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Sample records for pressure range micro pa

  1. Development of a new dynamic gas flow-control system in the pressure range of 1 Pa-133 Pa

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, S. S.; Chung, J. W.; Khan, Wakil

    2011-12-15

    A new flow-control system (FCS-705) has been developed at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. The system is intended for calibration of vacuum gauges in the pressure range of 1 Pa-133 Pa by comparison method. This paper describes some basic characteristics of the system including; (1) the design and construction of the system, (2) the generation of stable pressures in the chamber, (3) achieving high upstream pressure limit by installing a short duct in the by-pass pumping line, and (4) investigation of the gas flow regimes within the short duct.

  2. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Negative gauge pressure comparison: range -95 kPa to +95 kPa (EURAMET Project 1131)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantanen, Markku; Saxholm, Sari; Altintas, Aykurt; Pavis, Richard; Peterson, Guliko

    2010-01-01

    A pressure comparison in the negative gauge pressure range was arranged in 2009. The participating laboratories were CMI/Czech Republic, FORCE Technology/Denmark, AS Metrosert/Estonia and MIKES/Finland. Negative gauge pressures are a common range for pressure calibrations although uncertainty requirements are generally not very high. The results from the four participating laboratories suggest that calibrations in the negative gauge pressure range are not as easy as expected. Some of the claimed uncertainties were perhaps too optimistic, and the large variation in the results made it difficult to generate consistent reference values. The agreement of the results at positive gauge pressures on the same transfer standard was much better. Obviously there is a need for further comparisons in the negative gauge pressure range. The transfer standard was a multifunction calibrator Beamex MC5 equipped with an internal pressure module for the range -100 kPa to 104 kPa in the gauge mode. The resolution of the display was 0.001 kPa. The stability of the transfer standard was good. The comparison was registered as EURAMET Project No. 1131 and as the supplementary comparison EURAMET.M.P-S8 in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  3. New apparatus for calibrations in the range of 2 kPa absolute pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, S. Y.; Choi, I. M.

    2005-12-01

    Capacitance diaphragm gauges (CDGs) are precise electromechanical pressure sensors in which the displacement of a stretched thin metal diaphragm is detected by the measurement of a capacitance. These are very accurate gauges, and are frequently used as transfer gauges. To calibrate such accurate low-pressure gauges, precise mercury manometers have been used. However, complexity, concern about mercury vapour, and cost of mercury manometers have made it difficult to use these manometers in many industrial calibration laboratories. As a substitute, gas-operated piston gauges can be used for the calibration of such low-pressure gauges. However, the minimum pressure that is necessary to balance the tare weight, which generally corresponds to a pressure of several kilopascals, is a major obstacle. To reduce this minimum operating pressure, we adopted a variable bell-jar pressure method. To realize this method effectively, we developed a new mass-handling device that makes it possible to add or remove weights up to 200 g easily, with a resolution of 10 g, without breaking the vacuum during the calibration. This calibration system can be used to measure pressures from 100 Pa to 2 kPa in the absolute mode. In this paper, we also present the calibration results for two types of CDGs with full-scale ranges of 1330 Pa and 1000 Pa, respectively.

  4. EURAMET.M.P-S9: comparison in the negative gauge pressure range ‑950 to 0 hPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxholm, S.; Otal, P.; AltintaS, A.; Bermanec, L. G.; Durgut, Y.; Hanrahan, R.; Kocas, I.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Pražák, D.; Sandu, I.; Åetina, J.; Spohr, I.; Steindl, D.; Tammik, K.; Testa, N.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison in the negative gauge pressure range was arranged in the period 2011 - 2012. A total of 14 laboratories participated in this comparison: BEV (Austria), CMI (Czech Republic), DANIAmet-FORCE (Denmark), EIM (Greece), HMI/FSB-LPM (Croatia), INM (Romania), IPQ (Portugal), LNE (France), MCCAA (Malta), METROSERT (Estonia), MIKES (Finland), MIRS/IMT/LMT (Slovenia), NSAI (Ireland) and UME (Turkey). The project was divided into two loops: Loop1, piloted by MIKES, and Loop2, piloted by LNE. The results of the two loops are reported separately: Loop1 results are presented in this paper. The transfer standard was Beamex MC5 no. 25516865 with internal pressure module INT1C, resolution 0.01 hPa. The nominal pressure range of the INT1C is ‑1000 hPa to +1000 hPa. The nominal pressure points for the comparison were 0 hPa, ‑200 hPa, ‑400 hPa, ‑600 hPa, ‑800 hPa and ‑950 hPa. The reference values and their uncertainties as well as the difference uncertainty between the laboratory results and the reference values were determined from the measurement data by Monte Carlo simulations. Stability uncertainty of the transfer standard was included in the final difference uncertainty. Degrees of equivalences and mutual equivalences between the laboratories were calculated. Each laboratory reported results for all twelve measurement points, which means that there were 168 reported values in total. Some 163 of the 168 values (97 %) agree with the reference values within the expanded uncertainties, with a coverage factor k = 2. Among the laboratories, four different methods were used to determine negative gauge pressure. It is concluded that special attention must be paid to the measurements and methods when measuring negative gauge pressures. There might be a need for a technical guide or a workshop that provides information about details and practices related to the measurements of negative gauge pressure, as well as differences between the different methods. The

  5. Final report on EURAMET.M.P-S12 — Bilateral supplementary comparison of the national pressure standards of CMI and INRIM in the range 300 Pa to 15 kPa of negative gauge pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajícek, Zdenek; Bergoglio, Mercede; Pražák, Dominik; Pasqualin, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a EURAMET bilateral supplementary comparison between Czech CMI and Italian INRIM in low negative gauge pressure in gas (nitrogen), denoted as EURAMET.M.P-S12. The digital non-rotating pressure balance FPG8601 manufactured by Fluke/DH-Instruments, USA is normally used for gauge and absolute pressures in the range from 1 Pa to 15 kPa, but with some modifications it can be used also for the negative gauge pressures in the same range. During the preparation of the visit of INRIM at CMI for the last comparison within the framework of EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010, it was agreed to also perform an additional comparison in the range from 300 Pa to 15 kPa of negative gauge pressure. The measurements were performed in October 2012. Both institutes successfully proved their equivalence in all the tested points in the range from 300 Pa to 15 kPa of negative gauge pressure in a comparison that had, so far, been unique. . Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Final report on EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010: Key and supplementary comparison of national pressure standards in the range 1 Pa to 15 kPa of absolute and gauge pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajíček, Zdeněk; Bergoglio, Mercede; Jousten, Karl; Otal, Pierre; Sabuga, Wladimir; Saxholm, Sari; Pražák, Dominik; Vičar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a EURAMET comparison of five European National Metrology Institutes in low gauge and absolute pressure in gas (nitrogen), denoted as EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010. Its main intention is to state equivalence of the pressure standards, in particular those based on the technology of force-balanced piston gauges such as e.g. FRS by Furness Controls, UK and FPG8601 by DHI-Fluke, USA. It covers the range from 1 Pa to 15 kPa, both gauge and absolute. The comparison in absolute mode serves as a EURAMET Key Comparison which can be linked to CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 via PTB. The comparison in gauge mode is a supplementary comparison. The comparison was carried out from September 2008 till October 2012. The participating laboratories were the following: CMI, INRIM, LNE, MIKES, PTB-Berlin (absolute pressure 1 kPa and below) and PTB-Braunschweig (absolute pressure 1 kPa and above and gauge pressure). CMI was the pilot laboratory and provided a transfer standard for the comparison. This transfer standard was also the laboratory standard of CMI at the same time, which resulted in a unique and logistically difficult star comparison. Both in gauge and absolute pressures all the participating institutes successfully proved their equivalence with respect to the reference value and all also proved mutual bilateral equivalences in all the points. All the participating laboratories are also equivalent with the reference values of CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 in the relevant points. The comparison also proved the ability of FPG8601 to serve as a transfer standard. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Final report on COOMET key comparison of national pressure standards in the range 100 Pa to 5 kPa of gauge pressure (COOMET.M.P-K14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrendt, H.; Könemann, J.; Sabuga, W.; Kiselev, Y.; Vitkovskiy, O.; Pražák, D.; Krajicek, Z.; Dapkeviciene, K.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a COOMET key comparison of pneumatic gauge pressure standards of four national metrology institutes (listed in the chronological order of their measurements) that was carried out in the period from November 2008 to March 2010 in order to determine their degrees of equivalence in the range of 100 Pa to 5 kPa of gauge pressure. The pilot laboratory was PTB. The reference pressure standards of the participants were of different design. The transfer standard was a piston gauge model V1600 of the company Pressurements. The quantity under comparison was the effective area of the transfer standard at different pressure values reported together with uncertainty contributions and the conclusive combined uncertainty of measurement. All participants' results agree with the key comparison reference values within the expanded uncertainties calculated with a coverage factor 2, all but one results even within the standard uncertainties. For the participants' results compared in pairs, all of a total of 48 pairs show agreement within the expanded uncertainties and 46 pairs within the standard uncertainties. The results of the comparison demonstrate equivalence of the laboratory standards and support their measurement capabilities stated in the KCDB of BIPM. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  8. Final report on APMP.M.P-S4: Results of the bilateral supplementary comparison on pressure measurements in the range (60 to 350) kPa of gauge pressure in gas media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priruenrom, T.; Sabuga, W.; Konczak, T.

    2013-01-01

    The bilateral supplementary comparison APMP.M.P-S4 on pressure measurements in the range (60 to 350) kPa of gauge pressure in gas media was organized by National Institute of Metrology of Thailand, NIMT, as the pilot laboratory, comparing with Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt of Germany, PTB. The objective of this comparison is to check equivalence of gas pressure standards between NIMT and PTB. The period of measurement covered November to December 2012. NIMT provided a transfer standard, which was a WC-WC piston-cylinder assembly (PCA) with a nominal effective area of 10 cm2 manufactured by Fluke Corporation, DHI. The measurements were performed at pressures (60, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300 and 350) kPa. The NIMT laboratory standard used was a pressure balance with a PCA of 10 cm2 manufactured by DHI and identified by serial number 0693. The PTB laboratory standard used was a pressure balance with a PCA of 10 cm2 manufactured by Desgranges et Huot (DH) and identified by serial number 288. The results of this comparison show that the relative difference of the effective area values obtained by NIMT and PTB is not larger than 4.3 ppm, which corresponds to En = 0.26. Therefore, it confirms that the gas pressure standards maintained by the two institutes, NIMT and PTB, in the pressure range (60 to 350) kPa in gauge mode are equivalent under their uncertainties claimed. The result of this comparison is essential to support the calibration and measurement capabilities (CMC) of NIMT in this pressure range. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the APMP, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Final report on the supplementary comparison, EURAMET.M.P-S7 (EURAMET project 1040) in the pressure range from 1.10‑4 Pa to 0.9 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, C.; Alisic, S.; Bergoglio, M.; Saxholm, S.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Pražák, D.; Setina, J.

    2016-01-01

    Many laboratories within EURAMET started a calibration service in medium and high vacuum recently and did not have the opportunity to take part to a comparison before. In order to assess the uncertainty budget and the quality of the measurement of these laboratories, an intercomparison, EURAMET 1040 registered as EURAMET.M.P-S7, from 0.1 mPa to 0.9 Pa has been organised. The participants are the CMI (Czech republic), EIM (Greece), IMT (Slovenia), INRIM (Italy), IMBIH (Bosnia Herzegovinia) and MIKES (Finland) while METAS (Switzerland) is pilot laboratory. Three laboratories (INRIM, CMI and METAS) involved in this work have a primary definition of the pressure. Two spinning rotor gauges and a control electronic are used as transfer standard. The circulation of the transfer standard is organised as a succession of loops with a measurement by the pilot between each participant. A reference value has been determined based on a weighted mean of the results of the primary laboratories. All the participants have demonstrated their equivalence in the definition of the pressure. This comparison has been used as pilot comparison for the CCM.P-K14 project which covers the same scope with similar transfer standards. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Range and railgun development results at LS and PA ``Soyuz``

    SciTech Connect

    Babakov, Y.P.; Plekhanov, A.V.; Zheleznyi, V.B.

    1995-01-01

    A rail electromagnetic accelerator is one of the most reliable and simple devices for accelerating macroparticles up to high velocity. These accelerators allow scientists to carry out fundamental and applied investigations to study both equation-of-state of materials at high pressure due to high velocity encounters, and creation of conditions for shock thermonuclear fusion. In the department ``Energophyzika`` LS and PA ``Soyuz`` range was created. It was equipped with an inductor with storage capacity up to 12.5 MJ energized by a solid propellant MHD generator and a capacitor bank (energy capacity up to 6 MJ). These systems deliver currents of 1 MA and 2 MA, respectively. Diagnostic, recording, and autocalculation systems allow use of as many as 120 data channels with acquisition frequency up to 10 MHz. Recent technical successes in railgun construction, using special methods to compact plasma armature and produce high velocity trailing contact, creation of hybrid armatures, and optimizing acceleration made possible to gain velocities in the range of 6.2 to 6.8 km/s (masses of 3.8 to 10 g) and velocities 2.7 to 3.8 km/s (masses of 50 to 100 g) on railguns with length 2 to 4 m.

  11. Micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liu; Yan, Yao; Jiahao, Ma; Yanhang, Zhang; Qian, Wang; Zhaohua, Zhang; Tianling, Ren

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement which belongs to BioMEMS. It can be used in lumbar puncture surgery to measure intracranial pressure. Miniaturization is key for lumbar puncture surgery because the sensor must be small enough to allow it be placed in the reagent chamber of the lumbar puncture needle. The size of the sensor is decided by the size of the sensor chip and package. Our sensor chip is based on silicon piezoresistive effect and the size is 400 × 400 μm2. It is much smaller than the reported polymer intracranial pressure sensors such as liquid crystal polymer sensors. In terms of package, the traditional dual in-line package obviously could not match the size need, the minimal size of recently reported MEMS-based intracranial pressure sensors after packaging is 10 × 10 mm2. In this work, we are the first to introduce a quad flat no-lead package as the package form of piezoresistive intracranial pressure sensors, the whole size of the sensor is minimized to only 3 × 3 mm2. Considering the liquid measurement environment, the sensor is gummed and waterproof performance is tested; the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.9 × 10-2 mV/kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61025021, 61434001), and the ‘Thousands Talents’ Program for Pioneer Researchers and Its Innovation Team, China.

  12. High range resolution micro-Doppler analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammenga, Zachary A.; Smith, Graeme E.; Baker, Christopher J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses use of the micro-Doppler effect and the use of high range-resolution profiles to observe complex targets in complex target scenes. The combination of micro-Doppler and high range-resolution provides the ability to separate the motion of complex targets from one another. This ability leads to the differentiation of targets based on their micro-Doppler signatures. Without the high-range resolution, this would not be possible because the individual signatures would not be separable. This paper also addresses the use of the micro-Doppler information and high range-resolution profiles to generate an approximation of the scattering properties of a complex target. This approximation gives insight into the structure of the complex target and, critically, is created without using a pre-determined target model.

  13. A new primary standard oil manometer for absolute pressure up to 10 kPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhua; Yang, Yuanchao; Wang, Jinku; Sun, Junfeng

    2015-02-01

    The National Institute of Metrology has developed a new oil manometer that covers the absolute pressure range from 100 Pa up to 10 kPa. The manometer is based on the ultrasonic measurement of transit time in oil columns, and a novel dual U-tube system has been designed to measure the speed of sound in real time as the pressure changes. The working fluid, di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate, was chosen for its sufficiently low vapor pressure and low sound attenuation. Each tube has a coating of Teflon to resist wetting by the oil. To obtain a uniform and stable temperature environment, the dual U-tube system is located inside a guard vacuum chamber that is wrapped with foam and aluminium foil. A vertical temperature difference of less than 20 mK, a horizontal temperature difference of less than 5 mK and a temperature stability better than 10 mK were achieved. The overall standard (k = 1) uncertainty of the oil manometer is estimated to be approximately (0.015 + 1.63  ×  10-5 p Pa-1) Pa for absolute pressure measurements.

  14. Bilateral key comparison CCM.P-K3.1 for absolute pressure measurements from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedchak, J. A.; Bock, Th; Jousten, K.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the bilateral key comparison CCM.P-K3.1 between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) for absolute pressure in the range from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa. This comparison was a follow-up to the comparison CCM.P-K3. Two ionization gauges and two spinning rotor gauges (SRGs) were used as the transfer standards for the comparison. The SRGs were used to compare the standards at a pressure of 9 × 10-4 Pa and to normalize the ionization gauge readings. The two ionization gauges were used to compare the standards in the pressure range of from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 3 × 10-4 Pa. Both laboratories used dynamic expansion chambers as standards in the comparison. The two labs showed excellent agreement with each other and with the CCM.P-K3 key comparison reference value (KCRV) over the entire range. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. A Graphene-Based Resistive Pressure Sensor with Record-High Sensitivity in a Wide Pressure Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, He; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Bie, Zhi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Li, Cheng; Mi, Wen-Tian; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Pressure sensors are a key component in electronic skin (e-skin) sensing systems. Most reported resistive pressure sensors have a high sensitivity at low pressures (<5 kPa) to enable ultra-sensitive detection. However, the sensitivity drops significantly at high pressures (>5 kPa), which is inadequate for practical applications. For example, actions like a gentle touch and object manipulation have pressures below 10 kPa, and 10-100 kPa, respectively. Maintaining a high sensitivity in a wide pressure range is in great demand. Here, a flexible, wide range and ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor with a foam-like structure based on laser-scribed graphene (LSG) is demonstrated. Benefitting from the large spacing between graphene layers and the unique v-shaped microstructure of the LSG, the sensitivity of the pressure sensor is as high as 0.96 kPa-1 in a wide pressure range (0 ~ 50 kPa). Considering both sensitivity and pressure sensing range, the pressure sensor developed in this work is the best among all reported pressure sensors to date. A model of the LSG pressure sensor is also established, which agrees well with the experimental results. This work indicates that laser scribed flexible graphene pressure sensors could be widely used for artificial e-skin, medical-sensing, bio-sensing and many other areas.

  16. FOREWORD: The 4th CCM International Conference on Pressure Metrology from Ultra-High Vacuum to Very High Pressures (10-9 Pa to 109 Pa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legras, Jean-Claude; Jousten, Karl; Severn, Ian

    2005-12-01

    The fourth CCM (Consultative Committee for Mass and related quantities) International Conference on Pressure Metrology from Ultra-High Vacuum to Very High Pressures (10-9 Pa to 109 Pa) was held at the Institute of Physics in London from 19-21 April 2005. The event, which was organized by the Low, Medium and High Pressure working groups of the CCM, was attended by in excess of one hundred participants with representatives from five continents and every regional metrology organization. The purpose of this conference is to review all the work that is devoted to the highest quality of pressure measurement by primary standards as well as the dissemination of the pressure scale. A total of 52 papers were presented orally, and 26 as posters, in sessions that covered the following topics: Latest scientific advances in pressure and vacuum metrology Innovative transfer standards, advanced sensors and new instrument development Primary (top-level) measurement standards International and regional key comparisons New approaches to calibration It is interesting the note that since the third conference in 1999 the pressure range covered has increased by two orders of magnitude to 109 Pa, to take into account more exacting scientific and industrial demands for traceable vacuum measurement. A further feature of the conference was the increased range of instrumentation and techniques used in the realization and potential realization of pressure standards. Seton Bennett, Director of International Metrology at the National Physical Laboratory, opened the conference and Andrew Wallard, Director of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), gave the keynote address which described the implementation of the mutual recognition arrangement and the resulting removal of metrological barriers to international trade. Many experts have contributed significant amounts of their time to organize the event and to review the submitted papers. Thanks are due to all of these people

  17. In Vitro and in vivo characterization of wireless and passive micro system enabling gastrointestinal pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiang; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Deyong; Chen, Jian; Li, Jing; Bao, Kaikai

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a wireless and passive micro pressure system based on the LC mutual inductance detection mechanism for gastrointestinal (GI) pressure monitoring. The micro pressure system is composed of a sensor capsule (a pressure sensitive micro capacitive sensor in series with an induction coil to form an LC tank) and a detection unit (a detection coil connected with a network analyzer). The pressure variations under measurement lead to changes in the capacitance of the pressure sensor and therefore a shift in the LC tank resonant frequency, quantified by the impedance measurement of the detection coil. The pressure sensor was fabricated using microfabrication processes with key parameters optimized. The in vitro characterization of the micro pressure system recorded a sensitivity of 0.2491 kHz/kPa (-10 kPa to 30 kPa). One-month rabbit stomach pressure monitoring was conducted based on the developed micro pressure system as a confirmation of device long term in vivo stability. Furthermore, rabbit stomach pressure variations before and after food feeding was recorded and compared where three distinctive contraction patterns (random contraction with low amplitude, irregular strong contractions and regular contraction in a cyclic manner) following food feeding were located. Compared to previous reported GI pressure sensors, this LC tank is featured with simple device structure without batteries and electrical components for energy transfer. Both in vitro and in vivo characterization confirm the functionality of the system, which may enable the gastrointestinal motility study in the near future. PMID:25119603

  18. A Graphene-Based Resistive Pressure Sensor with Record-High Sensitivity in a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Tian, He; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Bie, Zhi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Li, Cheng; Mi, Wen-Tian; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Pressure sensors are a key component in electronic skin (e-skin) sensing systems. Most reported resistive pressure sensors have a high sensitivity at low pressures (<5 kPa) to enable ultra-sensitive detection. However, the sensitivity drops significantly at high pressures (>5 kPa), which is inadequate for practical applications. For example, actions like a gentle touch and object manipulation have pressures below 10 kPa, and 10–100 kPa, respectively. Maintaining a high sensitivity in a wide pressure range is in great demand. Here, a flexible, wide range and ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor with a foam-like structure based on laser-scribed graphene (LSG) is demonstrated. Benefitting from the large spacing between graphene layers and the unique v-shaped microstructure of the LSG, the sensitivity of the pressure sensor is as high as 0.96 kPa−1 in a wide pressure range (0 ~ 50 kPa). Considering both sensitivity and pressure sensing range, the pressure sensor developed in this work is the best among all reported pressure sensors to date. A model of the LSG pressure sensor is also established, which agrees well with the experimental results. This work indicates that laser scribed flexible graphene pressure sensors could be widely used for artificial e-skin, medical-sensing, bio-sensing and many other areas. PMID:25721159

  19. Pressure-induced phase transitions in Pa metal from first-principles theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soederlind, P.; Eriksson, O.

    1997-11-01

    Protactinium metal is shown to undergo a phase transition to the {alpha}-U orthorhombic structure below 1 Mbar pressure. At higher pressures, the bct phase reenters in the phase diagram and at the highest pressures, an ideal hcp structure becomes stable. Hence, Pa undergoes a sequence of transitions; bct{r_arrow}{alpha}-U{r_arrow}bct{r_arrow}hcp, with the first transition taking place at 0.25 Mbar and the subsequent ones above 1 Mbar. The bct{r_arrow}{alpha}-U transition is triggered by the pressure-induced promotion of the spd valence states to 5f states. In this regard, Pa approaches uranium which at ambient conditions has one more 5f electron than Pa at similar conditions. At higher compression of Pa, the 5f band broadens and electrostatic interactions in combination with Born-Mayer repulsion become increasingly important and this drives Pa to gradually more close-packed structures. At ultrahigh pressures, the balance between electrostatic energy, Born-Mayer repulsion, and one-electron band energy stabilizes the hcp (ideal packing) structure. The electrostatic energy and Born-Mayer repulsion rule out open crystal structures under these conditions in Pa and between the close-packed structures, the hcp structure is shown to be stabilized by filling of the 5f band. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Wide range load controllable MCFC cycle with pressure swing operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiba, Fumihiko; Izaki, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Takao

    Partial load efficiencies of a natural gas fuelled MCFC/GT system are calculated; the efficiencies of four systems are compared. A constant pressure air compressor is applied in system cases 1 and 2, whereas a pressure swing air compressor is provided in system cases 3 and 4. A gas cooler is integrated in the cathode gas recycling line of cases 2-4, and an anode recycling with sub-reformer is provided in case 4. The cathode pressure loss in the MCFC stack is kept below 3 kPa during the calculation procedure to avoid a leakage of cathode gas. The range of the power load is limited to 50-100% in the constant operating pressure system (cases 1 and 2), mainly because of the limited cathode gas pressure loss of 3 kPa. The range of the power load is enlarged to 20-100% in cases 3 and 4 by combining the pressure swing operation with gas cooling in the cathode recycling line. In system cases 3 and 4, the efficiency at the lowest load operation (approx. 20-30% load) remains over 35% HHV-CH 4, whereas the maximum efficiency is calculated to be 53% HHV-CH 4 in middle load operation; the efficiency of case 4 at 100% load is estimated to be 50% HHV-CH 4. The combination of the pressure swing operation and gas cooling in the cathode recycling line offers a high efficiency of the MCFC system in a wide range of loads.

  1. FOREWORD: CCM Second International Seminar: Pressure Metrology from 1 kPa to 1 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinar, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    The Comité Consultatif pour la Masse et les Grandeurs Apparentées (CCM), through its High Pressure and Medium Pressure Working Groups, organized this Second International Seminar on Pressure Metrology from 1 kPa to 1 GPa, which was held at the Laboratoire National d'Essais (LNE), Paris, France, from 2 to 4 June 1993. The scope of the seminar was to review the state of the art of pressure measurements in the 1 kPa to I GPa pressure range and to present innovative contributions by standards laboratories, universities and industry. The seminar was organized in six sessions: liquid-column manometers; piston gauge pressure standards; properties of liquids and gases relevant to pressure metrology; pressure transducers and transfer standards; pressure standard comparison (methods and results); dynamic pressure measurements. Each session opened with the presentation of a review paper on major requirements in that field and, at the end of the seminar, a general discussion was organized on the actual limits of accuracy of static and dynamic pressure measurements in fluid media, and the fundamental problems in pressure metrology between 1 kPa and 1 GPa. The seminar was attended by sixty scientists from twenty-four countries, all working in the field of pressure measurements. Forty-nine papers were presented. The participation of scientists from so many countries indicates the importance of pressure metrology from the scientific and industrial points of view. Most papers were presented by scientists from national standards laboratories, with eight papers from universities and four from industry. Eleven papers reported the results of cooperative work involving metrological institutions dealing with high pressure, generally national standards laboratories, an indication that scientific links are already well established at this level. Links are also strengthening between industry and standards laboratories. Although industrial participation at the seminar was relatively small

  2. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-08-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently until they disappeared from view at a net disappearance rate (0.02 mm(2) × min(-1)) significantly faster than for similar bubbles at 25 kPa altitude (0.01 mm(2) × min(-1)). At 25 kPa, most bubbles initially grew for 2-40 min, after which they shrank and disappeared. Four bubbles did not disappear while at 25 kPa. The results support bubble kinetic models based on Fick's first law of diffusion, Boyles law, and the oxygen window effect, predicting that oxygen contributes more to bubble volume and growth during hypobaric conditions. As the effect of oxygen increases, the lower the ambient pressure. The results indicate that recompression is instrumental in the treatment of aDCS. PMID:22653987

  3. Performance of an untethered micro-optical pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioppolo, Tindaro; Manzo, Maurizio; Krueger, Paul

    2012-11-01

    We present analytical and computational studies of the performance of a novel untethered micro-optical pressure sensor for fluid dynamics measurements. In particular, resolution and dynamic range will be presented. The sensor concept is based on the whispering galley mode (WGM) shifts that are observed in micro-scale dielectric optical cavities. A micro-spherical optical cavity (liquid or solid) is embedded in a thin polymeric sheet. The applied external pressure perturbs the morphology of the optical cavity leading to a shift in its optical resonances. The optical sensors are interrogated remotely, by embedding quantum dots or fluorescent dye in the micro-optical cavity. This allows a free space coupling of excitation and monitoring of the optical modes without the need of optical fibers or other cabling. With appropriate excitation and monitoring equipment, the micro-scale sensors can be distributed over a surface (e.g., including flexible biological surfaces) to monitor the local pressure field. We acknowledge the financial support from the National Science Foundation through grant CBET-1133876 with Dr. Horst Henning Winter as the program director.

  4. A Double-Primary Dead-Weight Tester for Pressures (35–175) kPa in Gage Mode

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Kamlesh; Cen, Yueqin; Bowers, Walter J.; Schmidt, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Primary pressure standards in the atmospheric pressure range are often established using mercury manometers. Less frequently, controlled-clearance dead-weight testers in which one component (normally the piston) has been dimensionally measured have also been used. Recent advances in technology on two fronts i) the fabrication of large-diameter pistons and cylinders with good geometry; and ii) the ability to measure the dimensions of these components, have allowed some dead-weight testers at NIST to approach total relative uncertainties (k = 2) in dimensionally-derived effective areas near 5 × 10−6. This paper describes a single piston/cylinder assembly (NIST-PG201WC/WC) that serves as both a primary gage in which both piston and cylinder are measured dimensionally and a controlled-clearance primary gage (employing the Heydemann-Welch method). Thus it allows some previous assumptions about the modeling of dead-weight testers to be checked. For the gage described in this paper the piston/cylinder clearance obtained from the two analyses have relative differences of 4 × 10−6 to 7 × 10−6 over the pressure range 35 kPa to 175 kPa. Some implications of these results will be discussed. From the dimensional characterizations and auxiliary measurements we have determined that the effective area for this gauge at 20 °C is: Aeff,20=1961.0659mm2(1+3.75×10−12P/Pa+3.05×10−12PJ/Pa),where P is the system pressure and PJ is a control pressure. The estimated relative uncertainty in effective area is 8.2 × 10−6 +1.4 × 10−11 P/Pa (k = 2). The temperature coefficient for the area was measured and found to be (9.06 ± 0.04) × 10−6/K. Thus using the gage at a reference temperature of 23 °C yields an effective area: Aeff,23=1961.1192mm2(1+3.75×10−12P/Pa+3.05×10−12PJ/Pa),with almost no increase in the uncertainty over that at 20 °C.

  5. Conceptual design of a low-pressure micro-resistojet based on a sublimating solid propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervone, Angelo; Mancas, Alexandru; Zandbergen, Barry

    2015-03-01

    In the current and future trend towards smaller satellite missions, the development of a simple and reliable propulsion system with performance and characteristics in line with the typical requirements of nano-satellites and CubeSats plays a crucial role for enhancing the capabilities of this type of missions. This paper describes the design of a micro-resistojet using water stored in the frozen state (ice) as propellant, operating under sublimation conditions at low pressure. The low operating pressure allows for using the vapor pressure of ice as the only method of propellant feeding, thereby allowing for extremely low thrust and electric power usage. The results of an extensive set of numerical simulations for optimizing the thruster geometry in terms of power ratio and specific impulse produced are discussed. In addition, the design of the complete propulsion system is described. It makes use of a limited number of moving parts and two power sources, one in the thruster to increase the propellant temperature and one in the tank to maintain the propellant storage conditions. Results show that the proposed design represents an alternative option capable of meeting the typical requirements of small satellite missions by means of an intrinsically green propellant such as water, with the pressure inside the system never exceeding 600 Pa. Optimization results showed an optimum thrust to power ratio in range 0.2-1.2 mN/W for an expansion slot aspect ratio of 2.5.

  6. Low current performance of the Bern medical cyclotron down to the pA range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Nesteruk, K. P.; Scampoli, P.

    2015-09-01

    A medical cyclotron accelerating H- ions to 18 MeV is in operation at the Bern University Hospital (Inselspital). It is the commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker. This feature is unique for a hospital-based facility and makes it possible to conduct routine radioisotope production for PET diagnostics in parallel with multidisciplinary research activities, among which are novel particle detectors, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. Several of these activities, such as radiobiology experiments for example, require low current beams down to the pA range, while medical cyclotrons are designed for high current operation above 10 μA. In this paper, we present the first results on the low current performance of a PET medical cyclotron obtained by ion source, radio-frequency and main coil tuning. With this method, stable beam currents down to (1.5+/- 0.5 ) pA were obtained and measured with a high-sensitivity Faraday cup located at the end of the beam transport line.

  7. Effectiveness of Micro-Blowing Technique in Adverse Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Larosiliere, Louis M.; Hwang, Danny P.; Wood, Jerry R.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of the micro-blowing technique (MBT) on the skin friction and total drag of a strut in a turbulent, strong adverse-pressure-gradient flow is assessed experimentally over a range of subsonic Mach numbers (0.3 less than M less than 0.7) and reduced blowing fractions (0 less than or equal to 2F/C (sub f,o) less than or equal to 1.75). The MBT-treated strut is situated along the centerline of a symmetric 2-D diffuser with a static pressure rise coefficient of 0.6. In agreement with presented theory and earlier experiments in zero-pressure-gradient flows, the effusion of blowing air reduces skin friction significantly (e.g., by 60% at reduced blowing fractions near 1.75). The total drag of the treated strut with blowing is significantly lower than that of the treated strut in the limit of zero-blowing; further, the total drag is reduced below that of the baseline (solid-plate) strut, provided that the reduced blowing fractions are sufficiently high. The micro-blowing air is, however, deficient in streamwise momentum and the blowing leads to increased boundary-layer and wake thicknesses and shape factors. Diffuser performance metrics and wake surveys are used to discuss the impact of various levels of micro-blowing on the aerodynamic blockage and loss.

  8. Extended range of the Lockheed Martin coax Micro cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D.; Champagne, P.; Will, E.; Kaldas, G.; Sanders, L.; Roth, E.; Olson, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the higher cooling capability of the Lockheed Martin coax Micro cryocooler thermal mechanical unit. The design of the previously qualified TRL6 Micro (Nast et al., 2014) [1] was modified to accommodate over twice the input power, greatly increasing the cooling capability. These Micro units are in a split configuration with the cold head separated from the compressor. This unit was optimized for cooling at 105 K and provides cooling over a wide range of temperatures. With a weight below 450 g, this small unit is ideal for compact instruments. Load lines were obtained over a range of powers, cold tip temperatures and rejection temperatures. This testing raised the Technology Readiness Level to six.

  9. Hydrostatic pressure sensor based on micro-cavities developed by the catastrophic fuse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, M. F.; Paixão, T.; Mesquita, E.; Alberto, N.; Antunes, P.; Varum, H.; André, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, an optical fiber hydrostatic pressure sensor based in Fabry-Perot micro-cavities is presented. These micro structures were generated by the recycling of optical fiber previously damaged by the fiber fuse effect, resulting in a cost effective solution when compared with the traditional methods used to produce similar micro-cavities. The developed sensor was tested for pressures ranging from 20.0 to 190.0 cmH2O and a sensitivity of 53.7 +/- 2.6 pm/cmH2O for hydrostatic pressures below to 100 cmH2O was achieved.

  10. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids—Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert A.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  11. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids--Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert A; Shaw, J M

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest. PMID:26429474

  12. Design of the micro pressure multi-node measuring system for micro-fluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lili; Guo, Shuheng; Rong, Li; Yin, Ke

    2016-01-01

    An online multi-node microfludic pressure measuring system was designed in the paper. The research focused on the design of pressure test circuit system and methods on dealing with pressure data collecting. The MPXV7002 micro-pressure sensor was selected to measure the chip inside channel pressure and installed by a silicone tube on different micro-channel measured nodes. The pressure transmission loss was estimated in the paper, and corrected by the filtering and smoothing method. The pressure test experiment was carried out and the data were analyzed. Finally, the measuring system was calibrated. The results showed that the measuring system had high testing precision.

  13. Cold Micro-Plasma Jets in Atmospheric Pressure Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A. H.; Suddala, S.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2003-10-01

    Direct current microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) have been operated in air, nitrogen and oxygen at pressures of one atmosphere. The electrodes are 250 μm thick molybdenum foils, separated by an alumina insulator of the same thickness. A cylindrical hole with a diameter in the 100 μm range is drilled through all layers. By flowing gases at high pressure through this hole, plasma jets with radial dimensions on the same order as the microhole dimensions, and with lengths of up to one centimeter are generated. The gas temperature in these jets was measured by means of a micro-thermocouple. The lowest temperatures of close to room temperature were measured when the flow changed from laminar to turbulent. The results of spectral emission and absorption studies indicate high concentrations of byproducts, such as ozone, when the discharge is operated in air or oxygen. This work is supported by the U.S Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  14. A review of the fundamental methods for measuring gauge pressures up to 1 kPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peggs, G. N.

    1980-12-01

    The review focuses on such small pressure measurement methods as liquid column manometry, pressure balance techniques, measurement by bell-type manometers, and methods based on gas laws. Uncertainties associated with the various methods are estimated, and methods for the calibration of pressure measuring devices are discussed along with the performance and design features of the various types of standards. It is shown that liquid-column manometers offer the most easily realized fundamental standards utilizing commonly used measurement techniques, while pressure balance techniques offer more flexibility for operating over a wide pressure range and also provide a degree of control.

  15. Wide-range dynamic pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Lane, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Transducer measures pressure by sensing the damping of a vibrating diaphragm immersed in the atmosphere to be measured. Improved sensor can be included in rugged, lightweight package for use aboard aircraft, meteorological vehicles, and space probes.

  16. Micro-Pressure Sensors for Future Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catling, David C.

    1996-01-01

    The joint research interchange effort was directed at the following principal areas: u further development of NASA-Ames' Mars Micro-meteorology mission concept as a viable NASA space mission especially with regard to the science and instrument specifications u interaction with the flight team from NASA's New Millennium 'Deep-Space 2' (DS-2) mission with regard to selection and design of micro-pressure sensors for Mars u further development of micro-pressure sensors suitable for Mars The research work undertaken in the course of the Joint Research Interchange should be placed in the context of an ongoing planetary exploration objective to characterize the climate system on Mars. In particular, a network of small probes globally-distributed on the surface of the planet has often been cited as the only way to address this particular science goal. A team from NASA Ames has proposed such a mission called the Micrometeorology mission, or 'Micro-met' for short. Surface pressure data are all that are required, in principle, to calculate the Martian atmospheric circulation, provided that simultaneous orbital measurements of the atmosphere are also obtained. Consequently, in the proposed Micro-met mission a large number of landers would measure barometric pressure at various locations around Mars, each equipped with a micro-pressure sensor. Much of the time on the JRI was therefore spent working with the engineers and scientists concerned with Micro-met to develop this particular mission concept into a more realistic proposition.

  17. Range 7 Scanner Integration with PaR Robot Scanning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, Jason; Burns, Bradley; Carlson, Jeffrey; Minich, Mark

    2011-01-01

    An interface bracket and coordinate transformation matrices were designed to allow the Range 7 scanner to be mounted on the PaR Robot detector arm for scanning the heat shield or other object placed in the test cell. A process was designed for using Rapid Form XOR to stitch data from multiple scans together to provide an accurate 3D model of the object scanned. An accurate model was required for the design and verification of an existing heat shield. The large physical size and complex shape of the heat shield does not allow for direct measurement of certain features in relation to other features. Any imaging devices capable of imaging the entire heat shield in its entirety suffers a reduced resolution and cannot image sections that are blocked from view. Prior methods involved tools such as commercial measurement arms, taking images with cameras, then performing manual measurements. These prior methods were tedious and could not provide a 3D model of the object being scanned, and were typically limited to a few tens of measurement points at prominent locations. Integration of the scanner with the robot allows for large complex objects to be scanned at high resolution, and for 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) models to be generated for verification of items to the original design, and to generate models of previously undocumented items. The main components are the mounting bracket for the scanner to the robot and the coordinate transformation matrices used for stitching the scanner data into a 3D model. The steps involve mounting the interface bracket to the robot's detector arm, mounting the scanner to the bracket, and then scanning sections of the object and recording the location of the tool tip (in this case the center of the scanner's focal point). A novel feature is the ability to stitch images together by coordinates instead of requiring each scan data set to have overlapping identifiable features. This setup allows models of complex objects to be developed

  18. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ([minus]60[degrees]F) temperatures.

  19. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ({minus}60{degrees}F) temperatures.

  20. Thermal and Pressure-Assisted Thermal Destruction Kinetics for Spores of Type A Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes PA3679.

    PubMed

    Reddy, N Rukma; Patazca, Eduardo; Morrissey, Travis R; Skinner, Guy E; Loeza, Viviana; Schill, Kristin M; Larkin, John W

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the inactivation kinetics of the spores of the most resistant proteolytic Clostridium botulinum strains (Giorgio-A and 69-A, as determined from an earlier screening study) and of Clostridium sporogenes PA3679 and to compare the thermal and pressure-assisted thermal resistance of these spores. Spores of these strains were prepared using a biphasic medium method. C. sporogenes PA3679 spores were heat treated before spore preparation. Using laboratory-scale and pilot-scale pressure test systems, spores of Giorgio-A, 69-A, and PA3679 suspended in ACES [N-(2-acetamido)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid] buffer (pH 7.0) were exposed to various combinations of temperature (93 to 121°C) and pressure (0.1 to 750 MPa) to determine their resistance. More than a 5-log reduction occurred after 3 min at 113°C for spores of Giorgio-A and 69-A and after 5 min at 117°C for spores of PA3679. A combination of high temperatures (93 to 121°C) and pressures yielded greater log reductions of spores of Giorgio-A, 69-A, and PA3679 compared with reduction obtained with high temperatures alone. No survivors from initial levels (>5.0 log CFU) of Giorgio-A and 69-A were detected when processed at a combination of high temperature (117 and 121°C) and high pressure (600 and 750 MPa) for <1 min in a pilot-scale pressure test system. Increasing pressure from 600 to 750 MPa at 117°C decreased the time from 2.7 to 1 min for a >4.5-log reduction of PA3679 spores. Thermal D-values of Giorgio-A, 69-A, and PA3679 spores decreased (i.e., 29.1 to 0.33 min for Giorgio-A, 40.5 to 0.27 min for 69-A, and 335.2 to 2.16 min for PA3679) as the temperature increased from 97 to 117°C. Pressure-assisted thermal D-values of Giorgio-A, 69-A, and PA3679 also decreased as temperature increased from 97 to 121°C at both pressures (600 and 750 MPa) (i.e., 17.19 to 0.15 min for Giorgio-A, 9.58 to 0.15 min for 69-A, and 12.93 to 0.33 min for PA3679 at 600 MPa). At higher

  1. First-principles investigations of equation of states and phase transitions in PaN under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, P.; Verma, Ashok K.

    2013-02-01

    We have studied equation of states (EOS) and pressure induced structural transitions of PaN using first principles electronic structure and total energy calculations. We have predicted that PaN undergoes a structural transition from NaCl to R-3m structure at around 55 GPa pressure. We have also calculated the enthalpy as a function of rhombohedral angle at constant pressures for the Buerger pathway of B1-B2 transition where R-3m is the intermediate state. We have showed that NaCl structure becomes mechanically unstable and f electrons of Pa plays crucial role to stabilize R-3m structure instead of CsCl at high pressure.

  2. Final report on SIM.M.P-S6: Differential pressure comparison from 50 Pa to 500 Pa with a liquid column manometer between CENAM (Mexico) and INTI-Fisica y Metrologia (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Guzman, Jorge; Forastieri, Juan; Zúñiga, Sinuhé

    2011-01-01

    A differential pressure comparison was performed between CENAM (Mexico) and INTI (Argentina) by means of a liquid column manometer. The measuring range was 50 Pa to 500 Pa. CENAM calibrated the transfer standard at the beginning and at the end of the comparison. The transfer standard used was a Dwyer liquid column manometer model Microtector with an accuracy class of 0.013% of the reading. The compared pressure points were (50, 75, 125, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 450, 500) Pa. The uncertainty sources to be evaluated included at least the following: (a) uncertainty due to the standard used by the laboratory; (b) uncertainty due to repeatability; (c) uncertainty due to resolution; (d) uncertainty due to hysteresis; (e) uncertainty due to zero drift. The criteria used to compare the results obtained were the normalized error equation (En). The results obtained by the laboratories were compatible according to the criteria |En| <= 1. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by SIM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  3. Size distributions of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taya, C.; Maeda, Y.; Hosokawa, S.; Tomiyama, A.; Ito, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Size of micro-bubbles is widely distributed in the range of one to several hundreds micrometers and depends on generation methods, flow conditions and elapsed times after the bubble generation. Although a size distribution of micro-bubbles should be taken into account to improve accuracy in numerical simulations of flows with micro-bubbles, a variety of the size distribution makes it difficult to introduce the size distribution in the simulations. On the other hand, several models such as the Rosin-Rammler equation and the Nukiyama-Tanazawa equation have been proposed to represent the size distribution of particles or droplets. Applicability of these models to the size distribution of micro-bubbles has not been examined yet. In this study, we therefore measure size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method by using a phase Doppler anemometry (PDA), and investigate the applicability of the available models to the size distributions of micro-bubbles. Experimental apparatus consists of a pressurized tank in which air is dissolved in liquid under high pressure condition, a decompression nozzle in which micro-bubbles are generated due to pressure reduction, a rectangular duct and an upper tank. Experiments are conducted for several liquid volumetric fluxes in the decompression nozzle. Measurements are carried out at the downstream region of the decompression nozzle and in the upper tank. The experimental results indicate that (1) the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation well represents the size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by the pressurized dissolution method, whereas the Rosin-Rammler equation fails in the representation, (2) the bubble size distribution of micro-bubbles can be evaluated by using the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation without individual bubble diameters, when mean bubble diameter and skewness of the bubble distribution are given, and (3) an evaluation method of visibility based on the bubble size distribution and bubble

  4. Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) Pressure Sensor for Footwear

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Galambos, Paul C.; Wheeler, Jason W.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Givler, Richard C.

    2008-09-23

    Footwear comprises a sole and a plurality of sealed cavities contained within the sole. The sealed cavities can be incorporated as deformable containers within an elastic medium, comprising the sole. A plurality of micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) pressure sensors are respectively contained within the sealed cavity plurality, and can be adapted to measure static and dynamic pressure within each of the sealed cavities. The pressure measurements can provide information relating to the contact pressure distribution between the sole of the footwear and the wearer's environment.

  5. Micro-Facet Scattering Model for Pulse Polarization Ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryjewski, J.; Roggemann, M.; Tyler, D.; Hand, D.

    Determining the shape, material and orientation of nano-sats (satellites too small to image from the ground) requires new sensing approaches. Pulse Polarization Ranging (PPR) is one such approach that uses the polarization and shape characteristics of laser pulses reflected from satellites to determine satellite shape, orientation and material. We use an innovative approach to relate PPR measurements to actual satellite characteristics (shape, material and orientation), requiring that we have an accurate physical and dynamical model of the satellite. In particular, to determine the polarization characteristics (depolarization, birefringence, diattenuation) of the reflected pulses we need an accurate model of light scattering from real (complex) surfaces. To do this, we have extended the micro-facet model of Ashikhmin et al. to include retro-reflection and multiple scattering effects. In this presentation, we describe the scattering model and its efficient implementation using graphical processing units (GPUs).

  6. A Micro Pressure Sensor with SU-8 Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaohong; Yin, Yonghua; Zheng, Xiaohu

    This paper investigated novel wireless RF pressure sensor fabricated with SU-8 polymer. To achieve highly simplified fabrication processes and designs for high-reliable operation, a passive wireless sensors were researched. SU-8 polymer-based micro pressure sensor was fabricated by micro-electro-mechenical system (MEMS) based batch process. The sensor consists of an inductor (L) interconnected with pressure-variable capacitor (C) to form a LC resonant circuit. Fabricated devices measure 4 × 3 mm2 in size and houses 9 turns of Cu electro-plated 100 nH coil. In this system, RF signal was transmitted from external antenna to the fabricated LC resonator. By detecting this abrupt resonant frequency shift of the fabricated device, the pressure change of the device can be measured by wireless method.

  7. Combustion of Micro- and Nanothermites under Elevating Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monogarov, K.; Pivkina, Alla; Muravyev, N.; Meerov, D.; Dilhan, D.

    Non-equilibrium process of combustion-wave propagation of thermite compositions (Mg/Fe2O3) inside the sealed steel tube have been investigated to study the burning rate at elevating pressure. Under confinement the hot gas-phase products, formed during thermite combustion result in considerable overpressure inside the tube that reverses the gas flow and leads to pressure-driven preheating effect of the burned-gas permeation. Convective origin of this preheating effect is discussed. The pressure-time dependency is obtained experimentally. The composition was pressed inside the steel tube in pellets; the size of each part was measured to obtain burning rate - pressure dependency. Both micro- and nanosized components were used to prepare thermite compositions under study. The significant difference in burning parameters of micron- and nanosized thermites is observed and analyzed. Based on obtained results, the combustion mechanism of thermites with the micro- and nanosized components is discussed.

  8. Diamond single micro-crystals and graphitic micro-balls’ formation in plasmoids under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Kartaschew, Konstantin; Bibinov, Nikita; Havenith, Martina; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Plasmoids are produced in the argon filamentary discharge. By going through hydrocarbon gas, the plasmoids collect carbon material. These plasmoids produce diamond single micro-crystals upon contact on the inner surface of cavity in air atmosphere. When the plasmoid’s contact point on the substrate is in inert atmosphere, they deposit their material as micro-balls with a graphite core. The dimension and nature of the micro-materials deposited by the plasmoids are analysed using scanning electron microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy. The compressive residual stress in the deposited micro-diamonds varies in the range -7 to -21 GPa.

  9. New Functionalities of PA6,6 Fabric Modified by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma and Grafted Glycidyl Methacrylate Derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative atmospheric pressure plasma was utilized to activate surface of PA 6,6 fabrics followed by graft copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and further reacted with triethylene tetramine (TETA), quaternary ammonium chitosan (HTCC) or cyclodextrin (CD). The inner CD cavity was complexe...

  10. Report of pilot study CCM.P-P1 for international comparison of absolute pressure measurements in gas from 3 × 10-9 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hajime; Arai, Kenta; Komatsu, Eiichi; Fujii, Kenichi; Bock, Thomas; Jousten, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A bilateral comparison of absolute gas pressure measurements from 3 × 10-9 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa was performed between the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). It is a pilot study CCM.P-P1 for the next international comparison in this pressure range to test the stability of ultrahigh vacuum gauges (UHV gauges) as transfer standards. Two spinning rotor gauges (SRGs), an axial-symmetric transmission gauge (ATG), and an extractor gauge (EXG) were used as transfer standards. The calibration ratio of one SRG was sufficiently stable, but the other was not. This result indicates that improvements in the transport mechanism for SRG are needed. The two ionization gauges ATG and EXG, on the other hand, were sufficiently stable. Provisional equivalence of the pressures realized by the primary standards at NMIJ and PTB was found. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM-WGS.

  11. MicroScale - Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Mohan

    2012-01-25

    Low-temperature plasmas play an essential role in the manufacturing of integrated circuits which are ubiquitous in modern society. In recent years, these top-down approaches to materials processing have reached a physical limit. As a result, alternative approaches to materials processing are being developed that will allow the fabrication of nanoscale materials from the bottom up. The aim of our research is to develop a new class of plasmas, termed “microplasmas” for nanomaterials synthesis. Microplasmas are a special class of plasmas formed in geometries where at least one dimension is less than 1 mm. Plasma confinement leads to several unique properties including high-pressure stability and non-equilibrium that make microplasams suitable for nanomaterials synthesis. Vapor-phase precursors can be dissociated to homogeneously nucleate nanometer-sized metal and alloyed nanoparticles. Alternatively, metal salts dispersed in liquids or polymer films can be electrochemically reduced to form metal nanoparticles. In this talk, I will discuss these topics in detail, highlighting the advantages of microplasma-based systems for the synthesis of well-defined nanomaterials.

  12. PaCO2 in Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial (SUPPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Wrage, Lisa A.; Das, Abhik; Laughon, Matthew; Cotten, C. Michael; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Shankaran, Seetha; Walsh, Michele C.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of PaCO2 with severe intraventricular hemorrhage (sIVH), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) at 18–22 months in premature infants. Design Secondary exploratory data analysis of SUPPORT. Setting Multiple referral NICUs. Patients 1316 infants 24 0/7 to 27 6/7 weeks gestation randomized to different oxygenation (SpO2 target 85–89% vs 91–95%) and ventilation strategies. Main Outcome Measures Blood gases from postnatal days 0–14 were analyzed. Five PaCO2 variables were defined: minimum [Min], maximum [Max], standard deviation, average (time-weighted), and a 4 level categorical variable (hypercapnic [highest quartile of Max PaCO2], hypocapnic [lowest quartile of Min PaCO2], fluctuators [both hypercapnia and hypocapnia], and normocapnic [middle two quartiles of Max and Min PaCO2]). PaCO2 variables were compared for infants with and without sIVH, BPD, and NDI (+/− death). Multivariable logistic regression models were developed for adjusted results. Results sIVH, BPD, and NDI (+/− death) were associated with hypercapnic infants and fluctuators. Association of Max PaCO2 and outcomes persisted after adjustment (Per 10 mmHg increase: sIVH/death: OR 1.27 [1.13–1.41]; BPD/death: OR 1.27 [1.12–1.44]; NDI/death: OR 1.23 [1.10–1.38], Death: OR 1.27 [1.12–1.44], all p <0.001). No interaction was found between PaCO2 category and SpO2 treatment group for sIVH/death, NDI/death, or death. Max PaCO2 was positively correlated with maximum FiO2 (rs0.55, p<0.0001) & ventilator days (rs0.61, p<0.0001). Conclusions Higher PaCO2 was an independent predictor of sIVH/death, BPD/death, and NDI/death. Further trials are needed to evaluate optimal PaCO2 targets for high risk infants. PMID:25425651

  13. The design and analysis of beam-membrane structure sensors for micro-pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Bian; Zhao Yulong; Jiang Zhuangde; Hu Bin

    2012-04-15

    This paper reports the design and analysis of a type of piezoresistive pressure sensor for micro-pressure measurement with a cross beam-membrane (CBM) structure. This new silicon substrate-based sensor has the advantages of a miniature structure and high sensitivity, linearity, and accuracy. By using the finite element method to analyze the stress distribution of the new structure and subsequently deducing the relationship between structural dimensions and mechanical performances, equations used to determine the CBM structure are established. Based on the CBM model and our stress and deflections equations, sensor fabrication is then performed on the silicon wafer via a process including anisotropy chemical etching and inductively coupled plasma. The structure's merits, such as linearity, sensitivity, and repeatability, have been investigated under the pressure of 5 kPa. Our results show that the precision of these equations is {+-}0.19%FS, indicating that this new small-sized structure offers easy preparation, high sensitivity, and high accuracy for micro-pressure measurement.

  14. Transmitted Ultrasound Pressure Variation in Micro Blood Vessel Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shengping; Kruse, Dustin E.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2008-01-01

    Silica, cellulose, and polymethylmethacrylate tubes with inner diameters of ten to a few hundred microns are commonly used as blood vessel phantoms in in vitro studies of microbubble or nanodroplet behavior during insonation. However, a detailed investigation of the ultrasonic fields within these micro-tubes has not yet been performed. This technical note provides a theoretical analysis of the ultrasonic fields within micro-tubes. Numerical results show that for the same tube material, the interaction between the micro-tube and megaHertz-frequency ultrasound may vary drastically with incident frequency, tube diameter, and wall thickness. For 10 MHz ultrasonic insonation of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube with an inner diameter of 195 μm and an outer diameter of 260 μm, the peak pressure within the tube can be up to 300% of incident pressure amplitude. However, using 1 MHz ultrasound and a silica tube with an inner diameter of 12 μm and an outer diameter of 50 μm, the peak pressure within the tube is only 12% of the incident pressure amplitude, and correspondingly the spatial-average-time-average intensity within the tube is only 1% of the incident intensity. PMID:18395962

  15. Transmitted ultrasound pressure variation in micro blood vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengping; Kruse, Dustin E; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2008-06-01

    Silica, cellulose and polymethylmethacrylate tubes with inner diameters of ten to a few hundred microns are commonly used as blood vessel phantoms in in vitro studies of microbubble or nanodroplet behavior during insonation. However, a detailed investigation of the ultrasonic fields within these micro-tubes has not yet been performed. This work provides a theoretical analysis of the ultrasonic fields within micro-tubes. Numerical results show that for the same tube material, the interaction between the micro-tube and megaHertz-frequency ultrasound may vary drastically with incident frequency, tube diameter and wall thickness. For 10 MHz ultrasonic insonation of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube with an inner diameter of 195 microm and an outer diameter of 260 microm, the peak pressure within the tube can be up to 300% of incident pressure amplitude. However, using 1 MHz ultrasound and a silica tube with an inner diameter of 12 microm and an outer diameter of 50 microm, the peak pressure within the tube is only 12% of the incident pressure amplitude and correspondingly, the spatial-average-time-average intensity within the tube is only 1% of the incident intensity. PMID:18395962

  16. Determination of Phonation Instability Pressure and Phonation Pressure Range in Excised Larynges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yu; Reynders, William J.; Jiang, Jack J.; Tateya, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was a methodological study designed to reveal the dynamic mechanisms of phonation instability pressure (PIP) using bifurcation analysis. Phonation pressure range (PPR) was also proposed for assessing the pressure range of normal vocal fold vibrations. Method: The authors first introduced the concept of bifurcation on the…

  17. Recovery from central nervous system oxygen toxicity in the rat at oxygen pressures between 100 and 300 kPa.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Ran; Truman, Marianna; Abramovich, Amir

    2008-11-01

    No symptoms related to central nervous system (CNS) oxygen toxicity have been reported when diving with oxygen rebreathers at depths shallower than 3 msw. We hypothesised that recovery from CNS oxygen toxicity will take place when the PO(2) is less than 130 kPa. We exposed rats to a high PO(2) (mainly 608 kPa) to produce CNS oxygen toxicity. The latency to the first electrical discharge (FED) preceding convulsions was determined as the animal's control latency. Thereafter, the rat was exposed to the same PO(2) for 60% of its latency, then to a lower PO(2) for 15 min (sufficient time for full recovery in normoxia), and finally to the high PO(2) again until appearance of the FED. If recovery from CNS oxygen toxicity takes place during the interim period, the latency for the final exposure to the high oxygen pressure should not be shorter than the control. The latencies to CNS oxygen toxicity for exposure to the high oxygen pressure after a 15-min interim period at 21, 101, 132, 203, 304, 405, and 456 kPa were 110, 110, 125, 94, 85, 54 and 38% of the control value, respectively. Only after the last two interim pressures were the latencies significantly shorter than control values. The remaining latencies were not significantly different from 100%. Recovery from CNS oxygen toxicity in the rat takes place at a PO(2) anywhere between 21 and 304 kPa. The present findings support our previous suggestion that recovery from CNS oxygen toxicity in humans will take place at a PO(2) below 130 kPa. If our findings are corroborated by further human studies, this will justify including recovery in the algorithm for CNS oxygen toxicity in closed-circuit oxygen divers. PMID:18670785

  18. Ozone formation in pulsed SDBD in a wide pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Nudnova, Maryia; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    Ozone concentration in surface anode-directed DBD for wide pressure range (150 - 1300 torr) was experimentally measured. Voltage and pressure effect were investigated. Reduced electric field was measured for anode-directed and cathode-directed SDBD. E/n values in cathode-directed SDBD is higher than in cathode-directed on 50 percent at atmospheric pressure. E/n value increase leads to decrease the rate of oxygen dissociation and Ozone formation at lower pressures. Radiating region thickness of sliding discharge was measured. Typical thickness of radiating zone is 0.4-1.0 mm within pressure range 220-740 torr. It was shown that high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge due to high E/n value produces less Ozone with compare to other discharges. Kinetic model was proposed to describe Ozone formation in the pulsed nanosecond SDBD.

  19. Pressure activated interconnection of micro transfer printed components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevatte, Carl; Guven, Ibrahim; Ghosal, Kanchan; Gomez, David; Moore, Tanya; Bonafede, Salvatore; Raymond, Brook; Trindade, António Jose; Fecioru, Alin; Kneeburg, David; Meitl, Matthew A.; Bower, Christopher A.

    2016-05-01

    Micro transfer printing and other forms of micro assembly deterministically produce heterogeneously integrated systems of miniaturized components on non-native substrates. Most micro assembled systems include electrical interconnections to the miniaturized components, typically accomplished by metal wires formed on the non-native substrate after the assembly operation. An alternative scheme establishing interconnections during the assembly operation is a cost-effective manufacturing method for producing heterogeneous microsystems, and facilitates the repair of integrated microsystems, such as displays, by ex post facto addition of components to correct defects after system-level tests. This letter describes pressure-concentrating conductor structures formed on silicon (1 0 0) wafers to establish connections to preexisting conductive traces on glass and plastic substrates during micro transfer printing with an elastomer stamp. The pressure concentrators penetrate a polymer layer to form the connection, and reflow of the polymer layer bonds the components securely to the target substrate. The experimental yield of series-connected test systems with >1000 electrical connections demonstrates the suitability of the process for manufacturing, and robustness of the test systems against exposure to thermal shock, damp heat, and mechanical flexure shows reliability of the resulting bonds.

  20. Cell Membranes Under Hydrostatic Pressure Subjected to Micro-Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilev, Vassil M.; Kostadinov, Kostadin G.; Mladenov, Ivaïlo M.; Shulev, Assen A.; Stoilov, Georgi I.; Djondjorov, Peter A.

    2011-04-01

    The work is concerned with the determination of the mechanical behaviour of cell membranes under uniform hydrostatic pressure subject to micro-injections. For that purpose, assuming that the shape of the deformed cell membrane is axisymmetric a variational statement of the problem is developed on the ground of the so-called spontaneous curvature model. In this setting, the cell membrane is regarded as an axisymmetric surface in the three-dimensional Euclidean space providing a stationary value of the shape energy functional under the constraint of fixed total area and fixed enclosed volume. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations and natural boundary conditions are derived, analyzed and used to express the forces and moments in the membrane. Several examples of such surfaces representing possible shapes of cell membranes under pressure subjected to micro injection are determined numerically.

  1. Peristaltic pump-based low range pressure sensor calibration system

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayakumar, K. B.; Naveen Kumar, G.; Rajanna, K. E-mail: krajanna2011@gmail.com; Nayak, M. M.; Dinesh, N. S.

    2015-11-15

    Peristaltic pumps were normally used to pump liquids in several chemical and biological applications. In the present study, a peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber (positive as well negative pressures) using atmospheric air. In the present paper, we discuss the development and performance study of an automatic pressurization system to calibrate low range (millibar) pressure sensors. The system includes a peristaltic pump, calibrated pressure sensor (master sensor), pressure chamber, and the control electronics. An in-house developed peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber. A closed loop control system has been developed to detect and adjust the pressure leaks in the chamber. The complete system has been integrated into a portable product. The system performance has been studied for a step response and steady state errors. The system is portable, free from oil contaminants, and consumes less power compared to existing pressure calibration systems. The veracity of the system was verified by calibrating an unknown diaphragm based pressure sensor and the results obtained were satisfactory.

  2. Peristaltic pump-based low range pressure sensor calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinayakumar, K. B.; Naveen Kumar, G.; Nayak, M. M.; Dinesh, N. S.; Rajanna, K.

    2015-11-01

    Peristaltic pumps were normally used to pump liquids in several chemical and biological applications. In the present study, a peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber (positive as well negative pressures) using atmospheric air. In the present paper, we discuss the development and performance study of an automatic pressurization system to calibrate low range (millibar) pressure sensors. The system includes a peristaltic pump, calibrated pressure sensor (master sensor), pressure chamber, and the control electronics. An in-house developed peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber. A closed loop control system has been developed to detect and adjust the pressure leaks in the chamber. The complete system has been integrated into a portable product. The system performance has been studied for a step response and steady state errors. The system is portable, free from oil contaminants, and consumes less power compared to existing pressure calibration systems. The veracity of the system was verified by calibrating an unknown diaphragm based pressure sensor and the results obtained were satisfactory.

  3. Peristaltic pump-based low range pressure sensor calibration system.

    PubMed

    Vinayakumar, K B; Naveen Kumar, G; Nayak, M M; Dinesh, N S; Rajanna, K

    2015-11-01

    Peristaltic pumps were normally used to pump liquids in several chemical and biological applications. In the present study, a peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber (positive as well negative pressures) using atmospheric air. In the present paper, we discuss the development and performance study of an automatic pressurization system to calibrate low range (millibar) pressure sensors. The system includes a peristaltic pump, calibrated pressure sensor (master sensor), pressure chamber, and the control electronics. An in-house developed peristaltic pump was used to pressurize the chamber. A closed loop control system has been developed to detect and adjust the pressure leaks in the chamber. The complete system has been integrated into a portable product. The system performance has been studied for a step response and steady state errors. The system is portable, free from oil contaminants, and consumes less power compared to existing pressure calibration systems. The veracity of the system was verified by calibrating an unknown diaphragm based pressure sensor and the results obtained were satisfactory. PMID:26628178

  4. CONFERENCE NOTE: Comité Consultatif pour la Masse et les grandeurs apparentées (CCM), High Pressure and Medium Pressure Working Groups, Second International Seminar on Pressure Metrology from 1 kPa to 1 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    The seminar will be held from 2 to 4 June 1993, preceding the next meeting of the CCM, at the Laboratoire National d'Essais (LNE), 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75015 Paris, France. Scope of the Seminar The purpose of the seminar is to review the state of the art of pressure measurements in the 1 kPa to 1 GPa range and to present original and innovative contributions from standards laboratories and industry. Main Topics The seminar will be organized in six sessions as follows: Liquid-column manometers Piston gauge pressure standards Properties of liquids and gases relevant to pressure metrology Pressure transducers and transfer standards Pressure standard comparison (methods and results) Dynamic pressure measurements. Each topic will be introduced by a review paper presented by a session chairman. A final session, coordinated by Dr G F Molinar (IMGC), Chairman of the CCM High Pressure Working Group, and Dr P Stuart (NPL), Chairman of the CCM Medium Pressure Working Group, will deal with: Actual limits of accuracy of static pressure measurements in fluid media Fundamental problems in pressure metrology between I kPa and 1 GPa. Call for Papers Papers should be prepared for oral presentation and will be refereed by the session chairmen. The Proceedings will be published as a special issue of Metrologia. Papers should be written according to the instructions for authors printed on the inside back cover of this journal. A one-page abstract should be sent to Dr Molinar at the IMGC, to arrive before 31 January 1993. A participation fee of 900 FFr (175 US) will be charged. This will cover general expenses and a copy of the Proceedings. Hotel reservations, meals and transport are not included. Organizers For further information please contact: 1993 CCM Pressure Seminar, Dr G F Molinar, Istituto di Metrologia "G Colonnetti", Strada delle Cacce 73, 1-10135 Torino, Italy telephone (39) 11 39771; telex 212209 IMGCTO-I; fax (39) 11 346761. Contact at the LNE: J C Legras, telephone (33

  5. High frequency glow discharges at atmospheric pressure with micro-structured electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars-Hibbe, L.; Sichler, P.; Schrader, C.; Lucas, N.; Gericke, K.-H.; Büttgenbach, S.

    2005-02-01

    Micro-structured electrode (MSE) arrays allow the generation of large-area uniform glow discharges over a wide pressure range up to atmospheric pressure. The electrode widths, thicknesses and distances in the micrometre range are realized by means of modern micro-machining and galvanic techniques. The electrode distance, the gap width d, is small enough to generate sufficiently high electric field strengths to ignite gas discharges by applying only moderate radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) voltages (80-390 V in Ne, He, Ar, N2 and air). The non-thermal plasma system is characterized by a special probe measuring the electric parameters. We tested MSE arrays with d = 70, 25 and 15 µm. The MSE driven plasmas show a different behaviour from conventional RF discharge plasmas. Due to the very small electrode gap width we can describe the behaviour of the charged particles in the RF field of our system with the dc Townsend breakdown theory, depending on the pressure range and gas. With decreasing pressure, the gas discharges, especially in Ne and He, are increasingly dominated by field electron emission. With the MSE arrays as plasma sources several applications were developed and successfully tested, e.g. decomposition of waste gases and sterilization of food packaging materials at atmospheric pressure.

  6. The diffusion of cesium in the graphitic matrix A3-3 in the presence of helium at pressures up to 10 7 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensel, W.; Hoinkis, E.

    1995-07-01

    The migration of 137CS in the graphitic matrix A3-3 was studied at helium pressures of 4 × 10 6 and 10 7 Pa by use of the thin film technique with vapor deposited carrier-free 137Cs. The penetration profiles did not satisfy Fick's second law, but we applied successfully the solution of the diffusion equation with terms for trapping and re-emission derived by Gaus. Compared to 137Cs migration in a vacuum a high helium pressure lead to a decrease in the coefficient D for diffusion of mobile 137Cs and an increase in the activation energies for diffusion and trapping. D and the trapping coefficient μ are given by D = 10.3 exp (-1.76/kT) cm 2s -1 and μ = 2.2 × 10 3 exp(-1.63/kT) s -1 in the temperature range 1073-1273 K at a helium pressure of 4 × 10 6 Pa, where k = 8.618 × 10 -5 eV/K.

  7. Mild neurotrauma indicates a range-specific pressure response to low level shock wave exposure.

    PubMed

    Vandevord, Pamela J; Bolander, Richard; Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Hay, Kathryn; Bir, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the level of overpressure required to create physiological deficits is vital to advance prevention, diagnostic, and treatment strategies for individuals exposed to blasts. In this study, a rodent model of primary blast neurotrauma was employed to determine the pressure at which acute neurological alterations occurred. Rats were exposed to a single low intensity shock wave at a pressure of 0, 97, 117, or 153 kPa. Following exposure, rats were assessed for acute cognitive alterations using the Morris water maze and motor dysfunction using the horizontal ladder test. Subsequently, histological analyses of three brain regions (primary motor cortex, the hippocampal dentate gyrus region, and the posteromedial cortical amygdala) were conducted. Histological parameters included measuring the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to identify astrocyte activation, cleaved caspase-3 for early apoptosis identification and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) which labels degenerating neurons within the brain tissue. The results demonstrated that an exposure to a single 117 kPa shock wave revealed a significant change in overall neurological deficits when compared to controls and the other pressures. The animals showed significant alterations in water maze parameters and a histological increase in the number of GFAP, caspase-3, and FJB-positive cells. It is suggested that when exposed to a low level shock wave, there may be a biomechanical response elicited by a specific pressure range which can cause low level neurological deficits within the rat. These data indicate that neurotrauma induced from a shock wave may lead to cognitive deficits in short-term learning and memory of rats. Additional histological evidence supports significant and diffuse glial activation and cellular damage. Further investigation into the biomechanical aspects of shock wave exposure is required to elucidate this pressure range-specific phenomenon. PMID:21994066

  8. Pressure drop characteristics of cryogenic mixed refrigerant at macro and micro channel heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Jeong, Sangkwon; Hwang, Gyuwan

    2012-12-01

    Mixed Refrigerant-Joule Thomson (MR-JT) refrigerators are widely used in various kinds of cryogenic systems these days. The temperature glide effect is one of the major features of using mixed refrigerants since a recuperative heat exchanger in a MR-JT refrigerator is utilized for mostly two-phase flow. Although a pressure drop estimation for a multi-phase and multi-component fluid in the cryogenic temperature range is necessarily required in MR-JT refrigerator heat exchanger designs, it has been rarely discussed so far. In this paper, macro heat exchangers and micro heat exchangers are compared in order to investigate the pressure drop characteristics in the experimental MR-JT refrigerator operation. The tube in tube heat exchanger (TTHE) is a well-known macro-channel heat exchanger in MR-JT refrigeration. Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHEs) have been developed as a compact heat exchanger with micro size channels. Several two-phase pressure drop correlations are examined to discuss the experimental pressure measurement results. The result of this paper shows that cryogenic mixed refrigerant pressure drop can be estimated with conventional two-phase pressure drop correlations if an appropriate flow pattern is identified.

  9. Quantification of the Effect of Pressure Wire Drift on the Diagnostic Performance of Fractional Flow Reserve, Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio, and Whole-Cycle Pd/Pa

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Yousif; Shun-Shin, Matthew J.; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Petraco, Ricardo; Al-Lamee, Rasha; Mayet, Jamil; Francis, Darrel P.; Sen, Sayan; Davies, Justin E.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Small drifts in intracoronary pressure measurements (±2 mm Hg) can affect stenosis categorization using pressure indices. This has not previously been assessed for fractional flow reserve (FFR), instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR), and whole-cycle distal pressure/proximal pressure (Pd/Pa) indices. Methods and Results—Four hundred forty-seven stenoses were assessed with FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa. Cut point values for significance were predefined as ≤0.8, <0.90, and <0.93, respectively. Pressure wire drift was simulated by offsetting the distal coronary pressure trace by ±2 mm Hg. FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa indices were recalculated and stenosis misclassification quantified. Median (±median absolute deviation) values for FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa were 0.81 (±0.11), 0.90 (±0.07), and 0.93 (±0.06), respectively. For the cut point of FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa, 34.6% (155), 50.1% (224), and 62.2% (278) of values, respectively, lay within ±0.05 U. With ±2 mm Hg pressure wire drift, 21% (94), 25% (110), and 33% (148) of the study population were misclassified with FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa, respectively. Both FFR and iFR had significantly lower misclassification than whole-cycle Pd/Pa (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between the diagnostic performance of FFR and iFR (P=0.125). Conclusions— In a substantial proportion of cases, small amounts of pressure wire drift are enough to cause stenoses to change classification. Whole-cycle Pd/Pa is more vulnerable to such reclassification than FFR and iFR. PMID:27076571

  10. Differential Wide Temperature Range CMOS Interface Circuit for Capacitive MEMS Pressure Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yucai; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) differential interface circuit for capacitive Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) pressure sensors that is functional over a wide temperature range between −55 °C and 225 °C. The circuit is implemented using IBM 0.13 μm CMOS technology with 2.5 V power supply. A constant-gm biasing technique is used to mitigate performance degradation at high temperatures. The circuit offers the flexibility to interface with MEMS sensors with a wide range of the steady-state capacitance values from 0.5 pF to 10 pF. Simulation results show that the circuitry has excellent linearity and stability over the wide temperature range. Experimental results confirm that the temperature effects on the circuitry are small, with an overall linearity error around 2%. PMID:25686312

  11. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  12. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  13. A high performance micro-pressure sensor based on a double-ended quartz tuning fork and silicon diaphragm in atmospheric packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Li, Cun; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Bo; Tian, Bian

    2015-06-01

    A resonant micro-pressure sensor based on a double-ended quartz tuning fork (DEQTF) and bossed silicon diaphragm in atmospheric packaging is presented. To achieve vacuum-free packaging with a high quality factor, the DEQTF is designed to resonate in an anti-phase vibration mode in a plane that is under the effect of slide-film damping. The feasibility is demonstrated by theoretical analysis and a finite element simulation. The dimensions of the DEQTF and diaphragm are optimized in accordance with the principles of improving sensitivity and minimizing energy dissipation. The sensor chip is fabricated using quartz and silicon micromachining technologies, and simply packaged in a stainless steel shell with standard atmosphere. The experimental setup is established for the calibration, where an additional sensor prototype without a pressure port is introduced as a frequency reference. By detecting the frequency difference of the tested sensor and reference sensor, the influences of environmental factors such as temperature and shocks on measuring accuracy are eliminated effectively. Under the action of a self-excitation circuit, static performance is obtained. The sensitivity of the sensor is 299 kHz kPa-1 in the operating range of 0-10 kPa at room temperature. Testing results shows a nonlinearity of 0.0278%FS, a hysteresis of 0.0207%FS and a repeatability of 0.0375%FS. The results indicate that the proposed sensor has favorable features, which provides a cost-effective and high-performance approach for low pressure measurement.

  14. Fabrication and Structural Design of Micro Pressure Sensors for Tire Pressure Measurement Systems (TPMS)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bian; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde; Zhang, Ling; Liao, Nansheng; Liu, Yuanhao; Meng, Chao

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe the design and testing of a micro piezoresistive pressure sensor for a Tire Pressure Measurement System (TPMS) which has the advantages of a minimized structure, high sensitivity, linearity and accuracy. Through analysis of the stress distribution of the diaphragm using the ANSYS software, a model of the structure was established. The fabrication on a single silicon substrate utilizes the technologies of anisotropic chemical etching and packaging through glass anodic bonding. The performance of this type of piezoresistive sensor, including size, sensitivity, and long-term stability, were investigated. The results indicate that the accuracy is 0.5% FS, therefore this design meets the requirements for a TPMS, and not only has a smaller size and simplicity of preparation, but also has high sensitivity and accuracy. PMID:22573960

  15. Geometry optimization for micro-pressure sensor considering dynamic interference.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhongliang; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Lili; Tian, Bian; Li, Cun

    2014-09-01

    Presented is the geometry optimization for piezoresistive absolute micro-pressure sensor. A figure of merit called the performance factor (PF) is defined as a quantitative index to describe the comprehensive performances of a sensor including sensitivity, resonant frequency, and acceleration interference. Three geometries are proposed through introducing islands and sensitive beams into typical flat diaphragm. The stress distributions of sensitive elements are analyzed by finite element method. Multivariate fittings based on ANSYS simulation results are performed to establish the equations about surface stress, deflection, and resonant frequency. Optimization by MATLAB is carried out to determine the dimensions of the geometries. Convex corner undercutting is evaluated. Each PF of the three geometries with the determined dimensions is calculated and compared. Silicon bulk micromachining is utilized to fabricate the prototypes of the sensors. The outputs of the sensors under both static and dynamic conditions are tested. Experimental results demonstrate the rationality of the defined performance factor and reveal that the geometry with quad islands presents the highest PF of 210.947 Hz(1/4). The favorable overall performances enable the sensor more suitable for altimetry. PMID:25273764

  16. Geometry optimization for micro-pressure sensor considering dynamic interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongliang; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Lili; Tian, Bian; Li, Cun

    2014-09-01

    Presented is the geometry optimization for piezoresistive absolute micro-pressure sensor. A figure of merit called the performance factor (PF) is defined as a quantitative index to describe the comprehensive performances of a sensor including sensitivity, resonant frequency, and acceleration interference. Three geometries are proposed through introducing islands and sensitive beams into typical flat diaphragm. The stress distributions of sensitive elements are analyzed by finite element method. Multivariate fittings based on ANSYS simulation results are performed to establish the equations about surface stress, deflection, and resonant frequency. Optimization by MATLAB is carried out to determine the dimensions of the geometries. Convex corner undercutting is evaluated. Each PF of the three geometries with the determined dimensions is calculated and compared. Silicon bulk micromachining is utilized to fabricate the prototypes of the sensors. The outputs of the sensors under both static and dynamic conditions are tested. Experimental results demonstrate the rationality of the defined performance factor and reveal that the geometry with quad islands presents the highest PF of 210.947 Hz1/4. The favorable overall performances enable the sensor more suitable for altimetry.

  17. Geometry optimization for micro-pressure sensor considering dynamic interference

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhongliang; Zhao, Yulong Li, Lili; Tian, Bian; Li, Cun

    2014-09-15

    Presented is the geometry optimization for piezoresistive absolute micro-pressure sensor. A figure of merit called the performance factor (PF) is defined as a quantitative index to describe the comprehensive performances of a sensor including sensitivity, resonant frequency, and acceleration interference. Three geometries are proposed through introducing islands and sensitive beams into typical flat diaphragm. The stress distributions of sensitive elements are analyzed by finite element method. Multivariate fittings based on ANSYS simulation results are performed to establish the equations about surface stress, deflection, and resonant frequency. Optimization by MATLAB is carried out to determine the dimensions of the geometries. Convex corner undercutting is evaluated. Each PF of the three geometries with the determined dimensions is calculated and compared. Silicon bulk micromachining is utilized to fabricate the prototypes of the sensors. The outputs of the sensors under both static and dynamic conditions are tested. Experimental results demonstrate the rationality of the defined performance factor and reveal that the geometry with quad islands presents the highest PF of 210.947 Hz{sup 1/4}. The favorable overall performances enable the sensor more suitable for altimetry.

  18. Outcomes of Patients Requiring Blood Pressure Control Before Thrombolysis with tPA for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Darger, Bryan; Gonzales, Nicole; Banuelos, Rosa C.; Peng, Hui; Radecki, Ryan P.; Doshi, Pratik B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to assess safety and efficacy of thrombolysis in the setting of aggressive blood pressure (BP) control as it compares to standard BP control or no BP control prior to thrombolysis. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) between 2004–2011. We compared the outcomes of patients treated with tPA for AIS who required aggressive BP control prior to thrombolysis to those requiring standard or no BP control prior to thrombolysis. The primary outcome of interest was safety, defined by all grades of hemorrhagic transformation and neurologic deterioration. The secondary outcome was efficacy, determined by functional status at discharge, and in-hospital deaths. Results Of 427 patients included in the analysis, 89 received aggressive BP control prior to thrombolysis, 65 received standard BP control, and 273 required no BP control prior to thrombolysis. Patients requiring BP control had more severe strokes, with median arrival National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale of 10 (IQR [6–17]) in patients not requiring BP control versus 11 (IQR [5–16]) and 13 (IQR [7–20]) in patients requiring standard and aggressive BP lowering therapies, respectively (p=0.048). In a multiple logistic regression model adjusting for baseline differences, there were no statistically significant differences in adverse events between the three groups (P>0.10). Conclusion We observed no association between BP control and adverse outcomes in ischemic stroke patients undergoing thrombolysis. However, additional study is necessary to confirm or refute the safety of aggressive BP control prior to thrombolysis. PMID:26759644

  19. Predicting the pressure driven flow of gases through micro-capillaries and micro-orifices

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.L.; Carlson, R.W.; Fischer, L.E.

    1994-11-01

    A large body of experimentally measured gas flow rates were obtained from the literature and then compared to the predictions obtained with constitutive flow equations. This was done to determine whether the equations apply to the predictions of gas flow rates from leaking containment vessels used to transport radioactive materials. The experiments consisted of measuring the volumetric pressure-driven flow of gases through micro-capillaries and micro-orifices. The experimental results were compared to the predictions obtained with the equations given in ANSI N14.5 the American National Standard for Radioactive Materials-Leakage Tests on Package for Shipment. The equations were applied to both (1) the data set according to the recommendations given in ANSI N14.5 and (2) globally to the complete data set. It was found that: The continuum and molecular flow equation provided good agreement between the experimental and calculated flow rates for flow rates less than about 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s. The choked flow equation resulted in over-prediction of the flow rates for flow rates less than about 1 atm-cm{sup 3}/s. For flow rates higher than 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s, the molecular and continuum flow equation over-predicted the measured flow rates and the predictions obtained with the choked flow equation agreed well with the experimental values. Since the flow rates of interest for packages used to transport radioactive materials are almost always less than 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s, it is suggested that the continuum and molecular flow equation be used for gas flow rate predictions related to these applications.

  20. A noncontact intraocular pressure measurement device using a micro reflected air pressure sensor for the prediagnosis of glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Kim, Byeong Hee; Seo, Young Ho

    2012-03-01

    This study investigates a novel, portable tonometer using a micro reflected air pressure sensor for the prediagnosis of glaucoma. Because glaucoma progresses slowly and is not painful, glaucoma patients require a portable prediagnosis system to periodically measure intraocular pressure at home. Conventionally, intraocular pressure is measured by an air-puff tonometer whereby the cornea is deformed by a short pulse of air pressure and the magnitude of the corneal deformation is measured by optic systems such as a combination of laser- and photodiodes. In this study, a micro reflected air pressure sensor was designed, fabricated, and tested in order to measure the magnitude of corneal deformation without optic systems. In an experimental study, artificial eyes with different internal pressures were fabricated and these pressures were measured by the aforementioned system.

  1. Note: A micro-perfusion system for use during real-time physiological studies under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltas, Jeff; Long, Zac; Huff, Alison; Maloney, Ryan; Ryan, Jordan; Urayama, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We construct a micro-perfusion system using piston screw pump generators for use during real-time, high-pressure physiological studies. Perfusion is achieved using two generators, with one generator being compressed while the other is retracted, thus maintaining pressurization while producing fluid flow. We demonstrate control over perfusion rates in the 10-μl/s range and the ability to change between fluid reservoirs at up to 50 MPa. We validate the screw-pump approach by monitoring the cyanide-induced response of UV-excited autofluorescence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under pressurization.

  2. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). 153.372 Section 153.372 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  3. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). 153.372 Section 153.372 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  4. The electron spectro-microscopy beamline at National Synchrotron Light Source II: A wide photon energy range, micro-focusing beamlinefor photoelectron spectro-microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger R.; Hulbert L.; Johnson P.D.; Sadowski, J.T.; Starr, D.E.; Chubar, O.; Valla, T.; Vescovo, E.

    2012-02-13

    A comprehensive optical design for a high-resolution, high-flux, wide-energy range, micro-focused beamline working in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray photon energy range is proposed. The beamline is to provide monochromatic radiation to three photoelectron microscopes: a full-field x-ray photoelectron emission microscope and two scanning instruments, one dedicated to angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy ({micro}-ARPES) and one for ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning photoelectron microscopy (AP-XPS/SPEM). Microfocusing is achieved with state of the art elliptical cylinders, obtaining a spot size of 1 {micro}m for ARPES and 0.5 {micro}m for AP-XPS/SPEM. A detailed ray tracing analysis quantitatively evaluates the overall beamline performances.

  5. Effects of Fin Shape on Condensation Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop inside Herringbone Micro Fin Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Akio; Otsubo, Yusuke; Ohtsuka, Satoshi

    Experiments of in-tube condensation of R410A have been carried out for as mooth tube, a h elical micro fin tube and five types of herringbone micro fin tubes. In the herringbone micro fin tube, the micro fins work to remove liquid at fin-diverging parts and collect liquid at fin-converging parts. In the high mass velocity region, heat transfer coefficient of all the herringbone tubes is about 2-4 times higher than that of the helical micro fin tube. In the low mass velocity region, however, the heat transfer coefficients of the herringbone micro fin tubes are equal to or smaller than those of the helical micro fin tube. Up to the fin height of 0.18 mm, the heat transfer coefficient is higher for higher fin, whereas that of ah igher fin tube is saturated. The pressure drop increases with increasing fin height. The helix angle strongly affects the heat transfer and pressure drop. Higher helix angle causes higher heat transfer coefficient and higher pressure drop. In the case of the herringbone tube which has shorter fin and/or smaller helix angle, pressure drops are equal to or lower than that of the helical micro fin tube, whereas those of other tubes are higher.

  6. Improved modified pressure imaging and software for egg micro-crack detection and egg quality grading

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cracks in the egg shell increase a food safety risk. Especially, eggs with very fine, hairline cracks (micro-cracks) are often undetected during the grading process because they are almost impossible to detect visually. A modified pressure imaging system was developed to detect eggs with micro-crack...

  7. Residual oxygen time model for oxygen partial pressure near 130 kPa (1.3 atm).

    PubMed

    Shykoff, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    A two-part residual oxygen time model predicts the probability of detectible pulmonary oxygen toxicity P(P[O2tox]) after dives with oxygen partial pressure (PO2) approximately 130 kPa, and provides a tool to plan dive series with selected risk of P[O2tox]. Data suggest that pulmonary oxygen injury at this PO2 is additive between dives. Recovery begins after a delay and continues during any following dive. A logistic relation expresses P(P[O2tox]) as a function of dive duration (T(dur)) [hours]: P(P[O2tox]) = 100/[1+exp (3.586-0.49 x T(dur))] This expression maps T(dur) to P(P[O2tox]) or, in the linear mid-portion of the curve, P(P[O2tox]) usefully to T(dur). For multiple dives or during recovery, it maps to an equivalent dive duration, T(eq). T(eq) was found after second dives of duration T(dur 2). Residual time from the first dive t(r) = T(eq) - T(dur2). With known t(r), t and T(dur) a recovery model was fitted. t(r) = T(dur) x exp [-k x((t-5)/T(dur)2], where t = t - 5 hours, k = 0.149 for resting, and 0.047 for exercising divers, and t represents time after surfacing. The fits were assessed for 1,352 man-dives. Standard deviations of the residuals were 8.5% and 18.3% probability for resting or exercise dives, respectively. PMID:26742255

  8. Plasma density evolution during nanosecond discharge in hydrogen gas at (1-3) × 105 Pa pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatom, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2014-05-01

    The results of a study of the nanosecond discharge in H2 gas at pressures of (1-3) × 105 Pa using fast-framing photography and space- and time-resolved spectroscopy are presented. The discharge is initiated by the application of a high-voltage pulse with an amplitude of ˜100 kV and duration of ˜5 ns to a blade cathode placed at a distance of 20 mm from the anode. The results show the dynamics of the discharge formation and the build-up of the plasma electron density in the discharge channels close to and at a distance from the edge of the cathode. The results obtained are compared to those obtained in recent studies of similar discharges in air and He gas. It was shown that the time and space evolution of the plasma light emission in the H2 gas discharge is very similar to that in air. Namely, the generation of the plasma is mainly confined to the plasma channels initiated at the top and bottom edges of the cathode electrode and that there are no new plasma channels formed from the explosive emission centres along the blade as it was obtained in earlier experiments with He gas. Spectroscopic measurements showed that the plasma density reaches 2 × 1017 cm-3 and 1.6 × 1016 cm-3 in the vicinity of the cathode and the middle of the anode-cathode gap, respectively, for a plasma electron temperature of <1.5 eV. The values of plasma electron density and the previously presented results of electric field measurements allow calculation of the resistance of the plasma channels.

  9. An Integrated Compact Unit for Wide Range Micro-Newton Force Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, M. A. Salam; Tohmyoh, Hironori; Saka, Masumi

    Wide range compact sensor is preferably sought for force sensing in testing of micro objects or local area of macro objects with the observation of high resolution microscope. This paper presents the design and development of an integrated passive cantilever type force sensing unit with the specificities of range variation, interchangeability of components and compact size by incorporating with cantilever, probe and a capacitive sensor for measurement of large range micro-newton forces in wide scope of application. In the design, the tactile force at the probe perpendicularly attached to the cantilever is converted as cantilever deflection, which is measured by the capacitive sensor. In connection to a tiny capacitive sensor a compatible cantilever with double-beam structure is considered. Cantilever length variation facility is incorporated in the unit for obtaining different force measurement ranges by using the same cantilever. Characterization of the cantilever is performed against a standard load cell. The force resolution with a typical cantilever is estimated as 10 nN. The elastic property of human hair is efficiently determined by testing with the combination of a digital microscope and the developed sensor system. The utility of the unit for different resolution/range by the interchangeability of cantilevers is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that this integrated force sensing unit achieves good sensitivity and linearity, and wide measurement range.

  10. Pressure Generation from Micro-Bubble Collapse at Shock Wave Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Akihisa; Ohtani, Kiyonobu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Nishio, Shigeru; Mimura, Haruo; Takeda, Minoru

    This paper reports the result of a primary experimental and analytical study used to explore a reliable technology that is potentially applicable to the inactivation of micro-creatures contained in ship ballast water. A shock wave generated by the micro-explosion of a 10mg silver azide pellet in a 10mm wide parallel test section was used to interact with a bubble cloud consisting of bubbles with average diameter 10µm produced by a swirling flow type micro-bubble generator. Observations were carried out with a high-speed camera, IMACON200, and the corresponding rebound pressures of the collapsing bubbles were measured with a fiber optic probe pressure transducer that provides high spatial and temporal resolutions. We found that micro-bubbles collapse in several hundred nanoseconds after the shock exposure and the resulting peak pressure pulses that repeatedly occurred exceeded well over 200MPa measured at the 20mm distance from the explosion center. These continued for well over 20µs. The experimental pressure responses were explained by solving the one-dimensional bubble Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Such high peak pressures could be used effectively for the inactivation of micro-creatures contained in ship ballast water.

  11. Multistage open-tube trap for enrichment of part-per-trillion trace components of low-pressure (below 27-kPa) air samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, D.; Vo, T.; Vedder, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A multistage open-tube trap for cryogenic collection of trace components in low-pressure air samples is described. The open-tube design allows higher volumetric flow rates than densely packed glass-bead traps commonly reported and is suitable for air samples at pressures below 27 kPa with liquid nitrogen as the cryogen. Gas blends containing 200 to 2500 parts per trillion by volume each of ethane and ethene were sampled and hydrocarbons were enriched with 100 + or - 4 percent trap efficiency. The multistage design is more efficient than equal-length open-tube traps under the conditions of the measurements.

  12. Review of the STM range of pressure distribution products.

    PubMed

    Moody, M

    STM Healthcare is a division of the Recticel Group which has been actively involved in the production and use of polyurethane foams for the past 40 years, and is now one of Europe's leading manufacturers of polyurethane foam for insulation, packaging, filtration, aerospace, the automotive and furniture industries, domestic and specialist bedding and seating products. STM Healthcare is able to draw upon the wealth of experience and expertise of the manufacturing facilities, enabling products to be developed using the latest environmentally friendly specification foams best suited to the requirements of pressure-reduction technology. All STM Healthcare mattresses, cushions and Linknurse mattresses are manufactured with Safeguard combustion modified high resilience foams. (Linknurse is a licensed product name; products are manufactured by Recticel and distributed by STM). PMID:9830917

  13. Phenomenological modeling of long range noncontact friction in micro- and nanoresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gusso, Andre

    2011-09-15

    Motivated by the results of an experiment using atomic force microscopy performed by Gotsmann and Fuchs [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2597 (2001)], where a strong energy loss due to the tip-sample interaction was measured, we investigate the potential implications of this energy loss channel to the quality factor of suspended micro- and nanoresonators. Because the observed tip-sample dissipation remains without a satisfactory theoretical explanation, two phenomenological models are proposed to generalize the experimental observations. In the minimal phenomenological model the range of validity of the power law found experimentally for the damping coefficient is assumed to be valid for larger separations. A more elaborate phenomenological model assumes that the noncontact friction is a consequence of the Casimir force acting between the closely spaced surfaces. Both models provide quantitative results for the noncontact friction between any two objects which are then used to estimate the energy loss for suspended bar micro- and nanoresonators. It is concluded that the energy loss due to the unknown mechanism has the potential to seriously restrict the quality factor of both micro- and nanoresonators.

  14. A normally-closed piezoelectric micro-valve with flexible stopper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song; Lu, Song; Liu, Yong; Wang, Jiantao; Tian, Xiaochao; Liu, Guojun; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    In the field of controlled drug delivery system, there are still many problems on those reported micro-valves, such as the small opening height, unsatisfactory particle tolerance and high cost. To solve the above problems, a novel normally-closed piezoelectric micro-valve is presented in this paper. The micro-valve was driven by circular unimorph piezoelectric vibrator and natural rubber membrane with high elasticity was used as the valve stopper. The small axial displacement of piezoelectric vibrator can be converted into a large stroke of valve stopper based on hydraulic amplification mechanism. The experiment indicates that maximum hydraulic amplification ratio is up to 14, and the cut-off pressure of the micro-valve is 39kPa in the case of no working voltage. The presented micro valve has a large flow control range (ranging from 0 to 8.75mL/min).

  15. High Resolution and Large Dynamic Range Resonant Pressure Sensor Based on Q-Factor Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Stell, Christopher B. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Vorperian, Vatche (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure sensor has a high degree of accuracy over a wide range of pressures. Using a pressure sensor relying upon resonant oscillations to determine pressure, a driving circuit drives such a pressure sensor at resonance and tracks resonant frequency and amplitude shifts with changes in pressure. Pressure changes affect the Q-factor of the resonating portion of the pressure sensor. Such Q-factor changes are detected by the driving/sensing circuit which in turn tracks the changes in resonant frequency to maintain the pressure sensor at resonance. Changes in the Q-factor are reflected in changes of amplitude of the resonating pressure sensor. In response, upon sensing the changes in the amplitude, the driving circuit changes the force or strength of the electrostatic driving signal to maintain the resonator at constant amplitude. The amplitude of the driving signals become a direct measure of the changes in pressure as the operating characteristics of the resonator give rise to a linear response curve for the amplitude of the driving signal. Pressure change resolution is on the order of 10(exp -6) torr over a range spanning from 7,600 torr to 10(exp -6) torr. No temperature compensation for the pressure sensor of the present invention is foreseen. Power requirements for the pressure sensor are generally minimal due to the low-loss mechanical design of the resonating pressure sensor and the simple control electronics.

  16. Laboratory investigation of high pressure survival in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into the gigapascal pressure range

    PubMed Central

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Kardzhaliyska, Liya; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at up to 1500 MPa was investigated by laboratory studies involving exposure to high pressure followed by evaluation of survivors as the number (N) of colony forming units (CFU) that could be cultured following recovery to ambient conditions. Exposing the wild type (WT) bacteria to 250 MPa resulted in only a minor (0.7 log N units) drop in survival compared with the initial concentration of 108 cells/ml. Raising the pressure to above 500 MPa caused a large reduction in the number of viable cells observed following recovery to ambient pressure. Additional pressure increase caused a further decrease in survivability, with approximately 102 CFU/ml recorded following exposure to 1000 MPa (1 GPa) and 1.5 GPa. Pressurizing samples from colonies resuscitated from survivors that had been previously exposed to high pressure resulted in substantially greater survivor counts. Experiments were carried out to examine potential interactions between pressure and temperature variables in determining bacterial survival. One generation of survivors previously exposed to 1 GPa was compared with WT samples to investigate survival between 37 and 8°C. The results did not reveal any coupling between acquired high pressure resistance and temperature effects on growth. PMID:25452750

  17. Laboratory investigation of high pressure survival in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into the gigapascal pressure range.

    PubMed

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Kardzhaliyska, Liya; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at up to 1500 MPa was investigated by laboratory studies involving exposure to high pressure followed by evaluation of survivors as the number (N) of colony forming units (CFU) that could be cultured following recovery to ambient conditions. Exposing the wild type (WT) bacteria to 250 MPa resulted in only a minor (0.7 log N units) drop in survival compared with the initial concentration of 10(8) cells/ml. Raising the pressure to above 500 MPa caused a large reduction in the number of viable cells observed following recovery to ambient pressure. Additional pressure increase caused a further decrease in survivability, with approximately 10(2) CFU/ml recorded following exposure to 1000 MPa (1 GPa) and 1.5 GPa. Pressurizing samples from colonies resuscitated from survivors that had been previously exposed to high pressure resulted in substantially greater survivor counts. Experiments were carried out to examine potential interactions between pressure and temperature variables in determining bacterial survival. One generation of survivors previously exposed to 1 GPa was compared with WT samples to investigate survival between 37 and 8°C. The results did not reveal any coupling between acquired high pressure resistance and temperature effects on growth. PMID:25452750

  18. A technique for remotely measuring surface pressure from a satellite using a multicolor laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The optical path length from a satellite to the earth's surface is strongly dependent on the atmospheric pressure along the propagation path. Surface pressure can be measured by using a multicolor laser ranging system to observe the change with wavelength in the optical path length from the satellite to a ground target. The equations which relate surface pressure to the differential path lengths are derived and the accuracy of the pressure measurement is evaluated in terms of the ranging system parameters. The results indicate that pressure accuracies of a few millibars appear feasible.

  19. Technique for remotely measuring surface pressure from a satellite using a multicolor laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The optical path length from a satellite to the earth's surface is strongly dependent on the atmospheric pressure along the propagation path. It is shown that surface pressures can be measured by the use of a multicolor laser ranging system to observe the change with wavelength in the optical path length from the satellite to a ground target. Equations are derived which relate surface pressure to the differential path lengths. In addition, the accuracy of the pressure measurement is evaluated in terms of the ranging system parameters. It is concluded that the results indicate that pressure accuracies of a few millibars appear feasible.

  20. High pressure studies using two-stage diamond micro-anvils grown by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2015-06-10

    Ultra-high static pressures have been achieved in the laboratory using a two-stage micro-ball nanodiamond anvils as well as a two-stage micro-paired diamond anvils machined using a focused ion-beam system. The two-stage diamond anvils’ designs implemented thus far suffer from a limitation of one diamond anvil sliding past another anvil at extreme conditions. We describe a new method of fabricating two-stage diamond micro-anvils using a tungsten mask on a standard diamond anvil followed by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) homoepitaxial diamond growth. A prototype two stage diamond anvil with 300 μm culet and with a CVD diamond second stage ofmore » 50 μm in diameter was fabricated. We have carried out preliminary high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on a sample of rare-earth metal lutetium sample with a copper pressure standard to 86 GPa. Furthermore, the micro-anvil grown by CVD remained intact during indentation of gasket as well as on decompression from the highest pressure of 86 GPa.« less

  1. High pressure studies using two-stage diamond micro-anvils grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2015-06-10

    Ultra-high static pressures have been achieved in the laboratory using a two-stage micro-ball nanodiamond anvils as well as a two-stage micro-paired diamond anvils machined using a focused ion-beam system. The two-stage diamond anvils’ designs implemented thus far suffer from a limitation of one diamond anvil sliding past another anvil at extreme conditions. We describe a new method of fabricating two-stage diamond micro-anvils using a tungsten mask on a standard diamond anvil followed by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) homoepitaxial diamond growth. A prototype two stage diamond anvil with 300 μm culet and with a CVD diamond second stage of 50 μm in diameter was fabricated. We have carried out preliminary high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on a sample of rare-earth metal lutetium sample with a copper pressure standard to 86 GPa. Furthermore, the micro-anvil grown by CVD remained intact during indentation of gasket as well as on decompression from the highest pressure of 86 GPa.

  2. Precise measurement of micro bubble resonator thickness by internal aerostatic pressure sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijing; Liao, Jie; Liu, Sheng; Wu, Xiang; Liu, Liying; Xu, Lei

    2016-09-01

    We develop a new, simple and non-destructive method to precisely measure the thickness of thin wall micro bubble resonators (MBRs) by using internal aerostatic pressure sensing. Measurement error of 1% at a bubble wall thickness of 2 μm is achieved. This method is applicable to both thin wall and thick wall MBR with high measurement accuracy. PMID:27607689

  3. Implementation of micro-ball nanodiamond anvils for high-pressure studies above 6 Mbar

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Abakumov, Artem M

    2012-01-01

    Since invention of the diamond anvil cell technique in the late 1950s for studying materials at extreme conditions, the maximum static pressure generated so far at room temperature was reported to be about 400 GPa. Here we show that use of micro-semi-balls made of nanodiamond as second-stage anvils in conventional diamond anvil cells drastically extends the achievable pressure range in static compression experiments to above 600 GPa. Micro-anvils (10–50 μm in diameter) of superhard nanodiamond (with a grain size below ∼50 nm) were synthesized in a large volume press using a newly developed technique. In our pilot experiments on rhenium and gold we have studied the equation of state of rhenium at pressures up to 640 GPa and demonstrated the feasibility and crucial necessity of the in situ ultra high-pressure measurements for accurate determination of material properties at extreme conditions. PMID:23093199

  4. Static Pressure Above 300 GPa Using Chemical Vapor Deposited Two-stage Diamond Micro-anvils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey; Samudrala, Gopi; Tsoi, Georgiy; Smith, Spencer; Vohra, Yogesh

    Two-stage diamond micro-anvils were grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on beveled diamond anvils with 30 micron central flats. These anvils were used to compress a pre-indented rhenium foil to pressures in excess of 300 Gigapascals (GPa) at relatively small applied loads. Powder diffraction patterns were collected across the high-pressure region using an x-ray beam collimated to 1x2 microns in a grid with a spacing of 1 micron. While multi-megabar pressures were seen across the entire second stage, the highest pressure regions were confined to areas of a few microns in diameter. These were observed at points near the edge of the second stage with nearby pressure gradients as high as 100 GPa/micron. The transmitted x-rays show that the second stage plastically deformed while maintaining multi-megabar pressures. This may have created a second-stage gasket consisting of CVD diamond and rhenium that supported the pressure gradient without substantial external confining pressure. Further improvements in two-stage diamond micro-anvils would require controlling the geometry and microcrystalline/nanocrystalline diamond content during CVD growth process. This work was supported by the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration under Grant Number DE-NA0002014.

  5. KEY COMPARISON: Final report of APMP pressure key comparison (APMP.M.P-K6) in gas media and gauge mode from 20 kPa to 105 kPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Woo, Sam Yong; Fitzgerald, Mark; Man, John; Ooiwa, Akira; Jescheck, M.; Jian, Wu; Fatt, Chen Soo; Chan, T. K.; Moore, Ken

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a regional key comparison (APMP-IC-2-97) under the aegis of Asia Pacific Metrology Program (APMP) for pressure measurements in gas media and in gauge mode from 20 kPa to 105 kPa. The transfer standard was a pressure-balance with a piston-cylinder assembly with nominal effective area 335.7 mm2 (TL-391) and was supplied by the National Metrology Institute of Japan [NMIJ]. Nine standards laboratories from the APMP region with one specially invited laboratory from the EUROMET region, namely Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany, participated in this comparison. The comparison started in October 1998 and was completed in May 2001. The pilot laboratory prepared the calibration procedure as per the guidelines of APMP and International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) [1-4]. Detailed instructions for performing this key comparison were provided in the calibration protocol and the required data were described in: (1) Annex 3 - characteristics of the laboratory standards, (2) Annex 4 - the effective area (A'p'/mm2) (where the prime indicates values based on measured quantities) at 23 °C of the travelling standard as a function of nominal pressure (p'/kPa) (five cycles both increasing and decreasing pressures at five predetermined pressure points) and (3) Annex 5 - the average effective area at 23 °C (A'p'/mm2) obtained for each pressure p'/kPa with all uncertainty statements. The pilot laboratory processed the information and the data provided by the participants for these three annexes, starting with the information about the standards as provided in Annex 3. Based on this information, the participating laboratories are classified into two categories: (I) laboratories that are maintaining primary standards, and (II) laboratories that are maintaining standards loosely classified as secondary standards with a clear traceability from other established national metrology institutes (NMI) as per norm of the BIPM. It is

  6. Large Area One-Step Facile Processing of Microstructured Elastomeric Dielectric Film for High Sensitivity and Durable Sensing over Wide Pressure Range.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sujie; Zhuo, Bengang; Guo, Xiaojun

    2016-08-10

    Once the requirement of sensitivity has been met, to enable a flexible pressure sensor technology to be widely adopted as an economic and convenient way for sensing diverse human body motions, critical factors need to be considered including low manufacturing cost, a large pressure detection range, and low power consumption. In this work, a facile approach is developed for one-step processing of a large area microstructured elastomer film with high density microfeatures of air voids, which can be seamlessly integrated into the process flow for fabricating flexible capacitive sensors. The fabricated sensors exhibit fast response and high sensitivity in the low pressure range to be able to detect very weak pressure down to 1 Pa and perform reliable wrist pulse monitoring. Compared to previous work, more advantageous features of this sensor are relatively high sensitivity being maintained in a wide pressure range up to 250 kPa and excellent durability under heavy load larger than 1 MPa, attributed to the formed dense air voids inside the film. A smart insole made with the sensor can accurately monitor the real-time walking or running behaviors and even a small weight change less than 1 kg under a heavy load of a 70 kg adult. For both application examples of wrist pulse monitoring and smart insole, the sensors are operated in a 3.3 V electronic system powered by a Li-ion battery, showing the potential for power-constrained wearable applications. PMID:27427977

  7. Carbon nanotubes on polymer-based pressure micro-sensor for manometric catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, M. F.; Hariz, A.; Hsu, H. Y.; Omari, T.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the fabrication process of a novel polymer based pressure micro-sensor for use in manometric measurements in medical diagnostics. Review and analysis of polymer materials properties and polymer based sensors has been carried out and has been reported by us elsewhere [1]. The interest in developing a novel polymer based flexible pressure micro-sensor was motivated by the numerous problems inherent in the currently available manometric catheters used in the hospitals. The most critical issue regarding existing catheters was the running and maintenance costs [2]. Thus expensive operation costs lead to reuse of the catheters, which increase the risk for disease transmission. The novel flexible polymer based pressure micro-sensor was build using SU-8, which is a special kind of negative photoresist. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and aluminum are used as the sensing material and contacting electrodes respectively. The pressure sensor diaphragm was first patterned on top of an oxidized silicon wafer using SU-8, followed by aluminum deposition to define the electrodes. The carbon nanotube is then deposited using dielectrophoresis (DEP) process. Once the carbon nanotubes are aligned in between these electrodes, the remaining of the sensor structure is formed using SU-8. Patterning of SU-8 and release from the substrate make the device ready for further testing of sensing ability. This research not only investigates the use of polymeric materials to build pressure sensors, but also explores the feasibility of full utilization of polymeric materials to replace conventional silicon materials in micro-sensors fabrication for use in medical environments. The completed sensor is expected to form an integral part of a large versatile sensing system. For example, the biocompatible artificial skin, is predicted to be capable of sensing force, pressure, temperature, and humidity, and may be used in such applications as medical and robotic system.

  8. Demonstration of micro-projection enabled short-range communication system for 5G.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsi-Hsir; Tsai, Cheng-Yu

    2016-06-13

    A liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) based polarization modulated image (PMI) system architecture using red-, green- and blue-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which offers simultaneous micro-projection and high-speed data transmission at nearly a gigabit, serving as an alternative short-range communication (SRC) approach for personal communication device (PCD) application in 5G, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In order to make the proposed system architecture transparent to the future possible wireless data modulation format, baseband modulation schemes such as multilevel pulse amplitude modulation (M-PAM), M-ary phase shift keying modulation (M-PSK) and M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM) which can be further employed by more advanced multicarrier modulation schemes (such as DMT, OFDM and CAP) were used to investigate the highest possible data transmission rate of the proposed system architecture. The results demonstrated that an aggregative data transmission rate of 892 Mb/s and 900 Mb/s at a BER of 10^(-3) can be achieved by using 16-QAM baseband modulation scheme when data transmission were performed with and without micro-projection simultaneously. PMID:27410326

  9. Temporally and spatially integrated elemental analysis algorithm for low-pressure micro-LIBS measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mungas, Greg

    2007-07-01

    Microscopic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (micro-LIBS) is a promising measurement technique for determining the relative elemental abundances of microscopic spots. Currently, the predominant source of measurement accuracy errors for micro-LIBS is shown to be based on a constant plasma temperature assumption. To reduce these measurement errors particularly in low-pressure applications (i.e.,extraterrestrial environments), a mathematical data analysis algorithm is presented that utilizes the many linear independent emission lines per element to estimate the time-integrated state of the plasma in the form of a plasma state matrix coupled with a vector of relative elemental abundances in the observed emission.

  10. Quantitative analysis of terahertz spectra for illicit drugs using adaptive-range micro-genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Ma, Yong; Lu, Zheng; Peng, Bei; Chen, Qin

    2011-08-01

    In the field of anti-illicit drug applications, many suspicious mixture samples might consist of various drug components—for example, a mixture of methamphetamine, heroin, and amoxicillin—which makes spectral identification very difficult. A terahertz spectroscopic quantitative analysis method using an adaptive range micro-genetic algorithm with a variable internal population (ARVIPɛμGA) has been proposed. Five mixture cases are discussed using ARVIPɛμGA driven quantitative terahertz spectroscopic analysis in this paper. The devised simulation results show agreement with the previous experimental results, which suggested that the proposed technique has potential applications for terahertz spectral identifications of drug mixture components. The results show agreement with the results obtained using other experimental and numerical techniques.

  11. Feature extraction of micro-motion frequency and the maximum wobble angle in a small range of missile warhead based on micro-Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Jiang, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    Micro-Doppler effect is induced by the micro-motion dynamics of the radar target itself or any structure on the target. In this paper, a simplified cone-shaped model for ballistic missile warhead with micro-nutation is established, followed by the theoretical formula of micro-nutation is derived. It is confirmed that the theoretical results are identical to simulation results by using short-time Fourier transform. Then we propose a new method for nutation period extraction via signature maximum energy fitting based on empirical mode decomposition and short-time Fourier transform. The maximum wobble angle is also extracted by distance approximate approach in a small range of wobble angle, which is combined with the maximum likelihood estimation. By the simulation studies, it is shown that these two feature extraction methods are both valid even with low signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. Plasma-polymerized methyl methacrylate via intense and highly energetic atmospheric pressure micro-plasma for bio-medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choon-Sang; Ballato, John; Kim, Sung-O.; Clemson University Team

    2013-09-01

    Poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA, has been widely used as a biocompatible material in bone cement, dental fillings, and many other bio-related applications. Vacuum plasmas and radio frequency (RF) atmospheric plasmas are the most common methods for depositing plasma-derived thin films and nanoparticles. However, the necessary equipment is difficult to operate and maintain as well as being large and expensive. Here, we report the use of a novel intense and highly energetic atmospheric pressure plasma jet array using direct plasma jet-to-jet coupling effects to deposit high quality plasma-polymerized MMA (PPMMA) for bio-medical applications. The newly proposed atmospheric pressure micro-plasma jet array device can generate the intense plasma mode with a strong plasma emission and high plasma particle energy. PPMMA was successfully deposited on a variety of substrates and characterized by SEM, AFM, and FT-IR. The micro-plasma jet is obtained at a sinusoidal voltage with a peak value of 30 kV and frequency of 35 kHz. Argon gas was employed as the discharge gas for plasma generation and its flow rate was in the range of 2230 sccm, Methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer was vaporized by means of a glass bubbler which was supplied by argon gas with flow rates in the range of 268 sccm from room temperature to 400°C. The deposited PPMMA thin films were flexible, transparent, thin, and strong on metal substrates.

  13. A peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls.

    PubMed

    Du, Min; Ye, Xiongying; Wu, Kang; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a membrane peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls for lab-on-a-chip applications. The fabrication process is based on standard soft lithography technology and bonding of a PDMS layer with a PMMA substrate. A linear flow rate range ∼490 μL/min was obtained by simply varying the rotation speed of a DC motor, and a maximum back pressure of 592 Pa was achieved at a rotation speed of 43 rpm. The flow rate of the pump can also be adjusted by using steel balls with different diameters or changing the number of balls. Nevertheless, the micro pump can also work in high speed mode. A high back pressure up to 10 kPa was achieved at 500 rpm using a high speed DC motor, and an utmost flow rate up to 5 mL/min was reached. PMID:22574035

  14. A Peristaltic Micro Pump Driven by a Rotating Motor with Magnetically Attracted Steel Balls

    PubMed Central

    Du, Min; Ye, Xiongying; Wu, Kang; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a membrane peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls for lab-on-a-chip applications. The fabrication process is based on standard soft lithography technology and bonding of a PDMS layer with a PMMA substrate. A linear flow rate range ∼490 μL/min was obtained by simply varying the rotation speed of a DC motor, and a maximum back pressure of 592 Pa was achieved at a rotation speed of 43 rpm. The flow rate of the pump can also be adjusted by using steel balls with different diameters or changing the number of balls. Nevertheless, the micro pump can also work in high speed mode. A high back pressure up to 10 kPa was achieved at 500 rpm using a high speed DC motor, and an utmost flow rate up to 5 mL/min was reached. PMID:22574035

  15. Complexities in Pressure Dependent Kinetics Across a Wide-Range of Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klippenstein, Stephen

    Sample ab initio transition state theory based master equation calculations will be used to illustrate interesting features of the kinetics for a variety of reactions of importance in astrochemistry, atmospheric, and combustion chemistry. The calculations will explore the role of long-range interactions, angular momentum conservation, tunneling, radiative emission, roaming processes, torsional motions, and prompt dissociation of incipient molecules. Comparisons with experiment will be presented to illustrate the current accuracy of such calculations.

  16. Micro-optical elements functioning in non-visible spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Andy Z. Z.; Bergström, Andreas; Huo, Vicky Z. J.; Almqvist, Susanne; Kaplan, Wlodek; Andersson, Jan Y.

    2010-05-01

    Nowadays novel micro-fabrication and wafer-based manufacturing approach allows realizing micro-optics in a way scientists have dreamt for generations, in particular, utilizing nano-imprint lithography as fabrication tooling enables greatly accelerating the micro-optics technology to its frontier. In this report, we present wafer-scale fabrication of various types of micro-optical elements based on photoresist, benzocyclobutene, photocurable imprint resist, and semiconductor materials by using thermal reflow, reactive ion etching, and imprint techniques. Especially, several concave or convex 3-dimensional micro-optical structures shaped by imprint method are detailed. These micro-optical elements can be monolithically or hybrid integrated onto optoelectronics devices, such as photodetectors and emitters as optical beam focuser, collimator, filter, or anti-reflectance elements. As application examples, polymer microlenses were integrated directly on the top of UV dual functional devices and quantum dot long wavelength infrared photodetectors, respectively.

  17. Evaluation of an Intervention to Maintain Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Within Therapeutic Range

    PubMed Central

    Sole, Mary Lou; Su, Xiaogang; Talbert, Steve; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Kalita, Samar; Jimenez, Edgar; Ludy, Jeffery E.; Bennett, Melody

    2012-01-01

    Background Endotracheal tube cuff pressure must be kept within an optimal range that ensures ventilation and prevents aspiration while maintaining tracheal perfusion. Objectives To test the effect of an intervention (adding or removing air) on the proportion of time that cuff pressure was between 20 and 30 cm H2O and to evaluate changes in cuff pressure over time. Methods A repeated-measure crossover design was used to study 32 orally intubated patients receiving mechanical ventilation for two 12-hour shifts (randomized control and intervention conditions). Continuous cuff pressure monitoring was initiated, and the pressure was adjusted to a minimum of 22 cm H2O. Caregivers were blinded to cuff pressure data, and usual care was provided during the control condition. During the intervention condition, cuff pressure alarm or clinical triggers guided the intervention. Results Most patients were men (mean age, 61.6 years). During the control condition, 51.7% of cuff pressure values were out of range compared with 11.1% during the intervention condition (P < .001). During the intervention, a mean of 8 adjustments were required, mostly to add air to the endotracheal tube cuff (mean 0.28 [SD, 0.13] mL). During the control condition, cuff pressure decreased over time (P < .001). Conclusions The intervention was effective in maintaining cuff pressure within an optimal range, and cuff pressure decreased over time without intervention. The effect of the intervention on outcomes such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and tracheal damage requires further study. PMID:21362715

  18. Development of a Piezoelectric Vacuum Sensing Component for a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing-Yu; Hsieh, Fan-Chun; Lin, Che-Yu; Chen, Shao-En; Chen, Fong-Zhi; Wu, Chia-Che

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we develop a clamped–clamped beam-type piezoelectric vacuum pressure sensing element. The clamped–clamped piezoelectric beam is composed of a PZT layer and a copper substrate. A pair of electrodes is set near each end. An input voltage is applied to a pair of electrodes to vibrate the piezoelectric beam, and the output voltage is measured at the other pair. Because the viscous forces on the piezoelectric beam vary at different air pressures, the vibration of the beam depends on the vacuum pressure. The developed pressure sensor can sense a wide range of pressure, from 6.5 × 10−6 to 760 Torr. The experimental results showed that the output voltage is inversely proportional to the gas damping ratio, and thus, the vacuum pressure was estimated from the output voltage. PMID:25421736

  19. Arabidopsis microRNA expression regulation in a wide range of abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Milanowska, Kaja; Knop, Katarzyna; Bielewicz, Dawid; Nuc, Przemyslaw; Plewka, Patrycja; Pacak, Andrzej M.; Vazquez, Franck; Karlowski, Wojciech; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis microRNA expression regulation was studied in a wide array of abiotic stresses such as drought, heat, salinity, copper excess/deficiency, cadmium excess, and sulfur deficiency. A home-built RT-qPCR mirEX platform for the amplification of 289 Arabidopsis microRNA transcripts was used to study their response to abiotic stresses. Small RNA sequencing, Northern hybridization, and TaqMan® microRNA assays were performed to study the abundance of mature microRNAs. A broad response on the level of primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) was observed. However, stress response at the level of mature microRNAs was rather confined. The data presented show that in most instances, the level of a particular mature miRNA could not be predicted based on the level of its pri-miRNA. This points to an essential role of posttranscriptional regulation of microRNA expression. New Arabidopsis microRNAs responsive to abiotic stresses were discovered. Four microRNAs: miR319a/b, miR319b.2, and miR400 have been found to be responsive to several abiotic stresses and thus can be regarded as general stress-responsive microRNA species. PMID:26089831

  20. High-pressure generation using double stage micro-paired diamond anvils shaped by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takeshi Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Yagi, Takehiko; Irifune, Tetsuo; Ohishi, Yasuo; Hirao, Naohisa; Suzuki, Yuya; Kuroda, Yasushi; Asakawa, Takayuki; Kanemura, Takashi

    2015-03-15

    Micron-sized diamond anvils with a 3 μm culet were successfully processed using a focused ion beam (FIB) system and the generation of high pressures was confirmed using the double stage diamond anvil cell technique. The difficulty of aligning two second-stage micro-anvils was solved via the paired micro-anvil method. Micro-manufacturing using a FIB system enables us to control anvil shape, process any materials, including nano-polycrystalline diamond and single crystal diamond, and assemble the sample exactly in a very small space between the second-stage anvils. This method is highly reproducible. High pressures over 300 GPa were achieved, and the pressure distribution around the micro-anvil culet was evaluated by using a well-focused synchrotron micro-X-ray beam.

  1. High-pressure generation using double stage micro-paired diamond anvils shaped by focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Takeshi; Yagi, Takehiko; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Irifune, Tetsuo; Ohishi, Yasuo; Hirao, Naohisa; Suzuki, Yuya; Kuroda, Yasushi; Asakawa, Takayuki; Kanemura, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Micron-sized diamond anvils with a 3 μm culet were successfully processed using a focused ion beam (FIB) system and the generation of high pressures was confirmed using the double stage diamond anvil cell technique. The difficulty of aligning two second-stage micro-anvils was solved via the paired micro-anvil method. Micro-manufacturing using a FIB system enables us to control anvil shape, process any materials, including nano-polycrystalline diamond and single crystal diamond, and assemble the sample exactly in a very small space between the second-stage anvils. This method is highly reproducible. High pressures over 300 GPa were achieved, and the pressure distribution around the micro-anvil culet was evaluated by using a well-focused synchrotron micro-X-ray beam.

  2. Atmospheric pressure fluctuations in the far infrasound range and emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, L. A.; Gorgo, Yu. P.; Dirckx, J. J. J.; Bogdanov, V. B.; Buytaert, J. A. N.; Lysenko, V. A.; Didyk, N. P.; Vershygora, A. V.; Erygina, V. T.

    2008-09-01

    This study examines whether a relation exists between rapid atmospheric pressure fluctuations, attributed to the far infrasound frequency range (APF), and a number of emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases (EEC). Over an entire year, the average integral amplitudes of APF in the range of periods from 3 s to 120 s over each hour (HA) were measured. Daily dynamics of HA averaged over the year revealed a wave shape with smooth increase from night to day followed by decrease from day to night. The total daily number of EEC within the city of Kiev, Ukraine, was related to the daily mean of HA (DHA) and to the ratio of HA averaged over the day time to HA averaged over the night time (Rdn), and was checked for confounding effects of classical meteorological variables through non-parametric regression algorithms. The number of EEC were significantly higher on days with high DHA (3.72 11.07 Pa, n = 87) compared to the low DHA (0.7 3.62 Pa, n = 260, p = 0.01), as well at days with low Rdn (0.21 1.64, n = 229) compared to the high Rdn (1.65 7.2, n = 118, p = 0.03). A difference between DHA and Rdn effects on the emergency events related to different categories of circulatory diseases points to a higher sensitivity of rheumatic and cerebro-vascular diseases to DHA, and ischaemic and hypertensive diseases to Rdn. Results suggest that APF could be considered as a meteorotropic factor capable of influencing circulatory system diseases.

  3. Silicon double spring for the simultaneous calibration of probing forces and deflections in the micro range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Uwe; Li, Zhi; Gao, Sai; Hahn, Susan; Hiller, Karla

    2016-01-01

    A new reference spring for the simultaneous calibration of probing force and displacement has been developed. The spring consists of two single silicon springs, which are placed at a distance of 3 μm from each other. Each single spring consists of a moveable shaft, which is suspended and guided by four double-folded silicon springs. This leads to a much higher stiffness of the spring perpendicular to the direction of movement than in the direction of movement. The area of contact of the double spring has a size of 50 μm  ×  60 μm. However, measurable changes in the calibration parameters could not be observed when we varied the location of the loading point within this area. Furthermore, it could be shown for measurements at different temperatures that the calibration parameters also show a very small dependence on temperature (<0.4%/K between 22 °C and 23 °C). A further outstanding property of this new reference spring is its small non-linearity of the force deflection curve of 0.1%. The spring can be used for the calibration of force and the displacement of atomic force microscopes, nanoindenters, and stylus instruments in the micro-Newton range up to 12 μN and up to 3 μm displacements.

  4. The effects of slight pressure oscillations in the far infrasound frequency range on the pars flaccida in gerbil and rabbit ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, L. A.; Bogdanov, V. B.; Lysenko, V. A.; Didyk, N. P.; Gorgo, Yu P.; Dirckx, J. J. J.

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to clarify whether the pars flaccida (PF) as a flexible part of the tympanic membrane is capable of reacting to pressure oscillations (PO) with amplitudes and frequencies typical for natural atmospheric pressure fluctuations in the far infrasound frequency range (APF). If so, the PF mechanical reactions to APF might be involved in the overall physiologic regulation processes, which make organisms susceptible to APF. The displacements of the PF in response to PO were measured in vitro in ears of gerbils and rabbits by means of laser Doppler vibrometry. The index of the PF reactivity (Ra) was determined as the ratio of the amplitude of the PF oscillations (PFO) to the amplitude of the PO. All kinds of PO applied caused PFO. The amplitude of the PFO increased when the amplitude of the PO was increased. In gerbils, a decrease in Ra with the increase in amplitude of the PO was observed. In the range of PO lowest amplitudes (4-20 Pa) Ra proved to be 1.4 times higher than in the range of highest amplitudes (90-105 Pa). Considering that the natural APF are usually within the range of ±20 Pa, this fact points to an important contribution of the PF to the pressure dynamics in the middle ear (ME) of gerbils. In rabbit ears, Ra was lower and recovery from plastic deformation was slower than in gerbils. Our findings are in line with the suggestion that the PF might play an important role in respect of adaptation to natural APF.

  5. Calculation of friction coefficient and analysis of fluid flow in a stepped micro-channel for wide range of Knudsen number using Lattice Boltzmann (MRT) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshan, Younes; Omidvar, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Micro scale gas flows have attracted significant research interest in the last two decades. In this research, the fluid flow of gases in a stepped micro-channel has been conducted. Wide range of Knudsen number has been implemented using the Lattice Boltzmann (MRT) method in this study. A modified second-order slip boundary condition and a Bosanquet-type effective viscosity are used to consider the velocity slip at the boundaries and to cover the slip and transition regimes of flow to obtain an accurate simulation of rarefied gases. The flow specifications such as pressure loss, velocity profile, stream lines and friction coefficient at different conditions have been presented. The results show, good agreement with available experimental data. The calculation shows, that the friction coefficient decreases with increasing the Knudsen number and stepping the micro-channel has an inverse effect on the friction coefficient value. Furthermore, a new correlation is suggested for calculation of the friction coefficient in the stepped micro-channel flows as below;

  6. Measurement of capillary pressure in fuel cell diffusion media, micro-porous layers, catalyst layers, and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaManna, Jacob M.; Bothe, James V.; Zhang, Feng Yuan; Mench, Matthew M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, semi-empirical Leverett J-Function relationships relating capillary pressure and water saturation are experimentally derived for commercial and experimental polymer electrolyte fuel cell materials developed for automotive applications. Relationships were derived for Mitsubishi Rayon Corp. (MRC) U105 and General Motors (GM) experimental high tortuosity diffusion media (DM), the micro-porous layer (MPL), and the catalyst layer (CL). The standard Leverett J-Function under-predicted drainage curves for the DM at high saturation levels and significantly under-predicted the capillary pressure requirements for the MPL and CL across the entire saturation range. Composite structures were tested to understand interfacial effects for DM|MPL and MPL|CL. Each additional layer was found to superimpose its effects on capillary pressure onto the previous layers. The MPL formulation tested increased in porosity from a 136 nm peak average to a 153 nm peak average with increased surface porosity of the substrate. Additionally, small voids and pockets that accumulate liquid water were found to exist in the MPL|CL interface. The results of this work are useful for computational modelers seeking to enhance the resolution of their macroscopic multi-phase flow models which underestimate capillary pressure using the standard Leverett J-Function.

  7. Test Results of High-Resolution Low Power, Portable Micro Barometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakov, L. G.; Passmore, P. R.; Hart, D. M.; Jones, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    The REF TEK high dynamic range micro barometer combines rugged construction design with wide bandwidth and low noise to ensure accurate measurements in most applications. The micro barometer measures the infrasound signals in the frequency range from 0.02 to 4 Hz with the atmospheric pressure measurement range from 0.001 Pa to 100 Pa. The sensor does not require any altitude adjustments. The micro barometer is housed in a sealed compact case to prevent moisture damage. Sandia National Laboratories, Ground-Based Monitoring R&D group conducted the test evaluation of the REF TEK micro barometer. The evaluation procedure included the following tests: 1. Output voltage linearity versus input pressure 2. Instrument response verification (sensitivity and pole-zero model) 3. Instrument self-noise, Full-scale and Dynamic range 4. Power Performing these tests will allow us to comment on the basic performance characteristics for this design of infrasound sensor. The detailed infrasound station specifications and performance are presented and discussed.

  8. Rate of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with propyne over an extended pressure and temperature range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The technique of flash photolysis coupled with time resolved detection of H via resonance fluorescence has been used to obtain rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with propyne at temperatures from 215 to 460 K and at pressures in the range 5-600 torr. The rate constants are strongly pressure dependent and the high pressure limiting values give rise to the Arrhenius expression K = approximately 6 x 10 to the minus 11th exp(-2450T) cu cm per molecule per sec. The results are discussed and compared with those of previous studies

  9. Deposition of YSZ Coatings in a Chamber at Pressures below 100 Pa Using Low-Power Plasma Spraying with an Internal Injection Powder Feeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Yang, Deming; Sun, Chengqi; Chen, Zhenyu

    2013-10-01

    By decreasing the chamber pressure, the effective mean free path length in a plasma jet increases, resulting in a distinct decrease in the heat transfer from the plasma jet to the powder feedstock. Thus, instantaneous, complete melting or partial evaporation of the powders in the plasma jet becomes difficult. To create yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings in a relatively low-power plasma jet and a low-pressure environment of 100 Pa, a new plasma torch with a specialized nozzle with an internal injection powder system was designed. Optical emission spectroscopy indicated that the feedstock powder could be partially vaporized in a 700-A plasma arc in either 40Ar-10H2 or 20Ar-20He-10H2 standard liters per minute (SLPM) plasma gas. Denser coatings were deposited at arc current of 700 A by changing the plasma gas mixture from argon-hydrogen to argon-helium-hydrogen. A compact coating was obtained as the amount of vaporized powder increased, but the microstructure of the coating lost its columnar morphology due to the limited amount of vapor phase. In addition, the porosity and microhardness of the coatings were measured.

  10. An atmospheric-pressure, high-aspect-ratio, cold micro-plasma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, X.; Wu, S.; Gou, J.; Pan, Y.

    2014-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium Ar micro-plasma generated inside a micro-tube with plasma radius of 3 μm and length of 2.7 cm is reported. The electron density of the plasma plume estimated from the broadening of the Ar emission line reaches as high as 3 × 1016 cm−3. The electron temperature obtained from CR model is 1.5 ev while the gas temperature of the plasma estimated from the N2 rotational spectrum is close to room temperature. The sheath thickness of the plasma could be close to the radius of the plasma. The ignition voltages of the plasma increase one order when the radius of the dielectric tube is decreased from 1 mm to 3 μm. PMID:25502006

  11. Controlled growth of copper oxide nanostructures by atmospheric pressure micro-afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaweel, A.; Filipič, G.; Gries, T.; Belmonte, T.

    2014-12-01

    A large variety of copper oxide nanostructures encompassing nanodots, nanowires and nanowalls, sometimes organized in “cabbage-like” architectures, are grown locally by direct oxidation of copper thin films using the micro-afterglow of an Ar-O2 microwave plasma operating at atmospheric pressure. Morphology, structure and composition of the oxidized copper thin films are characterized by X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The concentric areas where each kind of nanostructures is found are defined by both their radial position with respect to the afterglow centre and by experimental conditions. A growth mechanism is proposed, based on stress-induced outward migration of copper ions. The development of stress gradients is caused by the formation of a copper oxide scale layer. If copper oxide nanowires can be grown as in thermal oxidation processes, micro-afterglow conditions offer novel nanostructures and nano-architectures.

  12. Condensation pressure drop of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth and micro-fin U-tube

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Pradeep A.; Sapali, S.N.

    2011-01-15

    The frictional pressure drop during condensation of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth (8.56 mm ID) and micro-fin U-tubes (8.96 mm ID) are experimentally investigated. Different from previous studies, the present experiments are performed for various condensing temperatures. The test runs are done at average saturated condensing temperatures ranging from 35 C to 60 C. The mass fluxes are between 90 and 800 kg/m{sup 2}s. The experimental results indicate that the average frictional pressure drop increases with mass flux but decreases with increasing condensing temperature for both smooth and micro-fin-tubes. The average frictional pressure drops of HFC-134a and R-404A for the micro-fin-tubes were 1-1.7 and 1-2.1 times larger than that in smooth tube respectively. New correlations based on the data gathered during the experimentation for predicting frictional pressure drop are proposed for wide range of operating conditions. (author)

  13. A pressurized ion chamber monitoring system for environmental radiation measurements utilizing a wide-range temperature-compensated electrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenick, W. Van . Environmental Measurements Lab.)

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a complete pressurized ion chamber (PIC) radiation monitoring system is described. The design incorporates an improved temperature-compensated electrometer which is stable to [+-]3 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]16] A over the environmental range of temperature ([minus]40 to +40 C). Using a single 10[sup 11] [Omega] feed-back resistor, the electrometer accurately measures currents over a range from 3 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]15] A to 3 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]11] A. While retaining the sensitivity of the original PIC system (the instrument responds readily to small background fluctuations on the order of 0.1 [mu]R h[sup [minus]1]), the new system measures radiation levels up to the point where the collection efficiency of the ion chamber begins to drop off, typically [approximately]27 pA at 1 mR h[sup [minus]1]. A data recorder and system controller was designed using the Tattletale[trademark] Model 4A computer. Digital data is stored on removable solid-state, credit-card style memory cards.

  14. Microfluidic analysis of pressure drop and flow behavior in hypertensive micro vessels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruiqing; Li, Fen; Lv, Jiaqi; He, Ying; Lu, Detang; Yamada, Takashi; Ono, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The retinal arterial network is the only source of the highly nutrient-consumptive retina, thus any insult on the arteries can impair the retinal oxygen and nutrient supply and affect its normal function. The aim of this work is to study the influences of vascular structure variation on the flow and pressure characteristics via microfluidic devices. Two sets of micro-channel were designed to mimic the stenosed microvessels and dichotomous branching structure in the retinal arteries. Three working fluids including red blood cell (RBC) suspension were employed to investigate the pressure drop in the stenosed channel. The flow behaviors of RBC suspensions inside the micro channels were observed using high speed camera system. Pressure drop of different working fluids and RBC velocity profiles in the stenosed channel were obtained. Moreover, hematocrit levels of RBC suspensions inside the bifurcated channels were analyzed from the sequential images of RBC flow. The results of the flow in the stenosed channel show that RBCs drift from the center of the channels, and RBC velocity is influenced not only by the inlet flow rate but also the interaction between RBCs. The measured pressure drops in the stenosed channel increase notably with the increase of fluid viscosity. Furthermore, the dimensionless pressure drop due to the stenosis decreases with Reynolds number. On the other hand, the results of flow through the bifurcated channels show that as the ratio of the daughter-branch width to the mother-channel width increases, the ratio of hematocrit in two connected branches (Ht/Hd) decreases, which is in favorable agreement with the available analysis results. PMID:26004808

  15. Short range micro-power impulse radar with high resolution swept range gate with damped transmit and receive cavities

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with atypical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings.

  16. Short range micro-power impulse radar with high resolution swept range gate with damped transmit and receive cavities

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-30

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with atypical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. 20 figs.

  17. Size dependence of cubic to trigonal structural distortion in silver micro- and nanocrystals under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qixum; Zhao, Yusheng; Zin, Zhijun; Wang, Zhongwu; Skrabalak, Sara E; Xia, Younan

    2008-01-01

    Silver micro- and nanocrystals with sizes of {approx}2--3.5 {mu}m and {approx}50--100 nm were uniaxially compressed under nonhydrostatic pressures (strong deviatoric stress) up to {approx}30 GPa at room temperature in a symmetric diamond-anvil cell and studied in situ using angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A cubic to trigonal structural distortion along a 3-fold rotational axis was discovered by careful and comprehensive analysis of the apparent lattice parameter and full width at half-maximum, which are strongly dependent upon the Miller index and crystal size.

  18. An optimal frequency range for assessing the pressure reactivity index in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Howells, Tim; Johnson, Ulf; McKelvey, Tomas; Enblad, Per

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the optimal frequency range for computing the pressure reactivity index (PRx). PRx is a clinical method for assessing cerebral pressure autoregulation based on the correlation of spontaneous variations of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP). Our hypothesis was that optimizing the methodology for computing PRx in this way could produce a more stable, reliable and clinically useful index of autoregulation status. The patients studied were a series of 131 traumatic brain injury patients. Pressure reactivity indices were computed in various frequency bands during the first 4 days following injury using bandpass filtering of the input ABP and ICP signals. Patient outcome was assessed using the extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSe). The optimization criterion was the strength of the correlation with GOSe of the mean index value over the first 4 days following injury. Stability of the indices was measured as the mean absolute deviation of the minute by minute index value from 30-min moving averages. The optimal index frequency range for prediction of outcome was identified as 0.018-0.067 Hz (oscillations with periods from 55 to 15 s). The index based on this frequency range correlated with GOSe with ρ=-0.46 compared to -0.41 for standard PRx, and reduced the 30-min variation by 23%. PMID:24664812

  19. A study on the inactivation of micro-organisms and enzymes by high pressure CO2.

    PubMed

    Bertoloni, Giulio; Bertucco, Alberto; De Cian, Veronica; Parton, Tiziana

    2006-09-01

    This study addresses some microbial inactivation phenomena induced by high pressure CO2 over micro-organisms and enzymes. The activity of four selected enzymes was measured before and after treatment with CO2 under pressure in both buffer solutions and natural cellular environment (E. coli cells and tomato paste). Results are reported for acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, ATPase, and pectinase at different conditions of temperature, CO2 pressure, and treatment time (32-40 degrees C, 85-150 bar, 30-70 min). The results obtained show that the high pressure CO2 treatment induces an inactivation of cellular enzymatic activity higher than the one caused on the same enzymes in solution. However, the measured activity difference is not caused by a damage at the enzymes molecular level but is a consequence of the permeabilization of the cellular envelopes which leads to a release of unmodified enzymes from the cells with simultaneous drop of enzymatic cellular activity. The reported data suggest that the bacterial cell death is probably due not to a selective effect of high pressure CO2 treatment but to simultaneous detrimental action of CO2 on cellular membrane and cell wall. PMID:16732596

  20. An approach to improving transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Jianxin; Mei, Deqing Yang, Keji; Fan, Zongwei

    2014-08-14

    In existing ultrasonic transportation methods, the long-range transportation of micro-particles is always realized in step-by-step way. Due to the substantial decrease of the driving force in each step, the transportation is lower-speed and stair-stepping. To improve the transporting velocity, a non-stepping ultrasonic transportation approach is proposed. By quantitatively analyzing the acoustic potential well, an optimal region is defined as the position, where the largest driving force is provided under the condition that the driving force is simultaneously the major component of an acoustic radiation force. To keep the micro-particle trapped in the optimal region during the whole transportation process, an approach of optimizing the phase-shifting velocity and phase-shifting step is adopted. Due to the stable and large driving force, the displacement of the micro-particle is an approximately linear function of time, instead of a stair-stepping function of time as in the existing step-by-step methods. An experimental setup is also developed to validate this approach. Long-range ultrasonic transportations of zirconium beads with high transporting velocity were realized. The experimental results demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to improve transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles.

  1. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors.

    PubMed

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2-10 nm/kPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cm H2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k = 10.7 pm/K, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes. PMID:26184331

  2. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry–Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2–10 nmkPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cmH2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k=10.7 pmK, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes. PMID:26184331

  3. The electron spectro-microscopy beamline at National Synchrotron Light Source II: A wide photon energy range, micro-focusing beamline for photoelectron spectro-microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, R.; Hulbert, S. L.; Chubar, O.; Vescovo, E.; Johnson, P. D.; Valla, T.; Sadowski, J. T.; Starr, D. E.

    2012-02-15

    A comprehensive optical design for a high-resolution, high-flux, wide-energy range, micro-focused beamline working in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray photon energy range is proposed. The beamline is to provide monochromatic radiation to three photoelectron microscopes: a full-field x-ray photoelectron emission microscope and two scanning instruments, one dedicated to angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy ({mu}-ARPES) and one for ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning photoelectron microscopy (AP-XPS/SPEM). Microfocusing is achieved with state of the art elliptical cylinders, obtaining a spot size of 1 {mu}m for ARPES and 0.5 {mu}m for AP-XPS/SPEM. A detailed ray tracing analysis quantitatively evaluates the overall beamline performances.

  4. Scale of the equilibration volume in eclogites: insights from a new micro-mapping approach - Example of Atbashi range, Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loury, Chloé; Lanari, Pierre; Rolland, Yann; Guillot, Stéphane; Ganino, Clément

    2014-05-01

    Understanding geodynamic processes in subduction zones and mountains belts relies on the reconstruction of precise pressure-temperature paths (P-T paths) from metamorphic rocks. Most P-T paths are obtained using quantitative thermobarometry such as forward thermodynamics models. The question of the scale of the equilibration volume is of prime importance because its chemistry is used as input for the calculation of P-T sections. In chemically homogeneous rocks the bulk rock may be obtained either by ICP-MS or XRF analysis on whole rocks. For chemically heterogeneous rocks, containing different mineral assemblages and/or a high proportion of zoned minerals, the concept of local effective bulk (LEB) is essential. In the last 10 years, X-ray micro-mapping methods have been developed in this aim. Here we show how standardized X-ray maps can be used to estimate the equilibration volume at the pressure peak in an eclogite sample. The study area lies in the Atbashi range, in Kyrgyzstan, along the South-Tianshan carboniferous suture of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt with the Tarim block. We use the micro-mapping approach to unravel the P-T path of a mafic eclogite containing mm-scale garnet porphyroblasts. Quantitative compositional maps of a garnet and its surrounding matrix are obtained from standardized X-ray maps processed with the XMapTools program (Lanari et al, 2014). By using these maps we measured the LEB corresponding to the different stages of garnet growth. The equilibration volume is then modeled using the local compositions (extrapolated in 3D) combined with Gibbs free energy minimization. Our model suggests that equilibrium conditions are attained for chemistry made of 90% of garnet and 10% of matrix. P-T sections are calculated from the core of the garnet to the rim taking into account the fractionation at each stage of garnet growth by changing the bulk composition. We obtained the following P-T path: (1) garnet core crystallization during prograde stage

  5. Pressure gradient sensors for bearing determination in shallow water tracking ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Peter J.; Euerle, Steven E.; Menoche, Richard K.; Janiesch, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    Underwater acoustic tracking has traditionally used only the arrival time of tracking pings to localize targets. This implies that the ping transmitted from a target must be received at a minimum of three separate nodes (receiver locations) in order to determine the position. For deep water ranges this was acceptable. In shallow water, where propagation ranges are limited, this requires a large number of nodes. This makes shallow water ranges very costly. An effort is underway to use pressure gradient hydrophones as receivers and measure the bearing of the ping arrival along with arrival time, thereby locating the target using only one tracking node. This allows for increased node spacing and greatly reduced cost. However, the accuracy required for training ranges is on the order of 1 degree. Further, the directional receiver must be housed so as to withstand impacts from fishing operations. Research including design, fabrication, and testing of conventional and unconventional pressure gradient hydrophones, the housing, and signal processing methods are discussed. Extensive testing has already been conducted using a 1″ diameter by 5″ long multimode hydrophone. A shallow water tracking test was conducted at the NUWC Lake Seneca test facility. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tracking using a single pressure gradient hydrophone with an accuracy of 50 yds out to 2 kyds. The effects of multiple paths and scattering are also discussed.

  6. Pressure gradient sensors for bearing determination in shallow water tracking ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, P.J.; Euerle, S.E.; Menoche, R.K.; Janiesch, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Underwater acoustic tracking has traditionally used only the arrival time of tracking pings to localize targets. This implies that the ping transmitted from a target must be received at a minimum of three separate nodes (receiver locations) in order to determine the position. For deep water ranges this was acceptable. In shallow water, where propagation ranges are limited, this requires a large number of nodes. This makes shallow water ranges very costly. An effort is underway to use pressure gradient hydrophones as receivers and measure the bearing of the ping arrival along with arrival time, thereby locating the target using only one tracking node. This allows for increased node spacing and greatly reduced cost. However, the accuracy required for training ranges is on the order of 1 degree. Further, the directional receiver must be housed so as to withstand impacts from fishing operations. Research including design, fabrication, and testing of conventional and unconventional pressure gradient hydrophones, the housing, and signal processing methods are discussed. Extensive testing has already been conducted using a 1{double_prime} diameter by 5{double_prime} long multimode hydrophone. A shallow water tracking test was conducted at the NUWC Lake Seneca test facility. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tracking using a single pressure gradient hydrophone with an accuracy of 50 yds out to 2 kyds. The effects of multiple paths and scattering are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Effects of ionic liquid electrode on pulse discharge plasmas in the wide range of gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qiang; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2010-11-15

    Gas-liquid interfacial pulse discharge plasmas are generated in the wide range of gas pressures, where an ionic liquid is used as the liquid electrode. By analyzing the characteristics of discharge voltage and current, the discharge mechanisms at low and high pressures are found to be dominated by secondary electron emission and first Townsend ionization, respectively. Therefore, the discharge properties at low and high pressures are mainly determined by the cathode material and the discharge gas type, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma properties are investigated by a double Langmuir probe. The density of the positive pulse plasma is found to be much smaller than that of the negative pulse plasma, although the discharge voltage and current of the negative and positive pulse plasmas are of the same order of magnitude. The positive pulse discharge plasma is considered to quickly diffuse onto the chamber wall from the radially central region due to its high plasma potential compared with that in the peripheral region.

  8. Modelling of the void space of tablets compacted over a range of pressures.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, C J; Ridgway, K; Matthews, G P

    1997-04-01

    A previously developed computer model, named Pore-Cor, has been used to simulate the changes in the void-space dimensions which occur during the compaction of tablets over a range of pressures. The tablets were made by mixing pharmaceutical grade crystalline lactose and an anti-inflammatory compound in the proportion 4:1. Compacts were made by placing a weighed amount of the mixed powder into a stainless-steel die and applying pressure with a hand-operated calibrated hydraulic press. Compacts were prepared at eight pressures over the hydraulic pressure range 1 to 8 ton in-2 (15.4-123.2 MPa) in 1 ton in-2 increments. Mercury-intrusion curves were measured for the eight samples by use of a porosimeter and the Pore-Cor package was then used to simulate the mercury-intrusion curves and generate void-space models of the correct porosity. The experimental and simulated characteristic throat diameter, the experimental and simulated porosity, and the simulated permeability of the tablets have all been shown to follow expected trends. The successful modelling of void-structure parameters, which are difficult or impossible to measure experimentally, opens the way to an improved understanding of the strength of compacts. PMID:9232534

  9. Modified quadrupole mass analyzer RGA-100 for beam plasma research in forevacuum pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G.; Oks, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    The industrial quadrupole RGA-100 residual gas analyzer was modified for the research of electron beam-generated plasma at forevacuum pressure range. The standard ionizer of the RGA-100 was replaced by three electrode extracting unit. We made the optimization of operation parameters in order to provide the maximum values of measured currents of any ion species. The modified analyzer was successfully tested with beam plasma of argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbons.

  10. Modified quadrupole mass analyzer RGA-100 for beam plasma research in forevacuum pressure range

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G.; Oks, E. M.

    2015-12-15

    The industrial quadrupole RGA-100 residual gas analyzer was modified for the research of electron beam-generated plasma at forevacuum pressure range. The standard ionizer of the RGA-100 was replaced by three electrode extracting unit. We made the optimization of operation parameters in order to provide the maximum values of measured currents of any ion species. The modified analyzer was successfully tested with beam plasma of argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbons.

  11. A Liquid Density Standard Over Wide Ranges of Temperature and Pressure Based on Toluene

    PubMed Central

    McLinden, Mark O.; Splett, Jolene D.

    2008-01-01

    The density of liquid toluene has been measured over the temperature range −60 °C to 200 °C with pressures up to 35 MPa. A two-sinker hydrostatic-balance densimeter utilizing a magnetic suspension coupling provided an absolute determination of the density with low uncertainties. These data are the basis of NIST Standard Reference Material® 211d for liquid density over the temperature range −50 °C to 150 °C and pressure range 0.1 MPa to 30 MPa. A thorough uncertainty analysis is presented; this includes effects resulting from the experimental density determination, possible degradation of the sample due to time and exposure to high temperatures, dissolved air, uncertainties in the empirical density model, and the sample-to-sample variations in the SRM vials. Also considered is the effect of uncertainty in the temperature and pressure measurements. This SRM is intended for the calibration of industrial densimeters. PMID:27096111

  12. Spatial distribution and speciation of lead around corroding bullets in a shooting range soil studied by micro-X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vantelon, Delphine; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Scheinost, Andreas C; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2005-07-01

    We investigated the spatial distribution and speciation of Pb in the weathering crust and soil surrounding corroding metallic Pb bullets in a shooting range soil. The soil had a neutral pH, loamy texture, and was highly contaminated with Pb, with total Pb concentrations in the surface soil up to 68 000 mg kg(-1). Undisturbed soil samples containing corroding bullets were collected and embedded in resin, and polished sections were prepared for micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) elemental mapping and micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) spectroscopy. Bullet weathering crust material was separated from the metallic Pb cores and analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Our results show a steep decrease in total Pb concentrations from the bullet weathering crust into the surrounding soil matrix. The weathering crust consisted of a mixture of litharge [alpha-PbO], hydrocerussite [Pb3(CO3)2-(OH)2], and cerussite [PbCO3], with litharge dominating near the metallic Pb core and cerussite dominating in the outer crust, which is in contact with the soil matrix. On the basis of these results and thermodynamic considerations, we propose that the transition of Pb species after oxidation of Pb(O) to Pb(II) follows the sequence litharge --> hydrocerussite --> cerussite. Consequently, the solubility of cerussite limits the activity of Pb2+ in the soil solution in contact with weathering bullets to < or =1.28 x 10(-6) at pH 7, assuming that the CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) in the soil is equal or larger than in the atmosphere (PCO2 > or = 0.000 35 atm). PMID:16053078

  13. Temperature dependence of the anisotropic deformation of Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube material during micro-indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, B.; Klassen, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of temperature on the anisotropic plastic deformation of textured Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube material was studied using micro-indentation tests performed in the axial, radial, and transverse directions of the tube over the temperature range from 25 to 400 °C. The ratio of the indentation stress in the transverse direction relative to that in the radial and axial directions was 1.29:1 and 1.26:1 at 25 °C but decreased to 1.22:1 and 1.05:1 at 400 °C. The average activation energy of the obstacles that limit the rate of indentation creep increases, from 0.72 to 1.33 eV, with increasing temperature from 25 to 300 °C and is independent of indentation direction. At temperature between 300 °C and 400 °C the measured activation energy is considerably reduced for indentation creep in the transverse direction relative to that of either the axial or radial directions. We conclude that, over this temperature range, the strength of the obstacles that limit the time-dependent dislocation glide on the pyramidal slip system changes relative to that on the prismatic slip system. These findings provide new data on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and creep rate, particularly in the radial direction, of Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes and shed new light on the effect of temperature on the operation of dislocation glide on the prismatic and pyramidal slip systems which ultimately determines the degree of mechanical anisotropy in the highly textured Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material used in CANDU nuclear reactors.

  14. Tuning the sensing range of silicon pressure sensor by trench etching technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yu-Tuan; Lin, Hung-Yi; Hu, Hsin-Hua

    2006-01-01

    The silicon pressure sensor has been developed for over thirty years and widely used in automobiles, medical instruments, commercial electronics, etc. There are many different specifications of silicon pressure sensors that cover a very large sensing range, from less than 1 psi to as high as 1000 psi. The key elements of the silicon pressure sensor are a square membrane and the piezoresistive strain gages near the boundary of the membrane. The dimensions of the membrane determine the full sensing range and the sensitivity of the silicon sensor, including thickness and in-plane length. Unfortunately, in order to change the sensing range, the manufacturers need to order a customized epi wafer to get the desired thickness. All masks (usually six) have to be re-laid and re-fabricated for different membrane sizes. The existing technology requires at least three months to deliver the prototype for specific customer requests or the new application market. This research proposes a new approach to dramatically reduce the prototyping time from three months to one week. The concept is to tune the rigidity of the sensing membrane by modifying the boundary conditions without changing the plenary size. An extra mask is utilized to define the geometry and location of deep-RIE trenches and all other masks remain the same. Membranes with different depths and different patterns of trenches are designed for different full sensing ranges. The simulation results show that for a 17um thick and 750um wide membrane, the adjustable range by tuning trench depth is about 45% (from 5um to 10um), and can go to as high as 100% by tuning both the pattern and depth of the trenches. Based on an actual test in a product fabrication line, we verified that the total delivery time can be minimized to one week to make the prototyping very effective and cost-efficient.

  15. Three distinct modes in a surface micro-discharge in atmospheric pressure He + N2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Liu, Dingxin; He, Tongtong; Li, Qiaosong; Wang, Xiaohua; Kong, Michael G.

    2015-12-01

    A surface micro-discharge in atmospheric pressure He + N2 mixtures is studied in this paper with an emphasis on the discharge modes. With the N2 admixture increasing from 0.1% to 20%, the discharge evolves from a spatially diffuse mode to a filamentary mode during positive half-cycles of the applied voltage. However during the negative half-cycles, an additional patterned mode emerges between the diffuse and the filamentary modes, which has not been reported before to exist in surface micro-discharges. In the diffuse and patterned modes, the plasmas cover almost the entirety of the mesh area during one cycle after plasma ignition in all mesh elements, and the discharge power increases linearly with the applied voltage. In contrast, plasma coverage of the mesh area is only partial in the filamentary mode and the plasma is more unstable with the discharge power increasing exponentially with the applied voltage. As the surface micro-discharge evolves through the three modes, the density of excited species changes significantly, for instance, the density of N2+(B) drops by ˜20-fold from [N2] = 0.2% to 20%. The N2+(B) is predicted to be generated mainly through successive processes of Penning ionization by helium metastables and electron-impact excitation of N2+(X), the latter is most responsible for the density decrease of N2+(B) because much more N2+(X) is converted to N4+(X) as the increase of N2 fraction. Also, the electron density and electron temperature decrease with the discharge mode transition.

  16. APT: An Autonomous Tool for Measuring Acceleration, Pressure, and Temperature with Large Dynamic Range and Bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, M.; Davis, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new tool developed to facilitate the study of inter-related geodetic, geodynamic, seismic, and oceanographic phenomena. It incorporates a novel tri-axial accelerometer developed by Quartz Seismic Sensors, Inc, a pressure sensor developed by Paroscientific Inc., and a low-power, high-precision frequency counter and data logger built by RBR, Ltd. The sensors, counters, and loggers are housed in a 7 cm o.d., 70 cm long pressure case designed for use in up to 12 km of water. Sampling intervals are programmable from 0.1 s to 1 hr; standard memory can store up to 30 million samples; total power consumption is roughly 115 mW when operating continuously (1 s.p.s. or higher) and proportionately lower when operating intermittently (e.g., 2 mW at 1 sample per min.). Serial and USB communications protocols allow a variety of download and cable-connection options. Measurement precision of the order of 10-8 of full scale (e.g., 4000 m water depth, 1 g) allows observations of pressure and acceleration variations of 0.4 Pa and 0.1 μm s-2. Long-term variations in vertical acceleration are sensitive to displacement through the gravity gradient at a level of roughly 2 cm; long-term variations in horizontal acceleration are sensitive to tilt at a level of 0.01 μRad. With these sensitivities and the broad bandwidth (5 Hz to DC), ground motion associated with microseisms and seismic waves, tidal loading, and slow and rapid geodynamic deformation normally studied by disparate instruments can be observed with a single tool. The first c. 1-year deployment with the instrument connected to the Ocean Networks Canada NEPTUNE observatory cable is underway to study interseismic deformation of the Cascadia subduction zone. It will then be deployed at the Hikurangi subduction zone to study episodic slow slip. Deployment of the tool for the initial test was accomplished by pushing the tool vertically below the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle Jason, with no profile

  17. Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology in the Micro- and Nanometer Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, O.

    2009-04-01

    Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology in the Micro- and Nanometer Range S. Scherer1, E. Cristea1, O. Huber1, A. Krenn1 1 ALICONA GmbH Graz, Austria The need for increasing accuracy is a characteristic of all geo-applications, and hence of the instruments contributing to obtaining relevant data. Small and fine sensors are being developed, measuring different parameters of our geosystem and requiring continuous validation and calibration. These sensors have often very small components (fine sensors able to sense dust, atmospheric water vapour characteristics, pressure change, gravimeters, satellite micro-components), showing complex topographies including steep flanks and having varying reflective properties. In order to get valid and reliable results, quality assurance of these instruments and sensors is required. The optical technology Focus-Variation, developed by Alicona and added in the latest draft of the upcoming ISO standard 25178, provides high resolution 3D surface metrology even at those complex topographies. The technique of Focus-Variation combines the small depth of focus of an optical system with vertical scanning to provide topographical and color information from the variation of focus. It is used for high-resolution optical 3D surface measurements. The traceable and repeatable measurement results are further being used for e.g. calibration and validation purposes. Some of the characteristics of the technology are: - Measurement of instruments / samples with steep flanks up to 80° - Measurement of materials with strongly varying reflection properties - Measurement of surfaces presenting fine (from 10nm) or strong roughness Here, we present the operating principle and possible applications of the optical 3D measurement system "InfiniteFocus", which is based on the technology of Focus-Variation. With the vertical resolution of up to 10nm, InfiniteFocus yields meaningful form and roughness measurements. The

  18. Fabrication and characterization of 3C-silicon carbide micro sensor for wireless blood pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Nupur

    A potentially implantable single crystal 3C-SiC pressure sensor for blood pressure measurement was designed, simulated, fabricated, characterized and optimized. This research uses a single crystal 3C-SiC, for the first time, to demonstrate its application as a blood pressure measurement sensor. The sensor, which uses the epitaxial grown 3C-SiC membrane to measure changes in pressure, is designed to be wireless, biocompatible and linear. The SiC material was chosen for its superior physical, chemical and mechanical properties; the capacitive sensor uses a 3C-SiC membrane as one of the electrodes; and, the sensor system is wireless for comfort and to allow for convenient reading of real-time pressure data (wireless communication is enabled by connecting the sensor parallel to a planar inductor). Together, the variable capacitive sensor and planar inductor create a pressure sensitive resonant circuit. The sensor system described above allows for implantation into a human patient's body, after which the planar inductor can be coupled with an external inductor to receive data for real-time blood pressure measurement. Electroplating, thick photo-resist characterization, RIE etching, oxidation, CVD, chemical mechanical polishing and wafer bonding were optimized during the process of fabricating the sensor system and, in addition to detailing the sensor system simulation and characterization; the optimized processes are detailed in the dissertation. This absolute pressure sensor is designed to function optimally within the human blood pressure range of 50-350mmHg. The layout and modeling of the sensor uses finite element analysis (FEA) software. The simulations for membrane deflection, stress analysis and electro-mechanical analysis are performed for 100 μm2 and 400μm2sensors. The membrane deflection-pressure, capacitance-pressure and resonant frequency-pressure graphs were obtained, and detailed in the dissertation, along with the planar inductor simulation for

  19. Marvin: MARtian Vehicular INvestigator A Proposal for a Long-Range Pressurized Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA is planning manned missions to Mars in the near future. In order to fully exploit the available time on the surface for exploration, a roving vehicle is necessary. A nine-member student design team from the Wichita State University Department of Aerospace Engineering developed the MARtian Vehicular INvestigator (MARVIN) a manned, pressurized, long distance rover. In order to meet the unique requirements for successful operation in the harsh Martian environment a four wheeled, rover was designed with a composite pressure vessel six meters long and 2.5 meters in diameter. The rover is powered by twin proton exchange membrane fuel cells which provide electricity to the drive motors and onboard systems. The MARVIN concept is expected to have a 1500 km range with a maximum speed of 25 km/hr and a 14-day endurance.

  20. Shakedown and stress range of torispherical heads under cyclic internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P.

    1996-12-01

    Two effects on shakedown of torispherical heads are addressed in this paper: (1) changing geometry, and (2) initial pressurization, such as by a hydro (or proof) test. Shakedown and the cycled stress intensity range are calculated for two head geometries, having diameter-to-thickness ratios of 238 and 192. The calculations are carried out following two approaches: (1) using a nonlinear, elastic-plastic algorithm that accounts for changes in geometry, and (2) using elastic stresses in the undeformed geometry, which is the commonly used approach. The results show that, when the two geometries are subjected to the same initial and cyclic pressures, shakedown is achieved by the first approach but not by the second. Since real heads do benefit from geometry changes, and since most design codes require hydro (or proof) tests before operation, the first approach is recommended for the design of torispherical heads.

  1. Reproducible Tissue Homogenization and Protein Extraction for Quantitative Proteomics Using MicroPestle-Assisted Pressure-Cycling Technology.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shiying; Guo, Tiannan; Gross, Vera; Lazarev, Alexander; Koh, Ching Chiek; Gillessen, Silke; Joerger, Markus; Jochum, Wolfram; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2016-06-01

    The reproducible and efficient extraction of proteins from biopsy samples for quantitative analysis is a critical step in biomarker and translational research. Recently, we described a method consisting of pressure-cycling technology (PCT) and sequential windowed acquisition of all theoretical fragment ions-mass spectrometry (SWATH-MS) for the rapid quantification of thousands of proteins from biopsy-size tissue samples. As an improvement of the method, we have incorporated the PCT-MicroPestle into the PCT-SWATH workflow. The PCT-MicroPestle is a novel, miniaturized, disposable mechanical tissue homogenizer that fits directly into the microTube sample container. We optimized the pressure-cycling conditions for tissue lysis with the PCT-MicroPestle and benchmarked the performance of the system against the conventional PCT-MicroCap method using mouse liver, heart, brain, and human kidney tissues as test samples. The data indicate that the digestion of the PCT-MicroPestle-extracted proteins yielded 20-40% more MS-ready peptide mass from all tissues tested with a comparable reproducibility when compared to the conventional PCT method. Subsequent SWATH-MS analysis identified a higher number of biologically informative proteins from a given sample. In conclusion, we have developed a new device that can be seamlessly integrated into the PCT-SWATH workflow, leading to increased sample throughput and improved reproducibility at both the protein extraction and proteomic analysis levels when applied to the quantitative proteomic analysis of biopsy-level samples. PMID:27098501

  2. Long-range correlations in heart rate variability during computer-mouse work under time pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dineng; He, Mulu; Qiu, Yihong; Zhu, Yisheng; Tong, Shanbao

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of time pressure on long-range correlations in heart rate variability (HRV), the effects of relaxation on the cardiovascular regulation system and the advantages of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) over the conventional power spectral analysis in discriminating states of the cardiovascular systems under different levels of time pressure. Volunteer subjects ( n=10, male/female=5/5) participated in a computer-mouse task consisting of five sessions, i.e. baseline session (BSS) which was free of time pressure, followed by sessions with 80% (SS80), 100% (SS100), 90% (SS90) and 150% (SS150) of the baseline time. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and task performance were recorded throughout the experiments. Two rest sessions before and after the computer-mouse work, i.e. RS1 and RS2, were also recorded as comparison. HRV series were subsequently analyzed by both conventional power spectral analysis and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The long-term scaling exponent α2 by DFA was significantly lower in SS80 than that in other sessions. It was also found that short-term release of time pressure had positive influences on the cardiovascular system, i.e. the α2 in RS2 was significantly higher than that in SS80, SS100 and SS90. No significant differences were found between any two sessions by conventional power spectral analysis. Our results showed that DFA performed better in discriminating the states of cardiovascular autonomic modulation under time pressure than the conventional power spectral analysis.

  3. Geometrical Properties of Pore Structure in Berea Sandstone under Pressurization with Micro Focus X-Ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Urushimatsu, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Three dimensional geometry and connectivity of pore space play a fundamental role in governing fluid transport properties of porous media. Total porosity and pore size distribution have been obtained through mercury intrusion porosimetry and gas absorption method, but the spatial and three dimensional information of pore geometry were difficult to obtain. To visualize in detail the manner of deformation in sedimentary rocks under various confining pressure and pore pressure, we used a micro focus X-ray CT system to obtain three dimensional images with high resolution of 5 micron. A new pressure vessel was developed to simultaneously supply both confining pressure and pore pressure to cylindrical rock specimen. Berea sandstone specimen of 10mm diameter and 20mm length was deformed hydrostatically. The diameters at every 15 degree angle were measured under the various conditions of confining pressure and pore pressures. The average diameter decreased monotonically with increasing effective confining pressure. Sensitive orientation around the specimen diameter with large deformation was recognized under pressurization. In addition, to quantify the flow-relevant geometrical properties of the pore structure, we utilized three dimensional data of Berea sandstone obtained with micro focus X-ray CT. We present measured distributions of pore size, throat size, channel length, coordination number, and of correlations between pore and throat geometry.

  4. Modeling the excitation dynamics of micro structured atmospheric pressure plasma arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, Alexander; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2013-09-01

    Micro structured atmospheric pressure plasma arrays have been developed by J.G. Eden and co-workers as efficient light sources. In essence, this device forms an array of dielectric barrier discharges: a silicon wafer with a matrix of cavities is covered by dielectrics. The counter electrode grid is embedded in the dielectrics. It is driven by alternating voltage at a frequency of 10-100 kHz in argon at atmospheric pressure. To the naked eye these devices appear to glow homogeneously. However, phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy performed by V. Schulz-von der Gathen and co-workers revealed strong dynamics. The model presented here addresses each cavity independently: cavities are described by a one dimensional drift model. Interactions, mainly driven by photon transport, are treated in a separate model that couples back to the individual cavity models. This allows us to investigate the individual discharge as well as the experimentally observed ionization wave propagation. Both will be addressed in this work. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the frame of Research Group 1123 Physics of Microplasmas and the Ruhr University Research School.

  5. Isentropic expansion of copper plasma in Mbar pressure range at “Luch” laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'kov, S. A.; Derkach, V. N.; Garanin, S. G.; Mitrofanov, E. I.; Voronich, I. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Levashov, P. R.; Minakov, D. V.

    2014-01-21

    We present experimental results on thermodynamic properties of dense copper plasma in Mbar pressure range. The laser facility “Luch” with laser intensity 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} is used to compress copper up to ∼8 Mbar by a strong shock wave; subsequent expansion of copper plasma into Al, Ti, Sn allows us to obtain release isentropes of copper by the impedance–matching method. A theoretical analysis and quantum simulations show that in our experiments strongly coupled quantum plasma is generated.

  6. Polynomial approximations of thermodynamic properties of arbitrary gas mixtures over wide pressure and density ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, D. O.

    1972-01-01

    Computer programs for flow fields around planetary entry vehicles require real-gas equilibrium thermodynamic properties in a simple form which can be evaluated quickly. To fill this need, polynomial approximations were found for thermodynamic properties of air and model planetary atmospheres. A coefficient-averaging technique was used for curve fitting in lieu of the usual least-squares method. The polynomials consist of terms up to the ninth degree in each of two variables (essentially pressure and density) including all cross terms. Four of these polynomials can be joined to cover, for example, a range of about 1000 to 11000 K and 0.00001 to 1 atmosphere (1 atm = 1.0133 x 100,000 N/m sq) for a given thermodynamic property. Relative errors of less than 1 percent are found over most of the applicable range.

  7. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  8. A 100 μm diameter capacitive pressure sensor with 50 MPa dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents fully sealed absolute capacitive pressure sensors for high-pressure applications in hydraulic environments. The sensors have a ø100 μm diaphragm and a nominal interelectrode gap of 3 μm. The interiors of the cavities are electrically isolated, allowing the sensors to operate at the high end of the pressure range with the center of the diaphragm in contact with the substrate beneath it. The sensors are monolithically fabricated using a combination of surface micromachining and through-wafer isolated bulk-silicon lead transfer for backside contacts. This structure allows the device footprints to be reduced to about 150  ×  150 μm2, and simplifies system integration. Fabricated sensors with diaphragm thicknesses of 3 μm (C100t3) and 5 μm (C100t5) are tested in an oil environment at pressures up to 20 MPa and 50 MPa, respectively. The average sensitivities are 7200 ppm MPa-1 (3.1 fF MPa-1) for C100t3, and 3400 ppm MPa-1 (1.6 fF MPa-1) for C100t5 in the non-contact mode. In the contact mode, the average sensitivities are 9900 ppm MPa-1 (5.3 fF MPa-1) for C100t3, and 3100 ppm MPa-1 (1.6 fF MPa-1) for C100t5. A multiphysics finite element analysis approach that accommodates contact mode simulations is also presented.

  9. Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods: Dimensional and Related Measurements in the Micro- and Nanometer Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkening, Günter; Koenders, Ludger

    2005-08-01

    The quantitative determination of the properties of micro- and nanostructures is essential in research and development. It is also a prerequisite in process control and quality assurance in industry. The knowledge of the geometrical dimensions of structures in most cases is the base, to which other physical and chemical properties are linked. Quantitative measurements require reliable and stable instruments, suitable measurement procedures as well as appropriate calibration artefacts and methods. The seminar "NanoScale 2004" (6th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy and 2nd Seminar on Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods) at the National Metrology Institute (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt PTB), Braunschweig, Germany, continues the series of seminars on Quantitative Microscopy. The series stimulates the exchange of information between manufacturers of relevant hard- and software and the users in science and industry. Topics addressed in these proceedings are a) the application of quantitative measurements and measurement problems in: microelectronics, microsystems technology, nano/quantum/molecular electronics, chemistry, biology, medicine, environmental technology, materials science, surface processing b) calibration & correction methods: calibration methods, calibration standards, calibration procedures, traceable measurements, standardization, uncertainty of measurements c) instrumentation and methods: novel/improved instruments and methods, reproducible probe/sample positioning, position-measuring systems, novel/improved probe/detector systems, linearization methods, image processing

  10. Thermo-optical tuning of cascaded double micro-ring resonators for dynamic range enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Prashanth R.; Selvaraja, Shankar K.; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a silicon-photonic cascaded microring sensor with thermo-optic tuning for extension of detection range. Cascaded microring resonators have been used to realize refractive index sensors with high sensitivity in the intensity detection mode. In this configuration, one ring is used to probe analyte while the other ring (called filter) is used for spectrum overlap measurement. A significant drawback of this configuration is decreased range of detection. We overcome this problem by thermo-optically tuning the spectrum the filter ring to track the position of maximum overlap, as the spectrum of the probing ring undergoes shift. Using this peak tracking method, we have experimentally demonstrated range enhancement by a factor of 7.8, compared to the intensity detection scheme. This method can use a broadband source for operation, and has a potential for development of low cost, point of care biomedical applications.

  11. A simple expression for pressure drops of water and other low molecular liquids in the flow through micro-orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Ushida, Akiomi; Narumi, Takatsune

    2015-12-01

    Flows are generally divided into two types: shear flows and shear-free elongational (extensional) flows. Both are necessary for a thorough understanding of the flow properties of a fluid. Shear flows are easy to achieve in practice, for example, through Poiseuille or Couette flows. Shear-free elongational flows are experimentally hard to achieve, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the flow properties of fluids in micro-devices. Nevertheless, flows through micro-orifices are useful for probing the properties of elongational flows at high elongational rates; although these flows exhibit shear and elongation, the elongation is dominant and the shear is negligible in the central region of the flows. We previously reported an anomalous reduction in pressure drops in the flows of water, a 50/50 mixture of glycerol and water, and silicone oils through micro-orifices. In the present paper, we rearrange the data presented in the previous paper and reveal a simple relationship where the pressure drop is proportional to the velocity through the micro-orifices, independent of the orifice diameter and the viscosity of the liquids tested. We explain our observations by introducing a "fluid element" model, in which fluid elements are formed on entering the orifice. The model is based on the idea that low molecular liquids, including water, generate strong elongational stress, similar to a polymer solution, in the flow through micro-orifices.

  12. Catalyzed Combustion In Micro-Propulsion Devices: Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, C. J.; Schneider, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    the basic units, or in a rapid sequence in order to provide gradual but steady low-g acceleration. These arrays of micro-propulsion systems would offer unprecedented flexibility and redundancy for satellite propulsion and reaction control for launch vehicles. A high-pressure bi-propellant micro-rocket engine is already being developed using MEMS technology. High pressure turbopumps and valves are to be incorporated onto the rocket chip . High pressure combustion of methane and O2 in a micro-combustor has been demonstrated without catalysis, but ignition was established with a spark. This combustor has rectangular dimensions of 1.5 mm by 8 mm (hydraulic diameter 3.9 mm) and a length of 4.5 mm and was operated at 1250 kPa with plans to operate it at 12.7 MPa. These high operating pressures enable the combustion process in these devices, but these pressures are not practical for pressure fed satellite propulsion systems. Note that the use of these propellants requires an ignition system and that the use of a spark would impose a size limitation to this micro-propulsion device because the spark unit cannot be shrunk proportionately with the thruster. Results presented in this paper consist of an experimental evaluation of the minimum catalyst temperature for initiating/supporting combustion in sub-millimeter diameter tubes. The tubes are resistively heated and reactive premixed gases are passed through the tubes. Tube temperature and inlet pressure are monitored for an indication of exothermic reactions and composition changes in the gases.

  13. Analysis of Frequency Response and Scale-Factor of Tuning Fork Micro-Gyroscope Operating at Atmospheric Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xukai; Li, Hongsheng; Ni, Yunfang; Sang, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the frequency response and the scale-factor of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure in the presence of an interference sense mode by utilizing the approximate transfer function. The optimal demodulation phase (ODP), which is always ignored in vacuum packaged micro-gyroscopes but quite important in gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure, is obtained through the transfer function of the sense mode, including the primary mode and the interference mode. The approximate transfer function of the micro-gyroscope is deduced in consideration of the interference mode and the ODP. Then, the equation describing the scale-factor of the gyroscope is also obtained. The impacts of the interference mode and Q-factor on the frequency response and the scale-factor of the gyroscope are analyzed through numerical simulations. The relationship between the scale-factor and the demodulation phase is also illustrated and gives an effective way to find out the ODP in practice. The simulation results predicted by the transfer functions are in close agreement with the results of the experiments. The analyses and simulations can provide constructive guidance on bandwidth and sensitivity designs of the micro-gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure. PMID:25621614

  14. A proposed search for dark-matter axions in the 0.6-16 micro-eV range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbibber, Karl; Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N. S.; Tanner, D. B.; Turner, Michael S.; Moltz, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A proposed experiment is described to search for dark matter axions in the mass range 0.6 to 16 micro-eV. The method is based on the Primakoff conversion of axions into monochromatic microwave photons inside a tunable microwave cavity in a large volume high field magnet, as described by Sikivie. This proposal capitalizes on the availability of two Axicell magnets from the decommissioned Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) fusion machine at LLNL. Assuming a local dark matter density in axions of rho = 0.3 GeV/cu cm, the axion would be found or ruled out at the 97 pct. c.l. in the above mass range in 48 months.

  15. Study on the growth of ZnO micro and nano-structures at low temperature and atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, M.; Claflin, B.; Farlow, G. C.; Look, D. C.

    2007-03-01

    Deposition of ZnO from the vapor in flowing carrier gases has been studied for use in the growth of micro- and nano- structures. We have investigated how variations in the carrier gas composition and flow rate and the position of the substrate control the morphology of the nanostructures. Source material was either Zn powder or Zn acetate, either evaporated (powder) or decomposed (acetate) in the temperature range 500^oC to 650^oC in flowing Ar/O2 at atmospheric pressure. It was also found that Zn powder must be washed in HCl to achieve reliable deposition at the lower temperatures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of samples grown from a Zn acetate source show micron-sized chimneys forming at 5 cm from the source, to 100 nm dispersed crystals at 7 cm or greater distance from the source. SEM images of samples grown from a Zn powder source show forrested needles ˜ 100 nm in diameter by 1 micron long.Photoluminescence measurements from these samples show a dominate line at 3.36 eV with additional features at 3.32 and 3.37 eV. The line widths are ˜ 3.5 meV, indicating good quality material. The usual gree-band emission is also observed.

  16. An induction heating diamond anvil cell for high pressure and temperature micro-Raman spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Keiji; Noguchi, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    A new external heating configuration is presented for high-temperature diamond anvil cell instruments. The supporting rockers are thermally excited by induction from an externally mounted copper coil passing a 30 kHz alternating current. The inductive heating configuration therefore avoids the use of breakable wires, yet is capable of cell temperatures of 1100 K or higher. The diamond anvil cell has no resistive heaters, but uses a single-turn induction coil for elevating the temperature. The induction coil is placed near the diamonds and directly heats the tungsten carbide rockers that support the diamond. The temperature in the cell is determined from a temperature-power curve calibrated by the ratio between the intensities of the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman lines of silicon. The high-pressure transformation of quartz to coesite is successfully observed by micro-Raman spectroscopy using this apparatus. The induction heating diamond anvil cell is thus a useful alternative to resistively heated diamond anvil cells. PMID:18248060

  17. Design and characterization of an RF excited micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet for reference in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2015-09-01

    Over the last decade a huge variety of atmospheric pressure plasma jets has been developed and applied for plasma medicine. The efficiency of these non-equilibrium plasmas for biological application is based on the generated amounts of reactive species and radiation. The gas temperatures stay within a range tolerable for temperature-sensitive tissues. The variety of different discharge geometries complicates a direct comparison. In addition, in plasma-medicine the combination of plasma with reactive components, ambient air, as well as biologic tissue - typically also incorporating fluids - results in a complex system. Thus, real progress in plasma-medicine requires a profound knowledge of species, their fluxes and processes hitting biological tissues. That will allow in particular the necessary tailoring of the discharge to fit the conditions. The complexity of the problem can only be overcome by a common effort of many groups and requires a comparison of their results. A reference device based on the already well-investigated micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet is presented. It is developed in the frame of the European COST initiative MP1101 to establish a publicly available, stable and reproducible source, where required plasma conditions can be investigated. Here we present the design and the ideas behind. The presentation discusses the requirements for the reference source and operation conditions. Biological references are also defined by the initiative. A specific part of the talk will be attributed to the reproducibility of results from various samples of the device. Funding by the DFG within the Package Project PAK816 ``Plasma Cell Interaction in Dermatology'' and the Research Unit FOR 1123 ``Physics of microplasmas'' is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Cantilever Wide Dynamic Range Acceleration/Vibration /Pressure Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2003-09-02

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/V2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  19. Ultrananocrystalline diamond cantilever wide dynamic range acceleration/vibration/pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2002-07-23

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/N2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  20. Positron range in tissue-equivalent materials: experimental microPET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, H.; Quintana-Bautista, C.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work an experimental investigation was carried out to study the effect that positron range has over positron emission tomography (PET) scans through measurements of the line spread function (LSF) in tissue-equivalent materials. Line-sources consisted of thin capillary tubes filled with 18F, 13N or 68Ga water-solution inserted along the axis of symmetry of cylindrical phantoms constructed with the tissue-equivalent materials: lung (inhale and exhale), adipose tissue, solid water, trabecular and cortical bone. PET scans were performed with a commercial small-animal PET scanner and image reconstruction was carried out with filtered-backprojection. Line-source distributions were analyzed using radial profiles taken on axial slices from which the spatial resolution was determined through the full-width at half-maximum, tenth-maximum, twentieth-maximum and fiftieth-maximum. A double-Gaussian model of the LSFs was used to fit experimental data which can be incorporated into iterative reconstruction methods. In addition, the maximum activity concentration in the line-sources was determined from reconstructed images and compared to the known values for each case. The experimental data indicates that positron range in different materials has a strong effect on both spatial resolution and activity concentration quantification in PET scans. Consequently, extra care should be taken when computing standard-uptake values in PET scans, in particular when the radiopharmaceutical is taken up by different tissues in the body, and more even so with high-energy positron emitters.

  1. Characterization of the Distal Esophagus High-Pressure Zone with Manometry, Ultrasound and Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vegesna, Anil K.; Sloan, Joshua A.; Singh, Baltej; Phillips, Steven J; Braverman, Alan S.; Barbe, Mary F.; Ruggieri, Michael R.; Miller, Larry S.

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to determine how the individual components of the distal esophagus and proximal stomach form the gastroesophageal junction high-pressure zone (GEJHPZ) anti-reflux barrier. Methods An endoscopic ultrasound/manometry catheter was pulled through the proximal stomach and distal esophagus in 20 normal subjects. The axial length and width of individual structures on endoscopic ultrasound were measured. The anatomic orientation of gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) components was examined in two organ donor specimens using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Key Results The three distinct structures identified within the GEJHPZ, from distal to proximal, were: the gastric clasp and sling muscle fiber complex, crural diaphragm, and lower esophageal circular smooth muscle fibers (LEC). The LEC was statistically significantly thicker than adjacent esophageal muscles. These structures were associated with 3 pressure peaks. The pressure peak produced by the clasp/sling fiber complex often overlapped with the pressure peak from the crural diaphragm. The most proximal peak, associated with the LEC, was significantly greater and bimodal in 9 of 20 subjects. This bimodal LEC pressure peak correlated with two areas of thickened muscle observed with ultrasound. Micro-CT of GEJ from organ donors confirmed the two areas of thickened muscle. Conclusions and inferences Three distinct anatomic structures, the clasp and sling muscle fibers, crural diaphragm, and LEC combine to form the anti-reflux barrier of the proximal stomach and distal esophagus. The clasp and sling muscle fibers combine with the crural diaphragm to form a distal pressure profile. The more proximal LEC has a bimodal pressure profile in some patients. PMID:22998376

  2. An Expanded Notch-Delta Model Exhibiting Long-Range Patterning and Incorporating MicroRNA Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jerry S.; Gumbayan, Abygail M.; Zeller, Robert W.; Mahaffy, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Notch-Delta signaling is a fundamental cell-cell communication mechanism that governs the differentiation of many cell types. Most existing mathematical models of Notch-Delta signaling are based on a feedback loop between Notch and Delta leading to lateral inhibition of neighboring cells. These models result in a checkerboard spatial pattern whereby adjacent cells express opposing levels of Notch and Delta, leading to alternate cell fates. However, a growing body of biological evidence suggests that Notch-Delta signaling produces other patterns that are not checkerboard, and therefore a new model is needed. Here, we present an expanded Notch-Delta model that builds upon previous models, adding a local Notch activity gradient, which affects long-range patterning, and the activity of a regulatory microRNA. This model is motivated by our experiments in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis showing that the peripheral sensory neurons, whose specification is in part regulated by the coordinate activity of Notch-Delta signaling and the microRNA miR-124, exhibit a sparse spatial pattern whereby consecutive neurons may be spaced over a dozen cells apart. We perform rigorous stability and bifurcation analyses, and demonstrate that our model is able to accurately explain and reproduce the neuronal pattern in Ciona. Using Monte Carlo simulations of our model along with miR-124 transgene over-expression assays, we demonstrate that the activity of miR-124 can be incorporated into the Notch decay rate parameter of our model. Finally, we motivate the general applicability of our model to Notch-Delta signaling in other animals by providing evidence that microRNAs regulate Notch-Delta signaling in analogous cell types in other organisms, and by discussing evidence in other organisms of sparse spatial patterns in tissues where Notch-Delta signaling is active. PMID:24945987

  3. Design, Fabrication and Prototype testing of a Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator combined On-Board Range Extender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Mueller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we present the design, fabrication and prototype testing of Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator (CIμ-PFCA) combined On-Board Range Extender (O-BRE). CIμ-PFCA is silicon based micro-PEM fuel cell system with an integrated hydrogen storage feature (palladium metal hydride), the run time of CIμ-PFCA is dependent on the stored hydrogen, and in order to extend its run time an O-BRE is realized (catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride, NaBH4. Combining the CIμ-PFCA and O-BRE on a system level have few important design requirements to be considered; hydrogen regulation, gas -liquid separator between the CIμ-PFCA and the O-RE. The usage of traditional techniques to regulate hydrogen (tubes), gas-liquid phase membranes (porous membrane separators) are less desirable in the micro domain, due to its space constraint. Our approach is to use a passive hydrogen regulation and gas-liquid phase separation concept; to use palladium membrane. Palladium regulates hydrogen by concentration diffusion, and its property to selectively adsorb only hydrogen is used as a passive gas-liquid phase separator. Proof of concept is shown by realizing a prototype system. The system is an assembly of CIμ-PFCA, palladium membrane and the O-BRE. The CIμ-PFCA consist of 2 individually processed silicon chips, copper supported palladium membrane realized by electroplating followed by high temperature annealing process under inter atmosphere and the O-BRE is realized out of a polymer substrate by micromilling process with platinum coated structures, which functions as a catalyst for the hydrolysis of NaBH4. The functionality of the assembled prototype system is demonstrated by the measuring a unit cell (area 1 mm2) when driven by the catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride (NaBH4 and the prototype system shows run time more than 15 hours.

  4. III-V-on-silicon integrated micro - spectrometer for the 3 μm wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Muneeb, M; Vasiliev, A; Ruocco, A; Malik, A; Chen, H; Nedeljkovic, M; Penades, J S; Cerutti, L; Rodriguez, J B; Mashanovich, G Z; Smit, M K; Tourni, E; Roelkens, G

    2016-05-01

    A compact (1.2 mm2) fully integrated mid-IR spectrometer operating in the 3 μm wavelength range is presented. To our knowledge this is the longest wavelength integrated spectrometer operating in the important wavelength window for spectroscopy of organic compounds. The spectrometer is based on a silicon-on-insulator arrayed waveguide grating filter. An array of InAs0.91Sb0.09 p-i-n photodiodes is heterogeneously integrated on the spectrometers output grating couplers using adhesive bonding. The spectrometer insertion loss is less than 3 dB and the waveguide-referred responsivity of the integrated photodiodes at room temperature is 0.3 A/W. PMID:27137560

  5. Positron range in tissue-equivalent materials: experimental microPET studies.

    PubMed

    Alva-Sánchez, H; Quintana-Bautista, C; Martínez-Dávalos, A; Ávila-Rodríguez, M A; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M

    2016-09-01

    In this work an experimental investigation was carried out to study the effect that positron range has over positron emission tomography (PET) scans through measurements of the line spread function (LSF) in tissue-equivalent materials. Line-sources consisted of thin capillary tubes filled with (18)F, (13)N or (68)Ga water-solution inserted along the axis of symmetry of cylindrical phantoms constructed with the tissue-equivalent materials: lung (inhale and exhale), adipose tissue, solid water, trabecular and cortical bone. PET scans were performed with a commercial small-animal PET scanner and image reconstruction was carried out with filtered-backprojection. Line-source distributions were analyzed using radial profiles taken on axial slices from which the spatial resolution was determined through the full-width at half-maximum, tenth-maximum, twentieth-maximum and fiftieth-maximum. A double-Gaussian model of the LSFs was used to fit experimental data which can be incorporated into iterative reconstruction methods. In addition, the maximum activity concentration in the line-sources was determined from reconstructed images and compared to the known values for each case. The experimental data indicates that positron range in different materials has a strong effect on both spatial resolution and activity concentration quantification in PET scans. Consequently, extra care should be taken when computing standard-uptake values in PET scans, in particular when the radiopharmaceutical is taken up by different tissues in the body, and more even so with high-energy positron emitters. PMID:27494279

  6. The effect of CO sub 2 on pulmonary artery pressure (P sub pa ) over time in the isolated perfused rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, P.; Shayevitz, J. )

    1991-03-11

    The isolated perfused rabbit lung model is used in studies of pulmonary hemodynamics, structure, and function under conditions closely resembling those which occur in living animals. The purpose of this study is to observe changes in P{sub pa} in response to differing concentrations of CO{sub 2} over time. After rapid exsanguination a tracheostomy was performed. Cannulas were secured in the main pulmonary artery and the left atrium. The lungs were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer mixed with blood at a rate of 120 ml/min with recirculation. The temperature of the perfusate was maintained between 35 and 38C. The lungs were then ventilated with 5% CO{sub 2} in air with a tidal volume of 10 ml/kg at 20 breaths/min. CO{sub 2} was altered randomly by ventilating the lungs 2, 5 or 10% CO{sub 2} in air. Metabolic acidosis was corrected with NaHCO{sub 3}. In the first two hour period after lung perfusion was begun, the model was allowed to stabilize at each CO{sub 2} concentration, and pH, pCO{sub 2}, pO{sub 2}, and base excess were determined at each P{sub pa}. All measurements were repeated in the second period beginning two hours after lung perfusion was started. P{sub pa} was plotted against pH for each animal in both early and late phases, and simple regression analysis was performed. The slopes and the y intercepts for the data sets in both groups were compared using one factor ANOVA, and were found to be significantly different, implying a statistical difference between regression lines. In the early phase this model behaves like the in vivo lung, i.e. hypercarbia appears to increase, while hypocarbia decreases, P{sub pa}. During the late phase of lung perfusion the opposite occurs.

  7. Research on equipment of micro-pressure measure and control in loading experiment of plant cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lian; Yu, Chengbo; Tao, Hongyan; Chen, Xuejun; Zhai, Feng

    2005-12-01

    The equipment is developed to measure and control micro-pressure in loading experiment of plant cell mechanics. The motivation for the development of this equipment was to maintain a stationary micro-pressure on the agar of culturing cells to keep cytoactive in biology experiments. A singlechip controls the stepping motor of this equipment to drive loading equipment in the system, in order to load between 50mN and 250mN under a constant voltage. The accuracy is estimated to be +/-0.4 mN. The structure and control system of this equipment is introduced and described in detail. The experimental results show that the equipment is capable of maintaining a constant, stationary micropressure in cell culturing application and is worth of extending and applying.

  8. Glass Transitions and Elastic Properties of Lithium Borate Glasses over a Wide Composition Range Studied by Micro-Brillouin Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukawa, Yasuteru; Matsuda, Yu; Ike, Yuji; Kodama, Masao; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-05-01

    The elastic properties of lithium borate glasses, denoted by the composition formula xLi2O·(100 - x)B2O3 where x is the molar concentration in mol %, have been investigated over a wide composition range 6 ≤x ≤52 mol % by micro-Brillouin scattering. From the observed values of the longitudinal and transverse sound velocities, the elastic constants such as longitudinal modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio have been determined. The elastic constants have shown a strong composition dependence due to the variation of intermediate structural units. The temperature dependences of the longitudinal sound velocity and absorption coefficient of 44Li2O·56B2O3 clearly show the anomalies at the glass transition and crystallization temperatures.

  9. Stability and excitation dynamics of an argon micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünnbier, M.; Becker, M. M.; Iseni, S.; Bansemer, R.; Loffhagen, D.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2015-12-01

    A megahertz-driven plasma jet at atmospheric pressure—the so-called micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μAPPJ)—operating in pure argon has been investigated experimentally and by numerical modelling. To ignite the discharge in argon within the jet geometry, a self-made plasma tuning unit was designed, which additionally enables measurements of the dissipated power in the plasma itself. Discharges in the α-mode up to their transition to the γ-mode were studied experimentally for varying frequencies. It was found that the voltage at the α-γ transition behaves inversely proportional to the applied frequency f and that the corresponding power scales with an f   3/2law. Both these findings agree well with the results of time-dependent, spatially one-dimensional fluid modelling of the discharge behaviour, where the f  3/2 scaling of the α-γ transition power is additionally verified by the established concept of a critical plasma density for sheath breakdown. Furthermore, phase resolved spectroscopy of the optical emission at 750.39 nm as well as at 810.37 nm and 811.53 nm was applied to analyse the excitation dynamics of the discharge at 27 MHz for different applied powers. The increase of the power leads to an additional maximum in the excitation structure of the 750.39 nm line emission at the α-γ transition point, whereas the emission structure around 811 nm does not change qualitatively. According to the fluid modelling results, this differing behaviour originates from the different population mechanisms of the corresponding energy levels of argon.

  10. Micro-focusing System of the Taiwan Contract Beamline BL12XU at SPring-8 for IXS Experiments under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.-Y.; Cai, Y.-Q.; Chung, S.-C.; Song, Y.-F.; Tsang, K.-L.

    2007-01-19

    The Taiwan Contract Beamline BL12XU at SPring-8 is designed for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) experiments. DCS is a powerful technique capable of probing the dynamic behavior and electronic structure of materials under high pressure. The state-of-the-arts technology to generate static high pressure up to mega-bar range uses diamond anvil cells (DAC). The allowed volume of the sample in DAC scales inversely with the pressure and is limited to the order of 1 x 10-3 mm3. In order to utilize such a device to explore the interesting phenomena under high pressure, we have designed a micro-focusing system using a set of KB mirrors, which is compatible with the existing optical system of BL12XU. Realistic ray-tracing results indicate that the system can achieve a focus of 10 {mu}m x 5.3 {mu}m(H x V) with a total efficiency of about 86%. The improved focus is expected to substantially enhance the experimental capability of BL12XU for high-pressure research.

  11. Cost and Performance Report - Validation of the Low-Range Differential Pressure (LRDP) Leak Detection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) Port Hueneme, California, and its industrial partners, Vista Research, Inc., and Vista Engineering Technologies, L.L.C., have demonstrated and validated (DEM/VAL) an innovative mass-based leak detection system for bulk fuel underground storage tanks (USTs). The Low-Range Differential Pressure (LRDP) system is a computer-controlled system that can reliably detect small leaks in bulk USTs ranging in size from 50,000 gal to 12,500,000 gal. As part of this project, it has been evaluated for performance by an independent third party in a l22.5-ft diameter, 2,100,000-gal tank following EPA's standard test procedures. The LRDP meets monthly monitoring and annual precision (tightness) test regulatory compliance requirements using either a 10-h (overnight) or 24-h test. The LRDP has several significant cost advantages over the internal and external technologies. The cost advantages are realized because of the extremely high performance of the LRDP and the probability of false alarm, the on-line monitoring capability of the LRDP when pennanently installed in a tank, the capability of the system to conduct a short test (an overnight test), and the low recurring costs associated with testing. The cost of a tracer method is expensive because of the high recurring cost of testing. The cost of other mass-based methods is high because of lower performance and the inability to meet both the monthly monitoring and annual precision regulatory requirements with an online system. In addition, the LRDP has the potential to save DOD many hundreds of millions of dollars in terms of clean-up and tank replacement cost avoidance.

  12. Respiratory Response of the Deep-Sea Amphipod Stephonyx biscayensis Indicates Bathymetric Range Limitation by Temperature and Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alastair; Thatje, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Depth zonation of fauna on continental margins is well documented. Whilst increasing hydrostatic pressure with depth has long been considered a factor contributing significantly to this pattern, discussion of the relative significance of decreasing temperature with depth has continued. This study investigates the physiological tolerances of fed and starved specimens of the bathyal lysianassoid amphipod Stephonyx biscayensis at varying temperature to acute pressure exposure by measuring the rate of oxygen consumption. Acclimation to atmospheric pressure is shown to have no significant interaction with temperature and/or pressure effects. Similarly, starvation is shown to have no significant effect on the interaction of temperature and pressure. Subsequently, the effect of pressure on respiration rate is revealed to be dependent on temperature: pressure equivalent to 2000 m depth was tolerated at 1 and 3°C; pressure equivalent to 2500 m depth was tolerated at 5.5°C; at 10°C pressure equivalent to 3000 m depth was tolerated. The variation in tolerance is consistent with the natural distribution range reported for this species. There are clear implications for hypotheses relating to the observed phenomenon of a biodiversity bottleneck between 2000 and 3000 metres, and for the potential for bathymetric range shifts in response to global climate change. PMID:22174838

  13. The Design and Optimization of a Highly Sensitive and Overload-Resistant Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiawei; Zhao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    A piezoresistive pressure sensor with a beam-membrane-dual-island structure is developed for micro-pressure monitoring in the field of aviation, which requires great sensitivity and overload resistance capacity. The design, fabrication, and test of the sensor are presented in this paper. By analyzing the stress distribution of sensitive elements using the finite element method, a novel structure incorporating sensitive beams with a traditional bossed diaphragm is built up. The proposed structure proved to be advantageous in terms of high sensitivity and high overload resistance compared with the conventional bossed diaphragm and flat diaphragm structures. Curve fittings of surface stress and deflection based on ANSYS simulation results are performed to establish the sensor equations. Fabricated on an n-type single crystal silicon wafer, the sensor chips are wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB) and packaged for experiments. The static and dynamic characteristics are tested and discussed. Experimental results show that the sensor has a sensitivity as high as 17.339 μV/V/Pa in the range of 500 Pa at room temperature, and a high overload resistance of 200 times overpressure. Due to the excellent performance, the sensor can be applied in measuring micro-pressure lower than 500 Pa. PMID:27005627

  14. The Design and Optimization of a Highly Sensitive and Overload-Resistant Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiawei; Zhao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    A piezoresistive pressure sensor with a beam-membrane-dual-island structure is developed for micro-pressure monitoring in the field of aviation, which requires great sensitivity and overload resistance capacity. The design, fabrication, and test of the sensor are presented in this paper. By analyzing the stress distribution of sensitive elements using the finite element method, a novel structure incorporating sensitive beams with a traditional bossed diaphragm is built up. The proposed structure proved to be advantageous in terms of high sensitivity and high overload resistance compared with the conventional bossed diaphragm and flat diaphragm structures. Curve fittings of surface stress and deflection based on ANSYS simulation results are performed to establish the sensor equations. Fabricated on an n-type single crystal silicon wafer, the sensor chips are wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB) and packaged for experiments. The static and dynamic characteristics are tested and discussed. Experimental results show that the sensor has a sensitivity as high as 17.339 μV/V/Pa in the range of 500 Pa at room temperature, and a high overload resistance of 200 times overpressure. Due to the excellent performance, the sensor can be applied in measuring micro-pressure lower than 500 Pa. PMID:27005627

  15. The Influence of Fundamental Frequency and Sound Pressure Level Range on Breathing Patterns in Female Classical Singing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, Sally; Thorpe, C. William; Callaghan, Jean; Davis, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the influence of fundamental frequency (F0) and sound pressure level (SPL) range on respiratory behavior in classical singing. Method: Five trained female singers performed an 8-s messa di voce (a crescendo and decrescendo on one F0) across their musical F0 range. Lung volume (LV) change was estimated, and…

  16. Pressure distribution on a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter in the transition-speed range. [wind tunnel tests to measure pressure distribution on body and wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.; Margason, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel with a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter configuration to obtain detailed pressure measurements on the body and on the wing in the transition-speed range. The vectored-thrust jet exhaust induced a region of negative pressure coefficients on the lower surface of the wing and on the bottom of the fuselage. The location of the jet exhaust relative to the wing was a major factor in determining the extent of the region of negative pressure coefficients.

  17. Source depth dependence of micro-tsunamis recorded with ocean-bottom pressure gauges: The January 28, 2000 Mw 6.8 earthquake off Nemuro Peninsula, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirata, K.; Takahashi, H.; Geist, E.; Satake, K.; Tanioka, Y.; Sugioka, H.; Mikada, H.

    2003-01-01

    Micro-tsunami waves with a maximum amplitude of 4-6 mm were detected with the ocean-bottom pressure gauges on a cabled deep seafloor observatory south of Hokkaido, Japan, following the January 28, 2000 earthquake (Mw 6.8) in the southern Kuril subduction zone. We model the observed micro-tsunami and estimate the focal depth and other source parameters such as fault length and amount of slip using grid searching with the least-squares method. The source depth and stress drop for the January 2000 earthquake are estimated to be 50 km and 7 MPa, respectively, with possible ranges of 45-55 km and 4-13 MPa. Focal depth of typical inter-plate earthquakes in this region ranges from 10 to 20 km and stress drop of inter-plate earthquakes generally is around 3 MPa. The source depth and stress drop estimates suggest that the earthquake was an intra-slab event in the subducting Pacific plate, rather than an inter-plate event. In addition, for a prescribed fault width of 30 km, the fault length is estimated to be 15 km, with possible ranges of 10-20 km, which is the same as the previously determined aftershock distribution. The corresponding estimate for seismic moment is 2.7??1019 Nm with possible ranges of 2.3??1019-3.2??1019Nm. Standard tide gauges along the nearby coast did not record any tsunami signal. High-precision ocean-bottom pressure measurements offshore thus make it possible to determine fault parameters of moderate-sized earthquakes in subduction zones using open-ocean tsunami waveforms. Published by Elsevier Science B. V.

  18. Rapid, optical measurement of the atmospheric pressure on a fast research aircraft using open-path TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, B.; Afchine, A.; Ebert, V.

    2014-05-01

    Because of the high travel speed, the complex flow dynamics around an aircraft and the complex dependency of the fluid dynamics on numerous airborne parameters, it is quite difficult to obtain accurate pressure values at a specific instrument location of an aircraft's fuselage. Complex simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can in theory computationally "transfer" pressure values from one location to another. However, for long flight patterns, this process is inconvenient and cumbersome. Furthermore these CFD transfer models require a local experimental validation, which is rarely available. In this paper, we describe an integrated approach for a spectroscopic, calibration-free, in-flight pressure determination in an open-path White cell on an aircraft fuselage using ambient, atmospheric water vapour as the "sensor species". The presented measurements are realized with the HAI (Hygrometer for Atmospheric Investigations) instrument, built for multiphase water detection via calibration-free TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy). The pressure determination is based on raw data used for H2O concentration measurement, but with a different post-flight evaluation method, and can therefore be conducted at deferred time intervals on any desired flight track. The spectroscopic pressure is compared in-flight with the static ambient pressure of the aircraft avionic system and a micro-mechanical pressure sensor, located next to the open-path cell, over a pressure range from 150 hPa to 800 hPa, and a water vapour concentration range of more than three orders of magnitude. The correlation between the micro-mechanical pressure sensor measurements and the spectroscopic pressure measurements show an average deviation from linearity of only 0.14% and a small offset of 9.5 hPa. For the spectroscopic pressure evaluation we derive measurement uncertainties under laboratory conditions of 3.2% and 5.1% during in flight operation on the HALO airplane

  19. CePt2In7: Shubnikov-de Haas measurements on micro-structured samples under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanter, J.; Moll, P.; Friedemann, S.; Alireza, P.; Sutherland, M.; Goh, S.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Batlogg, B.

    2014-03-01

    CePt2In7 belongs to the CemMnIn3 m + 2 n heavy fermion family, but compared to the Ce MIn5 members of this group, exhibits a more two dimensional electronic structure. At zero pressure the ground state is antiferromagnetically ordered. Under pressure the antiferromagnetic order is suppressed and a superconducting phase is induced, with a maximum Tc above a quantum critical point around 31 kbar. To investigate the changes in the Fermi Surface and effective electron masses around the quantum critical point, Shubnikov-de Haas measurements were conducted under high pressures in an anvil cell. The samples were micro-structured and contacted using a Focused Ion Beam (FIB). The Focused Ion Beam enables sample contacting and structuring down to a sub-micrometer scale, making the measurement of several samples with complex shapes and multiple contacts on a single anvil feasible.

  20. OMVPE growth of GaInAsSb in the 2 to 2.4 {micro}m range

    SciTech Connect

    Charache, G.W.; Wang, C.A.

    1997-12-01

    Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} epilayers were grown lattice matched to GaSb substrates by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy using all organometallic precursors, which include triethylgallium, trimethylindium, tertiarybutylarsine, and trimethylantimony. Layers were grown over a temperature range between 525 and 575 C, a V/III ratio range between 0.9 and 1.7, x < 0.2 and y < 0.2, and on (100) GaSb substrates with 2{degree} toward (100) or 6{degree} toward (111)B. The overall material quality of these alloys depends on growth temperature, In content, V/III ratio, and substrate misorientation. A mirror-like surface morphology and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) could be obtained for GaInAsSb layers with peak emission in the wavelength range between 2 and 2.4 {micro}m. Based on epilayer surface morphology and low temperature PL spectra, the crystal quality improves for growth temperature decreasing from 575 to 525 C, and with decreasing In content. In general, GaInAsSb layers grown on (100) GaSb substrates with a 6{degree} toward (111)B misorientation exhibited smoother surfaces and narrower full width at half-maximum values of 4 K PL spectra than layers grown on the more standard substrate 9100 2{degree} toward (110). Nominally undoped GaInAsSb layers grown at 550 C are p-type with 300 K hole concentration of {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} and hole mobility of {approximately} 430 to 560 cm{sup 2}/V-s. The n- and p-type doping of GaInAsSb with diethyltellurium and dimethylzinc, respectively, are also reported.

  1. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xinguo; Newville, Matthew; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Rivers, Mark L.; Sutton, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within ±3° relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO2 recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO2 glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO2 glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures. PMID:19655966

  2. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Newville, M.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    2009-07-31

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within {+-}3{sup o} relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO{sub 2} recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO{sub 2} glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO{sub 2} glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures.

  3. Micro-joule pico-second range Yb3+-doped fibre laser for medical applications in acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.; Rivera-Manrique, S. I.; Jacques, S. L.

    2011-08-01

    The work described here is based on the optical design, simulation and on-going implementation of a pulsed (Q-switch) Yb3+-doped, 1-um diffraction-limited fibre laser with pico-second, 10 micro-Joule-range energy pulses for producing the right energy pulses which could be of benefit for patients who suffer chronic headache, photophobia, and even nausea which could is sometimes triggered by a series of factors. The specific therapeutic effect known as acupunctural analgesia is the main objective of this medium-term project. It is a simple design on which commercially available software was employed for laser cavity design. Monte Carlo technique for skin light-transport, thermal diffusion and the possible thermal de-naturalization optical study and prediction will also be included in the presentation. Full optical characterization will be included and a complete set of recent results on the laser-skin interaction and the so called moxi-bustion from the laser design will be extensively described.

  4. Refraction index of shock compressed water in the megabar pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Jakubowska, K.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Cavazzoni, C.; Danson, C.; Hall, T.; Kimpel, M.; Neely, D.; Pasley, J.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Telaro, B.

    2015-11-01

    We compressed water to megabar pressures by laser-driven shock waves and evidenced transparent, opaque and reflecting phases as pressure increases. The refraction index of water in the first two states was measured using a VISAR system. At high compression a sharp increase of the real and imaginary part of the refraction index is observed. Experiments were performed at the LULI and RAL laboratories.

  5. Alteration products of shock metamorphosed basalt from a range of shock pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the possibility that shock metamorphosed basalt weathers at faster rates than unshocked protoliths, a petrographic study of weathering products in shocked basalts is necessary. Lonar Crater, India is a fortuitous impact ~550 ka [Jourdan et al., 2010] into Deccan flood basalt. Deccan basalt is an excellent spectral analog for Martian basalts [Bandfield et al., 2000], and hence Lonar basalt shocked to a range of pressures [Kieffer et al., 1976] are excellent samples to compare to shergottites and remote sensing data of Mars. Shocked basalt is found as clasts in a thin, ~1 m suevite breccia layer that drapes an ~8 m lithic breccia that comprises the majority of the Lonar ejecta blanket. The lithic breccia represents the “throw out” ejected over the crater rim and only consists of clasts of unshocked and Class 1 (fractured grains) shocked basalt. The suevite breccia or “fall out” consists of all classes of shocked basalt classified by Kieffer et al. [1976]. Petrography of these clasts from suevite breccia outcrops will be shown and discussed. Class 2 shocked basalt shows intense shattering and fracturing of clinopyroxene grains, and labradorite has been converted to maskelynite (Figure 1). Classes 3 and 4 can be differentiated from Class 2 as the labradorite glass shows evidence of flow and vesiculation (e.g., Class 4 in Figure 2), respectively. Petrographic images of impact melts (Class 5) exhibit schlieren and flow features similar to lechatelierite from Meteor Crater and other terrestrial impact melts. The growth of hematite (Figure 1), calcite, chlorite, and serpentine within shattered augite and augite-maskelynite boundaries will be shown with comparisons to these minerals in unshocked basalt. Also discussed will be the petrography of shocked basalt talus vs. that of the in-situ clasts, as this bias in sample collection is influenced by what shocked basalt remains after ~550 ka. Class 2 shocked basalt in plain and cross polarized light. Note

  6. Gas and heat dynamics of a micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma reference jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Seán; Golda, Judith; Turner, Miles M.; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Gas and heat dynamics of the ‘Cooperation on Science and Technology (COST) Reference Microplasma Jet’ (COST-jet), a European lead reference device for low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma application, are investigated. Of particular interest to many biomedical application scenarios, the temperature characteristics of a surface impacted by the jet are revealed. Schlieren imaging, thermocouple measurements, infrared thermal imaging and numerical modelling are employed. Temperature spatial profiles in the gas domain reveal heating primarily of the helium fraction of the gas mixture. Thermocouple and model temporal data show a bounded exponential temperature growth described by a single characteristic time parameter to reach  ∼63% or (1-1/e) fraction of the temperature increase. Peak temperatures occurred in the gas domain where the carrier jet exits the COST-jet, with values ranging from ambient temperatures to in excess of 100 °C in ‘α-mode’ operation. In a horizontal orientation of the COST-jet a curved trajectory of the helium effluent at low gas flows results from buoyant forces. Gas mixture profiles reveal significant containment of the helium concentrations for a surface placed in close proximity to the COST-jet. Surface heating of a quartz plate follows a similar bounded exponential temporal temperature growth as device heating. Spatial profiles of surface heating are found to correlate strongly to the impacting effluent where peak temperatures occur in regions of maximum surface helium concentration.

  7. An experimental technique of split Hopkinson pressure bar using fiber micro-displacement interferometer system for any reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Tang, X. R.; Li, J. L.; Tan, D. W.

    2014-04-01

    A novel non-contact measurement technique had been developed for the mechanical properties of materials in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars (SHPB). Instead of the traditional strain gages mounted on the surfaces of bars, two shutters were mounted on the end of bars to directly measure interfacial velocity using Fiber Micro-Displacement Interferometer System for Any Reflector. Using the new technique, the integrated stress-strain responses could be determined. The experimental technique was validated by SHPB test simulation. The technique had been used to investigate the dynamic response of a brittle explosive material. The results showed that the new experimental technique could be applied to the dynamic behavior in SHPB test.

  8. Seismic attenuation in partially saturated Berea sandstone submitted to a range of confining pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using the forced oscillation method, we measure the extensional-mode attenuation and Young's modulus of a Berea sandstone sample at seismic frequencies (0.5-50 Hz) for varying levels of water saturation (~0-100%) and confining pressures (2-25 MPa). Attenuation is negligible for dry conditions and saturation levels <80%. For saturation levels between ~91% and ~100%, attenuation is significant and frequency dependent in the form of distinct bell-shaped curves having their maxima between 1 and 20 Hz. Increasing saturation causes an increase of the overall attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to lower frequencies. On the other hand, increasing the confining pressure causes a reduction in the attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to higher frequencies. For saturation levels above ~98%, the fluid pressure increases with increasing confining pressure. When the fluid pressure is high enough to ensure full water saturation of the sample, attenuation becomes negligible. A second series of comparable experiments reproduces these results satisfactorily. Based on a qualitative analysis of the data, the frequency-dependent attenuation meets the theoretical predictions of mesoscopic wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) in response to a heterogeneous water distribution in the pore space, so-called patchy saturation. These results show that mesoscopic WIFF can be an important source of seismic attenuation at reservoir conditions.

  9. Oxidation of gas-phase protactinium ions, Pa+ and Pa2+: formation and properties of PaO2(2+)(g), protactinyl.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marta; de Matos, António Pires; Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G; Tyagi, Rajni; Pitzer, Russell M

    2006-05-01

    Oxidation reactions of bare and ligated, monopositive, and dipositive Pa ions in the gas phase were studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Seven oxidants were employed, ranging from the thermodynamically robust N(2)O to the relatively weak CH(2)O-all oxidized Pa(+) to PaO(+) and PaO(+) to PaO(2)(+). On the basis of experimental observations, it was established that D[Pa(+)-O] and D[OPa(+)-O] > or = 751 kJ mol(-1). Estimates for D[Pa(+)-O], D[OPa(+)-O], IE[PaO], and IE[PaO(2)] were also obtained. The seven oxidants reacted with Pa(2+) to produce PaO(2+), indicating that D[Pa(2+)-O] > or = 751 kJ mol(-1). A particularly notable finding was the oxidation of PaO(2+) by N(2)O to PaO(2)(2+), a species, which formally comprises Pa(VI). Collision-induced dissociation of PaO(2)(2+) suggested the protactinyl connectivity, {O-Pa-O}(2+). The experimentally determined IE[PaO(2)(+)] approximately 16.6 eV is in agreement with self-consistent-field and configuration interaction calculations for PaO(2)(+) and PaO(2)(2+). These calculations provide insights into the electronic structures of these ions and indicate the participation of 5f orbitals in bonding and a partial "6p hole" in the case of protactinyl. It was found that PaO(2)(2+) catalyzes the oxidation of CO by N(2)O-such O atom transport via a dipositive metal oxide ion is distinctive. It was also observed that PaO(2)(2+) is capable of activating H(2) to form the stable PaO(2)H(2+) ion. PMID:16640369

  10. Range of the solvation pressure between lipid membranes: dependence on the packing density of solvent molecules.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, T J; Magid, A D; Simon, S A

    1989-09-19

    Well-ordered multilamellar arrays of liquid-crystalline phosphatidylcholine and equimolar phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol bilayers have been formed in the nonaqueous solvents formamide and 1,3-propanediol. The organization of these bilayers and the interactions between apposing bilayer surfaces have been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of liposomes compressed by applied osmotic pressures up to 6 X 10(7) dyn/cm2 (60 atm). The structure of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) bilayers in these solvents is quite different than in water, with the bilayer thickness being largest in water, 3 A narrower in formamide, and 6 A narrower in 1,3-propanediol. The incorporation of equimolar cholesterol increases the thickness of EPC bilayers immersed in each solvent, by over 10 A in the case of 1,3-propanediol. The osmotic pressures of various concentrations of the neutral polymer poly(vinylpyrrolidone) dissolved in formamide or 1,3-propanediol have been measured with a custom-built membrane osmometer. These measurements are used to obtain the distance dependence of the repulsive solvation pressure between apposing bilayer surfaces. For each solvent, the solvation pressure decreases exponentially with distance between bilayer surfaces. However, for both EPC and EPC-cholesterol bilayers, the decay length and magnitude of this repulsive pressure strongly depend on the solvent. The decay length for EPC bilayers in water, formamide, and 1,3-propanediol is found to be 1.7, 2.4, and 2.6 A, respectively, whereas the decay length for equimolar EPC-cholesterol bilayers in water, formamide, and 1,3-propanediol is found to be 2.1, 2.9, and 3.1 A, respectively. These data indicate that the decay length is inversely proportional to the cube root of the number of solvent molecules per unit volume.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2611220

  11. Control of TTIP Solution for Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet and Deposition of TiO2 Micro-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Masahiro; Parajulee, Shankar; Ikezawa, Shunjiro

    TiO2 deposition-methods are versatile and are expected to be more simple and easy, however, in recent years the industrial photocatalytic products have been developed enormously. In this work, photocatalytic TiO2 micro-particles are deposited using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet device. Here, deposition-method is carried out in two steps, at first, the hydrolysis reaction time has been able to control which will resolve the TTIP coagulating trouble during the transportation, by acidifying the solution with AA (Acetic acid) and DEA (Diethanolamine). An experiment was performed to measure the hydrolysis reaction time of TTIP (Titanium tetraisopropoxide) solution by He-Ne laser. Secondly, the deposition of TiO2 micro-particles was carried out using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet with the controlled TTIP solution in reaction time. Based on SEM and water contact angle measurement, it is found that the smaller the mixing ratios of TTIP and DEA the smaller the TiO2 particle size. Also, the smaller the TiO2 particles the smaller the contact angle under the UV irradiation which suffices the photocatalytic behavior.

  12. Extended pressure range performance of Kaiser/Marquardt 490N thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, J. R.; Kreiner, K. B.

    1993-06-01

    The performance of INTELSAT VI Reboost Program Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) is studied using both ground and flight testing results. Ground testing based on an INTELSAT VI qualification unit, S/N 002A, was performed at the Kaiser Marquardt facility in California in 1991. Data obtained from the F-603 flight show that the R4-D 490 N LAM is susceptible to a dynamic combustion instability mode, called chugging, when operated at a low inlet pressure with helium saturated propellants.

  13. Polymeric check valve with an elevated pedestal for precise cracking pressure in a glaucoma drainage device.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Ju; Yang, Dong-Seong; Cha, Jung-Joon; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a polymeric micro check valve for a glaucoma drainage device (GDD) featuring the precise regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) and effective aqueous humor turnover (AHT). The pedestal, slightly elevated by selective coating of a parylene C film, induces pre-stress in the thin valve membrane, which enhances the predictability of the cracking pressure of the GDD. The proposed GDD comprises a cannula and a normally closed polymeric micro check valve, which are made of PDMS, a biocompatible polymer, with three layers: top (cover), intermediate (thin valve membrane), and bottom (base plate). A feedback channel, located between the top and intermediate layers, prevents reverse flow by feeding the pressure of the outlet channel back to the thin valve membrane. To achieve a precise cracking pressure and sufficient drainage of humor for humans, the thicknesses of the valve membrane and parylene C film are designed to be 58 μm and 1 μm, respectively, which are confirmed using a COMSOL simulation. The experimental results show that the cracking pressure of the fabricated GDD lies within the range of normal IOP (1.33-2.67 kPa). The forward flow rate (drainage rate), 4.3 ± 0.9 μL/min at 2.5 kPa, is adequate to accommodate the rate of AHT in a normal human eye (2.4 ± 0.6 μL/min). The reverse flow was not observed when a hydrostatic pressure of up to 4 kPa was applied to the outlet and the feedback channel. PMID:26864969

  14. A piezoelectric micro control valve with integrated capacitive sensing for ambulant blood pressure waveform monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Maarten S.; Wu, Kai; Brookhuis, Robert A.; van Houwelingen, Marc J.; Brouwer, Dannis M.; Lötters, Joost C.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-12-01

    We have designed and characterized a MEMS microvalve with built-in capacitive displacement sensing and fitted it with a miniature piezoelectric actuator to achieve active valve control. The integrated displacement sensor enables high bandwidth proportional control of the gas flow through the valve. This is an essential requirement for non-invasive blood pressure waveform monitoring based on following the arterial pressure with a counter pressure. Using the capacitive sensor, we demonstrate negligible hysteresis in the valve control characteristics. Fabrication of the valve requires only two mask steps for deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and one release etch.

  15. Isothermal compressibility of amino alcohols in the pressure range from 0.1 to 300 MPa at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodnikova, M. N.; Troitskii, V. M.; Solonina, I. A.; Shirokova, E. V.; Kraevskii, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    The isothermal compressibilities of three amino alcohols are measured on a unique setup for direct compression in the pressure range of 0.1 to 300 MPa at 298 K. The lowest baric dependence of isothermal compressibility is found for 3-amino-1-propanol, while 2-amino-1-butanol is characterized by the highest isothermal compressibility. The crystallization of 4-amino-1-butanol is observed at pressures of 200-250 MPa. The resulting data are discussed from the viewpoint of the stability of spatial hydrogen bond networks in amino alcohols and are compared to the similar dependences of liquid diols.

  16. Rapid, optical measurement of the atmospheric pressure on a fast research aircraft using open-path TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, B.; Afchine, A.; Ebert, V.

    2014-11-01

    Because of the high travel speed, the complex flow dynamics around an aircraft, and the complex dependency of the fluid dynamics on numerous airborne parameters, it is quite difficult to obtain accurate pressure values at a specific instrument location of an aircraft's fuselage. Complex simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can in theory computationally "transfer" pressure values from one location to another. However, for long flight patterns, this process is inconvenient and cumbersome. Furthermore, these CFD transfer models require a local experimental validation, which is rarely available. In this paper, we describe an integrated approach for a spectroscopic, calibration-free, in-flight pressure determination in an open-path White cell on an aircraft fuselage using ambient, atmospheric water vapour as the "sensor species". The presented measurements are realised with the HAI (Hygrometer for Atmospheric Investigations) instrument, built for multiphase water detection via calibration-free TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy). The pressure determination is based on raw data used for H2O concentration measurement, but with a different post-flight evaluation method, and can therefore be conducted at deferred time intervals on any desired flight track. The spectroscopic pressure is compared in-flight with the static ambient pressure of the aircraft avionic system and a micro-mechanical pressure sensor, located next to the open-path cell, over a pressure range from 150 to 800 hPa, and a water vapour concentration range of more than 3 orders of magnitude. The correlation between the micro-mechanical pressure sensor measurements and the spectroscopic pressure measurements shows an average deviation from linearity of only 0.14% and a small offset of 9.5 hPa. For the spectroscopic pressure evaluation we derive measurement uncertainties under laboratory conditions of 3.2 and 5.1% during in-flight operation on the HALO airplane. Under

  17. Micro-seismicity at high pressure and temperature: Developing a system for generating and detecting deep earthquakes in the lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Officer, T.; Secco, R.

    2013-05-01

    In subduction zones, deep earthquakes are thought to be associated with faulting that arises from phase transformations (Green et al., 1992, Dobson et al, 2002). In order to test this mechanism experimentally, it is necessary to make micro-seismic measurements while the mineral under investigation is subjected to the pressure and temperature (P,T) environment at depth. We are developing a system capable of making in situ acoustic emission (AE) measurements on samples under P,T conditions representative of the upper mantle and transition zone. Experiments are performed in a 3000 ton multi-anvil press with 6 piezoelectric transducers mounted on the rear side of the anvils. Full waveforms of AE events are collected on six channels of an AE measurement system capable of 40 MHz sampling rate. By employing multiple transducers distributed in a micro-seismic array, it is possible to obtain the source location of a particular AE event using triangulation techniques. An additional benefit of the system is the ability to measure phase transformations using two distinct methods: 1) volume changes that accompany the transformation leads to the generation of acoustic energy associated with rapid readjustment of the pressure cell (de Ronde and Dobson, 2008) and 2) sending pulsed signals to measure the contrast in travel time between distinct mineral phases. Elements such as Hg and Sn experience solid-liquid transformations with large volume change leading to well defined velocity differences. Results on Hg clearly demonstrate an observable velocity contrast and Sn is expected to behave similarly. Future work is planned for silicate minerals. 1. Green II, H.W. et al., Geophys. Res. Lets, 1992, 19, p. 789-792 2. Dobson, D.P. et al., Science, 2002, 298, p. 1407-1410 3. de Ronde, Almar A. et al., High Pressure Research, 2008, 28, p. 9-17

  18. Changing the "Normal Range" for Blood Pressure from 140/90 to 130/Any Improves Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fulks, Michael; Stout, Robert L; Dolan, Vera F

    2015-01-01

    Objective .- Redefine the "normal" reference range for blood pressure from <140/90 to one that more effectively identifies individuals with increased mortality risk. Method .- Data from the recently published 2014 CRL blood pressure study was used. It includes 2,472,706 life insurance applicants tested by Clinical Reference Laboratory from 1993 to 2007 with follow-up for vital status using the September 2011 Social Security Death Master File. Various upper limits of blood pressure (BP in mm Hg) were evaluated to determine if any was superior to the current, commonly used limit of 140/90 in identifying individuals with increased mortality risk. Results .- An alternative reference range using a systolic BP (SBP) <130 with any diastolic BP (DBP) included 84% of life insurance applicants. It had a lower mortality rate and narrower range of relative risk than <140/90, including 89% as many applicants but only 68% as many deaths. This pattern of lives and deaths was consistent across age and sex. Conclusion .- Switching to a "normal" reference range of SBP <130 offers superior risk assessment relative to using BP <140/90 while still including a sufficient percentage of the population. PMID:27584806

  19. Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve results in rapid inhibition of the wide dynamic range neuronal response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve has recently been reported to provide rapid short-term relief of pain in patients with various pathologies. Wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons transmit nociceptive information from the dorsal horn to higher brain centers. In the present study, we examined the effect of a 2-min application of sciatic nerve pressure on WDR neuronal activity in anesthetized male Sprague–Dawley rats. Results Experiments were carried out on 41 male Sprague–Dawley albino rats weighing 160–280 grams. Dorsal horn WDR neurons were identified on the basis of characteristic responses to mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Acute pressure was applied for 2 min to the sciatic nerve using a small vascular clip. The responses of WDR neurons to three mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field were recorded before, and 2, 5 and 20 min after cessation of the 2-min pressure application on the sciatic nerve. Two-min pressure applied to the sciatic nerve caused rapid attenuation of the WDR response to pinching, pressure and brushing stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Maximal attenuation of the WDR response to pinching and pressure was noted 5 min after release of the 2-min pressure on the sciatic nerve. The mean firing rate decreased from 31.7±1.7 Hz to 13±1.4 Hz upon pinching (p < 0.001), from 31.2±2.3 Hz to 10.9±1.4 Hz (p < 0.001) when pressure was applied, and from 18.9±1.2 Hz to 7.6±1.1 Hz (p < 0.001) upon brushing. Thereafter, the mean firing rates gradually recovered. Conclusions Our results indicate that acute pressure applied to the sciatic nerve exerts a rapid inhibitory effect on the WDR response to both noxious and innocuous stimuli. Our results may partially explain the rapid analgesic effect of acute sciatic nerve pressure noted in clinical studies, and also suggest a new model for the study of pain. PMID:23211003

  20. Simulation of non-ionic surfactant micelle formation across a range of temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Gregory; Das, Payel; Matysiak, Silvina

    Non-ionic surfactants can, at certain concentrations and thermodynamic conditions, aggregate into micelles due to their amphiphilic nature. Our work looks at the formation and behavior of micelles at extremes of temperature and pressure. Due to the large system size and simulation time required to study micelle formation, we have developed a coarse-grained (CG) model of our system. This CG model represents each heavy atom with a single CG bead. We use the multibody Stillinger-Weber potential, which adds a three-body angular penalty to a two-body potential, to emulate hydrogen bonds in the system. We simulate the linear surfactant C12E5 , which has a nonpolar domain of 12 carbons and a polar domain of 5 ethers. Our CG model has been parameterized to match structural properties from all-atom simulations of single and dimer surfactant systems. Simulations were performed using a concentration above the experimental critical micelle concentration at 300K and 1atm. We observe an expected region of stable micelle formation at intermediate temperature, with a breakdown at high and low temperature, as well as at high pressure. The driving forces behind the destabilization of micelles and the mechanism of micelle formation at different thermodynamic conditions will be discussed.

  1. Safety analysis of high pressure 3He-filled micro-channels for thermal neutron detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferko, Scott M.; Galambos, Paul C.; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2008-11-01

    This document is a safety analysis of a novel neutron detection technology developed by Sandia National Laboratories. This technology is comprised of devices with tiny channels containing high pressure {sup 3}He. These devices are further integrated into large scale neutron sensors. Modeling and preliminary device testing indicates that the time required to detect the presence of special nuclear materials may be reduced under optimal conditions by several orders of magnitude using this approach. Also, these devices make efficient use of our {sup 3}He supply by making individual devices more efficient and/or extending the our limited {sup 3}He supply. The safety of these high pressure devices has been a primary concern. We address these safety concerns for a flat panel configuration intended for thermal neutron detection. Ballistic impact tests using 3 g projectiles were performed on devices made from FR4, Silicon, and Parmax materials. In addition to impact testing, operational limits were determined by pressurizing the devices either to failure or until they unacceptably leaked. We found that (1) sympathetic or parasitic failure does not occur in pressurized FR4 devices (2) the Si devices exhibited benign brittle failure (sympathetic failure under pressure was not tested) and (3) the Parmax devices failed unacceptably. FR4 devices were filled to pressures up to 4000 + 100 psig, and the impacts were captured using a high speed camera. The brittle Si devices shattered, but were completely contained when wrapped in thin tape, while the ductile FR4 devices deformed only. Even at 4000 psi the energy density of the compressed gas appears to be insignificant compared to the impact caused by the incoming projectile. In conclusion, the current FR4 device design pressurized up to 4000 psi does not show evidence of sympathetic failure, and these devices are intrinsically safe.

  2. Long-range correlations of microseism-band pressure fluctuations in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin S.; Godin, Oleg A.; Evers, Läslo G.; Lv, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the spatial coherence of underwater ambient noise using a yearlong time series measured off Ascension Island. Qualitative agreement with observed cross-correlations is achieved using a simple range-dependent model, constrained by earlier, active tomographic studies in the area. In particular, the model correctly predicts the existence of two weakly dispersive normal modes in the microseism frequency range, with the group speed of one of the normal modes being smaller than the sound speed in water. The agreement justifies our interpretation of the peaks of the measured cross-correlation function of ambient noise as modal arrivals, with dispersion that is sensitive to crustal velocity structure. Our observations are consistent with Scholte to Moho head wave coupled propagation, with double mode conversion occurring due to the bathymetric variations between receivers. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of interrogating crustal properties using noise interferometry of moored hydrophone data at ranges in excess of 120 km.

  3. Long-range correlations of microseism-band pressure fluctuations in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin S.; Godin, Oleg A.; Evers, Läslo G.; Lv, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the spatial coherence of underwater ambient noise using a yearlong time-series measured off Ascension Island. Qualitative agreement with observed cross-correlations is achieved using a simple range-dependent model, constrained by earlier, active tomographic studies in the area. In particular, the model correctly predicts the existence of two weakly dispersive normal modes in the microseism frequency range, with the group speed of one of the normal modes being smaller than the sound speed in water. The agreement justifies our interpretation of the peaks of the measured cross-correlation function of ambient noise as modal arrivals, with dispersion that is sensitive to crustal velocity structure. Our observations are consistent with Scholte to Moho head wave coupled propagation, with double mode conversion occurring due to the bathymetric variations between receivers. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of interrogating crustal properties using noise interferometry of moored hydrophone data at ranges in excess of 120 km.

  4. Reaction CH3 + OH studied over the 294-714 K temperature and 1-100 bar pressure ranges.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Manuvesh; Chesnokov, Evgeni N; Krasnoperov, Lev N

    2012-08-30

    Reaction of methyl radicals with hydroxyl radicals, CH(3) + OH → products (1) was studied using pulsed laser photolysis coupled to transient UV-vis absorption spectroscopy over the 294-714 K temperature and 1-100 bar pressure ranges (bath gas He). Methyl radicals were produced by photolysis of acetone at 193.3 nm. Hydroxyl radicals were generated in reaction of electronically excited oxygen atoms O((1)D), produced in the photolysis of N(2)O at 193.3 nm, with H(2)O. Temporal profiles of CH(3) were recorded via absorption at 216.4 nm using xenon arc lamp and a spectrograph; OH radicals were monitored via transient absorption of light from a dc discharge H(2)O/Ar low pressure resonance lamp at ca. 308 nm. The absolute intensity of the photolysis light inside the reactor was determined by an accurate in situ actinometry based on the ozone formation in the presence of molecular oxygen. The results of this study indicate that the rate constant of reaction 1 is pressure independent within the studied pressure and temperature ranges and has slight negative temperature dependence, k(1) = (1.20 ± 0.20) × 10(-10)(T/300)(-0.49) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). PMID:22846041

  5. Physician Assistant profession (PA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... provide health care services under the direction and supervision of a doctor of medicine (MD) or a ... location as the PA. Most states allow physician supervision by telephone communication with periodic site visits. Supervising ...

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation and Theories of Wall Turbulence with a Range of Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G. N.; Garbaruk, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    A new Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Couette-Poiseuille flow at a higher Reynolds number is presented and compared with DNS of other wall-bounded flows. It is analyzed in terms of testing semi-theoretical proposals for universal behavior of the velocity, mixing length, or eddy viscosity in pressure gradients, and in terms of assessing the accuracy of two turbulence models. These models are used in two modes, the traditional one with only a dependence on the wall-normal coordinate y, and a newer one in which a lateral dependence on z is added. For pure Couette flow and the Couette-Poiseuille case considered here, this z-dependence allows some models to generate steady streamwise vortices, which generally improves the agreement with DNS and experiment. On the other hand, it complicates the comparison between DNS and models.

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Macro-Periodic and Micro-Random Nanostructures with Simultaneously Spatial Translational Symmetry and Long-Range Order Breaking

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haifei; Ren, Xingang; Sha, Wei E. I.; Chen, Jiajie; Kang, Zhiwen; Zhang, Haixi; Ho, Ho-Pui; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Photonic and plasmonic quasicrystals, comprising well-designed and regularly-arranged patterns but lacking spatial translational symmetry, show sharp diffraction patterns resulting from their long-range order in spatial domain. Here we demonstrate that plasmonic structure, which is macroscopically arranged with spatial periodicity and microscopically constructed by random metal nanostructures, can also exhibit the diffraction effect experimentally, despite both of the translational symmetry and long-range order are broken in spatial domain simultaneously. With strategically pre-formed metal nano-seeds, the tunable macroscopically periodic (macro-periodic) pattern composed from microscopically random (micro-random) nanoplate-based silver structures are fabricated chemically through photon driven growth using simple light source with low photon energy and low optical power density. The geometry of the micro-structure can be further modified through simple thermal annealing. While the random metal nanostructures suppress high-order Floquet spectra of the spatial distribution of refractive indices, the maintained low-order Floquet spectra after the ensemble averaging are responsible for the observed diffraction effect. A theoretical approach has also been established to describe and understand the macro-periodic and micro-random structures with different micro-geometries. The easy fabrication and comprehensive understanding of this metal structure will be beneficial for its application in plasmonics, photonics and optoelectronics. PMID:25597407

  8. Contrasting sound velocity and intermediate-range structural order between polymerized and depolymerized silicate glasses under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Kono, Yoshio; Wang, Yanbin; Park, Changyong; Yu, Tony; Jing, Zhicheng; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction and ultrasonic velocity measurements of three silicate glasses (in jadeite, albite, and diopside compositions) show a sharp contrast in pressure-induced changes in structure and elasticity. With increasing pressure to around 6 GPa, polymerized glasses (jadeite and albite) display large shift in the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in the structure factor, S(Q), to higher-Q values, indicating rapid shrinkage in the intermediate-range ordered (IRO) structure. Above 6 GPa, the shift of FSDP decelerates, suggesting that shrinkage in the IRO structure has been largely completed and the structure evolution is now dominated by the diminution of the interstitial volume in a more densely packed arrangement. Associated with this structural change, sound velocities increase with pressure above 6 GPa. In contrast, the depolymerized diopside glass exhibits smaller changes in the pressure dependence for both sound velocities and FSDP positions. Compared to the polymerized glasses, the velocities are faster and the positions of FSDP appear at higher-Q under the same experimental conditions. The results suggest that the depolymerized diopside glass has an initially denser IRO structure compared to that of the polymerized glasses, and there are no sufficient interstitial voids to shrink. The different behaviors between polymerized and depolymerized glasses are apparently related to the initial linkage of tetrahedra and the pressure-induced structural reactions. These results suggest that under compression up to 10 GPa, the degree of polymerization is a major factor affecting the IRO network structure and the sound velocity of silicate glasses.

  9. A novel resonant pressure sensor with boron diffused silicon resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junbo; Shi, Xiaojing; Liu, Lei; Wu, Zhengwei; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Jinmin; Li, Shourong

    2008-12-01

    To improve the performance of the micro-machined resonant pressure sensor and simplify its fabrication process, a novel structure is proposed in which the boron diffused silicon (up to 15um thickness) and the bulk silicon are used as the resonant beam and pressure membrane respectively. The structural parameters were optimized through FEM to achieve the better sensitivity, and the relationships between the structural parameters and the sensitivity were established. Moreover, the fabrication processes were discussed to increase the product rate and the pressure sensor with the optimal structural parameters was fabricated by the bulk silicon MEMS processes. In order to enhance the signal of the sensor and make the closed-looped control of the sensor easily, electromagnetic excitation and detection was applied. However there is so high noise coming from the distributing capacitances between the diffused silicon layer and electrodes that reduce the signal to noise ratio of the sensor. Through the analysis of the micro-structure of the sensor, the asymmetrical excitation circuit was used to reduce the noise and then the detection circuit was designed for this sensor. The resonator of the sensor was packaged in the low vacuum condition so that the high quality factor (Q) with about 10000 can be achieved. Experimental tests were carried out for the sensor over the range of -80kPa to 100kPa, the results show that the sensitivity of the sensor is about 20kHz/100kPa, the sensitivity is 0.01%F.S. and the nonlinearity is about 1.8%.

  10. Three distinct modes in a surface micro-discharge in atmospheric pressure He + N{sub 2} mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dong; Liu, Dingxin He, Tongtong; Li, Qiaosong; Wang, Xiaohua; Kong, Michael G.

    2015-12-15

    A surface micro-discharge in atmospheric pressure He + N{sub 2} mixtures is studied in this paper with an emphasis on the discharge modes. With the N{sub 2} admixture increasing from 0.1% to 20%, the discharge evolves from a spatially diffuse mode to a filamentary mode during positive half-cycles of the applied voltage. However during the negative half-cycles, an additional patterned mode emerges between the diffuse and the filamentary modes, which has not been reported before to exist in surface micro-discharges. In the diffuse and patterned modes, the plasmas cover almost the entirety of the mesh area during one cycle after plasma ignition in all mesh elements, and the discharge power increases linearly with the applied voltage. In contrast, plasma coverage of the mesh area is only partial in the filamentary mode and the plasma is more unstable with the discharge power increasing exponentially with the applied voltage. As the surface micro-discharge evolves through the three modes, the density of excited species changes significantly, for instance, the density of N{sub 2}{sup +}(B) drops by ∼20-fold from [N{sub 2}] = 0.2% to 20%. The N{sub 2}{sup +}(B) is predicted to be generated mainly through successive processes of Penning ionization by helium metastables and electron-impact excitation of N{sub 2}{sup +}(X), the latter is most responsible for the density decrease of N{sub 2}{sup +}(B) because much more N{sub 2}{sup +}(X) is converted to N{sub 4}{sup +}(X) as the increase of N{sub 2} fraction. Also, the electron density and electron temperature decrease with the discharge mode transition.

  11. Inertial-range kinetic turbulence in pressure-anisotropic astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, M. W.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Chen, C. H. K.; Abel, I. G.; Cowley, S. C.

    2015-10-01

    > A theoretical framework for low-frequency electromagnetic (drift-)kinetic turbulence in a collisionless, multi-species plasma is presented. The result generalises reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) and kinetic RMHD (Schekochihin et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser., vol. 182, 2009, pp. 310-377) to the case where the mean distribution function of the plasma is pressure-anisotropic and different ion species are allowed to drift with respect to each other - a situation routinely encountered in the solar wind and presumably ubiquitous in hot dilute astrophysical plasmas such as the intracluster medium. Two main objectives are achieved. First, in a non-Maxwellian plasma, the relationships between fluctuating fields (e.g. the Alfvén ratio) are order-unity modified compared to the more commonly considered Maxwellian case, and so a quantitative theory is developed to support quantitative measurements now possible in the solar wind. Beyond these order-unity corrections, the main physical feature of low-frequency plasma turbulence survives the generalisation to non-Maxwellian distributions: Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations are energetically decoupled, with the latter passively advected by the former; the Alfvénic cascade is fluid, satisfying RMHD equations (with the Alfvén speed modified by pressure anisotropy and species drifts), whereas the compressive cascade is kinetic and subject to collisionless damping (and for a bi-Maxwellian plasma splits into three independent collisionless cascades). Secondly, the organising principle of this turbulence is elucidated in the form of a conservation law for the appropriately generalised kinetic free energy. It is shown that non-Maxwellian features in the distribution function reduce the rate of phase mixing and the efficacy of magnetic stresses, and that these changes influence the partitioning of free energy amongst the various cascade channels. As the firehose or mirror instability thresholds are approached, the dynamics

  12. A low-power pressure-and temperature-programmed separation system for a micro gas chromatograph.

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, Richard D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Robinson, Alex Lockwood (Advanced Sensor Technologies, Albuquerque, NM); Lambertus, Gordon R. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Potkay, Joseph A. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Wise, Kensall D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI)

    2006-10-01

    This thesis presents the theory, design, fabrication and testing of the microvalves and columns necessary in a pressure- and temperature-programmed micro gas chromatograph ({micro}GC). Two microcolumn designs are investigated: a bonded Si-glass column having a rectangular cross section and a vapor-deposited silicon oxynitride (Sion) column having a roughly circular cross section. Both microcolumns contain integrated heaters and sensors for rapid, controlled heating. The 3.2 cm x 3.2 cm, 3 m-long silicon-glass column, coated with a non-polar polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stationary phase, separates 30 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in less than 6 min. This is the most efficient micromachined column reported to date, producing greater than 4000 plates/m. The 2.7 mm x 1.4 mm Sion column eliminates the glass sealing plate and silicon substrate using deposited dielectrics and is the lowest power and fastest GC column reported to date; it requires only 11 mW to raise the column temperature by 100 C and has a response time of 11s and natural temperature ramp rate of 580 C/min. A 1 m-long PDMS-coated Sion microcolumn separates 10 VOCs in 52s. A system-based design approach was used for both columns.

  13. An experimental technique of split Hopkinson pressure bar using fiber micro-displacement interferometer system for any reflector.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Tang, X R; Li, J L; Tan, D W

    2014-04-01

    A novel non-contact measurement technique had been developed for the mechanical properties of materials in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars (SHPB). Instead of the traditional strain gages mounted on the surfaces of bars, two shutters were mounted on the end of bars to directly measure interfacial velocity using Fiber Micro-Displacement Interferometer System for Any Reflector. Using the new technique, the integrated stress-strain responses could be determined. The experimental technique was validated by SHPB test simulation. The technique had been used to investigate the dynamic response of a brittle explosive material. The results showed that the new experimental technique could be applied to the dynamic behavior in SHPB test. PMID:24784672

  14. High pressure capillary micro-fluidic valve device and a method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Crocker, Robert W.; Caton, Pamela F.; Gerhardt, Geoff C.

    2007-04-17

    A freeze-thaw valve and a method of micro-machining the freeze-thaw valve is provided and includes a valve housing, wherein the valve housing defines a housing cavity and includes a housing inlet, a housing vent, a capillary tubing inlet and a capillary tubing outlet. A valve body is provided, at least a portion of which is lithographically constructed, wherein the valve body includes a refrigerant inlet, a refrigerant outlet and an expansion chamber. The expansion chamber is disposed to communicate the refrigerant inlet with the refrigerant outlet and includes a restriction region having a flow restriction. Additionally, the valve body is disposed within the housing cavity to form an insulating channel between the valve housing and the valve body.

  15. Physical Modeling of Secondary Arcing at Environmental Pressures in the Range from Atmospheric to Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, A. V.; Dubrovskaya, E. L.; Karlik, K. V.; Kim, V. S.; Kochura, S. G.; Lavrinovich, V. A.; Suntsov, S. B.; Shnaider, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    An electrical breakdown in the onboard equipment of orbital space vehicles is a consequence of multifactor physical process related to vacuum electronics, low-temperature plasma physics, and gas discharge. The problem becomes especially urgent in connection with the application of an onboard electrical network voltage of 100 V and higher that exceeds the arcing threshold. The given problem is being actively investigated for more than 10 years; as a result, a number of standards regulating measures on prevention of secondary arcing as a consequence of electrostatic breakdown are currently in force in the world. However, arcing caused by internal processes in onboard equipment without high-voltage initiation has not yet practically been studied, despite the existence of such problem that makes these investigations urgent. The present work contains results of experiments on registration of the threshold parameters, first of all, the pressure that determines the risk of secondary arcing in the presence of the plasma imitating the primary discharge plasma and caused by wire evaporation. Results of experiments confirm the expected decrease of the threshold breakdown voltage below the minima of the Paschen curve. Experimental approaches used in this work are of methodological interest for imitation of arcing conditions and testing of stability of the equipment against arcing in orbital space.

  16. Reaction OH + OH studied over the 298-834 K temperature and 1-100 bar pressure ranges.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Manuvesh; Chesnokov, Evgeni N; Krasnoperov, Lev N

    2012-06-21

    Self-reaction of hydroxyl radicals, OH + OH → H(2)O + O (1a) and OH + OH → H(2)O(2) (1b), was studied using pulsed laser photolysis coupled to transient UV-vis absorption spectroscopy over the 298-834 K temperature and 1-100 bar pressure ranges (bath gas He). A heatable high-pressure flow reactor was employed. Hydroxyl radicals were prepared using reaction of electronically excited oxygen atoms, O((1)D), produced in photolysis of N(2)O at 193 nm, with H(2)O. The temporal behavior of OH radicals was monitored via transient absorption of light from a dc discharge in H(2)O/Ar low-pressure resonance lamp at ca. 308 nm. The absolute intensity of the photolysis light was determined by accurate in situ actinometry based on the ozone formation in the presence of molecular oxygen. The results of this study combined with the literature data indicate that the rate constant of reaction 1a, associated with the pressure independent component, decreases with temperature within the temperature range 298-414 K and increases above 555 K. The pressure dependent rate constant for (1b) was parametrized using the Troe expression as k(1b,inf) = (2.4 ± 0.6) × 10(-11)(T/300)(-0.5) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), k(1b,0) = [He] (9.0 ± 2.2) × 10(-31)(T/300)(-3.5±0.5) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), F(c) = 0.37. PMID:22397582

  17. Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High-T and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Dong, Junhang

    2014-09-30

    This is the final report for the program “Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High Temperature and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments”, funded by NETL, and performed by Missouri University of Science and Technology, Clemson University and University of Cincinnati from October 1, 2009 to September 30, 2014. Securing a sustainable energy economy by developing affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels is a central element to the mission of The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of novel sensor technologies that can function under the extreme operating conditions often found in advanced power systems. The main objective of this research program is to conduct fundamental and applied research that will lead to successful development and demonstration of robust, multiplexed, microstructured silica and single-crystal sapphire fiber sensors to be deployed into the hot zones of advanced power and fuel systems for simultaneous measurements of high temperature and gas pressure. The specific objectives of this research program include: 1) Design, fabrication and demonstration of multiplexed, robust silica and sapphire fiber temperature and dynamic gas pressure sensors that can survive and maintain fully operational in high-temperature harsh environments. 2) Development and demonstration of a novel method to demodulate the multiplexed interferograms for simultaneous measurements of temperature and gas pressure in harsh environments. 3) Development and demonstration of novel sapphire fiber cladding and low numerical aperture (NA) excitation techniques to assure high signal integrity and sensor robustness.

  18. Micro-Biocidal Activity of Yeast Cells by Needle Plasma Irradiation at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurumi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Taima, Tomohito; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    In this study, we report on the biocidal activity technique by needle helium plasma irradiation at atmospheric pressure using borosilicate capillary nozzle to apply for the oral surgery. The diameter of needle plasma was less than 50 µm, and temperature of plasma irradiated area was less than body temperature. Needle plasma showed emission due to OH and O radical. Raman spectra and methylene blue stain showed yeast cells were inactivated by needle plasma irradiation.

  19. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Transitional Flows in Low-Pressure Turbines under a Wide Range of Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Ashpis, D. E.; Volino, R. J.; Corke, T. C.; Thomas, F. O.; Huang, J.; Lake, J. P.; King, P. I.

    2007-01-01

    A transport equation for the intermittency factor is employed to predict the transitional flows in low-pressure turbines. The intermittent behavior of the transitional flows is taken into account and incorporated into computations by modifying the eddy viscosity, mu(sub p) with the intermittency factor, gamma. Turbulent quantities are predicted using Menter's two-equation turbulence model (SST). The intermittency factor is obtained from a transport equation model which can produce both the experimentally observed streamwise variation of intermittency and a realistic profile in the cross stream direction. The model had been previously validated against low-pressure turbine experiments with success. In this paper, the model is applied to predictions of three sets of recent low-pressure turbine experiments on the Pack B blade to further validate its predicting capabilities under various flow conditions. Comparisons of computational results with experimental data are provided. Overall, good agreement between the experimental data and computational results is obtained. The new model has been shown to have the capability of accurately predicting transitional flows under a wide range of low-pressure turbine conditions.

  20. Optical detection system for MEMS-type pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareło, K.; Górecka-Drzazga, A.; Dziuban, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper a special optical detection system designed for a MEMS-type (micro-electro-mechanical system) silicon pressure sensor is presented. The main part of the optical system—a detection unit with a perforated membrane—is bonded to the silicon sensor, and placed in a measuring system. An external light source illuminates the membrane of the pressure sensor. Owing to the light reflected from the deflected membrane sensor, the optical pattern consisting of light points is visible, and pressure can be estimated. The optical detection unit (20   ×   20   ×   20.4 mm3) is fabricated using microengineering techniques. Its dimensions are adjusted to the dimensions of the pressure sensor (5   ×   5 mm2 silicon membrane). Preliminary tests of the optical detection unit integrated with the silicon pressure sensor are carried out. For the membrane sensor from 15 to 60 µm thick, a repeatable detection of the differential pressure in the range of 0 to 280 kPa is achieved. The presented optical microsystem is especially suitable for the pressure measurements in a high radiation environment.

  1. Thermodynamics of hydrogen and helium plasmas in megabar and multi-megabar pressure range under strong shock and isentropic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryaznov, V. K.; Iosilevskiy, I. L.; Fortov, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    An approach based on the chemical picture of plasma is proposed for the description of thermodynamics and the equation of the state of warm dense matter. Corresponding to this approach, the effects of Coulomb interaction, the short range repulsion of atoms and molecules, free electron degeneracy, and radiation pressure contributions are taken into account. A family of models based upon this approach is presented and discussed. The possibilities of these models for the description of strongly coupled plasma of hydrogen isotopes and noble gases under megabar and terapascal pressures under shock and isentropic compression are demonstrated. The asymptotic properties of the models at high temperatures are demonstrated, showing their application to the very accurate description of solar plasma.

  2. Recovery of entire shocked samples in a range of pressure from ~100 GPa to Hugoniot elastic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaki, Keita; Kadono, Toshihiko; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Kondo, Tadashi; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Shigemori, Keisuke; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    We carried out laser shock experiments and wholly recovered shocked olivine and quartz samples. We investigated the petrographic features based on optical micrographs of sliced samples and found that each recovered sample comprises three regions, I (optically dark), II (opaque), and III (transparent). Scanning electron microscopy combined with electron backscattered diffraction shows that there are no crystal features in the region I; the materials in the region I have once melted. Moreover, numerical calculations performed with the iSALE shock physics code suggest that the boundary between regions II and III corresponds to Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). Thus, we succeeded in the recovery of the entire shocked samples experienced over a wide range of pressures from HEL (~10 GPa) to melting pressure (~100 GPa) in a hierarchical order.

  3. The shock Hugoniot of liquid hydrazine in the pressure range of 3.1 to 21.4 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, B.O.; Persson, P-A.

    1996-10-01

    Impedance matching was used; the technique was similar to Richard Dick`s. Shock pressures were produced using a plane wave explosive driver with different explosives and different reference materials against liq. hydrazine. Velocity of shock wave in the liquid and free surface velocity of the reference material were measured using different pin contact techniques. The experimental Hugoniot appears smooth, with no indication of a phase change. The shock Hugoniot of liq. hydrazine was compared against 3 other liquid Hugoniots (liq. NH3, water, CCl4) and is closest to that for water and in between NH3 and CCl4. The hydrazine Hugoniot was also compared to the ``Universal`` Hugoniot for liquids. This universal Hugoniot is not a good approximation for the liq. hydrazine in this pressure range.

  4. Recovery of entire shocked samples in a range of pressure from ~100 GPa to Hugoniot elastic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaki, Keita; Kadono, Toshihiko; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Kondo, Tadashi; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Shigemori, Keisuke; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    We carried out laser shock experiments and wholly recovered shocked olivine and quartz samples. We investigated the petrographic features based on optical micrographs of sliced samples and found that each recovered sample comprises three regions, I (optically dark), II (opaque), and III (transparent). Scanning electron microscopy combined with electron backscattered diffraction shows that there are no crystal features in the region I; the materials in the region I have once melted. Moreover, numerical calculations performed with the iSALE shock physics code suggest that the boundary between regions II and III corresponds to Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). Thus, we succeeded in the recovery of the entire shocked samples experienced over a wide range of pressures from HEL (~10 GPa) to melting pressure (~100 GPa) in a hierarchical order.

  5. Interaction of multiple atmospheric-pressure micro-plasma jets in small arrays: He/O2 into humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-02-01

    Arrays of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets are being considered as a means to increase the area being treated in surface modification and in plasma medicine in particular. A unique challenge of scaling plasma jet arrays is that individual plasma jets in an array tend to interact with each other, which can lead to quenching of some individual jets. To investigate these potential interactions, a computational study of one-, two- and three-tube arrays of micro-plasma jet arrays was performed. An atmospheric-pressure He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 mixture was flowed through the tubes into humid room air. We found that the jets interact through electrostatic, hydrodynamic and photolytic means. The hydrodynamic interactions result from the merging of individual He channels emerging from individual tubes as air diffuses into the extended gas jets. Ionization waves (IWs) or plasma bullets, which form the jets on the boundaries of an array, encounter higher mole fractions of air earlier compared with the center jet and so are slower or are quenched earlier. The close proximity of the jets produces electrostatic repulsion, which affects the trajectories of the IWs. If the jets are close enough, photoionizing radiation from their neighbors is an additional form of interaction. These interactions are sensitive to the spacing of the jets.

  6. [Applications of multi-micro-volume pressure-assisted derivatization reaction device for analysis of polar heterocyclic aromatic amines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiru; Chen, Fangxiang; Shi, Yamei; Tan, Connieal; Chen, Xi

    2013-01-01

    A multi-micro-volume pressure-assisted derivatization reaction device has been designed and made for the silylation derivatization of polar heterocyclic aromatic amines by N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl )-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) with 1% catalyst tert-butyldimethylchlorosilane (TBDMCS) at a high temperature. The tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives then could be automatically analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Using the pressure-assisted device, the silylation reaction may occur at a temperature higher than the boiling points of the reagents, and several micro-volume samples can be simultaneously pretreated in the same device to shorten the sample-preparation time and to improve the repeatability. The derivatization conditions including the headspace volume of the vial, the evaporative surface area of the reagent, derivatization temperature and time have been discussed for the use of the pressure-assisted device. The experimental results proved that the device is an effective way for the simultaneous derivatization of several micro-volume samples at a high temperature. Compared with a common device, the derivative amounts were obviously increased when using the pressure-assisted device at 90 degrees C. Quantitative derivatization can be achieved even at 150 degrees C while there was no common device could be applied at such a high temperature due to the heavy losses of reagents by evaporation. However, no obviously higher reaction speed has been observed in such a circumstance with a higher temperature and a higher pressure using the pressure-assisted device. PMID:23667982

  7. Regulation of Vapor Pressure Deficit by Greenhouse Micro-Fog Systems Improved Growth and Productivity of Tomato via Enhancing Photosynthesis during Summer Season.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dalong; Zhang, Zhongdian; Li, Jianming; Chang, Yibo; Du, Qingjie; Pan, Tonghua

    2015-01-01

    The role of a proposed micro-fog system in regulating greenhouse environments and enhancing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) productivity during summer season was studied. Experiments were carried out in a multi-span glass greenhouse, which was divided into two identical compartments involving different environments: (1) without environment control and (2) with a micro-fog system operating when the air vapor pressure deficit (VPD) of greenhouse was higher than 0.5 KPa. The micro-fog system effectively alleviated heat stress and evaporative demand in the greenhouse during summer season. The physiologically favourable environment maintained by micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced elongation of leaf and stem, which contributed to a substantial elevation of final leaf area and shoot biomass. These improvements in physiological and morphological traits resulted in around 12.3% increase of marketable tomato yield per plant. Relative growth rate (RGR) of micro-fog treatment was also significantly higher than control plants, which was mainly determined by the substantial elevation in net assimilation rate (NAR), and to a lesser extent caused by leaf area ratio (LAR). Measurement of leaf gas exchange parameters also demonstrated that micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced leaf photosynthesis capacity. Taken together, manipulation of VPD in greenhouses by micro-fog systems effectively enhanced tomato growth and productivity via improving photosynthesis during summer season. PMID:26221726

  8. Regulation of Vapor Pressure Deficit by Greenhouse Micro-Fog Systems Improved Growth and Productivity of Tomato via Enhancing Photosynthesis during Summer Season

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dalong; Zhang, Zhongdian; Li, Jianming; Chang, Yibo; Du, Qingjie; Pan, Tonghua

    2015-01-01

    The role of a proposed micro-fog system in regulating greenhouse environments and enhancing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) productivity during summer season was studied. Experiments were carried out in a multi-span glass greenhouse, which was divided into two identical compartments involving different environments: (1) without environment control and (2) with a micro-fog system operating when the air vapor pressure deficit (VPD) of greenhouse was higher than 0.5 KPa. The micro-fog system effectively alleviated heat stress and evaporative demand in the greenhouse during summer season. The physiologically favourable environment maintained by micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced elongation of leaf and stem, which contributed to a substantial elevation of final leaf area and shoot biomass. These improvements in physiological and morphological traits resulted in around 12.3% increase of marketable tomato yield per plant. Relative growth rate (RGR) of micro-fog treatment was also significantly higher than control plants, which was mainly determined by the substantial elevation in net assimilation rate (NAR), and to a lesser extent caused by leaf area ratio (LAR). Measurement of leaf gas exchange parameters also demonstrated that micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced leaf photosynthesis capacity. Taken together, manipulation of VPD in greenhouses by micro-fog systems effectively enhanced tomato growth and productivity via improving photosynthesis during summer season. PMID:26221726

  9. One-dimensional nanoclustering of the Cu(100) surface under CO gas in the mbar pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eren, Baran; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Hao, Yibo; Patera, Laerte L.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    The bulk terminated Cu(100) surface becomes unstable in the presence of CO at room temperature when the pressure reaches the mbar range. Scanning tunneling microscopy images show that above 0.25 mbar the surface forms nanoclusters with CO attached to peripheral Cu atoms. At 20 mbar and above 3-atom wide one-dimensional nanoclusters parallel to < 001 > directions cover the surface, with CO on every Cu atom, increasing in density up to 115 mbar. Density functional theory explains the findings as a result of the detachment of Cu atoms from step edges caused by the stronger binding of CO relative to that on flat terraces.

  10. The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians.

    PubMed

    Morris, J P; Thatje, S; Cottin, D; Oliphant, A; Brown, A; Shillito, B; Ravaux, J; Hauton, C

    2015-11-01

    Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms' thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts. PMID:26716003