peroneal Nerve Palsy by Posture  

PubMed Central

Objective Posture induced common peroneal nerve (CPN) palsy is usually produced during the prolonged squatting or habitual leg crossing while seated, especially in Asian culture and is manifested by the onset of foot drop. Because of its similarity to discogenic foot drop, patients may be diagnosed with a lumbar disc disorder, and in some patients, surgeons may perform unnecessary examinations and even spine surgery. The purpose of our study is to establish the clinical characteristics and diagnostic assessment of posture induced CPN palsy. Methods From June 2008 to June 2012, a retrospective study was performed on 26 patients diagnosed with peroneal nerve palsy in neurophysiologic study among patients experiencing foot drop after maintaining a certain posture for a long time. Results The inducing postures were squatting (14 patients), sitting cross-legged (6 patients), lying down (4 patients), walking and driving. The mean prolonged neural injury time was 124.2 minutes. The most common clinical presentation was foot drop and the most affected sensory area was dorsum of the foot with tingling sensation (14 patients), numbness (8 patients), and burning sensation (4 patients). The clinical improvement began after a mean 6 weeks, which is not related to neural injury times. Electrophysiology evaluation was performed after 2 weeks later and showed delayed CPN nerve conduction study (NCS) in 24 patients and deep peroneal nerve in 2 patients. Conclusion We suggest that an awareness of these clinical characteristics and diagnostic assessment methods may help clinicians make a diagnosis of posture induced CPN palsy and preclude unnecessary studies or inappropriate treatment in foot drop patients. PMID:23908699

Yu, Jeong Keun; Kang, Suk-Hyung; Cho, Yong-Jun

2013-01-01

215

The health status of women with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine preliminary associations between collected health status variables of women with cerebral palsy (CP) residing in the community.Design: Cross-sectional study using survey research.Participants: Sixty-three women residing in the community were administered the Telephone Questionnaire when contacted to arrange their visit to the study site located within the medical clinic of a local developmental services office. During the course

Margaret A. Turk; Cynthia A. Geremski; Paula F. Rosenbaum; Robert J. Weber

1997-01-01

216

Functional outcomes of strength training in spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine clinical effectiveness of strength training in children with spastic cerebral palsy.Design: Prospective before and after trial in which subjects participated in a 6-week strength training program. All received before and after isometric strength evaluation of eight muscle groups in both lower extremities with a hand-held dynamometer, 3-D gait analysis at free and fast speeds, administration of the

Diane L. Damiano; Mark F. Abel

1998-01-01

217

Combination of Citicoline and Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Background: The most common cause of physical disability in children is cerebral palsy. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of citicoline in combination to physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone, to improve the functional outcome in pediatric cerebral palsy. Methods: The clinical trial was performed on 50 pediatric patients aged 18-75 months with spastic diplegia or quadriplegic cerebral palsy. Patients were assessed in two groups: case group, under treatment, using injection of citicoline (10 mg/kg) every other day for 3 months and physiotherapy. Gross motor function classification system (GMFCS) levels were assessed in all patients before and after treatment. Results: Patient's mean age was 38.7 ± 17.2 months, and 52% were girls. Differences in the frequency of GMFCS levels between groups were not statistically significant, before (P = 0.09) and after (P = 0.47) treatment. In case group improving in GMFCS, level was occurred in 9/11 with level 2 to level 1, 3/5 with level 3 to other levels and 3/7 with level 4 to other levels. In the control group improving in GMFCS, level was occurred in 3/9 with level 2 to level 1, 3/10 with level 3 to other levels, and 2/4 with level 4 other levels. GMFCS level in 64% of cases was improved, whereas in control group, 32% was improved (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Results demonstrated that citicoline in combination to physiotherapy appears to be a promising agent to improve gross motor function in patients with cerebral palsy versus physiotherapy alone. Although, further studies are need to be done. PMID:25400890

Nasiri, Jafar; Kargar, Mehran

2014-01-01

218

Assessment and treatment of children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Children with cerebral palsy are prone to development of musculoskeletal deformities. The underlying neurlogic insult may results in a loss of selective motor control, an increase in underlying muscle tone, and muscle imbalance, which can lead to abnormal deforming forces acting on the immature skeleton. The severely involved child is one who is at increased risk for developing progressive musculoskeletal deformities. Close surveillance and evaluation are key to addressing the underlying deformity and improving and maintaining overall function. PMID:24975760

Chan, Gilbert; Miller, Freeman

2014-07-01

219

[A complication of inferior dental nerve block: temporary ocular palsy].  

PubMed

An interesting case of temporary ocular palsy, a complication of inferior dental nerve block was reported. Symptom, sign and proper management were described. Several updated literatures on this topic were reviewed and concluded that this complication might be explained by accidental intra-arterial injection of anesthetic solution. To prevent this serious complication, aspirating before each injection by an aspirated syringe was strongly recommended. PMID:2635191

Hotrabhavanond, P; Meksupa, L

1989-01-01

220

Treatment of the spasticity in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Botulinum toxin is a natural purified protein and one of the strongest biological poisons--neurotoxin. It is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Its medical usage started in USA in 1981 and in Europe in 1992. There are seven different immune types of the toxin: A, B, C1, D, E, F and G. Toxin types A and B are used to decrease muscular spasticity. Botulinum toxin prevents the formation of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve tissues in muscles, which in the end irreversibly destroys neuromuscular synapses. It is called temporary local chemodenervation. It does not affect the synthesis of acetylcholine. As it affects neuromuscular bond it also affects one of the symptoms of cerebral palsy--spasticity. Decreasing the spasticity of children with cerebral palsy leads to the improvement of conscious movements, muscles are less toned, passive mobility is improved, orthosis tolerance is also improved, and the child is enabled to perform easier and better motor functions such as crawling, standing and walking. Since the action of Botulinum toxin is limited to 2-6 months, new neural collaterals are formed and neuromuscular conductivity is reestablished which in the end once again develops a muscular spasm. This leads to a conclusion that botulinum toxin should again be applied into spastic muscles. It is very important for good effect of Botulinum toxin to set the goals of the therapy in advance. The goals include improvement of a function, prevention of contractions and deformities, ease of care and decrease of pain for children with cerebral palsy. After application of botulinum toxin, it is necessary to perform adequate and intensive physical treatment with regular monitoring of effects. This work shows a case of a boy with spastic form of cerebral palsy. After being rehabilitated using Vojta therapy and Bobath concept and the conduct of certain physical procedures, botulinum toxin is administered into his lower limbs' muscles and kinesiotherapy is intensified. After the administration of botulinum toxin significant functional improvement is noted. PMID:18039197

Meholji?-Fetahovi?, Ajsa

2007-11-01

221

A diagnostic approach for cerebral palsy in the genomic era.  

PubMed

An ongoing challenge in children presenting with motor delay/impairment early in life is to identify neurogenetic disorders with a clinical phenotype, which can be misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy (CP). To help distinguish patients in these two groups, conventional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain has been of great benefit in "unmasking" many of these genetic etiologies and has provided important clues to differential diagnosis in others. Recent advances in molecular genetics such as chromosomal microarray and next-generation sequencing have further revolutionized the understanding of etiology by more precisely classifying these disorders with a molecular cause. In this paper, we present a review of neurogenetic disorders masquerading as cerebral palsy evaluated at one institution. We have included representative case examples children presenting with dyskinetic, spastic, and ataxic phenotypes, with the intent to highlight the time-honored approach of using clinical tools of history and examination to focus the subsequent etiologic search with advanced neuroimaging modalities and molecular genetic tools. A precise diagnosis of these masqueraders and their differentiation from CP is important in terms of therapy, prognosis, and family counseling. In summary, this review serves as a continued call to remain vigilant for current and other to-be-discovered neurogenetic masqueraders of cerebral palsy, thereby optimizing care for patients and their families. PMID:25280894

Lee, Ryan W; Poretti, Andrea; Cohen, Julie S; Levey, Eric; Gwynn, Hilary; Johnston, Michael V; Hoon, Alexander H; Fatemi, Ali

2014-12-01

222

Quadruple salivary duct diversion for drooling in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Drooling complicates many neurologic disorders including cerebral palsy. It is socially debilitating for the patient and very tedious for the caregiver. Surgical treatment consists mainly of ablative (excision/ligation) or physiological (diversion) methods; combined techniques have also been proposed. We have applied bilateral diversion of both submandibular and parotid ducts in 12 cerebral palsy patients (age range, 7-15 years). Preoperative drooling severity was grade 4/5 in 10 cases and grade 5/5 in 2 of the cases. All patients underwent physiotherapy for a minimum of 6 months and were consulted with a dentist, otolaryngologist, and a speech therapist before surgery. No bleeding, hematoma, or infection has been observed in any of the patients. Two patients had early postoperative tongue edema that regressed with conservative treatment. All patients except one regressed to grade 2/5 drooling by the first postoperative month. In 1 patient who had previously been classified as grade 5/5, surgery provided limited improvement with only 1 grade of step-down. Satisfactory results for the patients and their families could be achieved and sustained for a median 18 months (7-20 months) of follow-up. In conclusion, the quadruple duct diversion method is an effective physiological surgical method in the control of drooling in cerebral palsy. PMID:22565904

Celet Ozden, Burcu; Aydin, Atakan; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Yazar, Memet; Ozmen, Meral; Tatli, Burak

2012-05-01

223

Isolated III cranial nerve palsy: a Hodgkin's lymphoma?  

PubMed

A 69-year-old woman developed ptosis and diplopia due to an isolated pupil-involving left oculomotor nerve palsy. General examination was unremarkable. Initial workup showed a mild increase in cerebrospinal fluid proteins. Imaging studies were remarkable for a left oculomotor nerve enhancement in brain MRI and hyperfixation along the nerve's pathway in full body single-photon emission CT. Assuming the possible diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis, the patient was started on high-dose methylprednisolone. Three months later she developed pancytopenia. A bone marrow biopsy was performed and histopathology revealed infiltration by Hodgkin's lymphoma. Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine protocol chemotherapy was started and full haematological remission obtained after four cycles, despite mild oculomotor nerve palsy persisted. Isolated oculomotor palsy as the first presenting manifestation of a lymphoma is rare and alternative differential diagnosis must be considered in the absence of other lymphoma manifestations. In this case as with many rare initial manifestations of common diseases watchful waiting was crucial to the correct diagnosis and treatment strategy. PMID:24759607

Meireles, Joana; Garrett, Maria Carolina; Abreu, Pedro

2014-01-01

224

Food pattern and nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES To assess the food intake pattern and the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 90 children from two to 12.8 years with cerebral palsy in the following forms: hemiplegia, diplegia, and tetraplegia. Nutritional status was assessed by weight, height, and age data. Food intake was verified by the 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire. The ability to chew and/or swallowing, intestinal habits, and physical activity were also evaluated. RESULTS For 2-3 year-old age group, the mean energy intake followed the recommended range; in 4-6 year-old age group with hemiplegia and tetraplegia, energy intake was below the recommended limits. All children presented low intake of carbohydrates, adequate intake of proteins and high intake of lipids. The tetraplegia group had a higher prevalence of chewing (41%) and swallowing (12.8%) difficulties compared to 14.5 and 6.6% of children with hemiplegia, respectively. Most children of all groups had a daily intestinal habit. All children presented mild physical activity, while moderate activity was not practiced by any child of the tetraplegia group, which had a significantly lower height/age Z score than those with hemiplegia (-2.14 versus -1.05; p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS The children with cerebral palsy presented inadequate dietary pattern and impaired nutritional status, with special compromise of height. Tetraplegia imposes difficulties regarding chewing/swallowing and moderate physical activity practice. PMID:24142317

Lopes, Patrícia Ayrosa C.; Amancio, Olga Maria S.; Araújo, Roberta Faria C.; Vitalle, Maria Sylvia de S.; Braga, Josefina Aparecida P.

2013-01-01

225

Effect of High-frequency, Low-magnitude Vibration on Bone and Muscle in Children With Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

with cerebral palsy (CP) have decreased strength, low bone mass, and an increased propensity to fracture. High II, prospective randomized cross-over study. Key Words: cerebral palsy, mechanical loading and osteoporosis later in life.1­3 The children with disabilities, such as cerebral palsy (CP), are particu- larly

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

226

Abstract --Cerebral palsy is a non-progressive neurological disorder caused by disturbances to the developing brain.  

E-print Network

Abstract -- Cerebral palsy is a non-progressive neurological disorder caused by disturbances forms of therapy for children with cerebral palsy are effective in minimizing symptoms, many children Cerebral palsy describes a group of permanent physical disorders caused by disturbances to the fetal

227

AETIOLOGY OF KIENBÖCK'S DISEASE BASED ON A STUDY OF THE CONDITION AMONG PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examination of 110 patients with cerebral palsy revealed a diagnosis of Kienböck's disease in six wrists in five cases. All had cerebral palsy of the mixed type with athetosis and high muscle tone. It is considered that the increased prevalence of Kienböck's disease in these cases was attributable to repeated minor trauma to the lunate from childhood due to high

S. JOJI; T. MIZUSEKI; S. KATAYAMA; K. TSUGE; Y. IKUTA

1993-01-01

228

Changes in Cognitive Performance in Children with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy following Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with cerebral palsy who receive selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for treatment of spasticity may show suprasegmental changes in upper limb function and control of speech musculature. Anecdotal reports suggest that suprasegmental effects may extend to cognitive functions such as attention and language. This study examined the performance of 16 children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy on tests of visual

Suzanne Crafts; T. S. Park; Desiree A. White; Jeffrey Schatz; Michael Noetzel; Susan Arnold

1995-01-01

229

BLADDER FUNCTION BEFORE AND AFTER SELECTIVE DORSAL RHIZOTOMY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeApproximately a third of children with cerebral palsy are expected to present with dysfunctional voiding symptoms. Selective dorsal rhizotomy, which is indicated for managing lower extremity spasticity in children with cerebral palsy, also has the potential of affecting bladder function. We evaluate the impact of selective dorsal rhizotomy on bladder function by comparing preoperative and postoperative symptoms, and urodynamic parameters

A. M. HOULE; O. VERNET; R. JEDNAK; PIPPI J. L. SALLE; J. P. FARMER

1998-01-01

230

Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured

Norman L. Foster; Sid Gilman; Stanley Berent; Elizabeth M. Morin; Morton B. Brown; Robert A. Koeppe

1988-01-01

231

Atypical progressive supranuclear palsy underlying progressive apraxia of speech and nonfluent aphasia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a clinicopathological entity typically presenting as an akinetic rigid syndrome with early falls, axial rigidity, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy and levodopa resistance. Pathological features consist of tau deposition in neuronal and glial cells located mainly in subcortical and brainstem structures. Rare cases with the pathological diagnosis of atypical PSP have been described in which neocortical

K. A. Josephs; B. F. Boeve; J. R. Duffy; G. E. Smith; D. S. Knopman; J. E. Parisi; R. C. Petersen; D. W. Dickson

2005-01-01

232

Distribution of cortical neurofibrillary tangles in progressive supranuclear palsy: A quantitative analysis of six cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive supranuclear palsy is characterized neuropathologically by the presence of high densities of neurofibrillary tangles in several subcortical structures. In some cases, neurofibrillary tangles have also been described in the cerebral cortex. We performed a quantitative regional and laminar analysis of the distribution of these lesions in six cases of progressive supranuclear palsy. We observed that the neurofibrillary tangle distribution

P. R. Hof; A. Delacourte; C. Bouras

1992-01-01

233

Rigidity and dorsiflexion of the neck in progressive supranuclear palsy and the interstitial nucleus of Cajal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rigidity and dorsiflexion of the neck are typical signs in progressive supranuclear palsy, but the responsible areas in the brain are unknown. To examine whether bilateral lesions of the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) in the midbrain tegmentum contribute to the signs of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, we have made bilateral INC lesions in cats and tried to correlate

J Fukushima-Kudo; K Fukushima; K Tashiro

1987-01-01

234

Bell's Palsy in Children: Role of the School Nurse in Early Recognition and Referral  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bell's palsy is the most common condition affecting facial nerves. It is an acute, rapidly progressing, idiopathic, unilateral facial paralysis that is generally self-limiting and non-life threatening that occurs in all age groups (Okuwobi, Omole, & Griffith, 2003). The school nurse may be the first person to assess facial palsy and muscle…

Gordon, Shirley C.

2008-01-01

235

The Relationship between Quality of Life and Functioning for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given that quality of life (QOL) is commonly confused with functioning, the aim of this study was to examine the association between functioning and QOL domains for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Two hundred and five parents of children aged 4 to 12 years with CP and 53 children aged 9 to 12 years with CP, completed the Cerebral Palsy Quality…

Shelly, A.; Davis, E.; Waters, E.; Mackinnon, A.; Reddihough, D.; Boyd, R.; Reid, S.; Graham, H. K.

2008-01-01

236

Central bilateral sixth nerve palsy associated with a unilateral preganglionic Horner's syndrome.  

PubMed

Unilateral peripheral sixth nerve palsy associated with an ipsilateral postganglionic Horner's syndrome has previously been described. Isolated bilateral sixth nerve palsy due to a pontine hemorrhagic lesion, however, is a rare occurrence. We describe such a case whose only other neurological finding was a unilateral preganglionic Horner's syndrome. PMID:2971682

Kellen, R I; Burde, R M; Hodges, F J; Roper-Hall, G

1988-09-01

237

"I Do Lots of Things": Children with Cerebral Palsy's Competence for Everyday Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored how children with cerebral palsy describe competent performance in everyday activities and sought to better understand the processes by which the children developed competence. Five children with cerebral palsy aged six to 17 years participated in a three-step procedure that included two observations, one semi-structured…

Kramer, Jessica M.; Hammel, Joy

2011-01-01

238

The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child): Evidence of Construct Validity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child) is the first health condition-specific questionnaire designed for measuring QOL in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, its construct validity has not yet been confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Hence, this study assessed the construct validity of the caregiver…

Chen, Kuan-Lin; Wang, Hui-Yi; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Lu, Lu; Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Huang, Chien-Yu

2013-01-01

239

Electropalatography in the Description and Treatment of Speech Disorders in Five Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some children with cerebral palsy have articulation disorders that are resistant to conventional speech therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the visual feedback method of electropalatography (EPG) could be an effective tool for treating five children (mean age of 9.4 years) with dysarthria and cerebral palsy and to explore…

Nordberg, Ann; Carlsson, Goran; Lohmander, Anette

2011-01-01

240

Arithmetic Difficulties in Children with Cerebral Palsy Are Related to Executive Function and Working Memory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Although it is believed that children with cerebral palsy are at high risk for learning difficulties and arithmetic difficulties in particular, few studies have investigated this issue. Methods: Arithmetic ability was longitudinally assessed in children with cerebral palsy in special (n = 41) and mainstream education (n = 16) and…

Jenks, Kathleen M.; de Moor, Jan; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.

2009-01-01

241

Theory of Mind and Irony Comprehension in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main goal of the present study was to characterise the pragmatic abilities of French children with cerebral palsy through their understanding of irony and other people's mental states. We predicted that children with cerebral palsy would have difficulty understanding false-belief and ironic remarks, due to the executive dysfunction that…

Caillies, Stephanie; Hody, Anais; Calmus, Arnaud

2012-01-01

242

Effect of Translucency on Transparency and Symbol Learning for Children with and without Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the concept of iconicity, the iconicity hypothesis was emphasized for decades. The aims of this study were to explore the effect of translucency on transparency and symbol learning for children with and without cerebral palsy. Twenty children with cerebral palsy and forty typical peers participated in the study. Ten symbols with high…

Huang, Chih-Hsiung; Chen, Ming-Chung

2011-01-01

243

Treadmill Training in a Child with Cerebral Palsy: A Case Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case report describes the use of treadmill training without body weight support to improve walking speed in a child with diplegic cerebral palsy. The child was a six-year-old girl with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. She walked short distances independently using a posterior support walker but was unable to keep up with her peers walking…

Crowley, Julie P.; Arnold, Sandra H.; McEwen, Irene R.; James, Shirley

2009-01-01

244

Psychological Problems in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Cross-Sectional European Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To describe psychological symptoms in 8-12-year-old children with cerebral palsy; to investigate predictors of these symptoms and their impact on the child and family. Design: A cross-sectional multi-centre survey. Participants: Eight hundred and eighteen children with cerebral palsy, aged 8-12 years, identified from population-based…

Parkes, Jackie; White-Koning, Melanie; Dickinson, Heather O.; Thyen, Ute; Arnaud, Catherine; Beckung, Eva; Fauconnier, Jerome; Marcelli, Marco; McManus, Vicki; Michelsen, Susan I.; Parkinson, Kathryn; Colver, Allan

2008-01-01

245

Position as a Cause of Deformity in Children with Cerebral Palsy (1976)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Deformities in the child with cerebral palsy have been ascribed to muscle imbalance (Sharrard 1961) and increased tone (Pollock 1959) or to the type of cerebral palsy (Bobath and Bobath 1975). As far as we know, the position in which the child is nursed, especially during the first year of life, has not been considered as a cause of deformity. It…

Scrutton, David

2008-01-01

246

Communicating about Loss: Experiences of Older Australian Adults with Cerebral Palsy and Complex Communication Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Loss and grief is a universal human experience, yet little is known about how older adults with a lifelong disability, such as cerebral palsy, and complex communication needs (CCN) experience loss and manage the grieving process. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 Australian participants with cerebral palsy and CCN to determine the types…

Dark, Leigha; Balandin, Susan; Clemson, Lindy

2011-01-01

247

Understanding Mealtime Changes for Adults with Cerebral Palsy and the Implications for Support Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Changes in the swallowing capabilities of adults with cerebral palsy as they age may impact on their health, safety, and well-being. Method: Thirty-two adults with cerebral palsy aged between 30 and 69 years participated in in-depth interviews about their experiences of changes in their swallowing and related management of their…

Balandin, Susan; Hemsley, Bronwyn; Hanley, Leah; Sheppard, Justine Joan

2009-01-01

248

Effects of Frequency of Feedback on the Learning of Motor Skill in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of frequency of knowledge of results (KR) on the learning of dart in individuals with cerebral palsy type I. Twenty-four individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) between the ages of 5 and 17 were chosen for this study. They were put into 3 homogenous groups according to their records after 20…

Hemayattalab, Rasool; Rostami, Leila Rashidi

2010-01-01

249

A prospective, longitudinal study of growth, nutrition and sedentary behaviour in young children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood, occurring in one in 500 children. It is caused by a static brain lesion in the neonatal period leading to a range of activity limitations. Oral motor and swallowing dysfunction, poor nutritional status and poor growth are reported frequently in young children with cerebral palsy and may

Kristie L Bell; Roslyn N Boyd; Sean M Tweedy; Kelly A Weir; Richard D Stevenson; Peter SW Davies

2010-01-01

250

Relation between cognitive dysfunction and pseudobulbar palsy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: To examine the relation between cognitive dysfunction and pseudobulbar features in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). METHODS: The performance of two patient groups, ALS with pseudobulbar palsy (n = 24) and ALS without pseudobulbar palsy (n = 28), was compared with 28 healthy age matched controls on an extensive neuropsychological battery. Tests used were the national adult reading

S Abrahams; L H Goldstein; A Al-Chalabi; A Pickering; R G Morris; R E Passingham; D J Brooks; P N Leigh

1997-01-01

251

Usability of an adaptable video game platform for children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virtual reality is a recent technology incorporated in upper extremity therapy programs for children with cerebral palsy. However, the systems currently being used cannot be graded to meet the skill level of children with cerebral palsy who have severely impaired upper extremities. These systems are often expensive, making them impractical for the clinical and home settings. ldquoHands-Uprdquo was designed as

Brooke M. Odle; Amanda Irving; Richard Foulds

2009-01-01

252

Ulnar nerve palsy-like motor and sensory loss caused by a small cortical infarct.  

PubMed

A 56-year-old man with a small infarct in the left precentral knob area induced both motor and sensory impairments that were similar to right ulnar nerve palsy. The only difference from ulnar nerve palsy was that the patient showed sensory disturbance not only on the ulnar side but also on the radial side of the right ring finger. PMID:21440458

Ueno, Tatsuya; Tomiyama, Masahiko; Haga, Rie; Nishijima, Haruo; Kon, Tomoya; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Miki, Yasuo; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Baba, Masayuki

2012-11-01

253

Heerfordt's Syndrome Presenting with Recurrent Facial Nerve Palsy: Case report and 10-year literature review.  

PubMed

Heerfordt's syndrome is defined as a combination of facial palsy, parotid swelling, uveitis and fever in sarcoidosis cases. Heerfordt's syndrome as a cause of facial palsy is very rare. We report a case of alternating facial nerve palsy in a 52-year-old female initially treated for Bell's palsy. The patient was referred to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India, in January 2013 for clinical evaluation. She was found to have a parotid swelling and anterior intermediate uveitis. A pathoradiological evaluation suggested sarcoidosis and a final diagnosis of Heerfordt's syndrome was made. Steroid treatment was initiated which led to an improvement in the facial palsy and uveitis as well as the disappearance of the parotid swelling with a corresponding decrease in angiotensin-converting enzyme levels. An English literature review was carried out to analyse the varied presentation of this syndrome. The analysis focused on presenting symptoms, biochemical markers and radiological findings of Heerfordt's syndrome cases. PMID:25685372

Chappity, Preetam; Kumar, Rajeev; Sahoo, Anjan K

2015-02-01

254

C5 palsy following anterior decompression and spinal fusion for cervical degenerative diseases  

PubMed Central

Postoperative C5 palsy is a common complication after cervical spine decompression surgery. However, the incidence, prognosis, and etiology of C5 palsy after anterior decompression with spinal fusion (ASF) have not yet been fully established. In the present study, we analyzed the clinical and radiological characteristics of patients who developed C5 palsy after ASF for cervical degenerative diseases. The cases of 199 consecutive patients who underwent ASF were analyzed to clarify the incidence of postoperative C5 palsy. We also evaluated the onset and prognosis of C5 palsy. The presence of high signal changes (HSCs) in the spinal cord was analyzed using T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. C5 palsy occurred in 17 patients (8.5%), and in 15 of them, the palsy developed after ASF of 3 or more levels. Among ten patients who had a manual muscle test (MMT) grade ?2 at the onset, five patients showed incomplete or no recovery. Sixteen of the 17 C5 palsy patients presented neck and shoulder pain prior to the onset of muscle weakness. In the ten patients with a MMT grade ?2 at the onset, nine patients showed HSCs at the C3–C4 and C4–C5 levels. The present findings demonstrate that, in most patients with severe C5 palsy after ASF, pre-existing asymptomatic damage of the anterior horn cells at C3–C4 and C4–C5 levels may participate in the development of motor weakness in combination with the nerve root lesions that occur subsequent to ASF. Thus, when patients with spinal cord lesions at C3–C4 and C4–C5 levels undergo multilevel ASF, we should be alert to the possible occurrence of postoperative C5 palsy. PMID:20461418

Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro; Mochizuki, Macondo; Aiba, Atsuomi; Okawa, Akihiko; Hayashi, Koichi; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koda, Masao; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

2010-01-01

255

Adults with spastic cerebral palsy have lower bone mass than those with dyskinetic cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Adults with cerebral palsy (CP) are known to have low bone mass with an increased risk of fragility fracture. CP is classified into two major types: spastic (pyramidal) and dyskinetic (extrapyramidal). Spastic CP is the most common and is characterized by muscle hypertonicity and impaired neuromuscular control. By contrast, dyskinetic CP is characterized by mixed muscle tone with involuntary movements. The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between bone metabolism and subtype of CP. Fifty-eight adults with CP (aged 18 to 49years, mean age 33.2years; 32 men, 26 women) were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Lumbar spine and femoral bone mineral density (BMD) Z-scores were measured. Bone markers, including C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx) and osteocalcin (OCN), were also analyzed. Among these participants, 30 had spastic CP and 28 had dyskinetic CP. The Z-scores of lumbar spine BMD did not differ between the two types. However, the Z-scores of femur trochanteric BMD were significantly lower in participants with spastic CP than in those with dyskinetic CP (-1.6±1.2 vs. -0.9±1.1, p<0.05). Seventy-four percent of participants with either type of CP had abnormally elevated CTx, while about 90% of participants showed normal OCN levels. When participants were subclassified into nonambulatory and ambulatory groups, the nonambulatory group had significantly lower BMD in the femur, including the trochanteric and total regions, whether they were spastic or dyskinetic (p<0.05). Because the type of CP affects bone mass, nonambulatory spastic CP participants showed the lowest total hip region BMD among the four groups. These results reveal that reduced weight bearing and immobility related to CP cause a negative bone balance because of increased bone resorption, which leads to a lower bone mass. In addition, hypertonicity of the affected limbs in participants with spastic CP resulted in lower bone mass than in those with dyskinetic CP. Type of CP and degree of ambulatory function in adults with CP should be regarded as important factors affecting bone metabolism. PMID:25316282

Kim, Wonjin; Lee, Su Jin; Yoon, Young-Kwon; Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae; Rhee, Yumie

2015-02-01

256

Anterior Knee Pain in Patients with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for anterior knee pain in patients with cerebral palsy. Methods This prospective study investigated the risk factors for anterior knee pain in 127 ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy in terms of walking pain, resting pain, and provocative pain. Demographic data analysis and physical examination for measuring the knee flexion contracture and unilateral and bilateral popliteal angles were performed. Patellar height was measured on radiographs, and patella alta was identified. The risk factors for anterior knee pain were analyzed using multivariate analysis with a generalized estimating equation. Results Seventy-seven patients were found to have patella alta based on the radiographic measurements (60.6%). Overall, sixteen patients (12.6%) had either unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain. Of these, 6 patients showed a visual analogue scale (VAS) ? 3, 9 patients showed 3 < VAS ? 7, and one patient showed a VAS > 7. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for walking pain and resting pain with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.14) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.15), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, knee flexion contracture was a significant protective factor with an OR of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.98). Conclusions Approximately 12.6% of ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy were found to have anterior knee pain in our hospital-based cohort study. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for anterior knee pain while walking and resting. PMID:25436067

Choi, Young; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Kyoung Min; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, In Hyeok; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon

2014-01-01

257

Massive psoas haematoma causing lumbar plexus palsy: a case report.  

PubMed

An 84-year-old man who was receiving oral anticoagulation therapy presented with complete lumbar plexus palsy caused by a massive psoas haematoma. Conservative treatment rather than drainage of the haematoma was undertaken, because of the risk of bleeding complications and mortality. At the one-year follow-up, the patient had no clinical signs of neurological recovery. The patient died 2 months later due to his concurrent medical problems. A high degree of suspicion is needed for the diagnosis because of the insidiously developing neurological deficit. PMID:22535820

Conesa, Xavier; Ares, Oscar; Seijas, Roberto

2012-04-01

258

Transverse plane gait problems in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Transverse plane deviations are significant contributors to pathologic gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Due to limitations in neuromuscular control, balance, strength and coordination, transverse plane gait deviations are poorly tolerated in these children. Transverse plane malalignment results in lever arm dysfunction and can be seen with either intoeing or out-toeing. Frequent causes of transverse plane problems and lever arm dysfunction include long bone (femoral and/or tibial) torsion, pelvic rotation, and pes varus or valgus. Computerized motion analysis facilitates accurate identification of transverse plane abnormalities. This article addresses appropriate identification and treatment of transverse plane gait deviations in children with CP. PMID:23653033

Rethlefsen, Susan A; Kay, Robert M

2013-06-01

259

Pain in children with cerebral palsy: a review.  

PubMed

Children with cerebral palsy (CP) face many challenges including impaired motor control and coordination, functional impairment, sensory disturbances, and, sometimes, communication difficulties and cognitive deficits. Pain also may be a problem for children with CP due in part to the inherent deficits associated with the disease, as well as the invasive medical and surgical procedures and rehabilitative activities children with CP undergo on a regular basis. A review of current literature indicates pain is a common experience for children with CP and has been understudied in this population. Further emphasis and research on appropriate assessment and management strategies sensitive to the unique characteristics and limitations of children with CP are warranted. PMID:15524243

McKearnan, Kimberly A; Kieckhefer, Gail M; Engel, Joyce M; Jensen, Mark P; Labyak, Susan

2004-10-01

260

Selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic cerebral palsy: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The purpose of this report is to review the historical development, current operative techniques, selection criteria, outcomes,\\u000a and complications of selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for treatment of spastic cerebral palsy (CP).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  This review is based on a review of literature and personal observations.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  SDR has evolved from the 1960s onwards into a standard neurosurgical procedure for spastic CP.

Paul Steinbok

2007-01-01

261

Management of spasticity in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Spasticity and other forms of muscle overactivity caused by cerebral palsy may impair function or ease of care or may cause discomfort or poor body image. The treatment program for a child with spasticity may include allied health therapy, exercise, casting, constraint-induced therapy, oral medications, chemodenervation, intrathecal baclofen, selective dorsal rhizotomy, and orthopedic surgery. Techniques may be combined for greater efficacy and better tailoring to the needs of the child. This article provides an overview of each approach, with a review of significant research findings in support of each. PMID:19501336

Tilton, Ann

2009-06-01

262

Astrocytic pathology in progressive supranuclear palsy: significance for neuropathological diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is known to have tau-positive cytoskeletal abnormalities in astrocytes and oligodendroglia\\u000a as well as neurons. Astrocytic tau-positive structures (tuft-shaped astrocytes; Tu-SA) were studied to elucidate their proper\\u000a significance in the neuropathological diagnosis of PSP. The distribution and incidence of Tu-SA were examined in 26 cases\\u000a of PSP. The disease specificity of Tu-SA was demonstrated by comparison

Hisashi Matsusaka; Kenji Ikeda; Haruhiko Akiyama; Tetsuaki Arai; Masayuki Inoue; Saburo Yagishita

1998-01-01

263

[Progressive supranucleair palsy: acetylcholineeserase-inhibitor a possible therapy?].  

PubMed

Progressive supranucleair palsy (PSP) is a serious neurologic disease which is seldom diagnosed due to its complexity. In 1996 international diagnostic criteria were developed by a group of experts, the diagnosis remains complicated. We describe three cases, which were followed in the period 2001-2008. In these case reports we elaborate on the therapeutic use of rivastigmine. During off-label rivastigmine use, patients showed minimal further cognitive decline, specifically with respect to frontal defects. However, larger studies and trials are necessary to explore the effects of rivastigmine in patients with PSP. PMID:19731749

Nijboer, H; Dautzenberg, P L J

2009-06-01

264

Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with oculomotor nerve palsy.  

PubMed

We report a patient with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with oculomotor nerve palsy. The patient presented with a high fever, diplopia, blepharoptosis and impairment of ocular movement of the left eye except for lateral gaze. Multiple erythematous and livedoid lesions were observed on the forehead, both cheeks and both legs. Laboratory examination showed positive results for myeloperoxidase antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Skin biopsy revealed leucocytoclastic vasculitis of the small arteries in the lower dermis. The patient was successfully treated with systemic corticosteroids. PMID:19187297

Seishima, M; Mizutani, Y; Shibuya, Y; Arakawa, C

2009-03-01

265

Foreign body resulting in chronic otomastoiditis and facial palsy.  

PubMed

We present a case of a foreign body in the ear of 5-year-old girl child. She presented with features of chronic suppurative otitis media with facial nerve palsy. On exploration exuberant granulation was found in attic and middle ear. A foreign body (seed) was found buried within the granulation tissue which was removed. Bony facial canal was dehiscent in the tympanic segment. She had recovery of facial nerve function. The case is being reported to increase awareness among otolaryngologist and to consider foreign body as a differential diagnosis in cases of complicated CSOM; especially in children. PMID:25500549

Verma, Roshan Kumar; Gupta, Bhumika; Panda, Naresh K

2015-02-01

266

Superior mesenteric artery syndrome in a patient with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Superior mesenteric artery syndrome involves compression of the third part of the duodenum due to narrowing of the area between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). We will describe the case of a 34-year-old with cerebral palsy who presented with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss and was diagnosed with SMA syndrome via CT-imaging. With failure of conservative measures, our patient underwent a duodenojejunostomy after which improvement in her weight as well as relief of her abdominal symptoms was noted. Given the rarity of this syndrome, physicians need to keep a high index of suspicion in order to prevent the damaging consequences. PMID:25053950

Neuman, Adi; Desai, Bhavita; Glass, Daniel; Diab, Wassim

2014-01-01

267

Ulnar nerve palsy following rotational osteotomy of congenital radioulnar synostosis.  

PubMed

Two successive cases of ulnar nerve palsy following rotational osteotomy through a congenital radioulnar synostosis are described. Entrapment of the ulnar nerve by the fascia connecting the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris was documented in one patient. Recommendations to avoid this complication include shortening of the forearm at the osteotomy site and the release of unyielding soft tissue restraints. Rotational osteotomy at the distal radial metaphysis may provide a safe, alternative approach in the surgical management of this difficult problem. PMID:3793902

Hankin, F M; Smith, P A; Kling, T F; Louis, D S

1987-01-01

268

Back pain in mothers of cerebral palsied children.  

PubMed

Background. Cerebral palsy (CP) leads to varying degrees of movement restrictions, imposing on the parents (especially mothers) a number of additional responsibilities. The burden of long-term care for a disabled child can lead to severe pain in various locations and of various intensity. Therefore, it is important to identify their risk factors and provide training for parents of CP children to educate them how to offer care not only to aid rehabilitation of their child, but also to avoid hazards to their own health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of back pain and its underlying causes in mothers of children with cerebral palsy. Material and methods. The study enrolled 179 mothers of CP children aged 3-18 years. The intensity, frequency and functional consequences of the pain were described according to the criteria formulated by Jackson and Moskowitz. The children's functional status was assessed on the basis of their medical records, the GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System) scale and an interview with their mothers. Pain intensity in the mother was compared with the functional status of the child and the level of his/her independence as well as other factors related to the daily care of a child with cerebral palsy. The nonparametric chi-square (x2) test was used for the statistical analyses, with the level of significance at p <0.05. Results. Most of the mothers caring for a CP child on a daily basis suffered from back pain of various location and intensity. The intensity of the pain was determined by the child's locomotor skills and independence level, the necessity of lifting the child several times a day, the number of additional tasks performed by the mother and the age and body weight of the child. At the same time, pain intensity was independent of maternal age, the possibility of having a replacement caregiver and (lack of) prior instruction on appropriate behaviours in their daily care for the disabled child. Conclusions. 1. Long-term daily care of children with cerebral palsy promotes the development of back pain in their mothers. 2. The incidence and intensity of pain depends primarily on the child's functional status and independence level, body weight, age, the need for repeatedly lifting the disabled child throughout the day and the number of additional tasks performed by the mother. PMID:25406923

Czupryna, Krzysztof; Nowotny-Czupryna, Olga; Nowotny, Janusz

2014-10-01

269

Facial Nerve Palsy: Providing Eye Comfort and Cosmesis  

PubMed Central

Development of facial nerve palsy (FNP) may lead to dramatic change in the patient's facial function, expression, and emotions. The ophthalmologist may play an important role in the initial evaluation, and the long-term management of patients with new-onset of FNP. In patients with expected temporary facial weakness, no efforts should be wasted to ensure proper corneal protection. Patients with permanent functional deficit may require combination of surgical procedures tailored to the patient's clinical findings that may require good eye comfort and cosmesis. PMID:20616921

Alsuhaibani, Adel H.

2010-01-01

270

Dynamic evaluation of facial palsy by moire topography video  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several visual assessment methods have been proposed for evaluating facial nerve function. They are of value clinically, but they have drawbacks when objective, quantitative, and reproducible assessment is required. To solve these problems, we used moire topography, which helps visualize information in three dimensions. We previously reported that one could evaluate the severity of facial palsy by observing characteristic patterns of the moire strips produced by facial movement. Accordingly, we developed a new form of the dynamic evaluation by recording the dynamic changes in moire strip patterns on the face on a videotape.

Yuen, Koji; Inokuchi, Ikuo; Maeta, Manabu; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Masuda, Yu

1994-02-01

271

Evaluation and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.  

PubMed

Brachial plexus birth palsy can result in permanent lifelong deficits and unfortunately continues to be relatively common despite advancements in obstetric care. The diagnosis can be made shortly after birth by physical examination, noting a lack of movement in the affected upper extremity. Treatment begins with passive range-of-motion exercises to maintain flexibility and tactile stimulation to provide sensory reeducation. Primary surgery consists of microsurgical nerve surgery, whereas secondary surgery consists of alternative microsurgical procedures, tendon transfers, or osteotomies, all of which improve outcomes in the short term. However, the long-term outcomes of current treatment recommendations remain unknown. PMID:24684916

Abzug, Joshua M; Kozin, Scott H

2014-04-01

272

A population-based study of communication impairment in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

To explore factors associated with communication impairments in children with cerebral palsy. Data were obtained on children born between 1999 and 2008 from the Quebec Cerebral Palsy Registry (REPACQ). Out of 535 children with cerebral palsy, 297 were identified to have communication impairments (55.5%). Of these, 96 were unable to communicate verbally (32.3%), 195 had some verbal communication (65.7%), and 6 were unspecified (2.0%). These children were significantly more likely to have a more severe motor deficit (Gross Motor Function Classification System levels IV and V and Manual Ability Classification System levels IV and V), to have spastic quadriplegia or dyskinetic subtypes of cerebral palsy, and gray matter injury on neuroimaging. Communication impairment is a common comorbidity in cerebral palsy and is associated with a more severe motor deficit, spastic quadriplegic or dyskinetic subtype of cerebral palsy, and gray matter injury on neuroimaging. This information allows clinicians to better predict and manage communication impairment in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:25051968

Zhang, James Yue; Oskoui, Maryam; Shevell, Michael

2015-03-01

273

Aetiology of Kienböck's disease based on a study of the condition among patients with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Examination of 110 patients with cerebral palsy revealed a diagnosis of Kienböck's disease in six wrists in five cases. All had cerebral palsy of the mixed type with athetosis and high muscle tone. It is considered that the increased prevalence of Kienböck's disease in these cases was attributable to repeated minor trauma to the lunate from childhood due to high muscle tone across the wrist joint, together with negative ulnar variance. The high prevalence of Kienböck's disease observed in patients with cerebral palsy strongly suggests that repeated minor trauma together with negative ulnar variance is also the cause of Kienböck's disease in normal individuals. PMID:8345252

Joji, S; Mizuseki, T; Katayama, S; Tsuge, K; Ikuta, Y

1993-06-01

274

Mediators of the association between pre-eclampsia and cerebral palsy: population based cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objective To test the hypothesis that pre-eclampsia is a risk factor for cerebral palsy mediated through preterm birth and being born small for gestational age. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Clinical data from the Norwegian Cerebral Palsy Registry were linked with perinatal data prospectively recorded by the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Participants All singleton babies who survived the neonatal period during 1996-2006 (849 children with cerebral palsy and 616?658 control children). Main outcome measures Cerebral palsy and cerebral palsy subtypes. Results Children exposed to pre-eclampsia had an excess risk of cerebral palsy (unadjusted odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 2.0 to 3.2) compared with unexposed children. Among children born at term (?37 weeks), exposure to pre-eclampsia was not associated with an excess risk of cerebral palsy in babies not born small for gestational age (1.2, 0.7 to 2.0), whereas children exposed to pre-eclampsia and born small for gestational age had a significantly increased risk of cerebral palsy (3.2, 1.5 to 6.7). Non-small for gestational age babies born very preterm (<32 weeks) and exposed to pre-eclampsia had a reduced risk of cerebral palsy compared with unexposed children born at the same gestational age (0.5, 0.3 to 0.8), although the risk was not statistically significantly reduced among children exposed to pre-eclampsia and born small for gestational age (0.7, 0.4 to 1.3). Exposure to pre-eclampsia was not associated with a specific cerebral palsy subtype. Conclusions Exposure to pre-eclampsia was associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy, and this association was mediated through the children being born preterm or small for gestational age, or both. Among children born at term, pre-eclampsia was a risk factor for cerebral palsy only when the children were small for gestational age. PMID:23838554

2013-01-01

275

Iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome to Facial Nerve Palsy: Via Intracranial Tuberculoma-An Interesting Journey  

PubMed Central

Isolated Facial nerve palsy is a less common neurological manifestation of intracranial tuberculoma. Again, tuberculoma can arise following development of Cushing syndrome after prolonged intake of steroids due to origin of immunosuppressed state. Thus exogenous steroid administration leading to iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome which again causing tuberculoma, with facial nerve palsy developing as a manifestation of tuberculoma is not unnatural but definitely a unique scenario. The author reports an interesting case where a patient developed left sided facial palsy following development of intracranial tuberculoma from iatrogenic Cushing syndrome after longterm intake of Dexamethasone as a treatment for low back pain. This situation is rarely reported before.

2014-01-01

276

Spontaneous improvement in oculomotor function of children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Eye movements are essential to get a clear vision of moving objects. In the present study, we assessed quantitatively the oculomotor deficits of children with cerebral palsy (CP). We recorded eye movements of 51 children with cerebral palsy (aged 5-16 years) with relatively mild motor impairment and compared their performance with age-matched control and premature children. Overall eye movements of children with CP are unexpectedly close to those of controls even though some oculomotor parameters are biased by the side of hemiplegia. Importantly, the difference in performance between children with CP and controls decreases with age, demonstrating that the oculomotor function of children with CP develops as fast as or even faster than controls for some visual tracking parameters. That is, oculomotor function spontaneously improves over the course of childhood. This evolution highlights the ability of lesioned brain of children with CP to compensate for impaired motor function beyond what would be achieved by normal development on its own. PMID:25462523

Ego, Caroline; Orban de Xivry, Jean-Jacques; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Yüksel, Demet; Lefèvre, Philippe

2014-11-20

277

Can spasticity and dystonia be independently measured in cerebral palsy?  

PubMed

Selecting and evaluating appropriate treatments for children with cerebral palsy has been challenging. One difficulty is in the ability to quantify the presence and importance of coexisting motor signs. This study presents quantitative measures developed to assess spasticity and dystonia. Children diagnosed with extrapyramidal or spastic cerebral palsy and matched control children were studied. Spasticity was measured as the slope of the force-velocity relationship from a test where we measured the forces required to passively extend the elbow at different velocities. Dystonia was assessed by measuring "overflow" movements of arm during active movement of the other arm. Measures of dystonia and spasticity did not correlate with one another, but did correlate with their respective clinical measurement tools, the Modified Ashworth scale and the Barry-Albright Dystonia scale. Most children had a combination of both spasticity and dystonia, despite diagnosis. Our measures also related to different aspects of reaching: children with increased dystonia made more curved paths, and children with increased spasticity hit higher peak velocities. These measurements allow us to distinguish between different motor disorders and the degree to which each contributes to reaching performance. Use of quantitative measures should improve selection and evaluation of treatments for childhood motor disorders. PMID:17138005

Gordon, Laurie M; Keller, Jennifer L; Stashinko, Elaine E; Hoon, Alec H; Bastian, Amy J

2006-12-01

278

Vibration treatment in cerebral palsy: A randomized controlled pilot study.  

PubMed

In this 6-month trial, twenty children with cerebral palsy (age 6.2 to 12.3 years; 6 girls) were randomized to either continue their school physiotherapy program unchanged or to receive 9 minutes of side-alternating whole-body vibration (WBV; Vibraflex Home Edition II, Orthometrix Inc) per school day in addition to their school physiotherapy program. Patients who had received vibration therapy increased the average walking speed in the 10 m walk test by a median of 0.18 ms(-1) (from a baseline of 0.47 ms(-1)), whereas there was no change in the control group (P=0.03 for the group difference in walking speed change). No significant group differences were detected for changes in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at the lumbar spine, but at the distal femoral diaphysis aBMD increased in controls and decreased in the WBV group (P=0.03 for the group difference in aBMD change). About 1% of the WBV treatment sessions were interrupted because the child complained of fatigue or pain. In conclusion, the WBV protocol used in this study appears to be safe in children with cerebral palsy and may improve mobility function but we did not detect a positive treatment effect on bone. PMID:20190383

Ruck, J; Chabot, G; Rauch, F

2010-03-01

279

Rehabilitation Needs of People with Cerebral Palsy: a qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Cerebral palsy (CP) describes a group of disorders regarding the development of movement and posture, which causes limitations in activity. In fact, it is attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occur during brain development in fetus or infant. CP disorders may accompany by speech, auditory, visual abnormality, seizure, learning disorder, mental retardation and etc. Due to the variation in disorders and ultimately the needs that are made in the wake of the diseases, understanding the needs of these patients is essential. Methods: This research was a qualitative study, with phenomenology method and sampling was purposeful. The participants were 17 cerebral palsy people (6 female and 11 male, with aged 15 to 43). Data were collected by deep interview with open-end questions and analyzed by collaizi method. Results: During the interview sessions, notes and ideas were classified and assorted, so that, the rehabilitation needs of people with CP were understood according to the statements of participants. The results of this study were placed in four domains, 3 themes and 22 subthemes. The domains included social, emotional needs, economic, and therapeutic needs. Conclusion: The requirements studies in this research were particularly introduced by patients with CP. People in the society, who might have contact with these patients, are responsible to help them to overcome their problems and disabilities. PMID:25250261

sharifi, Azam; Kamali, Mohammad; Chabok, Ali

2014-01-01

280

Bell's Palsy: Symptoms Preceding and Accompanying the Facial Paresis.  

PubMed

This individual prospective cohort study aims to report and analyze the symptoms preceding and accompanying the facial paresis in Bell's palsy (BP). Two hundred sixty-nine patients affected by BP with a maximum delay of 48 hours from the onset were enrolled in the study. The evolution of the facial paresis expressed as House-Brackmann grade in the first 10 days and its correlation with symptoms were analyzed. At the onset, 136 patients presented postauricular pain, 114 were affected by dry eye, and 94 reported dysgeusia. Dry mouth was present in 54 patients (19.7%), facial pain, hyperlacrimation, aural fullness, and hyperacusis represented a smaller percentage of the reported symptoms. After 10 days, 39.9% of the group had a severe paresis while 10.2% reached a complete recovery. Dry mouth at the onset was correlated with severe grade of palsy and was prognostic for poor recovery in the early period. These outcomes lead to the deduction that the nervus intermedius plays an important role in the presentation of the BP and it might be responsible for most of the accompanying symptomatology of the paresis. Our findings could be of important interest to early address a BP patient to further examinations and subsequent therapy. PMID:25544960

De Seta, Daniele; Mancini, Patrizia; Minni, Antonio; Prosperini, Luca; De Seta, Elio; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Covelli, Edoardo; De Carlo, Andrea; Filipo, Roberto

2014-01-01

281

Common peroneal nerve palsy caused by compression stockings after surgery.  

PubMed

Peroneal nerve palsy is one of the more common entrapment neuropathies of the lower limb and can be a result of a multitude of causes. Compression stockings are commonly used for prophylaxis of deep venous thromboembolism after surgery. The entrapment on the head and the neck of the fibula caused by compression stockings is uncommon. In this article, the authors report a 46-yr-old male patient who was operated on for postauricular squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. On the third postoperative day, it was noticed that compression stockings had rolled down, and a linear impression mark was observed under its upper edge at the proximal part of the left cruris. He had left foot drop and difficulty in walking during gait assessment. The needle electromyography confirmed total axonal degeneration of the left peroneal nerve with denervation potentials. The aim of this report was to emphasize the importance of the size and length of the compression stockings and regular skin control in avoiding the risk for peroneal nerve palsy. PMID:24743458

Güzelküçük, Ümüt; Skempes, Dimitrios; Kumnerddee, Wipoo

2014-07-01

282

Bell's Palsy: Symptoms Preceding and Accompanying the Facial Paresis  

PubMed Central

This individual prospective cohort study aims to report and analyze the symptoms preceding and accompanying the facial paresis in Bell's palsy (BP). Two hundred sixty-nine patients affected by BP with a maximum delay of 48 hours from the onset were enrolled in the study. The evolution of the facial paresis expressed as House-Brackmann grade in the first 10 days and its correlation with symptoms were analyzed. At the onset, 136 patients presented postauricular pain, 114 were affected by dry eye, and 94 reported dysgeusia. Dry mouth was present in 54 patients (19.7%), facial pain, hyperlacrimation, aural fullness, and hyperacusis represented a smaller percentage of the reported symptoms. After 10 days, 39.9% of the group had a severe paresis while 10.2% reached a complete recovery. Dry mouth at the onset was correlated with severe grade of palsy and was prognostic for poor recovery in the early period. These outcomes lead to the deduction that the nervus intermedius plays an important role in the presentation of the BP and it might be responsible for most of the accompanying symptomatology of the paresis. Our findings could be of important interest to early address a BP patient to further examinations and subsequent therapy. PMID:25544960

Mancini, Patrizia; Minni, Antonio; Prosperini, Luca; De Seta, Elio; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Covelli, Edoardo; De Carlo, Andrea; Filipo, Roberto

2014-01-01

283

Arterial Structure and Function in Ambulatory Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Are Not Different from Healthy Controls  

PubMed Central

Physical inactivity in youth with cerebral palsy (CP) places them at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The current study assessed indices of arterial health in adolescents with CP, classified as levels I-II of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) (n = 11, age 13.2 ± 2.1?yr), in comparison to age- and sex-matched controls (n = 11, age 12.4 ± 2.3?yr). Groups were similar in anthropometric measurements, resting blood pressures, and heart rates. There were no group differences in brachial flow-mediated dilation (11.1 ± 7.8 versus 6.1 ± 3.6), carotid intima-media thickness (0.42 ± 0.04 versus 0.41 ± 0.03?mm), and distensibility (0.008 ± 0.002 versus 0.008 ± 0.002?mmHg) or central (4.3 ± 0.6 versus 4.1 ± 0.9?m/s) and peripheral pulse wave velocity (7.1 ± 1.7 versus 7.6 ± 1.1?m/s); CP versus healthy controls, respectively. Vigorous intensity physical activity (PA) was lower in the CP group (CP: 38 ± 80?min versus controls: 196 ± 174?min); groups were similar in light and moderate intensity PA levels. Arterial health of ambulatory youth with CP is not different from a control group despite lower vigorous PA levels. Similar studies need to examine individuals with more pronounced mobility limitations (GMFCS level III–V). PMID:22778755

Martin, Audra A.; Cotie, Lisa M.; Timmons, Brian W.; Gorter, Jan Willem; MacDonald, Maureen J.

2012-01-01

284

Effect of radial shock wave therapy on muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is a treatment of choice in patients with musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radial shock wave therapy (RSWT) on muscle spasticity of plantar flexor muscles in children with cerebral palsy. This was an open, controlled, observational study with one placebo treatment session, followed 4 weeks later by one active treatment session. Procedures and measurements were performed on inpatients of the Physical and Rehabilitation department of the Medical University Hospital, Plovdiv, Bulgaria. Twenty-five children, mean age 4.84±3.11 years, with spastic diplegia and hemiplegia participated in the study. They received a single session of RSWT to the plantar flexors of the foot. The following clinical methods were used for outcome assessment before, after, and 2 and 4 weeks later: passive range of motion, Modified Ashworth Scale. Baropodometric measurements were performed before and after the placebo and active session. After placebo application, no changes measured by clinical or instrumental methods were found. After RSWT, a significant increase in passive range of motion was observed: 47.00±2.29° versus 33.25±2.20° (P<0.001), which persisted at the second (46.87±2.08°, P<0.001) and fourth week (44.12±1.93°, P<0.001) after treatment. The Modified Ashworth Scale score decreased from 2.77 to 2.00 points (P<0.001), which persisted at the second (mean 2.05±0.07 points, P<0.001) and fourth week (2.15±0.76 points, P<0.001) after treatment. Baropodometric measurement showed a significant increase in the contact plantar surface area of the affected foot (from 81.32±6.14 to 101.58±5.41 cm, P<0.001) and in heel pressure (from 50.47±6.61 to 75.17±3.42 N/cm, P<0.001). There is a significant reduction in the spasticity of plantar flexor muscles in children with cerebral palsy after a single session of RSWT and this improvement remains at the 4-week follow-up. PMID:23603803

Gonkova, Mariya I; Ilieva, Elena M; Ferriero, Giorgio; Chavdarov, Ivan

2013-09-01

285

Neuropsychological characterization of typical and atypical progressive supranuclear palsy and comparison with Parkinson's disease .  

E-print Network

??This thesis examined the cognitive aspects of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy defined according to the recently proposed phenotypic distinctions (PSP+). 14 patients with PSP-Richardson???s… (more)

Lee, Young-Eun Claire

2013-01-01

286

The Evaluation and Cultivation of Spatial and Linguistic Abilities in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

The work of the Cerebral Palsy project (members: Seymour Papert, Sylvia Weir, Jose Valente and Gary Drescher) over the past eighteen months is summarized, and the next phase of activity is outlined. The issues to be ...

Weir, Sylvia

1979-10-01

287

Journal of Sciences A REVIEW ON CEREBRAL PALSY AND ITS MANAGEMENT  

E-print Network

The term cerebral palsy refers to a range of clinical symptoms, with related service requirements, resulting from lesions or abnormalities in the brain arising early in life. Cerebral palsy (CP), a static, nonprogressive disorder caused by brain insult or injury in the prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal time period, is the major developmental disability affecting function in children. It is characterized by the inability to normally control motor functions, and it has the potential to have an effect on the overall development of a child by affecting the child’s ability to explore, speak, learn, and become independent. This article discusses the definition and differential classification of cerebral palsy, describes trends in its management over time stratified by associated variables, and briefly reviews the most recent findings concerning its aetiology. Key words: Cerebral palsy; Definition; Classification; Trends; Aetiology; Therapy.

unknown authors

288

Claude's syndrome associated with supranuclear horizontal gaze palsy caused by dorsomedial midbrain infarction.  

PubMed

Claude's syndrome caused by dorsal midbrain lesion is characterized by ipsilateral third nerve palsy and contralateral ataxia. To date, reports in the literature concerning Claude's syndrome associated with the midbrain paresis of horizontal gaze are rare. A 62-year-old man suddenly developed left third cranial nerve palsy, right lateral gaze palsy, and right ataxia. Intact Bell's phenomenon and preserved right horizontal oculocephalic reflex suggested the lateral gaze palsy in the right eye was supranuclear in nature. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an infarction in the left dorsomedial midbrain. Although the red nucleus has often been suggested as the lesion site responsible for Claude's syndrome, a lesion of the superior cerebellar peduncle just below and medial to the red nucleus could be responsible for this syndrome. This case demonstrates neurological heterogeneity of midbrain infarction. PMID:16252618

Fong, Chin-Shih

2005-09-01

289

Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Youth With Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Palisano RJ, Orlin M, Chiarello LA, Oeffinger D, Polansky M, Maggs J, Gorton G, Bagley A, Tylkowski C, Vogel L, Abel M, Stevenson R. Determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by youth with cerebral palsy.

Robert J. Palisano; Margo Orlin; Lisa A. Chiarello; Donna Oeffinger; Marcy Polansky; Jill Maggs; George Gorton; Anita Bagley; Chester Tylkowski; Lawrence Vogel; Mark Abel; Richard Stevenson

2011-01-01

290

Guadeloupean parkinsonism: a cluster of progressive supranuclear palsy-like tauopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary An unusually high frequency of atypical Parkinson syn- drome has been delineated over the last 5 years in the French West Indies. Postural instability with early falls, prominent frontal lobe dysfunction and pseudo-bulbar palsy were common and three-quarters of the patients were L-dopa unresponsive. One-third of all patients seen had probable progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). This new focus of

Dominique Caparros-Lefebvre; Nicolas Sergeant; Andrew Lees; Agnes Camuzat; Susan Daniel; Annie Lannuzel; Alexis Brice; Eduardo Tolosa; Andre Delacourte; Charles Duyckaerts

2002-01-01

291

Striopallidodentate Calcification and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-Like Phenotype in a Patient with Idiopathic Hypoparathyroidism  

PubMed Central

We present a 77-year-old woman with levodopa-nonresponsive parkinsonism, dementia, and supranuclear gaze palsy on vertical and horizontal gaze. Laboratory findings were consistent with idiopathic hypoparathyroidism, and brain computed tomography showed extensive bilateral calcifications of the basal ganglia, centrum semiovale, dentate nuclei, and cerebellar white matter. These results illustrate that striopallidodentate calcification due to hypoparathyroidism may present with symptoms mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy. PMID:19513345

Kim, Tae-Won; Park, In-Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Yeong-In

2007-01-01

292

Potentially asphyxiating conditions and spastic cerebral palsy in infants of normal birth weight  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to examine the association of cerebral palsy with conditions that can interrupt oxygen supply to the fetus as a primary pathogenetic event.STUDY DESIGN: A population-based case-control study was performed in four California counties, 1983 through 1985, comparing birth records of 46 children with disabling spastic cerebral palsy without recognized prenatal brain lesions and 378 randomly selected

Karin B. Nelson; Judith K. Grether

1998-01-01

293

Postpartum care of a woman with cerebral palsy and deep vein thrombosis: a case study.  

PubMed

Pregnancy can be challenging for women with cerebral palsy. Physical limitations and comorbidities can predispose them to complications during pregnancy, such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, making their care needs more complex. A multidisciplinary care plan, as well as clear and effective communication among different health care providers, will help ensure safe and optimal postpartum care of women with cerebral palsy and their newborns. PMID:22900725

Phillips, Cathi; Bulmer, Jean

2012-01-01

294

Prevalence of emotional and behavioural problems in Cerebral Palsy Children in Gaza Strip  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of child behaviour problems among cerebral palsy children aged 6-12 years old. Method: A cross sectional method was chosen registered children aged 6-12 years-old at the physiotherapy clinics in the Gaza Strip. A systematic random sample of 219 children suffering from cerebral palsy was selected and their parents were interviewed using the

Salah Ahmad Saleh; Gaza PALESTINE; Abdel Aziz; Mousa Thabet; Panos Vostanis

295

Age Specificity in General and Rehabilitation Medical Services in Children With Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Objective To review the medical utilization in children with cerebral palsy according to age and discern particularities Methods From January 2007 to December 2007, 10,659 children and adolescents between 1 and 18 years of age who had filed national insurance claims for a diagnosis of cerebral palsy were selected. Age was chosen as an independent variable, and the population was categorized into specific age groups to verify any differences in medical service utilization. Admission duration to rehabilitation, number of visits to rehabilitation outpatient clinics, numbers of admission dates and outpatient clinic visits for general medical services, number of rehabilitation utilizations, and type of rehabilitations treatment were selected as dependent variables. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical evaluation, and analysis was done with SAS software. Results In general medical use, adolescences diagnosed with cerebral palsy had the highest mean admission duration (p<0.001). The mean visit day to outpatient clinics for general medical services was highest for infants (p<0.001). In rehabilitation treatment, infants diagnosed with cerebral palsy had the highest mean admission duration (p<0.001). The mean visit day to outpatient clinics for rehabilitation treatment was highest for infants (p<0.001). Conclusion Significant differences in use of general and rehabilitation medical services among pediatric age groups with cerebral palsy were evident. This implies that particular attention is necessary when setting up a national medical care policy for patient with cerebral palsy.

Kim, Dong-A; Hong, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Hee-Yeon; Lee, Hye-Sun

2014-01-01

296

Strabismus in cerebral palsy: when and why to operate.  

PubMed

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in children. Orthoptists and ophthalmologists who care for children with CP know that strabismus is a common feature. This paper reviews the literature on strabismus in patients with CP, and then provides summary data and recommendations for management of these patients. The incidence of strabismus in patients with CP, especially in patients with spastic diplegia, is much higher than in neurologically normal children. Esotropia is the most common ocular misalignment. CP patients with strabismus benefit from nonsurgical treatment and should be treated promptly. Strabismus surgery should be considered in CP patients for psychosocial reasons as well as for potential successful ocular realignment and restoration of binocular vision. The literature is lacking in a long-term natural history study, prospective strabismus surgery studies, and long-term outcome studies of strabismus management in patients with CP. PMID:25313106

Collins, Mary Louise Z

2014-01-01

297

Reliability of balance evaluation in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The evaluation of balance in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is an extremely difficult and complex procedure. The purpose of the present study was the evaluation of three balance tests: Berg Balance Scale (BBS), time up and go (TUG) and Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP) and their reliability in children with CP. The control of the reliability of the tests was based on the successive application to twenty children with CP within a short period in order to substantiate their ability to give the same results in a stable sample. No difference was found according to scores between the measures but important statistical differences were found of the scores of the children in all tests. The tests BBS, TUG and BOTMP are considered to be reliable and valid tests, able to objectively define the quantitative mutation of the balance of the child in test with CP. PMID:25031506

Iatridou, G; Dionyssiotis, Y

2013-10-01

298

Progressive parkinsonism, balance difficulties, and supranuclear gaze palsy.  

PubMed

A 76-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of a progressive parkinsonian syndrome. It started with slowness of gait and mood dysfunction. Symptoms slowly progressed and further included occasional unexplained falls. On examination, he showed a severe parkinsonian syndrome featuring bradykinesia, rigidity (axial?>?appendicular), and positive pull-test finding. Moreover, there was an upgaze supranuclear palsy and slow saccades on vertical plane. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed that revealed significant basal ganglia lesions and white matter hyperintensities, including periventricular regions and both frontal and temporal subcortical areas, along with moderate widespread atrophy and ventricular enlargement. Here, we reveal the pathological diagnosis and discuss the approach to the clinical data. PMID:24275943

Erro, Roberto; Lees, Andrew J; Moccia, Marcello; Picillo, Marina; Penco, Silvana; Mosca, Lorena; Vitale, Carmine; Barone, Paolo

2014-01-01

299

Cerebral palsy and developmental coordination disorder in children born preterm.  

PubMed

Children born early (<37 weeks of gestation) are at high risk of a range of motor impairments due to a variety of biological and environmental risk factors. Cerebral palsy occurs more frequently in those children born preterm, with the risk increasing with decreasing gestational age. Mild and moderate motor impairments, consistent with developmental coordination disorder, occur in almost half of those children born preterm and include difficulties with balance, manual dexterity and ball skills. All forms of motor impairment are associated with comorbidities, which may have a greater effect on quality of life, academic achievement and participation in extracurricular activities than the motor impairment itself. Infants at risk of motor impairment can be identified in early infancy with a combination of clinical assessment tools and perinatal risk factors. However, the reliable diagnosis of motor impairment requires follow-up into early childhood and it is important to ensure that the appropriate intervention is implemented. PMID:24290908

Spittle, Alicia Jane; Orton, Jane

2014-04-01

300

Therapeutic Potential of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Background. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a severe disabling disease with worldwide incidence being 2 to 3 per 1000 live births. CP was considered as a noncurable, nonreparative disorder, but stem cell therapy offers a potential treatment for CP. Objective. The present study evaluates the safety and efficacy of autologous bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BMMNCs) transplantation in CP patient. Material and Methods. In the present study, five infusions of autologous stem cells were injected intrathecally. Changes in neurological deficits and improvements in function were assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS-E&R) scale. Results. Significant motor, sensory, cognitive, and speech improvements were observed. Bowel and bladder control has been achieved. On the GMFCS-E&R level, the patient was promoted from grade III to I. Conclusion. In this study, we report that intrathecal infusion of autologous BMMNCs seems to be feasible, effective, and safe with encouraging functional outcome improvements in CP patient. PMID:23259143

Purandare, Chaitanya; Shitole, D. G.; Belle, Vaijayantee; Kedari, Aarti; Bora, Neeta; Joshi, Meghnad

2012-01-01

301

Gastrostomy feeding in cerebral palsy: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Aims: To determine benefits and risks for gastrostomy or jejunostomy feeding compared with oral feeding for children with cerebral palsy. Methods: Systematic review. Search strategy: electronic databases—Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Lilacs, databases of theses, grey literature. Included: relevant systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, observational studies, case reports. Excluded: non-systematic reviews and qualitative research. Participants: children with cerebral palsy. Intervention: use of gastrostomy or jejunostomy tube to provide nutrition. Outcome: evaluated outcome measures included death, growth, gastro-oesophageal reflux, other complications, psychosocial aspects, and caregiver wellbeing. Results: No relevant systematic reviews or randomised controlled trials were found. Two cohort studies, 15 case series, and eight case reports met the inclusion criteria. Eight studies specifically described percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy as the intervention. Weight gain resulted from gastrostomy feeding in most cases. There was an approximately fourfold increased risk of death reported in one cohort study for the gastrostomy fed children. Many complications were reported, including potential for increased gastro-oesophageal reflux and fluid aspiration into the lungs. Conclusions: Benefits associated with gastrostomy or jejunostomy feeding are difficult to assess from the available evidence. Risks of gastrostomy, particularly in relation to surgical complications, have been described but the size of the risk could not be quantified. The finding of a higher death rate for children fed by gastrostomy may merely reflect the greater disability of these compared with orally fed children. Lack of available evidence and the substantial risk of bias in observational studies suggests that a well conducted randomised controlled trial of sufficient size will be needed to answer these problems. PMID:15155398

Sleigh, G; Brocklehurst, P

2004-01-01

302

An unusual case of isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy secondary to osteophytic projection from the atlanto-occipital joint.  

PubMed

We describe an unusual and rare case of isolated left hypoglossal nerve palsy secondary to compression from a prominent degenerative osteophyte from the left atlanto-occipital joint. The hypoglossal nerve is a purely motor cranial nerve innervating the tongue musculature. Palsy of the hypoglossal nerve is frequently associated with other cranial nerve palsies and can be related to vascular, neoplastic, infectious or traumatic conditions. Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy is quite rare and very few cases have been reported in the literature to date. PMID:24976205

Patro, Satya Narayana; Torres, Carlos; Riascos, Roy

2014-06-01

303

Surgical Treatment Guidelines for Digital Deformity Associated with Intrinsic Muscle Spasticity (Intrinsic Plus Foot) in Adults with Cerebral Palsy.  

PubMed

Intrinsic plus foot deformity has primarily been associated with cerebral palsy and involves spastic contracture of the intrinsic musculature with resultant toe deformities. Digital deformity is caused by a dynamic imbalance between the intrinsic muscles in the foot and extrinsic muscles in the lower leg. Spastic contracture of the toes frequently involves curling under of the lesser digits or contracture of the hallux into valgus or plantar flexion deformity. Patients often present with associated pressure ulcers, deformed toenails, shoe or brace fitting challenges, and pain with ambulation or transfers. Four different patterns of intrinsic plus foot deformity have been observed by the authors that likely relate to the different patterns of muscle involvement. Case examples are provided of the 4 patterns of intrinsic plus foot deformity observed, including global intrinsic plus lesser toe deformity, isolated intrinsic plus lesser toe deformity, intrinsic plus hallux valgus deformity, and intrinsic plus hallux flexus deformity. These case examples are presented to demonstrate each type of deformity and our approach for surgical management according to the contracture pattern. The surgical approach has typically involved tenotomy, capsulotomy, or isolated joint fusion. The main goals of surgical treatment are to relieve pain and reduce pressure points through digital realignment in an effort to decrease the risk of pressure sores and allow more effective bracing to ultimately improve the patient's mobility. PMID:25154656

Boffeli, Troy J; Collier, Rachel C

2014-08-21

304

Restless Leg Syndrome in Different Types of Demyelinating Neuropathies: A Single-Center Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Methods: Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Results: Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). Conclusions: our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy. Citation: Luigetti M; Del Grande A; Testani E; Bisogni G; Losurdo A; Giannantoni NM; Mazza S; Sabatelli M; Della Marca G. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):945-949. PMID:23997707

Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

2013-01-01

305

ABSTRACT: The motions of lower-limb extension, adduction, and internal rotation are frequently coupled in persons with cerebral palsy (CP) and are  

E-print Network

coupled in persons with cerebral palsy (CP) and are commonly referred to as an extension synergy. However ABNORMAL COUPLING OF KNEE AND HIP MOMENTS DURING MAXIMAL EXERTIONS IN PERSONS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY DARRYL G, such as walking, because the ob- Abbreviations: A/D, analog-to-digital; CP, cerebral palsy; EMG, electro- myogram

Delp, Scott

306

Quantifying muscle activity in non-ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy before and after selective dorsal rhizotomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is a condition that results in varying degrees of functional deficits. The goal of this study was to develop an objective measure of muscle activity during a prescribed voluntary motor task in non-ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy. While performing a simultaneous hip\\/knee flexion task from the supine position, followed by return to the starting position, electromyographic and

Julie E. Perry; Brian L. Davis; Mark G. Luciano

2001-01-01

307

Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

Buesch, Francisca Eugster

2010-01-01

308

The Use of Computers and Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices by Children and Young with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to determine the use of computers and assistive devices amongst children with cerebral palsy (CP) and establish the satisfaction level of both users and educational staff. The study was carried out with 30 children with cerebral palsy. A questionnaire was designed to characterize the use of new technologies and…

Garcia, Thais Pousada; Loureiro, Javier Pereira; Gonzalez, Betania Groba; Riveiro, Laura Nieto; Sierra, Alejandro Pazos

2011-01-01

309

Description and Psychometric Properties of the CP QOL-Teen: A Quality of Life Questionnaire for Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To assess the measurement properties of a new QOL instrument, the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Teen (CP QOL-Teen), in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 13-18 years, examining domain structure, reliability, validity and adolescent-caregiver concordance. Based on age, 695 eligible families were invited to participate by mail.…

Davis, Elise; Mackinnon, Andrew; Davern, Melanie; Boyd, Roslyn; Bohanna, India; Waters, Elizabeth; Graham, H. Kerr; Reid, Susan; Reddihough, Dinah

2013-01-01

310

Amniotic fluid inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, interleukin-1?, and tumor necrosis factor-?), neonatal brain white matter lesions, and cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Ultrasonographically detectable neonatal brain white matter lesions are the most important identifiable risk factor for cerebral palsy. Inflammatory cytokines released during the course of intrauterine infections have been implicated in the genesis of brain white matter lesions and subsequent cerebral palsy. This study was undertaken to determine whether fetuses who subsequently were diagnosed to have periventricular brain white matter

Bo Hyun Yoon; Jong Kwan Jun; Roberto Romero; Kyo Hoon Park; Ricardo Gomez; Jung-Hwan Choi

1997-01-01

311

Effect of Cardiorespiratory Training on Aerobic Fitness and Carryover to Activity In Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The question under consideration was does cardiorespiratory training improve aerobic fitness in children with cerebral palsy and is there any carryover into activity? The study design consisted of a systematic review of randomized trials using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Participants were children of school age with cerebral palsy.…

Butler, Jane M.; Scianni, Aline; Ada, Louise

2010-01-01

312

Classification of Speech and Language Profiles in 4-Year-Old Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Prospective Preliminary Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In this study, the authors proposed and tested a preliminary speech and language classification system for children with cerebral palsy. Method: Speech and language assessment data were collected in a laboratory setting from 34 children with cerebral palsy (CP; 18 male, 16 female) with a mean age of 54 months (SD = 1.8). Measures of…

Hustad, Katherine C.; Gorton, Kristin; Lee, Jimin

2010-01-01

313

Participation in life situations of 8-12 year old children with cerebral palsy: cross sectional European study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To evaluate how involvement in life situations (participation) in children with cerebral palsy varies with type and severity of impairment and to investigate geographical variation in participation.Design Cross sectional study. Trained interviewers visited parents of children with cerebral palsy; multilevel multivariable regression related participation to impairments, pain, and sociodemographic characteristics.Setting Eight European regions with population registers of children with

Jérôme Fauconnier; Heather O Dickinson; Eva Beckung; Marco Marcelli; Vicki McManus; Susan I Michelsen; Jackie Parkes; Kathryn N Parkinson; Ute Thyen; Catherine Arnaud; Allan Colver

2009-01-01

314

Growth and anthropometry in hemiplegic cerebral palsy patients Crescimento e antropometria em pacientes com paralisia cerebral hemiplégica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To analyze the linear growth, the head circum- ference and the anthropometric differences between involved and non-involved sides of 24 children with hemiplegic cer- ebral palsy, comparing them to standard values for age. Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 24 con- secutive children with cerebral palsy clinically classified as spastic hemiplegia. The anthropometric measures included: weight, lenght, head circumference, total

Marise Bueno Zonta; Fábio Agert; Sandra Regina; B. Muzzolon; Sérgio Antonio Antoniuk; Neiva Isabel; R. Magdalena; Isac Bruck

315

Electrophysiological characteristics of lesions in facial palsies of different etiologies. A study using electrical and magnetic stimulation techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using magnetic stimulation techniques in addition to conventional electrical stimulation, the entire facial motor pathway can be assessed electrophysiologically. To study the diagnostic yield of these examinations, 174 patients with facial palsies of a variety of etiologies were examined (85 Bell's palsies, 24 Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), 19 Lyme borreliosis, 17 zoster oticus, 12 meningeal affections, 10 brain-stem disorders and 7

K. M. Rösler; M. R. Magistris; F. X. Glocker; A. Kohler; G. Deuschl; C. W. Hess

1995-01-01

316

Physical Activity in the Life of a Woman with Cerebral Palsy: Physiotherapy, Social Exclusion, Competence, and Intimacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although physical activity can have substantial mental and physical health benefits, people with cerebral palsy usually lead sedentary lives. To understand, at an individual level, this inactivity, we interviewed a 29-year-old minimally active woman with cerebral palsy (Alana) about the meanings and experiences of physical activity throughout her…

Gaskin, Cadeyrn J.; Andersen, Mark B.; Morris, Tony

2012-01-01

317

Autologous Cord Blood Therapy for Infantile Cerebral Palsy: From Bench to Bedside  

PubMed Central

About 17 million people worldwide live with cerebral palsy, the most common disability in childhood, with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, preterm birth, and low birth weight being the most important risk factors. This review will focus on recent developments in cell therapy for infantile cerebral palsy by transplantation of autologous umbilical cord blood. There are only 4 publications available at present; however, the observations made along with experimental data in vivo and in vitro may be of utmost importance clinically, so that a review at an early developmental stage of this new therapeutic concept seems justified. Particularly, since the first published double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial in a paradigm using allogeneic cord blood and erythropoietin to treat cerebral palsy under immunosuppression showed beneficial therapeutic effects in infantile cerebral palsy, long-held doubts about the efficacy of this new cell therapy are dispelled and a revision of therapeutic views upon an ailment, for which there is no cure at present, is warranted. Hence, this review will summarize the available information on autologous cord blood therapy for cerebral palsy and that on the relevant experimental work as far as potential mechanisms and modes of action are concerned. PMID:24695413

Jensen, A.

2014-01-01

318

Autologous cord blood therapy for infantile cerebral palsy: from bench to bedside.  

PubMed

About 17 million people worldwide live with cerebral palsy, the most common disability in childhood, with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, preterm birth, and low birth weight being the most important risk factors. This review will focus on recent developments in cell therapy for infantile cerebral palsy by transplantation of autologous umbilical cord blood. There are only 4 publications available at present; however, the observations made along with experimental data in vivo and in vitro may be of utmost importance clinically, so that a review at an early developmental stage of this new therapeutic concept seems justified. Particularly, since the first published double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial in a paradigm using allogeneic cord blood and erythropoietin to treat cerebral palsy under immunosuppression showed beneficial therapeutic effects in infantile cerebral palsy, long-held doubts about the efficacy of this new cell therapy are dispelled and a revision of therapeutic views upon an ailment, for which there is no cure at present, is warranted. Hence, this review will summarize the available information on autologous cord blood therapy for cerebral palsy and that on the relevant experimental work as far as potential mechanisms and modes of action are concerned. PMID:24695413

Jensen, A

2014-01-01

319

Capacity of adolescents with cerebral palsy on paediatric balance scale and Berg balance scale.  

PubMed

The Berg balance scale (BBS) and the paediatric balance scale (PBS) are reliable tools for measuring balance ability. However, reports of BBS and PBS scores in adolescent cerebral palsy have been limited. The objectives of this study were to investigate functional balance capacities, as tested with the BBS and PBS in adolescents with cerebral palsy, to compare the total PBS and BBS scores between Gross Motor Function Classification System-Expanded and Revised (GMFCS-E&R) levels and to compare the static balance PBS and BBS scores within each GMFCS-E&R level. Fifty-eight school-aged adolescents with cerebral palsy between the ages of 12 and 18 years with GMFCS-E&R levels of I to IV were recruited. The Kruskal-Wallis test was utilized to compare the median scores for the PBS and BBS between the different GMFCS-E&R levels. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed to examine the differences in the static balance scores between the PBS and the BBS within the same GMFCS-E&R levels. The results reveal that there were differences in the BBS and PBS scores among the four GMFCS-E&R levels. A significant difference was found between the BBS and PBS scores only among the patients with cerebral palsy and level III GMFCS-E&R. The BBS and PBS are valid and reliable tools for clinical examination and for distinguishing between levels of functional balance in adolescents with cerebral palsy. PMID:25462467

Jantakat, Chanada; Ramrit, Sirinun; Emasithi, Alongkot; Siritaratiwat, Wantana

2014-10-15

320

TITLE: Functional Electric Stimulation (FES) for Children with Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Effectiveness  

E-print Network

Cerebral palsy encompasses a variety of non-progressive clinical syndromes characterized by abnormalities of motor activity and posture, causing an affected voluntary movement to become uncoordinated, stereotypic and limited. 1 Although the primary lesion is known to be static, neurologic symptoms may evolve with increasing age. 1 Cerebral palsy shows high variability in terms of severity and motor impairment, and may have a substantial impact on patients and their family. 2 A multidisciplinary approach is imperative and treatment aims at improving daily function and maximizing quality of life. 3 Electrical stimulation is one of the interventions offered to children with cerebral palsy, with the objective of increasing muscle strength. 3 There are different types of electrical stimulation, usually considered minimally invasive. However, in the same way as other interventions administered to improve symptoms of patients with cerebral palsy, electrical stimulation is sometimes considered experimental and uncertainty remains regarding its efficacy on clinically relevant outcomes. 3 This report will review evidence from studies assessing the clinical effectiveness of functional electrical stimulation (FES) for children with cerebral palsy. This information could aid in

unknown authors

2011-01-01

321

Acupuncture for sequelae of Bell's palsy: a randomized controlled trial protocol  

PubMed Central

Objective Incomplete recovery from facial palsy has a long-term impact on the quality of life, and medical options for the sequelae of Bell's palsy are limited. Invasive treatments and physiotherapy have been employed to relieve symptoms, but there is limited clinical evidence for their effectiveness. Acupuncture is widely used on Bell's palsy patients in East Asia, but there is insufficient evidence for its effectiveness on Bell's palsy sequelae. The objective is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with sequelae of Bell's palsy. Method/Design This study consists of a randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms: an acupuncture group and a waitlist group. The acupuncture group will receive acupuncture treatment three times per week for a total of 24 sessions over 8 weeks. Participants in the waitlist group will not receive any acupuncture treatments during this 8 week period, but they will participate in the evaluations of symptoms at the start of the study, at 5 weeks and at 8 weeks after randomization, at which point the same treatment as the acupuncture group will be provided. The primary outcome will be analyzed by the change in the Facial Disability Index (FDI) from baseline to week eight. The secondary outcome measures will include FDI from baseline to week five, House-Brackmann Grade, lip mobility, and stiffness scales. Trial registration Current Controlled-Trials ISRCTN43104115; registration date: 06 July 2010; the date of the first patient's randomization: 04 August 2010 PMID:21388554

2011-01-01

322

Brachial plexus lesions after backpack carriage in young adults.  

PubMed

Carrying a heavy backpack exerts compression on shoulders, with the potential to cause brachial plexopathy. We evaluated the incidence and predisposing factors of compression plexopathy of the shoulder region in 152,095 military conscripts, hypothesizing that a low body mass index and poor physical fitness predispose to the plexus lesion. Reports of conscripts with neural lesions of the upper arm associated with load carriage were reviewed retrospectively for details associated with the condition onset, symptoms, signs, nerve conduction studies, and electromyographic examinations. Height, weight, and physical fitness scores were obtained from their military training data. The incidence of neural compression after shoulder load carriage in Finnish soldiers was 53.7 (95% confidence interval, 39.5-67.8) per 100,000 conscripts per year. The long thoracic nerve was affected in 19, the axillary nerve in 13, the suprascapular nerve in seven, and the musculocutaneous nerve in six patients. Four patients (7%) had hereditary neuropathy with susceptibility to pressure palsies (HNPP). Symptoms were induced by lighter loads in patients with HNPP. Vulnerability to brachial plexopathy was not predictable from body structure or physical fitness level. To prevent these lesions, awareness of the condition and its symptoms should be increased and backpack designs should be improved. PMID:16906084

Mäkelä, Jyrki P; Ramstad, Raimo; Mattila, Ville; Pihlajamäki, Harri

2006-11-01

323

Clinical correlations of microstructural changes in progressive supranuclear palsy.  

PubMed

In patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), previous reports have shown a severe white matter (WM) damage involving supra and infratentorial regions including cerebellum. In the present study, we investigated potential correlations between WM integrity loss and clinical-cognitive features of patients with PSP. By using magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging with tract based spatial statistic analysis, we analyzed WM volume in 18 patients with PSP and 18 healthy controls (HCs). All patients and HCs underwent a detailed clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. Relative to HCs, patients with PSP showed WM changes encompassing supra and infratentorial areas such as corpus callosum, fornix, midbrain, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, superior cerebellar peduncle, superior longitudinal fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, cingulate gyrus, and cortico-spinal tract bilaterally. Among different correlations between motor-cognitive features and WM structural abnormalities, we detected a significant association between fronto-cerebellar WM loss and executive cognitive impairment in patients with PSP. Our findings, therefore, corroborate the hypothesis that cognitive impairment in PSP may result from both "intrinsic" and "extrinsic" frontal lobe dysfunction, likely related to cerebellar disconnection. PMID:24786632

Tessitore, Alessandro; Giordano, Alfonso; Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Corbo, Daniele; De Micco, Rosa; Russo, Antonio; Liguori, Sara; Cirillo, Mario; Esposito, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

2014-10-01

324

Most frequent gait patterns in diplegic spastic cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To identify gait patterns in a large group of children with diplegic cerebral palsy and to characterize each group according to age, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level, Gait Deviation Index (GDI) and previous surgical procedures. METHODS: One thousand eight hundred and five patients were divided in seven groups regarding observed gait patterns: jump knee, crouch knee, recurvatum knee, stiff knee, asymmetric, mixed and non-classified. RESULTS: The asymmetric group was the most prevalent (48.8%). The jump knee (9.6 years old) and recurvatum (9.4 years old) groups had mean age lower than the other groups. The lowest GDI (43.58) was found in the crouch group. There were more children classified within GMFCS level III in the crouch and mixed groups. Previous surgical procedures on the triceps surae were more frequent in stiff knee and mixed groups. The jump knee group received less and the stiff-knee group more surgical procedures at hamstrings than others. CONCLUSIONS: The asymmetrical cases were the most frequent within a group of diplegic patients. Individuals with crouch gait pattern were characterized by the lowest GDI and the highest prevalence of GMFCS III, while patients with stiff knee exhibited a higher percentage of previous hamstring lengthening in comparison to the other groups. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study. PMID:25246849

de Morais, Mauro César; Kawamura, Cátia Miyuki; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Neves, Daniella Lins; Cardoso, Michelle de Oliveira; Caiafa, Jordana Brandão

2014-01-01

325

Coping with chronic pain associated with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Fifty-nine adults with cerebral palsy (CP) were administered, via in-person interviews, measures of pain intensity, pain-related disability, and psychological functioning, in addition to a measure of pain coping (Waldron/Varni Pediatric Pain Coping Inventory; PPCI). Regression analyses indicated that the PPCI scales made a nonsignificant contribution to the prediction of pain intensity, but did make a significant contribution to the prediction of psychological functioning when controlling for pain intensity. Only the PPCI Catastrophizing subscale made a significant independent contribution to the prediction of psychological functioning, and only the PPCI Seek Social Support subscale made a significant independent contribution to the prediction of pain-related disability. These findings support a link between coping and functioning among adults with CP, and suggest that catastrophizing responses and some aspects of support seeking may be maladaptive for coping with CP-related pain. Limitations of the study include a correlational design, a reliance on self-report data, and a small subject population. Experimental research is needed to determine if changes in coping lead to changes in psychological and physical functioning. PMID:17623374

Engel, Joyce M; Jensen, Mark P; Schwartz, Lauren

2006-01-01

326

Spasticity and Its Contribution to Hypertonia in Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Spasticity is considered an important neural contributor to muscle hypertonia in children with cerebral palsy (CP). It is most often treated with antispasticity medication, such as Botulinum Toxin-A. However, treatment response is highly variable. Part of this variability may be due to the inability of clinical tests to differentiate between the neural (e.g., spasticity) and nonneural (e.g., soft tissue properties) contributions to hypertonia, leading to the terms “spasticity” and “hypertonia” often being used interchangeably. Recent advancements in instrumented spasticity assessments offer objective measurement methods for distinction and quantification of hypertonia components. These methods can be applied in clinical settings and their results used to fine-tune and improve treatment. We reviewed current advancements and new insights with respect to quantifying spasticity and its contribution to muscle hypertonia in children with CP. First, we revisit what is known about spasticity in children with CP, including the various definitions and its pathophysiology. Second, we summarize the state of the art on instrumented spasticity assessment in CP and review the parameters developed to quantify the neural and nonneural components of hypertonia. Lastly, the impact these quantitative parameters have on clinical decision-making is considered and recommendations for future clinical and research investigations are discussed. PMID:25649546

Molenaers, Guy; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Van Campenhout, Anja; Feys, Hilde; Desloovere, Kaat

2015-01-01

327

Cerebral palsy: early diagnosis, intervention and risk factors.  

PubMed

Early diagnosis and intervention intensity were suggested to be crucial factor in cerebral palsy (CP) treatment. Herein we observed 347 children diagnosed for CP in Clinical Hospital Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and studied the relationship between (a) intervention start point and the final motor outcome, (b) intensity of treatment and final outcome, and (c) relationship between documented risk factors and early diagnosis of the CP. Our study suggests that it is possible to relatively accurately diagnose the CP in the first trimester. Previous miscarriages, sepsis and intracerebral haemorrhage were significantly related to early diagnosis, while delivery outcome, RDS, premature birth, intracerebral haemorrhage, sepsis, meningitis, hydrocephalus and convulsions were found as significantly related to final motor CP outcome. We have found no significant influence of the intervention intensity and final diagnosis. Our results support the idea that the intervention start point has to be considered as one of the most important factors for the effective intervention program. In future studies dealing with the CP interventions and risk factors, special attention should be paid to homogeneity and size of the sample, as well as necessity of including the non-treated controls in the investigation. PMID:20120401

Naletili?, Mladenka; Tomi?, Vajdana; Sabi?, Marina; Vlak, Tonko

2009-12-01

328

Disorders of memory of motor sequences in cerebral palsied children.  

PubMed

In 74 children (32 boys, 42 girls) between 7 and 14 years of age with different forms of cerebral palsy (mainly spastic ones) the motor memory was tested with a sequence of movements which had to be remembered at once, after 24 hours and after 5 days. The normal levels were determined by testing 21 healthy children matched as to age as control as (10 boys, 11 girls). Each exercise was evaluated separately as follows: the movement is performed correctly in the right sequence, 2 points; the movement is performed in a wrong sequence, but in the correct group of three exercises, 1 point; the sequence of movements is entirely wrong or the child does not perform the movements at all, 0 points. Thus for each testing a child can get a maximum of 12 points and for all three testings a maximal 36 points. In 48.5% of the CP children a disorder of memory was found, more frequently in left-sided hemiparesis than in right-sided, and more frequently in paucospastic diparesis (without adductor or flexor spasms and without flexor spastic signs in the toes) than in the classical form. Thus a motor memory disorder is part of the natural history of CP. PMID:2403205

Lesný, I; Nachtmann, M; Stehlik, A; Tománková, A; Zajidková, J

1990-01-01

329

Somatosensory-evoked Cortical Activity in Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Somatosensory deficits have been identified in cerebral palsy (CP), but associated cortical brain activity in CP remains poorly understood. Functional MRI was used to measure blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses during three tactile tasks in 10 participants with spastic diplegia (mean age 18.70y, SD 7.99y; 5 females) and 10 age-matched controls (mean age 18.60y, SD 3.86y; 5 females). Tactile stimulation involved servo-controlled translation of smooth or embossed surfaces across the right index finger pad; the discrimination tasks with embossed surfaces involved judging whether 1) paired shapes were similar or different, and 2) a rougher set of horizontal gratings preceded or followed a smoother one. Velocity and duration of surface translation was identical across all trials. Additionally, an event-related design revealed response dynamics per trial in both groups. Compared to controls, individuals with spastic diplegia had significantly reduced spatial extents in activated cortical areas and smaller BOLD response magnitudes in cortical areas for somatosensation, motor, and goal-directed/attention behaviors. These results provide mechanisms for the widespread somatosensory deficits in CP. The reduced activation noted across multiple cortical areas might contribute to motor deficits in CP. PMID:20205249

Wingert, Jason R.; Sinclair, Robert J.; Dixit, Sachin; Damiano, Diane L.; Burton, Harold

2010-01-01

330

SPINAL BRACING IN CHILDREN WITH ATONIC CEREBRAL PALSY by  

E-print Network

FOLLOWING a survey of mentally subnormal patients with orthopaedic abnormalities at Muckamore Abbey (James 1971), a group of children were found who were unable to sit unaided. These children were suffering from a mainly atonic form of cerebral palsy. Due to poor muscle tone their spines tended to "collapse" when sitting, and some had developed a fixed kyphosis or kyphoscoliosis. Due to their inability to sit they tended to lie in their cots and to have a very restricted view of the world. Attempts were made to sit them up, but they tended to sag and fall over. It seemed logical to fit these children with a spinal support that would hold their spine in a corrected position, so that the fixed spinal deformity could be prevented. Some fifty children were found that would benefit by a support. The production of fifty standard braces was beyond the capacity of our usual orthotic services at that time. Miss G. Morris, of the Northern Ireland Orthopaedic Service, designed a support made of plastic that was produced in the Plastics Workshop at Musgrave Park Hospital, and later was also produced in the Plastics Workshop at Muckamore

unknown authors

331

JUMP LANDING CHARACTERISTICS IN ELITE SOCCER PLAYERS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to analyse the parameters that characterize the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, and to determine the relationship among these parameters in elite soccer players with cerebral palsy (CP). Thirteen male members of the Spanish national soccer team for people with CP (mean age: 27.1 ± 4.7 years) volunteered for the study. Each participant performed three counter movement jumps. The characteristics of the first peak of the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, which corresponds to the forefoot contact with the ground, were similar to the results obtained in previous studies. However, a higher magnitude of rearfoot contact with the ground (F2) was observed in participants with CP than in participants without CP. Furthermore, a significant correlation between F2 magnitude and the elapsed time until its production (T2) was not observed (r = -0.474 for p = 0.102). This result implies that a landing technique based on a delay in the production of F2 might not be effective to reduce its magnitude, contrary to what has been observed in participants without CP. The absence of a significant correlation between these two parameters in the present study, and the high magnitude of F2, suggest that elite soccer players with CP should use footwear with proper cushioning characteristics. PMID:24744473

Grande, I.; Mejuto, G.; Los Arcos, A.; Yanci, J.

2013-01-01

332

Survey Results of Pain Treatments in Adults with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Objectives To identify the types and frequencies of pain treatments used by individuals with cerebral palsy (CP); examine the perceived effectiveness of these treatments; and identify the types of healthcare providers that were accessed for pain-related services. Design A cross-sectional survey design was employed. 83 adults (mean age=40.3 years, SD=13.6) with CP indicated their pain location and intensity during the past 3 months. Next, they indicated their use of 24 different pain treatments and the effectiveness of each. Finally, participants indicated the frequency of pain-related healthcare visits to specific providers over the past 6 months. Results 63% of participants reported experiencing chronic pain and rated their pain intensity over the past week as 5.1/10, on average. The most common pain locations were the lower back, hips, and legs. Physical interventions (e.g., physical therapy, strengthening) were the most common pain treatments reportedly used, and were rated as moderately effective. Many other treatments were also used, and participants sought pain-related care from a variety of providers. Conclusions Although participants reportedly accessed pain care from a variety of providers, and perceived that several types of treatments were effective, many of the treatments rated as effective were rarely used or provided. Future research using clinical trial methods would further elucidate the specific pain treatments that are most beneficial for adults with CP. PMID:21273894

Hirsh, Adam T.; Kratz, Anna L.; Engel, Joyce M.; Jensen, Mark P.

2011-01-01

333

Abnormalities of optokinetic nystagmus in progressive supranuclear palsy  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To measure vertical and horizontal responses to optokinetic (OK) stimulation and investigate directional abnormalities of quick phases in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Methods: Saccades and OK nystagmus were studied in six PSP patients, five with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 10 controls. The OK stimulus subtended 72° horizontally, 60° vertically, consisted of black and white stripes, and moved at 10–50°/s. Results: All PSP patients showed slowed voluntary vertical saccades and nystagmus quick phases compared with PD or controls. Small, paired, horizontal saccadic intrusions (SWJ) were more frequent and larger in PSP during fixation. Vertical saccades were transiently faster at the time of SWJ and horizontal saccades in PSP. During vertical OK nystagmus, small quick phases were often combined with horizontal SWJ in all subjects; in PSP the vector was closer to horizontal. Vertical OK slow phase gain was reduced in PSP but, in most PD patients, was similar to normals. The average position of gaze shifted in the direction of vertical OK stimulus in PSP patients with preserved slow phase responses but impaired quick phases. Conclusions: Vertical OK responses in PSP show impaired slow phase responses, and quick phases that are slowed and combined with SWJ to produce an oblique vector. SWJ facilitate vertical saccades and quick phases in PSP, but it is unclear whether this is an adaptive process or a result of the disease. A large OK stimulus is useful to induce responses that can be quantitatively analysed in patients with limited voluntary range of vertical gaze. PMID:15377682

Garbutt, S; Riley, D; Kumar, A; Han, Y; Harwood, M; Leigh, R

2004-01-01

334

Segmental masseteric flap for dynamic reanimation of facial palsy.  

PubMed

The masseter muscle is one of the major chewing muscles and contributes to define facial contour. It is an important landmark for aesthetic and functional surgery and has been used for facial palsy reanimation or as source of donor motor nerve. We present an anatomic study to evaluate the possibility of using a muscle subunit for dynamic eye reanimation. Sixteen head halves were dissected under magnification to study the neurovascular distribution and determine safe muscle subunits; areas of safe/dangerous dissection were investigated. Once isolated, the arc of rotation of the muscular subunit was measured on fresh body to verify the reach to the lateral canthus. The patterns of neurovascular distribution and areas of safe dissection were identified; the anterior third of the muscle represents an ideal subunit with constant nerve and artery distribution. The muscle is too short to reach the lateral canthus; a fascia graft extension is needed. The information provided identified the main neurovascular branches and confirms the feasibility of a dynamic segmental flap. The need of efficient motor units for facial reanimation demands for different surgical options. A detailed anatomic description of the neurovascular bundle is mandatory to safely raise a functional motor subunit. PMID:24621710

Romeo, Marco; Lim, Yee Jun; Fogg, Quentin; Morley, Stephen

2014-03-01

335

Environment-driven responses in progressive supranuclear palsy.  

PubMed

The neurological signs and behaviors that accompany degenerative diseases associated with fronto-striatal dysfunction are incompletely described. We observed several novel environmentally-driven behaviors in seven patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). All patients had cognitive deficits with greatest impairments on tests of frontal lobe function, and frontal lobe cerebral perfusion was significantly reduced in 4 of the 5 who had single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain scans. Visual grasping, in which a patient's gaze was attracted to an incidental object in the environment such as a TV set or mirror, was preeminent. Once fixed, there was inability to release the gaze and shift to another object. In other instances, removing a table placed in front of a patient or unbuckling of his seat belt would make him stand up, which was impossible on command. Similarly, playing music would induce rhythmic foot beating, which was never obtained on command. There were compulsive utilization behaviors, such as repetitively picking up and replacing the telephone for no apparent reason. As expected, there were signs of heightened facial reflexes, grasp reflexes, apraxia of eyelid opening, echolalia and echopraxia. We postulate that these stimuli-oriented behaviors stem from parietal lobe disinhibition due to fronto-striatal dysfunction. PMID:7650525

Ghika, J; Tennis, M; Growdon, J; Hoffman, E; Johnson, K

1995-05-01

336

A proposed multidisciplinary approach for identifying feeding abnormalities in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Children with neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, frequently have associated oral motor dysfunction, which leads to feeding difficulties, risk of aspiration, prolonged feeding times, and malnutrition with its attendant physical compromise. The authors propose a comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment, including neurological and dysphagia examination and ear, nose, and throat examination, to evaluate clinical indicators and severity of feeding impairment in children affected by neurodevelopmental disorders. A representative sample of 40 children with cerebral palsy (spastic, dyskinetic, or mixed), intellectual disability, and feeding problems was included in the study. A specific multidisciplinary evaluation and standardized mealtime observation in patients with cerebral palsy appear feasible and appropriate to recognize proactive indicators of dysphagia and to establish personalized programs of gastric and rehabilitative interventions. PMID:22019841

Santoro, Amelia; Lang, Maria Bianca Dasso; Moretti, Elena; Sellari-Franceschini, Stefano; Orazini, Laura; Cipriani, Paola; Cioni, Giovanni; Battini, Roberta

2012-06-01

337

Common peroneal nerve palsy secondary to peroneus longus abscess: case report.  

PubMed

Muscle abscess presenting as nerve palsy is rare and has not been previously reported in the common peroneal nerve (CPN). The objective of this case report is to describe the diagnosis and treatment of an uncommon presentation of peroneal abscess in the leg of an otherwise healthy man. We present a case of CPN palsy in a 50-year-old immunocompetent man with no other comorbid medical condition secondary to peroneus longus abscess. The diagnosis was suggested by magnetic resonance imaging examination and confirmed by intraoperative findings. After surgical drainage of the abscess, the patient made a complete recovery. A review of the literature confirms that peroneus longus abscess giving rise to CPN palsy has not been described. Early diagnosis and surgical drainage of the compressing abscess can produce a favorable outcome. PMID:22342606

Agrawal, Mayank; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Wangchuk, Tsering; Sural, Sumit; Dhal, Anil

2012-01-01

338

Axillary nerve palsy following blunt trauma to the shoulder region: a clinical and electrophysiological review.  

PubMed Central

Although the commonest type of axillary nerve palsy occurs following shoulder dislocation on humeral fracture, another form is seen after blunt trauma to the shoulder region without associated fracture or dislocation. The former usually goes on to a full recovery whereas a failure to recover is common in the latter group. In our review of 13 patients with palsy after blunt shoulder trauma, seven patients showed minimal or no recovery of deltoid muscle function and six patients went on to complete or near complete recovery. Serial electromyographic examinations usually revealed the lesion to be in continuity although eventual clinical recovery was not satisfactory in a number of these patients. The mechanism of the palsy appeared to involve a stretch injury and this was confirmed at operation in two patients. Glenohumeral fixation was a troublesome complication which limited recovery of function in four patients. Further details of the type of trauma, clinical and electromyographic examination, assessment and management are discussed. Images PMID:7175526

Berry, H; Bril, V

1982-01-01

339

Horner's Syndrome and Contralateral Abducens Nerve Palsy Associated with Zoster Meningitis  

PubMed Central

A 55-year-old woman presented with diplopia following painful skin eruptions on the right upper extremity. On presentation, she was found to have 35 prism diopters of esotropia and an abduction limitation in the left eye. Two weeks later, she developed blepharoptosis and anisocoria with a smaller pupil in the right eye, which increased in the darkness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and a positive result for immunoglobulin G antibody to varicella zoster virus. She was diagnosed to have zoster meningitis with Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy. After intravenous antiviral and steroid treatments, the vesicular eruptions and abducens nerve palsy improved. Horner's syndrome and diplopia resolved after six months. Here we present the first report of Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis. PMID:24311937

Cho, Bum-Joo; Kim, Ji-Soo

2013-01-01

340

ANCA-Negative Wegener's Granulomatosis with Multiple Lower Cranial Nerve Palsies  

PubMed Central

Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small and medium-sized vessels with granulomatous formation. Though it is known for respiratory tract and kidney involvement, neurologic manifestation has been also reported. Herein we report a patient who suffered pansinusitis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies but reached remission by immunosuppressant after the diagnosis of WG. A 54-yr-old female visited with headache, hearing difficulty, and progressive bulbar symptoms. She experienced endoscopic sinus surgeries due to refractory sinusitis. Neurologic examination revealed multiple lower cranial nerve palsies. Vasculitic markers showed no abnormality. Nasal biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis involving small vessels. Given cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, her symptoms were prominently improved. WG should be considered in the patient with multiple cranial nerve palsies, especially those with paranasal sinus disease. Because WG can be lethal if delayed in treatment, prompt immunosuppressant is warranted after the diagnostic tissue biopsy. PMID:24265538

Kim, Sung-Hee; Park, Jin; Bae, Jung Ho; Cho, Min-Sun; Park, Kee Duk

2013-01-01

341

[A case of facial nerve palsy induced by nab-paclitaxel].  

PubMed

The patient was a 60-year-old woman who underwent total mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for right breast cancer. She was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy( epirubicin plus cyclophosphamide[EC]and paclitaxel), hormone therapy, and radiation therapy. Multiple lung, lymph node, and bone metastases were detected after 4 years. The patient subsequently received nab-paclitaxel (nabPTX, 260 mg/m2, triweekly) and zoledronate therapy. Ptosis of her right eyebrow and the right angle of her mouth were observed after 8 courses of nabPTX, and peripheral right facial nerve palsy was diagnosed. She underwent rehabilitation, and facial nerve palsy improved after 9 months. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is a very rare adverse event of nabPTX. This is the first case report of peripheral facial nerve paralysis associated with nab- PTX. PMID:24394117

Minatani, Naoko; Kosaka, Yoshimasa; Sengoku, Norihiko; Kikuchi, Mariko; Nishimiya, Hiroshi; Waraya, Mina; Enomoto, Takumo; Tanino, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko

2013-11-01

342

Eyelid reanimation, neurotisation, and transplantation of the cornea in a patient with facial palsy.  

PubMed

Patients affected by facial palsy suffer from failure to fully close the eyelids; the resulting eye exposure can lead to dry eye syndrome, loss of epithelial integrity, corneal ulceration and infections. Corneal anaesthesia exacerbates risk of corneal damage in these patients. Eyelid paralysis-associated corneal lesions may induce severe visual impairment, for which the ideal treatment is corneal transplantation, a procedure contraindicated in patients with corneal sensitivity and inadequate eyelid closure. We present the case of a patient affected by unilateral facial palsy associated with corneal anaesthesia, due to seventh and fifth cranial nerve damage following homolateral eighth cranial nerve surgery. The patient underwent surgery to re-establish eyelid and corneal competence, and then received a corneal graft with consequent amelioration of visual acuity. This is the first case of associated corneal anaesthesia and facial palsy that was comprehensively treated with a set of surgical procedures, including a corneal transplant. PMID:25139921

Allevi, Fabiana; Fogagnolo, Paolo; Rossetti, Luca; Biglioli, Federico

2014-01-01

343

Churg-Strauss Syndrome Presented With Hearing Impairment and Facial Palsy  

PubMed Central

Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Cranial nerve involvement is very rare in CSS. A 59-year-old woman had complained of both hearing impairments for eight months and left facial palsy for three months. Left facial and cochlear neuropathies were detected in electrodiagnostic studies. Paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) showed chronic pansinusitis. Chest CT revealed eosinophilic infiltration in the right upper lobe. Tissue biopsy of the right inferior turbinate displayed necrotizing vasculitis with eosinophilic infiltration. She was diagnosed as CSS, based on the presence of eosinophilia, pulmonary infiltration, paranasal sinusitis, and biopsy containing blood vessels with extravascular eosinophils. She was treated with intravenous and oral steroids and azathioprine, showing relatively good prognosis on facial palsy and hearing impairment. We report a very rare case of CSS presented with hearing impairment and facial palsy. PMID:25566487

Byun, Jeong-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hoo

2014-01-01

344

Parental stress in mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

Objectives to evaluate parental stress of mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy; to verify whether parental stress undergoes variations according to the level of motor compromise, the child's phase of life, and sociodemographic variables. Method a cross-sectional, descriptive study, with 223 mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. Results 45.3% of the mothers presented high levels of stress; there were differences in stress between mothers of children with mild and severe motor impairment; mothers of older children were more stressed than mothers of younger children and of adolescents; paid work and leisure activities reduced the stress. Conclusion mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy, whose children present mild to severe motor impairment are vulnerable to parental stress. Paid work and leisure activities were the factors that contributed most to reducing the stress. PMID:25029055

Ribeiro, Maysa Ferreira Martins; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Vandenberghe, Luc; Porto, Celmo Celeno

2014-01-01

345

A Longitudinal Study of Motor, Oculomotor and Cognitive Function in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy  

PubMed Central

Objective We studied the annual change in measures of motor, oculomotor and cognitive function in progressive supranuclear palsy. This had twin objectives, to assess the potential for clinical parameters to monitor disease progression in clinical trials and to illuminate the progression of pathophysiology. Methods Twenty three patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (Richardson’s syndrome) were compared to 22 matched controls at baseline and 16 of these patients compared at baseline and one year using: the progressive supranuclear palsy rating scale; the unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale; the revised Addenbrooke’s cognitive examination; the frontal assessment battery; the cubes section of the visual object and space perception battery; the Hayling and Brixton executive tests; and saccadic latencies. Results Patients were significantly impaired in all domains at baseline. However, cognitive performance was maintained over a year on the majority of tests. The unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale, saccadic latency and progressive supranuclear palsy rating scale deteriorated over a year, with the latter showing the largest change. Power estimates indicate that using the progressive supranuclear palsy rating scale as an outcome measure in a clinical trial would require 45 patients per arm, to identify a 50% reduction in rate of decline with 80% power. Conclusions Motor, oculomotor and cognitive domains deteriorate at different rates in progressive supranuclear palsy. This may be due to differential degeneration of their respective cortical-subcortical circuits, and has major implications for the selection of outcome measures in clinical trials due to wide variation in sensitivity to annual rates of decline. PMID:24058574

Ghosh, Boyd C. P.; Carpenter, Roger H. S.; Rowe, James B.

2013-01-01

346

Combined ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus in a case of cerebral infarction.  

PubMed

We report a patient with acute cerebral infarction of the left paramedian thalamus, upper mesencephalon and cerebellum who exhibited ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus. The site of the infarction was considered to be the paramedian thalamopeduncular and cerebellar regions, which are supplied by the superior cerebellar artery containing direct perforating branches or both the superior cerebellar artery and the superior mesencephalic and posterior thalamosubthalamic arteries. Contralateral and monocular downbeat nystagmus is very rare. Our case suggests that the present downbeat nystagmus was due to dysfunction of cerebellar-modulated crossed oculovestibular fibers of the superior cerebellar peduncle or bilateral downbeat nystagmus with one-sided oculomotor nerve palsy. PMID:24926263

Matsuzono, Kosuke; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko; Abe, Koji

2014-01-01

347

Brachial plexus birth palsy: multimodality imaging of spine and shoulder abnormalities in children.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the imaging of brachial plexus palsy, including both pathologic conditions of the spine and shoulder and clinical background and management. CONCLUSION. Brachial plexus birth palsy can result in permanent disability and limb deformity. Identifying the lesion type and associated sequelae is important in clinical management aimed at optimizing outcome. The imaging algorithms used are guided by clinical presentation and are designed to assess the extent of injury to guide possible surgical intervention. PMID:25615781

Menashe, Sarah J; Tse, Raymond; Nixon, Jason N; Ishak, Gisele E; Thapa, Mahesh M; McBroom, Jennifer A; Iyer, Ramesh S

2015-02-01

348

Two-level motor nerve transfer for the treatment of long thoracic nerve palsy.  

PubMed

The authors report a case of long thoracic nerve (LTN) palsy treated with two-level motor nerve transfers of a pectoral fascicle of the middle trunk, and a branch of the thoracodorsal nerve. This procedure resulted in near-total improvement of the winged scapula deformity, and a return of excellent shoulder function. A detailed account of the postoperative physical therapy regimen is included, as this critical component of the favorable result cannot be overlooked. This case establishes the two-level motor nerve transfer as a new option for treating LTN palsy, and demonstrates that nerve transfers should be considered in the therapeutic algorithm of an idiopathic mononeuritis. PMID:21699477

Ray, Wilson Z; Pet, Mitchell A; Nicoson, Michael C; Yee, Andrew; Kahn, Lorna C; Mackinnon, Susan E

2011-10-01

349

Isolated Upgaze Palsy in a Patient with Vertebrobasilar Artery Dolichoectasia; a Case Report  

PubMed Central

Purpose To report isolated upgaze palsy in a patient with a dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery. Case Report We report a 48-year-old man who showed upgaze palsy and convergence insufficiency. The left vertebral artery and basilar artery were shown to be greatly expanded, elongated and tortuous in cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The vertebrobasilar artery runs along the sulcus basilaris superior to the pontomesencephalic junction. Conclusion A dolichoectatic basilar artery may result in compression of midbrain structures related to vertical gaze. PMID:24982741

Ortak, Huseyin; Tas, Ufuk; Aksoy, Durdane Bekar; Ayan, Erdo?an

2014-01-01

350

Combined Ipsilateral Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Contralateral Downbeat Nystagmus in a Case of Cerebral Infarction  

PubMed Central

We report a patient with acute cerebral infarction of the left paramedian thalamus, upper mesencephalon and cerebellum who exhibited ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus. The site of the infarction was considered to be the paramedian thalamopeduncular and cerebellar regions, which are supplied by the superior cerebellar artery containing direct perforating branches or both the superior cerebellar artery and the superior mesencephalic and posterior thalamosubthalamic arteries. Contralateral and monocular downbeat nystagmus is very rare. Our case suggests that the present downbeat nystagmus was due to dysfunction of cerebellar-modulated crossed oculovestibular fibers of the superior cerebellar peduncle or bilateral downbeat nystagmus with one-sided oculomotor nerve palsy. PMID:24926263

Matsuzono, Kosuke; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko; Abe, Koji

2014-01-01

351

Glufosinate Herbicide Intoxication Causing Unconsciousness, Convulsion, and 6th Cranial Nerve Palsy  

PubMed Central

Although glufosinate ammonium herbicides are considered safe when used properly, ingestion of the undiluted form can cause grave outcomes. Recently, we treated a 34-yr-old man who ingested glufosinate ammonium herbicide. In the course of treatment, the patient developed apnea, mental deterioration, and sixth cranial nerve palsy; he has since been discharged with full recovery after intensive care. This case report describes the clinical features of glufosinate intoxication with a focus on sixth cranial nerve palsy. Our observation suggests that neurologic manifestations after ingestion of a "low-grade toxicity herbicide" are variable and more complex than that was previously considered. PMID:24265537

Park, Jae-seok; Kwak, Soo-Jung; Gil, Hyo-wook; Kim, So-Young

2013-01-01

352

Bell’s palsy and choreiform movements during peginterferon ? and ribavirin therapy  

PubMed Central

Neuropsychiatric side effects of long-term recombinant interferon-? therapy consist of a large spectrum of symptoms. In the literature, cranial neuropathy, especially Bell’s palsy, and movement disorders, have been reported much less often than other neurotoxic effects. We report a case of Bell’s palsy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C during peginterferon-? and ribavirin therapy. The patient subsequently developed clinically inapparent facial nerve involvement on the contralateral side and showed an increase in choreic movements related to Huntington’s disease during treatment. PMID:19653353

Barut, Sener; Karaer, Hatice; Oksuz, Erol; Eken, Asl? Gündo?du; Basak, Ayse Nazl?

2009-01-01

353

Vocal cord palsy as a presenting feature of sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis.  

PubMed

Sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis (SSA) is rare and often difficult to manage condition. The sternoclavicular joint is an unusual site of septic arthritis in healthy persons, but may be commonly involved in intravenous drug users, primary or secondary immunosuppressive disorders, infections or the presence of infected central lines. After thorough literature search, no cases have yet been reported on SSA leading to vocal cord palsy. The following case describes a male patient who presented to hospital with left vocal cord palsy and symptoms consistent with aero-digestive tract malignancy. Radiological examination and subsequent response to treatment demonstrated the only causative pathology to be an ipsilateral septic sternoclavicular joint. PMID:25583908

Jamil, Fahad; Hussain, Khalid

2015-01-01

354

Oculomotor Nerve Palsy following Cardiac Tamponade with Churg-Strauss Syndrome: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

A 57-year-old man with a history of more than 10 years of bronchial asthma and chronic sinusitis complained of double vision which developed 18 days after cardiac tamponade with eosinophil-rich fluid (eosinophils 30%). He had oculomotor nerve palsy, and a blood test revealed eosinophilia (12,700/mm3) and elevation of both C-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor. He was diagnosed as having Churg-Strauss syndrome. His symptoms were relieved by corticosteroid therapy. Our case and previous cases in the literature revealed that oculomotor nerve palsy in Churg-Strauss syndrome is associated with pupil involvement and may be relieved by corticosteroid treatment. PMID:22125528

Suganuma, Kazuki; Hashimoto, Takao; Sato, Hiromasa; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Sakurai, Shunpei

2011-01-01

355

Cerebral Palsy and Growth Failure at 6 to 7 Years  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between severity of cerebral palsy (CP) and growth to 6 to 7 years of age among children with moderate to severe (Mod/Sev) hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). It was hypothesized that children with Mod/Sev CP would have poorer growth, lower cognitive scores, and increased rehospitalization rates compared with children with no CP (No CP). METHODS: Among 115 of 122 surviving children followed in the hypothermia trial for neonatal HIE, growth parameters and neurodevelopmental status at 18 to 22 months and 6 to 7 years were available. Group comparisons (Mod/Sev CP and No CP) with unadjusted and adjusted analyses for growth <10th percentile and z scores by using Fisher’s exact tests and regression modeling were conducted. RESULTS: Children with Mod/Sev CP had high rates of slow growth and cognitive and motor impairment and rehospitalizations at 18 to 22 months and 6 to 7 years. At 6 to 7 years of age, children with Mod/Sev CP had increased rates of growth parameters <10th percentile compared with those with No CP (weight, 57% vs 3%; height, 70% vs 2%; and head circumference, 82% vs 13%; P < .0001). Increasing severity of slow growth was associated with increasing age (P < .04 for weight, P < .001 for length, and P < .0001 for head circumference). Gastrostomy feeds were associated with better growth. CONCLUSIONS: Term children with HIE who develop Mod/Sev CP have high and increasing rates of growth <10th percentile by 6 to 7 years of age. These findings support the need for close medical and nutrition management of children with HIE who develop CP. PMID:24019415

Stephens, Bonnie E.; McDonald, Scott A.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Pappas, Athina; Hintz, Susan R.; Shankaran, Seetha; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Das, Abhik

2013-01-01

356

Astrocytic inclusions in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration.  

PubMed

Tufted astrocytes (TAs) in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and astrocytic plaques (APs) in corticobasal degeneration (CBD) have been regarded as the pathological hallmarks of major sporadic 4-repeat tauopathies. To better define the astrocytic inclusions in PSP and CBD and to outline the pathological features of each disease, we reviewed 95 PSP cases and 30 CBD cases that were confirmed at autopsy. TAs exhibit a radial arrangement of thin, long, branching accumulated tau protein from the cytoplasm to the proximal processes of astrocytes. APs show a corona-like arrangement of tau aggregates in the distal portions of astrocytic processes and are composed of fuzzy, short processes. Immunoelectron microscopic examination using quantum dot nanocrystals revealed filamentous tau accumulation of APs located in the immediate vicinity of the synaptic structures, which suggested synaptic dysfunction by APs. The pathological subtypes of PSP and CBD have been proposed to ensure that the clinical phenotypes are in accordance with the pathological distribution and degenerative changes. The pathological features of PSP are divided into 3 representative subtypes: typical PSP type, pallido-nigro-luysian type (PNL type), and CBD-like type. CBD is divided into three pathological subtypes: typical CBD type, basal ganglia- predominant type, and PSP-like type. TAs are found exclusively in PSP, while APs are exclusive to CBD, regardless of the pathological subtypes, although some morphological variations exist, especially with regard to TAs. The overlap of the pathological distribution of PSP and CBD makes their clinical diagnosis complicated, although the presence of TAs and APs differentiate these two diseases. The characteristics of tau accumulation in both neurons and glia suggest a different underlying mechanism with regard to the sites of tau aggregation and fibril formation between PSP and CBD: proximal-dominant aggregation of TAs and formation of filamentous NFTs in PSP in contrast to the distal-dominant aggregation of APs and formation of less filamentous pretangles in CBD. PMID:25124031

Yoshida, Mari

2014-12-01

357

Learning of grasp control in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

This study examined whether children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) have anticipatory control of fingertip forces during lifts of familiar objects, and what type of practice (blocked or random) best enhances the retention of anticipatory control during lifts of novel objects. Eighteen children with hemiplegic CP (7 females, 11 males; 7 to 14 years of age, mean age 10 years, SD 1.8) and 18 age-matched typically developing children (8 males, 10 females; mean age 10.4 years, SD 1.7) participated in the study. In the first experiment the children lifted familiar objects of various weights and sizes five times each, while the vertical lifting (load) force was measured. Most participants demonstrated higher rates of load force increase for heavier (and larger) objects already during the first lift, indicating anticipatory control. Furthermore, the load force rates generally were similar across the five lifts for each object, suggesting that they had stable representations of the objects' properties. In the second experiment children lifted three novel objects varying in weight (but identical in volume) 27 times each, in either a blocked or a random order, followed by nine immediate and nine delayed (24 hours) retention trials. Blocked practice resulted in greater differentiation of the force rates between objects during acquisition than did random practice. Both practice schedules resulted in similar retention. These findings suggest that children with hemiplegic CP have a priori internal representations used for anticipatory force scaling with familiar objects. Furthermore, the results indicate that these children can form and retain internal representations of novel objects for anticipatory control, irrespective of the type of practice schedule employed. Thus, clinically based practice sessions that incorporate lifts with novel objects may enhance anticipatory force scaling and related prehensile function in children with hemiplegic CP. PMID:14580130

Duff, Susan V; Gordon, Andrew M

2003-11-01

358

Drooling, saliva production, and swallowing in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Fourteen participants (six females, eight males) ranging in age from 7 years 11 months to 18 years 2 months (mean 11y 7mo) with a confirmed diagnosis of spastic cerebral palsy (CP) were included in the study. Participants included those who drooled (CP+, n=14); age- and sex-matched children with spastic CP who were dry to mild and never to infrequent droolers (CP-, n=14) as well as typically developing peers (CTRL, n=14) served as controls. Frequency of swallowing was measured by using simultaneous cervical ausculation and videotaping of the head and neck. Saliva production was measured with the Saxon test, a simple gauze-chewing procedure. In addition, Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI), Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-3 (TONI-3), dysarthria severity scale, and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) scores were obtained for each participant. Both groups of participants with CP tended to swallow less frequently than typically developing participants and tended to produce less saliva than typically developing controls; however, these differences were not statistically significant. No correlation was found between amount of saliva produced and amount drooled (r=0.245). An analysis of variance (ANOVA) conducted on the PEDI functional skills mean scores indicated significant differences between the three groups (F(2,39)=23.522,p<0.0001). Likewise, an ANOVA conducted on the TONI-3 scores revealed statistically significant differences between the three groups (F(2,39)=31.761, p<0.0001). A Spearman's rho correlation indicated that GMFCS scores were not significantly correlated with drooling severity (Spearman's rho correlation=0.3951,p=0.037). Drooling severity was found to be positively correlated with dysarthria severity (Spearman's rho correlation=0.82,p<0.0001). These findings suggest that drooling in patients with CP is related to swallowing difficulties rather than hypersalivation. PMID:15581152

Senner, Jill E; Logemann, Jerilyn; Zecker, Steven; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

2004-12-01

359

Neuroradiological and Neurophysiological Characteristics of Patients With Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate neuroradiological and neurophysiological characteristics of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy (CP), by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), voxel-based morphometry (VBM), diffusion tensor tractography (DTT), and motor evoked potential (MEP). Methods Twenty-three patients with dyskinetic CP (13 males, 10 females; mean age 34 years, range 16-50 years) were participated in this study. Functional evaluation was assessed by the Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) and Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS). Brain imaging was performed on 3.0 Tesla MRI, and volume change of the grey matter was assessed using VBM. The corticospinal tract (CST) and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) were analyzed by DTT. MEPs were recorded in the first dorsal interossei, the biceps brachii and the deltoid muscles. Results Mean BADS was 16.4±5.0 in ambulatory group (GMFCS levels I, II, and III; n=11) and 21.3±3.9 in non-ambulatory group (GMFCS levels IV and V; n=12). Twelve patients showed normal MRI findings, and eleven patients showed abnormal MRI findings (grade I, n=5; grade II, n=2; grade III, n=4). About half of patients with dyskinetic CP showed putamen and thalamus lesions on MRI. Mean BADS was 20.3±5.7 in normal MRI group and 17.5±4.0 in abnormal MRI group. VBM showed reduced volume of the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. In DTT, no abnormality was observed in CST, but not in SLF. In MEPs, most patients showed normal central motor conduction time. Conclusion These results support that extrapyramidal tract, related with basal ganglia circuitry, may be responsible for the pathophysiology of dyskinetic CP rather than CST abnormality. PMID:24855613

Park, Byung-Hyun; Seo, Jeong-Hwan; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Chung, Gyung-Ho

2014-01-01

360

Aculaser therapy for the treatment of cerebral palsy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensoryneural deafness and speech disorders. In all 500 children were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 4 years from December 2006 till December 2010. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for a minimum of 08 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 342 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 294 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 252 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 182 children showing 72% success rate, out of 96 children with Cortical Blindness 60 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 210 children with Hearing Difficulties, 126 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 380 children with Speech Disorders 244 showed improvement reflecting 64 % improvement rate, out of 192 children with Hemiplegia 142 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 152 children with Quadriplegia 104 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 116 children with Paraplegia of lower limbs 88 showed improvement in weight bearing, standing and movement accounting for 76% improvement rate.

Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Ammad, Haseeb U.

2012-03-01

361

Characterization of tau oligomeric seeds in progressive supranuclear palsy  

PubMed Central

Background Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy which is primarily defined by the deposition of tau into globose-type neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Tau in its native form has important functions for microtubule dynamics. Tau undergoes alternative splicing in exons 2, 3, and 10 which results in six different isoforms. Products of splicing on exon 10 are the most prone to mutations. Three repeat (3R) and four repeat (4R) tau, like other disease-associated amyloids, can form oligomers which may then go on to further aggregate and form fibrils. Recent studies from our laboratory and others have provided evidence that tau oligomers, not NFTs, are the most toxic species in neurodegenerative tauopathies and seed the pathological spread of tau. Results Analysis of PSP brain sections revealed globose-type NFTs, as well as both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated tau oligomers. Analysis of PSP brains via Western blot and ELISA revealed the presence of increased levels of tau oligomers compared to age-matched control brains. Oligomers were immunoprecipitated from PSP brain and were capable of seeding the oligomerization of both 3R and 4R tau isoforms. Conclusions This is the first time tau oligomers have been characterized in PSP. These results indicate that tau oligomers are an important component of PSP pathology, along with NFTs. The ability of PSP brain-derived tau oligomers to seed 3R and 4R tau suggests that these oligomers represent the pathological species responsible for disease propagation and the presence of oligomers in a pure neurodegenerative tauopathy implies a common neuropathological process for tau seen in diseases with other amyloid proteins. PMID:24927818

2014-01-01

362

Ocular disorders in children with spastic subtype of cerebral palsy  

PubMed Central

AIM To document common ocular abnormalities in children with spastic subtype of cerebral palsy (CP) and to find out whether any correlation exists between their occurance and etiologic factors. METHODS Totally 194 patients with the diagnosis of spastic type CP were enrolled in this retrospective study. Detailed ophthalmic examinations were performed. Demographic data and neuroradiological findings were documented. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney U, Pearson Chi-square tests and Student's t tests were used in the statistical analysis. RESULTS The mean age was 64.7±44.2 months on the first ophthalmic examination. Prevalences of diplegia (47.4%) and tetraplegia (36.1%) were found to be higher than the frequency of hemiplegia (16.5%) in our study population. Etiologic factor was asphyxia in 60.8% of the patients. Abnormal ocular findings were present in 78.9% of the patients. Statistically significant poor vision was detected in tetraplegia group among all the spastic ubtypes of CP (P=0.000). Anisometropia and significant refractive error were found in 14.4% and 70.1% of the patients, respectively. Thirty-six children (18.6%) had nystagmus and 107 children (55.2%) had strabismus. Lower gestational age and birth weight were statistically higher in patients with esotropia than exotropia (P=0.009 and P=0.024, respectively). Abnormal morphology of the optic disc was present in 152 eyes (39.2%). Severe periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) was found in 48 patients and statistically significant poor vision was detected in the presence of PVL (P=0.000). CONCLUSION Spastic diplegic or tetraplegic CP patients with positive neuroradiological symptoms, younger gestational age and lower birth weight ought to have detailed ophthalmic examinations as early as possible to provide best visual rehabilitation. PMID:23638425

Ozturk, A.Taylan; Berk, A.Tulin; Yaman, Aylin

2013-01-01

363

Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy.  

PubMed

Background and purpose - The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods - Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991-2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10-20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results - At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9-19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23-25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (? 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation - Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

2014-12-01

364

Finger movement at birth in brachial plexus birth palsy  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate whether the finger movement at birth is a better predictor of the brachial plexus birth injury. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study reviewing pre-surgical records of 87 patients with residual obstetric brachial plexus palsy in study 1. Posterior subluxation of the humeral head (PHHA), and glenoid retroversion were measured from computed tomography or Magnetic resonance imaging, and correlated with the finger movement at birth. The study 2 consisted of 141 obstetric brachial plexus injury patients, who underwent primary surgeries and/or secondary surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Information regarding finger movement was obtained from the patient’s parent or guardian during the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Among 87 patients, 9 (10.3%) patients who lacked finger movement at birth had a PHHA > 40%, and glenoid retroversion < -12°, whereas only 1 patient (1.1%) with finger movement had a PHHA > 40%, and retroversion < -8° in study 1. The improvement in glenohumeral deformity (PHHA, 31.8% ± 14.3%; and glenoid retroversion 22.0° ± 15.0°) was significantly higher in patients, who have not had any primary surgeries and had finger movement at birth (group 1), when compared to those patients, who had primary surgeries (nerve and muscle surgeries), and lacked finger movement at birth (group 2), (PHHA 10.7% ± 15.8%; Version -8.0° ± 8.4°, P = 0.005 and P = 0.030, respectively) in study 2. No finger movement at birth was observed in 55% of the patients in this study group. CONCLUSION: Posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion measurements indicated significantly severe shoulder deformities in children with finger movement at birth, in comparison with those lacked finger movement. However, the improvement after triangle tilt surgery was higher in patients who had finger movement at birth. PMID:23362472

Nath, Rahul K; Benyahia, Mohamed; Somasundaram, Chandra

2013-01-01

365

Early Intervention to Improve Hand Function in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy often have marked hand involvement with excessive thumb adduction and flexion and limited active wrist extension from infancy. Post-lesional aberrant plasticity can lead to progressive abnormalities of the developing motor system. Disturbances of somatosensory and visual function and developmental disregard contribute to difficulties with hand use. Progressive soft tissue and bony changes may occur, leading to contractures, which further limit function in a vicious cycle. Early intervention might help to break this cycle, however, the precise nature and appropriateness of the intervention must be carefully considered. Traditional approaches to the hemiplegic upper limb include medications and botulinum toxin injections to manage abnormalities of tone, and surgical interventions. Therapist input, including provision of orthoses, remains a mainstay although many therapies have not been well evaluated. There has been a recent increase in interventions for the hemiplegic upper limb, mostly aimed outside the period of infancy. These include trials of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and bimanual therapy as well as the use of virtual reality and robot-assisted therapy. In future, non-invasive brain stimulation may be combined with therapy. Interventions under investigation in the infant age group include modified CIMT and action observation therapy. A further approach which may be suited to the infant with thumb-in-palm deformity, but which requires evaluation, is the use of elastic taping. Enhanced cutaneous feedback through mechanical stimulation to the skin provided by the tape during movement has been postulated to modulate ongoing muscle activity. If effective, this would represent a low-cost, safe, widely applicable early intervention. PMID:25610423

Basu, Anna Purna; Pearse, Janice; Kelly, Susan; Wisher, Vicki; Kisler, Jill

2015-01-01

366

Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose — The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods — Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991–2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10–20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results — At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9–19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23–25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (? 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation — Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

2014-01-01

367

A Three-Generation Family with Idiopathic Facial Palsy Suggesting an Autosomal Dominant Inheritance with High Penetrance  

PubMed Central

Idiopathic facial palsy (IFP), also known as Bell's palsy, is a common neurologic disorder, but recurrent and familial forms are rare. This case series presents a three-generation family with idiopathic facial palsy. The mode of inheritance of IFP has previously been suggested as autosomal dominant with low or variable penetrance, but the present family indicates an autosomal dominant trait with high or complete penetrance. Chromosome microarray studies did not reveal a pathogenic copy number variation, which could enable identification of a candidate gene. PMID:25685580

Grønhøj Larsen, Christian; Gyldenløve, Mette; Jønch, Aia Elise; Charabi, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep

2015-01-01

368

RESEARCH Association of cerebral palsy with Apgar score in low and normal birthweight infants: population based cohort study  

E-print Network

Objectives To assess the association of Apgar score 5 minutes after birth with cerebral palsy in both normal weight and low birthweight children, and also the association with the cerebral palsy subdiagnoses of quadriplegia, diplegia, and hemiplegia. Design Population based cohort study. Setting The Medical Birth Registry of Norway was used to identify all babies born between 1986 and 1995. These data were linked to the Norwegian Registry of Cerebral Palsy in Children born 1986-95, which was established on the basis of discharge diagnoses at all paediatric departments in Norway. Population All singletons without malformations born in Norway during 1986-95 and who survived the first year of

unknown authors

369

Gait Patterns in Hemiplegic Children with Cerebral Palsy: Comparison of Right and Left Hemiplegia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aims of this study are to compare quantitatively the gait strategy of the right and left hemiplegic children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) using gait analysis. The gait strategy of 28 right hemiparetic CP (RHG) and 23 left hemiparetic CP (LHG) was compared using gait analysis (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters) and considering the hemiplegic…

Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

2010-01-01

370

Trends in Prevalence and Characteristics of Cerebral Palsy among Icelandic Children Born 1990 to 2003  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To describe trends in cerebral palsy (CP) prevalence, severity, and associated impairments among 139 Icelandic children (65 males, 74 females) born from 1990 to 1996 (period one) and 1997 to 2003 (period two). Method: A population-based study using systematically collected data on motor functioning and associated impairments of children with…

Sigurdardottir, Solveig; Thorkelsson, Thordur; Halldorsdottir, Margret; Thorarensen, OLafur; Vik, Torstein

2009-01-01

371

Epitope expression and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein in corticobasal degeneration: differentiation from progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a rare, progressive neurological disorder characterized by widespread neuronal and glial accumulation of abnormal tau protein. Using immunohistochemistry we analyzed tau epitope expression and phosphorylation state in CBD and compared them to cytoskeletal changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Epitopes spanning the entire length of the tau protein were present in CBD

M. B. Feany; H. Ksiezak-Reding; W.-K. Liu; I. Vincent; S.-H. C. Yen; D. W. Dickson

1995-01-01

372

Locomotor Tests Predict Community Mobility in Children and Youth with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ambulatory children and youth with cerebral palsy have limitations in locomotor capacities and in community mobility. The ability of three locomotor tests to predict community mobility in this population (N = 49, 27 boys, 6-16 years old) was examined. The tests were a level ground walking test, the 6-min-Walk-Test (6MWT), and two tests of advanced…

Ferland, Chantale; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree

2012-01-01

373

A Systematic Review of Measures of Activity Limitation for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This systematic review critically appraises the literature on the psychometric properties and clinical utility of evaluative activity limitation outcome measures used for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The search strategy yielded 29 articles for eight outcome measures that met the inclusion criteria for the review. The Gross Motor Function…

Harvey, Adrienne; Robin, Jonathan; Morris, Meg E.; Graham, H. Kerr; Baker, Richard

2008-01-01

374

Bone density and size in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy TISHYA AL WREN1  

E-print Network

; 18 males, 19 females) and 37 children in a comparison group (same age and sex distribu- tionsBone density and size in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy TISHYA AL WREN1 | DAVID C LEE1 | ROBERT M KAY1 | FREDERICK J DOREY2 | VICENTE GILSANZ3 1 Children's Orthopaedic Center, Children

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

375

Communication Breakdown at Home and at School in Young Children with Cerebral Palsy and Severe Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data about communication breakdown were gathered through interviews of care providers and mailed surveys of special education teachers and speech and language pathologists of 17 children with cerebral palsy and significant language delay. Most care providers indicated that children used personalized communication systems and that these frequently…

Snell, Martha E.; Chen, Lih-Yuan; Allaire, Janet H.; Park, Eunhye

2008-01-01

376

Being in Pain: A Phenomenological Study of Young People with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the experience and impact of chronic pain on the lives of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Six participants with CP (four males, two females; age range 14-24y) who were known to experience chronic pain participated in individual in-depth interviews. Five participants had quadriplegia and used wheelchairs;…

Castle, Kirstyn; Imms, Christine; Howie, Linsey

2007-01-01

377

Active Citizens or Passive Recipients: How Australian Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy Define Citizenship  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Citizenship participation by young adults has reciprocal benefits both for the individual and for society. This paper provides an insight into the ways young people with cerebral palsy (CP) perceive their citizenship experiences, and also examines factors which may influence citizenship participation for this group. Method: Qualitative…

Yeung, Polly H. Y.; Passmore, Anne E.; Packer, Tanya L.

2008-01-01

378

Achilles Tendon Length and Medial Gastrocnemius Architecture in Children With Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

Achilles Tendon Length and Medial Gastrocnemius Architecture in Children With Cerebral Palsy. Methods: Ultrasound was used to measure Achilles tendon length and muscle-tendon architectural parameters and Scheffe post hoc tests. Results: The CP groups had longer Achilles tendons and shorter muscle bellies than

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

379

The Effect of a Series of Television Science Lessons on Learning by Cerebral Palsied Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thirty-one cerebral palsied children at the third grade level were taught a science unit on weather and climate. An experimental group (randomly assigned) received instruction via closed circuit television and earphones, and the control group viewed and heard the instructor directly. A microphone in front of each child in the experimental group…

Nicholson, Charles Lemuel

380

Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Related Factors in Turkey: A Controlled Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary objective of the study was to determine whether there was any difference, with respect to depression, between mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and mothers of healthy children. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether some additional factors had an impact on the depression of the mothers. The study included 49…

Unsal-Delialioglu, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Ozel, Sumru; Gorgulu, Gulderen

2009-01-01

381

Effects of Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy for Spastic Diplegia on Hip Migration in Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In spastic diplegia of cerebral palsy, migration of the femoral head beyond a lateral edge of the acetabulum is a common orthopedic deformity and requires surgical treatment. We investigated whether selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic diplegia halts or exacerbates lateral hip migration. The Reimers migration percentage computed from preoperative and postoperative hip radiographs was used as an index of the

T. S. Park; George P. Vogler; Lawrence H. Phillips; Bruce A. Kaufman; Madeleine R. Ortman; Stephanie M. McClure; Patricia E. Gaffney

1994-01-01

382

Selective dorsal rhizotomy as a treatment option for children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is the most common motor disorder originating in childhood and spasticity is the most frequent manifestation. The treatment strategies to reduce spasticity and thereby ameliorate the attendant gait abnormalities have included physiotherapy, orthoses, antispastic medications, orthopaedic surgery and neurosurgery. Of these, the neurosurgical procedure known as selective dorsal rhizotomy has gained widespread exposure, and indeed acceptance, over the

Christopher L. Vaughan; Nivedita Subramanian; Monica E. Busse

383

Selective dorsal rhizotomy as a treatment option for children with spastic cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is the most common motor disorder originating in childhood and spasticity is the most frequent manifestation. The treatment strategies to reduce spasticity and thereby ameliorate the attendant gait abnormalities have included physiotherapy, orthoses, antispastic medications, orthopaedic surgery and neurosurgery. Of these, the neurosurgical procedure known as selective dorsal rhizotomy has gained widespread exposure, and indeed acceptance, over the

Christopher L Vaughan; Nivedita Subramanian; Monica E Busse

1998-01-01

384

Electrophysiologic Studies in Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy for Spasticity in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A group of 20 children with spastic cerebral palsy underwent selective dorsal rhizotomy for alleviation of spasticity. Pre- and postoperatively, cortical somatosensory evoked responses (cSSEP), H reflex and F wave studies were done. Clinically there was dramatic reduction of tone without noticeable sensory loss. The electrophysiologic studies showed several findings: (1) many children have abnormal cSSEP preoperatively; (2) surgery seldom

Leslie D. Cahan; M. S. Kundi; David McPherson; Arnold Starr; Warwick Peacock

1987-01-01

385

Variation between Centers in Electrophysiologic Techniques Used in Lumbosacral Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy for Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extent of variation between centers in the electrophysiologic techniques used in lumbosacral selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for spastic cerebral palsy was studied using a questionnaire survey. Nineteen centers completed the questionnaire, and the responses were analyzed for those 16 centers in which the extent of dorsal root section was guided by intraoperative electrophysiologic responses. Consistent techniques included: use of

Paul Steinbok; John R. Kestle

1996-01-01

386

Dynamic properties of partially denervated muscle in children with brachial plexus birth palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contraction time, time to peak rate of tension development, half-relaxation time and maximum twitch tension of partially denervated flexor carpi ulnaris muscle were measured in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. The extent of weakness of the affected muscle was assessed by expressing its maximum twitch tension as a percentage of the tension of the contralateral normal muscle. Contraction time,

M Stefanova-Uzunova; L Stamatova; V Gatev

1981-01-01

387

Relationship between Gross Motor Capacity and Daily-Life Mobility in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between gross motor capacity and daily-life mobility in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to explore the moderation of this relationship by the severity of CP. Method: Cross-sectional analysis in a cohort study with a clinic-based sample of children with CP (n=116; 76 males, 40…

Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Gorter, Jan Willem; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; van Schie, Petra Em; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Lindeman, Eline; Jongmans, Marian J.

2010-01-01

388

Progressive supranuclear palsy: extensive neuropil threads in addition to neurofibrillary tangles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Light microscopic immunohistochemical investigations were performed on neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) in four histologically confirmed cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in five patients with a progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The antibody panel included antisera to the neuronal microtubule-associated protein, tau, and to isolated paired helical filaments (PHF), as well as mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to phosphorylated epitopes on high and

A. Probst; D. Langui; C. Lautenschlager; J. Ulrich; J. P. Brion; B. H. Anderton

1988-01-01

389

Strong association of a novel Tau promoter haplotype in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The microtubule associated protein, tau, is found in fibrillar lesions that characterise progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and related tauopathies. Mutations in the tau gene in frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) and genetic association of the H1 haplotype of the tau gene with PSP has firmly established a direct role for tau in disease pathogenesis. However, the

Rohan de Silva; Markus Weiler; Huw R Morris; Eden R Martin; Nicholas W Wood; Andrew J Lees

2001-01-01

390

The significance of cortical pathology in progressive supranuclear palsy: Clinico-pathological data in 10 cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Several observations suggest that the cortical lesions of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) play a role in the clinical symptoms and signs of the disease, although direct evidence for this is lacking. We addressed the significance of these lesions in a series of 10 cases of definite PSP. Tau positive cortical lesions were constant, and the mean density of neurofibriUary

M. Verny; C. Duyckaerts; Y. Agid; J.-J. Hauw

1996-01-01

391

Magnetic resonance imaging-based volumetry differentiates progressive supranuclear palsy from corticobasal degeneration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because there are no biological markers for the clinical diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD), we established a mathematical model based on three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to differentiate between these parkinsonian disorders. Using MR imaging-based volumetry we studied the pattern of atrophic changes in patients with probable, possible or definite PSP (n = 33) or

Klaus Gröschel; Till-Karsten Hauser; Andreas Luft; Nicholas Patronas; Johannes Dichgans; Irene Litvan; Jörg B Schulz

2004-01-01

392

The pedunculopontine nucleus in Parkinson's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy and Alzheimer's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant loss of neurons in the pedunculopontine nucleus pars compacta (PPNc), a putative cholinergic nucleus involved in modulating somatic motor activities, has been demonstrated in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease but not in Alzheimer's disease. A morphometric study of this nucleus was performed in two cases of PSP and in a cohort of cases of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's

K Jellinger

1988-01-01

393

Initial letter and semantic category fluency in Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type, 10 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, and 10 patients with Huntington's disease were compared on two types of verbal fluency task--namely, initial letter fluency and category (semantic) fluency. The groups were carefully matched for overall level of dementia on the dementia rating scale, and were compared with 25 age matched normal controls. The

A Rosser; J R Hodges

1994-01-01

394

The prevalence of progressive supranuclear palsy (Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome) in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary We performed a study to estimate the point prevalence of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) in the UK at national, regional and community levels. A 'Russian doll' design was used in which the population denominator for each of the three studies was successively smaller, whilst the method of case ascertainment became increasingly more rigorous. The NINDS-SPSP (National Institute of Neurological

U. Nath; Y. Ben-Shlomo; R. G. Thomson; H. R. Morris; N. W. Wood; A. J. Lees; D. J. Burn

2001-01-01

395

Ballooned neurons in progressive supranuclear palsy are usually due to concurrent argyrophilic grain disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a sporadic multisystem neurodegenerative disorder that is one of the major causes of parkinsonism, which shares common biochemical and genetic features with corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Ballooned neurons (BN) are one of the histopathologic hallmarks of CBD and their presence is a neuropathologic feature that helps differentiate PSP from CBD, since BN are uncommon in PSP.

Takashi Togo; Dennis W. Dickson

2002-01-01

396

Clinical deficits correlate with regional cerebral atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Most cerebral imaging studies of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) have noted subtle atrophy, although the full extent of atrophy and any correlates to clinical features have not been determined. We used voxel-based morphometry analysis of grey matter, white matter and CSF on MRI brain scans to map the statistical probability of regional tissue atrophy in 21 patients

N. J. Cordato; A. J. Duggins; G. M. Halliday; J. G. L. Morris; C. Pantelis

2005-01-01

397

Relationship between brainstem MRI and pathological findings in progressive supranuclear palsy — study in autopsy cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between the features of MRI in brainstem and pathological findings was investigated in eight autopsy cases with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Features of T1-weighted images at midbrain level were atrophy of tegmentum and tectum, and dilatation of aqueduct. Histologically, these findings were consistent with atrophy of periaqueductal gray matter, quadrigeminal plate, and tegmentum. In these lesions, we detected

Ikuko Aiba; Yoshio Hashizume; Mari Yoshida; Satoshi Okuda; Nobuyuki Murakami; Nobuko Ujihira

1997-01-01

398

Relationship between Frontotemporal Dementia and Corticobasal Degeneration\\/Progressive Supranuclear Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) were described as separate entities, but prior to that an extrapyramidal variety of Pick’s disease was recognized. Subsequently a pathological overlap between these conditions and clinical overlap between frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, corticobasal degeneration syndrome and more recently PSP was recognized. Initially only the movement disorder had been emphasized, but now

Andrew Kertesz; David Munoz

2004-01-01

399

The topographic distribution of brain atrophy in Huntington's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topographic distribution of brain atrophy was quantified by image analysis of fixed coronal brain slices from 12 patients dying with Huntington's disease (HD) and from 4 other patients dying with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). In HD, atrophy was maximal within the caudate nucleus, putamen and globus pallidus. However, the cerebral cortex was also atrophied with reductions in cross-sectional area

D. M. A. Mann; R. Oliver; J. S. Snowden

1993-01-01

400

The fine structure of subcortical neurofibrillary tangles in progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fine structure of subcortical neurofibrillary tangles was investigated in pallidum, substantia nigra, periaqueductal gray, pontine reticular gray, and dentate nucleus of 5 autopsy cases of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Only tangles due to straight 150 Å wide filaments have been detected. These findings, obtained from a large series of cases and areas examined, confirm previous observations on the fine structure

O. Bugiani; G. L. Mancardi; A. Brusa; A. Ederli

1979-01-01

401

Longitudinal MRI in progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy: rates and regions of atrophy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rate of brain atrophy and its relationship to clinical disease progression in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) is not clear. Twenty-four patients with PSP, 11 with MSA-P (Parkinsonian variant), 12 with Parkinson's disease, and 18 healthy control subjects were recruited for serial MRI scans, clinical assessments and formal neuropsychological evaluations in order to measure brain

Dominic C. Paviour; Shona L. Price; Marjan Jahanshahi; Andrew J. Lees; Nick C. Fox

2006-01-01

402

Pathology of the dentate nucleus in progressive supranuclear palsy: a histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dentate nucleus pathology was studied histologically and immunohistochemically in four cases and ultrastructurally in three cases of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). In addition to neurofibrillary changes, there were ill-defined clumps of eosinophilic granular structures, named grumose degeneration (GD). GD was observed in three of the four cases; it was not seen in a case exhibiting severe Purkinje cell loss. In

H. Mizusawa; S.-H. Yen; A. Hirano; J. F. Llena

1989-01-01

403

A comparison of tau protein in cerebrospinal fluid between corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many clinical and pathological discussions have been focused on the difficulty of differential diagnosis between corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) in recent years. This study was conducted to evaluate the usefulness of tau proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for the differentiation of these two diseases. Subjects consisted of 10 patients with CBD (four males and six females

Katsuya Urakami; Masatada Mori; Kenji Wada; Hisanori Kowa; Takao Takeshima; Hiroyuki Arai; Hidetada Sasaki; Mitsuyasu Kanai; Mikio Shoji; Kaoru Ikemoto; Mitsunori Morimatsu; Chikanori Hikasa; Kenji Nakashima

1999-01-01

404

What are the Best Animal Models for Testing Early Intervention in Cerebral Palsy?  

PubMed Central

Interventions to treat cerebral palsy should be initiated as soon as possible in order to restore the nervous system to the correct developmental trajectory. One drawback to this approach is that interventions have to undergo exceptionally rigorous assessment for both safety and efficacy prior to use in infants. Part of this process should involve research using animals but how good are our animal models? Part of the problem is that cerebral palsy is an umbrella term that covers a number of conditions. There are also many causal pathways to cerebral palsy, such as periventricular white matter injury in premature babies, perinatal infarcts of the middle cerebral artery, or generalized anoxia at the time of birth, indeed multiple causes, including intra-uterine infection or a genetic predisposition to infarction, may need to interact to produce a clinically significant injury. In this review, we consider which animal models best reproduce certain aspects of the condition, and the extent to which the multifactorial nature of cerebral palsy has been modeled. The degree to which the corticospinal system of various animal models human corticospinal system function and development is also explored. Where attempts have already been made to test early intervention in animal models, the outcomes are evaluated in light of the suitability of the model.

Clowry, Gavin John; Basuodan, Reem; Chan, Felix

2014-01-01

405

Children with Severe Cerebral Palsy: An Educational Guide. Guides for Special Education No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide, intended to help teachers, parents, and community workers throughout the world develop educational services for children with severe cerebral palsy, is published in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, and Chinese. The 11 practitioner-contributed chapters stress specific intervention techniques based on the practitioners' own experiences…

Rye, Henning, Ed.; Skjorten, Miriam Donath, Ed.

406

Physical Activity in a Total Population of Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aims of this study were to describe the participation in physical activity of children with cerebral palsy (CP) at school and during leisure time and to identify characteristics associated with physical activity. The frequency of receiving physiotherapeutic interventions were described as a variable of interest. A total population of 364…

Lauruschkus, Katarina; Westbom, Lena; Hallstrom, Inger; Wagner, Philippe; Nordmark, Eva

2013-01-01

407

Stationary Cycling and Children with Cerebral Palsy: Case Reports for Two Participants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These case reports describe a stationary cycling intervention and outcomes for two child participants (P1 and P2) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. Each child completed a 12-week, 30-session cycling intervention consisting of strengthening and cardiorespiratory fitness phases. P1 exhibited higher training intensities, particularly during the…

Siebert, Kara L.; DeMuth, Sharon K.; Knutson, Loretta M.; Fowler, Eileen G.

2010-01-01

408

Acceptability and Potential Effectiveness of a Foot Drop Stimulator in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: Ankle-foot orthoses are the standard of care for foot drop in cerebral palsy (CP), but may overly constrain ankle movement and limit function in those with mild CP. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be a less restrictive and more effective alternative, but has rarely been used in CP. The primary objective of this study was to…

Prosser, Laura A.; Curatalo, Lindsey A.; Alter, Katharine E.; Damiano, Diane L.

2012-01-01

409

Oromotor Dysfunction and Communication Impairments in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Register Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To report the prevalence, clinical associations, and trends over time of oromotor dysfunction and communication impairments in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Multiple sources of ascertainment were used and children followed up with a standardized assessment including motor speech problems, swallowing/chewing difficulties,…

Parkes, Jackie; Hill, Nan; Platt, Mary Jane; Donnelly, Caroline

2010-01-01

410

Integrating Neurodevelopmental Treatment and Sensory Integration-Theory and Practice in the Client with Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The client with cerebral palsy often shows signs of problems integrating sensory information in combination with a motor disorder. This may be, in part, due to the initial insult or cause of the CP, but may be made worse by the lack of independent movement and absence of typical development that helps children learn to integrate sensory inputs. Medical issues

Carolyn Murray-Slutsky

411

Medical Expenditures Attributable to Cerebral Palsy and Intellectual Disability among Medicaid-Enrolled Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study estimated medical expenditures attributable to cerebral palsy (CP) among children enrolled in Medicaid, stratified by the presence of co-occurring intellectual disability (ID), relative to children without CP or ID. The MarketScan[R] Medicaid Multi-State database was used to identify children with CP for 2003-2005 by using the…

Kancherla, Vijaya; Amendah, Djesika D.; Grosse, Scott D.; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn; Van Naarden Braun, Kim

2012-01-01

412

Bilateral facial palsy: a form of neuroborreliosis presentation in paediatric age  

PubMed Central

Bilateral facial palsy (BFP) is a very uncommon entity, particularly in the paediatric age group. Despite its several aetiologies, neuroborreliosis should be suspected, especially in children from endemic areas presenting with acute neurological disease of unknown cause. We present two cases of BFPs as the presenting forms of neuroborreliosis. PMID:23396928

Francisco, Telma; Marques, Marília; Vieira, José Pedro; Brito, Maria João

2013-01-01

413

The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

2011-01-01

414

Mirror Visual Feedback Induces Lower Neuromuscular Activity in Children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the effects of mirror feedback information on neuromuscular activation during bimanual coordination in eight children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and a matched control group. The "mirror box" creates a visual illusion, which gives rise to a visual perception of a zero lag, symmetric movement between the two…

Feltham, Max G.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

2010-01-01

415

Outcome Assessments in Children with Cerebral Palsy, Part II: Discriminatory Ability of Outcome Tools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discriminatory ability of several pediatric outcome tools was assessed relative to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level in patients with cerebral palsy. Five hundred and sixty-two patients (400 with diplegia, 162 with hemiplegia; 339 males, 223 females; age range 4-18y, mean 11y 1mo [SD 3y 7mo]), classified as GMFCS Levels I to…

Bagley, Anita M; Gorton, George; Oeffinger, Donna; Barnes, Douglas; Calmes, Janine; Nicholson, Diane; Damiano, Diane; Abel, Mark; Kryscio, Richard; Rogers, Sarah; Tylkowski, Chester

2007-01-01

416

Relationships between Respiratory Muscle Strength and Daily Living Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common childhood disorder characterized by motor disability. Children with CP are at risk of developing significant respiratory problems associated with insufficient respiratory muscle strength. It is crucial to identify important factors which are associated with the limitations in daily living function in such children.…

Wang, Hui-Yi; Chen, Chien-Chih; Hsiao, Shih-Fen

2012-01-01

417

Predictors of Reading Comprehension in Children with Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predictors of reading comprehension were evaluated in 41 children with cerebral palsy and 74 typically developing children between the ages of 6 and 12 years. Regression analyses were conducted to determine the relative contributions of measures of phonemic awareness, receptive vocabulary, and general reasoning to variance in reading comprehension. All three independent variables were statistically significant predictors of reading comprehension

Shana Asbell; Jacobus Donders; Marie Van Tubbergen; Seth Warschausky

2010-01-01

418

Typical and Atypical (Cerebral Palsy) Development of Unimanual and Bimanual Grasp Planning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the present study we tested 13 children with cerebral palsy (CP) and 24 typically developing children (7-12 years old) in a unimanual and bimanual motor planning task. We focused on two research questions: (1) How does motor planning develop in children with and without CP? and (2) Is motor planning facilitated when the task is performed with…

Janssen, Loes; Steenbergen, Bert

2011-01-01

419

A Systematic Review of Common Physiotherapy Interventions in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This systematic review focused on the common conventional physiotherapy interventions used with children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 4 to 18 years, and critically appraised the recent evidence of each of these interventions using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The search strategy yielded 34 articles after…

Martin, Liz; Baker, Richard; Harvey, Adrienne

2010-01-01

420

Evaluating Neurodevelopmental Theory and Training with Cerebral Palsied, Severely Handicapped Students. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effectiveness and theoretical validity of Neurodevelopmental Treatment (NDT), based on neuromotor development among nonhandicapped infants and young children, was investigated across seven cerebral palsied, severely handicapped children, ages 2 1/2 to 12 years. Results indicated that training had a statistically significant effect for four…

Guess, Doug; Noonan, Mary Jo

421

Intra- and Inter-Observer Reliability of the Trunk Impairment Scale for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Standardized scales to evaluate qualities of trunk movements in children with dysfunction are sparse. An examination of the reliability of scales that may be useful in the clinic is important. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Standardized scales are…

Saether, Rannei; Jorgensen, Lone

2011-01-01

422

Neurotropic viruses and cerebral palsy: population based case-control study  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the association between cerebral palsy and direct evidence for perinatal exposure to neurotropic viruses. Design Population based case-control study. Setting Adelaide Women's and Children's Hospital Research Laboratory. Participants and main outcome measures Newborn screening cards of 443 white case patients with cerebral palsy and 883 white controls were tested for viral nucleic acids from enteroviruses and herpes viruses by using polymerase chain reaction. Herpes group A viruses included herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), and herpes group B viruses included varicella zoster virus (VZV) and human herpes viruses 6 and 7 (HHV-6 and HHV-7). Results The prevalence of viral nucleic acids in the control population was high: 39.8% of controls tested positive, and the prevalence was highest in preterm babies. The detection of herpes group B viral nucleic acids increased the risk of developing cerebral palsy (odds ratio 1.68, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 2.59). Conclusions Perinatal exposure to neurotropic viruses is associated with preterm delivery and cerebral palsy. PMID:16399770

Gibson, Catherine S; MacLennan, Alastair H; Goldwater, Paul N; Haan, Eric A; Priest, Kevin; Dekker, Gustaaf A

2006-01-01

423

Action Planning in Typically and Atypically Developing Children (Unilateral Cerebral Palsy)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the present study, we investigated the development of action planning in children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP, aged 3-6 years, n = 24) and an age matched control group. To investigate action planning, participants performed a sequential movement task. They had to grasp an object (a wooden play sword) and place the sword in a hole in a…

Craje, Celine; Aarts, Pauline; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria; Steenbergen, Bert

2010-01-01

424

Bilateral third and unilateral sixth nerve palsies as early presenting signs of metastatic prostatic carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose To report four cases of cranial nerve palsy, which presented to the ophthalmologist as the only or one of the earliest manifestations of prostatic carcinoma. This is an infrequent complication of metastatic prostatic carcinoma usually only occurring late in the disease process in those with a history of prostatic carcinoma.Methods The case records of four patients with a history

C E McAvoy; S Kamalarajab; R Best; S Rankin; J Bryars; K Nelson

2002-01-01

425

Assessment of Postural Control in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aimed to review studies that assessed postural control (PC) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and describe the methods used to investigate postural control in this population. It also intended to describe the performance of children with CP in postural control. An extensive database search was performed using the keywords: postural…

Pavao, Silvia Leticia; dos Santos, Adriana Neves; Woollacott, Marjorie Hines; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

2013-01-01

426

The Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme for cerebral palsy: an end to the "forensic lottery"?  

PubMed

The new Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme is set to revolutionise disability support for an estimated 440,000 disabled persons and in particular for over 35,000 victims of cerebral palsy. The current support for sufferers of cerebral palsy is fragmented and their families and carers expend great time and effort accessing a range of different support agencies. The present "forensic lottery" means that only a small percentage of cerebral palsy victims whose injuries have been caused by medical negligence can secure large settlements under civil tort litigation. The NDIS promises a much more equitable scheme where severely disabled children can receive the necessary early intervention, which is so important to their long-term outcome. Such support will be provided irrespective of "fault", although recouping the costs of lifelong care through civil litigation in medical negligence remains an option. Debate continues about the affordability of such an ambitious Scheme. This is no doubt fuelled by the perceived New Zealand experience of its no-fault Accident Compensation Scheme. The NDIS advantage over almost all "no fault" schemes internationally is that it provides unified comprehensive care and support to cerebral palsy sufferers irrespective of a "treatment injury". Determinations for eligibility will no doubt involve extensive medical documentation. Uncertainty remains about the preparedness of the Chief Executive Officer of the NDIS to pursue health providers in civil negligence where treatment injuries may have been causative. PMID:24804524

O'Connor, Mike

2014-03-01

427

Quality of Life of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: Perspectives of Adolescents and Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Quality of life (QOL) has emerged over the past 20 years as an outcome for measuring the effectiveness of health-improvement interventions. The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire for Children (CPQOL-Child) is well regarded and now integrated into research internationally. We describe the results of qualitative research, using grounded…

Davis, Elise; Shelly, Amy; Waters, Elizabeth; MacKinnon, Andrew; Reddihough, Dinah; Boyd, Roslyn; Graham, H. Kerr

2009-01-01

428

Index of mechanical work in gait of children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

The pathological gait of children with cerebral palsy involves higher mechanical work, which limits their ability to function properly in society. Mechanical work is directly related to walking speed and, although a number of studies have been carried out in this field, few of them analysed the effect of the speed. The study aimed to develop standards for mechanical work during gait of children with cerebral palsy depending on the walking speed. The study covered 18 children with cerebral palsy and 14 healthy children. The BTS Smart software and the author's software were used to evaluate mechanical work, kinetic, potential and rotational energy connected with motion of the children body during walk. Compared to healthy subjects, mechanical work in children with cerebral palsy increases with the degree of disability. It can be expressed as a linear function of walking speed and shows strong and statistically significant correlations with walking gait. A negative statistically significant correlation between the degree of disability and walking speed can be observed. The highest contribution to the total mechanical energy during gait is from mechanical energy of the feet. Instantaneous value of rotational energy is 700 times lower than the instantaneous mechanical energy. An increase in walking speed causes the increase in the effect of the index of kinetic energy on total mechanical work. The method described can provide an objective supplementation for doctors and physical therapists to perform a simple and immediate diagnosis without much technical knowledge. PMID:25308510

Dziuba, Alicja Katarzyna; Tylkowska, Ma?gorzata; Jaroszczuk, Sebastian

2014-01-01

429

Motor Control of the Lower Extremity Musculature in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this investigation was to quantify the differences in torque steadiness and variability of the muscular control in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing (TD) children. Fifteen children with CP (age = 14.2 [plus or minus] 0.7 years) that had a Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) score of I-III and 15…

Arpin, David J.; Stuberg, Wayne; Stergiou, Nicholas; Kurz, Max J.

2013-01-01

430

Neuromuscular Adaptations to Eccentric Strength Training in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To determine the neuromuscular outcomes of an eccentric strength-training programme for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: In this randomised, parallel-group trial with waiting control, 14 participants with CP (six males, eight females; mean age 11y, SD 2y range 9-15y), diagnosed with upper-limb spasticity were…

Reid, Siobhan; Hamer, Peter; Alderson, Jacqueline; Lloyd, David

2010-01-01

431

A Survey of Adolescent and Post-Adolescent Cerebral Palsied Individuals Toward Ambulation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attitudes toward their ambulatory status of two groups of cerebral palsied (50 wheelchair status and 54 crutches and braces status) adolescents and young adults were compared. Analysis of questionnaire and demographic survey responses indicated that the wheelchair group viewed ambulation with crutches and braces in a more favorable light than did…

Ottman, Ronald A.

432

Bioplastique medialization therapy improves the quality of life in terminally ill patients with vocal cord palsy.  

PubMed

Unilateral vocal cord palsy can result in a weak breathy voice and an inability to communicate effectively. This study was designed to assess prospectively the efficacy of polymethylsiloxane elastomer (Bioplastique) medialization injection therapy in patients with vocal cord palsy and terminal disease with particular regard to quality of life issues. Patients with unilateral vocal cord palsy secondary to malignant disease were offered Bioplastique injection. A digital voice recording was taken preoperatively and at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. Maximum phonation time (MPT) was recorded at the same intervals, and patients completed two questionnaires: the voice handicap index (VHI) and SF 36 general health questionnaire. Sixteen patients were entered into the study. There was a significant improvement in voice score, MPT, VHI and in three subgroups of the SF 36 at 1 month postoperatively, and the improvement was maintained in the small number who survived to 3 and 6 months. Bioplastique injection for unilateral vocal cord palsy produces a significant improvement in quality of life in addition to measured voice quality in patients with terminal disease. It should be recommended in patients even when the life expectancy is short. PMID:12383303

Alves, C B; Loughran, S; MacGregor, F B; Dey, J I R; Bowie, L J

2002-10-01

433

Prevalence of feeding problems and oral motor dysfunction in children with cerebral palsy: A community survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and nature of feeding difficulties and oral motor dysfunction among a representative sample of 49 children with cerebral palsy (12 to 72 months of age). STUDY DESIGN: A population survey was undertaken by means of a combination of interview and home observational measures. RESULTS: Sucking (57%) and swallowing (38%) problems in the first 12 months

Sheena Reilly; David Skuse; Ximena Poblete

1996-01-01

434

Treadmill Training with Partial Body-Weight Support in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

OKAim: The aim of this systematic review was to examine the literature on the effects of partial body-weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) on functional outcomes and attainment of ambulation. Method: We searched the relevant literature from 1950 to July 2007. We found eight studies on the use of PWSBTT on…

Mutlu, Akmer; Krosschell, Kristin; Spira, Deborah Gaebler

2009-01-01

435

Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

2012-01-01

436

Effectiveness of Adaptive Pretend Play on Affective Expression and Imagination of Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty participating in role-pretending activities. The concept of adaptive play makes play accessible by modifying play materials for different needs or treatment goals for children with CP. This study examines the affective expressions and imagination in children with CP as a function of…

Hsieh, Hsieh-Chun

2012-01-01

437

Emergent Literacy Activities, Instructional Adaptations and School Absence of Children with Cerebral Palsy in Special Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the present study was to get an overview of the emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to normally developing peers. The results showed that there were differences between the groups regarding the amount of emergent literacy instruction. While time…

Peeters, Marieke; de Moor, Jan; Verhoeven, Ludo

2011-01-01

438

Matching Accuracy in Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy during Unimanual and Bimanual Movements with (Mirror) Visual Feedback  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the present study participants with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) were asked to match the position of a target either with the impaired arm only (unimanual condition) or with both arms at the same time (bimanual condition). The target was placed at 4 different locations scaled to the individual maximum reaching distance. To test the…

Smorenburg, Ana R. P.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

2012-01-01

439

Prenatal and perinatal factors and cerebral palsy in very low birth weight infants  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE. To identify prenatal and perinatal characteristics associated with cerebral palsy (CP) in infants born weighing <1500 gm (very low birth weight, VLBW). DESIGN. All 42 VLBW singleton infants with CP born in the period from 1983 to 1985 in a defined population were compared with 75 randomly selected VLBW control infants. RESULTS. Birth in a level I facility was

Judith K. Grether; Karin B. Nelson; E. Stanley Emery; Susan K. Cummins

1996-01-01

440

Autism Spectrum Disorder Phenotype in Children with Ambulatory Cerebral Palsy: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study aims to describe the cognitive profile, autism profile, medical and behavioral presentation of children with a dual diagnosis of cerebral palsy (CP) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Little is known about the dual presentation of CP and ASD. Timely diagnosis is imperative as early intervention may impact a child's developmental…

Smile, S.; Dupuis, A.; MacArthur, C.; Roberts, W.; Fehlings, D.

2013-01-01

441

Context Therapy: A New Intervention Approach for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To describe the development of context therapy, a new intervention approach designed for a randomized controlled trial. Method: Therapists were trained to change task and environmental factors to achieve parent-identified functional goals for children with cerebral palsy. Therapists did not provide any remediation strategies to change the…

Darrah, Johanna; Law, Mary C.; Pollock, Nancy; Wilson, Brenda; Russell, Dianne J.; Walter, Stephen D.; Rosenbaum, Peter; Galuppi, Barb

2011-01-01

442

An Exploration of Loneliness: Communication and the Social Networks of Older People with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: There is a large body of research focusing on the experiences of loneliness of older adults, yet little is known about the loneliness experiences of older adults with lifelong disability. In this paper, the authors present some findings from a larger qualitative study on the loneliness experiences of older people with cerebral palsy.…

Ballin, Liora; Balandin, Susan

2007-01-01

443

Trends in perinatal mortality and cerebral palsy in Western Australia, 1967 to 1985  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To analyse the trends in stillbirths, neonatal deaths, and cerebral palsy in all infants born in Western Australia from 1967 to 1985. To relate these trends to changes in perinatal care, particularly in relation to avoidance of intrapartum asphyxia in term infants and the increased survival of low birthweight infants. DESIGN--Descriptive epidemiological study calculating population rates for perinatal deaths and

F. J. Stanley; L. Watson

1992-01-01

444

Enabling the Children with Cerebral Palsy to Interact Seluk ARTUT, PhD  

E-print Network

Enabling the Children with Cerebral Palsy to Interact Selçuk ARTUT, PhD Sabanci University Abstract of children between the ages of 4 to 7 living with Cerebral Palsyn (CP) who are studying at the TSCF (Turkish Spastic Children Foundation - www.tscv.org.tr) institution. Keywords Human Computer Interaction, Cerebral

Yanikoglu, Berrin

445

Motor Learning of a Bimanual Task in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) have been shown to improve their motor performance with sufficient practice. However, little is known about how they learn goal-oriented tasks. In the current study, 21 children with unilateral CP (age 4-10 years old) and 21 age-matched typically developed children (TDC) practiced a simple bimanual…

Hung, Ya-Ching; Gordon, Andrew M.

2013-01-01

446

The Relationship between Manual Ability and Ambulation in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship between gross motor function and manual ability in 120 adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) (15.2, SD 2.1 years, 59.8% male). Adolescents were evaluated using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS). A neurologist classified CP subtype. Most…

Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Shevell, Michael; Poulin, Chantal; Lach, Lucyna; Law, Mary; Schmitz, Norbert

2013-01-01

447

Twenty Weeks of Computer-Training Improves Sense of Agency in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with cerebral palsy (CP) show alteration of perceptual and cognitive abilities in addition to motor and sensory deficits, which may include altered sense of agency. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether 20 weeks of internet-based motor, perceptual and cognitive training enhances the ability of CP children to determine whether they…

Ritterband-Rosenbaum, A.; Christensen, M. S.; Nielsen, J. B.

2012-01-01

448

Intelligibility of 4-Year-Old Children with and without Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The authors examined speech intelligibility in typically developing (TD) children and 3 groups of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who were classified into speech/language profile groups following Hustad, Gorton, and Lee (2010). Questions addressed differences in transcription intelligibility scores among groups, the effects of utterance…

Hustad, Katherine C.; Schueler, Brynn; Schultz, Laurel; DuHadway, Caitlin

2012-01-01

449

A Neurocognitive Perspective on Developmental Disregard in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A common problem in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) is the asymmetrical development of arm and hand capacity caused by the lack of use of the affected upper limb, or developmental disregard. In this paper, we provide a neuropsychological model that relates developmental disregard to attentional processes and motor learning. From this…

Houwink, Annemieke; Aarts, Pauline B. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Steenbergen, Bert

2011-01-01

450

Social Participation of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: Trade-Offs and Choices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on the findings of a qualitative study about the experiences and perceptions of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) in relation to social participation. A phenomenological approach was used to interview 10 adolescents with CP, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling. An iterative process of data collection…

Stewart, Debra A.; Lawless, John J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Palisano, Robert J.; Freeman, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

2012-01-01

451

Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity among Children with and without Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency is believed to influence children's physical activity (PA), with those more proficient tending to be more active. Children with cerebral palsy (CP), who represent the largest diagnostic group treated in pediatric rehabilitation, have been found to be less active than typically developing children. This…

Capio, Catherine M.; Sit, Cindy H. P.; Abernethy, Bruce; Masters, Rich S. W.

2012-01-01

452

Recommendations for the use of botulinum toxin type A in the management of cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is increasingly being used for the treatment of childhood spasticity, particularly cerebral palsy. However, until very recently, all such use in this indication has been unapproved with no generally accepted treatment protocols, resulting in considerable uncertainty and variation in its use as a therapeutic agent. In view of the increasing awareness of, and interest in,

H. Kerr Graham; K. Roger Aoki; Ilona Autti-Rämö; Roslyn N Boyd; Mauricio R Delgado; Deborah J Gaebler-Spira; Mark E Gormley; Barry M Guyer; Florian Heinen; Andrew F Holton; Dennis Matthews; Guy Molenaers; Francesco Motta; Pedro J Garc??a Ruiz; Jörg Wissel

2000-01-01

453

Efficacy of Intensive Versus Nonintensive Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Metaanalysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A commonly used treatment for cerebral palsy in children is so-called "conventional therapy", which includes physiotherapy or the neurodevelopmental approach. Although more intensive rehabilitative treatment is thought to be more effective than less intensive interventions, this assumption has not been proven. In this study we compared the…

Arpino, Carla

2010-01-01

454

Arithmetic Performance of Children with Cerebral Palsy: The Influence of Cognitive and Motor Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP) often show difficulties in arithmetic compared to their typically developing peers. The present study explores whether cognitive and motor variables are related to arithmetic performance of a large group of primary school children with CP. More specifically, the relative influence of non-verbal…

van Rooijen, Maaike; Verhoeven, Ludo; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Becher, Jules G.; Steenbergen, Bert

2012-01-01

455

Construct Validity of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the construct validity of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A total of 170 QUEST assessments from a convenience sample of 94 children with CP involved in clinical and research treatment programmes (54 males, 40 females; mean age 6y 10mo, SD…

Thorley, Megan; Lannin, Natasha; Cusick, Anne; Novak, Iona; Boyd, Roslyn

2012-01-01

456

Gaze Behaviour during Interception in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Anticipatory gaze behaviour during interceptive movements was investigated in children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy (SUCP), and related to the side of the intracerebral lesion. Five children with lesions of the right hemisphere (RHL) and five children with lesions of the left hemisphere (LHL) had to walk towards and intercept a ball that…

van Kampen, P. M.; Ledebt, A.; Smorenburg, A. R. P.; Vermeulen, R. J.; Kelder, M. E.; van der Kamp, J.; Savelsbergh, G. J. P.

2012-01-01

457

Predicting Speech Intelligibility with a Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method: Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and…

Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

2014-01-01

458

Feeding Interventions for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Review of the Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To examine the evidence of the effectiveness of different feeding interventions for children with cerebral palsy. Methods: A search of 12 electronic databases identified all relevant studies. For each study, the quality of the methods was assessed according to the study design. A total of 33 articles were retrieved, and 21 studies were…

Snider, Laurie; Majnemer, Annette; Darsaklis, Vasiliki

2011-01-01

459

Psychiatric Disorders among Children with Cerebral Palsy at School Starting Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present population study was to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP), as well as the impact of comorbid conditions. A cohort of children with CP born 2001-2003, and living in the Western Health Region of Norway were evaluated at school starting age. Parents were interviewed with the…

Bjorgaas, H. M.; Hysing, M.; Elgen, I.

2012-01-01

460

Relationship between Kinematics, F2 Slope and Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A multimodal approach combining acoustics, intelligibility ratings, articulography and surface electromyography was used to examine the characteristics of dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP). CV syllables were studied by obtaining the slope of F2 transition during the diphthong, tongue-jaw kinematics during the release of the onset consonant,…

Rong, Panying; Loucks, Torrey; Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark

2012-01-01

461

CEREBRAL VENOUS ANGIOMA IN THE PONS ASSOCIATED WITH CONGENITAL PERIPHERAL FACIAL PALSY  

E-print Network

Ilik F, Çaksen H. Cerebral venous angioma in the pons associated with congenital peripheral facial palsy. Case Study and Case Report 2013; 3(2): 61- 64. Congenital facial palsy (CFP) is clinically defined as facial palsy of the 7th cranial nerve which is present at birth or shortly thereafter. Case: A 10-years-old boy was presented with left-sided facial paralysis noticed at birth. There was no history of birth trauma or facial paralysis in his family. Discussion: The facial motor nucleus is located in the lower third of the pons. Peripheral-type FP can result from lesions involving the facial motor nucleus of the pons. In our case, contrast-enhanced cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed 2x1.5 mm venous angioma in the pons. Conclusion: This is the first reported case, to our knowledge, venous angioma in the pons caused congenital facial paralysis. This case shows the MRI examination has a crucial role in the evaluation of patients with CFP and should be present in the diagnostic battery of the CFP. Key words: congenital facial palsy, cerebral venous angioma, pons

unknown authors

462

Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

2012-01-01

463

Assessment of Specific Characteristics of Abnormal General Movements: Does It Enhance the Prediction of Cerebral Palsy?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: Abnormal general movements at around 3 months corrected age indicate a high risk of cerebral palsy (CP). We aimed to determine whether specific movement characteristics can improve the predictive power of definitely abnormal general movements. Method: Video recordings of 46 infants with definitely abnormal general movements at 9 to 13 weeks…

Hamer, Elisa G.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

2011-01-01

464

Modified Constraint-Induced Therapy for Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: Conventional constraint-based therapies are intensive and demanding to implement, particularly for children. Modified forms of constraint-based therapies that are family-centred may be more acceptable and feasible for families of children with cerebral palsy (CP)-but require rigorous evaluation using randomized trials. The aim of this study…

Wallen, Margaret; Ziviani, Jenny; Naylor, Olivia; Evans, Ruth; Novak, Iona; Herbert, Robert D.

2011-01-01

465

Exploring Issues of Participation among Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: What's Important to Them?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine what participation issues are important to adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Two hundred and three adolescents with CP (mean age 16.0 [plus or minus] 1.8 years) were assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). This was done through semistructured interviews by…

Livingston, Michael H.; Stewart, Debra; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

2011-01-01

466

Changes in Mobility of Children with Cerebral Palsy over Time and across Environmental Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined changes in mobility methods of children with cerebral palsy (CP) over time and across environmental settings. Sixty-two children with CP, ages 6-14 years and classified as levels II-IV on the Gross Motor Function Classification System, were randomly selected from a larger data base and followed for three to four years. On each…

Tieman, Beth L.; Palisano, Robert J.; Gracely, Edward J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; O'Neil, Margaret E.

2004-01-01

467

Predictors of Cerebral Palsy in Very Preterm Infants: The EPIPAGE Prospective Population-Based Cohort Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the independent role of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, and several other neonatal and obstetric factors, as potential predictors of cerebral palsy (CP) in a large population-based cohort of very preterm infants. Method: As part of EPIPAGE, a population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data…

Beaino, Ghada; Khoshnood, Babak; Kaminski, Monique; Pierrat, Veronique; Marret, Stephane; Matis, Jacqueline; Ledesert, Bernard; Thiriez, Gerard; Fresson, Jeanne; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Zupan-Simunek, Veronique; Arnaud, Catherine; Burguet, Antoine; Larroque, Beatrice; Breart, Gerard; Ancel, Pierre-Yves

2010-01-01

468

Bilateral facial nerve palsy secondary to the administration of high-dose paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Bilateral facial nerve palsy is an uncommon occurrence. We describe a case of bilateral facial nerve palsy secondary to a single cycle of high-dose paclitaxel therapy (825 mg/m2), in a woman with breast cancer. Prior to her high-dose therapy, she had a residual grade 2 peripheral neuropathy following treatment with ten cycles of standard-dose paclitaxel (total dose 3200 mg). The features of the peripheral neuropathy due to standard-dose paclitaxel, which can be both motor and sensory, are well described. Cumulative paclitaxel dose is considered a risk factor for development of the neuropathy. Although facial nerve palsy secondary to paclitaxel is not previously reported, other cranial nerve toxicity has been described. Consistent with reports of the reversibility of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy, the facial nerve palsies in our patient resolved over 23 months. Ongoing studies of high-dose paclitaxel warrant close attention to its cumulative neurotoxic effects, particularly in patients previously treated with neurotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:10586344

Lee, R T; Oster, M W; Balmaceda, C; Hesdorffer, C S; Vahdat, L T; Papadopoulos, K P

1999-10-01

469

Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event…

van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

2013-01-01

470

Does Surgical Management of the Hand in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy Affect Functional Outcome?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this review was to examine the literature on the effects of surgery of the spastic hand in children with cerebral palsy on functional outcome and muscle coordination. We performed a search of the relevant literature in Medline, Embase, and Biological Abstracts from 1966 to June 2006. The search resulted in eight studies on the effect of…

van Munster, Judith C.; Maathuis, Karel G. B.; Haga, Nienke; Verheij, Nienke P.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

2007-01-01

471

A Predictive Mathematical Model of Muscle Forces for Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine if our previously developed muscle model could be used to predict forces of the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae muscles of children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Twenty-two children with CP (12 males, 10 females; mean age 10y, SD 2y, range 7-13y; Gross Motor Function…

Lee, Samuel C. K.; Ding, Jun; Prosser, Laura A.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A.

2009-01-01

472

Unmet Health Care Needs in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with potentially severe health conditions such as cerebral palsy (CP) are at risk for unmet health care needs. We sought to determine whether children with CP had significantly greater unmet health care needs than children with other special health care needs (SHCN), and whether conditions associated with CP increased the odds of unmet…

Jackson, Katie E.; Krishnaswami, Shanthi; McPheeters, Melissa

2011-01-01

473

Developing and Validating the Communication Function Classification System for Individuals with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The purpose of this study was to create and validate the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP), for use by a wide variety of individuals who are interested in CP. This paper reports the content validity, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability of the CFCS for children with CP.…

Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Paneth, Nigel; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Kent, Raymond D.; Lillie, Janet; Eulenberg, John B.; Chester, Ken, Jr.; Johnson, Brenda; Michalsen, Lauren; Evatt, Morgan; Taylor, Kara

2011-01-01

474

Sit-to-Stand Movement in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Critical Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sit-to-stand (STS) movement is widely performed in daily life and an important pre requisite for acquisition of functional abilities. However, STS is a biomechanical demanding task which requires high levels of neuromuscular coordination, muscle strength and postural control. As children with cerebral palsy (CP) exhibit a series of impairments in…

dos Santos, Adriana Neves; Pavao, Silvia Leticia; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

2011-01-01

475

Development of Non-Verbal Intellectual Capacity in School-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are at greater risk for a limited intellectual development than typically developing children. Little information is available which children with CP are most at risk. This study aimed to describe the development of non-verbal intellectual capacity of school-age children with CP and to examine the…

Smits, D. W.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J. W.; van Schie, P. E.; Becher, J. G.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M. J.

2011-01-01

476

Development of the Gross Motor Function Classification System for Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) for cerebral palsy has been widely used internationally for clinical, research, and administrative purposes. This paper recounts the ideas and work behind the creation of the GMFCS, reports on the lessons learned, and identifies some philosophical challenges inherent in trying to develop an…

Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Palisano, Robert J.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; Galuppi, Barbara E.; Russell, Dianne J.

2008-01-01

477

Clinimetric Properties of the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the criterion-related validity and clinimetric properties of the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation (APCP) for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Eighty-two children with CP (age range, two to five years and 11 months) and their caregivers participated in this study. The APCP consists of diversity and intensity…

Chen, Chia-ling; Chen, Chung-yao; Shen, I-hsuan; Liu, I-Shu; Kang, Lin-ju; Wu, Ching-yi

2013-01-01

478

Energy Efficiency in Gait, Activity, Participation, and Health Status in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the study was to establish if a relationship exists between the energy efficiency of gait, and measures of activity limitation, participation restriction, and health status in a representative sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Secondary aims were to investigate potential differences between clinical subtypes and gross motor…

Kerr, Claire; Parkes, Jackie; Stevenson, Mike; Cosgrove, Aidan P.; McDowell, Brona C.

2008-01-01

479

Physical Activity Measurement Instruments for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: This paper is a systematic review of physical activity measurement instruments for field-based studies involving children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Database searches using PubMed Central, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and PEDro located 12 research papers, identifying seven instruments that met the inclusion…

Capio, Catherine M.; Sit, Cindy H. P.; Abernethy, Bruce; Rotor, Esmerita R.

2010-01-01

480

Characterization of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy: Dependence of Catch Angle on Velocity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To evaluate spasticity under controlled velocities and torques in children with cerebral palsy (CP) using a manual spasticity evaluator. Method: The study involved 10 children with spastic CP (six males, four females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 2y 9mo, range 7-16y; one with quadriplegia, six with right hemiplegia, three with left hemiplegia; Gross…

Wu, Yi-Ning; Ren, Yupeng; Goldsmith, Ashlee; Gaebler, Deborah; Liu, Shu Q.; Zhang, Li-Qun

2010-01-01

481

Amount and Focus of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy for Young Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aims of this study were to describe physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) services for a cohort of 399 children with cerebral palsy (CP), 2-6 years old, residing in the United States and Canada. Parents completed a services questionnaire by telephone interview. Therapists classified children's Gross Motor Function Classification…

Palisano, Robert J.; Begnoche, Denise M.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Chang, Hui-Ju

2012-01-01

482

Ambulatory Activity of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Which Characteristics Are Important?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To assess ambulatory activity of children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 7 to 13 years, and identify associated characteristics. Method: Sixty-two children with spastic CP (39 males, 23 females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 1y 8mo; age range 7-13y), classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I to III, participated.…

van Wely, Leontien; Becher, Jules G.; Balemans, Astrid C. J.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

2012-01-01

483

Stability of Caregiver-Reported Manual Ability and Gross Motor Function Classifications of Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To examine the stability of caregiver-reported classifications of function of children with cerebral palsy (CP) measured 12 months apart. Method: Participants were 86 children (50 males, 36 females) with CP of all motor types and severities who were recruited into a population-based longitudinal study. Children were aged 11 years 8 months (SD…

Imms, Christine; Carlin, John; Eliasson, Ann-Christin

2010-01-01

484

Longitudinal Development of Hand Function in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how the usefulness of the hemiplegic hand develops in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) aged between 18 months and 8 years. Method: A prospective longitudinal study of 43 children (22 males, 21 females) with unilateral CP was conducted. Inclusion age was 18 months to 5 years 4 months (mean 2y…

Holmefur, Marie; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena; Bergstrom, Jakob; Eliasson, Ann-Christin

2010-01-01

485

Self-Concept of Children with Cerebral Palsy Compared with that of Children without Impairment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether the self-concept of children with cerebral palsy (CP) differed from that of children without impairment. Forty-seven children (24 males, 23 females; mean age 11y 8mo [SD 2y 6mo]) with spastic diplegia or hemiplegia were matched with children without impairment. The level of disability of the children with CP was…

Shields, Nora; Loy, Yijun; Murdoch, Alison; Taylor, Nicholas F.; Dodd, Karen J

2007-01-01

486

Determinants of Intensity of Participation in Leisure and Recreational Activities by Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To test a model of child, family, and service determinants of intensity of participation in leisure and recreational activities by children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Participants were 288 children with CP, age range 6 to 12 years (mean 9y 8mo, SD 2y), and their parents from seven children's hospitals. The sample comprised 166 (57.6%)…

Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Orlin, Margo; Oeffinger, Donna; Polansky, Marcy; Maggs, Jill; Bagley, Anita; Gorton, George

2011-01-01

487

Level of Motivation in Mastering Challenging Tasks in Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe and identify factors associated with motivation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Children with CP were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Children were assessed using the Leiter Intelligence Test, the Gross Motor Function Measure, and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale. Parents…

Majnemer, Annette; Shevell, Michael; Law, Mary; Poulin, Chantal; Rosenbaum, Peter

2010-01-01

488

Participation and Enjoyment of Leisure Activities in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to characterize participation in leisure activities in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and identify determinants of greater involvement. Ninety-five children of school age (9y 7mo [SD 2y 1mo]) with CP were recruited, and participation was evaluated with the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment in a…

Majnemer, Annette; Shevell, Michael; Law, Mary; Birnbaum, Rena; Chilingaryan, Gevorg; Rosenbaum, Peter; Poulin, Chantal

2008-01-01

489

Reference Values for Anaerobic Performance and Agility in Ambulatory Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to provide reference values of anaerobic performance and agility in a group of children and adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A total of 300 children (184 males, 116 females) with spastic CP were recruited from 26 rehabilitation centres in six different countries. Of these, 215 were classified at…

Verschuren, Olaf; Bloemen, Manon; Kruitwagen, Cas; Takken, Tim

2010-01-01

490

Measurement of Habitual Physical Activity Performance in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: This systematic review compares the validity, reliability, and clinical use of habitual physical activity (HPA) performance measures in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Measures of HPA across Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-V for adolescents (10-18y) with CP were included if at least 60% of items…

Clanchy, Kelly M.; Tweedy, Sean M.; Boyd, Roslyn

2011-01-01

491

Dance program for physical rehabilitation and participation in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This pilot study aimed to examine a classical ballet program created for children with cerebral palsy (CP) as an emerging physical rehabilitation modality. The main program goals were to promote participation and to provide an artistic, physically therapeutic activity. Methods: The study was conducted in collaboration with a tertiary rehabilitation hospital, one outpatient physical therapy clinic, and one community

Citlali López-Ortiz; Kim Gladden; Laura Deon; Jennifer Schmidt; Gay Girolami; Deborah Gaebler-Spira

2012-01-01

492

Dance program for physical rehabilitation and participation in children with cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This pilot study aimed to examine a classical ballet program created for children with cerebral palsy (CP) as an emerging physical rehabilitation modality. The main program goals were to promote participation and to provide an artistic, physically therapeutic activity. Methods: The study was conducted in collaboration with a tertiary rehabilitation hospital, one outpatient physical therapy clinic, and one community

Citlali López-Ortiz; Kim Gladden; Laura Deon; Jennifer Schmidt; Gay Girolami; Deborah Gaebler-Spira

2011-01-01

493

The Health and Well-Being of Caregivers of Children With Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT. Objective. Most children enjoy healthy childhoods with little need for specialized health care services. However, some children experience difficulties in early childhood and require access to and utilization of considerable health care resources over time. Although impaired motor function is the hallmark of the cerebral palsy (CP) syndromes, many children with this develop- ment disorder also experience sensory, communicative,

Dianne Russell; Marilyn Swinton; Ellen Wood Parminder Raina; Maureen O'Donnell; Peter Rosenbaum; Jamie Brehaut

2010-01-01

494

Association of cerebral palsy with consanguineous parents and other risk factors in a Palestinian population.  

PubMed

This case-control study investigated risk factors for cerebral palsy in a Palestinian population. Cases were 107 children aged 1-15 years at a cerebral palsy referral centre in Jerusalem; controls were 233 children without cerebral palsy from West Bank outpatient clinics. Data were collected from medical records and a structured questionnaire to parents. In stepwise logistical regression, consanguinity and birth deficits in other family members were positively associated with cerebral palsy (OR = 4.62; 95% CI: 2.07-10.3 and OR = 12.7; 95% CI: 3.13-51.7 respectively), suggesting a possible genetic link. Other risk factors were: perinatal hypoxia (OR = 92.5; 95% CI: 24.5-350), low birth weight (OR = 4.98; 95% CI: 2.01-12.3), twin births (OR = 9.25; 95% CI: 1.29-66.8) and no prenatal medical care (OR = 5.22; 95% CI: 1.18-23.1). This first stepwise model of significant and modifiable risk factors in our population provides useful evidence for policy-makers. PMID:25023773

Daher, S; El-Khairy, L

2014-07-01

495

Neuro-Ophthalmological Disorders in Cerebral Palsy: Ophthalmological, Oculomotor, and Visual Aspects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is a disorder caused by damage to the retrogeniculate visual pathways. Cerebral palsy (CP) and CVI share a common origin: 60 to 70% of children with CP also have CVI. We set out to describe visual dysfunction in children with CP. A further aim was to establish whether different types of CP are associated with…

Fazzi, Elisa; Signorini, Sabrina G.; La Piana, Roberta; Bertone, Chiara; Misefari, Walter; Galli, Jessica; Balottin, Umberto; Bianchi, Paolo Emilio

2012-01-01

496

Compromised Motor Planning and Motor Imagery in Right Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated whether motor planning problems in people with Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (HCP) are paralleled by impaired ability to use Motor Imagery (MI). While some studies have shown that individuals with HCP can solve a mental rotation task, it was not clear if they used MI or Visual Imagery (VI). In the present study, motor planning and MI…

Craje, Celine; van Elk, Michiel; Beeren, Manuela; van Schie, Hein T.; Bekkering, Harold; Steenbergen, Bert

2010-01-01

497

Change in Ambulatory Ability of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to determine the probability that a child with cerebral palsy (CP) will lose or gain ambulatory ability through adolescence and young adulthood. We analyzed retrospectively data from 1987 to 2002 on Californians with CP initially aged 10 years (SD 0.9y; n=7550 [4304 males, 3246 females]) and 25 years (SD 0.8y; n=5721 [3261 males,…

Day, Steven M.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Strauss, David J.; Shavelle, Robert M.; Reynolds, Robert J.

2007-01-01

498

Effect of a single session of transcranial direct-current stimulation on balance and spatiotemporal gait variables in children with cerebral palsy: A randomized sham-controlled study  

PubMed Central

Background: Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) has been widely studied with the aim of enhancing local synaptic efficacy and modulating the electrical activity of the cortex in patients with neurological disorders. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of a single session of tDCS regarding immediate changes in spatiotemporal gait and oscillations of the center of pressure (30 seconds) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A randomized controlled trial with a blinded evaluator was conducted involving 20 children with CP between six and ten years of age. Gait and balance were evaluated three times: Evaluation 1 (before the stimulation), Evaluation 2 (immediately after stimulation), and Evaluation 3 (20 minutes after the stimulation). The protocol consisted of a 20-minute session of tDCS applied to the primary motor cortex at an intensity of 1 mA. The participants were randomly allocated to two groups: experimental group - anodal stimulation of the primary motor cortex; and control group - placebo transcranial stimulation. Results: Significant reductions were found in the experimental group regarding oscillations during standing in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions with eyes open and eyes closed in comparison with the control group (p<0.05). In the intra-group analysis, the experimental group exhibited significant improvements in gait velocity, cadence, and oscillation in the center of pressure during standing (p<0.05). No significant differences were found in the control group among the different evaluations. Conclusion: A single session of tDCS applied to the primary motor cortex promotes positive changes in static balance and gait velocity in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:25372004

Grecco, Luanda A. C.; Duarte, Natália A. C.; Zanon, Nelci; Galli, Manuela; Fregni, Felipe; Oliveira, Claudia S.

2014-01-01

499

Effect of a single session of transcranial direct-current stimulation on balance and spatiotemporal gait variables in children with cerebral palsy: A randomized sham-controlled study.  

PubMed

Background: Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) has been widely studied with the aim of enhancing local synaptic efficacy and modulating the electrical activity of the cortex in patients with neurological disorders. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of a single session of tDCS regarding immediate changes in spatiotemporal gait and oscillations of the center of pressure (30 seconds) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A randomized controlled trial with a blinded evaluator was conducted involving 20 children with CP between six and ten years of age. Gait and balance were evaluated three times: Evaluation 1 (before the stimulation), Evaluation 2 (immediately after stimulation), and Evaluation 3 (20 minutes after the stimulation). The protocol consisted of a 20-minute session of tDCS applied to the primary motor cortex at an intensity of 1 mA. The participants were randomly allocated to two groups: experimental group - anodal stimulation of the primary motor cortex; and control group - placebo transcranial stimulation. Results: Significant reductions were found in the experimental group regarding oscillations during standing in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions with eyes open and eyes closed in comparison with the control group (p<0.05). In the intra-group analysis, the experimental group exhibited significant improvements in gait velocity, cadence, and oscillation in the center of pressure during standing (p<0.05). No significant differences were found in the control group among the different evaluations. Conclusion: A single session of tDCS applied to the primary motor cortex promotes positive changes in static balance and gait velocity in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:25317766

Grecco, Luanda A C; Duarte, Natália A C; Zanon, Nelci; Galli, Manuela; Fregni, Felipe; Oliveira, Claudia S

2014-10-10

500

Cognitive impairment in patients with multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy.  

PubMed

This article reports the severity and profile of neuropsychological impairment on a prevalent cohort of patients with a clinical diagnosis of either multiple system atrophy (n=372) or progressive supranuclear palsy (n=311) from the Neuroprotection and Natural History in Parkinson Plus Syndromes cohort. The Dementia Rating Scale and Frontal Assessment Battery were used to assess global cognition and executive dysfunction. For the Dementia Rating Scale impairment was observed in approximately 57% of the progressive supranuclear palsy group and 20% of the multiple system atrophy group. In the former, impairment in a single cognitive domain was observed in 40%, with the same number showing impairment in multiple domains, while in the latter the figures were 28.6 and 13.5%, respectively. On the Frontal Assessment Battery, impairment was observed in 62.0% of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and 31.8% of those with multiple system atrophy. Although the progressive supranuclear palsy group performed worse overall, the cognitive profiles of the two groups on the Dementia Rating Scale subscales were identical, with the main impairment of the Initiation and Perseveration subscale. The impaired patients in the two groups were largely indistinguishable, qualitatively and quantitatively. Impairment was associated with greater age and clinical disability in both groups and was evident even in the early stages (22% in multiple system atrophy and 50% in progressive supranuclear palsy). Where a pathological diagnosis was available, the original clinical diagnosis was confirmed in the majority of cases, including those with significant cognitive impairment. The rate of impairment in those with a confirmed pathological diagnosis was comparable to that of the sample as a whole. These results demonstrate, in the largest prospectively recruited cohort of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy studied to date, the existence of a cognitive profile similar to that previously reported in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The results indicate a high level of cognitive impairment associated with progressive supranuclear palsy, but also point to comparable dysfunction in a substantial proportion of the patients with multiple system atrophy. Significant cognitive impairment appears consistent with a diagnosis of multiple system atrophy, even early in the disease, with important implications for diagnosis, research and management. PMID:20576697

Brown, Richard G; Lacomblez, Lucette; Landwehrmeyer, Bernard G; Bak, Thomas; Uttner, Ingo; Dubois, Bruno; Agid, Yves; Ludolph, Albert; Bensimon, Gilbert; Payan, Christine; Leigh, Nigel P

2010-08-01