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Sample records for pressure recording analytic

  1. Blood pressure reprogramming adapter assists signal recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Blood pressure reprogramming adapter separates the two components of a blood pressure signal, a dc pressure signal and an ac Korotkoff sounds signal, so that the Korotkoff sounds are recorded on one channel as received while the dc pressure signal is converted to FM and recorded on a second channel.

  2. Analytic Modeling of Pressurization and Cryogenic Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corpening, Jeremy H.

    2010-01-01

    An analytic model for pressurization and cryogenic propellant conditions during all mission phases of any liquid rocket based vehicle has been developed and validated. The model assumes the propellant tanks to be divided into five nodes and also implements an empirical correlation for liquid stratification if desired. The five nodes include a tank wall node exposed to ullage gas, an ullage gas node, a saturated propellant vapor node at the liquid-vapor interface, a liquid node, and a tank wall node exposed to liquid. The conservation equations of mass and energy are then applied across all the node boundaries and, with the use of perfect gas assumptions, explicit solutions for ullage and liquid conditions are derived. All fluid properties are updated real time using NIST Refprop.1 Further, mass transfer at the liquid-vapor interface is included in the form of evaporation, bulk boiling of liquid propellant, and condensation given the appropriate conditions for each. Model validation has proven highly successful against previous analytic models and various Saturn era test data and reasonably successful against more recent LH2 tank self pressurization ground test data. Finally, this model has been applied to numerous design iterations for the Altair Lunar Lander, Ares V Core Stage, and Ares V Earth Departure Stage in order to characterize Helium and autogenous pressurant requirements, propellant lost to evaporation and thermodynamic venting to maintain propellant conditions, and non-uniform tank draining in configurations utilizing multiple LH2 or LO2 propellant tanks. In conclusion, this model provides an accurate and efficient means of analyzing multiple design configurations for any cryogenic propellant tank in launch, low-acceleration coast, or in-space maneuvering and supplies the user with pressurization requirements, unusable propellants from evaporation and liquid stratification, and general ullage gas, liquid, and tank wall conditions as functions of time.

  3. Analytical prediction of reverse buckling pressure for thin shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martindale, D. L.; Urbanac, C.

    1970-01-01

    Analytical technique is developed for prediction of reverse buckling in thin curved shells. Test data indicate technique predicts actual reverse buckling pressure within 10 percent, and should be useful for analytical prediction of reversed condition failure for problems such as explosive decomposition through vacuum failure.

  4. Analytical vacuum force, atmospheric pressure dispute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    Typically, the gap gas molecules is 10-9 m, since the center speed of the tornado is over 100 m / sec, it divided by the speed of a tornado, the gap of the gas molecules becomes 10-11m. Equivalent to the gap when there is no tornado that the gas molecules allow radiation to pass through, equivalent to the gap is reduced gas molecules 100 times by a tornado. There is no change in the Earth's radiate, the Earth's radiation is reduced to one percent of the original intensity by the radiation through the tornado periphery into the center of the tornado. According to the APS Division of Nuclear Physics in APS -2013 Fall Meeting - Event - Gravitational radiation theory http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/DNP13/Session/FB.8, which I published, the gravity will br reduced to the original gravity percentage one. Waterspout by the Earth's gravity to become the original one percent. Cause the external of the tornadoes atmospheric pressure is constant, the height waterspout should support column height atmospheric pressure is 100 times,that height waterspout may reach nearly kilometers.

  5. Validated Analytical Model of a Pressure Compensation Drip Irrigation Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Taylor, Katherine; Tran, Davis; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    This work is focused on analytically characterizing the behavior of pressure-compensating drip emitters in order to design low-cost, low-power irrigation solutions appropriate for off-grid communities in developing countries. There are 2.5 billion small acreage farmers worldwide who rely solely on their land for sustenance. Drip, compared to flood, irrigation leads to up to 70% reduction in water consumption while increasing yields by 90% - important in countries like India which are quickly running out of water. To design a low-power drip system, there is a need to decrease the pumping pressure requirement at the emitters, as pumping power is the product of pressure and flow rate. To efficiently design such an emitter, the relationship between the fluid-structure interactions that occur in an emitter need to be understood. In this study, a 2D analytical model that captures the behavior of a common drip emitter was developed and validated through experiments. The effects of independently changing the channel depth, channel width, channel length and land height on the performance were studied. The model and the key parametric insights presented have the potential to be optimized in order to guide the design of low-pressure, clog-resistant, pressure-compensating emitters.

  6. The Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW): a Platform for Analytics using Electronic Health Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Post, Andrew R.; Kurc, Tahsin; Cholleti, Sharath; Gao, Jingjing; Lin, Xia; Bornstein, William; Cantrell, Dedra; Levine, David; Hohmann, Sam; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To create an analytics platform for specifying and detecting clinical phenotypes and other derived variables in electronic health record (EHR) data for quality improvement investigations. Materials and Methods We have developed an architecture for an Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW). It supports transforming data represented in different physical schemas into a common data model, specifying derived variables in terms of the common model to enable their reuse, computing derived variables while enforcing invariants and ensuring correctness and consistency of data transformations, long-term curation of derived data, and export of derived data into standard analysis tools. It includes software that implements these features and a computing environment that enables secure high-performance access to and processing of large datasets extracted from EHRs. Results We have implemented and deployed the architecture in production locally. The software is available as open source. We have used it as part of hospital operations in a project to reduce rates of hospital readmission within 30 days. The project examined the association of over 100 derived variables representing disease and co-morbidity phenotypes with readmissions in five years of data from our institution’s clinical data warehouse and the UHC Clinical Database (CDB). The CDB contains administrative data from over 200 hospitals that are in academic medical centers or affiliated with such centers. Discussion and Conclusion A widely available platform for managing and detecting phenotypes in EHR data could accelerate the use of such data in quality improvement and comparative effectiveness studies. PMID:23402960

  7. Analytical parametric investigation of low pressure ratio fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, F. B.; Hanson, D. B.; Menthe, R. W.; Towle, G. B.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an analytical study are reported which shows the effect of various physical and operating parameters on noise produced by low pressure ratio propulsive fans operating at subsonic top speeds. Acoustical duct lining effects are included in the study. The concepts used to develop the noise theory used in the study, as well as the correlation between the theory and model test results are also presented. It is shown that good correlation has been established between theory and experiment. Using the theory, it is shown that good aerodynamic design, maximum acceptable fan solidity, low tip speed operation and use of few blades and vanes leads to the lowest noise levels. Typical results of the study indicate that a fan operating at 1.2 fan pressure ratio and 700 ft/second tip speed with 12 blades and 7 vanes and including modest acoustic treatment on the duct wall would produce levels allowing a 100,000 lb. STOL aircraft to meet a noise level objective of 95 PNdB at 500 ft at takeoff.

  8. Detail view of gauges that record pressure of gas coming ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of gauges that record pressure of gas coming into the engine house. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  9. Detail view of gauges that record pressure of gas leaving ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of gauges that record pressure of gas leaving the engine house. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  10. Portable digital pressure indicator for calibrating magnetic tape recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, Royce F.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a portable Digital Pressure Indicator (DPI) to be used for calibrating the pressure systems on Langley's magnetic tape recorders is described. High-speed magnetic tape recorders require pressure (0 to 20 psig) for providing an air cushion across the tape guides and a slight vacuum (30 inch H2O) for maintaining the proper number of tape loops in the advance and feed chamber. The DPI is a hand-held device that can be quickly coupled to a magnetic tape recorder and includes a two-position switch for selecting either measured pressure or vacuum, to be displayed digitally in engineering units (psig or inches H2O). The DPI is currently in use in Langley's Analysis and Computation Division.

  11. A new system for ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure recording

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J; Gibbs, R; MacLachlan, Donald; Fox, Kim M

    1992-01-01

    Objective—To develop a complete system for the measurement, recording, and analysis of ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure. Design—The new system consists of a pulmonary artery catheter, an ambulatory recorder, and a desktop computer. Pulmonary artery pressure is measured by a micromanometer tipped catheter with an in vivo calibration system to allow correction for zero drift. This catheter is plugged into a small battery powered recorder. The recorder has two input channels, one for pressure and one for an event marker. The pressure wave is sampled 32 times/s, processed by an in built computer, compressed, and stored in semiconductor memory. On completion of a recording, data is transferred from the ambulatory recorder through a serial data link to an Acorn Archimedes desktop computer on which further data processing, statistical analysis, graphics, and printouts can be obtained. Results—The system has been used in 18 patients, with technically successful recording in 14, less than 15 minutes of data loss in three, and 12 hours of data loss in one. Conclusions—A new system for ambulatory pulmonary artery monitoring has been developed and used clinically with success. It may provide new perspectives on the pathophysiology of disease as it applies to everyday life. PMID:1389746

  12. Analytical interpretation of arc instabilities in a DC plasma spray torch: the role of pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2016-06-01

    Arc instabilities in a plasma spray torch are investigated experimentally and theoretically thanks to a linear simplified analytical model. The different parameters that determine the useful properties of the plasma jet at the torch exit, such as specific enthalpy and speed, but also pressure inside the torch and time variations of the flow rate are studied. The work is particularly focused on the link between the recorded arc voltage and the pressure in the cathode cavity. A frequency analysis of the recorded voltage and pressure allows the separation of different contributions following their spectral characteristics and highlights a resonance effect due to Helmholtz oscillations; these oscillations are responsible for the large amplitude fluctuations of all the parameters investigated. The influence of heat transfer, friction forces and residence time of the plasma in the nozzle are taken into account, thanks to different characteristics’ times. The volume of the cathode cavity in which the cold gas is stored before entering the arc region appears to be of prime importance for the dynamics of instabilities, particularly for the non-intuitive effect that induces flow-rate fluctuations in spite of the fact that the torch is fed at a constant flow rate.

  13. Thermal problems in plethysmography and pressure/volume recording.

    PubMed

    Vanggaard, L; Ostergaard, J

    1977-04-01

    Where volume changes are recorded as the concomitant changes in pressure, modern, fast-responding pressure transducers might record not only the pressure changes due to volume changes in the measured object but also the heat of compression, showing itself as an overshoot or hysteresis phenomenon in the calibration curves. Introduction of an effective heat sink (e.g. copper mesh) within the air space in the plethysmograph might absorb this heat and thereby diminish the overshoot phenomena. The effect is not of practical importance in classical venous occlusion plethysmography where rapid changes only contribute to a smaller part of the total volume change during venous occlusion. When rapid changes, as in volume pulse recordings, are to be evaluated, the effect must be taken into consideration and should be reduced. PMID:860977

  14. Speed and pressure recording in three-dimensional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisam, F

    1932-01-01

    Van der Megge Zijnen's spherical Pitot tube with its 5 test holes insures a simultaneous record of static pressure and magnitude and direction of velocity in three-dimensional flow. The report treats the method as well as the range of application of this Pitot in the light of modern knowledge on flow around spheres.

  15. Analytical study of pressure balancing in gas film seals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1973-01-01

    Proper pressure balancing of gas film seals requires knowledge of the pressure profile load factor (load factor) values for a given set of design conditions. In this study, the load factor is investigated for subsonic and choked flow conditions, laminar and turbulent flows, and various seal entrance conditions. Both parallel sealing surfaces and surfaces with small linear deformation were investigated. The load factor for subsonic flow depends strongly on pressure ratio; under choked flow conditions, however, the load factor is found to depend more strongly on film thickness and flow entrance conditions rather than pressure ratio. The importance of generating hydrodynamic forces to keep the seal balanced under severe and multipoint operation is also discussed.

  16. The AM5600 ambulatory blood pressure recording system.

    PubMed

    Richey; Jones; Harshfield; Somes; Johnson; Bailey; Soberman

    1997-08-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe our experience with the AM5600 (Advanced Medical Products, inc.) ambulatory blood pressure recorder-Holter monitor which has the unique features of providing full disclosure Holter data and the storage of Korotkoff signals for each blood pressure measurement. METHODS: We performed a total of 236 recording sessions with 118 normotensive subjects aged 49-74 years. We then selected 25 of the recordings randomly and examined them on two different occasions, first with the aid of the Korotkoff signals and later using the traditional technique, without the aid of the Korotkoff signals. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixteen (91.5%) recordings were completed successfully. Within these data sets, on average 82.3 +/- 12.1% of the measurements per recording were considered acceptable after examination of the Korotkoff signals. This comparison between the traditional and the Korotkoff technique resulted in a sensitivity 11.3% and a specificity 99.2% of those of the traditional method. CONCLUSION: The performance of the AM5600 is satisfactory and the storage of Korotkoff signals improves the detection of artifacts. PMID:10234116

  17. Analytical study of pressure balancing in gas film seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1973-01-01

    The load factor is investigated for subsonic and choked flow conditions, laminar and turbulent flows, and various seal entrance conditions. Both parallel sealing surfaces and surfaces with small linear deformation were investigated. The load factor for subsonic flow depends strongly on pressure ratio; under choked flow conditions, however the load factor is found to depend more strongly on film thickness and flow entrance conditions rather than pressure ratio. The importance of generating hydrodynamic forces to keep the seal balanced under severe and multipoint operation is also discussed.

  18. A Method for Recording Urethral Pressure Profiles in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengfei; Li, Xiaohui; Xu, Lei; Chen, Biao; Tan, Huibing; Du, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Aims Urethral pressure profile (UPP) and leak-point pressure (LPP) measurements as well as external urethral sphincter (EUS) electromyography (EMG) and videourodynamic analyses are the primary methods for evaluating urethral function in humans. However, UPP recording in female rats, a widely used animal model, is challenging due to their small body sizes. This study reports a novel method for recording UPP in female rats. Materials and Methods Seventeen anesthetized female rats were studied. LPP data for 14 rats were included. The other 3 rats were excluded because of death or abnormal urogenital organs. UPP curves were recorded using a modified water-perfusion catheter system, with the lateral hole facing the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o’clock positions in a randomized sequence. LPP, functional urethral length (FUL) and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) were analyzed. Results The mean LPP was 64.39 ± 20.29 cm H2O. The mean FUL and MUCP values at the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o’clock positions were 12.90 ± 1.20, 16.70 ± 1.95, 13.90 ± 2.42, and 11.60 ± 0.97 mm, respectively, and 38.70 ± 11.85, 33.90 ± 11.82, 37.40 ± 11.95, and 71.90 ± 23.01 cm H2O, respectively. The FUL at the 6-o’clock position and MUCP at the 12-o’clock position were significantly greater than those at the other 3 positions. The FUL and MUCP of repeated UPP recordings were not significantly different than those of the first recordings. Conclusions UPP recording using a modified method based on a water-perfusion catheter system is feasible and replicable in female rats. It produces UPP curves that sensitively and appreciably reflect detailed pressure changes at different points within the urethra and thus provides opportunity to evaluate urethral structures, especially the urethral sphincter, in detail. These results may enhance the utility of female rat models in research of urinary sphincter mechanisms. PMID:26502072

  19. High-pressure phonon dispersion of copper by using the modified analytic embedded atom method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Chang-Le; Feng, Fei-Long

    2013-09-01

    By using the Born—von Kármán theory of lattice dynamics and the modified analytic embedded atom method, we reproduce the experimental results of the phonon dispersion in fcc metal Cu at zero pressure along three high symmetry directions and four off-symmetry directions, and then simulate the phonon dispersion curves of Cu at high pressures of 50, 100, and 150 GPa. The results show that the shapes of dispersion curves at high pressures are very similar to that at zero pressure. All the vibration frequencies of Cu in all vibration branches at high pressures are larger than the results at zero pressure, and increase correspondingly as pressure reaches 50, 100, and 150 GPa sequentially. Moreover, on the basis of phonon dispersion, we calculate the values of specific heat of Cu at different pressures. The prediction of thermodynamic quantities lays a significant foundation for guiding and judging experiments of thermodynamic properties of solids under high pressures.

  20. Effect of Sediment on Dynamic Pressure of Gravity Dams Using an Analytical Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Khiavi, Majid Pasbani; Gharabaghi, Ahmad R. M.; Abedi, Karim

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents an analytical solution to get a reliable estimation of the earthquake-induced hydrodynamic pressure on gravity dams by proposing closed-form formulas for the eigenvalues involved when solving the fluid and dam interaction problem. A new analytical technique is presented for calculation of earthquake-induced hydrodynamic pressure on rigid gravity dams allowing for water compressibility and wave absorption at the reservoir bottom. This new analytical solution can take into account the effect of bottom material on seismic response of gravity dams. The obtained results are in good agreement with other classical solutions. The main capability of proposed analytical solution is direct calculation of eigenvalues, without any need for numerical solution. In addition the method can be easily incorporated in dynamic analysis of a dam.

  1. Carbon disulfide reagent allows the characterization of nonpolar analytes by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin C; Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J; Amundson, Lucas M; Archibold, Enada F; Tan, Xiaoli; Azyat, Khalid; Tykwinski, Rik; Gray, Murray; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2011-07-30

    While atmospheric pressure ionization methodologies have revolutionized the mass spectrometric analysis of nonvolatile analytes, limitations native to the chemistry of these methodologies hinder or entirely inhibit the analysis of certain analytes, specifically, many nonpolar compounds. Examination of various analytes, including asphaltene and lignin model compounds as well as saturated hydrocarbons, demonstrates that atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) using CS(2) as the reagent produces an abundant and stable molecular ion (M(+•)) for all model compounds studied, with the exception of completely saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons and the two amino acids tested, arginine and phenylalanine. This reagent substantially broadens the applicability of mass spectrometry to nonvolatile nonpolar analytes and also facilitates the examination of radical cation chemistry by mass spectrometry. PMID:21698674

  2. Approximate analytic solutions for the ionization structure of a pressure equilibrium Strömgren sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco Arenas, A.; González Bolívar, M.; Medina Covarrubias, R.; Raga, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present analytic models for a photoionized region in pressure equilibrium with the surrounding, neutral material. The models are based on the assumption of a linear relation between the H ionization fraction and the square of the sound speed of the gas. We show that under these assumptions the "grey" radiative transfer equation has analytic solutions that provide the ionization structure and the density of the nebula as a function of radius.

  3. Assessing electronic health record systems in emergency departments: Using a decision analytic Bayesian model.

    PubMed

    Ben-Assuli, Ofir; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    In the last decade, health providers have implemented information systems to improve accuracy in medical diagnosis and decision-making. This article evaluates the impact of an electronic health record on emergency department physicians' diagnosis and admission decisions. A decision analytic approach using a decision tree was constructed to model the admission decision process to assess the added value of medical information retrieved from the electronic health record. Using a Bayesian statistical model, this method was evaluated on two coronary artery disease scenarios. The results show that the cases of coronary artery disease were better diagnosed when the electronic health record was consulted and led to more informed admission decisions. Furthermore, the value of medical information required for a specific admission decision in emergency departments could be quantified. The findings support the notion that physicians and patient healthcare can benefit from implementing electronic health record systems in emergency departments. PMID:26033468

  4. Analytical model for non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters - II. Comparison with cosmological hydrodynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xun; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Turbulent gas motion inside galaxy clusters provides a non-negligible non-thermal pressure support to the intracluster gas. If not corrected, it leads to a systematic bias in the estimation of cluster masses from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) observations assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, and affects interpretation of measurements of the SZ power spectrum and observations of cluster outskirts from ongoing and upcoming large cluster surveys. Recently, Shi & Komatsu developed an analytical model for predicting the radius, mass, and redshift dependence of the non-thermal pressure contributed by the kinetic random motions of intracluster gas sourced by the cluster mass growth. In this paper, we compare the predictions of this analytical model to a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamics simulation. As different mass growth histories result in different non-thermal pressure, we perform the comparison on 65 simulated galaxy clusters on a cluster-by-cluster basis. We find an excellent agreement between the modelled and simulated non-thermal pressure profiles. Our results open up the possibility of using the analytical model to correct the systematic bias in the mass estimation of galaxy clusters. We also discuss tests of the physical picture underlying the evolution of intracluster non-thermal gas motions, as well as a way to further improve the analytical modelling, which may help achieve a unified understanding of non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters.

  5. Analytic Modeling of Pressurization and Cryogenic Propellant Conditions for Lunar Landing Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corpening, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development, validation and application of the model to the Lunar Landing Vehicle. The model named, Computational Propellant and Pressurization Program -- One Dimensional (CPPPO), is used to model in this case cryogenic propellant conditions of the Altair Lunar lander. The validation of CPPPO was accomplished via comparison to an existing analytic model (i.e., ROCETS), flight experiment and ground experiments. The model was used to the Lunar Landing Vehicle perform a parametric analysis on pressurant conditions and to examine the results of unequal tank pressurization and draining for multiple tank designs.

  6. Analytical solution for subsurface gas flow to a well induced by surface pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Rossabi, Joseph; Falta, Ronald W

    2002-01-01

    A simple analytical model is presented for predicting subsurface gas flow to a vadose-zone well in response to atmospheric pressure fluctuations (barometric pumping). The effective radial permeability (kr) in the vicinity of the well is determined during model calibration using less than two weeks worth of data. By combining the flow solution with a solution for the vertical gas pressure, only atmospheric pressure data are required to predict the induced flow through a well. The ability to quantitatively predict naturally induced flow in vadose-zone wells by simple and inexpensive measurements is invaluable for systems using barometric pumping for remediation. PMID:11798048

  7. Analytical Solution for Subsurface Gas Flow to a Well Induced by Surface Pressure Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.

    2001-06-20

    A simple analytical model is presented for predicting subsurface gas flow to a vadose zone well in response to atmospheric pressure fluctuations (barometric pumping). The effective radial permeability (kr) in the vicinity of the well is determined during model calibration using less than two weeks of data. By combining the flow solution with a solution for the vertical gas pressure, only atmospheric pressure data are required to predict the induced flow through a well. The ability to quantitatively predict naturally induced flow in vadose zone wells by simple and inexpensive measurements is invaluable for systems using barometric pumping for remediation.

  8. Analytical modeling of pressure transient behavior for coalbed methane transport in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-06-01

    Resulting from the nature of anisotropy of coal media, it is a meaningful work to evaluate pressure transient behavior and flow characteristics within coals. In this article, a complete analytical model called the elliptical flow model is established by combining the theory of elliptical flow in anisotropic media and Fick's laws about the diffusion of coalbed methane. To investigate pressure transient behavior, analytical solutions were first obtained through introducing a series of special functions (Mathieu functions), which are extremely complex and are hard to calculate. Thus, a computer program was developed to establish type curves, on which the effects of the parameters, including anisotropy coefficient, storage coefficient, transfer coefficient and rate constant, were analyzed in detail. Calculative results show that the existence of anisotropy would cause great pressure depletion. To validate new analytical solutions, previous results were used to compare with the new results. It is found that a better agreement between the solutions obtained in this work and the literature was achieved. Finally, a case study is used to explain the effects of the parameters, including rock total compressibility coefficient, coal medium porosity and anisotropic permeability, sorption time constant, Langmuir volume and fluid viscosity, on bottom-hole pressure behavior. It is necessary to coordinate these parameters so as to reduce the pressure depletion.

  9. Analytic Formulation and Numerical Implementation of an Acoustic Pressure Gradient Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seongkyu; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.; Morris, Philip J.

    2008-01-01

    Two new analytical formulations of the acoustic pressure gradient have been developed and implemented in the PSU-WOPWOP rotor noise prediction code. The pressure gradient can be used to solve the boundary condition for scattering problems and it is a key aspect to solve acoustic scattering problems. The first formulation is derived from the gradient of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation. This formulation has a form involving the observer time differentiation outside the integrals. In the second formulation, the time differentiation is taken inside the integrals analytically. This formulation avoids the numerical time differentiation with respect to the observer time, which is computationally more efficient. The acoustic pressure gradient predicted by these new formulations is validated through comparison with available exact solutions for a stationary and moving monopole sources. The agreement between the predictions and exact solutions is excellent. The formulations are applied to the rotor noise problems for two model rotors. A purely numerical approach is compared with the analytical formulations. The agreement between the analytical formulations and the numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observer cases.

  10. Analytic Formulation and Numerical Implementation of an Acoustic Pressure Gradient Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seongkyu; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, Fereidoun

    2007-01-01

    The scattering of rotor noise is an area that has received little attention over the years, yet the limited work that has been done has shown that both the directivity and intensity of the acoustic field may be significantly modified by the presence of scattering bodies. One of the inputs needed to compute the scattered acoustic field is the acoustic pressure gradient on a scattering surface. Two new analytical formulations of the acoustic pressure gradient have been developed and implemented in the PSU-WOPWOP rotor noise prediction code. These formulations are presented in this paper. The first formulation is derived by taking the gradient of Farassat's retarded-time Formulation 1A. Although this formulation is relatively simple, it requires numerical time differentiation of the acoustic integrals. In the second formulation, the time differentiation is taken inside the integrals analytically. The acoustic pressure gradient predicted by these new formulations is validated through comparison with the acoustic pressure gradient determined by a purely numerical approach for two model rotors. The agreement between analytic formulations and numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observers case.

  11. Evaluation of simplified analytical models for CO2 plume movement and pressure buildup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruganti, Y.; Mishra, S.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 injection into the sub-surface is emerging as a viable technology for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. When large amounts of CO2 are sequestered, pressure buildup is an associated risk, along with plume movement beyond the injected domain. In this context, simple modeling tools become valuable assets in preliminary CO2 injection project screening and implementation phases. This study presents an evaluation of two commonly used simplified analytical models for plume movement and pressure buildup, (1) the sharp interface model of Nordbotten et al. (2005), and the corresponding pressure distribution solution of Mathias et al. (2008), and (2) the 3-region model of Burton et al. (2008) based on fractional flow and steady-state pressure gradient considerations. The three-region model of Burton et al. assumes a constant pressure outer boundary. In this study, we incorporate the radius of investigation of the pressure front as the transient pressure boundary, in order to represent an infinite-acting system. The sharp-interface model also assumes the system to be infinite-acting. Temperature and pressure conditions used in these models correspond to the "warm, shallow" and "cold, deep" aquifer conditions as defined by Nordbotten et al. The saturation and pressure profiles as well as injection-well pressure buildup predicted by the analytical models are compared with those from the numerical simulator STOMP in order to provide a verification of the simplified modeling assumptions. Both the STOMP results and the three-region model show two sharp fronts (the drying and two-phase fronts), and a good match is obtained between the front positions at any time. For the sharp interface model, the vertically averaged gas saturation does not exhibit two sharp fronts as seen in the STOMP simulations, but shows a gradual change in saturation with radial distance over the two-phase region. The pressure profiles from STOMP and the analytical model are

  12. A finite volume discretization of the pressure gradient force using analytic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcroft, Alistair; Hallberg, Robert; Harrison, Matthew

    Layered ocean models can exhibit spurious thermobaric instability if the compressibility of sea water is not treated accurately enough. We find that previous solutions to this problem are inadequate for simulations of a changing climate. We propose a new discretization of the pressure gradient acceleration using the finite volume method. In this method, the pressure gradient acceleration is exhibited as the difference of the integral "contact" pressure acting on the edges of a finite volume. This integral "contact" pressure can be calculated analytically by choosing a tractable equation of state. The result is a discretization that has zero truncation error for an isothermal and isohaline layer and does not exhibit the spurious thermobaric instability.

  13. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Keiji G; Ford, Michael J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol(reg. sign) and Evista(reg. sign) tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d{sub 3} as an internal standard.

  14. Analytical study of stresses recorded in the DH 2011 rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kretz, M.; Aubrun, J. N.; Larche, M.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical study of stresses in the blades recorded during the tests of the DH 2011 jet flap rotor was performed. The main objective of the study was to compare the experimental results with analyticaly determined stresses. The comparison extended over 15 specific flight cases has been only partially successful. In fact computed 3P and 4P stress components showed only a poor correlation with the test data obtained. It is believed that the simplified model of aeroelastic effects used is mainly responsible for this lack of agreement with test results.

  15. An accurate analytic approximation to the non-linear change in volume of solids with applied pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    An accurate analytic expression for the nonlinear change of the volume of a solid as a function of applied pressure is of great interest in high-pressure experimentation. It is found that a two-parameter analytic expression, fits the experimental volume-change data to within a few percent over the entire experimentally attainable pressure range. Results are presented for 24 different materials including metals, ceramic semiconductors, polymers, and ionic and rare-gas solids.

  16. Non-invasive determination of transcatheter pressure gradient in stenotic aortic valves: an analytical model.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Motamed, Pouyan K; Maftoon, Nima

    2015-03-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS), in which the opening of the aortic valve is narrowed, is the most common valvular heart disease. Cardiac catheterization is considered the reference standard for definitive evaluation of AS severity, based on instantaneous systolic value of transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG). However, using invasive cardiac catheterization might carry high risks knowing that undergoing multiple cardiac catheterizations for follow-up in patients with AS is common. The objective of this study was to suggest an analytical description of the AS that estimates TPG without a need for high risk invasive data collection. For this purpose, Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the elastic-deformation equation was solved analytically. The estimated TPG resulted from the suggested analytical description was validated against published in vivo and in vitro measurement data. Very good concordances were found between TPG obtained from the analytical formulation and in vivo (maximum root mean square error: 3.8 mmHg) and in vitro (maximum root mean square error: 9.4 mmHg). The analytical description can be integrated to non-invasive imaging modalities to estimate AS severity as an alternative to cardiac catheterization to help preventing its risks in patients with AS. PMID:25682932

  17. Condensation pressures in small pores: An analytical model based on density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    R. H. Nilson; S. K. Griffiths

    1999-02-01

    Adsorption and condensation are critical to many applications of porous materials including filtration, separation, and the storage of gases. Integral methods are used to derive an analytical expression describing fluid condensation pressures in slit pores bounded by parallel plane walls. To obtain this result, the governing equations of Density Functional Theory (DFT) are integrated across the pore width assuming that fluid densities within adsorbed layers are spatially uniform. The thickness, density, and energy of these layers are expressed as composite functions constructed from asymptotic limits applicable to small and large pores. By equating the total energy of the adsorbed layers to that of a liquid-full pore, the authors arrive at a closed-form expression for the condensation pressure in terms of the pore size, surface tension, and Lennard-Jones parameters of the adsorbent and adsorbate molecules. The resulting equation reduces to the Kelvin equation in the large-pore limit. It further reproduces the condensation pressures computed by means of the full DFT equations for all pore sizes in which phase transitions are abrupt. Finally, in the limit of extremely small pores, for which phase transitions may be smooth and continuous, this simple analytical expression provides a good approximation to the apparent condensation pressure indicated by the steepest portion of the adsorption isotherm computed via DFT.

  18. An environmental pressure index proposal for urban development planning based on the analytic network process

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Navarro, Tomas; Diaz-Martin, Diego

    2009-09-15

    This paper introduces a new approach to prioritize urban planning projects according to their environmental pressure in an efficient and reliable way. It is based on the combination of three procedures: (i) the use of environmental pressure indicators, (ii) the aggregation of the indicators in an Environmental Pressure Index by means of the Analytic Network Process method (ANP) and (iii) the interpretation of the information obtained from the experts during the decision-making process. The method has been applied to a proposal for urban development of La Carlota airport in Caracas (Venezuela). There are three options which are currently under evaluation. They include a Health Club, a Residential Area and a Theme Park. After a selection process the experts chose the following environmental pressure indicators as ANP criteria for the project life cycle: used land area, population density, energy consumption, water consumption and waste generation. By using goal-oriented questionnaires designed by the authors, the experts determined the importance of the criteria, the relationships among criteria, and the relationships between the criteria and the urban development alternatives. The resulting data showed that water consumption is the most important environmental pressure factor, and the Theme Park project is by far the urban development alternative which exerts the least environmental pressure on the area. The participating experts coincided in appreciating the technique proposed in this paper is useful and, for ranking ordering these alternatives, an improvement from traditional techniques such as environmental impact studies, life-cycle analysis, etc.

  19. Reliability of pressure recordings via catheters used for transluminal coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Busch, U W; Sebening, H; Beeretz, R; Heinze, R

    1984-06-01

    Because of common difficulties in obtaining adequate pressure tracing during transluminal coronary angioplasty, the pressure transmission characteristics of catheter systems used for angioplasty were determined. Transmission of cine wave pressures (0.2 to 14 Hz) and of arterial pressure pulses reproduced in vitro was evaluated. Following adequate elimination of air bubbles from the system, the Grüntzig dilatation catheters yielded satisfactory frequency response curves and thus good reproduction of arterial pressure waveforms. The Simpson-Robert catheter showed clearly inferior frequency response characteristics, explaining the more significant damping of the pressure tracings. However, mean pressures were reliably recorded with each type. PMID:15227077

  20. Measuring Respiratory Pressures with Mercury Manometer in Low Economic Health Care Settings- An Analytical Study

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Vishnupriya; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Trakroo, Madanmohan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health care economics restricts many health centers from using hi-tech diagnostics equipment. Mercury manometers are used for calibration of pressure transducers. If standardized it would be a cost effective, simple alternative to transducers in low economic settings. Aim To analyse the feasibility of mercury manometer usage in respiratory pressure measurement. Materials and Methods The experimental study was conducted with 30 healthy volunteers of age group 17–19 yrs. They were recruited by using simple random sampling method. The volunteers were made familiarized to lab environment, instrument and techniques of maximum inspiratory (Pimax) and expiratory pressures (Pemax). Then parameters were recorded using mercury manometer connected to different syringes as mouth piece (2.5 ml, 10 ml, and 20 ml) and with sphygmomanometer. Statistical analysis was done by using IBM SPSS statistics version 21. Results The Pimax was 111.07 ± 6.53 with a 2.5 ml syringe as mouth piece. With 20 ml syringe it was 61.47 ± 9.98. PEmax with 2.5 ml syringe was 70.33 ± 8.19 with a confidence limit of 2.93 and with sphygmomanometer was 99.33 ± 8.16 with a confidence limit of 2.92. There was a change in recorded pressure and the correlation analysis result showed a significant difference from both above and below 10 ml mouth piece range. Conclusion Mercury manometers could be used for recording respiratory pressures in low economic facilities once standardized. Size of syringe to be used as mouth piece needs further more works although this study finds 10 ml syringe as suitable. PMID:26894061

  1. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  2. Analytically useful spectra excited in an atmospheric pressure active nitrogen afterglow

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, G.W.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1984-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure active nitrogen (APAN) discharge has been utilized for producing characteristic molecular emissions from nonmetallic species introduced into the afterglow region of the discharge. The addition of inorganic S-, P-, B-, Cl-, and Br-containing compounds into the afterglow has resulted in the formation of excited S/sub 2/, PN, BO, NCl, and NBr species, respectively. Intense molecular Br/sub 2/ emission and I/sub 2/ emission, as well as atomic I emission, have also been observed. Preliminary analytical utilization of the molecular or atomic emissions observed revealed that the APAN afterglow may serve as a potentially useful detector for the aforementioned elements.

  3. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [evaluation of methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Samples of liquid oxygen, high pressure nitrogen, low pressure nitrogen, and missile grade air were studied to determine the hydrocarbon concentrations. Concentration of the samples was achieved by adsorption on a molecular sieve and activated charcoal. The trapped hydrocarbons were then desorbed and transferred to an analytical column in a gas chromatograph. The sensitivity of the method depends on the volume of gas passed through the adsorbent tubes. The value of the method was verified through recoverability and reproducibility studies. The use of this method enables LOX, GN2, and missile grade air systems to be routinely monitored to determine low level increases in specific hydrocarbon concentration that could lead to potentially hazardous conditions.

  4. Risk factor detection for heart disease by applying text analytics in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Torii, Manabu; Fan, Jung-Wei; Yang, Wei-Li; Lee, Theodore; Wiley, Matthew T; Zisook, Daniel S; Huang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    In the United States, about 600,000 people die of heart disease every year. The annual cost of care services, medications, and lost productivity reportedly exceeds 108.9 billion dollars. Effective disease risk assessment is critical to prevention, care, and treatment planning. Recent advancements in text analytics have opened up new possibilities of using the rich information in electronic medical records (EMRs) to identify relevant risk factors. The 2014 i2b2/UTHealth Challenge brought together researchers and practitioners of clinical natural language processing (NLP) to tackle the identification of heart disease risk factors reported in EMRs. We participated in this track and developed an NLP system by leveraging existing tools and resources, both public and proprietary. Our system was a hybrid of several machine-learning and rule-based components. The system achieved an overall F1 score of 0.9185, with a recall of 0.9409 and a precision of 0.8972. PMID:26279500

  5. Analytical solution of geological carbon sequestration under constant pressure injection into a horizontal radial reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhang, R.; Liou, T.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is believed to be an economically feasible technology to mitigate global warming by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2), the major component of greenhouse gases, from the atmosphere and injecting it into deep geological formations.Several mechanisms can help trap CO2 in the pore space of a geological reservoir, stratigraphic and structural trapping, hydrodynamic trapping, and geochemical trapping.Besides these trapping mechanisms, another important issue that deserves careful attention is the risk of CO2 leakage. The common ';constant injection rate' scenario may induce high pressure buildup that will endanger the mechanical integrity as well as the sealing capability of the cap rock. Instead of injecting CO2 at a constant mass rate, CO2 can be injected into the reservoir by fixing the pressure (usually the bottom-hole pressure) in the injection borehole. By doing so, the inevitable pressure buildup associated with the constant injection scheme can be completely eliminated in the constant pressure injection scheme. In this paper, a semi-analytical solution for CO2 injection with constant pressure was developed. For simplicity, structural and geochemical trapping mechanisms were not considered. Therefore, a horizontal reservoir with infinite radial extent was considered. Prior to injection, the reservoir is fully saturated with the formation brine. It is assumed that CO2 does not mix with brine such that a sharp interface is formed once CO2 invades the brine-saturated pores. Because of the density difference between CO2 and brine, CO2 resides above the interface. Additional assumptions were also made when building up the brine and CO2 mass balance equations: (1) both of the fluids and the geological formations are incompressible, (2) capillary pressure is neglected, (3)there is no fluid flow in the vertical direction, and the horizontal flow satisfies the Darcy's law.In order to solve for the height of brine-CO2 interface, the two

  6. An Analytical Theory for the Perturbative Effect of Solar Radiation Pressure on Natural and Artificial Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jay W.

    Solar radiation pressure is the largest non-gravitational perturbation for most satellites in the solar system, and can therefore have a significant influence on their orbital dynamics. This work presents a new method for representing the solar radiation pressure force acting on a satellite, and applies this theory to natural and artificial satellites. The solar radiation pressure acceleration is modeled as a Fourier series which depends on the Sun's location in a body-fixed frame; a new set of Fourier coefficients are derived for every latitude of the Sun in this frame, and the series is expanded in terms of the longitude of the Sun. The secular effects due to the solar radiation pressure perturbations are given analytically through the application of averaging theory when the satellite is in a synchronous orbit. This theory is then applied to binary asteroid systems to explain the Binary YORP effect. Long term predictions of the evolution of the near-Earth asteroid 1999 KW4 are discussed under the influence of solar radiation pressure, J2, and 3rd body gravitational effects from the Sun. Secular effects are shown to remain when the secondary asteroid becomes non-synchronous due to a librational motion. The theory is also applied to Earth orbiting spacecraft, and is shown to be a valuable tool for improved orbit determination. The Fourier series solar radiation pressure model derived here is shown to give comparable results for orbit determination of the GPS IIR-M satellites as JPL's solar radiation pressure model. The theory is also extended to incorporate the effects of the Earth's shadow analytically. This theory is briefly applied to the evolution of orbital debris to explain the assumptions that are necessary in order to use the cannonball model for debris orbit evolution, as is common in the literature. Finally, the averaging theory methodology is applied to a class of Earth orbiting solar sail spacecraft to show the orbital effects when the sails are made

  7. A comparative study on the analytical utility of atmospheric and low-pressure MALDI sources for the mass spectrometric characterization of peptides.

    PubMed

    Moskovets, Eugene; Misharin, Alexander; Laiko, Viktor; Doroshenko, Vladimir

    2016-07-15

    A comparative MS study was conducted on the analytical performance of two matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) sources that operated at either low pressure (∼1Torr) or at atmospheric pressure. In both cases, the MALDI sources were attached to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a two-stage ion funnel. The obtained results indicate that the limits of detection, in the analysis of identical peptide samples, were much lower with the source that was operated slightly below the 1-Torr pressure. In the low-pressure (LP) MALDI source, ion signals were observed at a laser fluence that was considerably lower than the one determining the appearance of ion signals in the atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI source. When the near-threshold laser fluences were used to record MALDI MS spectra at 1-Torr and 750-Torr pressures, the level of chemical noise at the 1-Torr pressure was much lower compared to that at AP. The dependency of the analyte ion signals on the accelerating field which dragged the ions from the MALDI plate to the MS analyzer are presented for the LP and AP MALDI sources. The study indicates that the laser fluence, background gas pressure, and field accelerating the ions away from a MALDI plate were the main parameters which determined the ion yield, signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios, the fragmentation of the analyte ions, and adduct formation in the LP and AP MALDI MS methods. The presented results can be helpful for a deeper insight into the mechanisms responsible for the ion formation in MALDI. PMID:26899429

  8. Analyte zone sharpening in pressurized capillary electrochromatography based on electrophoretic migration under a heterogeneous field.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Shinya; Buno, Hiroki; Sakabe, Koichi; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Ohtani, Hajime

    2014-11-01

    Significant peak width reductions, or peak height enhancements, of angiotensins were observed when a high voltage was applied to hydrophilic interaction pressurized capillary electrochromatography using gradient elution with mobile phases containing perchloric acid. The investigation using a contactless conductivity detector revealed that perchloric acid was adsorbed on the surface of the stationary phase, when the acetonitrile content in the mobile phase was high, and released from the stationary phase by increasing the water content during a gradient procedure. The released perchloric acid formed a highly concentrated zone moving from the column inlet to the outlet. The electrochromatographic behavior of the analytes, primarily electrophoretic migration, was changed in this zone. As a consequence of the significant variation in migration velocity of the analytes, the sample band width was reduced similar fashion to on-capillary concentration in capillary electrophoresis. Using this result, the reduction of band width and enhancement in separation efficiency was demonstrated in reversed-phase pressurized electrochromatography, in which the conductivity of the mobile phase was significantly altered using a step gradient. The resolution between benzoic acid and 1-naphthalene sulfonic acid was successfully improved from 2.7 to 4.3 by using the band width reduction method based on field-amplified stacking. PMID:25115853

  9. A New Analytical Solution for Diaphragm Deflection and its Application to a Surface-Micromachined Pressure Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Bitsie, F.; Eaton, W.P.; Plummer, D.W.; Smith, J.H.

    1999-03-09

    An analytical solution for large deflections of a clamped circular diaphragm with built-in stress is presented. The solution is directly applicable to micromachined pressure sensors. The solution is compared to finite element analysis results and experimental data from a surface-micromachined pressure sensor.

  10. PARAMO: A Parallel Predictive Modeling Platform for Healthcare Analytic Research using Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kenney; Ghoting, Amol; Steinhubl, Steven R.; Stewart, Walter F.; Malin, Bradley; Sun, Jimeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective Healthcare analytics research increasingly involves the construction of predictive models for disease targets across varying patient cohorts using electronic health records (EHRs). To facilitate this process, it is critical to support a pipeline of tasks: 1) cohort construction, 2) feature construction, 3) cross-validation, 4) feature selection, and 5) classification. To develop an appropriate model, it is necessary to compare and refine models derived from a diversity of cohorts, patient-specific features, and statistical frameworks. The goal of this work is to develop and evaluate a predictive modeling platform that can be used to simplify and expedite this process for health data. Methods To support this goal, we developed a PARAllel predictive MOdeling (PARAMO) platform which 1) constructs a dependency graph of tasks from specifications of predictive modeling pipelines, 2) schedules the tasks in a topological ordering of the graph, and 3) executes those tasks in parallel. We implemented this platform using Map-Reduce to enable independent tasks to run in parallel in a cluster computing environment. Different task scheduling preferences are also supported. Results We assess the performance of PARAMO on various workloads using three datasets derived from the EHR systems in place at Geisinger Health System and Vanderbilt University Medical Center and an anonymous longitudinal claims database. We demonstrate significant gains in computational efficiency against a standard approach. In particular, PARAMO can build 800 different models on a 300,000 patient data set in 3 hours in parallel compared to 9 days if running sequentially. Conclusion This work demonstrates that an efficient parallel predictive modeling platform can be developed for EHR data. This platform can facilitate large-scale modeling endeavors and speed-up the research workflow and reuse of health information. This platform is only a first step and provides the foundation for our ultimate

  11. An analytical and experimental investigation of natural circulation transients in a model pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Massoud, M

    1987-01-01

    Natural Circulation phenomena in a simulated PWR was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental investigation included determination of system characteristics as well as system response to the imposed transient under symmetric and asymmetric operations. System characteristics were used to obtain correlation for heat transfer coefficient in heat exchangers, system flow resistance, and system buoyancy heat. Asymmetric transients were imposed to study flow oscillation and possible instability. The analytical investigation encompassed development of mathematical model for single-phase, steady-state and transient natural circulation as well as modification of existing model for two-phase flow analysis of phenomena such as small break LOCA, high pressure coolant injection and pump coast down. The developed mathematical model for single-phase analysis was computer coded to simulate the imposed transients. The computer program, entitled ''Symmetric and Asymmetric Analysis of Single-Phase Flow (SAS),'' were employed to simulate the imposed transients. It closely emulated the system behavior throughout the transient and subsequent steady-state. Modifications for two-phase flow analysis included addition of models for once-through steam generator and electric heater rods. Both programs are faster than real time. Off-line, they can be used for prediction and training applications while on-line they serve for simulation and signal validation. The programs can also be used to determine the sensitivity of natural circulation behavior to variation of inputs such as secondary distribution and power transients.

  12. Observations of Seafloor Vertical Deformation on Axial Seamount with the Self-Calibrating Pressure Recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, M. J.; Sasagawa, G. S.; Zumberge, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A geodetic pressure gauge, the Self-Calibrating Pressure Recorder (SCPR), was deployed on Axial Seamount on September 7, 2013. The device performs in situ pressure calibrations every 10 days by applying a time-invariant reference pressure from a piston gauge (also known as a deadweight calibrator) to continuously recording quartz pressure gauges through a hydraulic valve. The reference pressure measurements are then used to estimate and correct for the inherent drift in the quartz resonant seafloor pressure gauges. Pressure data are collected at 100 s integration intervals. A small subset of a year-long data set was recovered via an acoustic modem in August 2014. Using three epoch measurements, the pressure rate of change from September 2013 to August 2014 was -4.1 to -4.2 kPa/year, equivalent to uplift of 41- 42 cm/year. Other pressure time series and micro-bathymetric repeat surveys are in rough agreement with this SCPR rate. The instrument is scheduled for recovery in August 2015; the anticipated data collection interval spans the eruption on April 24, 2015. We present the drift-corrected pressure series and constraints estimated for magma supply rates during the inflation, eruption, and post-eruptive phases.

  13. Sea level pressure variability in the Amundsen Sea region inferred from a West Antarctic glaciochemical record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutz, K. J.; Mayewski, P. A.; Pittalwala, I. I.; Meeker, L. D.; Twickler, M. S.; Whitlow, S. I.

    2000-02-01

    Using European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) numerical operational analyses, sea ice extent records, and station pressure data, we investigate the influence of sea level pressure variability in the Amundsen Sea region on a West Antarctic (Siple Dome) glaciochemical record. Empirical orthogonal function analysis of the high-resolution Siple Dome multivariate ice core chemical time series record (SDEOF1) documents lower tropospheric transport of sea-salt aerosols to the site. During 1985-1994 the SDEOF1 record of high (low) aerosol transport corresponds to anomalously low (high) sea level pressure (SLP) in the Amundsen Sea region. Spatial correlation patterns between ECMWF monthly SLP fields and the annual SDEOF1 record suggest that a majority of sea-salt aerosol is transported to Siple Dome during spring (September, October, and November). Analysis of zonal and meridional wind fields supports the SLP/SDEOF1 correlation and suggests the SDEOF1 record is sensitive to changes in regional circulation strength. No relationship is found between sea ice extent and the SDEOF1 record for the period 1973-1994. To investigate the SDEOF1 record prior to ECMWF coverage, a spring transpolar index (STPI) is created, using normalized SLP records from the New Zealand and South America/Antarctic Peninsula sectors, and is significantly correlated (at least 95% c.l.) with the SDEOF1 record on an annual (r = 0.32, p < 0.001) and interannual (3 years; r = 0.51, p < 0.001) basis. Dominant periodicities (3.3 and 7.1 years) in the annual SDEOF1 record (1890-1994 A.D.) suggest that a portion of the recorded interannual variability may be related tropical/extratropical ENSO teleconnections. Changes in the periodic structure of the full (850-1994 A.D.) Siple Dome record suggests a shift in SLP forcing during the Little Ice Age (˜1400-1900 A.D.) interval.

  14. A new analytical solar radiation pressure model for current BeiDou satellites: IGGBSPM

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bingfeng; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Baocheng; Hsu, Hou Ze; Ou, Jikun

    2016-01-01

    An analytical solar radiation pressure (SRP) model, IGGBSPM (an abbreviation for Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics BeiDou Solar Pressure Model), has been developed for three BeiDou satellite types, namely, geostationary orbit (GEO), inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium earth orbit (MEO), based on a ray-tracing method. The performance of IGGBSPM was assessed based on numerical integration, SLR residuals and analyses of empirical SRP parameters (except overlap computations). The numerical results show that the integrated orbit resulting from IGGBSPM differs from the precise ephemerides by approximately 5 m and 2 m for GEO and non-GEO satellites, respectively. Moreover, when IGGBSPM is used as an a priori model to enhance the ECOM (5-parameter) model with stochastic pulses, named ECOM + APR, for precise orbit determination, the SLR RMS residual improves by approximately 20–25 percent over the ECOM-only solution during the yaw-steering period and by approximately 40 percent during the yaw-fixed period. For the BeiDou GEO01 satellite, improvements of 18 and 32 percent can be achieved during the out-of-eclipse season and during the eclipse season, respectively. An investigation of the estimated ECOM D0 parameters indicated that the β-angle dependence that is evident in the ECOM-only solution is no longer present in the ECOM + APR solution. PMID:27595795

  15. A new analytical solar radiation pressure model for current BeiDou satellites: IGGBSPM.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bingfeng; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Baocheng; Hsu, Hou Ze; Ou, Jikun

    2016-01-01

    An analytical solar radiation pressure (SRP) model, IGGBSPM (an abbreviation for Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics BeiDou Solar Pressure Model), has been developed for three BeiDou satellite types, namely, geostationary orbit (GEO), inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium earth orbit (MEO), based on a ray-tracing method. The performance of IGGBSPM was assessed based on numerical integration, SLR residuals and analyses of empirical SRP parameters (except overlap computations). The numerical results show that the integrated orbit resulting from IGGBSPM differs from the precise ephemerides by approximately 5 m and 2 m for GEO and non-GEO satellites, respectively. Moreover, when IGGBSPM is used as an a priori model to enhance the ECOM (5-parameter) model with stochastic pulses, named ECOM + APR, for precise orbit determination, the SLR RMS residual improves by approximately 20-25 percent over the ECOM-only solution during the yaw-steering period and by approximately 40 percent during the yaw-fixed period. For the BeiDou GEO01 satellite, improvements of 18 and 32 percent can be achieved during the out-of-eclipse season and during the eclipse season, respectively. An investigation of the estimated ECOM D0 parameters indicated that the β-angle dependence that is evident in the ECOM-only solution is no longer present in the ECOM + APR solution. PMID:27595795

  16. Experimental Study and Analytical Methods for Particle Bed Dryout With Heterogeneous Particles and Pressure Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Sairanen, Risto; Lindholm, Ilona; Holmstrom, Stefan

    2002-07-01

    The interest to study the dryout heat flux in particle beds is related to interest of quantify the debris coolability margins during a hypothetical severe reactor accident. When the molten core has relocated to the containment floor, one accident management concept is based on the cooling of the corium by the water injection on top. Earlier experimental and analytical work has concentrated on homogeneous particle beds at atmospheric pressures. For plant safety assessment in Finland, there is a need to consider heterogeneous particle mixtures, layered particle bed setups and varied pressures. A facility has been constructed at VTT to measure dryout heat flux in a heterogeneous particle bed. The bed dimensions are 0.3 m in diameter and 0.6 m in height, with a mixture of 0.1 to 10 mm particles. The facility has a pressure range from atmospheric to 6 bar (overpressure). The bed is heated by spirals of a resistance band. The preliminary experiments have been carried out, but a more systematic set of data is expected to be available in the spring 2002. To support the experiments analytical models have been developed for qualification of the experimental results. The first comparison is done against various critical heat flux correlations developed in 1980's and 1990's for homogeneous bed conditions. The second comparison is done against 1-D and 0-D models developed by Lipinski. The most detailed analysis of the transient process conditions and dryout predictions are done by using the two-dimensional, drift-flux based thermohydraulic solution for the particle bed immersed into the water. The code is called PILEXP. Already the first validation results against the preliminary tests indicate that the transient process conditions and the mechanisms related to the dryout can be best explained and understood by using a multidimensional, transient code, where all details of the process control can be modeled as well. The heterogeneous bed and stratified bed can not be well

  17. Field-Analytical approach of land-sea records for elucidating the Younger Dryas Boundary syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, T.; Courty, M. M.; Guichard, F.

    2009-12-01

    Linking lonsdaleite crystals, carbon spherules and diamond polymorphs from the North American dark layers at 12.9 cal yr B.P. to a cosmic event has questioned the nature and timing of the related impact processes. A global signal should trace the invoked airshocks and/or surface impacts from a swarm of comets or carbonaceous chondrites. Here we report on the contextual analytical study of debris fall events from three reference sequences of the Younger Dyras period (11-13 ka cal BP) : (1) sand dune fields along the French Atlantic coast at the Audenge site; (2) A 10 m record of detrital/bioorganic accumulation in the southern basin of the Caspian Sea with regular sedimentation rate (0.1 to 3 mm per year) from 14 to 2-ka BP cal; (3) the Paijan sequence (Peruvian coastal desert) offering fossiliferous fluvial layers with the last large mammals and aquatic fauna at 13 ka BP sealed by abiotic sand dunes. The three sequences display one remarkable layer of exogenous air-transported microdebris that is part of a complex time series of recurrent fine dust/wildfire events. The sharp debris-rich microfacies and its association to ashes derived from calcination of the local vegetation suggest instantaneous deposition synchronous to a high intensity wildfire. The debris assemblage comprises microtektite-like glassy spherules, partly devitrified glass shards, unmelted to partly melted sedimentary and igneous clasts, terrestrial native metals, and carbonaceous components. The later occur as grape-clustered polymers, vitrified graphitic carbon, amorphous carbon spherules with a honeycomb pattern, and green carbon fibres with recrystallized quartz and metal blebs. Evidence for high temperature formation from a heterogeneous melt with solid debris and volatile components derived from carbonaceous precursors supports an impact origin from an ejecta plume. The association of debris deposition to total firing would trace a high energy airburst with surface effects of the fireball. In

  18. Semi-analytical solutions for nonisothermal fluid injection including heat loss from the reservoir: Part 2. Pressure and stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForce, T.; Mijić, A.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.

    2014-11-01

    In this work semi-analytical solutions for saturation, temperature, pressure and in situ reservoir stress are found for immiscible nonisothermal injection into a radial porous medium. A model for advection-dominated, nonisothermal, two-phase flow from a previous work is used to estimate the reservoir pressure and stress that result from injection of cold CO2. Flow is assumed to be one-dimensional and purely advective, while temperature has radial advection in the reservoir and transverse diffusion into the surrounding media. A simplified thermal solution is developed to allow for easier analysis of the reservoir stress. Two pressure models are presented, one which requires numerical integration of the pressure in the two-phase region, and one which is fully analytical, but simplifies the pressure profile. Two models are used to calculate reservoir stress, one which uses the full pressure and temperature profiles and must be numerically integrated, and one which uses the simplified models and has a closed-form analytical solution. The resulting radial and tangential (hoop) stress profiles in the reservoir are compared and it is shown that the simplified model is adequate for estimating the reservoir stresses. The impact of outer boundary conditions on reservoir pressure and stresses is also explored.

  19. High-Area-Ratio Rocket Nozzle at High Combustion Chamber Pressure: Experimental and Analytical Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Smith, Timothy D.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained on an optimally contoured nozzle with an area ratio of 1025:1 and on a truncated version of this nozzle with an area ratio of 440:1. The nozzles were tested with gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants at combustion chamber pressures of 1800 to 2400 psia and mixture ratios of 3.89 to 6.15. This report compares the experimental performance, heat transfer, and boundary layer total pressure measurements with theoretical predictions of the current Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force (JANNAF) developed methodology. This methodology makes use of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle performance code. Comparisons of the TDK-predicted performance to experimentally attained thrust performance indicated that both the vacuum thrust coefficient and the vacuum specific impulse values were approximately 2.0-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 1025:1 configurations, and approximately 0.25-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 440:1 configuration. Nozzle wall temperatures were measured on the outside of a thin-walled heat sink nozzle during the test fittings. Nozzle heat fluxes were calculated front the time histories of these temperatures and compared with predictions made with the TDK code. The heat flux values were overpredicted for all cases. The results range from nearly 100 percent at an area ratio of 50 to only approximately 3 percent at an area ratio of 975. Values of the integral of the heat flux as a function of nozzle surface area were also calculated. Comparisons of the experiment with analyses of the heat flux and the heat rate per axial length also show that the experimental values were lower than the predicted value. Three boundary layer rakes mounted on the nozzle exit were used for boundary layer measurements. This arrangement allowed total pressure measurements to be obtained at 14 different distances from the nozzle wall. A comparison of boundary layer total pressure profiles and analytical

  20. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of marigold at high pressures: comparison of analytical and pilot-scale extraction.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Dietmar; Adler, Sven; Griiner, Sabine; Otto, Frank; Weinreich, Bernd; Hamburger, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    The effects of pressure and co-solvent on the extraction of anti-inflammatory faradiol esters in marigold (Calendula officinalis L.) were investigated by supercritical fluid extraction at laboratory and pilot scales. Pressures higher than 300 bar and modifier (ethanol) concentrations ranging from 0 to 20% (v/v) were used at an extraction temperature of 50 degrees C. With an analytical extractor, exhaustive extraction of the drug and highest concentrations in the extracts were achieved with 0.5% ethanol at the maximum pressure of 689 bar. Increased modifier concentrations improved the extractability at lower pressure, but the higher amount of total extractables led to a lower concentration of faradiol esters in the extracts. The HPLC fingerprints of the extracts, the yields of total extract and the concentration of faradiol esters obtained with analytical and pilot scale extractors under the same conditions were comparable. PMID:15311841

  1. A preliminary study for investigating idiopatic normal pressure hydrocephalus by means of statistical parameters classification of intracranial pressure recordings.

    PubMed

    Calisto, A; Bramanti, A; Galeano, M; Angileri, F; Campobello, G; Serrano, S; Azzerboni, B

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate Id-iopatic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (INPH) through a multidimensional and multiparameter analysis of statistical data obtained from accurate analysis of Intracranial Pressure (ICP) recordings. Such a study could permit to detect new factors, correlated with therapeutic response, which are able to validate a predicting significance for infusion test. The algorithm developed by the authors computes 13 ICP parameter trends on each of the recording, afterward 9 statistical information from each trend is determined. All data are transferred to the datamining software WEKA. According to the exploited feature-selection techniques, the WEKA has revealed that the most significant statistical parameter is the maximum of Single-Wave-Amplitude: setting a 27 mmHg threshold leads to over 90% of correct classification. PMID:19965228

  2. Formation of Metal-Adducted Analyte Ions by Flame-Induced Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Wang, Chin-Hsiung; Shiea, Jentaie

    2016-05-17

    A flame-induced atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) source, consisting of a miniflame, nebulizer, and heated tube, was developed to ionize analytes. The ionization was performed by reacting analytes with a charged species generated in a flame. A stainless steel needle deposited with saturated alkali chloride solution was introduced into the mini oxyacetylene flame to generate alkali ions, which were reacted with analytes (M) generated in a heated nebulizer. The alkali-adducted 18-crown-6 ether ions, including (M + Li)(+), (M + Na)(+), (M + K)(+), (M + Rb)(+), and (M + Cs)(+), were successfully detected on the FAPCI mass spectra when the corresponding alkali chloride solutions were separately introduced to the flame. When an alkali chloride mixture was introduced, all alkali-adducted analyte ions were simultaneously detected. Their intensity order was as follows: (M + Cs)(+) > (M + Rb)(+) > (M + K)(+) > (M + Na)(+) > (M + Li)(+), and this trend agreed with the lattice energies of alkali chlorides. Besides alkali ions, other transition metal ions such as Ni(+), Cu(+), and Ag(+) were generated in a flame for analyte ionization. Other than metal ions, the reactive species generated in the fossil fuel flame could also be used to ionize analytes, which formed protonated analyte ions (M + H)(+) in positive ion mode and deprotonated analyte ions (M - H)(-) in negative ion mode. PMID:27093572

  3. Inflating one's own cuff does not increase self-recorded blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Veerman, D P; van Montfrans, G A; Karemaker, J M; Wieling, W

    1988-12-01

    To determine whether the muscular activity required to inflate a blood pressure cuff for self-recording influences the blood pressure at the instant of the subsequent measurement, finger blood pressure was recorded continuously during cuff inflation. Ten normotensive and seven untreated hypertensive subjects used their dominant hands to inflate, in 5 s, an occluding cuff on the same arm up to 200 mmHg. Blood pressure in the middle finger of the other arm was measured continuously by the Finapres device. Korotkoff sounds were determined by a microphone in the arm cuff, and the speed of deflation was kept constant by the investigator at 2-3 mmHg/s. Systolic pressure rose at the onset of inflation, with an average peak of 13 +/- 6 (s.d.) and 12 +/- 8 mmHg above baseline in the normotensive and hypertensive subjects, respectively. Five seconds after the onset of deflation both systolic and diastolic pressures in both groups had returned to baseline levels. Thus, self-inflation of a blood pressure cuff allows a valid measurement of blood pressure provided the recommended guidelines are strictly followed. PMID:3241283

  4. A new portable device for recording 24-h indirect blood pressure in hypertensive outpatients.

    PubMed

    Tochikubo, O; Kaneko, Y; Yokoi, H; Yukinari, Y

    1985-12-01

    To simplify 24-h blood pressure (BP) recording in hypertensive outpatients, we devised a new portable, automatic BP recorder and studied its accuracy and usefulness. The fully automatic recorder, measuring 5 x 16 x 18 cm with a cuff of usual size, weighs approximately 1 kg and is driven by a rechargeable battery. The cuff is inflated by a compact CO2 cartridge and two microphones are used to detect differentially the Korotkoff sounds in the upper arm. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) are automatically measured, displayed with the time of measurement, and recorded on a memory card at intervals of 15 min for 24 h. This equipment has high noise immunity and works very quietly. It predicts approximate BP during the period of increasing cuff pressure, and measures BP more quickly than the conventional method (the time required for each measurement was reduced by about half). Afterwards, mean values with standard deviations, trendgrams and histograms of BP and HR over a certain period of time can be displayed and recorded with an accessory analyser. The accuracy of the BP values recorded by this device were compared with those measured by the auscultatory method. The average differences were -0.6 +/- 2.1 (s.d.) mmHg for SBP and 0.2 +/- 3.0 mmHg for DBP (n = 152). The BP values by this method were also compared with those obtained directly from the brachial artery, the differences being -5.8 +/- 5.9/0.3 +/- 6.0 mmHg (n = 85). In 30 ambulatory hypertensive patients, 24-h BP was recorded using this recorder.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2856737

  5. High Pressure Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC) of humic substances: molecular sizes, analytical parameters, and column performance

    PubMed

    Conte; Piccolo

    1999-02-01

    High Pressure Size Exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) is increasingly used to evaluate molecular sizes of humic substances from different sources. Asymmetry factors (As), number of theoretical plates (N), coefficient of distribution (k(d)), and column resolution (Rs) were determined for two different HPSEC columns (TSK G3000SW and Biosep S2000) and polysaccharides of known molecular weights were used as standards. Calibration curves were equivalent for both columns whereas analytical parameters revealed that the TSK column was only slightly more efficient in separating polysaccharide standards. Mw and Mn values for humic substances differed according to the molecular weight range of each column but relative standard deviation never exceeded 5% for both columns. Variations between columns were attributed to intrinsic humic properties such as the stability of conformational structures. These results suggested that humic substances in solutions are loosely-bound association of small molecules that may be consistently dispersed by diffusion through size-exclusion pores. HPSEC is confirmed to represent a highly precise method to evaluate the relative molecular-size distribution of dissolved humic substances. PMID:10901671

  6. Hornblende phenocrysts record a pressure gradient in and contamination of the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.; Wittke, J. ); Duffield, W. ); Davis, A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Taylor Creek Rhyolite of southwestern New Mexico comprises 20 coeval porphyritic lava domes erupted from a large vertically zoned reservoir of silicic magma. The rhyolite is high-silica, subalkaline, and is nearly constant in major-element composition. Trace elements and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr[sub i] (0.705 to 0.713) define vertical zoning that records a downward-decreasing imprint of minor (<1 wt%) partial assimilation of Proterozoic roof rocks. Consistent with the major-element homogeneity, electron-microprobe analyses of hornblende phenocrysts show little or no measurable variation in principal constituents. The hornblende is edenite whose mean composition and standard deviation of 110 analyses are SiO[sub 2], 44.66 [+-] 0.64; TiO[sub g], 1.27 [+-] 0.13; Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], 6.80 [+-] 0.31; FeO, 21.00 [+-] 1.60; MnO, 1.19 [+-] 0.16; MgO, 9.94 [+-] 1.09; CaO, 10.51 [+-] 0.22; Na[sub 2]O, 2.22 [+-] 0.13; K[sup 2]O, 0.98 [+-] 0.08; F, 2.04 [+-] 0.35; Cl, 0.20 [+-] 0.03. Except for FeO, MnO, and MgO, compositional variations are non systematic and mostly within analytical uncertainty. FeO and Mno exhibit strong negative correlation with MgO. Individual hornblende crystals are zoned to relatively MgO-rich and FeO-MnO-poor rims, opposite what might be expected if the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma reservoir evolved chemically isolated from its surroundings. Hornblende with rims richest in MgO occurs in domes fed from the uppermost part of the reservoir. Calculated pressures based on Al in hornblende range from 1.6 to 2.0 kb, [+-] 0.5 kb. Though the range of calculated P is encompassed within the uncertainty, the lowest hornblende pressure is for a dome fed from, or near, the top of the reservoir, whereas the chemically defined vertical zoning.

  7. Comparisons of blood pressure measurements by auscultation and Physiometrics Infrasonde recording techniques.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, B J

    1980-01-01

    The levels of blood pressures measured by a Physiometrics Infrasonde recorder (model SR-2) were compared with the levels simultaneously measured byt auscultation utilizing a standard mercury sphygmomanometer (Baumanometer). The measurements were made on 1530 adult women and their 1760 adolescent children 15-17 years old. Two sets of blood pressures were taken about 3 minutes apart, each with an occluding cuff connected to the Physiometrics recorder as well as to the mercury sphygmomanometer. The reproducibility of the Physiometrics method was similar to that of the auscultation method. The means of the systolic pressures measured by the Physiometrics method were virtually equal to those of the auscultation method for women and girls; for boys, the means of the former method surpassed those of the latter by about 3 mm. The mean diastolic pressures by the Physiometric method were very close to the Korotkoff sound 5 (K5) pressure by the auscultation method for all three groups. The correlation coefficients between both methods were 0.98 for the systolic and 0.93 for the diastolic pressure of the adult women, and 0.94 for the systolic pressure of the adolescents. The correlations between the two diastolic pressures of adolescents were much less (0.69). The Physiometrics measurements were consistent with the measurements by auscultation for systolic and diastolic pressures of women and systolic pressure of adolescents, but the consistency was low for diastolic pressure of adolescents. An effort has been made to relate differences between the two methods with other anthropometric variables, but the correlations with these variables were of low level. PMID:7399640

  8. Acute Effects of Exercise on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analytic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Carpio-Rivera, Elizabeth; Moncada-Jiménez, José; Salazar-Rojas, Walter; Solera-Herrera, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension affects 25% of the world's population and is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and other diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the evidence regarding the acute effect of exercise on blood pressure (BP) using meta-analytic measures. Sixty-five studies were compared using effect sizes (ES), and heterogeneity and Z tests to determine whether the ES were different from zero. The mean corrected global ES for exercise conditions were -0.56 (-4.80 mmHg) for systolic BP (sBP) and -0.44 (-3.19 mmHg) for diastolic BP (dBP; z ≠ 0 for all; p < 0.05). The reduction in BP was significant regardless of the participant's initial BP level, gender, physical activity level, antihypertensive drug intake, type of BP measurement, time of day in which the BP was measured, type of exercise performed, and exercise training program (p < 0.05 for all). ANOVA tests revealed that BP reductions were greater if participants were males, not receiving antihypertensive medication, physically active, and if the exercise performed was jogging. A significant inverse correlation was found between age and BP ES, body mass index (BMI) and sBP ES, duration of the exercise's session and sBP ES, and between the number of sets performed in the resistance exercise program and sBP ES (p < 0.05). Regardless of the characteristics of the participants and exercise, there was a reduction in BP in the hours following an exercise session. However, the hypotensive effect was greater when the exercise was performed as a preventive strategy in those physically active and without antihypertensive medication. PMID:27168471

  9. Acute Effects of Exercise on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analytic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Carpio-Rivera, Elizabeth; Moncada-Jiménez, José; Salazar-Rojas, Walter; Solera-Herrera, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension affects 25% of the world's population and is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and other diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the evidence regarding the acute effect of exercise on blood pressure (BP) using meta-analytic measures. Sixty-five studies were compared using effect sizes (ES), and heterogeneity and Z tests to determine whether the ES were different from zero. The mean corrected global ES for exercise conditions were -0.56 (-4.80 mmHg) for systolic BP (sBP) and -0.44 (-3.19 mmHg) for diastolic BP (dBP; z ≠ 0 for all; p < 0.05). The reduction in BP was significant regardless of the participant's initial BP level, gender, physical activity level, antihypertensive drug intake, type of BP measurement, time of day in which the BP was measured, type of exercise performed, and exercise training program (p < 0.05 for all). ANOVA tests revealed that BP reductions were greater if participants were males, not receiving antihypertensive medication, physically active, and if the exercise performed was jogging. A significant inverse correlation was found between age and BP ES, body mass index (BMI) and sBP ES, duration of the exercise's session and sBP ES, and between the number of sets performed in the resistance exercise program and sBP ES (p < 0.05). Regardless of the characteristics of the participants and exercise, there was a reduction in BP in the hours following an exercise session. However, the hypotensive effect was greater when the exercise was performed as a preventive strategy in those physically active and without antihypertensive medication. PMID:27168471

  10. Analytical Analysis of the Effect of the Radiation Pressure on Planetary Exospheres: Application to Earth, Mars, Titan and Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mazelle, C. X.

    2014-12-01

    Because of rare collisions, the motion of light species (H, H2) in the planetary exospheres is essentially determined by the external forces: the gravitation from the planet and the radiation pressure, ... Currently, the only analytical model used to model exospheric neutral density profiles is the well-known Chamberlain model which takes into account only the gravity. In this work and in the same way as Chamberlain, we solve rigorously and analytically, based on the Hamiltonian mechanics and Liouville theorem, the additional effect of the radiation pressure in particular for hydrogen (the model works for any species sensitive to the radiation pressure) on the structure of the exosphere and on the density profiles of ballistic particles. This approach was initially developed by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989) only in the Sun-planet direction. We extend it here to the whole exosphere with a 2D model. Also, we determine analytically the escape flux on the dayside at SZA=0, which can be compared with the Jeans' escape flux. We thus show that the radiation pressure induces : strong density asymmetries at high altitudes in the planetary exospheres, leading to the phenomenon of geotail at Earth for example the natural existence of an external limit (or exopause) for the exosphere, whose location is analytically determined an increase of the exospheric densities compared with Chamberlain profiles without radiation pressure (e.g. up to +150% at 5 Martian radius) a significant increase of the thermal escape flux (up to 30/35% for Earth/Mars today), until a «blow-off » regime with a constant escape flux for an extreme radiation pressure. The influence of the radiation pressure on the escape flux may thus bring conditions on the size of primary atmospheres, because of a strong radiation pressure in the Sun's young years. Finally, we show that this model may be applied to exoplanets, in particular to the hot Jupiters that are also subject to additional effects: centrifugal

  11. Perspectives on Using Video Recordings in Conversation Analytical Studies on Learning in Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusk, Fredrik; Pörn, Michaela; Sahlström, Fritjof; Slotte-Lüttge, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Video is currently used in many studies to document the interaction in conversation analytical (CA) studies on learning. The discussion on the method used in these studies has primarily focused on the analysis or the data construction, whereas the relation between data construction and analysis is rarely brought to attention. The aim of this…

  12. A numerical and analytical study of normal stresses and pressure differences in non-Newtonian creeping flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Minwu

    1989-12-01

    Analytical and numerical studies of some non-Newtonian creeping flows are pursued with particular interests in normal stresses and pressure differences. The study is started with the phenomenon of excess pressure rise across the pressure-hole which was observed in the Couette base flow over a transverse slot. This excess pressure rise phenomenon turns out to be very important in correctly applying the Higashitani and Pritchard (HP) theory. The correct application of HP theory involves a modified hole-pressure relation (MHPR). By studying the MHPR in streamline coordinate formulation, a fortuitous error cancellation phenomenon was found which provides a complete theoretical explanation for the paradox between an apparently flawed derivation and the fortunate success of the HP prediction. This error cancellation is proved to be exact for second-order fluid, and for Tanner's viscoelastic liquids under certain assumptions. For other non-Newtonian models, such as the Maxwell and modified Johnson-Segalman fluids, results also favor the error cancellation postulate. The theory numerical simulations of hole-pressure are conducted for second-order, Maxwell and Johnson-Segalman fluids. Some important results and conclusions are presented for creeping flows. Two unperturbed shearing flows, i.e., the plane Poiseuille flow and plate-driven tangential annular flow of modified Johnson-Segalman fluid are also studied. By changing integral variable and solving a cubic equation at each location, exact steady solutions were obtained for these two flows. Both monotone and non-monotone stress-strain-rate relations are considered and complete formulation and solution procedures are developed. Then the analytical solution technique and results are applied to the hole-pressure error prediction, convergence study of FEM solutions and reliability verification of the numerical methods used in the hole-pressure simulation.

  13. 30 CFR 250.523 - How long do I keep records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and diagnostic tests? 250.523 Section 250.523 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... long do I keep records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests? Records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests must be kept at the field office nearest the well for a minimum of 2 years. The last...

  14. 30 CFR 250.523 - How long do I keep records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and diagnostic tests? 250.523 Section 250.523 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests? Records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests must be kept at the field office nearest the well for a minimum of 2 years. The last casing diagnostic test...

  15. 30 CFR 250.524 - How long do I keep records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and diagnostic tests? 250.524 Section 250.524 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests? Records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests must be kept at the field office nearest the well for a minimum of 2 years. The last casing diagnostic test...

  16. 30 CFR 250.524 - How long do I keep records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and diagnostic tests? 250.524 Section 250.524 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests? Records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests must be kept at the field office nearest the well for a minimum of 2 years. The last casing diagnostic test...

  17. A semi-analytical model for pressure-time history of granular pyrotechnic materials in a closed system

    SciTech Connect

    Razani, A.; Shahinpoor, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Hingorani-Norenberg, S.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Recent experiments with Titanium Subhydride Potassium Perchlorate burning under a zero-volume firing condition have shown that compaction occurs ahead of the burn front. A multiphase flow model can be used to obtain the pressure-time history. However, the number of assumptions on parameters and models must be made to obtain a solution. In this work a semi-analytical model is developed to determine the pressure-time history based on the measured burning front velocity. There are experimental evidence that the burning velocity is a slowly varying function of compaction. It is assumed that the burning particles have a given size distribution and they burn parallel to their outer surface. The burning rate is assumed to be pressure dependent. The penetration of gaseous combustion products into the pores ahead of the burn front and the compaction of the charge can be included by introducing suitable pressure dependent parameters. The formulation of the problem results in an integro-differential equation for the pressure-time history of gaseous combustion products in the close system. This equation is solved numerically to obtain the pressure. A parametric study is performed to find the sensitivity of pressure to different parameters. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Mobile health platform for pressure ulcer monitoring with electronic health record integration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joel J P C; Pedro, Luís M C C; Vardasca, Tomé; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Martins, Henrique M G

    2013-12-01

    Pressure ulcers frequently occur in patients with limited mobility, for example, people with advanced age and patients wearing casts or prostheses. Mobile information communication technologies can help implement ulcer care protocols and the monitoring of patients with high risk, thus preventing or improving these conditions. This article presents a mobile pressure ulcer monitoring platform (mULCER), which helps control a patient's ulcer status during all stages of treatment. Beside its stand-alone version, it can be integrated with electronic health record systems as mULCER synchronizes ulcer data with any electronic health record system using HL7 standards. It serves as a tool to integrate nursing care among hospital departments and institutions. mULCER was experimented with in different mobile devices such as LG Optimus One P500, Samsung Galaxy Tab, HTC Magic, Samsung Galaxy S, and Samsung Galaxy i5700, taking into account the user's experience of different screen sizes and processing characteristics. PMID:24255053

  19. Ocean Bottom Pressure Records at the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbert, Angela; Matthews, Andrew; Hughes, Chris W.; Tamisiea, Mark E.

    2014-05-01

    As part of a research effort funded by the U.K. Natural Environment Research Council, the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) has been developing a repository of data from in-situ ocean bottom pressure recorders (OBPRs) from all possible sources. The data are being processed to a common format using a consistent methodology so that time series are directly comparable. Efforts are also being made to ensure that data are accompanied by comprehensive metadata. The OBPR data are supplied primarily for hourly and daily intervals, making them ideal for studies of tidal to seasonal variability. In addition, because bottom pressure recorders measure changes in ocean mass, these data are an ideal complement to GRACE satellite data and a useful accompaniment to sea level data from tide gauges and altimetry. Consequently, it is anticipated that the PSMSL OBPR repository will become a valuable product to the scientific community.

  20. Development of a tonometric sensor for measurement and recording of arterial pressure waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczuk, K.; Werszko, M.; Sasiadek, J. Z.; Kosek, J.; Berny, W.; Weiser, A.; Feder-Kubis, J.

    2013-09-01

    There are many techniques and devices for measurement and recording of arterial blood pressure. Some of them allow (enable) additionally to observe the shape of a wave of arterial pressure, which can be regarded as one of the most important diagnostic parameters of human cardiovascular system. This paper presents a novel design and prototype of a new, non-invasive blood waveform measuring device. It expounds theoretical and experimental (including latest preliminary clinical) results obtained during several years of extensive investigations into blood pressure waveform measuring and monitoring problem. According to investigations performed in the laboratory and preliminary clinical evaluation, the sensor has linear steady-state characteristics and satisfactory dynamic properties. It is an efficient and accurate tool for blood pressure waveform monitoring and assessing the cardiovascular condition of the patients. The novelty of this solution is that the device is equipped with a pneumatic pressure sensor based on the pneumatic nozzle flapper amplifier principle with negative feedback. Due to such a technical solution, the device does not require any cuff, which remains an essential component of the majority of contemporary non-invasive blood pressure measurement devices; therefore, it can be used on the artery where the application of a cuff would be impossible (e.g., carotid artery). This advantage makes possible to obtain an accurate shape of blood pressure waveform with high fidelity, comparable to a direct measurement method. Moreover, during the measurement the device converts directly "pressure into pressure." Such a principle of operation makes possible to eliminate additional calibration (at the current stage of research we have eliminated the necessity of calibration in laboratory conditions).

  1. Development of a tonometric sensor for measurement and recording of arterial pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Tomczuk, K; Werszko, M; Sasiadek, J Z; Kosek, J; Berny, W; Weiser, A; Feder-Kubis, J

    2013-09-01

    There are many techniques and devices for measurement and recording of arterial blood pressure. Some of them allow (enable) additionally to observe the shape of a wave of arterial pressure, which can be regarded as one of the most important diagnostic parameters of human cardiovascular system. This paper presents a novel design and prototype of a new, non-invasive blood waveform measuring device. It expounds theoretical and experimental (including latest preliminary clinical) results obtained during several years of extensive investigations into blood pressure waveform measuring and monitoring problem. According to investigations performed in the laboratory and preliminary clinical evaluation, the sensor has linear steady-state characteristics and satisfactory dynamic properties. It is an efficient and accurate tool for blood pressure waveform monitoring and assessing the cardiovascular condition of the patients. The novelty of this solution is that the device is equipped with a pneumatic pressure sensor based on the pneumatic nozzle flapper amplifier principle with negative feedback. Due to such a technical solution, the device does not require any cuff, which remains an essential component of the majority of contemporary non-invasive blood pressure measurement devices; therefore, it can be used on the artery where the application of a cuff would be impossible (e.g., carotid artery). This advantage makes possible to obtain an accurate shape of blood pressure waveform with high fidelity, comparable to a direct measurement method. Moreover, during the measurement the device converts directly "pressure into pressure." Such a principle of operation makes possible to eliminate additional calibration (at the current stage of research we have eliminated the necessity of calibration in laboratory conditions). PMID:24089854

  2. Analytical approach to transforming filter design for sound field recording and reproduction using circular arrays with a spherical baffle.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shoichi; Furuya, Ken'ichi; Wakayama, Keigo; Shimauchi, Suehiro; Saruwatari, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    A sound field recording and reproduction method using circular arrays of microphones and loudspeakers with a spherical baffle is proposed. The spherical baffle is an acoustically rigid object on which the microphone array is mounted. The driving signals of the loudspeakers must be obtained from the signals received by the microphones. A transform filter for this signal conversion is analytically derived, which is referred to as the wave field reconstruction filter. The proposed method using a spherical baffle is compared with methods using an array of directional microphones and a microphone array mounted on a cylindrical baffle. Numerical simulations indicated that the proposed method is advantageous for sound field recording and reproduction compared with the other two methods. The results of measurement experiments in a real environment are also demonstrated. PMID:27036240

  3. Recording and analysis of transient otoacoustic emissions during outer ear canal pressure compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Moises

    Otoacoustic Emissions (OAEs) are sounds generated by an active process in the auditory system's cochlea. It has been widely accepted that the generation of OAEs is a precursor for healthy hearing. The measurement of evoked OAEs can be used to determine the general health of the cochlea and basilar membrane's response and sound transmission forward and backwards through the inner ear. OAEs are commonly used for newborn infant hearing screening where many middle ear pathologies are first detected. In most cases, secondary screening tests such as tympanometry are not conducted unless the patient has failed the OAE screening first. Increases in ear canal pressure have an almost identical effect on OAE recordings when compared to naturally occurring negative middle ear pressures (NMEPs) (Sun & Shaver, 2009). Thus arises the need for pressure compensated OAE screening. This study aims at reviewing the design of a self-compensating pressure system capable of generating steady meatal pressures during OAE subject screening. Facets of system design including patient safety, software interaction, and initial test results will be presented. We will also present the results of a volunteer study which collected the TEOAE and meatal responses of 20 individual ears during multiple pressure criteria. Testing and analysis of signals in both the time and frequency domains will be reviewed.

  4. Analytical model of high pressure burning rates in a transient environment. [nitramine propellant combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.; Strand, L. D.

    1978-01-01

    A transient ballistics and combustion model is derived to represent the closed vessel experiment that is widely used to characterize the high pressure burning rates of solid propellants. The model is applied to explain why burning rates deduced from the closed vessel are in basic agreement with those measured from an equilibrium strand burner in the case of homogeneous propellants, but differ significantly in the case of nitramine composite propellants. Thermal profile time lag effects become small at high pressure because the burning rates become high. However, the development of the burning surface structure of those nitramine propellants which exhibit shifts in pressure exponent causes the mass burning rate to lag and then exceed the equilibrium value. It is necessary to consider this mechanism in applications dealing with high pressures and pressurization rates.

  5. Development and Evaluation of Computer-Administered Analytical Questions for the Graduate Record Examinations General Test. GRE Board Professional Report No. 88-06P.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgeman, Brent; Rock, Donald A.

    Three new computer-administered item types for the analytical scale of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test were developed and evaluated. One item type was a free-response version of the current analytical reasoning item type. The second item type was a somewhat constrained free-response version of the pattern identification (or…

  6. An Analytical Approach for Estimating Fossil Record and Diversification Events in Sharks, Skates and Rays

    PubMed Central

    Guinot, Guillaume; Adnet, Sylvain; Cappetta, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern selachians and their supposed sister group (hybodont sharks) have a long and successful evolutionary history. Yet, although selachian remains are considered relatively common in the fossil record in comparison with other marine vertebrates, little is known about the quality of their fossil record. Similarly, only a few works based on specific time intervals have attempted to identify major events that marked the evolutionary history of this group. Methodology/Principal Findings Phylogenetic hypotheses concerning modern selachians’ interrelationships are numerous but differ significantly and no consensus has been found. The aim of the present study is to take advantage of the range of recent phylogenetic hypotheses in order to assess the fit of the selachian fossil record to phylogenies, according to two different branching methods. Compilation of these data allowed the inference of an estimated range of diversity through time and evolutionary events that marked this group over the past 300 Ma are identified. Results indicate that with the exception of high taxonomic ranks (orders), the selachian fossil record is by far imperfect, particularly for generic and post-Triassic data. Timing and amplitude of the various identified events that marked the selachian evolutionary history are discussed. Conclusion/Significance Some identified diversity events were mentioned in previous works using alternative methods (Early Jurassic, mid-Cretaceous, K/T boundary and late Paleogene diversity drops), thus reinforcing the efficiency of the methodology presented here in inferring evolutionary events. Other events (Permian/Triassic, Early and Late Cretaceous diversifications; Triassic/Jurassic extinction) are newly identified. Relationships between these events and paleoenvironmental characteristics and other groups’ evolutionary history are proposed. PMID:22957091

  7. Aquifer Response to Record Low Barometric Pressures in the Southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    A late-winter cyclone classified as one of the most intense of the 20th century moved across the Southeastern states of Georgia and South Carolina and onto the Northeast during March 12-14, 1993. Record low barometric pressures were recorded in Augusta, Georgia (28.93 inches of mercury) and Columbia, South Carolina (28.63 inches of mercury) on March 13,1993, and pressures returned to normal values (near 3D inches of mercury) within one day following these record lows. This relatively unusual event provided an opportunity to examine the attendant water-level response in continuously monitored ground-water wells in regional Atlantic Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Blue Ridge aquifers in the Southeast. Water levels in all wells examined responded inversely to the short duration, extreme drop in barometric pressure. Barometric efficiencies (??ground-water level/??barometric-pressure level) calculated were dependent on depth to screened- or open-interval midpoint (highest correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.89) and, to a lesser extent, total thickness of confining material above the aquifer tapped (highest r2 = 0.65). Wells in crystalline-rock aquifers had a correlation with depth to open-interval midpoint (r2 = 0.89) similar to the sedimentary aquifers examined. The magnitude of barometric efficiency was also strongly related to a well's increased distance from aquifer outcrop areas in the Cretaceous aquifers in South Carolina (r2 = 0.95) and the upper Brunswick aquifer in Georgia (r2 = 0.90), because these aquifers are more deeply buried toward the coast. This relation between barometric efficiency, well depth, and extent of confinement suggests that barometric efficiency determinations can provide useful information to hydrologists concerned with examining an aquifer's degree of confinement and corresponding isolation from land surface, particularly when the aquifer is used as a source for public supply.

  8. Wideband external pulse recording during cuff deflation: a new technique for evaluation of the arterial pressure pulse and measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Blank, S G; West, J E; Müller, F B; Cody, R J; Harshfield, G A; Pecker, M S; Laragh, J H; Pickering, T G

    1988-06-01

    Analysis of the external brachial pulse recorded during standard blood pressure cuff deflation with use of a transducer with a wide frequency response has revealed a reproducible pattern with three distinct components that we have labeled K1, K2, and K3. K1 is a low-amplitude, low-frequency signal that is present with cuff pressures above systolic pressure. K2 is a triphasic signal appearing at systolic pressure and disappearing at diastolic pressure, which approximately corresponds to the audible Korotkoff sound. K3 appears with cuff pressure between systolic and diastolic pressure and continues to be present below diastolic pressure. Intra-arterial pressure recordings made with a high-fidelity Millar catheter-tip manometer revealed K2 and K3 analogs. K3 resembles the intra-arterial pressure waveform and when calibrated according to the pulse pressure, noninvasive dK3/dt determinations correlated well with intra-arterial dP/dt measurements. The appearance/disappearance property of K2 was designated as the "K2 algorithm" and represents a new, objective noninvasive method for measurement of blood pressure. The K2 algorithm compares favorably with intra-arterial measurements, is more accurate than the auscultatory technique, and may be especially useful in clinical situations in which the auscultatory technique does not work well. PMID:3370770

  9. The influence of institutional pressures on hospital electronic health record presence.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Naleef; Bazzoli, Gloria J; Farnsworth Mick, Stephen S; Harless, David W

    2015-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) are a promising form of health information technology that could help US hospitals improve on their quality of care and costs. During the study period explored (2005-2009), high expectations for EHR diffused across institutional stakeholders in the healthcare environment, which may have pressured hospitals to have EHR capabilities even in the presence of weak technical rationale for the technology. Using an extensive set of organizational theory-specific predictors, this study explored whether five factors - cause, constituents, content, context, and control - that reflect the nature of institutional pressures for EHR capabilities motivated hospitals to comply with these pressures. Using information from several national data bases, an ordered probit regression model was estimated. The resulting predicted probabilities of EHR capabilities from the empirical model's estimates were used to test the study's five hypotheses, of which three were supported. When the underlying cause, dependence on constituents, or influence of control were high and potential countervailing forces were low, hospitals were more likely to employ strategic responses that were compliant with the institutional pressures for EHR capabilities. In light of these pressures, hospitals may have acquiesced, by having comprehensive EHR capabilities, or compromised, by having intermediate EHR capabilities, in order to maintain legitimacy in their environment. The study underscores the importance of our assessment for theory and policy development, and provides suggestions for future research. PMID:25840047

  10. Discriminating exhumation models of ultra-high-pressure rocks in the Western Alps by structural record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury; Schmalholz, Stefam; Pleuger, Jan; Epard, Jean-Luc

    2014-05-01

    Despite extensive research, the dynamics of tectonic nappes exhibiting high- and ultrahigh-pressure rocks [(U)HP] is still debated. We classify existing models for nappe formation into two types, and refer to them as the thrust and intrusion models. Classical thrust models approximate the orogen as a wedge with a rigid buttress behind and a subducting lithospheric slab beneath. The dominant process of nappe formation is thrusting (brittle and/or ductile) that generates a dominant top-to-the-foreland sense of shear. Thrust models can explain the imbricate nappe stacking and first-order structural observations in the Western Alps. However, in the last decades (U)HP rocks were found in nappes, and it is usually assumed that metamorphic pressure is a good indicator of maximum burial. In intrusion models, (U)HP rocks are subducted to mantle depths (>100 km) and return to crustal depths by buoyancy-driven or tectonically-forced flow. Intrusion models could reproduce the first-order patterns of P-T-t paths of the Western Alps. Nappe formation at such mantle depths cannot be explained by the thrust model; nappe intrusion from large depths into shallower areas seems more appropriate. This argument against thrust models, however, is solely based on the assumption that metamorphic pressure indicates maximum burial (assuming lithostatic pressure). This very assumption is the only argument in favour of the intrusion models. If, however, significant and positive deviations from lithostatic pressure existed during nappe formation, then (U)HP rocks would have been formed at significantly shallower depth, and thrust models could be applicable to the Western Alps reconciling both structural and P-T-t records. Discrimination between the two nappe-forming models can better be achieved by examining the absence of a particular structural record and not by evaluating the existing structural and P-T-t records. A fundamental kinematic (rheology and driving force independent) feature of the

  11. Experimental and analytical investigation on the variation of spray characteristics along radial distance downstream of a pressure swirl atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. H.; Li, W. M.; Chin, J. S.

    1986-06-01

    The variation of spray characteristics (Sauter Mean Diameter and Rosin-Rammler drop-size distribution parameter) downstream of a pressure swirl atomizer along radial distance has been measured by laser light scattering technology. An analytical model has been developed that is capable of predicting the variation of spray characteristics along radial distance. A comparison between the prediction and experimental data shows excellent agreement. It shows that the spray model proposed, although relatively simple, is correct and can be used with some expansion and modification to predict more complicated spray systems.

  12. Tsunami data assimilation of Cascadia seafloor pressure gauge records from the 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Sheehan, Anne F.; Satake, Kenji; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Mulia, Iyan Eka; Maeda, Takuto

    2016-05-01

    We use tsunami waveforms recorded on a dense array of seafloor pressure gauges offshore Oregon and California from the 2012 Haida Gwaii, Canada, earthquake to simulate the performance of two different real-time tsunami-forecasting methods. In the first method, the tsunami source is first estimated by inversion of recorded tsunami waveforms. In the second method, the array data are assimilated to reproduce tsunami wavefields. These estimates can be used for forecasting tsunami on the coast. The dense seafloor array provides critical data for both methods to produce timeliness (>30 min lead time) and accuracy in both timing and amplitude (>94% confidence) tsunami forecasts. Real-time tsunami data on dense arrays and data assimilation can be tested as a possible new generation tsunami warning system.

  13. A Record-High Ocean Bottom Pressure in the South Pacific Observed by GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boening, Carmen; Lee, Tong; Zlotnicki, Victor

    2011-01-01

    In late 2009 to early 2010, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite pair observed a record increase in ocean bottom pressure (OBP) over a large mid-latitude region of the South East Pacific. Its magnitude is substantially larger than other oceanic events in the Southern Hemisphere found in the entire GRACE data records (2003-2010) on multi-month time scales. The OBP data help to understand the nature of a similar signal in sea surface height (SSH) anomaly observed by altimetry: the SSH increase is mainly due to mass convergence. Analysis of the barotropic vorticity equation using scatterometer data, atmospheric reanalysis product, and GRACE and altimeter an atmospheric reanalysis product observations suggests that the observed OBP/SSH signal was primarily caused by wind stress curl associated with a strong and persistent anticyclone in late 2009 in combination with effects of planetary vorticity gradient, bottom topography, and friction

  14. Evaluation of a new fiber-optic pressure recording system for cardiovascular measurements in mice.

    PubMed

    Woldbaek, Per Reidar; Stromme, Taevje Andreas; Sande, Jørn Bodvar; Christensen, Geir; Tønnessen, Theis; Ilebekk, Arnfinn

    2003-11-01

    We have tested a new fiber-optic pressure recording system, Samba, with a thin fiber [outer diameter (OD) = 0.25 mm] and a pressure sensor (length and OD = 0.42 mm) attached to the end. The accuracy of the system tested in vitro was good, with a coefficient of variation of 2.54% at 100 mmHg. The drift was <0.45 mmHg/h, and the temperature sensitivity was approximately 0.07 mmHg/1 degrees C between 22 and 37 degrees C. The frequency response characteristics were similar to a 1.4-Fr Millar catheter (0-200 Hz). Introduction of the Samba sensor from the right carotid artery into the left ventricle in six mice caused no drop in mean aortic pressure, whereas introduction of a 1.4-Fr Millar catheter (OD = 0.47 mm; n = 6) caused a pressure drop from 91.6 +/- 9.2 to 65.1 +/- 6.2 mmHg; P < 0.05. Thus the Samba sensor system may represent a new alternative to assess hemodynamic variables in the murine cardiovascular system. PMID:12829434

  15. Prediction of pressure drop in fluid tuned mounts using analytical and computational techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasher, William C.; Khalilollahi, Amir; Mischler, John; Uhric, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A simplified model for predicting pressure drop in fluid tuned isolator mounts was developed. The model is based on an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and was made more general through the use of empirical coefficients. The values of these coefficients were determined by numerical simulation of the flow using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package FIDAP.

  16. Continuous ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. A new method using a transducer tipped catheter and a simple recording system.

    PubMed

    Levy, R D; Cunningham, D; Shapiro, L M; Wright, C; Mockus, L; Fox, K M

    1986-04-01

    A transducer tipped catheter and simple recording system were used for the continuous measurement of ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure. The pulmonary artery pressure was recorded on a miniaturised tape recorder and replayed via an optical writer. Pulmonary arterial systolic and diastolic pressures can be analysed on a beat to beat basis. Continuous ambulatory monitoring was performed for a total 288 hours in 13 patients who were undergoing routine investigation for coronary artery disease. There was less than 1% zero drift and 0.25% linearity error per full scale pressure. The frequency response of the entire system was flat to 8 Hz with a linear phase delay. The transducer tipped catheter and a conventional fluid-filled system were used to measure left ventricular and pulmonary artery end diastolic pressures in eight patients. The correlation between the results obtained by the two methods was excellent. This method could be used at any centre equipped for ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. PMID:3964499

  17. Digitized pressure-time records, selected nuclear events. Technical report, 1 September 1982-1 April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    McMullan, F.W.; Bryant, E.J.

    1986-04-30

    Pressure-time records are presented for selected atmospheric nuclear events. The records were extracted from published test reports, digitized, and given uniform pressure-time scales for a given event and a given range to permit easier comparison. Data include p-t, q-t, p(tot)-t, Mach No-t, and Impulse-t as appropriate. Selected data were scaled to 1 kT.

  18. Experimental and analytical program to determine strains in 737 LAP splice joints subjected to normal fuselage pressurization loads

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Jeong, D.Y.

    1996-02-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (FAATC) has initiated several research projects to assess the structural integrity of the aging commercial aircraft fleet. One area of research involves the understanding of a phenomenon known as ``Widespread Fatigue Damage`` or WFD, which refers to a type of multiple element cracking that degrades the damage tolerance capability of an aircraft structure. Research on WFD has been performed both experimentally and analytically including finite element modeling of fuselage lap splice joints by the Volpe Center. Fuselage pressurization tests have also been conducted at the FAA`s Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to obtain strain gage data from select locations on the FAA/AANC 737 Transport Aircraft Test Bed. One-hundred strain channels were used to monitor five different lap splice bays including the fuselage skin and substructure elements. These test results have been used to evaluate the accuracy of the analytical models and to support general aircraft analysis efforts. This paper documents the strain fields measured during the AANC tests and successfully correlates the results with analytical predictions.

  19. Pressure tide gauge records from the Atlantic shelf off Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Mendoza, Luciano; Perdomo, Raúl; Hormaechea, José Luis; Savcenko, Roman; Bosch, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Based on pressure tide gauge observations at three sites off the Atlantic coast of Tierra del Fuego main island, time series spanning one to seven months of bottom pressure and sea-level variations are derived and analysed to reveal the major driving mechanisms. Ocean tides account for 99.5% of the total energy of the sea-level variations. The amplitudes and phases of a comprehensive set of tidal constituents resulting from a harmonic tidal analysis are presented. Exceptionally large shallow-water tides are identified. The second largest contribution is due to the local inverse barometer model accounting for up to 65% of the variance of the tide residual sea-level variations. Close to the shore a significant topographic modulation of the sea-level variations is revealed. The in situ observations are compared with six recent global ocean tide models, official tide tables, and sea-surface heights derived from satellite altimetry data. The amplitudes and phases predicted by the ocean tide models for the semidiurnal and diurnal constituents agree with those derived from our tide gauge records on average within 2 cm and 5°, respectively. In the time domain the tidal signal represented by the models deviates typically by a few decimetres from that extracted from our records. Absolute altimeter biases were determined for the Jason-2, Jason-1 extended mission, and Envisat satellite altimeters. Relative sea-level variations are represented by the altimetry data with an accuracy of the order of 5 cm.

  20. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [data aquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Information regarding the safety limits of hydrocarbons in liquid and gaseous oxygen, the steps taken for hydrocarbon removal from liquified gases, and the analysis of the contaminants was searched and the results are presented. The safety of hydrocarbons in gaseous systems was studied, and the latest hydrocarbon test equipment and methodology is reviewed. A detailed sampling and analysis plan is proposed to evaluate high pressure GN2 and LOX systems.

  1. Tephrostratigraphic record from the Northern Ionian Sea and geochemical analytic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, B.; Siani, G.; Sanatcroce, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Paterne, M.; Villemant, B.

    2012-12-01

    condition in the Ionian Sea and can be used for land-sea correlations for this important climatic event. More in general, these data allow a significant update of the knowledge of the volcanic ash dispersal from Lipari and Somma-Vesuvius volcanoes. Caron et al., 2012, Late Pleistocene to Holocene tephrostratigraphic record from the Northern Ionian Sea. Marine Geology, 311-314; 41-51

  2. 30 CFR 250.523 - How long do I keep records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and diagnostic tests? 250.523 Section 250.523 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... casing pressure and diagnostic tests? Records of casing pressure and diagnostic tests must be kept at the field office nearest the well for a minimum of 2 years. The last casing diagnostic test for each...

  3. A compact and autoclavable system for acute extracellular neural recording and brain pressure monitoring for humans.

    PubMed

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Baranauskas, Gytis; Vato, Alessandro; Bonfanti, Andrea; Zambra, Guido; Maggiolini, Emma; Semprini, Marianna; Ricci, Davide; Ansaldo, Alberto; Castagnola, Elisa; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Fadiga, Luciano

    2015-02-01

    One of the most difficult tasks for the surgeon during the removal of low-grade gliomas is to identify as precisely as possible the borders between functional and non-functional brain tissue with the aim of obtaining the maximal possible resection which allows to the patient the longer survival. For this purpose, systems for acute extracellular recordings of single neuron and multi-unit activity are considered promising. Here we describe a system to be used with 16 microelectrodes arrays that consists of an autoclavable headstage, a built-in inserter for precise electrode positioning and a system that measures and controls the pressure exerted by the headstage on the brain with a twofold purpose: to increase recording stability and to avoid disturbance of local perfusion which would cause a degradation of the quality of the recording and, eventually, local ischemia. With respect to devices where only electrodes are autoclavable, our design permits the reduction of noise arising from long cable connections preserving at the same time the flexibility and avoiding long-lasting gas sterilization procedures. Finally, size is much smaller and set up time much shorter compared to commercial systems currently in use in surgery rooms, making it easy to consider our system very useful for intra-operatory mapping operations. PMID:25486648

  4. Analytical Investigation of Elastic Thin-Walled Cylinder and Truncated Cone Shell Intersection Under Internal Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zamani, J; Soltani, B; Aghaei, M

    2014-10-01

    An elastic solution of cylinder-truncated cone shell intersection under internal pressure is presented. The edge solution theory that has been used in this study takes bending moments and shearing forces into account in the thin-walled shell of revolution element. The general solution of the cone equations is based on power series method. The effect of cone apex angle on the stress distribution in conical and cylindrical parts of structure is investigated. In addition, the effect of the intersection and boundary locations on the circumferential and longitudinal stresses is evaluated and it is shown that how quantitatively they are essential. PMID:25053860

  5. A Graphene-Based Resistive Pressure Sensor with Record-High Sensitivity in a Wide Pressure Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, He; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Bie, Zhi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Li, Cheng; Mi, Wen-Tian; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Pressure sensors are a key component in electronic skin (e-skin) sensing systems. Most reported resistive pressure sensors have a high sensitivity at low pressures (<5 kPa) to enable ultra-sensitive detection. However, the sensitivity drops significantly at high pressures (>5 kPa), which is inadequate for practical applications. For example, actions like a gentle touch and object manipulation have pressures below 10 kPa, and 10-100 kPa, respectively. Maintaining a high sensitivity in a wide pressure range is in great demand. Here, a flexible, wide range and ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor with a foam-like structure based on laser-scribed graphene (LSG) is demonstrated. Benefitting from the large spacing between graphene layers and the unique v-shaped microstructure of the LSG, the sensitivity of the pressure sensor is as high as 0.96 kPa-1 in a wide pressure range (0 ~ 50 kPa). Considering both sensitivity and pressure sensing range, the pressure sensor developed in this work is the best among all reported pressure sensors to date. A model of the LSG pressure sensor is also established, which agrees well with the experimental results. This work indicates that laser scribed flexible graphene pressure sensors could be widely used for artificial e-skin, medical-sensing, bio-sensing and many other areas.

  6. A Graphene-Based Resistive Pressure Sensor with Record-High Sensitivity in a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Tian, He; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Bie, Zhi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Li, Cheng; Mi, Wen-Tian; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Pressure sensors are a key component in electronic skin (e-skin) sensing systems. Most reported resistive pressure sensors have a high sensitivity at low pressures (<5 kPa) to enable ultra-sensitive detection. However, the sensitivity drops significantly at high pressures (>5 kPa), which is inadequate for practical applications. For example, actions like a gentle touch and object manipulation have pressures below 10 kPa, and 10–100 kPa, respectively. Maintaining a high sensitivity in a wide pressure range is in great demand. Here, a flexible, wide range and ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor with a foam-like structure based on laser-scribed graphene (LSG) is demonstrated. Benefitting from the large spacing between graphene layers and the unique v-shaped microstructure of the LSG, the sensitivity of the pressure sensor is as high as 0.96 kPa−1 in a wide pressure range (0 ~ 50 kPa). Considering both sensitivity and pressure sensing range, the pressure sensor developed in this work is the best among all reported pressure sensors to date. A model of the LSG pressure sensor is also established, which agrees well with the experimental results. This work indicates that laser scribed flexible graphene pressure sensors could be widely used for artificial e-skin, medical-sensing, bio-sensing and many other areas. PMID:25721159

  7. Data-infilling in daily mean river flow records: first results using a visual analytics tool (gapIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustarini, Laura; Parisot, Olivier; Ghoniem, Mohammad; Trebs, Ivonne; Médoc, Nicolas; Faber, Olivier; Hostache, Renaud; Matgen, Patrick; Otjacques, Benoît

    2015-04-01

    Missing data in river flow records represent a loss of information and a serious drawback in water management. An incomplete time series prevents the computation of hydrological statistics and indicators. Also, records with data gaps are not suitable as input or validation data for hydrological or hydrodynamic modelling. In this work we present a visual analytics tool (gapIT), which supports experts to find the most adequate data-infilling technique for daily mean river flow records. The tool performs an automated calculation of river flow estimates using different data-infilling techniques. Donor station(s) are automatically selected based on Dynamic Time Warping, geographical proximity and upstream/downstream relationships. For each gap the tool computes several flow estimates through various data-infilling techniques, including interpolation, multiple regression, regression trees and neural networks. The visual application provides the possibility for the user to select different donor station(s) w.r.t. those automatically selected. The gapIT software was applied to 24 daily time series of river discharge recorded in Luxembourg over the period 01/01/2007 - 31/12/2013. The method was validated by randomly creating artificial gaps of different lengths and positions along the entire records. Using the RMSE and the Nash-Sutcliffe (NS) coefficient as performance measures, the method is evaluated based on a comparison with the actual measured discharge values. The application of the gapIT software to artificial gaps led to satisfactory results in terms of performance indicators (NS>0.8 for more than half of the artificial gaps). A case-by-case analysis revealed that the limited number of reconstructed record gaps characterized by a high RMSE values (NS>0.8) were caused by the temporary unavailability of the most appropriate donor station. On the other hand, some of the gaps characterized by a high accuracy of the reconstructed record were filled by using the data from

  8. Road, rail, and air transportation noise in residential and workplace neighborhoods and blood pressure (RECORD Study).

    PubMed

    Méline, Julie; Van Hulst, Andraea; Thomas, Frederique; Chaix, Basile

    2015-01-01

    Associations between road traffic noise and hypertension have been repeatedly documented, whereas associations with rail or total road, rail, and air (RRA) traffic noise have rarely been investigated. Moreover, most studies of noise in the environment have only taken into account the residential neighborhood. Finally, few studies have taken into account individual/neighborhood confounders in the relationship between noise and hypertension. We performed adjusted multilevel regression analyses using data from the 7,290 participants of the RECORD Study to investigate the associations of outdoor road, rail, air, and RRA traffic noise estimated at the place of residence, at the workplace, and in the neighborhoods around the residence and workplace with systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and hypertension. Associations were documented between higher outdoor RRA and road traffic noise estimated at the workplace and a higher SBP [+1.36 mm of mercury, 95% confidence interval (CI): +0.12, +2.60 for 65-80 dB(A) vs 30-45 dB(A)] and DBP [+1.07 (95% CI: +0.28, +1.86)], after adjustment for individual/neighborhood confounders. These associations remained after adjustment for risk factors of hypertension. Associations were documented neither with rail traffic noise nor for hypertension. Associations between transportation noise at the workplace and blood pressure (BP) may be attributable to the higher levels of road traffic noise at the workplace than at the residence. To better understand why only noise estimated at the workplace was associated with BP, our future work will combine Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking, assessment of noise levels with sensors, and ambulatory monitoring of BP. PMID:26356373

  9. Road, rail, and air transportation noise in residential and workplace neighborhoods and blood pressure (RECORD Study)

    PubMed Central

    Méline, Julie; Van Hulst, Andraea; Thomas, Frederique; Chaix, Basile

    2015-01-01

    Associations between road traffic noise and hypertension have been repeatedly documented, whereas associations with rail or total road, rail, and air (RRA) traffic noise have rarely been investigated. Moreover, most studies of noise in the environment have only taken into account the residential neighborhood. Finally, few studies have taken into account individual/neighborhood confounders in the relationship between noise and hypertension. We performed adjusted multilevel regression analyses using data from the 7,290 participants of the RECORD Study to investigate the associations of outdoor road, rail, air, and RRA traffic noise estimated at the place of residence, at the workplace, and in the neighborhoods around the residence and workplace with systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and hypertension. Associations were documented between higher outdoor RRA and road traffic noise estimated at the workplace and a higher SBP [+1.36 mm of mercury, 95% confidence interval (CI): +0.12, +2.60 for 65-80 dB(A) vs 30-45 dB(A)] and DBP [+1.07 (95% CI: +0.28, +1.86)], after adjustment for individual/neighborhood confounders. These associations remained after adjustment for risk factors of hypertension. Associations were documented neither with rail traffic noise nor for hypertension. Associations between transportation noise at the workplace and blood pressure (BP) may be attributable to the higher levels of road traffic noise at the workplace than at the residence. To better understand why only noise estimated at the workplace was associated with BP, our future work will combine Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking, assessment of noise levels with sensors, and ambulatory monitoring of BP. PMID:26356373

  10. A Semi-Analytical Method for Rapid Estimation of Near-Well Saturation, Temperature, Pressure and Stress in Non-Isothermal CO2 Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForce, T.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.

    2015-12-01

    Reservoir cooling near the wellbore is expected when fluids are injected into a reservoir or aquifer in CO2 storage, enhanced oil or gas recovery, enhanced geothermal systems, and water injection for disposal. Ignoring thermal effects near the well can lead to under-prediction of changes in reservoir pressure and stress due to competition between increased pressure and contraction of the rock in the cooled near-well region. In this work a previously developed semi-analytical model for immiscible, nonisothermal fluid injection is generalised to include partitioning of components between two phases. Advection-dominated radial flow is assumed so that the coupled two-phase flow and thermal conservation laws can be solved analytically. The temperature and saturation profiles are used to find the increase in reservoir pressure, tangential, and radial stress near the wellbore in a semi-analytical, forward-coupled model. Saturation, temperature, pressure, and stress profiles are found for parameters representative of several CO2 storage demonstration projects around the world. General results on maximum injection rates vs depth for common reservoir parameters are also presented. Prior to drilling an injection well there is often little information about the properties that will determine the injection rate that can be achieved without exceeding fracture pressure, yet injection rate and pressure are key parameters in well design and placement decisions. Analytical solutions to simplified models such as these can quickly provide order of magnitude estimates for flow and stress near the well based on a range of likely parameters.

  11. Homogenization of atmospheric pressure time series recorded at VLBI stations using a segmentation LASSO approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balidakis, Kyriakos; Heinkelmann, Robert; Lu, Cuixian; Soja, Benedikt; Karbon, Maria; Nilsson, Tobias; Glaser, Susanne; Andres Mora-Diaz, Julian; Anderson, James; Liu, Li; Raposo-Pulido, Virginia; Xu, Minghui; Schuh, Harald

    2015-04-01

    Time series of meteorological parameters recorded at VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) observatories allow us to realistically model and consequently to eliminate the atmosphere-induced effects in the VLBI products to a large extent. Nevertheless, this advantage of VLBI is not fully exploited since such information is contaminated with inconsistencies, such as uncertainties regarding the calibration and location of the meteorological sensors, outliers, missing data points, and breaks. It has been shown that such inconsistencies in meteorological data used for VLBI data analysis impose problems in the geodetic products (e.g vertical site position) and result in mistakes in geophysical interpretation. The aim of the procedure followed here is to optimally model the tropospheric delay and bending effects that are still the main sources of error in VLBI data analysis. In this study, the meteorological data recorded with sensors mounted in the vicinity of VLBI stations have been homogenized spanning the period from 1979 until today. In order to meet this objective, inhomogeneities were detected and adjusted using test results and metadata. Some of the approaches employed include Alexandersson's Standard Normal Homogeneity Test and an iterative procedure, of which the segmentation part is based on a dynamic programming algorithm and the functional part on a LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator) estimator procedure. For the provision of reference time series that are necessary to apply the aforementioned methods, ECMWF's (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ERA-Interim reanalysis surface data were employed. Special care was taken regarding the datum definition of this model. Due to the significant height difference between the VLBI antenna's reference point and the elevation included in geopotential fields of the specific numerical weather models, a hypsometric adjustment is applied using the absolute pressure level from the WMO

  12. Coupling of Pore Pressure and Ground Motion: Further Studies using Data Recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seale, S. H.; Lavallee, D.; Archuleta, R. J.; Steidl, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Pore pressure built up during an earthquake and the hazard associated with soil liquefaction present a major challenge for our society, as has been dramatically illustrated by recent large events (e.g. the 2011 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake). There is consensus among scientists that a better assessment of the liquefaction risk requires a better understanding of the coupling between pore pressure and ground motion time histories. There is a basic need to investigate coupling as a function of the frequency content of the ground motion. The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah event has provided a remarkable opportunity to investigate and model the coupling. The event was well recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife station located 110 km from the hypocenter. The station is equipped with three-component strong-motion accelerometers at the surface and in boreholes at various depths and with pore pressure transducers located in a saturated, liquefiable layer. The recorded pore pressure and ground motion time histories both have frequency content that is a function of time. We have applied a wavelet decomposition technique to the El Mayor ground motion and pore pressure data, looking for a linear relationship between the signals. The analysis shows that the early P-wave accelerations (vertical component) initiate pore pressure response. However, the pore pressure records contain a low-frequency component that dominates the signal with no corresponding low-frequency component in the ground motion signals recorded near-by. Although uncommon, a similar behavior has been also reported in the literature for pore pressure signals recoded during the 1980 Mammoth Lakes, California, earthquake. We have extended this work to the analysis of 4 other seismic events that have induced an increase in pore pressure at WLA. As the response of pore pressure is potentially a local phenomenon, we have restricted our analysis to recordings from the same site. These events include the M5.8 Ocotillo

  13. 2D fluid-analytical simulation of electromagnetic effects in low pressure, high frequency electronegative capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Lieberman, M. A.; Marakhtanov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    A fast 2D axisymmetric fluid-analytical multifrequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor code is used to study center high nonuniformity in a low pressure electronegative chlorine discharge. In the code, a time-independent Helmholtz wave equation is used to solve for the capacitive fields in the linearized frequency domain. This eliminates the time dependence from the electromagnetic (EM) solve, greatly speeding up the simulations at the cost of neglecting higher harmonics. However, since the code allows up to three driving frequencies, we can add the two most important harmonics to the CCP simulations as the second and third input frequencies. The amplitude and phase of these harmonics are estimated by using a recently developed 1D radial nonlinear transmission line (TL) model of a highly asymmetric cylindrical discharge (Lieberman et al 2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 055011). We find that at higher applied frequencies, the higher harmonics contribute significantly to the center high nonuniformity due to their shorter plasma wavelengths.

  14. [Twenty-four hour automatic recording of blood pressure and cardiac rhythm in patients with borderline hypertension].

    PubMed

    Cybulska, I; Popławska, W; Niegowska, J; Makowiecka-Cieśla, M; Kabat, M; Borowiecka, E; Sznajderman, M

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of 24-hour automatic recording of blood pressure and cardiac rhythm in patients with borderline hypertension. The study was performed in 50 patients aged 38.8 +/- 13.1 using the Del Mar Avionics device. Mean time of recordings was 21.3 hours, and the mean number of blood pressure measurements per one patient was 52.4. Great fluctuations of systolic blood pressure (from 92.1 +/- 12.6 to 191 +/- 37.0 mm Hg) and diastolic one (from 57.3 +/- 11.4 to 118.9 +/- 13.8 mm Hg) were observed. Mean systolic blood pressure (125.6 +/- 10.6 mm Hg) was significantly lower than the mean value of last three ambulatory measurements (141.9 +/- 9.8; p less than 0.001). Also mean diastolic pressure was lower than that obtained in the out patient clinic (84.7 +/- 9.7 vs 91.9 +/- 3.2 mm Hg; p less than 0.001). Mean heart rate during the day was 86.2 +/- 10.7 and at night 69.7 +/- 10.5 beats per minute. Ventricular and/or supraventricular cardiac arrhythmias were observed in 14 (28%) of examined patients. Results of the study indicate, that 24-hour automatic blood pressure recording is the valuable method, affording possibilities for more precise estimation of blood pressure and its 24-hour fluctuations in patients with borderline hypertension. PMID:2639977

  15. Prediction of pressure drawdown in gas reservoirs using a semi-analytical solution of the non-linear gas flow equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mattar, L.; Adegbesan, L.O.

    1980-01-01

    The differential equation for flow of gases in a porous medium is nonlinear and cannot be solved by strictly analytical methods. Previous studies in the literature have obtained analytical solutions to this equation by linearlization (i.e., treating viscosity and compressibilty as constant). In this study, the solution for nonlinear gas flow equation is obtained using the semianalytical technique developed by Kale and Mattar which solves the nonlinear equation by the method of perturbation. Results obtained, for prediction of pressure drawdown in gas reservoirs, indicate that the solution of the linearlized form of the equation is valid for both low and high permeability reservoirs.

  16. Grain-scale pressure variations recorded in orthopyroxene from the diamond grade ultra-high pressure Svartberget peridotite body, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.

    2014-05-01

    The ultra-high pressure (UHP) area in the Western Gneiss Region (WGR) in Norway is recognized as a giant UHP domain that resulted from the collision of Baltica and Laurentia during the Caledonian Orogeny. Recent geochronological data suggest the WGR resided at UHP for several tens of millions of years and slowly exhumed near- isothermally to amphibolite facies conditions. The Svartberget peridotite body is located in the north-westernmost part of the UHP area of the WGR. The rocks record diamond grade peak metamorphism at ~800 ° C in crosscutting pyroxenite veins as evidenced by micro-diamond inclusions in Caledonian metamorphic garnet. The peridotite body preserves primary spinel-garnet-peridotite assemblages stable at much lower pressure (~2.0 GPa at ~800 ° C). Orthopyroxene typically shows bowl-shaped aluminium (Al) zoning and conventional geothermobarometry using core compositions of garnet-opx mineral pairs yields P-T estimates of 5.5 GPa at ~800 ° C. Besides Al increasing toward the rims of orthopyroxene grains, concentrations also increase in cracks and veins crosscutting the mineral. Here, recently developed unconventional geobarometry and Gibbs minimization methods are used to derive the grain-scale pressure variations corresponding to the observed Al-zoning. The methods independently result in pressure variations from core to rim on the order of 2.0 GPa. Interestingly, low-Al cores correspond to low pressures whereas high-Al rims correspond to high pressures, opposite to conventional geothermobarometry results. However, the new estimates are in agreement with the consideration that at high pressure the high density phases become more stable. In a binary orthopyroxene in the MAS-system, the Mg-Tschermak endmember thought to be the dominant Al-species in the mineral has a higher density then the Al-free enstatite endmember. Therefore at higher pressure the Mg-Tschermak endmember in orthopyroxene is favoured over the enstatite endmember. This is similar

  17. Analytical evaluation of effect of equivalence ratio inlet-air temperature and combustion pressure on performance of several possible ram-jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, Leonard K; Gammon, Benson E

    1953-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation of the theoretical air specific impulse performance and adiabatic combustion temperatures of several possible ram-jet fuels over a range of equivalence ratios, inlet-air temperatures, and combustion pressures, is presented herein. The fuels include octane-1, 50-percent-magnesium slurry, boron, pentaborane, diborane, hydrogen, carbon, and aluminum. Thermal effects from high combustion temperatures were found to effect considerably the combustion performance of all the fuels. An increase in combustion pressure was beneficial to air specific impulse at high combustion temperatures. The use of these theoretical data in engine operation and in the evaluation of experimental data is described.

  18. Experimental and analytical investigation of the variation of spray characteristics along a radial distance downstream of a pressure-swirl atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, J. S.; Li, W. M.; Wang, X. F.

    1986-01-01

    The variation of spray characteristics along a radial distance downstream of a pressure-swirl atomizer was measured by laser light-scattering technology. An analytical model was developed to predict the variation of spray characteristics along the radial distance. A comparison of the predicted and experimental data showed excellent agreement. Therefore, the spray model proposed, although relatively simple, is correct and can be used, with some expansion and modification of the prepared model, to predict more complicated spray systems.

  19. Fracture opening/propagation behavior and their significance on pressure-time records during hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Takashi Kojima; Yasuhiko Nakagawa; Koji Matsuki; Toshiyuki Hashida

    1992-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing with constant fluid injection rate was numerically modeled for a pair of rectangular longitudinal fractures intersecting a wellbore in an impermeable rock mass, and numerical calculations have been performed to investigate the relations among the form of pressure-time curves, fracture opening/propagation behavior and permeability of the mechanically closed fractures. The results have shown that both permeability of the fractures and fluid injection rate significantly influence the form of the pressure-time relations on the early stage of fracture opening. Furthermore it has been shown that wellbore pressure during fracture propagation is affected by the pre-existing fracture length.

  20. Reliability and validity of pressure and temporal parameters recorded using a pressure-sensitive insole during running.

    PubMed

    Mann, Robert; Malisoux, Laurent; Brunner, Roman; Gette, Paul; Urhausen, Axel; Statham, Andrew; Meijer, Kenneth; Theisen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Running biomechanics has received increasing interest in recent literature on running-related injuries, calling for new, portable methods for large-scale measurements. Our aims were to define running strike pattern based on output of a new pressure-sensitive measurement device, the Runalyser, and to test its validity regarding temporal parameters describing running gait. Furthermore, reliability of the Runalyser measurements was evaluated, as well as its ability to discriminate different running styles. Thirty-one healthy participants (30.3 ± 7.4 years, 1.78 ± 0.10 m and 74.1 ± 12.1 kg) were involved in the different study parts. Eleven participants were instructed to use a rearfoot (RFS), midfoot (MFS) and forefoot (FFS) strike pattern while running on a treadmill. Strike pattern was subsequently defined using a linear regression (R(2)=0.89) between foot strike angle, as determined by motion analysis (1000 Hz), and strike index (SI, point of contact on the foot sole, as a percentage of foot sole length), as measured by the Runalyser. MFS was defined by the 95% confidence interval of the intercept (SI=43.9-49.1%). High agreement (overall mean difference 1.2%) was found between stance time, flight time, stride time and duty factor as determined by the Runalyser and a force-measuring treadmill (n=16 participants). Measurements of the two devices were highly correlated (R ≥ 0.80) and not significantly different. Test-retest intra-class correlation coefficients for all parameters were ≥ 0.94 (n=14 participants). Significant differences (p<0.05) between FFS, RFS and habitual running were detected regarding SI, stance time and stride time (n=24 participants). The Runalyser is suitable for, and easily applicable in large-scale studies on running biomechanics. PMID:24054346

  1. Doctors record higher blood pressures than nurses: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christopher E; Horvath, Isabella A; Taylor, Rod S; Campbell, John L

    2014-01-01

    Background The magnitude of the ‘white coat effect’, the alerting rise in blood pressure, is greater for doctors than nurses. This could bias interpretation of studies on nurse-led care in hypertension, and risks overestimating or overtreating high blood pressure by doctors in clinical practice. Aim To quantify differences between blood pressure measurements made by doctors and nurses. Design and setting Systematic review and meta-analysis using searches of MEDLINE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase, journal collections, and conference abstracts. Method Studies in adults reporting mean blood pressures measured by doctors and nurses at the same visit were selected, and mean blood pressures extracted, by two reviewers. Study risk of bias was assessed using modified Cochrane criteria. Outcomes were pooled across studies using random effects meta-analysis. Results In total, 15 studies (11 hypertensive; four mixed hypertensive and normotensive populations) were included from 1899 unique citations. Compared with doctors’ measurements, nurse-measured blood pressures were lower (weighted mean differences: systolic −7.0 [95% confidence interval {CI} = −4.7 to −9.2] mmHg, diastolic −3.8 [95% CI = −2.2 to −5.4] mmHg). For studies at low risk of bias, differences were lower: systolic −4.6 (95% CI = −1.9 to −7.3) mmHg; diastolic −1.7 (95% CI = −0.1 to −3.2) mmHg. White coat hypertension was diagnosed more frequently based on doctors’ than on nurses’ readings: relative risk 1.6 (95% CI =1.2 to 2.1). Conclusions The white coat effect is smaller for blood pressure measurements made by nurses than by doctors. This systematic difference has implications for hypertension diagnosis and management. Caution is required in pooling data from studies using both nurse- and doctor-measured blood pressures. PMID:24686887

  2. Blood pressure level impacts risk of death among HIV seropositive adults in Kenya: a retrospective analysis of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mortality among people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is increasingly due to non-communicable causes. This has been observed mostly in developed countries and the routine care of HIV infected individuals has now expanded to include attention to cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure are often overlooked among HIV seropositive (+) individuals in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to determine the effect of blood pressure on mortality among HIV+ adults in Kenya. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of electronic medical records of a large HIV treatment program in western Kenya between 2005 and 2010. All included individuals were HIV+. We excluded participants with AIDS, who were <16 or >80 years old, or had data out of acceptable ranges. Missing data for key covariates was addressed by inverse probability weighting. Primary outcome measures were crude mortality rate and mortality hazard ratio (HR) using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for potential confounders including HIV stage. Results There were 49,475 (74% women) HIV+ individuals who met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Mortality rates for men and women were 3.8 and 1.8/100 person-years, respectively, and highest among those with the lowest blood pressures. Low blood pressure was associated with the highest mortality incidence rate (IR) (systolic <100 mmHg IR 5.2 [4.8-5.7]; diastolic <60 mmHg IR 9.2 [8.3-10.2]). Mortality rate among men with high systolic blood pressure without advanced HIV (3.0, 95% CI: 1.6-5.5) was higher than men with normal systolic blood pressure (1.1, 95% CI: 0.7-1.7). In weighted proportional hazards regression models, men without advanced HIV disease and systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg carried a higher mortality risk than normotensive men (HR: 2.39, 95% CI: 0.94-6.08). Conclusions Although there has been little attention paid to high blood pressure among HIV+ Africans, we show that blood

  3. 10+ years of ACORK: Continuous pore pressure record from the decollement zone at Nankai Trough off Muroto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, M.; Davis, E. E.; Becker, K.; Miyazaki, J.; Hulme, S.; Mendrum, R.; Toki, T.; Wheat, C. G.; Kasaya, T.

    2012-12-01

    Pore pressure and hydrological properties play key roles in governing coupling and slip behavior along the subducting plate interface. During the KR22-12 cruise, three dives were completed using ROV KAIKO onboard R/V KAIREI during Dec. 20-25, 2011, to retrieve pore pressure data and interstitial fluid samples from ACORKs at ODP Holes 808I and 1173B situated landward and seaward of the deformation front in the Nankai Trough off Cape Muroto. With 3-year-long and a 4-year-long new data records from Holes 808I and 1173B, respectively, we now have over 10-year-long continuous pressure records since June 2001 at both sites. Data from most monitoring depths show systematic variations in average pressure, and in formation pressure response to seafloor tidal loading. In 2005 and 2009, we observed significant decrease in the amplitudes of pressure response to semi-diurnal tidal loading at Hole 808I. Transient changes were observed at the time of several nearby earthquakes, including the 2011 Mar. 11 Tohoku earthquake, followed by long-lasting pressure changes in both holes starting on Mar. 23, 2011. Gas-tight fluid sampling operations were successfully carried out from the hydraulic port attached to the swellable packer inserted within the ACORK head at Hole 808I. The swellable packer was set in order to isolate the décollement zone that lies roughly 20 m below the bottom of casing at 922 m below the seafloor. We observed shimmering water venting through the port, and the flow rate was measured using a ball-type flowmeter. Fluid samples looked muddy, probably as a result of staining from the casing steel. We believe that the packer seal at the ACORK head is set properly, although the pore pressure at 922 m does not seem to have increased up to 2011. Still, the observed fluid seepage suggests a significant amount of fluid evacuated from the décollement zone since ACORK installation, which may have changed its hydrogeological condition.

  4. How pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication: a conversation analytic study of psychiatric outpatient consultations.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Alan; Chaplin, Rob; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2012-01-01

    The professional identity of psychiatry depends on it being regarded as one amongst many medical specialties and sharing ideals of good practice with other specialties, an important marker of which is the achievement of shared decision-making and avoiding a reputation for being purely agents of social control. Yet the interactions involved in trying to achieve shared decision-making are relatively unexplored in psychiatry. This study analyses audiotapes of 92 outpatient consultations involving nine consultant psychiatrists focusing on how pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication. Detailed conversation analysis reveals that some shared decisions are considerably more pressured than others. At one end of a spectrum of pressure are pressured shared decisions, characterised by an escalating cycle of pressure and resistance from which it is difficult to exit without someone losing face. In the middle are directed decisions, where the patient cooperates with being diplomatically steered by the psychiatrist. At the other extreme are open decisions where the patient is allowed to decide, with the psychiatrist exerting little or no pressure. Directed and open decisions occurred most frequently; pressured decisions were rarer. Patient risk did not appear to influence the degree of pressure applied in these outpatient consultations. PMID:21812791

  5. Comparing (semi-) analytic solutions used to model the impact of deep carbon injection on the displacement and pressurization of the resident brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandilla, K.; Kraemer, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide into deep saline formations is seen as one possible technology for mitigating carbon emissions from utilities. The safety of the sequestered carbon dioxide is the focus of many studies with leakage through faults or abandoned wells as some of the main failure mechanisms. The focus of this study is on the displacement of resident brine and the resulting changes in pressure due to the injection of large volumes of super-critical phase carbon dioxide into the subsurface. The movement of brine becomes important if it travels vertically and reaches an existing or potential underground source of drinking water where an increase in salt content may threaten the viability of the drinking water source. Vertical displacement of brine may occur slowly through confining layers, or more rapidly through faults and abandoned wells. This presentation compares several (semi-) analytic solutions to determine their applicability to the problem of brine pressurization and displacement. The goal is to find ranges of formation parameters (e.g., formation seal conductivity, distance to lateral boundary, … ) for which simplifying assumption are justifiable Each simplification in the conceptual model (e.g., neglecting the lateral boundary turns a bounded domain into an infinite one) leads to a simpler (semi-) analytic solution. The process involves a solution hierarchy from the most complex solution down to the basic Theis solution. A software tool-kit implementing several (semi-) analytic solutions was developed for this study to facilitate the comparison of the solutions.

  6. Role of Ambulatory and Home Blood Pressure Recording in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Nimrta; Campbell, Patrick; White, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Due to shortcomings of the office blood pressure (BP) in individuals with hypertension, including white coat and masked hypertension effects, terminal digit bias and large variability in BP among a small number of readings, the utilization of out-of-office blood pressure measurements has become much more common in clinical practice. The presence of the syndromes of white coat and masked hypertension creates the concern that the office BP measurements are not reflective of an individual patient's true BP values. Home (or self) and ambulatory BP assessments have been used in numerous types of clinical trials and have demonstrated their usefulness as reliable research and clinical tools. In this article, we review the recent literature on the benefits and limitations of home (self) and ambulatory monitoring of the BP in clinical practice, particularly how it relates to diagnosis of patients with various presentations of hypertension and to cardiovascular outcomes with long-term follow-ups of population cohorts. PMID:19863865

  7. An Analytical Solution for Mechanical Responses Induced by Temperature and Air Pressure in a Lined Rock Cavern for Underground Compressed Air Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shu-Wei; Xia, Cai-Chu; Du, Shi-Gui; Zhang, Ping-Yang; Zhou, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical responses induced by temperature and air pressure significantly affect the stability and durability of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in a lined rock cavern. An analytical solution for evaluating such responses is, thus, proposed in this paper. The lined cavern of interest consists of three layers, namely, a sealing layer, a concrete lining and the host rock. Governing equations for cavern temperature and air pressure, which involve heat transfer between the air and surrounding layers, are established first. Then, Laplace transform and superposition principle are applied to obtain the temperature around the lined cavern and the air pressure during the operational period. Afterwards, a thermo-elastic axisymmetrical model is used to analytically determine the stress and displacement variations induced by temperature and air pressure. The developments of temperature, displacement and stress during a typical operational cycle are discussed on the basis of the proposed approach. The approach is subsequently verified with a coupled compressed air and thermo-mechanical numerical simulation and by a previous study on temperature. Finally, the influence of temperature on total stress and displacement and the impact of the heat transfer coefficient are discussed. This paper shows that the temperature sharply fluctuates only on the sealing layer and the concrete lining. The resulting tensile hoop stresses on the sealing layer and concrete lining are considerably large in comparison with the initial air pressure. Moreover, temperature has a non-negligible effect on the lined cavern for underground compressed air storage. Meanwhile, temperature has a greater effect on hoop and longitudinal stress than on radial stress and displacement. In addition, the heat transfer coefficient affects the cavern stress to a higher degree than the displacement.

  8. A Semi-Analytical Solution for Large-Scale Injection-Induced PressurePerturbation and Leakage in a Laterally Bounded Aquifer-AquitardSystem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-07-15

    A number of (semi-)analytical solutions are available to drawdown analysis and leakage estimation of shallow aquifer-aquitard systems. These solutions assume that the systems are laterally infinite. When a large-scale pumping from (or injection into) an aquifer-aquitard system of lower specific storativity occurs, induced pressure perturbation (or hydraulic head drawdown/rise) may reach the lateral boundary of the aquifer. We developed semi-analytical solutions to address the induced pressure perturbation and vertical leakage in a 'laterally bounded' system consisting of an aquifer and an overlying/underlying aquitard. A one-dimensional radial flow equation for the aquifer was coupled with a one-dimensional vertical flow equation for the aquitard, with a no-flow condition imposed on the outer radial boundary. Analytical solutions were obtained for (1) the Laplace-transform hydraulic head drawdown/rise in the aquifer and in the aquitard, (2) the Laplace-transform rate and volume of leakage through the aquifer-aquitard interface integrated up to an arbitrary radial distance, (3) the transformed total leakage rate and volume for the entire interface, and (4) the transformed horizontal flux at any radius. The total leakage rate and volume depend only on the hydrogeologic properties and thicknesses of the aquifer and aquitard, as well as the duration of pumping or injection. It was proven that the total leakage rate and volume are independent of the aquifer's radial extent and wellbore radius. The derived analytical solutions for bounded systems are the generalized solutions of infinite systems. Laplace-transform solutions were numerically inverted to obtain the hydraulic head drawdown/rise, leakage rate, leakage volume, and horizontal flux for given hydrogeologic and geometric conditions of the aquifer-aquitard system, as well as injection/pumping scenarios. Application to a large-scale injection-and-storage problem in a bounded system was demonstrated.

  9. An Analytical Explanation for the X-43A Flush Air Data Sensing System Pressure Mismatch Between Flight and Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, Joel C.

    2010-01-01

    Following the successful Mach 7 flight test of the X-43A, unexpectedly low pressures were measured by the aft set of the onboard Flush Air Data Sensing System s pressure ports. These in-flight aft port readings were significantly lower below Mach 3.5 than was predicted by theory. The same lower readings were also seen in the Mach 10 flight of the X-43A and in wind-tunnel data. The pre-flight predictions were developed based on 2-dimensional wedge flow, which fails to predict some of the significant 3-dimensional flow features in this geometry at lower Mach numbers. Using Volterra s solution to the wave equation as a starting point, a three-dimensional finite wedge approximation to flow over the X-43A forebody is presented. The surface pressures from this approximation compare favorably with the measured wind tunnel and flight data at speeds of Mach 2.5 and 3.

  10. Analytic Study of Induced Pressure on Long Bodies of Revolution with Varying Nose Bluntness at Hypersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHise, Vernon

    1961-01-01

    Pressure distributions and shock shapes for a series of cylindrical afterbodies having nose fineness ratios from 0.4 to 4 have been calculated by using the method of characteristics for a perfect gas. The fluid mediums investigated were air and helium and the Mach number range was from 5 to 40. Flow parameters obtained from blast-wave analogy gave good correlations of blunt-nose induced pressures and shock shapes. Experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the characteristic calculations. The concept of hypersonic similitude enables good correlation of the results with respect to body shape, Mach number, and ratio of specific heats.

  11. Chart-Recorded Capillary Pulse Pressure Measurement as an Unobtrusive Means of Detecting Unspecified Frame-Specific Flaws in Programmed Instruction Sequences: An Experimental Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraley, Lawrence E., Jr.

    Capillary pulse pressure measurement may have potential as a covert but direct means of determining a subject's level of affect as he encounters the frame-by-frame content of programed instruction. An experiment was designed which called for recording the capillary pulse pressure of subjects as they worked through some programed instruction…

  12. Numerical and analytical assessment of the influence of blood flow through arterial perforators on the pulse pressure shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Piechna, Adam; Cieślicki, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Most of the existing models of cardiovascular system do not take into account the leakage of blood through a number of small vessels branching the main arterial trunks and called perforators. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate their influence on the pulse pressure waveform. Linearized, 1D computer model of a minute part of the cardiovascular system has been designed and series of simulations with and without leakage have been conducted. Blood flow in a single segment of the arterial system and pressure in vascular nodes were described by the two first order partial differential equations. A set of boundary conditions on both ends of a single vascular segment and at nodal point have been formulated. To solve the linear set of above equations, a numerical method of characteristic has been used. It was shown that the leakage reduces reflection from the peripheral resistance. The simulations have also shown a decrease of the average pressure value with increase of leakage and modification of the pulse pressure waveform. All these effects depended strongly on the assumed leakage value and practically died out when its value was reduced to about 10% of the main flow.

  13. Analytical Modeling of Pressure Wall Hole Size and Maximum Tip-to-Tip Crack Length for Perforating Normal and Oblique Orbital Debris Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Mohamed, Essam

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study whose objective was to develop first-principles-based models of hole size and maximum tip-to-tip crack length for a spacecraft module pressure wall that has been perforated in an orbital debris particle impact. The hole size and crack length models are developed by sequentially characterizing the phenomena comprising the orbital debris impact event, including the initial impact, the creation and motion of a debris cloud within the dual-wall system, the impact of the debris cloud on the pressure wall, the deformation of the pressure wall due to debris cloud impact loading prior to crack formation, pressure wall crack initiation, propagation, and arrest, and finally pressure wall deformation following crack initiation and growth. The model development has been accomplished through the application of elementary shock physics and thermodynamic theory, as well as the principles of mass, momentum, and energy conservation. The predictions of the model developed herein are compared against the predictions of empirically-based equations for hole diameters and maximum tip-to-tip crack length for three International Space Station wall configurations. The ISS wall systems considered are the baseline U.S. Lab Cylinder, the enhanced U.S. Lab Cylinder, and the U.S. Lab Endcone. The empirical predictor equations were derived from experimentally obtained hole diameters and crack length data. The original model predictions did not compare favorably with the experimental data, especially for cases in which pressure wall petalling did not occur. Several modifications were made to the original model to bring its predictions closer in line with the experimental results. Following the adjustment of several empirical constants, the predictions of the modified analytical model were in much closer agreement with the experimental results.

  14. A 240 ka terrestrial 18O record from a NE-Siberian loess-like permafrost paleosol-sequence based on a novel analytical 18O method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthorn, M.; Zech, M.; Detsch, F.; Juchelka, D.; Kalbitz, K.; Mayr, C.; Werner, R.; Zech, R.; Zech, W.; Glaser, B.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, we developed a novel analytical tool for paleoclimate research based on compound-specific delta18O analyses of hemicellulose-derived monosaccharides using gas chromatography-pyrolysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-Py-IRMS) (Zech and Glaser, 2009. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 23, 3522-3532). This method overcomes extraction, purification and hygroscopicity problems of so far applied cellulose methods based on TC/EA-IRMS delta18O analyses and allows establishing 18O records from sedimentary organic matter. Taking advantage of plant samples from a climate chamber experiment we can demonstrate that our novel method yields similar results like cellulose for plant material. Furthermore, we demonstrate using 18O-enriched water that the hydroxyl-groups of hemicelluloses are not prone to oxygen exchange reactions (Zech et al., 2012. Organic Geochemistry 42, 1470-1475). Ongoing methodological improvements will be shortly reported. By applying our novel 18O method to a loess-like permafrost paleosol-sequence we established a presumably 240 ka terrestrial 18O record for NE-Siberia. While the modern topsoil and the interglacial/-stadial paleosols reveal more positive delta18O values, the glacial paleosols reveal more negative delta18O values. The 18O variability is generally confirmed by a respective deltaD record which is based on sedimentary plant leafwax-derived n-alkanes. This finding suggests that our high-latitude 240 ka terrestrial 18O and D/H record from NE-Siberia reflects the temperature-dependent isotopic composition of precipitation and the increased isotopic enrichment of leaf-water during interglacials/-stadials.

  15. Semi-analytical prediction of hydraulic resistance and heat transfer for pipe and channel flows of water at supercritical pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Laurien, E.

    2012-07-01

    Within the Generation IV International Forum the Supercritical Water Reactor is investigated. For its core design and safety analysis the efficient prediction of flow and heat transfer parameters such as the wall-shear stress and the heat-transfer coefficient for pipe and channel flows is needed. For circular pipe flows a numerical model based on the one-dimensional conservation equations of mass, momentum end energy in the radial direction is presented, referred to as a 'semi-analytical' method. An accurate, high-order numerical method is employed to evaluate previously derived analytical solutions of the governing equations. Flow turbulence is modeled using the algebraic approach of Prandtl/van-Karman, including a model for the buffer layer. The influence of wall roughness is taken into account by a new modified numerical damping function of the turbulence model. The thermo-hydraulic properties of water are implemented according to the international standard of 1997. This method has the potential to be used within a sub-channel analysis code and as wall-functions for CFD codes to predict the wall shear stress and the wall temperature. The present study presents a validation of the method with comparison of model results with experiments and multi-dimensional computational (CFD) studies in a wide range of flow parameters. The focus is laid on forced convection flows related to reactor design and near-design conditions. It is found, that the method can accurately predict the wall temperature even under deterioration conditions as they occur in the selected experiments (Yamagata el al. 1972 at 24.5 MPa, Ornatski et al. 1971 at 25.5 and Swenson et al. 1963 at 22.75 MPa). Comparison of the friction coefficient under high heat flux conditions including significant viscosity and density reductions near the wall with various correlations for the hydraulic resistance will be presented; the best agreement is achieve with the correlation of Pioro et al. 2004. It is

  16. Nitrogen recycling in subducted oceanic lithosphere: The record in high- and ultrahigh-pressure metabasaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halama, Ralf; Bebout, Gray E.; John, Timm; Schenk, Volker

    2010-03-01

    This paper provides the first measurements of the nitrogen (N) concentrations and isotopic compositions of high- and ultrahigh-pressure mafic eclogites, aimed at characterizing the subduction input flux of N in deeply subducting altered oceanic crust (AOC). The samples that were studied are from the Raspas Complex (Ecuador), Lago di Cignana (Italy), the Zambezi Belt (Zambia) and Cabo Ortegal (Spain), together representing subduction to 50-90 km depths. The eclogites contain 2-20 ppm N with δ 15N air values ranging from -1 to +8‰. These values overlap those of altered oceanic crust, but are distinct from values for fresh MORB (for the latter, ˜1.1 ppm N and δ 15N air ˜ -4‰). Based on N data in combination with other trace element data, the eclogite suites can be subdivided into those that are indistinguishable from their likely protolith, AOC, with or without superimposed effects of devolatilization (Lago di Cignana, Cabo Ortegal), and those that have experienced metasomatic additions during subduction-zone metamorphism (Zambezi Belt, Raspas). For the former group, the lack of a detectable loss of N in the eclogites, compared to various altered MORB compositions, suggests the retention of N in deeply subducted oceanic crust. The metasomatic effects affecting the latter group can be best explained by mixing with a (meta)sedimentary component, resulting in correlated enrichments of N and other trace elements (in particular, Ba and Pb) thought to be mobilized during HP/UHP metamorphism. Serpentinized and high-pressure metamorphosed peridotites, associated with the eclogites at Raspas and Cabo Ortegal, contain 3-15 ppm N with δ 15N air values ranging from +3 to +6‰, significantly higher than the generally accepted values for the MORB mantle (δ 15N air ˜ -5‰). Based on their relatively high N contents and their homogeneous and positive δ 15N values, admixing of sedimentary N is also indicated for the serpentinized peridotites. One possible pathway for the

  17. Equipment Errors: A Prevalent Cause for Fallacy in Blood Pressure Recording - A Point Prevalence Estimate from an Indian Health University

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Badrinarayan; Sinha, Nidhi Dinesh; Gidwani, Hitesh; Shukla, Sushil Kumar; Kawatra, Abhishek; Mehta, SC

    2013-01-01

    Background: Blood pressure (BP) recording is the most commonly measured clinical parameter. Standing mercury sphygmomanometer is the most widely used equipment to record this. However, recording by sphygmomanometer is subject to observer and instrumental error. The different sources of equipment error are faulty manometer tube calibration, baseline deviations and improper arm bladder cuff dimensions. This is further compounded by a high prevalence of arm bladder miss-cuffing in the target population. Objectives: The study was designed to assess the presence of equipment malcalibrations, cuff miss-matching and their effect on BP recording. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional check of all operational sphygmomanometers in a health university was carried out for the length of the manometer tube, deviation of resting mercury column from “0” level, the width and length of arm bladder cuff and extent of bladder cuff-mismatch with respect to outpatient attending population. Results: From the total of 50 apparatus selected, 39 (78%) were from hospital setups and 11 (22%) from pre-clinical departments. A manometer height deficit of 13 mm was recorded in 36 (92.23%) of the equipment in hospital and 11 (100%) from pre-clinical departments. Instruments from both settings showed significant deviation from recommended dimensions in cuff bladder length, width and length to width ratio (P < 0.001). Significant number of apparatus from hospital setups showed presence of mercury manometer baseline deviation either below or above 0 mmHg at the resting state (χ2 = 5.61, D. F. = 1, P = 0.02). Positive corelationship was observed between manometer height deficit, baseline deviation and width of arm cuff bladder (Pearson correlation, P < 0.05). Bladder cuff mismatching in response to the target population was found at 48.52% for males and 36.76% for females. The cumulative effect of these factors can lead to an error in the range of 10-12 mmHg. Conclusion: Faulty equipments and

  18. Decoding carotid pressure waveforms recorded by laser Doppler vibrometry: Effects of rebreathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaccia, Sara; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Richter, Edward; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rohrbaugh, John W.

    2014-05-01

    The principal goal of this study was to assess the capability of the laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) method for assessing cardiovascular activity. A rebreathing task was used to provoke changes within individuals in cardiac and vascular performance. The rebreathing task is known to produce multiple effects, associated with changes in autonomic drive as well as alterations in blood gases. The rise in CO2 (hypercapnia), in particular, produces changes in the cerebral and systemic circulation. The results from a rebreathing task (involving rebreathing the same air in a rubber bag) are presented for 35 individuals. The LDV pulse was measured from a site overlying the carotid artery. For comparison and validation purposes, several conventional measures of cardiovascular function were also obtained, with an emphasis on the electrocardiogram (ECG), continuous blood pressure (BP) from the radial artery, and measures of myocardial performance using impedance cardiography (ICG). During periods of active rebreathing, ventilation increased. The conventional cardiovascular effects included increased mean arterial BP and systemic vascular resistance, and decreased cardiac stroke volume (SV) and pulse transit time (PTT). These effects were consistent with a pattern of α-adrenergic stimulation. During the immediate post-rebreathing segments, in contrast, mean BP was largely unaffected but pulse BP increased, as did PTT and SV, whereas systemic vascular resistance decreased-a pattern consistent with β-adrenergic effects in combination with the direct effects of hypercapnia on the vascular system. Measures of cardiovascular activity derived from the LDV pulse velocity and displacement waveforms revealed patterns of changes that mirrored the results obtained using conventional measures. In particular, the ratio of the maximum early peak in the LDV velocity pulse to the maximum amplitude of the LDV displacement pulse (in an early systolic interval) closely mirrored the conventional

  19. Simultaneous cerebral and spinal fluid pressure recordings in surgical indications of the Chiari malformation without myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Häckel, M; Benes, V; Mohapl, M

    2001-09-01

    Patients with Chiari's malformation without myelodysplasia often suffer from another associated spinal cord lesion--syringomyelia. A condition entirely overriding the clinical picture, affecting adversely the results of surgery as well as the prognosis of this congenital developmental defect. Proceeding from the results of their surgical treatment of 40 patients with hindbrain malformation, the authors recommend, in accordance with the literature, a different approach to and classification of patients depending on the presence of syringomyelia (A/B classification; A: syringomyelia on MR--present, B: absent). The pathological development of the syrinx is caused by obstruction to the natural CSF circulation in the subarachnoid spaces of the craniocervical junction (Williams' dissociation theory). The authors are convinced that routine (static) imaging methods (CT, MR) cannot prove the presence or behaviour of a CSF block, and that they cannot help choose reliably the optimum type of treatment. In contrast, direct measurement (and monitoring) of CSF pressure in different compartments of the CSF pathways (intracranial/intraspinal compartment, i.e., in front of and beyond the suspected block) are a method which can help ascertain with precision the presence and behaviour of a CSF circulatory block, and which also provides dynamic information on such a block during the diurnal rhythm for a period of several days. The authors present the results of a prospective study of 25 patients with hindbrain malformation and describe a technique of parallel monitoring of the two CSF compartments using an adaptation of the Williams method, as well as two different types of dissociation tests designed to prove the presence of a CSF block. CSF flow obstruction was found in 11 patients, in 14 patients it could not be proved. In 8 out of 9 patients with a fully developed syrinx (group A) the block was found as expected. It was, however, diagnosed also in 3 patients until then without any

  20. Semi-analytical solution for pressure change and leakage rate through aquifer leaks or fractures considering both Darcy and non-Darcy phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, J.; Zhan, H.

    2013-12-01

    Study of potential leakage of hazardous liquid waste into deep aquifer or abandoned wells is very important research work in recent days. CO2 sequestration into the brine media is not an exception of that. The saline aquifer is always overlain by a leaky aquitard or seal which may allow the migration of the injected CO2 or any kind of hazardous liquid waste to the upper aquifer through some leaks or fractures. The scope of study includes how the migration through the seal or aquitard causes the pressure change in the upper aquifer because of that injection into the target storage aquifer. Such pressure change is used to infer the leakage pathway location and characteristics of the leak or fractures. In this complex issue both Darcian and non-Darcian flow has been taken care of combindly. The Izbash equation has been used to describe the non-Darcian flow in the aquifer. A semi-analytical solution is obtained in Laplace domain and finally it has been solved numerically. Afterwards different parameters have been evaluated (leak or fracture size, injection rate, conductivity) to see how they directly affect the upper aquifer pressure and leakage rate independently.

  1. [A validation of the data obtained with the simultaneous recording of blood pressure and the 24-hour electrocardiogram].

    PubMed

    Germanò, G; Caparra, A; Valentino, S; Coia, F; Federico, L; Santucci, A

    1993-06-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the blood pressure (BP) measurement reliability of a light weight ambulatory BP and ECG recorder. Micro AM is a new 300 g portable apparatus that combines in one device both the ambulatory BP and solid state ECG recording. The dimensions of the Micro AM are 75 x 140 x 29 mm. The monitor measures BP using Korotkoff phase 1 for systolic and phase 5 for diastolic BP, and concurrently measures oscillometric BP, one method validating the other. In addition, the manual and programmed BP measurement modes can be supplemented by an "intelligent" mode in which the ECG triggers an ambulatory BP reading during an abnormal ST segment change. A standard mercury manometer was connected with the cuff of the Micro AM with a Y-shaped part, and 12 BP measurements were simultaneously taken at 5 min intervals by the automatic device in auscultatory mode and by a trained technician in 86 normotensive volunteers (aged from 18 to 44 years, 37 males and 49 females). The algebraic differences, the frequency distribution and the difference distribution of systolic and diastolic data between the 2 methods were calculated. The results show that the automatic method gives values for systolic BP that are lower than conventional ones (average differences -0.643 mmHg), whereas for diastolic BP, the values are higher (average differences +0.229 mmHg). Then, Student's paired t-test was used to evaluate statistically significant differences. The test relative to systolic BP was significant to the critical level of 0.1%, but the differences being 3 times smaller than the instrumental tolerance. On the contrary, diastolic BP differences were non significant. In conclusion, we found a good agreement between BP recorded automatically and by sphygmomanometer. PMID:8402748

  2. Fast transient analysis and first-stage collision-induced dissociation with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ionization source to improve analyte detection and identification.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Jacob T; Hieftje, Gary M

    2010-04-01

    The recent development of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has enabled fast, simple analysis of many different sample types. The ADI-MS sources have numerous advantages, including little or no required sample pre-treatment, simple mass spectra, and direct analysis of solids and liquids. However, problems of competitive ionization and limited fragmentation require sample-constituent separation, high mass accuracy, and/or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to detect, identify, and quantify unknown analytes. To maintain the inherent high throughput of ADI-MS, it is essential for the ion source/mass analyzer combination to measure fast transient signals and provide structural information. In the current study, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source is coupled with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) to analyze fast transient signals (<500 ms FWHM). It was found that gas chromatography (GC) coupled with the FAPA source resulted in a reproducible (<5% RSD) and sensitive (detection limits of <6 fmol for a mixture of herbicides) system with analysis times of ca. 5 min. Introducing analytes to the FAPA in a transient was also shown to significantly reduce matrix effects caused by competitive ionization by minimizing the number and amount of constituents introduced into the ionization source. Additionally, MS/MS with FAPA-TOF-MS, enabling analyte identification, was performed via first-stage collision-induced dissociation (CID). Lastly, molecular and structural information was obtained across a fast transient peak by modulating the conditions that caused the first-stage CID. PMID:20349535

  3. Pressure-induced site-selective disordering of Ge2Sb2Te5: a new insight into phase-change optical recording.

    PubMed

    Kolobov, A V; Haines, J; Pradel, A; Ribes, M; Fons, P; Tominaga, J; Katayama, Y; Hammouda, T; Uruga, T

    2006-07-21

    We demonstrate that , the material of choice in phase-change optical recording (such as DVD-RAM), can be rendered amorphous by the application of hydrostatic pressure. It is argued that this structural change is due to a very strong second-nearest-neighbor Te-Te interaction that determines the long-range order in the metastable cubic phase of and also to the presence of vacancies. This newly discovered phenomenon suggests that pressure is an important factor for the formation of the amorphous phase which opens new insight into the mechanism of phase-change optical recording. PMID:16907512

  4. Knocking Combustion Observed in a Spark-Ignition Engine with Simultaneous Direct and Schlieren High-Speed Motion Pictures and Pressure Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterstrom, Gordon E

    1948-01-01

    Simultaneous direct and Schlieren photographs at 40,000 frames per second and correlated pressure records were taken of knocking combustion in a special spark-ignition engine to ascertain the intensity of certain end-zone reactions previously noted from Schlieren photography alone. A violent propagated homogeneous autoignition, or a similar phenomenon, previously observed, was again observed. The pressure records show autoignition of varying violence before the passage of a probable detonation wave. Extensive autoignition without occurrence of gas vibrations was seen in one explosion.

  5. On-line high-performance liquid chromatography method for analyte quantitation from pressurized metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishek; Myrdal, Paul B

    2004-04-01

    A sensitive and rapid, on-line reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method for quantitation of compounds at low concentrations in pressurized metered dose inhaler (MDI) systems was developed. Traditional methods for the quantitation of compounds in MDI formulations involve the opening of the MDI vial along with sample dilution prior to quantitation. The new method, reported in this study, involves a direct injection from the MDI vial into the needle injector port of a manual injector. Since there is no dilution step involved, this method can be used to quantitate low concentrations of compounds in MDIs with excellent precision. In addition, since the method requires a small injection volume of 5 microl, repeated analyses can be performed in order to generate multiple data points using the same MDI vial. Validation of the method was performed using ethanol-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (134a)-based MDIs. Beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP), a corticosteroid used for the treatment of asthma, was used as a model compound. Phase separation studies were conducted to investigate the miscibility of the ethanol-134a mixtures with different mobile phase solvent compositions. For the MDI systems in this study, an acetonitrile-water (90:10, v/v) mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.9 ml/min was found to give acceptable chromatography for BDP on a Apollo C18 5 microm, 150 mm x 4.6 mm column (Alltech Associates, Deerfield, IL, USA). Ultraviolet detection was done at 240 nm and the retention time of BDP was 2.7 min. The on-line HPLC method was characterized to be accurate, precise, sensitive, and specific. PMID:15072294

  6. Tracking Ocean Gravity Waves in Real-time: Highlights of Bottom Pressure Data Recorded on Ocean Networks Canada's NEPTUNE observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, Martin; Mihaly, Steve; Gemmrich, Johannes; Davis, Earl; Thomson, Richard; Dewey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Ocean Networks Canada operates two cabled ocean observatories off Vancouver Island on Canada's west coast. The regional NEPTUNE observatory spans the entire Juan de Fuca tectonic plate from the coast across the subduction zone to the hydrothermally active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Segment while the VENUS observatory focuses on coastal processes. Both observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex earth processes. High-precision bottom pressure recorders (BPR) deployed on the NEPTUNE observatory are capable of detecting a wide range of phenomena related to sea level variations. The observatory BPRs provide observations of nano-resolution (with respect to full scale of the instrument) pressure variations which correspond to sub-millimeter scale surface water displacements in several kilometers of water. Detected signals include tides, tsunamis, infragravity waves, swell, wave-induced microseisms, storm surge, and seismic signals. Spectral analysis reveals many of these phenomena with periods ranging from a few seconds to many hours. Dispersion patterns from distant swells are prominent in the swell and microseism bands. By comparing the difference of arrival times between longer period waves, which arrive first, and shorter period waves we can estimate the distance the swells travelled since they were generated. Using this information, swell can be tracked back to specific storms across the Pacific. The presentation will high-light some examples of the mentioned phenomena in the continuous time-series that in some instances are more than seven years long.

  7. Pressure Changes before and after Explosive Rhyolitic Bomb Ejection at Chaiten, Chile Recorded By Water Diffusion Profiles Around Tuffisite Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuffen, H.; McGowan, E.; Castro, J. M.; Berlo, K.; James, M. R.; Owen, J.; Schipper, C. I.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Saubin, E.; Wehbe, K.

    2014-12-01

    The recent rhyolitic eruptions at Chaitén and Cordón Caulle have provided valuable new insights into the relationship between explosive and effusive activity, and the gas escape mechanisms that permit rapid effusion of degassed lava[1,2]. Bombs ejected during mixed explosive-effusive activity host spectacular tuffisite veins cutting both dense obsidian (Fig 1a) and highly-expanded pumice. Tuffisite veins are ash-filled fracture networks that act as ephemeral permeable pathways for gas escape in shallow conduits and lava domes. Previous studies have revealed water depletion adjacent to tuffisite veins, leading to models of fracture-triggered pressure release[2] and estimates of gas escape timescales[2,3]. We have characterised water diffusion profiles from a new suite of tuffisite-bearing Chaitén bombs, using synchrotron-source FTIR at the Diamond Light Source, Oxford, UK. Unexpectedly, one exceptionally large tuffisite vein, which is 30 mm thick (Fig. 1a, b) is mantled by zones of strong water enrichment, which enclose the usual narrow depletion zones immediately adjacent to the vein (Fig. 1c). Consistent results from different branches of this vein (Fig. 1b) indicate a similar history. The plausible range of diffusion model solutions points towards ~2-4 hours of vein pressurisation, followed by a brief pre-quench period of lower pressure conditions. In our model the vein opened during a period of overpressure at the lava dome base, sustained by gas influx from a deeper catchment extending hundreds of metres into the upper conduit. Overpressure culminated in violent bomb ejection, after which vein pressure decreased due to gas leakage to the atmosphere through the incompletely welded vein, as observed in rhyolitic bombs from Cordón Caulle (Fig. 1d). Commonly-seen water depletion zones[2,3] may therefore merely record post-fragmentation degassing. However, the enrichment zone points towards the type of deep pressurisation associated with cycles of tilt and

  8. Characterization of Zebrafish Green Cone Photoresponse Recorded with Pressure-Polished Patch Pipettes, Yielding Efficient Intracellular Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Aquila, Marco; Benedusi, Mascia; Fasoli, Anna; Rispoli, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The phototransduction enzymatic cascade in cones is less understood than in rods, and the zebrafish is an ideal model with which to investigate vertebrate and human vision. Therefore, here, for the first time, the zebrafish green cone photoresponse is characterized also to obtain a firm basis for evaluating how it is modulated by exogenous molecules. To this aim, a powerful method was developed to obtain long-lasting recordings with low access resistance, employing pressure-polished patch pipettes. This method also enabled fast, efficient delivery of molecules via a perfusion system coupled with pulled quartz or plastic perfusion tubes, inserted very close to the enlarged pipette tip. Sub-saturating flashes elicited responses in different cells with similar rising phase kinetics but with very different recovery kinetics, suggesting the existence of physiologically distinct cones having different Ca2+ dynamics. Theoretical considerations demonstrate that the different recovery kinetics can be modelled by simulating changes in the Ca2+-buffering capacity of the outer segment. Importantly, the Ca2+-buffer action preserves the fast response rising phase, when the Ca2+-dependent negative feedback is activated by the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+. PMID:26513584

  9. Characterization of Zebrafish Green Cone Photoresponse Recorded with Pressure-Polished Patch Pipettes, Yielding Efficient Intracellular Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Marco; Benedusi, Mascia; Fasoli, Anna; Rispoli, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The phototransduction enzymatic cascade in cones is less understood than in rods, and the zebrafish is an ideal model with which to investigate vertebrate and human vision. Therefore, here, for the first time, the zebrafish green cone photoresponse is characterized also to obtain a firm basis for evaluating how it is modulated by exogenous molecules. To this aim, a powerful method was developed to obtain long-lasting recordings with low access resistance, employing pressure-polished patch pipettes. This method also enabled fast, efficient delivery of molecules via a perfusion system coupled with pulled quartz or plastic perfusion tubes, inserted very close to the enlarged pipette tip. Sub-saturating flashes elicited responses in different cells with similar rising phase kinetics but with very different recovery kinetics, suggesting the existence of physiologically distinct cones having different Ca2+ dynamics. Theoretical considerations demonstrate that the different recovery kinetics can be modelled by simulating changes in the Ca2+-buffering capacity of the outer segment. Importantly, the Ca2+-buffer action preserves the fast response rising phase, when the Ca2+-dependent negative feedback is activated by the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+. PMID:26513584

  10. Changes in switching fields of CoCrPt-SiO2 perpendicular recording media due to Ru intermediate layer under low and high gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Weixing; Murakami, Yasukazu; Shindo, Daisuke; Takahashi, Migaku

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the deposition of an intermediate Ru layer under high Ar pressure during the fabrication of CoCrPt-SiO2 perpendicular recording media is effective in improving the magnetic properties of the upper CoCrPt-SiO2 layer. The change in the switching fields of the CoCrPt-SiO2 recording layer resulting from the presence of the high-pressure Ru layer is investigated through experiments and computer simulation. The monotonous increase in the magnetic anisotropy Ku and the decrease in the intergranular exchange coupling of the CoCrPt grains due to the presence of the high-pressure Ru layer result in a slight increase in the nucleation field, a significant increase in the coercivity and the saturation field, and a decrease in the slope of the hysteresis loop.

  11. Resolution-independent modelling of environmental effects in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation that include ram-pressure stripping of both hot and cold gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Kang, Xi; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Fu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The quenching of star formation in satellite galaxies is observed over a wide range of dark matter halo masses and galaxy environments. In the recent Guo et al. and Fu et al. semi-analytic + N-body models, the gaseous environment of the satellite galaxy is governed by the properties of the dark matter subhalo in which it resides. This quantity depends of the resolution of the N-body simulation, leading to a divergent fraction of quenched satellites in high- and low-resolution simulations. Here, we incorporate an analytic model to trace the subhaloes below the resolution limit. We demonstrate that we then obtain better converged results between the Millennium I and II simulations, especially for the satellites in the massive haloes (log Mhalo = [14, 15]). We also include a new physical model for the ram-pressure stripping of cold gas in satellite galaxies. However, we find very clear discrepancies with observed trends in quenched satellite galaxy fractions as a function of stellar mass at fixed halo mass. At fixed halo mass, the quenched fraction of satellites does not depend on stellar mass in the models, but increases strongly with mass in the data. In addition to the overprediction of low-mass passive satellites, the models also predict too few quenched central galaxies with low stellar masses, so the problems in reproducing quenched fractions are not purely of environmental origin. Further improvements to the treatment of the gas-physical processes regulating the star formation histories of galaxies are clearly necessary to resolve these problems.

  12. Effects of varying CoCrV seed layer deposition pressure on Ru crystallinity in perpendicular magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Joost, W.; Das, A.; Alford, T. L.

    2009-10-01

    The effects of varying deposition parameters of a CoCrV seed layer under Ru on the structural and interfacial properties of both layers were studied. While sputtering power showed little effect on film structure, sputtering pressure during deposition of the seed layer had a significant effect on the structural properties of the seed layer. In particular, the grain morphology and crystallinity of the seed layer varied considerably with deposition pressure. Deposition of Ru using a constant recipe for all samples demonstrated the effect of varying seed layer deposition pressure on the Ru layer. The strain energy of the Ru film, a measurement of contraction due to the registry with the seed layer, was greatest at moderate seed layer sputtering pressures, while the Ru(0002) peak area was greatest at low sputtering pressures. The competing contributions of interfacial energy and strain energy describe this effect, with interfacial energy dominating at low sputtering pressures.

  13. Spectral components of laser Doppler flowmetry signals recorded in healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects at rest and during a local and progressive cutaneous pressure application: scalogram analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Koïtka, Audrey; Abraham, Pierre; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2004-09-01

    A significant transient increase in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals is observed in response to a local and progressive cutaneous pressure application in healthy subjects. This reflex may be impaired in diabetic patients. The work presents a signal processing providing the clarification of this phenomenon. Scalogram analyses of LDF signals recorded at rest and during a local and progressive cutaneous pressure application are performed on healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects. Three frequency bands, corresponding to myogenic, neurogenic and endothelial related metabolic activities, are studied. The results show that, at rest, the scalogram energy of each frequency band is significantly lower for diabetic patients than for healthy subjects, but the scalogram relative energies do not show any statistical difference between the two groups. Moreover, the neurogenic and endothelial related metabolic activities are significantly higher during the progressive pressure than at rest, in healthy and diabetic subjects. However, the relative contribution of the endothelial related metabolic activity is significantly higher during the progressive pressure than at rest, in the interval 200-400 s following the beginning of the pressure application, but only for healthy subjects. These results may improve knowledge on cutaneous microvascular responses to injuries or local pressures initiating diabetic complications.

  14. Coupling of Pore Pressure and Ground Motion Data Recorded During the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Baja California) Earthquake at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, D.; Seale, S. H.; Steidl, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Pore pressure built up during an earthquake and the hazard associated with soil liquefaction present a major challenge for our society, as was dramatically displayed during the 2011 Higashi Nihon Daishinsai (Tohoku-oki, Japan) earthquake. Currently, there is a consensus among scientists that a better assessment of the risk associated with liquefaction requires a better understanding of the coupling between pore pressure time histories and ground motion time histories. Specifically, there is a basic need to investigate the coupling as a function of the frequency content of the ground motion. The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Baja California) earthquake (M 7.2) provides a remarkable opportunity to undertake such an investigation and lay the basis to model the coupling. The event was well recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife station located 110 km from the hypocenter. The station is equipped with three-component strong-motion accelerometers at the surface and in boreholes at various depths and with pore pressure transducers located in a saturated, liquefiable layer. The recorded pore pressure and ground motion time histories are both characterized by a frequency content that is a function of time. A wavelet representation is a natural approach to investigate non-stationary time histories. To study the coupling between two signals we use the following procedure: We first compute the wavelet coefficients associated with the two signals. Then we compute the correlation between the wavelet coefficients of the two signals as a function of the frequency. Correlation coefficients provide information about the degree of linear dependence between the two signals. To account for the presence of multiplicative constants relating the wavelet coefficients of the first signal to the wavelet coefficients of the second signal, we compare the square norm of the wavelet coefficients of the two signals for the available frequency range. Additionally, investigating the distribution of the square

  15. Examining Evidence-Based Content Related to Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Paper and Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaekel, Camilla M.

    2012-01-01

    Although there have been great advancements in the Electronic Health Record (EHR), there is a dearth of rigorous research that examines the relationship between the use of electronic documentation to capture nursing process components and the impact of consistent documentation on patient outcomes (Daly, Buckwalter & Maas, 2002; Gugerty, 2006;…

  16. Mode of action of a surgical electronic lithoclast--high speed pressure, cinematographic and schlieren recordings following an ultrashort underwater electronic discharge.

    PubMed

    Tidd, M J; Webster, J; Wright, H C; Harrison, I R

    1976-01-01

    In order to investigate the mode of action of the electrical discharges from a surgical electronic lithoclast in shattering bladder stones high speed pressure-time recordings were made. The results indicated effects similar to those following an underwater detonation of high explosive. Subsequent high speed photographic analysis confirmed this. Calculations based on the results suggested that the shock waves and pressure pulses generated were of a potentially hazardous magnitude and that gas-containing bowel close to the bladder might be at particular risk as well as solid tissue as the bladder wall. Photographic data also suggested that danger might be incurred by the use of similar devices in a small enclosed space such as the ureter or renal pelvis. PMID:1244885

  17. NASA LaRC FIB Multi-Channel Anemometry Recording System-User's Manual. [conducted at the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sherylene (Compiler); Bertelrud, Arild (Compiler); Anders, J. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report is part of a series of reports describing a flow physics high-lift experiment conducted in NASA Langley Research Center's Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) in 1996. The anemometry system used in the experiment was originally designed for and used in flight tests with NASA's Boeing 737 airplane. Information that may be useful in the evaluation or use of the experimental data has been compiled. The report also contains details regarding record structure, how to read the embedded time code, as well as the output file formats used in the code reading the binary data.

  18. Time frequency analysis of laser Doppler flowmetry signals recorded in response to a progressive pressure applied locally on anaesthetized healthy rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Koïtka, Audrey; Abraham, Pierre; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2004-03-01

    The laser Doppler flowmetry technique has recently been used to report a significant transient increase of the cutaneous blood flow signal, in response to a local non-noxious pressure applied progressively on the skin of both healthy humans and rats. This phenomenon is not entirely understood yet. In the present work, a time-frequency analysis is applied to signals recorded on anaesthetized healthy rats, at rest and during a cutaneous pressure-induced vasodilation (PIV). The comparison, at rest and during PIV, of the scalogram relative energies and scalogram relative amplitudes in five bands, corresponding to five characteristic frequencies, shows an increased contribution for the endothelial related metabolic activity in PIV signals, till 400 s after the beginning of the progressive pressure application. The other subsystems (heart, respiration, myogenic and neurogenic activities) contribute relatively less during PIV than at rest. The differences are statistically significant for all the relative activities in the interval 0-200 s following the beginning of the pressure. These results and others obtained on patients, such as diabetics, could increase the understanding of some cutaneous pathologies involved in various neurological diseases and in the pathophysiology of decubitus ulcers.

  19. TitaniQ Records of P-T-D Paths from Metapelites during Burial Metamorphism and Orogenesis: Evidence for the Role of Pressure Solution Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, L. E.; Dyess, P.; Ashley, K. T.; Spear, F. S.; Thomas, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    TitaniQ (Ti-in-quartz) thermobarometry of metapelites recording crenulation cleavage development during prograde metamorphism reveals that quartz grains in different fabric domains may record distinct stages of P-T-D paths and further testifies to the importance of pressure solution creep in the rheology of the upper and middle continental crust. This study integrates microstructural analyses, petrologic modeling, cathodoluminscence (CL) imaging, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) of samples with known tectonic histories. Samples were collected along E-W transects across the Rowe-Hawley Belt (RHB) and the Connecticut Valley-Gaspe Trough (CVG) of central Vermont. Rocks of the RHB record both the Taconic and Acadian orogenies; CVG rocks record the Acadian orogeny only. CL and SIMS analyses were conducted on quartz in different microstructural contexts such as fold hinges, microlithons and cleavage domains, inclusion suites defining internal foliations in garnet, and pressure shadows. In each generation of foliation, metapelites of the RHB and CVG display pressure solution seams, flattened quartz grains neighboring micas in cleavage domains, and more equant quartz grains with foam textures in quartz-rich microlithons and hinges of microfolds. Quartz grains in prograde fabric domains lack lattice preferred orientations. CL (415 nm) zoning patterns of quartz are typically complex and associated with sharp boundaries. Patterns include: rounded-to-anhedral dark cores with bright rims (indicating an increase in [Ti] from core to rim); bright cores with dark rims; dark cores with bright mantles, and dark rims; patchy zoning; and striated grains. RHB chlorite-garnet grade metapelites yielded [Ti] from 0.4-157 ppm; a small fraction of analyses yielded [Ti] greater than that predicted for peak metamorphic conditions and are interpreted as detrital signatures. Garnet-staurolite grade CVG metapelites yielded [Ti] of 2.2-9.8 ppm. The degree of geochemical recycling of

  20. Sedimentologic to metamorphic processes recorded in the high-pressure/low-temperature Mesozoic Rosetta Marble of Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, F.; Oberhänsli, R.; Pourteau, A.; Immenhauser, A.; Candan, O.

    2016-01-01

    Anatolia's high-pressure metamorphic belts are characterized in part by a Neotethyan stratigraphic succession that includes a mid-Cretaceous hemi-pelagic marble sequence. This unit contains, towards its stratigraphic top, dm-to-m-long radiating calcitic rods forming rosette-like textures. Here, we refer to these features as "Rosetta Marble". The remarkable textural similarity of non-metamorphic selenite crystals and radiating calcite rods in the Rosetta Marble strongly suggests that these textures represent pseudomorphs after selenites. Metamorphosed hemi-pelagic limestones, dominated by Rosetta selenite pseudomorphs, are alternating with siliceous meta-sediments containing relictic radiolaria tests. This stratigraphic pattern is indicative of transient phases characterized by evaporites precipitated from basinal brines alternating with non-evaporative hemi-pelagic deposition from normal-marine seawater. The regional distribution of Rosetta Marble exposures over 600 km is indicative of basin-scale evaporitic intervals. High-pressure, low-temperature metamorphism of these rocks is witnessed by Sr-rich (up to 3500 ppm), fibrous calcite pseudomorphs after aragonite and isolated aragonite inclusions in quartz. Peak metamorphic conditions of 1.2 GPa and 300-350 °C are attested by high-Si white mica thermobarometry. The Rosetta Marble case example examines the potential to unravel the complete history from deposition to diagenesis and metamorphism of meta-sedimentary rocks.

  1. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Selma Pressure Treating Company, California (first remedial action), September 88

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-24

    The Selma Pressure Treating Company is located in Selma, California, 15 miles south of the City of Fresno. The site encompasses approximately 18 acres, including a 3- to 4-acre wood-treatment facility and 14 acres of adjacent vineyards that were used for site drainage. Wood-preserving activities using pentachlorophenol (PCP) were conducted at the site from 1942 until 1965 under a series of owners. In 1965, a new facility was constructed converting operations to a pressure treating process using chemical preservatives. Prior to 1982, wastes generated from spent retort fluids and sludges were discharged to drainage and percolation ditches, dry wells, and an unlined pond and sludge pit, as well as onto open ground and the adjacent vineyards. An inspection conducted by EPA in 1981 raised concerns about the potential for ground-water contamination, and as a result the company was required to modify its operations to minimize the potential for contamination. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water and soil are organics including dioxin and phenols, and metals including arsenic and chromium. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  2. Self-blood pressure monitoring in an urban, ethnically diverse population: A randomized clinical trial utilizing the electronic health record

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Stella S.; Tabaei, Bahman P.; Angell, Sonia Y.; Rapin, Anne; Buck, Michael D; Pagano, William G.; Maselli, Frank J.; Simmons, Alvaro; Chamany, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease. While control rates have improved over time, racial/ethnic disparities in hypertension control persist. Self-blood pressure monitoring (SBPM), by itself, has been shown to be an effective tool in predominantly white populations, but less studied in minority, urban communities. These types of minimally intensive approaches are important to test in all populations, especially those experiencing related health disparities, for broad implementation with limited resources. Methods and Results The New York City Health Department in partnership with community clinic networks implemented a randomized clinical trial (n=900, 450 per arm) to investigate the effectiveness of SBPM in medically underserved, and largely black and Hispanic participants. Intervention participants received a home blood pressure (BP) monitor and training on use, while control participants received usual care. After 9 months, systolic BP decreased (intervention: 14.7 mm Hg, control: 14.1 mm Hg; p=0.70). Similar results were observed when incorporating longitudinal data and calculating a mean slope over time. Control was achieved in 38.9% of intervention and 39.1% of control participants at the end of follow-up; the time-to-event experience of achieving BP control in the intervention vs. control were not different from each other (logrank p-value=0.91). Conclusions SBPM was not shown to improve control over usual care in this largely minority, urban population. The patient population in this study, which included a high proportion of Hispanics and uninsured persons is understudied. Results indicate these groups may have additional meaningful barriers to achieving BP control beyond access to the monitor itself. PMID:25737487

  3. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous analysis of ten amphetamine-, methamphetamine- and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-related (MDMA) analytes in human meconium

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Tamsin; Gray, Teresa R.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2008-01-01

    A liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS/MS) method for quantification of ten amphetamine-related analytes in 1 g meconium is presented. Specimen preparation included homogenization and solid phase extraction. Two multiple reaction monitoring transitions were monitored per analyte. Ten and 1 µL injection volumes permitted quantification up to 10,000 ng/g, with sufficient sensitivity to quantify minor metabolites. Lower limits of quantification ranged from 1.25 to 40 ng/g. Precision was less than 14.2%, with accuracy between 79 – 115%. Meconium from a methamphetamine-exposed neonate was analyzed. Metabolites p-hydroxymethamphetamine, norephedrine and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine were identified in meconium for the first time. PMID:18424195

  4. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of the three-dimensional flow field and relative analyte concentration distribution in an atmospheric pressure ion source.

    PubMed

    Poehler, Thorsten; Kunte, Robert; Hoenen, Herwart; Jeschke, Peter; Wissdorf, Walter; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the validation and analysis of steady state numerical simulations of the gas flows within a multi-purpose ion source (MPIS) are presented. The experimental results were obtained with particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in a non-scaled MPIS. Two-dimensional time-averaged velocity and turbulent kinetic energy distributions are presented for two dry gas volume flow rates. The numerical results of the validation simulations are in very good agreement with the experimental data. All significant flow features have been correctly predicted within the accuracy of the experiments. For technical reasons, the experiments were conducted at room temperature. Thus, numerical simulations of ionization conditions at two operating points of the MPIS are also presented. It is clearly shown that the dry gas volume flow rate has the most significant impact on the overall flow pattern within the APLI source; far less critical is the (larger) nebulization gas flow. In addition to the approximate solution of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, a transport equation for the relative analyte concentration has been solved. The results yield information on the three-dimensional analyte distribution within the source. It becomes evident that for ion transport into the MS ion transfer capillary, electromagnetic forces are at least as important as fluid dynamic forces. However, only the fluid dynamics determines the three-dimensional distribution of analyte gas. Thus, local flow phenomena in close proximity to the spray shield are strongly impacting on the ionization efficiency. PMID:21952755

  5. An impaired metabolic response to hydrostatic pressure explains Alcanivorax borkumensis recorded distribution in the deep marine water column

    PubMed Central

    Scoma, Alberto; Barbato, Marta; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Alcanivorax borkumensis is an ubiquitous model organism for hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, which dominates polluted surface waters. Its negligible presence in oil-contaminated deep waters (as observed during the Deepwater Horizon accident) raises the hypothesis that it may lack adaptive mechanisms to hydrostatic pressure (HP). The type strain SK2 was tested under 0.1, 5 and 10 MPa (corresponding to surface water, 500 and 1000 m depth, respectively). While 5 MPa essentially inactivated SK2, further increase to 10 MPa triggered some resistance mechanism, as indicated by higher total and intact cell numbers. Under 10 MPa, SK2 upregulated the synthetic pathway of the osmolyte ectoine, whose concentration increased from 0.45 to 4.71 fmoles cell−1. Central biosynthetic pathways such as cell replication, glyoxylate and Krebs cycles, amino acids metabolism and fatty acids biosynthesis, but not β-oxidation, were upregulated or unaffected at 10 MPa, although total cell number was remarkably lower with respect to 0.1 MPa. Concomitantly, expression of more than 50% of SK2 genes was downregulated, including genes related to ATP generation, respiration and protein translation. Thus, A. borkumensis lacks proper adaptation to HP but activates resistance mechanisms. These consist in poorly efficient biosynthetic rather than energy-yielding degradation-related pathways, and suggest that HP does represent a major driver for its distribution at deep-sea. PMID:27515484

  6. An impaired metabolic response to hydrostatic pressure explains Alcanivorax borkumensis recorded distribution in the deep marine water column.

    PubMed

    Scoma, Alberto; Barbato, Marta; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Alcanivorax borkumensis is an ubiquitous model organism for hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, which dominates polluted surface waters. Its negligible presence in oil-contaminated deep waters (as observed during the Deepwater Horizon accident) raises the hypothesis that it may lack adaptive mechanisms to hydrostatic pressure (HP). The type strain SK2 was tested under 0.1, 5 and 10 MPa (corresponding to surface water, 500 and 1000 m depth, respectively). While 5 MPa essentially inactivated SK2, further increase to 10 MPa triggered some resistance mechanism, as indicated by higher total and intact cell numbers. Under 10 MPa, SK2 upregulated the synthetic pathway of the osmolyte ectoine, whose concentration increased from 0.45 to 4.71 fmoles cell(-1). Central biosynthetic pathways such as cell replication, glyoxylate and Krebs cycles, amino acids metabolism and fatty acids biosynthesis, but not β-oxidation, were upregulated or unaffected at 10 MPa, although total cell number was remarkably lower with respect to 0.1 MPa. Concomitantly, expression of more than 50% of SK2 genes was downregulated, including genes related to ATP generation, respiration and protein translation. Thus, A. borkumensis lacks proper adaptation to HP but activates resistance mechanisms. These consist in poorly efficient biosynthetic rather than energy-yielding degradation-related pathways, and suggest that HP does represent a major driver for its distribution at deep-sea. PMID:27515484

  7. Experimental and analytical study of cryogenic propellant boiloff to develop and verify alternate pressurization concepts for Space Shuttle external tank using a scaled down tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuzlu, K. M.; Jones, S.; Meredith, T.

    1993-01-01

    Self pressurization by propellant boiloff is experimentally studied as an alternate pressurization concept for the Space Shuttle external tank (ET). The experimental setup used in the study is an open flow system which is composed of a variable area test tank and a recovery tank. The vacuum jacketed test tank is geometrically similar to the external LOx tank for the Space Shuttle. It is equipped with instrumentation to measure the temperature and pressure histories within the liquid and vapor, and viewports to accommodate visual observations and Laser-Doppler Anemometry measurements of fluid velocities. A set of experiments were conducted using liquid Nitrogen to determine the temperature stratification in the liquid and vapor, and pressure histories of the vapor during sudden and continuous depressurization for various different boundary and initial conditions. The study also includes the development and calibration of a computer model to simulate the experiments. This model is a one-dimensional, multi-node type which assumes the liquid and the vapor to be under non-equilibrium conditions during the depressurization. It has been tested for a limited number of cases. The preliminary results indicate that the accuracy of the simulations is determined by the accuracy of the heat transfer coefficients for the vapor and the liquid at the interface which are taken to be the calibration parameters in the present model.

  8. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  9. Comparison of sea level pressure reconstructions from western North American tree rings with a proxy record of winter severity in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.A. ); Lough, J.M.; Fritts, H.C. ); Kelley, P.M. )

    1985-11-01

    Reconstructions of winter (December-February) sea level pressure (SLP) from western North American tree-ring chronologies are compared with a proxy record of winter severity in Japan derived from the historically documented freeze dates of Lake Suwa. The SLP reconstructions extend from 1602 to 1961 and freeze dates from 1443 to 1954. The instrumental and reconstructed SLP for the 20th century reveal two distinct circulation regimes (teleconnection patterns) over the North Pacific that appear to be associated with severe and mild winters and, consequently, with early and late freezing of the lake. The reconstructed SLPO anomaly map for severe winters prior to 1683 shows a pattern similar to those in the instrumental and reconstructed records of the 20th century. The analysis reveals that the reliability of the reconstruction may vary with the configuration of the actual SLP pattern as the mild winter pattern is not as well reconstructed as the severe winter pattern. That result illustrates the importance of testing the reliability of a reconstruction within the context of the intended interpretation. This analysis demonstrates how different types of proxy climate data can be compared and verified.

  10. Analytical capabilities of high performance liquid chromatography - Atmospheric pressure photoionization - Orbitrap mass spectrometry (HPLC-APPI-Orbitrap-MS) for the trace determination of novel and emerging flame retardants in fish.

    PubMed

    Zacs, D; Bartkevics, V

    2015-10-22

    A new analytical method was established and validated for the analysis of 27 brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including so called "emerging" and "novel" BFRs (EBFRs and NBFRs) in fish samples. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to Orbitrap mass spectrometry (Orbitrap-MS) employing atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) interface operated in negative mode was used for the identification/quantitation of contaminants. HPLC-Orbitrap-MS analysis provided a fast separation of selected analytes within 14 min, thus demonstrating a high throughput processing of samples. The developed methodology was tested by intralaboratory validation in terms of recovery, repeatability, linear calibration ranges, instrumental and method limits of quantitation (i-LOQ and m-LOQ), and where possible, trueness was verified by analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs). Recoveries of analytes were between 80 and 119%, while the repeatability in terms of relative standard deviations (RSDs) was in the range from 1.2 to 15.5%. The measured values for both analyzed CRMs agreed with the provided consensus values, revealing the recovery of reference concentrations in 72-119% range. The elaborated method met the sensitivity criterion according to Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on monitoring of BFRs in food products for majority of the compounds. The concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in real samples determined by HPLC-APPI-Orbitrap-MS method and validated gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) method were found to be in a good agreement. PMID:26526911

  11. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  12. SNC Oxygen Fugacity Recorded in Pyroxenes and its Implications for the Oxidation State of the Martian Interior: An Experimental and Analytical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCanta, M. C.; Rutherford, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the oxidation state of a magma is critical as it is one of the parameters which controls the nature and composition of the resulting crystals. In terrestrial magmatic systems, oxygen fugacity (fo2) is known to vary by over nine orders of magnitude. With variations of this magnitude, understanding the compositional differences, phase changes, and crystallization sequence variations, caused by the magma fo2, is essential in deciphering the origin of all igneous rocks. Magmatic oxidation state is of great importance in that it reflects the degree of oxidation of the source region and can provide insight into magmatic processes, such as metasomatism, degassing, and assimilation, which may have changed them. Carmichael [1991] argues that most magmas are unlikely to have their redox states altered from those of their source region. This assumption allows for estimation of the oxidation state of planetary interiors. Conversely, it is known that the fo2 of the magma can be affected by other processes, which occur outside of the source region and therefore, the oxidation state may record those too. Processes which could overprint source region fugacities include melt dehydrogenation or other volatile loss, water or melt infiltration, or assimilation of oxidized or reduced wallrock. Understanding which of these processes is responsible for the redox state of a magma can provide crucial information regarding igneous processes and other forces active in the region. The composition of the SNC basalts and their widely varying proposed oxidation states raise some interesting questions. Do the SNC meteorites have an oxidized or reduced signature? What was the oxygen fugacity of the SNC source region at the time of melt generation? Is the fugacity calculated for the various SNC samples the fugacity of the magma source region or was it overprinted by later events? Are there different oxidation states in the Martian interior or a single one? This proposal seeks to

  13. High-pressure whiteschists from the Ti-N-Eggoleh area (Central Hoggar, Algeria): A record of Pan-African oceanic subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjerid, Zouhir; Godard, Gaston; Ouzegane, Khadidja

    2015-06-01

    The Ti-N-Eggoleh area (Sérouènout Terrane, Central Hoggar, Algeria) comprises mainly a high-pressure Neoproterozoic metamorphic formation consisting of talc-kyanite-quartz whiteschists, chlorite schists, marbles, sulphide ores, partially serpentinized peridotites and partially amphibolitized eclogites, and reminiscent of an ophiolitic mélange that was metamorphosed and strongly deformed under eclogite-facies conditions. Major and trace elements indicate that the whiteschists underwent intense hydrothermal alteration, with Mg enrichment and leaching of alkalis and Ca, prior to high-pressure metamorphism. The main talc-kyanite-quartz paragenesis is stable within a large multivariant P-T field extending from high-P amphibolite to eclogite facies; the Tschermak substitution in talc marginally constrains peak pressure conditions to P > 11 kbar and 600 < T < ~ 800 °C. The subsequent development of cordierite ± sapphirine ± corundum symplectites and coronae at the contact between talc and kyanite was due to isochemical and almost univariant reactions (Tlc + Ky + Qtz → Crd; Tlc + Ky → Crd + Crn; Tlc + Ky → Crd + Spr) which combined together to produce hybrid microstructures. These metamorphic reactions indicate a thermal overprint under granulite-facies conditions (T = 650-860 °C; P < 12 kbar). The peraluminous Mg-rich sapphirine observed in the symplectites reaches one of the highest degrees of Tschermak substitution ever reported for this mineral (with n = 3.6), intermediate between the 13:19:5 (n = 3) and 3:5:1 (n = 4) theoretical compositions. The neighbouring eclogites record a similar P-T evolution: after the eclogite-facies metamorphic peak, they underwent partial amphibolitization and a subsequent high-temperature overprint under granulite-facies conditions that led to partial dehydration. The Ti-N-Eggoleh series is interpreted as the product of the thermal alteration of oceanic rocks that were subducted prior to the continental collision that formed

  14. First application of tsunami back-projection and source inversion for the 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake using tsunami data recorded on a dense array of seafloor pressure gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusman, A. R.; Satake, K.; Sheehan, A. F.; Mulia, I. E.; Heidarzadeh, M.; Maeda, T.

    2015-12-01

    Adaption of absolute or differential pressure gauges (APG or DPG) to Ocean Bottom Seismometers has provided the opportunity to study tsunamis. Recently we extracted tsunami waveforms of the 28 October 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake recoded by the APG and DPG of Cascadia Initiative program (Sheehan et al., 2015, SRL). We applied such dense tsunami observations (48 stations) together with other records from DARTs (9 stations) to characterize the tsunami source. This study is the first study that used such a large number of offshore tsunami records for earthquake source study. Conventionally the curves of tsunami travel times are drawn backward from station locations to estimate the tsunami source region. Here we propose a more advanced technique called tsunami back-projection to estimate the source region. Our image produced by tsunami back-projection has the largest value or tsunami centroid that is very close to the epicenter and above the Queen Charlotte transform fault (QCF), whereas the negative values are mostly located east of Haida Gwaii in the Hecate Strait. By using tsunami back-projection we avoid picking initial tsunami phase which is a necessary step in the conventional method that is rather subjective. The slip distribution of the 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake estimated by tsunami waveform inversion shows large slip near the trench (4-5 m) and also on a plate interface southeast the epicenter (3-4 m) below QCF. From the slip distribution, the calculated seismic moment is 5.4 × 1020 N m (Mw 7.8). The steep bathymetry offshore Haida Gwaii and the horizontal movement caused by the earthquake possibly affects the sea surface deformation. The potential tsunami energy calculated from the sea-surface deformation of pure faulting is 2.20 × 1013 J, while that from the bathymetry effect is 0.12 × 1013 J or about 5% of the total potential energy. The significant deformation above the steep slope is confirmed by another tsunami inversion that disregards fault

  15. Source depth dependence of micro-tsunamis recorded with ocean-bottom pressure gauges: The January 28, 2000 Mw 6.8 earthquake off Nemuro Peninsula, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirata, K.; Takahashi, H.; Geist, E.; Satake, K.; Tanioka, Y.; Sugioka, H.; Mikada, H.

    2003-01-01

    Micro-tsunami waves with a maximum amplitude of 4-6 mm were detected with the ocean-bottom pressure gauges on a cabled deep seafloor observatory south of Hokkaido, Japan, following the January 28, 2000 earthquake (Mw 6.8) in the southern Kuril subduction zone. We model the observed micro-tsunami and estimate the focal depth and other source parameters such as fault length and amount of slip using grid searching with the least-squares method. The source depth and stress drop for the January 2000 earthquake are estimated to be 50 km and 7 MPa, respectively, with possible ranges of 45-55 km and 4-13 MPa. Focal depth of typical inter-plate earthquakes in this region ranges from 10 to 20 km and stress drop of inter-plate earthquakes generally is around 3 MPa. The source depth and stress drop estimates suggest that the earthquake was an intra-slab event in the subducting Pacific plate, rather than an inter-plate event. In addition, for a prescribed fault width of 30 km, the fault length is estimated to be 15 km, with possible ranges of 10-20 km, which is the same as the previously determined aftershock distribution. The corresponding estimate for seismic moment is 2.7??1019 Nm with possible ranges of 2.3??1019-3.2??1019Nm. Standard tide gauges along the nearby coast did not record any tsunami signal. High-precision ocean-bottom pressure measurements offshore thus make it possible to determine fault parameters of moderate-sized earthquakes in subduction zones using open-ocean tsunami waveforms. Published by Elsevier Science B. V.

  16. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  17. The relationship between serum albumin levels and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahbap, Elbis; Sakaci, Tamer; Kara, Ekrem; Sahutoglu, Tuncay; Koc, Yener; Basturk, Taner; Sevinc, Mustafa; Akgol, Cuneyt; Kayalar, Arzu O.; Ucar, Zuhal A.; Bayraktar, Feyza; Unsal, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum albumin levels and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (24-h ABPM) recordings in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients. METHODS: A total of 354 patients (mean [SD] age: 55.5 [14.3] years, 50% females) with essential hypertension and 24-h ABPM recordings were included. Patient 24-h nighttime and daytime ABPM values, systolic and diastolic dipping status and average nocturnal dipping were recorded. The correlations between serum albumin levels and nocturnal systolic and diastolic dipping were evaluated, and correlates of average nocturnal systolic dipping were determined via a linear regression model. RESULTS: Overall, 73.2% of patients were determined to be non-dippers. The mean (SD) levels of serum albumin (4.2 [0.3] g/dL vs. 4.4 [0.4] g/dL, p<0.001) and the average nocturnal systolic (15.2 [4.8] mmHg vs. 0.3 [6.6] mmHg, p<0.001) and diastolic dipping (4.2 [8.6] mmHgvs. 18.9 [7.0] mmHg, p<0.001) were significantly lower in non-dippers than in dippers. A significant positive correlation was noted between serum albumin levels and both systolic (r=0.297, p<0.001) and diastolic dipping (r=0.265, p<0.001). The linear regression analysis revealed that for each one-unit increase in serum albumin, the average nocturnal dip in systolic BP increased by 0.17 mmHg (p=0.033). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate an association between serum albumin levels and the deterioration of circadian BP rhythm among essential hypertensive patients along with the identification of a non-dipper pattern in more than two-thirds of patients. Our findings emphasize the importance of serum albumin levels, rather than urinary albumin excretion, as an independent predictor of nocturnal systolic dipping, at least in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients with moderate proteinuria. PMID:27276394

  18. 49 CFR 195.310 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.310 Records. (a) A record must be made of each pressure test required by... use. (b) The record required by paragraph (a) of this section must include: (1) The pressure recording... test; (5) The minimum test pressure; (6) The test medium; (7) A description of the facility tested...

  19. Analytical Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses analytical searching, a process that enables searchers of electronic resources to develop a planned strategy by combining words or phrases with Boolean operators. Defines simple and complex searching, and describes search strategies developed with Boolean logic and truncation. Provides guidelines for teaching students analytical…

  20. Optimization of an analytical methodology for the simultaneous determination of different classes of ultraviolet filters in cosmetics by pressurized liquid extraction-gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vila, Marlene; Lamas, J Pablo; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Dagnac, Thierry; Llompart, Maria

    2015-07-31

    A methodology based on pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) followed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of different classes of UV filters including methoxycinnamates, benzophenones, salicylates, p-aminobenzoic acid derivatives, and others in cosmetic products. The extractions were carried out in 1mL extraction cells and the amount of sample extracted was only 100mg. The experimental conditions, including the acetylation of the PLE extracts to improve GC performance, were optimized by means of experimental design tools. The two main factors affecting the PLE procedure such as solvent type and extraction temperature were assessed. The use of a matrix matched approach consisting of the addition of 10μL of diluted commercial cosmetic oil avoided matrix effects. Good linearity (R(2)>0.9970), quantitative recoveries (>80% for most of compounds, excluding three banned benzophenones) and satisfactory precision (RSD<10% in most cases) were achieved under the optimal conditions. The validated methodology was successfully applied to the analysis of different types of cosmetic formulations including sunscreens, hair products, nail polish, and lipsticks, amongst others. PMID:26091782

  1. Analytical sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.W. . Dept. of Geology); McConchie, D.M. . Centre for Coastal Management)

    1994-01-01

    Both a self instruction manual and a cookbook'' guide to field and laboratory analytical procedures, this book provides an essential reference for non-specialists. With a minimum of mathematics and virtually no theory, it introduces practitioners to easy, inexpensive options for sample collection and preparation, data acquisition, analytic protocols, result interpretation and verification techniques. This step-by-step guide considers the advantages and limitations of different procedures, discusses safety and troubleshooting, and explains support skills like mapping, photography and report writing. It also offers managers, off-site engineers and others using sediments data a quick course in commissioning studies and making the most of the reports. This manual will answer the growing needs of practitioners in the field, either alone or accompanied by Practical Sedimentology, which surveys the science of sedimentology and provides a basic overview of the principles behind the applications.

  2. Blood pressure outcomes in patients receiving angiotensin II receptor blockers in primary care: a comparative effectiveness analysis from electronic medical record data.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S; Ramaswamy, Krishnan; Qian, Chunlin; Biskupiak, Joe; Ryan, Amy; Quah, Ruth; Russo, Patricia A

    2011-11-01

    The authors examined the comparative effectiveness of 4 angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in patients with hypertension using a large electronic medical record database. Analysis of covariance and logistic multivariate regression models were used to estimate the blood pressure (BP) outcomes of 73,012 patients during 13 months of treatment with olmesartan, losartan, valsartan, and irbesartan. Results were adjusted by baseline BP, starting dose, year, age, sex, race, body mass index, comorbid conditions, and concomitant medications of patients. All ARBs led to sustained reductions in BP, but with significant differences in the magnitude of BP reduction. Raw mean systolic BP/diastolic BP reductions with losartan, valsartan, irbesartan, and olmesartan were 9.3/4.9 mm Hg, 10.4/5.6 mm Hg, 10.1/5.3 mm Hg, and 12.4/6.8 mm Hg, respectively. Adjusting for all covariates, the overall BP reductions with olmesartan were 1.88/0.86 mm Hg, 1.21/0.52 mm Hg, and 0.89/0.51 mm Hg greater than for losartan, valsartan, and irbesartan, respectively, and mean differences were higher for monotherapy: 2.43/1.16 mm Hg; 2.18/0.93 mm Hg; 1.44/0.91 mm Hg, respectively (all P values <.0001). Adjusted odds ratios of the JNC 7 goal attainment for losartan, valsartan, and irbesartan compared with olmesartan were 0.76, 0.86, and 0.91 (P<.05). Differences were also found in subpopulations: African Americans, diabetics, and obese/overweight patients but not all of these reached statistical significance. A broad choice of ARBs may be required to get patients to treatment goals. PMID:22051424

  3. Hot and deep: Rock record of subduction initiation and exhumation of high-temperature, high-pressure metamorphic rocks, Feather River ultramafic belt, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Christopher M.; Wakabayashi, John

    2009-12-01

    Studies of a 10 to 300-m-thick unit of high-grade metamorphic rock ("external schists") that crops out along the western border of the Feather River ultramafic belt (FRB), northern California, yield new insights into subduction initiation and ophiolite emplacement processes. The high-temperature ( T) foliation of the external schists dip moderately to steeply eastward beneath the ultramafic rocks of the FRB, a 150-km-long slab of suboceanic upper mantle and the high- T fabric shows a tops-to-the-west (FRB-side-up) sense of shear. The structurally highest external schists record peak metamorphic conditions of 650-760 °C at 1.3-2.2 GPa. In contrast, sheeted dikes of the Devil's Gate ophiolite that overlie the ultramafic rocks yield metamorphic conditions of 710-730 °C at about 0.3-0.7 GPa. A km-scale lens of amphibolite within ultramafic rocks yields somewhat lower pressures than the structurally highest external schist, as do the structurally lower rocks within the external schists. Significant exhumation of the external schists relative to the structurally overlying ophiolitic rocks occurred along at least two major zones and the most significant exhumation was accommodated at least 1.5 km structurally above the ultramafic-external schist contact. Based on available geochronology, intraoceanic subduction may have initiated at approximately 240 Ma, and exposure of the external schist occurred prior to the deposition of rocks in the structurally highest part of the Calaveras Complex (minimum 177 Ma), a subduction complex that structurally underlies the external schists. High- T metamorphism of the Devil's Gate ophiolite may have resulted from partial (failed) ridge subduction.

  4. Pressure-Induced Site-Selective Disordering of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}: A New Insight into Phase-Change Optical Recording

    SciTech Connect

    Kolobov, A. V.; Haines, J.; Pradel, A.; Ribes, M.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.; Katayama, Y.; Hammouda, T.; Uruga, T.

    2006-07-21

    We demonstrate that Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, the material of choice in phase-change optical recording (such as DVD-RAM), can be rendered amorphous by the application of hydrostatic pressure. It is argued that this structural change is due to a very strong second-nearest-neighbor Te-Te interaction that determines the long-range order in the metastable cubic phase of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and also to the presence of vacancies. This newly discovered phenomenon suggests that pressure is an important factor for the formation of the amorphous phase which opens new insight into the mechanism of phase-change optical recording.

  5. Analysis of Hopkinson bar pressure gage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baylot, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) designed Hopkinson pressure bar gages were fielded on the Dilute Explosive Tile (DET) test along with New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) designed bar gages and pressure gages manufactured by PCB Piezotronics, Inc. On the Mineral Find 3 (MF3) explosive test, WES bar gages were fielded along with pressure transducers manufactured by Kulite. The peak pressures recorded by the PCB ages were much higher than those recorded by the WES bar gages on the DET test. The peak stresses were higher for the Kulite gages than for the WES bar gages in the MF3 test. In each of these tests, the stresses recorded later in time for the bar gage were higher than those recorded for the other types of gages. The NMERI gages indicated that the pressure time-history had two significant peaks while the WES gages indicated only one significant peak. One-half of the surviving PCB gages agreed with the WES gages, while one-half agreed with the NMERI gages. Analytical and finite element (FE) calculations were performed to assess the response of the bar gages in these tests. The analytical solutions included only the bar and agreed extremely well with comparable FE calculations. These calculations indicated that the primary reason for the low peak stress readings in the bar gages was the lower frequency response capability of the recording system used to record the bar gage data. The calculations also indicated that the presence of water around the bar did not significantly affect the measured peak stress in the bar, and that the drag of the water past the bar did not cause significant forces to be developed in the bar.

  6. The analytical modeling of planetary exospheres: a) the satellite particles at Earth, Titan and Mars, b) the influence of the radiation pressure on the ballistic and escaping particles density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mazelle, C. X.

    2013-12-01

    a) The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We revisit here the importance of a specific exospheric population, i.e. the satellite particles, which is usually neglected in the models (see also Beth et al., Icarus, accepted). These particles are indeed produced through rare collisions in the exospheres, and may either be negligible or dominate the exospheres of all planets with dense atmospheres in our solar system, depending on the balance between their sources and losses. Richter et al. (1979) were the first to propose, beyond the Chamberlain's (Chamberlain (1963)) rough approximation, a rigorous approach for these particles by using the Boltzmann equation in the Earth exosphere below 3000 km altitude. We here further investigate this approach and determine the contribution of satellite populations to the densities of light elements at Titan (H2 species) and Mars (H species). The results confirm that the Chamberlain approximation overestimates the satellite particles densities at high altitudes, but that there may be enough collisions to produce a significant amount of satellite particles in some conditions, up to more than 50% of the contributions due to ballistic and escaping populations (i.e. those considered in the collisionless models) in the case of Mars or even 36% at Titan. This suggests that considering collisionless exospheric profiles for light species can lead to an underestimation of the total densities at high altitudes. b) We also present a new analytical approach to understand the structure of the exospheres submitted to the radiation pressure and determine the densities of others populations, i.e. ballistic and escaping particles, using the Liouville theorem and Hamiltonian mechanics. Our modeling work will in particular enable to better

  7. Biomedical recording system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, H. A.

    1970-01-01

    System collects medical data directly from patients and permanently records and displays several parameters - electrocardiograph, electroencephalograph, heart rate, respiration rate, auscultatory blood pressure, leg circumference changes, body temperature, and time. Components and operation of the system are described.

  8. Oxygen isotope record of oceanic and high-pressure metasomatism: a P-T-time-fluid path for the Monviso eclogites (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubatto, Daniela; Angiboust, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Fluids are considered a fundamental agent for chemical exchanges between different rock types in the subduction system. Constraints on the sources and pathways of subduction fluids thus provide crucial information to reconstruct subduction processes. The Monviso ophiolitic sequence is composed of mafic, ultramafic and minor sediments that have been subducted to ~80 km depth. In this sequence, both localized fluid flow and channelized fluids along major shear zones have been documented. We investigate the timing and source of the fluids that affected the dominant mafic rocks using microscale U-Pb dating of zircon and oxygen isotope analysis of mineral zones (garnet, zircon and antigorite) in high-pressure rocks with variable degree of metasomatic modification. In mafic eclogites, Jurassic zircon cores are the only mineralogical relicts of the protolith gabbros and retain δ18O values of 4.5-6 ‰, typical of mantle melts. Garnet and metamorphic zircon that grew during prograde to peak metamorphism display low δ18O values between 0.2 and 3.8 ‰, which are likely inherited from high-temperature alteration of the protolith on the sea floor. This is corroborated by δ18O values of 3.0 and 3.6 ‰ in antigorite from surrounding serpentinites. In metasomatized eclogites within the lower shear zone, garnet rim formed at the metamorphic peak shows a shift to higher δ18O up to 6 ‰. The age of zircons in high-pressure veins and metasomatized eclogites constrains the timing of fluid flow at high pressure at around 45-46 Ma. Although the oxygen data do not contradict previous reports of interaction with serpentinite-derived fluids, the shift to isotopically heavier oxygen compositions requires contribution from sediment-derived fluids. The scarcity of metasediments in the Monviso sequence suggests that such fluids were concentrated and fluxed along the lower shear zone in a sufficient amount to modify the oxygen composition of the eclogitic minerals.

  9. CD Recorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of CD (compact disc) recorders describes recording applications, including storing large graphic files, creating audio CDs, and storing material downloaded from the Internet; backing up files; lifespan; CD recording formats; continuous recording; recording software; recorder media; vulnerability of CDs; basic computer requirements; and…

  10. An Early Cretaceous garnet pressure-temperature path recording synconvergent burial and exhumation from the hinterland of the Sevier orogenic belt, Albion Mountains, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Eric D.; Hoisch, Thomas D.; Wells, Michael L.; Vervoort, Jeffrey D.; Beyene, Mengesha A.

    2015-08-01

    Rocks may undergo complex pressure-temperature ( P- T) histories during orogenesis in response to alternating episodes of synconvergent burial and exhumation. In this study, chemical zoning in garnets combined with textural and chemical evidence from the schist of Willow Creek in the Albion Mountains of south-central Idaho (USA), reveals a complex P- T path during the early stages of Sevier orogenesis. The distribution of quartz inclusions combined with internal resorption features establishes a hiatus in garnet growth. Chemical zoning was simulated using a G-minimization approach to yield a P- T path consisting of three distinct pressure changes during increasing temperature, defining an "N" shape. Lu-Hf isochron ages from multiple garnet fractions and whole-rock analyses in two samples are 132.1 ± 2.4 and 138.7 ± 3.5 Ma. The samples were collected from the hanging wall of the Basin-Elba thrust fault and yielded results similar to those previously obtained from the footwall. This leads to several conclusions: (1) Both the hanging wall and footwall experienced the same metamorphic event, (2) the paths document a previously unrecognized crustal thickening and synorogenic extension cycle that fills an important time gap in the shortening history of the Sevier retroarc, suggesting progressive eastward growth of the orogen rather than a two-stage history, and (3) episodes of extensional exhumation during protracted convergent orogenesis are increasingly well recognized and highlight the dynamic behavior of orogenic belts.

  11. Analytical one-dimensional model for laser-induced ultrasound in planar optically absorbing layer.

    PubMed

    Svanström, Erika; Linder, Tomas; Löfqvist, Torbjörn

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound generated by means of laser-based photoacoustic principles are in common use today and applications can be found both in biomedical diagnostics, non-destructive testing and materials characterisation. For certain measurement applications it could be beneficial to shape the generated ultrasound regarding spectral properties and temporal profile. To address this, we studied the generation and propagation of laser-induced ultrasound in a planar, layered structure. We derived an analytical expression for the induced pressure wave, including different physical and optical properties of each layer. A Laplace transform approach was employed in analytically solving the resulting set of photoacoustic wave equations. The results correspond to simulations and were compared to experimental results. To enable the comparison between recorded voltage from the experiments and the calculated pressure we employed a system identification procedure based on physical properties of the ultrasonic transducer to convert the calculated acoustic pressure to voltages. We found reasonable agreement between experimentally obtained voltages and the voltages determined from the calculated acoustic pressure, for the samples studied. The system identification procedure was found to be unstable, however, possibly from violations of material isotropy assumptions by film adhesives and coatings in the experiment. The presented analytical model can serve as a basis when addressing the inverse problem of shaping an acoustic pulse from absorption of a laser pulse in a planar layered structure of elastic materials. PMID:24262676

  12. Let's Talk... Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2012-01-01

    Talk about analytics seems to be everywhere. Everyone is talking about analytics. Yet even with all the talk, many in higher education have questions about--and objections to--using analytics in colleges and universities. In this article, the author explores the use of analytics in, and all around, higher education. (Contains 1 note.)

  13. Analytics for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeill, Sheila; Campbell, Lorna M.; Hawksey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development and use of analytics in the context of education. Using Buckingham Shum's three levels of analytics, the authors present a critical analysis of current developments in the domain of learning analytics, and contrast the potential value of analytics research and development with real world…

  14. 40 CFR 86.107-98 - Sampling and analytical system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recorder, an on-line computer system, or other suitable means shall be used to record enclosure ambient... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sampling and analytical system. 86.107... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.107-98 Sampling and analytical system. Section...

  15. 40 CFR 86.107-98 - Sampling and analytical system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recorder, an on-line computer system, or other suitable means shall be used to record enclosure ambient... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sampling and analytical system. 86.107... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.107-98 Sampling and analytical system. Section...

  16. 40 CFR 86.107-98 - Sampling and analytical system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recorder, an on-line computer system, or other suitable means shall be used to record enclosure ambient... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sampling and analytical system. 86.107... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.107-98 Sampling and analytical system. Section...

  17. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  18. Analytical prediction of aerospace vehicle vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Piersol, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given recently to the formulation and validation of analytical models for the prediction of aerospace vehicle vibration response to acoustic and fluctuating pressures. This paper summarizes the development of such analytical models for two applications, (1) structural vibrations of the Space Shuttle orbiter vehicle due to broadband rocket noise and aerodynamic boundary layer turbulence, and (2) structural vibrations of general aviation aircraft due to discrete frequency propeller and reciprocating engine exhaust noise. In both cases, the spatial exterior excitations are convected pressure fields which are described on the basis of measured cross spectra (coherence and phase) information. Structural modal data are obtained from analytical predictions, and structural responses to appropriate excitation fields are calculated. The results are compared with test data, and the strengths and weaknesses of the analytical models are assessed.

  19. Analytical prediction of aerospace vehicle vibration environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Piersol, A. G.

    1981-09-01

    Considerable attention has been given recently to the formulation and validation of analytical models for the prediction of aerospace vehicle vibration response to acoustic and fluctuating pressures. This paper summarizes the development of such analytical models for two applications, (1) structural vibrations of the Space Shuttle orbiter vehicle due to broadband rocket noise and aerodynamic boundary layer turbulence, and (2) structural vibrations of general aviation aircraft due to discrete frequency propeller and reciprocating engine exhaust noise. In both cases, the spatial exterior excitations are convected pressure fields which are described on the basis of measured cross spectra (coherence and phase) information. Structural modal data are obtained from analytical predictions, and structural responses to appropriate excitation fields are calculated. The results are compared with test data, and the strengths and weaknesses of the analytical models are assessed.

  20. Multimedia Analysis plus Visual Analytics = Multimedia Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Thomas, James J.; Wong, Pak C.; Christel, Michael; Ribarsky, Martin W.

    2010-10-01

    Multimedia analysis has focused on images, video, and to some extent audio and has made progress in single channels excluding text. Visual analytics has focused on the user interaction with data during the analytic process plus the fundamental mathematics and has continued to treat text as did its precursor, information visualization. The general problem we address in this tutorial is the combining of multimedia analysis and visual analytics to deal with multimedia information gathered from different sources, with different goals or objectives, and containing all media types and combinations in common usage.

  1. Analytical Challenges in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glajch, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights five major analytical areas (electrophoresis, immunoassay, chromatographic separations, protein and DNA sequencing, and molecular structures determination) and discusses how analytical chemistry could further improve these techniques and thereby have a major impact on biotechnology. (JN)

  2. Visual Analytics for MOOC Data.

    PubMed

    Qu, Huamin; Chen, Qing

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of massive open online courses (MOOCs), tens of millions of learners can now enroll in more than 1,000 courses via MOOC platforms such as Coursera and edX. As a result, a huge amount of data has been collected. Compared with traditional education records, the data from MOOCs has much finer granularity and also contains new pieces of information. It is the first time in history that such comprehensive data related to learning behavior has become available for analysis. What roles can visual analytics play in this MOOC movement? The authors survey the current practice and argue that MOOCs provide an opportunity for visualization researchers and that visual analytics systems for MOOCs can benefit a range of end users such as course instructors, education researchers, students, university administrators, and MOOC providers. PMID:26594957

  3. Analyticity without Differentiability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirillova, Evgenia; Spindler, Karlheinz

    2008-01-01

    In this article we derive all salient properties of analytic functions, including the analytic version of the inverse function theorem, using only the most elementary convergence properties of series. Not even the notion of differentiability is required to do so. Instead, analytical arguments are replaced by combinatorial arguments exhibiting…

  4. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1989-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  5. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  6. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  7. Analytical model for ramp compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Quanxi; Jiang, Shaoen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Hu, Yun; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-08-01

    An analytical ramp compression model for condensed matter, which can provide explicit solutions for isentropic compression flow fields, is reported. A ramp compression experiment can be easily designed according to the capability of the loading source using this model. Specifically, important parameters, such as the maximum isentropic region width, material properties, profile of the pressure pulse, and the pressure pulse duration can be reasonably allocated or chosen. To demonstrate and study this model, laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments and code simulation are performed successively, and the factors influencing the accuracy of the model are studied. The application and simulation show that this model can be used as guidance in the design of a ramp compression experiment. However, it is verified that further optimization work is required for a precise experimental design.

  8. Progressive Visual Analytics: User-Driven Visual Exploration of In-Progress Analytics.

    PubMed

    Stolper, Charles D; Perer, Adam; Gotz, David

    2014-12-01

    As datasets grow and analytic algorithms become more complex, the typical workflow of analysts launching an analytic, waiting for it to complete, inspecting the results, and then re-Iaunching the computation with adjusted parameters is not realistic for many real-world tasks. This paper presents an alternative workflow, progressive visual analytics, which enables an analyst to inspect partial results of an algorithm as they become available and interact with the algorithm to prioritize subspaces of interest. Progressive visual analytics depends on adapting analytical algorithms to produce meaningful partial results and enable analyst intervention without sacrificing computational speed. The paradigm also depends on adapting information visualization techniques to incorporate the constantly refining results without overwhelming analysts and provide interactions to support an analyst directing the analytic. The contributions of this paper include: a description of the progressive visual analytics paradigm; design goals for both the algorithms and visualizations in progressive visual analytics systems; an example progressive visual analytics system (Progressive Insights) for analyzing common patterns in a collection of event sequences; and an evaluation of Progressive Insights and the progressive visual analytics paradigm by clinical researchers analyzing electronic medical records. PMID:26356879

  9. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-11-15

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  10. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-08-02

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  11. Helical recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, P. T.; Studer, P. A.; Tyler, A. L.

    1969-01-01

    Tape recorder, using metallic tape, has a minimum of moving parts and no belts. It permits long-term bulk storage in extreme environments, and has less weight and bulk than present recording equipment.

  12. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  13. Analytical Chemistry in Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Mary A.; Ullman, Alan H.

    1988-01-01

    Clarifies the roles of a practicing analytical chemist in industry: quality control, methods and technique development, troubleshooting, research, and chemical analysis. Lists criteria for success in industry. (ML)

  14. Sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Dechang; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-07-05

    A sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes includes a microscale body having a first end and a second end and a surface between the ends for adsorbing a chemical analyte. The surface includes at least one conductive heating track for heating the chemical analyte and also a conductive response track, which is electrically isolated from the heating track, for producing a thermal response signal from the chemical analyte. The heating track is electrically connected with a voltage source and the response track is electrically connected with a signal recorder. The microscale body is restrained at the first end and the second end and is substantially isolated from its surroundings therebetween, thus having a bridge configuration.

  15. Process Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callis, James B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses process analytical chemistry as a discipline designed to supply quantitative and qualitative information about a chemical process. Encourages academic institutions to examine this field for employment opportunities for students. Describes the five areas of process analytical chemistry, including off-line, at-line, on-line, in-line, and…

  16. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

    2012-05-08

    Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

  17. Learning Analytics Considered Harmful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dringus, Laurie P.

    2012-01-01

    This essay is written to present a prospective stance on how learning analytics, as a core evaluative approach, must help instructors uncover the important trends and evidence of quality learner data in the online course. A critique is presented of strategic and tactical issues of learning analytics. The approach to the critique is taken through…

  18. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  19. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  20. Validating Analytical Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures utilized by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) to develop, evaluate, and validate analytical methods for the analysis of chemical pollutants are detailed. Methods validated by AOAC are used by the EPA and FDA in their enforcement programs and are granted preferential treatment by the courts. (BT)

  1. Teaching the Analytical Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Using a survey of 138 writing programs, I argue that we must be more explicit about what we think students should get out of analysis to make it more likely that students will transfer their analytical skills to different settings. To ensure our students take analytical skills with them at the end of the semester, we must simplify the task we…

  2. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  3. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed. PMID:26631024

  4. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  5. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  6. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27126470

  7. Performance of Examinee Groups on a Measure of Analytical Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Kathleen; Rizavi, Saba

    Beginning in 1999, an analytical writing measure was offered as an optional test in the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) program. This test will be incorporated into the GRE General Test in fall 2002. The essays in this test focus on critical reasoning and analytical writing skills. This study examined the performance of various examinee groups…

  8. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  9. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both ...

  10. Ultrasonic analyte concentration and application in flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Goddard, Greg; Salzman, Gary; Sinha, Dipen; Martin, John C.; Kwiatkowski, Christopher; Graves, Steven

    2008-03-11

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for concentrating analytes within a fluid flowing through a tube using acoustic radiation pressure. The apparatus includes a function generator that outputs a radio frequency electrical signal to a transducer that transforms the radio frequency electric signal to an acoustic signal and couples the acoustic signal to the tube. The acoustic signal is converted within the tube to acoustic pressure that concentrates the analytes within the fluid.

  11. Ultrasonic analyte concentration and application in flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Goddard, Greg; Salzman, Gary; Sinha, Dipen; Martin, John C.; Kwiatkowski, Christopher; Graves, Steven

    2015-07-07

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for concentrating analytes within a fluid flowing through a tube using acoustic radiation pressure. The apparatus includes a function generator that outputs a radio frequency electrical signal to a transducer that transforms the radio frequency electric signal to an acoustic signal and couples the acoustic signal to the tube. The acoustic signal is converted within the tube to acoustic pressure that concentrates the analytes within the fluid.

  12. Ultrasonic analyte concentration and application in flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Goddard, Greg; Salzman, Gary; Sinha, Dipen; Martin, John C.; Kwiatkowski, Christopher; Graves, Steven

    2014-07-22

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for concentrating analytes within a fluid flowing through a tube using acoustic radiation pressure. The apparatus includes a function generator that outputs a radio frequency electrical signal to a transducer that transforms the radio frequency electric signal to an acoustic signal and couples the acoustic signal to the tube. The acoustic signal is converted within the tube to acoustic pressure that concentrates the analytes within the fluid.

  13. Experimental measurements and analytical analysis related to gas turbine heat transfer. Part 1: Time-averaged heat-flux and surface-pressure measurements on the vanes and blades of the SSME fuel-side turbine and comparison with prediction. Part 2: Phase-resolved surface-pressure and heat-flux measurements on the first blade of the SSME fuel-side turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Time averaged Stanton number and surface-pressure distributions are reported for the first-stage vane row, the first stage blade row, and the second stage vane row of the Rocketdyne Space Shuttle Main Engine two-stage fuel-side turbine. Unsteady pressure envelope measurements for the first blade are also reported. These measurements were made at 10 percent, 50 percent, and 90 percent span on both the pressure and suction surfaces of the first stage components. Additional Stanton number measurements were made on the first stage blade platform blade tip, and shroud, and at 50 percent span on the second vane. A shock tube was used as a short duration source of heated and pressurized air to which the turbine was subjected. Platinum thin-film heat flux gages were used to obtain the heat flux measurements, while miniature silicon-diaphragm flush-mounted pressure transducers were used to obtain the pressure measurements. The first stage vane Stanton number distributions are compared with predictions obtained using a version of STAN5 and a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes solution. This same quasi-3D N-S code was also used to obtain predictions for the first blade and the second vane.

  14. [Contributions and novelties from Functional Analytic Psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ferro García, Rafael; Valero Aguayo, Luis; López Bermúdez, Miguel A

    2007-08-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy is based on the principles of radical behaviourism. It emphasises the impact of events occurring during therapeutic sessions, the therapist-client interaction context, functional equivalence of environments, natural reinforcement, and shaping by the therapist. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy makes use of both the basic principles of behaviour analysis: individual functional assessment and application of in vivo treatment. This paper analyses novelties and new contributions of this therapy. New contributions are classified in various categories: integration with other psychotherapies, improvement of therapeutic skills, methods for evaluation and data recording in therapy, its application to several clinical problems, and studies of its efficacy. PMID:17617985

  15. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  16. Analytical techniques: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation, containing articles on a number of analytical techniques for quality control engineers and laboratory workers, is presented. Data cover techniques for testing electronic, mechanical, and optical systems, nondestructive testing techniques, and gas analysis techniques.

  17. A single-step pesticide extraction and clean-up multi-residue analytical method by selective pressurized liquid extraction followed by on-line solid phase extraction and ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for complex matrices.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elsa Teresa; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Salgueiro-González, Noelia; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Alpendurada, Maria Fátima

    2016-06-24

    Pesticides, a group of compounds linked to human activity, may, when in toxic levels, have a profound effect on water quality, and hence result in adverse consequences to aquatic life and ultimately to human health. Analytical challenges arise when successfully trying to determine these levels in environmental complex matrices. Therefore, fast, simple, sensitive and selective analytical methodologies for multi-residue determination of pesticides (atrazine, azoxystrobin, bentazon, λ-cyhalothrin, penoxsulam and terbuthylazine) in sediment, macrophytes (algae and aquatic plants) and aquatic animals were developed and validated. The established methods were matrix-dependent and were based on Selective Pressurized Liquid Extraction (SPLE) followed by on-line Solid Phase Extraction and Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectrometry (on-line SPE-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS). This cutting-edge research methodology uses a small amount of sample, is time saving and reduces the use of organic solvents in compliance with Green Chemistry principles. The analytical features were adequate for all compounds in all studied matrices. The established methodology was applied on real marine samples and no pesticide concentrations above their respective method quantification limits were measured in sediments or aquatic plants. However, terbuthylazine was found in the macroalgae Ulva spp. (108ngg(-1)dw) and all the prospected pesticides were measured above their respective method quantification limits in the bivalve Scrobicularia plana (atrazine: 48ngg(-1)dw, azoxystrobin: 64ngg(-1)dw, bentazon: 33ngg(-1)dw, λ-cyhalothrin: 2531ngg(-1)dw, penoxsulam: 50ngg(-1)dw, and terbuthylazine: 44ngg(-1)dw). PMID:27234845

  18. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; Potok, Thomas E; Pullum, Laura L; Ramanathan, Arvind; Shipman, Galen M; Thornton, Peter E

    2013-01-01

    Given the scale and complexity of today s data, visual analytics is rapidly becoming a necessity rather than an option for comprehensive exploratory analysis. In this paper, we provide an overview of three applications of visual analytics for addressing the challenges of analyzing climate, text streams, and biosurveilance data. These systems feature varying levels of interaction and high performance computing technology integration to permit exploratory analysis of large and complex data of global significance.

  19. Pressure measurements of nonplanar stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.H.; Charest, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Measuring the pressure of non-planar stress waves using thin piezo-resistive gages requires correcting for induced strain parallel to the sensing elements. A technique has been developed that permits such measurements, making use of a dual element gage. One element, Manganin, is sensitive to stress both parallel and perpendicular to the sensing element; the other element, Constantan, is primarily sensitive to stress parallel to the sensing element. The change in resistance in the Constantan element is thereby used to correct for the strain effect parallel to the Manganin element axis. Individual and combined Manganin and Constantan elements were subjected to controlled gas gun impact tests in the pressure and strain ranges of 0 to 50 kbar and 0 to 7%, respectively. From planar wave tests, the piezoresistivity of Constantan was found to be positive but negligible in comparison with Manganin. From combined stress and strain environments, the compression and tension strain factors of Constantan were found to be constant and equal to 2.06. The strain factors of Manganin were found to increase from 1.2 to 2.0 asymptotically in the range of 0 to 3% strain. It was experimentally demonstrated that, because of the closeness of their strain factors, the Manganin-Constantan dual element gage could be used in the differential recording mode to yield pressure directly. In this mode the gage is a strain compensating gage. Analytical techniques have also been developed for more accurate strain compensation.

  20. Barometric pressure variations

    SciTech Connect

    Crippen, M.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents Hanford Site barometric data that can be used to determine the breathing rate of Hanford Site tanks and details the derivation of the data. The barometric pressure data recorded at the Hanford Weather Station were used for this analysis. Data for 1988, 1989, 1990, and 1991 were used.

  1. A piezo-bar pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, W. H.; Murphy, C. L.; Shanfield, I.

    1967-01-01

    Piezo-bar pressure type probe measures the impact velocity or pressure of a moving debris cloud. It measures pressures up to 200,000 psi and peak pressures may be recorded with a total pulse duration between 5 and 65 musec.

  2. Post-operative cranial pressure monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fager, C. A., Jr.; Long, L. E.; Trent, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System for monitoring of fluidic pressures in cranial cavity uses a miniaturized pressure sensing transducer, combined with suitable amplification means, a meter with scale calibrated in terms of pressures between minus 100 and plus 900 millimeters of water, and a miniaturized chart recorder covering similar range of pressures.

  3. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... may form. Pressure sores are also called bedsores, pressure ulcers and decubitus ulcers. Symptoms What are the symptoms ... do to help pressure sores heal: Relieving the pressure that caused the sore Treating the sore itself Improving nutrition and other conditions to help the sore heal ...

  4. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    PubMed

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-01

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  5. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  6. Comparative Validity of the GRE-Analytical Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowsesian, Richard; Hays, William L.

    The predictive validity of the revised Graduate Record Examination Analytical Test (GRE-A) was compared with the experimental form of the GRE-A, in terms of graduate school admissions as well as advancement to Ph.D. candidacy decisions. Prior to 1974 the Graduate Record Examination included just a verbal and a quantitative test; in 1974 it was…

  7. The Measurement of Pressure Through Tubes in Pressure Distribution Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemke, Paul E

    1928-01-01

    The tests described in this report were made to determine the error caused by using small tubes to connect orifices on the surface of aircraft to central pressure capsules in making pressure distribution tests. Aluminum tubes of 3/16-inch inside diameter were used to determine this error. Lengths from 20 feet to 226 feet and pressures whose maxima varied from 2 inches to 140 inches of water were used. Single-pressure impulses for which the time of rise of pressure from zero to a maximum varied from 0.25 second to 3 seconds were investigated. The results show that the pressure recorded at the capsule on the far end of the tube lags behind the pressure at the orifice end and experiences also a change in magnitude. For the values used in these tests the time lag and pressure change vary principally with the time of rise of pressure from zero to a maximum and the tube length. Curves are constructed showing the time lag and pressure change. Empirical formulas are also given for computing the time lag. Analysis of pressure distribution tests made on airplanes in flight shows that the recorded pressures are slightly higher than the pressures at the orifice and that the time lag is negligible. The apparent increase in pressure is usually within the experimental error, but in the case of the modern pursuit type of airplane the pressure increase may be 5 per cent. For pressure-distribution tests on airships the analysis shows that the time lag and pressure change may be neglected.

  8. Transient pressure changes in the vertebral canal during whiplash motion--A hydrodynamic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hua-Dong; Svensson, Mats Y; Nilsson, Håkan

    2016-02-01

    In vehicle collisions, the occupant's torso is accelerated in a given direction while the unsupported head tends to lag behind. This mechanism results in whiplash motion to the neck. In whiplash experiments conducted for animals, pressure transients have been recorded in the spinal canal. It was hypothesized that the transients caused dorsal root ganglion dysfunction. Neck motion introduces volume changes inside the vertebral canal. The changes require an adaptation which is likely achieved by redistribution of blood volume in the internal vertebral venous plexus (IVVP). Pressure transients then arise from the rapid redistribution. The present study aimed to explore the hypothesis theoretically and analytically. Further, the objectives were to quantify the effect of the neck motion on the pressure generation and to identify the physical factors involved. We developed a hydrodynamic system of tubes that represent the IVVP and its lateral intervertebral vein connections. An analytical model was developed for an anatomical geometrical relation that the venous blood volume changes with respect to the vertebral angular displacement. This model was adopted in the hydrodynamic tube system so that the system can predict the pressure transients on the basis of the neck vertebral motion data from a whiplash experiment. The predicted pressure transients were in good agreement with the earlier experimental data. A parametric study was conducted and showed that the system can be used to assess the influences of anatomical geometrical properties and vehicle collision severity on the pressure generation. PMID:26827171

  9. Recent advances in analytical satellite theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Recent work on analytical satellite perturbation theory has involved the completion of a revision to 4th order for zonal harmonics, the addition of a treatment for ocean tides, an extension of the treatment for the noninertial reference system, and the completion of a theory for direct solar-radiation pressure and earth-albedo pressure. Combined with a theory for tesseral-harmonics, lunisolar, and body-tide perturbations, these formulations provide a comprehensive orbit-computation program. Detailed comparisons with numerical integration and observations are presented to assess the accuracy of each theoretical development.

  10. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. Record the expiration date... synthetic air, also referred to as “zero gas” (Contamination≤1 ppm C, ≤1 ppm CO, ≤400 ppm CO2, ≤0.1 ppm NO... chemical compositions must be available: C3 H8 and purified synthetic air (dilute measurements); C3 H8...

  11. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. Record the expiration date... synthetic air, also referred to as “zero gas” (Contamination≤1 ppm C, ≤1 ppm CO, ≤400 ppm CO2, ≤0.1 ppm NO... chemical compositions must be available: C3 H8 and purified synthetic air (dilute measurements); C3 H8...

  12. Advances in analytical chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  13. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  14. Laryngeal pressure receptors.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P; Sant'Ambrogio, G; Fisher, J T; Sant'Ambrogio, F B

    1984-07-01

    We studied the response characteristics of laryngeal pressure receptors in anesthetized dogs, breathing through a tracheal cannula, by recording single unit action potentials from the peripheral cut end of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. The larynx, with the rest of the upper airway, was isolated and cannulated separately for the application of distending and collapsing pressures. We identified receptors responding to either negative or positive pressure and a few responding to both. All these receptors showed a marked dynamic sensitivity and had the characteristics of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors. The majority of pressure receptors were active at zero transmural pressure and the gain of their response to pressure was higher at lower values, suggesting a role for these receptors in eupnea. Reflex alterations in breathing pattern and upper airway muscle activity during upper airway pressure changes, previously reported, are presumably mediated by the receptors described here. Moreover, these receptors may play a role in certain pathological states, such as obstructive sleep apnea, in which the upper airway is transiently subjected to large collapsing pressure. PMID:6484319

  15. Frontiers in analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, I.

    1988-12-15

    Doing more with less was the modus operandi of R. Buckminster Fuller, the late science genius, and inventor of such things as the geodesic dome. In late September, chemists described their own version of this maxim--learning more chemistry from less material and in less time--in a symposium titled Frontiers in Analytical Chemistry at the 196th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Los Angeles. Symposium organizer Allen J. Bard of the University of Texas at Austin assembled six speakers, himself among them, to survey pretty widely different areas of analytical chemistry.

  16. Guided Text Analysis Using Adaptive Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; Symons, Christopher T; DeNap, Frank A; Potok, Thomas E; Potok, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the promise of augmenting interactive visualizations with semi-supervised machine learning techniques to improve the discovery of significant associations and insight in the search and analysis of textual information. More specifically, we have developed a system called Gryffin that hosts a unique collection of techniques that facilitate individualized investigative search pertaining to an ever-changing set of analytical questions over an indexed collection of open-source publications related to national infrastructure. The Gryffin client hosts dynamic displays of the search results via focus+context record listings, temporal timelines, term- frequency views, and multiple coordinated views. Furthermore, as the analyst interacts with the display, the interactions are recorded and used to label the search records. These labeled records are then used to drive semi-supervised machine learning algorithms that re-rank the unlabeled search records such that potentially relevant records are moved to the top of the record listing. Gryffin is described in the context of the daily tasks encountered at the Department of Homeland Securitys Fusion Centers, with whom we are collaborating in its development. The resulting system is capable of addressing the analysts information overload that can be directly attributed to the deluge of information that must be addressed in search and investigative analysis of textual information.

  17. Guided Text Search Using Adaptive Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; Symons, Christopher T; Senter, James K; DeNap, Frank A

    2012-10-01

    This research demonstrates the promise of augmenting interactive visualizations with semi- supervised machine learning techniques to improve the discovery of significant associations and insights in the search and analysis of textual information. More specifically, we have developed a system called Gryffin that hosts a unique collection of techniques that facilitate individualized investigative search pertaining to an ever-changing set of analytical questions over an indexed collection of open-source documents related to critical national infrastructure. The Gryffin client hosts dynamic displays of the search results via focus+context record listings, temporal timelines, term-frequency views, and multiple coordinate views. Furthermore, as the analyst interacts with the display, the interactions are recorded and used to label the search records. These labeled records are then used to drive semi-supervised machine learning algorithms that re-rank the unlabeled search records such that potentially relevant records are moved to the top of the record listing. Gryffin is described in the context of the daily tasks encountered at the US Department of Homeland Security s Fusion Center, with whom we are collaborating in its development. The resulting system is capable of addressing the analysts information overload that can be directly attributed to the deluge of information that must be addressed in the search and investigative analysis of textual information.

  18. Pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Deborah

    2016-04-13

    My nursing experience is in acute care. Acute medical nurses are well placed to assess skin integrity, identify patients at risk of pressure ulcer development, and commence appropriate interventions to prevent or treat pressure ulcers. PMID:27073966

  19. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  20. Analytical Services Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Church, Shane; Nigbor, Mike; Hillman, Daniel

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standard chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.

  1. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry and Material Development Group maintains a capability in chemical analysis, materials R&D failure analysis and contamination control. The uniquely qualified staff and facility support the needs of flight projects, science instrument development and various technical tasks, as well as Cal Tech.

  2. Analytical Services Management System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standardmore » chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.« less

  3. Analytics: Changing the Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2013-01-01

    In this third and concluding discussion on analytics, the author notes that we live in an information culture. We are accustomed to having information instantly available and accessible, along with feedback and recommendations. We want to know what people think and like (or dislike). We want to know how we compare with "others like me."…

  4. Social Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham Shum, Simon; Ferguson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    We propose that the design and implementation of effective "Social Learning Analytics (SLA)" present significant challenges and opportunities for both research and enterprise, in three important respects. The first is that the learning landscape is extraordinarily turbulent at present, in no small part due to technological drivers. Online social…

  5. Challenges for Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James J.; Kielman, Joseph

    2009-09-23

    Visual analytics has seen unprecedented growth in its first five years of mainstream existence. Great progress has been made in a short time, yet great challenges must be met in the next decade to provide new technologies that will be widely accepted by societies throughout the world. This paper sets the stage for some of those challenges in an effort to provide the stimulus for the research, both basic and applied, to address and exceed the envisioned potential for visual analytics technologies. We start with a brief summary of the initial challenges, followed by a discussion of the initial driving domains and applications, as well as additional applications and domains that have been a part of recent rapid expansion of visual analytics usage. We look at the common characteristics of several tools illustrating emerging visual analytics technologies, and conclude with the top ten challenges for the field of study. We encourage feedback and collaborative participation by members of the research community, the wide array of user communities, and private industry.

  6. Ada & the Analytical Engine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Elisabeth

    1996-01-01

    Presents a brief history of Ada Byron King, Countess of Lovelace, focusing on her primary role in the development of the Analytical Engine--the world's first computer. Describes the Ada Project (TAP), a centralized World Wide Web site that serves as a clearinghouse for information related to women in computing, and provides a Web address for…

  7. Analytical Instrument Obsolescence Examined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggin, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    The threat of instrument obsolescence and tight federal budgets have conspired to threaten the existence of research analytical laboratories. Despite these and other handicaps most existing laboratories expect to keep operating in support of basic research, though there may be serious penalties in the future unless funds are forthcoming. (Author)

  8. Pressure Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    EPIC is Electronic Pressure Indicating Controller produced by North American Manufacturing Company. It is a high-sensitivity device for improving combustion efficiency in industrial furnaces that interprets a signal from a pressure transducer on a furnace and regulates furnace pressure accordingly. A controller can provide savings of from five to 25 percent of an industrial user's annual furnace fuel bill.

  9. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  10. Externally Pressurized Journal Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, John H.

    1959-01-01

    Externally pressurized gas-lubricated bearings with multiple orifice feed are investigated. An analytical treatment is developed for a semi-cylindrical bearing with 9 orifices and for a cylindrical journal bearing with 192 radial and 24 axial orifices. Experiments are described on models of the two bearing configurations with specially designed fixtures which incorporate pneumatic loading and means for determining pressure profiles, gas flow and gap height. The correlation between theory and experiment is satisfactory.

  11. PSP Measurement of Stator Vane Surface Pressures in a High Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of static pressures on the stator vane suction side of a high-speed single stage fan using the technique of pressure sensitive paint (PSP). The paper illustrates development in application of the relatively new experimental technique to the complex environment of internal flows in turbomachines. First, there is a short explanation of the physics of the PSP technique and a discussion of calibration methods for pressure sensitive paint in the turbomachinery environment. A description of the image conversion process follows. The recorded image of the stator vane pressure field is skewed due to the limited optical access and must be converted to the meridional plane projection for comparison with analytical predictions. The experimental results for seven operating conditions along an off-design rotational speed line are shown in a concise form, including performance map points, mindspan static tap pressure distributions, and vane suction side pressure fields. Then, a comparison between static tap and pressure sensitive paint data is discussed. Finally, the paper lists shortcomings of the pressure sensitive paint technology and lessons learned in this high-speed fan application.

  12. Student Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morshavitz, Helen

    1974-01-01

    Pupil files are accumulating increasing amounts of sensitive data. Yet parents have been barred from seeing their children's files while law enforcement officials and other public agencies have been given virtually free access. However, a national law in regard to student records is a real possibility. (Author/WM)

  13. Student Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  14. Records Reaching Recording Data Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresik, G. W. L.; Siebe, S.; Drewello, R.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies) is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  15. Analytical caustic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    This document discusses the determination of caustic surfaces in terms of rays, reflectors, and wavefronts. Analytical caustics are obtained as a family of lines, a set of points, and several types of equations for geometries encountered in optics and microwave applications. Standard methods of differential geometry are applied under different approaches: directly to reflector surfaces, and alternatively, to wavefronts, to obtain analytical caustics of two sheets or branches. Gauss/Seidel aberrations are introduced into the wavefront approach, forcing the retention of all three coefficients of both the first- and the second-fundamental forms of differential geometry. An existing method for obtaining caustic surfaces through exploitation of the singularities in flux density is examined, and several constant-intensity contour maps are developed using only the intrinsic Gaussian, mean, and normal curvatures of the reflector. Numerous references are provided for extending the material of the present document to the morphologies of caustics and their associated diffraction patterns.

  16. Requirements for Predictive Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-03-01

    It is important to have a clear understanding of how traditional Business Intelligence (BI) and analytics are different and how they fit together in optimizing organizational decision making. With tradition BI, activities are focused primarily on providing context to enhance a known set of information through aggregation, data cleansing and delivery mechanisms. As these organizations mature their BI ecosystems, they achieve a clearer picture of the key performance indicators signaling the relative health of their operations. Organizations that embark on activities surrounding predictive analytics and data mining go beyond simply presenting the data in a manner that will allow decisions makers to have a complete context around the information. These organizations generate models based on known information and then apply other organizational data against these models to reveal unknown information.

  17. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  18. Analytic holographic superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Christopher P.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate a holographic superconductor that admits an analytic treatment near the phase transition. In the dual 3+1-dimensional field theory, the phase transition occurs when a scalar operator of scaling dimension two gets a vacuum expectation value. We calculate current-current correlation functions along with the speed of second sound near the critical temperature. We also make some remarks about critical exponents. An analytic treatment is possible because an underlying Heun equation describing the zero mode of the phase transition has a polynomial solution. Amusingly, the treatment here may generalize for an order parameter with any integer spin, and we propose a Lagrangian for a spin-two holographic superconductor.

  19. Avatars in Analytical Gaming

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Cowell, Amanda K.

    2009-08-29

    This paper discusses the design and use of anthropomorphic computer characters as nonplayer characters (NPC’s) within analytical games. These new environments allow avatars to play a central role in supporting training and education goals instead of planning the supporting cast role. This new ‘science’ of gaming, driven by high-powered but inexpensive computers, dedicated graphics processors and realistic game engines, enables game developers to create learning and training opportunities on par with expensive real-world training scenarios. However, there needs to be care and attention placed on how avatars are represented and thus perceived. A taxonomy of non-verbal behavior is presented and its application to analytical gaming discussed.

  20. Competing on analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    We all know the power of the killer app. It's not just a support tool; it's a strategic weapon. Companies questing for killer apps generally focus all their firepower on the one area that promises to create the greatest competitive advantage. But a new breed of organization has upped the stakes: Amazon, Harrah's, Capital One, and the Boston Red Sox have all dominated their fields by deploying industrial-strength analytics across a wide variety of activities. At a time when firms in many industries offer similar products and use comparable technologies, business processes are among the few remaining points of differentiation--and analytics competitors wring every last drop of value from those processes. Employees hired for their expertise with numbers or trained to recognize their importance are armed with the best evidence and the best quantitative tools. As a result, they make the best decisions. In companies that compete on analytics, senior executives make it clear--from the top down--that analytics is central to strategy. Such organizations launch multiple initiatives involving complex data and statistical analysis, and quantitative activity is managed atthe enterprise (not departmental) level. In this article, professor Thomas H. Davenport lays out the characteristics and practices of these statistical masters and describes some of the very substantial changes other companies must undergo in order to compete on quantitative turf. As one would expect, the transformation requires a significant investment in technology, the accumulation of massive stores of data, and the formulation of company-wide strategies for managing the data. But, at least as important, it also requires executives' vocal, unswerving commitment and willingness to change the way employees think, work, and are treated. PMID:16447373

  1. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  2. Competing on talent analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H; Harris, Jeanne; Shapiro, Jeremy

    2010-10-01

    Do investments in your employees actually affect workforce performance? Who are your top performers? How can you empower and motivate other employees to excel? Leading-edge companies such as Google, Best Buy, Procter & Gamble, and Sysco use sophisticated data-collection technology and analysis to answer these questions, leveraging a range of analytics to improve the way they attract and retain talent, connect their employee data to business performance, differentiate themselves from competitors, and more. The authors present the six key ways in which companies track, analyze, and use data about their people-ranging from a simple baseline of metrics to monitor the organization's overall health to custom modeling for predicting future head count depending on various "what if" scenarios. They go on to show that companies competing on talent analytics manage data and technology at an enterprise level, support what analytical leaders do, choose realistic targets for analysis, and hire analysts with strong interpersonal skills as well as broad expertise. PMID:20929194

  3. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  4. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  7. Analytical considerations in the code qualification of piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Antaki, G.A.

    1995-02-01

    The paper addresses several analytical topics in the design and qualification of piping systems which have a direct bearing on the prediction of stresses in the pipe and hence on the application of the equations of NB, NC and ND-3600 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. For each of the analytical topics, the paper summarizes the current code requirements, if any, and the industry practice.

  8. Managing School Social Work Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Kendra J.

    2012-01-01

    This article documents results of a survey of 73 school social workers regarding their record-keeping practices. These social workers indicated that time pressures are a major challenge to documentation; they struggle to know what to include, and they worry about privacy. More than half fail to consistently include assessment information, progress…

  9. MERRA Analytic Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnase, J. L.; Duffy, D. Q.; McInerney, M. A.; Tamkin, G. S.; Thompson, J. H.; Gill, R.; Grieg, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    MERRA Analytic Services (MERRA/AS) is a cyberinfrastructure resource for developing and evaluating a new generation of climate data analysis capabilities. MERRA/AS supports OBS4MIP activities by reducing the time spent in the preparation of Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data used in data-model intercomparison. It also provides a testbed for experimental development of high-performance analytics. MERRA/AS is a cloud-based service built around the Virtual Climate Data Server (vCDS) technology that is currently used by the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) to deliver Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) data to the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). Crucial to its effectiveness, MERRA/AS's servers will use a workflow-generated realizable object capability to perform analyses over the MERRA data using the MapReduce approach to parallel storage-based computation. The results produced by these operations will be stored by the vCDS, which will also be able to host code sets for those who wish to explore the use of MapReduce for more advanced analytics. While the work described here will focus on the MERRA collection, these technologies can be used to publish other reanalysis, observational, and ancillary OBS4MIP data to ESGF and, importantly, offer an architectural approach to climate data services that can be generalized to applications and customers beyond the traditional climate research community. In this presentation, we describe our approach, experiences, lessons learned,and plans for the future.; (A) MERRA/AS software stack. (B) Example MERRA/AS interfaces.

  10. Instrumentation: Analytical Capabilities on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westall, Frances; Allen, Carl; Braiser, Martin; Farmer, Jack; Massell, Wulf; Agee, Carl B.; Steele, Andrew; Fortson, Russ

    1998-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will consist of a series of long-term missions, with early missions focusing upon establishing the Mars base, and undertaking basic field reconnaissance. A capable laboratory on Mars is an essential element in the exploration strategy. Analytical equipment both in the field and in the laboratory serves to extend the senses of the crew and help them sharpen their sampling skills as they learn to recognize rocks in the field and understand their geologic context and significance. On-site sample analyses allow results to be incorporated into evolving surface exploration plans and strategies, which will be developing in real-time as we learn more about Mars. Early Mars missions will focus on reconnaissance EVAs to collect rock and soil samples, maximizing the amount of Mars material returned to Earth. Later missions will be increasingly devoted to both extensive field campaigns and laboratory analyses. The capabilities and equipment described below will be built up at the Mars base incrementally over many missions, with science payloads and investigative infrastructure being partitioned among launch opportunities. This discussion considers what we require to measure, observe, and explore on a new planetary territory. Alternatively, what do we need to know and how do we equip ourselves to provide ample capabilities to acquire these data? Suggestions follow describing specific instruments that we could use. Appendix 5 lists a strawman science instrument payload, and a feasibility study of equipment transportation into the field on pressurized or unpressurized rovers.

  11. Automation of analytical isotachophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thormann, Wolfgang

    1985-01-01

    The basic features of automation of analytical isotachophoresis (ITP) are reviewed. Experimental setups consisting of narrow bore tubes which are self-stabilized against thermal convection are considered. Sample detection in free solution is discussed, listing the detector systems presently used or expected to be of potential use in the near future. The combination of a universal detector measuring the evolution of ITP zone structures with detector systems specific to desired components is proposed as a concept of an automated chemical analyzer based on ITP. Possible miniaturization of such an instrument by means of microlithographic techniques is discussed.

  12. Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pressure Systems, Inc.'s DPT 6400 is a system designed to increase productivity in industrial processes where there is a need for making multiple pressure measurements quickly and with high accuracy. It is applicable in controlling industrial processes in plants that are being upgraded to automated status. In order to automate such plants the pressures at the many loops must be measured, converted to digital information and transmitted to the plant's process control computer. The DPT 6400 serves that function. By employing solid-state pressure sensing transducers whose errors are automatically corrected by a microprocessor, it is capable of highly accurate pressure measurements. Basic DPT 6400 has 64 channels, but the system can be expanded to 256 channels by the addition of "slave" units.

  13. Breaking the pumping speed barrier in mass spectrometry: discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2008-06-01

    The performance of mass spectrometers with limited pumping capacity is shown to be improved through use of a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI). A proof-of-concept DAPI interface was designed and characterized using a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. The interface consists of a simple capillary directly connecting the atmospheric pressure ion source to the vacuum mass analyzer region; it has no ion optical elements and no differential pumping stages. Gases carrying ionized analytes were pulsed into the mass analyzer for short periods at high flow rates rather than being continuously introduced at lower flow rates; this procedure maximized ion transfer. The use of DAPI provides a simple solution to the problem of coupling an atmospheric pressure ionization source to a miniature instrument with limited pumping capacity. Data were recorded using various atmospheric pressure ionization sources, including electrospray ionization (ESI), nano-ESI, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. The interface was opened briefly for ion introduction during each scan. With the use of the 18 W pumping system of the Mini 10, limits of detection in the low part-per-billion levels were achieved and unit resolution mass spectra were recorded. PMID:18461971

  14. Cascaded radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Lingang; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-07-15

    A cascaded radiation-pressure acceleration scheme is proposed. When an energetic proton beam is injected into an electrostatic field moving at light speed in a foil accelerated by light pressure, protons can be re-accelerated to much higher energy. An initial 3-GeV proton beam can be re-accelerated to 7 GeV while its energy spread is narrowed significantly, indicating a 4-GeV energy gain for one acceleration stage, as shown in one-dimensional simulations and analytical results. The validity of the method is further confirmed by two-dimensional simulations. This scheme provides a way to scale proton energy at the GeV level linearly with laser energy and is promising to obtain proton bunches at tens of gigaelectron-volts.

  15. 75 FR 81247 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    .... Deletions: DCIFA 01 System name: CIFA Operational and Analytical Records (February 25, 2005, 70 FR 9281.../Counterintelligence/Operation Record System (June 15, 2010, 75 FR 33791). BILLING CODE 5001-06-P ... of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Intelligence Agency,...

  16. Quality Indicators for Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffel, Maren; Drachsler, Hendrik; Stoyanov, Slavi; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a framework of quality indicators for learning analytics that aims to standardise the evaluation of learning analytics tools and to provide a mean to capture evidence for the impact of learning analytics on educational practices in a standardised manner. The criteria of the framework and its quality indicators are based on…

  17. Learning Analytics: Readiness and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm

    2013-01-01

    This position paper introduces the relatively new field of learning analytics, first by considering the relevant meanings of both "learning" and "analytics," and then by looking at two main levels at which learning analytics can be or has been implemented in educational organizations. Although integrated turnkey systems or…

  18. The analytic renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Finite temperature Euclidean two-point functions in quantum mechanics or quantum field theory are characterized by a discrete set of Fourier coefficients Gk, k ∈ Z, associated with the Matsubara frequencies νk = 2 πk / β. We show that analyticity implies that the coefficients Gk must satisfy an infinite number of model-independent linear equations that we write down explicitly. In particular, we construct "Analytic Renormalization Group" linear maps Aμ which, for any choice of cut-off μ, allow to express the low energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | < μ (with the possible exception of the zero mode G0), together with the real-time correlators and spectral functions, in terms of the high energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | ≥ μ. Operating a simple numerical algorithm, we show that the exact universal linear constraints on Gk can be used to systematically improve any random approximate data set obtained, for example, from Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results are illustrated on several explicit examples.

  19. Data Intensive Architecture for Scalable Cyber Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Bryan K.; Johnson, John R.; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2011-11-15

    Cyber analysts are tasked with the identification and mitigation of network exploits and threats. These compromises are difficult to identify due to the characteristics of cyber communication, the volume of traffic, and the duration of possible attack. It is necessary to have analytical tools to help analysts identify anomalies that span seconds, days, and weeks. Unfortunately, providing analytical tools effective access to the volumes of underlying data requires novel architectures, which is often overlooked in operational deployments. Our work is focused on a summary record of communication, called a flow. Flow records are intended to summarize a communication session between a source and a destination, providing a level of aggregation from the base data. Despite this aggregation, many enterprise network perimeter sensors store millions of network flow records per day. The volume of data makes analytics difficult, requiring the development of new techniques to efficiently identify temporal patterns and potential threats. The massive volume makes analytics difficult, but there are other characteristics in the data which compound the problem. Within the billions of records of communication that transact, there are millions of distinct IP addresses involved. Characterizing patterns of entity behavior is very difficult with the vast number of entities that exist in the data. Research has struggled to validate a model for typical network behavior with hopes it will enable the identification of atypical behavior. Complicating matters more, typically analysts are only able to visualize and interact with fractions of data and have the potential to miss long term trends and behaviors. Our analysis approach focuses on aggregate views and visualization techniques to enable flexible and efficient data exploration as well as the capability to view trends over long periods of time. Realizing that interactively exploring summary data allowed analysts to effectively identify

  20. An analytical method of estimating turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochendorfer, Fred D; Nettles, J Cary

    1949-01-01

    A method is developed by which the performance of a turbine over a range of operating conditions can be analytically estimated from the blade angles and flow areas. In order to use the method, certain coefficients that determine the weight flow and the friction losses must be approximated. The method is used to calculate the performance of the single-stage turbine of a commercial aircraft gas-turbine engine and the calculated performance is compared with the performance indicated by experimental data. For the turbine of the typical example, the assumed pressure losses and the tuning angles give a calculated performance that represents the trends of the experimental performance with reasonable accuracy. The exact agreement between analytical performance and experimental performance is contingent upon the proper selection of a blading-loss parameter.

  1. An Analytical Method of Estimating Turbine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochendorfer, Fred D; Nettles, J Cary

    1948-01-01

    A method is developed by which the performance of a turbine over a range of operating conditions can be analytically estimated from the blade angles and flow areas. In order to use the method, certain coefficients that determine the weight flow and friction losses must be approximated. The method is used to calculate the performance of the single-stage turbine of a commercial aircraft gas-turbine engine and the calculated performance is compared with the performance indicated by experimental data. For the turbine of the typical example, the assumed pressure losses and turning angles give a calculated performance that represents the trends of the experimental performance with reasonable accuracy. The exact agreement between analytical performance and experimental performance is contingent upon the proper selection of the blading-loss parameter. A variation of blading-loss parameter from 0.3 to 0.5 includes most of the experimental data from the turbine investigated.

  2. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  3. [Individual pressure tolerance--a "target" pressure?].

    PubMed

    Bogdănici, C; Vancea, P P

    1999-01-01

    In literature there are many meanings for the limit between normal and pathological intraocular pressure: "normative pressure", "critic pressure", "individual tolerance pressure" and "target pressure". The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that these terms are synonymous. PMID:10756882

  4. Ram Pressure Stripping: The Long Goodbye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Lu, Yu; Benson, Andrew; Peter, Annika; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Weisz, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    What turns off star formation in satellite galaxies? Ram pressure stripping, the removal of a galaxy's gas through direct interaction with the gas halo in which it orbits, is an attractive quenching mechanism, particularly in the Milky Way halo where the radial distribution of quenching is dramatic. However, many implementations of this process in semi-analytic models result in overly-rapid gas removal when compared with observations. We use high resolution hydrodynamical simulations run with Enzo to parameterize the stripping of disk and halo gas from an orbiting satellite galaxy for use in the semi-analytic modeling code Galacticus. We find that using the instantaneous ram pressure overestimates the amount of gas that is stripped, and present a physically-motivated module for including ram pressure stripping in semi-analytic models that uses the integral of the ram pressure experienced by a satellite galaxy. We will compare our results to observations of the Milky Way satellites.

  5. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  6. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... and behaviors. This is often positive — it's human nature to listen to and learn from other people ... Responding to peer pressure is part of human nature — but some people are more likely to give ...

  7. Pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  8. VERDE Analytic Modules

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-15

    The Verde Analytic Modules permit the user to ingest openly available data feeds about phenomenology (storm tracks, wind, precipitation, earthquake, wildfires, and similar natural and manmade power grid disruptions and forecast power outages, restoration times, customers outaged, and key facilities that will lose power. Damage areas are predicted using historic damage criteria of the affected area. The modules use a cellular automata approach to estimating the distribution circuits assigned to geo-located substations. Population estimates servedmore » within the service areas are located within 1 km grid cells and converted to customer counts by conversion through demographic estimation of households and commercial firms within the population cells. Restoration times are estimated by agent-based simulation of restoration crews working according to utility published prioritization calibrated by historic performance.« less

  9. VERDE Analytic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    The Verde Analytic Modules permit the user to ingest openly available data feeds about phenomenology (storm tracks, wind, precipitation, earthquake, wildfires, and similar natural and manmade power grid disruptions and forecast power outages, restoration times, customers outaged, and key facilities that will lose power. Damage areas are predicted using historic damage criteria of the affected area. The modules use a cellular automata approach to estimating the distribution circuits assigned to geo-located substations. Population estimates served within the service areas are located within 1 km grid cells and converted to customer counts by conversion through demographic estimation of households and commercial firms within the population cells. Restoration times are estimated by agent-based simulation of restoration crews working according to utility published prioritization calibrated by historic performance.

  10. Analytical sensor redundancy assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulcare, D. B.; Downing, L. E.; Smith, M. K.

    1988-01-01

    The rationale and mechanization of sensor fault tolerance based on analytical redundancy principles are described. The concept involves the substitution of software procedures, such as an observer algorithm, to supplant additional hardware components. The observer synthesizes values of sensor states in lieu of their direct measurement. Such information can then be used, for example, to determine which of two disagreeing sensors is more correct, thus enhancing sensor fault survivability. Here a stability augmentation system is used as an example application, with required modifications being made to a quadruplex digital flight control system. The impact on software structure and the resultant revalidation effort are illustrated as well. Also, the use of an observer algorithm for wind gust filtering of the angle-of-attack sensor signal is presented.

  11. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity. PMID:25379262

  12. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  13. Some analytical models of anisotropic strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Over the years of the concept of local isotropy has become a too stringent condition in modeling relativistic self-gravitating objects. Taking local anisotropy into consideration, in this work, some analytical models of relativistic anisotropic charged strange stars have been developed. The Einstein-Maxwell gravitational field equations have been solved with a particular form of one of the metric potentials. The radial pressure and the energy density have been assumed to follow the usual linear equation of state of strange quark matter, the MIT bag model.

  14. Nuclear material investigations by advanced analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Martin, M.; Froideval, A.; Cammelli, S.; Orlov, A.; Bertsch, J.; Pouchon, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    Advanced analytical techniques have been used to characterize nuclear materials at the Paul Scherrer Institute during the last decade. The analysed materials ranged from reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, Zircaloy claddings to fuel samples. The processes studied included copper cluster build up in RPV steels, corrosion, mechanical and irradiation damage behaviour of PWR and BWR cladding materials as well as fuel defect development. The used advanced techniques included muon spin resonance spectroscopy for zirconium alloy defect characterization while fuel element materials were analysed by techniques derived from neutron and X-ray scattering and absorption spectroscopy.

  15. Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Richard L.; Sullivan, Humbert G.; Miller, J. Douglas

    1978-01-01

    Digital computer simulation is utilized to test hypotheses regarding poorly understood mechanisms of intracranial pressure change. The simulation produces graphic output similar to records from polygraph recorders used in patient monitoring and in animal experimentation. The structure of the model is discussed. The mathematic model perfected by the comparison between simulation and experiment will constitute a formulation of medical information applicable to automated clinical monitoring and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  16. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  17. Pressure regulator

    DOEpatents

    Ebeling, Jr., Robert W.; Weaver, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure within a pressurized flow reactor operated under harsh environmental conditions is controlled by establishing and maintaining a fluidized bed of uniformly sized granular material of selected density by passing the gas from the reactor upwardly therethrough at a rate sufficient to fluidize the bed and varying the height of the bed by adding granular material thereto or removing granular material therefrom to adjust the backpressure on the flow reactor.

  18. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fixler, D E; Wallace, J M; Thornton, W E; Dimmitt, P

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to identify youths with chronic blood pressure elevation. Nineteen adolescent boys were studied, ten had 5-year average systolic or diastolic pressures above the 95th percentile, nine had normal pressure. A Del Mar Avionics Pressurometer III system recorded an average of 121 readings on each subject. The coefficients of variation for pressure were similar for hypertensive and normotensive individuals. During classes, eight of the ten hypertensive youths had elevated pressures in over half of the measurements. Also during these classes eight of ten hypertensive boys had average systolic or diastolic pressure above the 95th percentile, whereas only one of nine normotensive boys had average pressures above this level. We suggest that schooltime ambulatory pressures may be most useful in classifying the blood pressure trend in a youth. PMID:2346634

  19. Analytic integrable systems: Analytic normalization and embedding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang

    In this paper we mainly study the existence of analytic normalization and the normal form of finite dimensional complete analytic integrable dynamical systems. More details, we will prove that any complete analytic integrable diffeomorphism F(x)=Bx+f(x) in (Cn,0) with B having eigenvalues not modulus 1 and f(x)=O(|) is locally analytically conjugate to its normal form. Meanwhile, we also prove that any complete analytic integrable differential system x˙=Ax+f(x) in (Cn,0) with A having nonzero eigenvalues and f(x)=O(|) is locally analytically conjugate to its normal form. Furthermore we will prove that any complete analytic integrable diffeomorphism defined on an analytic manifold can be embedded in a complete analytic integrable flow. We note that parts of our results are the improvement of Moser's one in J. Moser, The analytic invariants of an area-preserving mapping near a hyperbolic fixed point, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 9 (1956) 673-692 and of Poincaré's one in H. Poincaré, Sur l'intégration des équations différentielles du premier order et du premier degré, II, Rend. Circ. Mat. Palermo 11 (1897) 193-239. These results also improve the ones in Xiang Zhang, Analytic normalization of analytic integrable systems and the embedding flows, J. Differential Equations 244 (2008) 1080-1092 in the sense that the linear part of the systems can be nonhyperbolic, and the one in N.T. Zung, Convergence versus integrability in Poincaré-Dulac normal form, Math. Res. Lett. 9 (2002) 217-228 in the way that our paper presents the concrete expression of the normal form in a restricted case.

  20. Gaseous analytes of concern at Hanford Tank Farms. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Large amounts of toxic and radioactive waste materials are stored in underground tanks at DOE sites. When the vapors in the tank headspaces vent to the open atmosphere a potentially dangerous situation can occur for personnel in the area. An open-path atmospheric pollution monitor is being developed for DOE to monitor the open air space above these tanks. In developing this monitor it is important to know what hazardous gases are most likely to be found in dangerous concentrations. These gases are called the Analytes of Concern. At the present time, measurements in eight tanks have detected thirty-one analytes in at least two tanks and fifteen analytes in only one tank. In addition to these gases, Carbon tetrachloride is considered to be an Analyte of Concern because it permeates the ground around the tanks. These Analytes are described and ranked according to a Hazard Index which combines their vapor pressure, density, and approximate danger level. The top sixteen ranked analytes which have been detected in at least two tanks comprise an {open_quotes}Analytes of Concern Test List{close_quotes} for determining the system performance of the atmospheric pollution monitor under development. A preliminary examination of the infrared spectra, barring atmospheric interferences, indicates that: The pollution monitor will detect all forty-seven Analytes!

  1. Arterial pulse wave pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C.; Gorelick, D.; Chen, W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An arterial pulse wave pressure transducer is introduced. The transducer is comprised of a fluid filled cavity having a flexible membrane disposed over the cavity and adapted to be placed on the skin over an artery. An arterial pulse wave creates pressure pulses in the fluid which are transduced, by a pressure sensitive transistor in direct contact with the fluid, into an electric signal. The electrical signal is representative of the pulse waves and can be recorded so as to monitor changes in the elasticity of the arterial walls.

  2. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  3. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z. )

    1992-02-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibria with anisotropic pressure are obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distributions or particle distributions measured along a satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibria including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator owing to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has a significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling the dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the taillike flux surface.

  4. Hanford transuranic analytical capability

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-02-24

    With the current DOE focus on ER/WM programs, an increase in the quantity of waste samples that requires detailed analysis is forecasted. One of the prime areas of growth is the demand for DOE environmental protocol analyses of TRU waste samples. Currently there is no laboratory capacity to support analysis of TRU waste samples in excess of 200 nCi/gm. This study recommends that an interim solution be undertaken to provide these services. By adding two glove boxes in room 11A of 222S the interim waste analytical needs can be met for a period of four to five years or until a front end facility is erected at or near the 222-S facility. The yearly average of samples is projected to be approximately 600 samples. The figure has changed significantly due to budget changes and has been downgraded from 10,000 samples to the 600 level. Until these budget and sample projection changes become firmer, a long term option is not recommended at this time. A revision to this document is recommended by March 1996 to review the long term option and sample projections.

  5. Analytics for Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Christopher J.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Nhan, Melissa; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants, while deep omics analysis provides a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research. PMID:26442249

  6. 40 CFR 86.111-90 - Exhaust gas analytical system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... description. The exhaust gas analytical system for HC, CO, CO2, and NOX, Figure B90-7, consists of a flame.... A heated flame ionization detector (HFID) is used for the continuous determination of hydrocarbons... with a flame ionization detector. The analysis for formaldehyde is performed using high pressure...

  7. 40 CFR 86.111-90 - Exhaust gas analytical system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... description. The exhaust gas analytical system for HC, CO, CO2, and NOX, Figure B90-7, consists of a flame.... A heated flame ionization detector (HFID) is used for the continuous determination of hydrocarbons... with a flame ionization detector. The analysis for formaldehyde is performed using high pressure...

  8. 40 CFR 86.111-90 - Exhaust gas analytical system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... description. The exhaust gas analytical system for HC, CO, CO2, and NOX, Figure B90-7, consists of a flame.... A heated flame ionization detector (HFID) is used for the continuous determination of hydrocarbons... with a flame ionization detector. The analysis for formaldehyde is performed using high pressure...

  9. 40 CFR 86.111-90 - Exhaust gas analytical system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... description. The exhaust gas analytical system for HC, CO, CO2, and NOX, Figure B90-7, consists of a flame.... A heated flame ionization detector (HFID) is used for the continuous determination of hydrocarbons... with a flame ionization detector. The analysis for formaldehyde is performed using high pressure...

  10. AUTOMATIC CALIBRATING SYSTEM FOR PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, E.L.; Rodgers, G.W.

    1958-01-01

    An automatic system for calibrating a number of pressure transducers is described. The disclosed embodiment of the invention uses a mercurial manometer to measure the air pressure applied to the transducer. A servo system follows the top of the mercury column as the pressure is changed and operates an analog- to-digital converter This converter furnishes electrical pulses, each representing an increment of pressure change, to a reversible counterThe transducer furnishes a signal at each calibration point, causing an electric typewriter and a card-punch machine to record the pressure at the instant as indicated by the counter. Another counter keeps track of the calibration points so that a number identifying each point is recorded with the corresponding pressure. A special relay control system controls the pressure trend and programs the sequential calibration of several transducers.

  11. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version High Blood Pressure Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the amount of force that your ... called your blood pressure. What is high blood pressure? High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your blood ...

  12. Analytical steam injection model for layered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abdual-Razzaq; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    Screening, evaluation and optimization of the steam flooding process in homogeneous reservoirs can be performed by using simple analytical predictive models. In the absence of any analytical model for layered reservoirs, at present, only numerical simulators can be used. And these are expensive. In this study, an analytical model has been developed considering two isolated layers of differing permeabilities. The principle of equal flow potential is applied across the two layers. Gajdica`s (1990) single layer linear steam drive model is extended for the layered system. The formulation accounts for variation of heat loss area in the higher permeability layer, and the development of a hot liquid zone in the lower permeability layer. These calculations also account for effects of viscosity, density, fractional flow curves and pressure drops in the hot liquid zone. Steam injection rate variations in the layers are represented by time weighted average rates. For steam zone calculations, Yortsos and Gavalas`s (1981) upper bound method is used with a correction factor. The results of the model are compared with a numerical simulator. Comparable oil and water flow rates, and breakthrough times were achieved for 100 cp oil. Results with 10 cp and 1000 cp oils indicate the need to improve the formulation to properly handle differing oil viscosities.

  13. Line broadening of confined CO gas: from molecule-wall to molecule-molecule collisions with pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, J-M; Boulet, C; Auwera, J Vander; El Hamzaoui, H; Capoen, B; Bouazaoui, M

    2014-02-14

    The infrared absorption in the fundamental band of CO gas confined in porous silica xerogel has been recorded at room temperature for pressures between about 5 and 920 hPa using a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. The widths of individual lines are determined from fits of measured spectra and compared with ab initio predictions obtained from requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. Good agreement is obtained from the low pressure regime where the line shapes are governed by molecule-wall collisions to high pressures where the influence of molecule-molecule interactions dominates. These results, together with those obtained with a simple analytical model, indicate that both mechanisms contribute in a practically additive way to the observed linewidths. They also confirm that a single collision of a molecule with a wall changes its rotational state. These results are of interest for the determination of some characteristics of the opened porosity of porous materials through optical soundings. PMID:24527910

  14. Portable measurement of maximum mouth pressures.

    PubMed

    Hamnegård, C H; Wragg, S; Kyroussis, D; Aquilina, R; Moxham, J; Green, M

    1994-02-01

    We have compared a small portable mouth pressure meter (MPM) to our laboratory standard (LS) pressure recording equipment in order to evaluate this new device. The mouth pressure meter measures and displays as a digital read-out peak pressure for inspiratory and expiratory efforts. It samples the signal at 16 Hz, and an integral microprocessor is programmed to determine and display the maximum pressure averaged over one second both during inspiratory and expiratory manoeuvres (PImax and PEmax, respectively). A fine bore catheter connecting the mouthpiece of the mouth pressure meter to a Validyne pressure transducer enabled simultaneous measurement of pressure, which was analysed by LabVIEW, running on a Macintosh Quadra 700 computer. We studied 13 normal subjects and 11 patients with respiratory disease. Each subject performed inspiratory and five expiratory efforts. The values displayed from the mouth pressure meter were manually recorded. The mouth pressure meter reliably and accurately measured peak pressure and maximal pressure both for inspiratory and expiratory efforts in normals and patients. The mean +/- SD difference when compared with the Validyne method was 0.19 +/- 0.12 and -0.04 +/- 0.12 kPa, for PImax and PEmax, respectively. This portable device should be useful to measure mouth pressures, not only in the routine lung function laboratory but also at the bedside and in the clinic. PMID:8162993

  15. Censorship: Pressure Groups and Boycotts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Fred

    1978-01-01

    Records ABC President Fred Silverman's 1977 speech to the American Association of Advertising Agencies emphasizing the potential harm inherent in pressure groups and boycott's increasing power over broadcasters and advertisers. Available from: Vital Speeches of the Day, City News Publishing Company, Box 606, Southold, New York 11971. (MH)

  16. Thermodynamic Pressure/Temperature Transducer Health Check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher D. (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Deyoe, Richard T. (Inventor); Starr, Stanley O. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and procedure for checking the health of a pressure transducer in situ is provided. The procedure includes measuring a fixed change in pressure above ambient pressure and a fixed change in pressure below ambient pressure. This is done by first sealing an enclosed volume around the transducer with a valve. A piston inside the sealed volume is increasing the pressure. A fixed pressure below ambient pressure is obtained by opening the valve, driving the piston The output of the pressure transducer is recorded for both the overpressuring and the underpressuring. By comparing this data with data taken during a preoperative calibration, the health of the transducer is determined from the linearity, the hysteresis, and the repeatability of its output. The further addition of a thermometer allows constant offset error in the transducer output to be determined.

  17. Big data and visual analytics in anaesthesia and health care.

    PubMed

    Simpao, A F; Ahumada, L M; Rehman, M A

    2015-09-01

    Advances in computer technology, patient monitoring systems, and electronic health record systems have enabled rapid accumulation of patient data in electronic form (i.e. big data). Organizations such as the Anesthesia Quality Institute and Multicenter Perioperative Outcomes Group have spearheaded large-scale efforts to collect anaesthesia big data for outcomes research and quality improvement. Analytics--the systematic use of data combined with quantitative and qualitative analysis to make decisions--can be applied to big data for quality and performance improvements, such as predictive risk assessment, clinical decision support, and resource management. Visual analytics is the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces, and it can facilitate performance of cognitive activities involving big data. Ongoing integration of big data and analytics within anaesthesia and health care will increase demand for anaesthesia professionals who are well versed in both the medical and the information sciences. PMID:25627395

  18. New Analytical Monographs on TCM Herbal Drugs for Quality Proof.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Hildebert; Bauer, Rudolf; Melchart, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Regardless of specific national drug regulations there is an international consensus that all TCM drugs must meet stipulated high quality standards focusing on authentication, identification and chemical composition. In addition, safety of all TCM drugs prescribed by physicians has to be guaranteed. During the 25 years history of the TCM hospital Bad Kötzting, 171 TCM drugs underwent an analytical quality proof including thin layer as well as high pressure liquid chromatography. As from now mass spectroscopy will also be available as analytical tool. The findings are compiled and already published in three volumes of analytical monographs. One more volume will be published shortly, and a fifth volume is in preparation. The main issues of the analytical procedure in TCM drugs like authenticity, botanical nomenclature, variability of plant species and parts as well as processing are pointed out and possible ways to overcome them are sketched. PMID:27271998

  19. Pressure fluctuations as a diagnostic tool for fluidized beds. [Quarterly] technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Brue, E.

    1995-04-10

    A series of preliminary experiments were conducted at the Iowa State University power plant circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB). Pressure fluctuation measurements were recorded from a pressure transducer located immediately above the primary air distributor at the base of the CFB boiler under normal operating conditions. The purpose of these initial experiments was to examine the general pressure fluctuation structure of the fluidized bed boiler in order to assess what further signal processing techniques may be necessary for valid pressure fluctuation analysis and analytical characterization. These initial results show that the CFB boiler pressure fluctuations obtained are highly periodic. Due to the dominance of this periodic component (and its subsequent harmonics), the Bode plots of these pressure fluctuation signals are difficult to interpret. While an overall system roll-off is apparent, neither the overall system order nor the system time constants can be adequately estimated from this initial data. Further data recorded from other locations in the CFB boiler should provide a more complete explanation of the nature of boiler pressure fluctuations. This initial experimentation suggests that a better description of pressure fluctuations could be attained using signal filtering techniques. Numerous experiments were also completed using the 2.0 inch diameter cold-model CFB, completing the first stage of a comprehensive set of similitude experiments. This bed was pressurized, and fluidized with 0.15 and 0.2 mm steel shot. A variety of operating conditions were selected such that similitude parameters could be matched in a 4.0 inch diameter CFB model exactly twice the scale of this small CFB. Currently, the final similitude tests in the small CFB with 0.1 mm steel shot are being performed.

  20. Subminiature micropower digital recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, R. M.; Pitman, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    High-density digital data, collected periodically or randomly from multiplicity of sensors, are recorded by subminiature recorder. Magnetic recording head is energized with suitable pulsatile signals to reverse polarization on magnetically-sensitive tape while tape is immobilized at recording head. Prior to next recording, set tape so new area of tape is at recording head.

  1. Analytical augmentation of 3D simulation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughran, Julia J.; Stahl, Marchelle M.

    1998-05-01

    This paper describes an approach for augmenting three- dimensional (3D) virtual environments (VEs) with analytic information and multimedia annotations to enhance training and education applications. Analytic or symbolic information in VEs is presented as bar charts, text, graphical overlays, or with the use of color. Analytic results can be computed and displayed in the VE at run-time or, more likely, while replaying a simulation. These annotations would typically include computations of pre-defined Measures of Performance (MOPs) or Measures of Effectiveness (MOEs) associated with the training or educational goals of the simulation. Multimedia annotations are inserted into the VE by the user and may include: a drawing or whiteboarding capability, enabling participants to insert written text and/or graphics into the two-dimensional (2D) or 3D world; audio comments, and/or video recordings. These annotations can clarify a point, capture teacher feedback, or elaborate on the student's perspective or understanding of the experience. The annotations are captured in the VE either synchronously or asynchronously from the users (students and instructors), during simulation execution or afterward during a replay. When replaying or reviewing the simulation, the embedded annotations can be reviewed by a single user or by multiple users through the use of collaboration technologies. By augmenting 3D virtual environments with analytic and multimedia annotations, the education and training experience may be enhanced. The annotations can offer more effective feedback, enhance understanding, and increase participation. They may also support distance learning by promoting student/teacher interaction without co-location.

  2. The Case for Assessment Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Cath

    2013-01-01

    Learning analytics is a relatively new field of inquiry and its precise meaning is both contested and fluid (Johnson, Smith, Willis, Levine & Haywood, 2011; LAK, n.d.). Ferguson (2012) suggests that the best working definition is that offered by the first Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK) conference: "the measurement, collection,…

  3. Understanding Education Involving Geovisual Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenliden, Linnea

    2013-01-01

    Handling the vast amounts of data and information available in contemporary society is a challenge. Geovisual Analytics provides technology designed to increase the effectiveness of information interpretation and analytical task solving. To date, little attention has been paid to the role such tools can play in education and to the extent to which…

  4. Varied line spacing plane holographic grating recorded by using uniform line spacing plane gratings.

    PubMed

    Qing, Ling; Gang, Wu; Bin, Liu; Qiuping, Wang

    2006-07-20

    Uniform line spacing plane gratings are introduced into a recording system to generate aspherical wavefronts for recording varied line spacing plane holographic gratings. Analytical expressions of groove parameters are derived to the fourth order. A ray-tracing validation algorithm is provided based on Fermat's principle and a local search method. The recording parameters are optimized to record a varied line spacing plane holographic grating with the aid of derived analytical expressions. A design example demonstrates the exactness of the analytical expressions and the superiority of recording optics with auxiliary gratings. PMID:16826244

  5. 40 CFR 141.33 - Record maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., check sample, raw or process water sample or other special purpose sample; (3) Date of analysis; (4) Laboratory and person responsible for performing analysis; (5) The analytical technique/method used; and (6) The results of the analysis. (b) Records of action taken by the system to correct violations...

  6. 40 CFR 141.33 - Record maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., check sample, raw or process water sample or other special purpose sample; (3) Date of analysis; (4) Laboratory and person responsible for performing analysis; (5) The analytical technique/method used; and (6) The results of the analysis. (b) Records of action taken by the system to correct violations...

  7. 40 CFR 141.33 - Record maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., check sample, raw or process water sample or other special purpose sample; (3) Date of analysis; (4) Laboratory and person responsible for performing analysis; (5) The analytical technique/method used; and (6) The results of the analysis. (b) Records of action taken by the system to correct violations...

  8. Characterization of Analytical Reference Glass-1 (ARG-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.L.

    1993-12-01

    High-level radioactive waste may be immobilized in borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Aiken, South Carolina, and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), Richland, Washington. The vitrified waste form will be stored in stainless steel canisters before its eventual transfer to a geologic repository for long-term disposal. Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) (DOE 1993), Section 1.1.2 requires that the waste form producers must report the measured chemical composition of the vitrified waste in their production records before disposal. Chemical analysis of glass waste forms is receiving increased attention due to qualification requirements of vitrified waste forms. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been supporting the glass producers` analytical laboratories by a continuing program of multilaboratory analytical testing using interlaboratory ``round robin`` methods. At the PNL Materials Characterization Center Analytical Round Robin 4 workshop ``Analysis of Nuclear Waste Glass and Related Materials,`` January 16--17, 1990, Pleasanton, California, the meeting attendees decided that simulated nuclear waste analytical reference glasses were needed for use as analytical standards. Use of common standard analytical reference materials would allow the glass producers` analytical laboratories to calibrate procedures and instrumentation, to control laboratory performance and conduct self-appraisals, and to help qualify their various waste forms.

  9. Anchorage Receives Record Snowfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The forecast called for flurries, but the snow accumulated on the ground in Anchorage, Alaska, at the rate of 2 inches per hour (5 cm per hour) for much of Saturday, March 16, 2002. By the time the winter storm passed on Sunday afternoon, Anchorage had received 28.6 inches (72.6 cm) of snow, surpassing by far the previous record of 15.6 inches (39.6 cm) set on December 29, 1955. Flights were canceled and schools were closed as a result of the storm. This true-color image of Alaska was acquired by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 18. It appears another large, low-pressure system is heading toward the Anchorage region, which could bring substantially more snowfall. The low-pressure system can be identified by the characteristic spiral pattern of clouds located off Alaska's southwestern coast in this scene.

  10. A Visual Analytics Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James J.; Cook, Kristin A.

    2006-01-01

    The September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were a wakeup call to the United States. The Hurricane Katrina disaster in August 2005 provided yet another reminder that unprecedented disasters can and do occur. And when they do, we must be able to analyze large amounts of disparate data in order to make sense of exceedingly complex situations and save lives. Responding to an Urgent Need This need to support penetrating analysis of massive data collections is not limited to security, though. From systems biology to human health, from evaluations of product effectiveness to strategizing for competitive positioning, to assessing the results of marketing campaigns, there is a critical need to analyze very large amounts of complex information. Simply put, our ability to collect data far outstrips our ability to analyze the data we have collected. Following the September 11 attacks, the government initiated efforts to evaluate the technologies that are available today or are on the near horizon. Two National Academy of Sciences reports identified serious gaps in the technologies. Making the Nation Safer [Alberts & Wulf, 2002] describes how science and technology can be advanced to protect the nation against terrorism. Information Technology for Counterterrorism [Hennessy et al., 2003] expands upon the work of Making the Nation Safer, focusing specifically on the opportunities for information technology to help counter and respond to terrorist attacks. Significant research progress has been made in disciplines such as scientific and information visualization, statistically-based exploratory and confirmatory analysis, data and knowledge representations, and perceptual and cognitive sciences, However, the research community has not adequately addressed the integration of these subspecialties to advance the ability for analysts to apply their expert human judgment to complex data in pressure-filled situations. Although some research is being done

  11. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  12. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  13. Pressure driven flow in porous tubular membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Nils; Martinand, Denis; Serre, Eric; Lueptow, Richard

    2011-11-01

    We consider the steady laminar flow of a Newtonian incompressible fluid in a porous tubular membrane with pressure-driven transmembrane flow. Due to its fundamental importance to membrane filtration systems, this flow has been studied extensively both analytically and numerically, yet a robust analytic solution has not been found. The problem is challenging due to the coupling between the transmembrane pressure and velocity with the simultaneous coupling between the axial pressure gradient and the axial velocity. We present a robust analytical solution which incorporates Darcy's law on the membrane surface. The solution is in the form of an asymptotic expansion about a small parameter related to the membrane permeability. We verify the analytical solution with comparison to 2-D spectral direct numerical simulations of ultrafiltration and microfiltration systems with typical operating conditions, as well as extreme cases of cross-flow reversal and axial flow exhaustion. In all cases, the agreement between the analytical and numerical results is excellent. Finally, we use the analytical and numerical results to provide guidelines about when common simplifying assumptions about the permeate flow may be made. Specifically, the assumptions of a parabolic axial velocity profile and uniform transmembrane velocity are valid only for small permeabilities.

  14. Research on pressure sensors for biomedical instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a piezo-resistive pressure transducer is discussed suitable for recording pressures typically encountered in biomedical applications. The pressure transducer consists of a thin silicon diaphragm containing four strain-sensitive resistors, and is fabricated using silicon monolithic integrated-circuit technology. The pressure transducers can be as small as 0.7 mm outer diameter, and are, as a result, suitable for mounting at the tip of a catheter. Pressure-induced stress in the diaphragm is sensed by the resistors, which are interconnected to form a Wheatstone bridge.

  15. Pressure of two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J.; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Tian, Wen-de

    2016-06-01

    A simple analytic expression for the pressure of a two-dimensional Yukawa liquid is found by fitting results from a molecular dynamics simulation. The results verify that the pressure can be written as the sum of a potential term which is a simple multiple of the Coulomb potential energy at a distance of the Wigner–Seitz radius, and a kinetic term which is a multiple of the one for an ideal gas. Dimensionless coefficients for each of these terms are found empirically, by fitting. The resulting analytic expression, with its empirically determined coefficients, is plotted as isochores, or curves of constant area. These results should be applicable to monolayer dusty plasmas.

  16. Using Big Data Technologies and Analytics to Predict Sensor Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mital, R.; Coughlin, J.; Canaday, M.

    A goal of big data analytics is to help leaders make informed and rapid decisions by analyzing large volumes of complex data, as well as other forms of data that may be untapped by conventional analyses, and presenting it in a form that facilitates decision making. Big data analytics is the process of examining large data sets containing a variety of data types to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other useful information. Sensors typically record significant amounts of data but it is often not exploited except in special cases and after historically large amounts of analysis time. Big data analytics provides a mechanism to routinely monitor these data sets while also providing insight into anomalous events, such as are encountered in large sensor systems such as those in the space surveillance network. In this study, we simulate recorded data from a notional radar or optical sensor and use big data technologies and the analytics to process the data to analyze and predict sensor performance. This study focuses on data products that would commonly be analyzed at a site and how big data technologies can be used to detect anomalies. This study shows how the ability to rapidly drill down into the data enables an analyst or decision maker to assess potential system anomalies. This study shows how current technologies and predictive analytical techniques can be used to view the data, detect and explain anomalies, and predict preventative maintenance actions in a timely manner.

  17. The Science of Analytic Reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Pike, William A.

    2009-09-23

    The challenge of visually communicating analysis results is central to the ability of visual analytics tools to support decision making and knowledge construction. The benefit of emerging visual methods will be improved through more effective exchange of the insights generated through the use of visual analytics. This paper outlines the major requirements for next-generation reporting systems in terms of eight major research needs: the development of best practices, design automation, visual rhetoric, context and audience, connecting analysis to presentation, evidence and argument, collaborative environments, and interactive and dynamic documents. It also describes an emerging technology called Active Products that introduces new techniques for analytic process capture and dissemination.

  18. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The ...

  19. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  20. Blood Pressure Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  1. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Aug 17,2016 Blood pressure is typically ... Your doctor should evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare ...

  2. Biofeedback With Implanted Blood-Pressure Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rischell, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Additional uses found for equipment described in "Implanted Blood-Pressure-Measuring Device" (GSC-13042). Implanted with device electronic circuitry that measures, interprets, and transmits data via inductive link through patient's skin to external receiver. Receiver includes audible alarm generator activated when patient's blood pressure exceeds predetermined threshold. Also included in receiver a blood-pressure display, recorder, or both, for use by patient or physician.

  3. [Ambulatory invasive and noninvasive blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Bachmann, K; Wortmann, A; Engels, G

    1989-08-01

    Indirect arterial blood pressure measurement has not changed substantially since its introduction by Riva-Rocci in 1986, Korotkoff in 1905 and Recklinghausen in 1906. Random measurements in the clinic or practice reflect only incompletely the dynamic nature of the blood pressure. Blood pressure recordings by patients themselves have provided more information through better temporal resolution, however, exact characterization of the pressure response throughout the entire day and, in particular, during physical exertion are not enabled; the latter are especially important with regard to diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. In 1966, therefore, radiotelemetric transmission of direct, continuously-measured arterial blood pressure was developed which enabled beat-to-beat registration of blood pressure, outside the laboratory, during normal daily life and sport activities. The initial results showed a marked variability of the blood pressure during the course of the day (Figure 1). Excessive blood pressure increases were observed during exposure to cold, static and dynamic exercise and to a lesser degree during automobile driving and exposure to heat (Figure 3). Recording of the pressure curves via transmission by radiotelemetry shows a high degree of accuracy and temporal resolution, spatial and situational freedom but is invasive and costly in terms of personnel. The same holds true for direct continuous blood pressure registration and storage on a portable tape recorder. Portable, automatic blood pressure measuring units for ambulatory monitoring employ indirect auscultatory or oscillometric recording with a cuff. As compared with the radiotelemetric direct continuous blood pressure measuring method, the indirect method has subordinate temporal resolution, that is, the measurements are only intermittent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2676813

  4. Analytical model for screening potential CO2 repositories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okwen, R.T.; Stewart, M.T.; Cunningham, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing potential repositories for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide using numerical models can be complicated, costly, and time-consuming, especially when faced with the challenge of selecting a repository from a multitude of potential repositories. This paper presents a set of simple analytical equations (model), based on the work of previous researchers, that could be used to evaluate the suitability of candidate repositories for subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide. We considered the injection of carbon dioxide at a constant rate into a confined saline aquifer via a fully perforated vertical injection well. The validity of the analytical model was assessed via comparison with the TOUGH2 numerical model. The metrics used in comparing the two models include (1) spatial variations in formation pressure and (2) vertically integrated brine saturation profile. The analytical model and TOUGH2 show excellent agreement in their results when similar input conditions and assumptions are applied in both. The analytical model neglects capillary pressure and the pressure dependence of fluid properties. However, simulations in TOUGH2 indicate that little error is introduced by these simplifications. Sensitivity studies indicate that the agreement between the analytical model and TOUGH2 depends strongly on (1) the residual brine saturation, (2) the difference in density between carbon dioxide and resident brine (buoyancy), and (3) the relationship between relative permeability and brine saturation. The results achieved suggest that the analytical model is valid when the relationship between relative permeability and brine saturation is linear or quasi-linear and when the irreducible saturation of brine is zero or very small. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  5. Physical and analytical modeling of upland soil erosion due to headcut migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. J.; Alonso, C. V.

    2002-12-01

    On hillslopes and agricultural fields, discrete areas of intense, localized soil erosion commonly take place in the form of migrating headcuts. These erosional features significantly increase soil loss and landscape degradation, yet the unsteady, transient, and migratory habits of headcuts complicate their phenomenological and erosional characterization. Here a unique experimental facility was constructed to examine actively migrating headcuts typical of upland concentrated flows. Essential components of the facility include a deep soil cavity with external drainage, rainfall simulator, overland flow, and a video recording technique for data collection. These experiments provided unrivalled insight into steady state soil erosion processes, self-similarity of migrating headcuts, and integral time and length scales for headcut development. Several examples of migrating headcuts and their salient characteristics will be shown using the video recordings, including the effects of flow rate, bed slope, and initial step height on headcut dimensions, turbulent flow structure within the scour hole, and the distribution of bed pressure along the headcut face. It will be shown that erosion processes are controlled by the characteristics of the overfall nappe and wall jets within the plunge pool and that modified jet impingement theory can be successfully applied to a migrating headcut. These experiments provided the insight as well as the conceptual framework for a complete analytical solution for predicting headcut migration rate, equilibrium scour depth, and total sediment flux in upland concentrated flows. Without such experiments, the formative processes of headcut erosion in soils would remain speculative at best.

  6. Blood Outflow from Capillary under Forced Pressure: Comparison between Electric Circuit Analog and Optical Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamanaka, Yohei

    2007-12-01

    An electric circuit analog is proposed for blood outflow from a skin capillary when static pressure higher than the highest blood pressure of the artery is applied to the capillary. The proposed electric circuit analog consists of a capacitor and a variable resistor. The resistance of the variable resistor changes depending on the charge stored in the capacitor, which models the increase in blood flow resistance due to less blood in the capillary. In order to evaluate the electric circuit analog, the analytical solution is compared with in vivo data. In vivo data are measured using an inherent optical sensor, which consists of a light-emitting diode and a photodetector mounted on a mechanical actuator that applies static pressure to the skin surface. The change of the received light during pressurization is recorded. A parameter that is related to blood concentration is estimated from the Lambert-Beer law. In vivo data are measured for fingertips of 30 healthy volunteers, and the square errors of the fitting curves derived using an exponential function model, third-order function model, and the proposed electric circuit analog are compared. It is shown that the proposed electric circuit analog gives the best approximation among the three models. This result confirms that the blood outflow from the capillary under forced pressure can be evaluated using the proposed model.

  7. 40 CFR 86.142-90 - Records required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... measurements recorded. (j) Test cell barometric pressure, ambient temperature, and humidity. Note: A central laboratory barometer may be used: Provided, that individual test cell barometric pressures are shown to be within ±0.1 percent of the barometric pressure at the central barometer location. (k)...

  8. 40 CFR 86.142-90 - Records required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... measurements recorded. (j) Test cell barometric pressure, ambient temperature, and humidity. Note: A central laboratory barometer may be used: Provided, that individual test cell barometric pressures are shown to be within ±0.1 percent of the barometric pressure at the central barometer location. (k)...

  9. 40 CFR 86.142-90 - Records required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... measurements recorded. (j) Test cell barometric pressure, ambient temperature, and humidity. Note: A central laboratory barometer may be used: Provided, that individual test cell barometric pressures are shown to be within ±0.1 percent of the barometric pressure at the central barometer location. (k)...

  10. 40 CFR 86.142-90 - Records required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... measurements recorded. (j) Test cell barometric pressure, ambient temperature, and humidity. Note: A central laboratory barometer may be used: Provided, that individual test cell barometric pressures are shown to be within ±0.1 percent of the barometric pressure at the central barometer location. (k)...

  11. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a pressure-controlled electrothermal atomizer.

    PubMed

    Lonardo, R F; Yuzefovsky, A I; Irwin, R L; Michel, R G

    1996-02-01

    A theoretical model was developed to describe the loss of analyte atoms in graphite furnaces during atomization. The model was based on two functions, one that described the supply of analyte by vaporization, and another that described the removal of the analyte by diffusion. Variation in working pressure was shown to affect the competition between these two processes. Optimal atomization efficiency was predicted to occur at a pressure where the supply of the analyte was maximized, and gas phase interactions between the analyte and matrix were minimized. Experiments to test the model included the direct determination of phosphorus and tellurium in nickel alloys and of cobalt in glass. In all cases, reduction in working pressure from atmospheric pressure to 7 Pa decreased sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude, but improved temporal peak shape. For the atomization of tellurium directly from a solid nickel alloy, and the atomization of cobalt from an aqueous solution, no change in sensitivity was observed as the working pressure was reduced from atmospheric pressure to approximately 70 kPa. If a reduction in working pressure affected only the diffusion of the analyte, poorer sensitivity should have been obtained. Only a commensurate increase in analyte vaporization could account for maintained sensitivity at lower working pressures. Overall, analyte vaporization was not dramatically improved at reduced working pressures, and maximum atomization efficiency was found to occur near atmospheric pressure. PMID:8712359

  12. [City and County Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Judith O.; And Others

    Six papers presented at the Institute were concerned with city and county records. They are: "EWEB and Its Records," which discusses the history, laws and records of the Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB);""Police Records: Eugene, Oregon," classifies police records, other than administrative, into three general categories: (1) case or…

  13. Trends in Analytical Scale Separations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgenson, James W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses recent developments in the instrumentation and practice of analytical scale operations. Emphasizes detection devices and procedures in gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, electrophoresis, supercritical fluid chromatography, and field-flow fractionation. (JN)

  14. Liposomes: Technologies and Analytical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesorka, Aldo; Orwar, Owe

    2008-07-01

    Liposomes are structurally and functionally some of the most versatile supramolecular assemblies in existence. Since the beginning of active research on lipid vesicles in 1965, the field has progressed enormously and applications are well established in several areas, such as drug and gene delivery. In the analytical sciences, liposomes serve a dual purpose: Either they are analytes, typically in quality-assessment procedures of liposome preparations, or they are functional components in a variety of new analytical systems. Liposome immunoassays, for example, benefit greatly from the amplification provided by encapsulated markers, and nanotube-interconnected liposome networks have emerged as ultrasmall-scale analytical devices. This review provides information about new developments in some of the most actively researched liposome-related topics.

  15. Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas W.

    1979-01-01

    This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

  16. Analytic Methods in Investigative Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2001-01-01

    Suggests an alternative proof by analytic methods, which is more accessible than rigorous proof based on Euclid's Elements, in which students need only apply standard methods of trigonometry to the data without introducing new points or lines. (KHR)

  17. Analytical Chemistry: A Literary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucy, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an anthology of references to descriptions of analytical chemistry techniques from history, popular fiction, and film which can be used to capture student interest and frame discussions of chemical techniques. (WRM)

  18. Cautions Concerning Electronic Analytical Balances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bruce B.; Wells, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Cautions chemists to be wary of ferromagnetic samples (especially magnetized samples), stray electromagnetic radiation, dusty environments, and changing weather conditions. These and other conditions may alter readings obtained from electronic analytical balances. (JN)

  19. Microemulsification: an approach for analytical determinations.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renato S; Shiroma, Leandro Y; Teixeira, Alvaro V N C; de Toledo, José R; do Couto, Bruno C; de Carvalho, Rogério M; Carrilho, Emanuel; Kubota, Lauro T; Gobbi, Angelo L

    2014-09-16

    water, in turn, the linear range was observed throughout the volume fraction of analyte. The best limits of detection were 0.32% v/v water to ethanol and 0.30% v/v monoethylene glycol to water. Furthermore, the accuracy was highly satisfactory. The natural gas samples provided by the Petrobras exhibited color, particulate material, high ionic strength, and diverse compounds as metals, carboxylic acids, and anions. These samples had a conductivity of up to 2630 μS cm(-1); the conductivity of pure monoethylene glycol was only 0.30 μS cm(-1). Despite such downsides, the method allowed accurate measures bypassing steps such as extraction, preconcentration, and dilution of the sample. In addition, the levels of robustness were promising. This parameter was evaluated by investigating the effect of (i) deviations in volumetric preparation of the dispersions and (ii) changes in temperature over the analyte contents recorded by the method. PMID:25148857

  20. Modern differential pressure gas counter (WIGZ) measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, O.

    1985-07-01

    The differential pressure gas counter facility developed to measure gas flow rate on orifice plates in the pipe system transporting Soviet gas to West Germany and France was equipped with small computers which record all the parameters of a measuring system and calculate the standard volume and the quantity of heat. These parameters are used to calibrate the facility. The differential pressure indicators and operating densitometers, the standard densitometers, pressure and temperature sensors, and calorific value indicators are described. The operation of and processing by the 16-bit microprocessor computers of all parameters are summarized. The central computer and the performance recording facility are presented.

  1. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOEpatents

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  2. Visual Analytics Technology Transition Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Cook, Kristin A.; Whiting, Mark A.; Lemon, Douglas K.; Greenblatt, Howard

    2009-09-23

    The authors provide a description of the transition process for visual analytic tools and contrast this with the transition process for more traditional software tools. This paper takes this into account and describes a user-oriented approach to technology transition including a discussion of key factors that should be considered and adapted to each situation. The progress made in transitioning visual analytic tools in the past five years is described and the challenges that remain are enumerated.

  3. Analytical multikinks in smooth potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brito, G. P.; Correa, R. A. C.; de Souza Dutra, A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work we present an approach that can be systematically used to construct nonlinear systems possessing analytical multikink profile configurations. In contrast with previous approaches to the problem, we are able to do it by using field potentials that are considerably smoother than the ones of the doubly quadratic family of potentials. This is done without losing the capacity of writing exact analytical solutions. The resulting field configurations can be applied to the study of problems from condensed matter to braneworld scenarios.

  4. A socio-technical analytical framework on the EHR-organizational innovation interplay: Insights from a public hospital in Greece.

    PubMed

    Emmanouilidou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The healthcare sector globally is confronted with increasing internal and external pressures that urge for a radical reform of health systems' status quo. The role of technological innovations such as Electronic Health Records (EHR) is recognized as instrumental in this transition process as it is expected to accelerate organizational innovations. This is why the widespread uptake of EHR systems is a top priority in the global healthcare agenda. The successful co-deployment though of EHR systems and organizational innovations within the context of secondary healthcare institutions is a complex and multifaceted issue. Existing research in the field has made little progress thus emphasizing the need for further research contribution that will incorporate a holistic perspective. This paper presents insights about the EHR-organizational innovation interplay from a public hospital in Greece into a socio-technical analytical framework providing a multilevel set of action points for the eHealth roadmap with worldwide relevance. PMID:25991259

  5. CCTV Video Analytics: Recent Advances and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velastin, Sergio A.

    There has been a significant increase in the number of CCTV cameras in public and private places worldwide. The cost of monitoring these cameras manually and of reviewing recorded video is prohibitive and therefore manual systems tend to be used mainly reactively with only a small fraction of the cameras being monitored at any given time. There is a need to automate at least simple observation tasks through computer vision, a functionality that has become known popularly as "video analytics". The large size of CCTV systems and the requirement of high detection rates and low false alarms are major challenges. This paper illustrates some of the recent efforts reported in the literature, highlighting advances and pointing out important limitations.

  6. Medical records and record-keeping standards.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Iain; Ram, Mala Bridgelal; Croft, Giles P; Williams, John G

    2007-08-01

    The structure of medical records becomes ever more critical with the advent of electronic records. The Health Informatics Unit (HIU) of the Royal College of Physicians has two work streams in this area. The Records Standards programme is developing generic standards for all entries into medical notes and standards for the content of admission, handover and discharge records. The Information Laboratory (iLab) focuses on hospital episode statistics and their use for monitoring clinician performance. Clinician endorsement of the work is achieved through extensive consultations. Generic medical record-keeping standards are now available. PMID:17882846

  7. Earth's partial pressure of CO2 over the past 100-500 Ma; evidence from Ce anomalies in mostly shallow seas (less than 200 m) as recorded in carbonate sediments, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y.-G.; Reinhardt, J. W.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    We reported the direct relationship of Ce anomalies recorded in 0.2-119 Ma CaCO3 sediments (Ce(sup A*)) to the Ce anomalies in the parental Pacific deep seawater (Ce(sup A)) and their relationship to atmospheric P(CO2) relative to present P(CO2). We have analyzed continental CaCO3 samples that were deposited in ancient oceans and shallow sea platforms less than 200 m over central USA, central Europe, China, and Saudi-Arabia/Oman. We have plotted Ce(sup A*) over the 75-470 Ma interval. For P(CO2) calculations, we assumed as a reference standard the less than 200 m mixed Pacific Ocean with a Ce(sup A) geometric mean of 0.22 and a range of 0.10-0.43. Because P(CO2) values obtained from reliable deep Pacific Ocean carbonates in the 67-119 Ma interval were similar to the present P(CO2) values, we have drawn a 1.0 ratio for that interval. Although there is considerable scatter among the approximately 150 Ma carbonates, the average Ce(sup A*) value suggests that P(CO2) increased during the early Cretaceous, from 1.0X at approximately 120 Ma to about 1.4X at approximately 150 Ma. At approximately 250 Ma, the average Ce(sup A*) in 13 shallow sea China carbonates agrees well with the single and more reliable approximately 250 Ma China carbonate deposited in deeper open platform. We suggest that P(CO2) ranged from 1.4-1.7X over the Jurassic and Triassic periods. At approximately 280 Ma, three China carbonates deposited in deeper open platforms and therefore considered more reliable are consistent with a European carbonate, which indicate Ce(sup A) and P(CO2) values similar to the present. The minimum at this time corresponds to the great Permo-Carboniferous glaciation. From 280 Ma to 470 Ma, the trend favors increasing Ce(sup A*) and corresponding P(CO2) values between 1.9-2.7X, with a more reliable value closer to 2.7X at 430 Ma because of the unknown higher temperature in the less than 100 m seawater over continental USA which was located just south of the equator at

  8. Experimental and analytical ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Friedly, V. J.; Peng, Xiaohang; Keefer, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    The results of further spectroscopic studies on the plume from a 3 cm ion source operated on an argon propellant is reported on. In particular, it is shown that it should be possible to use the spectroscopic technique to measure the plasma density of the ion plume close to the grids, where it is difficult to use electrical probe measurements. How the technique, along with electrical probe measurements in the far downstream region of the plume, can be used to characterize the operation of a three-grid, 15 cm diameter thruster from NASA JPL is outlined. Pumping speed measurements on the Vacuum Research Facility have shown that this facility should be adequate for testing the JPL thruster at pressures in the low 10(exp -5) Torr range. Finally, we describe a simple analytical model which can be used to calculate the grid impingement current which results from charge-exchange collisions in the ion plume.

  9. The Scalable Reasoning System: Lightweight Visualization for Distributed Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, William A.; Bruce, Joseph R.; Baddeley, Robert L.; Best, Daniel M.; Franklin, Lyndsey; May, Richard A.; Rice, Douglas M.; Riensche, Roderick M.; Younkin, Katarina

    2008-11-01

    A central challenge in visual analytics is the creation of accessible, widely distributable analysis applications that bring the benefits of visual discovery to as broad a user base as possible. Moreover, to support the role of visualization in the knowledge creation process, it is advantageous to allow users to describe the reasoning strategies they employ while interacting with analytic environments. We introduce an application suite called the Scalable Reasoning System (SRS), which provides web-based and mobile interfaces for visual analysis. The service-oriented analytic framework that underlies SRS provides a platform for deploying pervasive visual analytic environments across an enterprise. SRS represents a “lightweight” approach to visual analytics whereby thin client analytic applications can be rapidly deployed in a platform-agnostic fashion. Client applications support multiple coordinated views while giving analysts the ability to record evidence, assumptions, hypotheses and other reasoning artifacts. We describe the capabilities of SRS in the context of a real-world deployment at a regional law enforcement organization.

  10. The Scalable Reasoning System: Lightweight Visualization for Distributed Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, William A.; Bruce, Joseph R.; Baddeley, Robert L.; Best, Daniel M.; Franklin, Lyndsey; May, Richard A.; Rice, Douglas M.; Riensche, Roderick M.; Younkin, Katarina

    2009-03-01

    A central challenge in visual analytics is the creation of accessible, widely distributable analysis applications that bring the benefits of visual discovery to as broad a user base as possible. Moreover, to support the role of visualization in the knowledge creation process, it is advantageous to allow users to describe the reasoning strategies they employ while interacting with analytic environments. We introduce an application suite called the Scalable Reasoning System (SRS), which provides web-based and mobile interfaces for visual analysis. The service-oriented analytic framework that underlies SRS provides a platform for deploying pervasive visual analytic environments across an enterprise. SRS represents a “lightweight” approach to visual analytics whereby thin client analytic applications can be rapidly deployed in a platform-agnostic fashion. Client applications support multiple coordinated views while giving analysts the ability to record evidence, assumptions, hypotheses and other reasoning artifacts. We describe the capabilities of SRS in the context of a real-world deployment at a regional law enforcement organization.

  11. Subglottal pressure oscillations accompanying phonation.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Johan; Scherer, Ronald; Hess, Markus; Müller, Frank; Granqvist, Svante

    2013-07-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic properties of the voice source and vocal tract have been extensively analyzed during the last half century. Corresponding investigations of the subglottal system are rare but can be assumed to be relevant to voice production. In the present exploratory study, subglottal pressure was recorded in a male adult subject by means of tracheal puncture. Also recorded were the oral airflow and audio signals. Effects of vowel, phonation type, and vocal register shifts on the subglottal pressure waveform were examined. The moment of maximum flow declination rate was synchronous with the main positive peak of the subglottal pressure waveform. The three lowest subglottal resonance frequencies, determined by inverse filtering and long-term average spectra of the subglottal pressure during speech, were found to be about 500, 1220, and 2000Hz, irrespective of supraglottal variations and phonation type. However, the subglottal pressure waveform was affected by the supraglottal formants, whereas the radiated vowel spectra did not show clear influence by the subglottal resonances. The fundamental frequency immediately preceding and immediately following a register break in pitch glides did not show systematic relationships with formants or with the lowest subglottal resonance. PMID:23809566

  12. Secondary waste minimization in analytical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Smith, L.L.; Crain, J.S.; Boparai, A.S.; Kiely, J.T.; Yaeger, J.S.; Schilling, J.B.

    1995-07-01

    The characterization phase of site remediation is an important and costly part of the process. Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are used in common analytical methods, characterization is also a source of new waste, including mixed waste. Alternative analytical methods can reduce the volume or form of hazardous waste produced either in the sample preparation step or in the measurement step. The authors are examining alternative methods in the areas of inorganic, radiological, and organic analysis. For determining inorganic constituents, alternative methods were studied for sample introduction into inductively coupled plasma spectrometers. Figures of merit for the alternative methods, as well as their associated waste volumes, were compared with the conventional approaches. In the radiological area, the authors are comparing conventional methods for gross {alpha}/{beta} measurements of soil samples to an alternative method that uses high-pressure microwave dissolution. For determination of organic constituents, microwave-assisted extraction was studied for RCRA regulated semivolatile organics in a variety of solid matrices, including spiked samples in blank soil; polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in soils, sludges, and sediments; and semivolatile organics in soil. Extraction efficiencies were determined under varying conditions of time, temperature, microwave power, moisture content, and extraction solvent. Solvent usage was cut from the 300 mL used in conventional extraction methods to about 30 mL. Extraction results varied from one matrix to another. In most cases, the microwave-assisted extraction technique was as efficient as the more common Soxhlet or sonication extraction techniques.

  13. Keeping the Records Straight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Phil; Keynes, Milton

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines are given regarding keeping and using educational records for exceptional children in Great Britain. Procedures related to anecdotal records, observation inventories, and rating scales are delineated. (CL)

  14. Analytic models of ducted turbomachinery tone noise sources. Volume 2: Subprogram documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. L.; Ganz, U. W.; Graf, G. A.; Westall, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical models were developed for computing the periodic sound pressures of subsonic fans in an infinite hardwall annular duct with uniform flow. The computer programs are described which are used for numerical computations of sound pressure mode amplitudes. The data are applied to the acoustic properties of turbomachinery.

  15. Climate Analytics as a Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnase, John L.; Duffy, Daniel Q.; McInerney, Mark A.; Webster, W. Phillip; Lee, Tsengdar J.

    2014-01-01

    Climate science is a big data domain that is experiencing unprecedented growth. In our efforts to address the big data challenges of climate science, we are moving toward a notion of Climate Analytics-as-a-Service (CAaaS). CAaaS combines high-performance computing and data-proximal analytics with scalable data management, cloud computing virtualization, the notion of adaptive analytics, and a domain-harmonized API to improve the accessibility and usability of large collections of climate data. MERRA Analytic Services (MERRA/AS) provides an example of CAaaS. MERRA/AS enables MapReduce analytics over NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data collection. The MERRA reanalysis integrates observational data with numerical models to produce a global temporally and spatially consistent synthesis of key climate variables. The effectiveness of MERRA/AS has been demonstrated in several applications. In our experience, CAaaS is providing the agility required to meet our customers' increasing and changing data management and data analysis needs.

  16. The transfer of analytical procedures.

    PubMed

    Ermer, J; Limberger, M; Lis, K; Wätzig, H

    2013-11-01

    Analytical method transfers are certainly among the most discussed topics in the GMP regulated sector. However, they are surprisingly little regulated in detail. General information is provided by USP, WHO, and ISPE in particular. Most recently, the EU emphasized the importance of analytical transfer by including it in their draft of the revised GMP Guideline. In this article, an overview and comparison of these guidelines is provided. The key to success for method transfers is the excellent communication between sending and receiving unit. In order to facilitate this communication, procedures, flow charts and checklists for responsibilities, success factors, transfer categories, the transfer plan and report, strategies in case of failed transfers, tables with acceptance limits are provided here, together with a comprehensive glossary. Potential pitfalls are described such that they can be avoided. In order to assure an efficient and sustainable transfer of analytical procedures, a practically relevant and scientifically sound evaluation with corresponding acceptance criteria is crucial. Various strategies and statistical tools such as significance tests, absolute acceptance criteria, and equivalence tests are thoroughly descibed and compared in detail giving examples. Significance tests should be avoided. The success criterion is not statistical significance, but rather analytical relevance. Depending on a risk assessment of the analytical procedure in question, statistical equivalence tests are recommended, because they include both, a practically relevant acceptance limit and a direct control of the statistical risks. However, for lower risk procedures, a simple comparison of the transfer performance parameters to absolute limits is also regarded as sufficient. PMID:23978903

  17. Sterilization of Fuji pressure-sensitive film.

    PubMed

    Liggins, A B; Hardie, W R; Finlay, J B

    1994-11-01

    Fuji Prescale film is a pressure-sensitive medium which produces a characteristic pink stain on the application of pressure. Up to a saturation level, increases in pressure will produce a denser stain, thereby providing a method of determining pressures within the interface between two articulating surfaces. The relationship between the magnitude of applied pressure and the optical density of the resulting stain is non-linear; this relationship also varies with ambient temperature and humidity, in addition to load rate, and therefore requires a calibration procedure prior to use. The use of Fuji prescale film for recording interface pressures within the joint space in vivo has been widely reported; however, the object of this study was to assess the effects of sterilizing this medium, with a view to future in vivo applications. Samples of Fuji film were sterilized using a standard ethylene oxide (ETO) gas process and their subsequent pressure-recording properties were compared to a control group of samples. The 'optical-density vs pressure' relationship for the sterilized group was significantly different from that of the control group (paired Student's t-test, P < = 0.001); however, both groups provided reliable data across the same pressure-range and both exhibited an excellent degree of repeatability (coefficient of variation < 2.5%). It was concluded that Fuji film will continue to produce pressure-stains following ETO sterilization; however, the calibration of this film will only be valid if it is conducted using film from the sterilized group. PMID:7858782

  18. Analytical Derivation and Experimental Evaluation of Short-Bearing Approximation for Full Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, George B; Ocvirk, Fred W

    1953-01-01

    An approximate analytical solution including the effect of end leakage from the oil film of short plain bearings is presented because of the importance of endwise flow in sleeve bearings of the short lengths commonly used. The analytical approximation is supported by experimental data, resulting in charts which facilitate analysis of short plain bearings. The analytical approximation includes the endwise flow and that part of the circumferential flow which is related to surface velocity and film thickness but neglects the effect of film pressure on the circumferential flow. In practical use, this approximation applies best to bearings having a length-diameter ratio up to 1, and the effects of elastic deflection, inlet oil pressure, and changes of clearance with temperature minimize the relative importance of the neglected term. The analytical approximation was found to be an extension of a little-known pressure-distribution function originally proposed by Michell and Cardullo.

  19. Complete equation of state for shocked liquid nitrogen: Analytical developments.

    PubMed

    Winey, J M; Gupta, Y M

    2016-08-01

    The thermodynamic response of liquid nitrogen has been studied extensively, in part, due to the long-standing interest in the high pressure and high temperature dissociation of shocked molecular nitrogen. Previous equation of state (EOS) developments regarding shocked liquid nitrogen have focused mainly on the use of intermolecular pair potentials in atomistic calculations. Here, we present EOS developments for liquid nitrogen, incorporating analytical models, for use in continuum calculations of the shock compression response. The analytical models, together with available Hugoniot data, were used to extrapolate a low pressure reference EOS for molecular nitrogen [R. Span et al., J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 29, 1361 (2000)] to high pressures and high temperatures. Using the EOS presented here, the calculated pressures and temperatures for single shock, double shock, and multiple shock compression of liquid nitrogen provide a good match to the measured results over a broad range of P-T space. These calculations provide the first comparison of EOS developments with recently measured P-T states under multiple shock compression. The present EOS developments are general and are expected to be useful for other liquids that have low pressure reference EOS information available. PMID:27497562

  20. Complete equation of state for shocked liquid nitrogen: Analytical developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermodynamic response of liquid nitrogen has been studied extensively, in part, due to the long-standing interest in the high pressure and high temperature dissociation of shocked molecular nitrogen. Previous equation of state (EOS) developments regarding shocked liquid nitrogen have focused mainly on the use of intermolecular pair potentials in atomistic calculations. Here, we present EOS developments for liquid nitrogen, incorporating analytical models, for use in continuum calculations of the shock compression response. The analytical models, together with available Hugoniot data, were used to extrapolate a low pressure reference EOS for molecular nitrogen [R. Span et al., J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 29, 1361 (2000)] to high pressures and high temperatures. Using the EOS presented here, the calculated pressures and temperatures for single shock, double shock, and multiple shock compression of liquid nitrogen provide a good match to the measured results over a broad range of P-T space. These calculations provide the first comparison of EOS developments with recently measured P-T states under multiple shock compression. The present EOS developments are general and are expected to be useful for other liquids that have low pressure reference EOS information available.

  1. Breakdown and dc discharge in low-pressure water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoš, J.; Škoro, N.; Marić, D.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report studies of basic properties of breakdown, low-current Townsend discharge and high-current discharge regimes in water vapour. Paschen curves and the corresponding distributions of emission intensities at low current were recorded in the range of pd (pressure x electrode gap) from 0.1 to 10 Torrcm covering the region of Paschen minimum. From the experimental profiles we obtained effective ionization coefficient of water vapour for the E/N range 650 Td-7 kTd and fitted the results by using the extended Townsend analytical formula. Using the obtained ionization coefficient, we calculated the effective yield of secondary electrons from the copper cathode. Results of the measurements of Volt-Ampere characteristics in water vapour were presented together with the images of the axial structure of the discharge in a wide range of discharge currents for two pd values. Recorded profiles showed development of the spatial structure of the discharge in different operating regimes. We were able to identify conditions where processes induced by heavy particles, probably fast hydrogen atoms, are dominant in inducing emission from the discharge. Finally, standard scaling laws were tested for low current and glow discharges in water vapour.

  2. Faculty Forum: The GRE Analytical Writing Test-- Description and Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briihl, Deborah S.; Wasieleski, David T.

    2007-01-01

    The authors surveyed graduate programs to see how they use the Graduate Record Examination Analytic Writing (GRE-AW) Test. Only 35% of the graduate programs that responded use the GRE-AW test in their admission policy; of the programs not using it, most do not plan to do so. The programs using the GRE-AW rated it as medium or low in importance in…

  3. Analytical Chemistry of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research, owing primarily to its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. A requirement for understanding its origin, activity, and regulation is the need for accurate and precise measurement techniques. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO’s unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span pM to µM in physiological milieu, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with special focus on the fundamentals behind each technique and approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools or exploited to create novel NO sensors. PMID:20636069

  4. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S. M. Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A.; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  5. A Survey of Risk Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoult, Evan

    2003-03-01

    Risk Analytical Units within Wall Street firms are responsible for developing the methods used to quantify the different forms of risk inherent in the firms' activities. This talk is an overview of risk analytics. It will cover: the function and validation of valuation models; the measurement of market risk; and the measurement of the different aspects of and forms of credit risk, including the simulation of the potential counterparty credit exposure of derivatives, the estimation of obligor default probability and the simulation of the potential loss distribution of loan portfolios. Risk Analytics is an applied field that integrates finance theory, mathematics and statistical analysis. It is a field in that has attracted many physicists and one in which many physicists have flourished. The talk will conclude with an analysis of why this is so.

  6. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  7. Analytical and experimental study of axisymmetric truncated plug nozzle flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, T. J.; Sule, W. P.; Fanning, A. E.; Giel, T. V.; Galanga, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigation of the flow field and base pressure of internal-external-expansion truncated plug nozzles are discussed. Experimental results for two axisymmetric, conical plug-cylindrical shroud, truncated plug nozzles are presented for both open and closed wake operations. These results include extensive optical and pressure data covering nozzle flow field and base pressure characteristics, diffuser effects, lip shock strength, Mach disc behaviour, and the recompression and reverse flow regions. Transonic experiments for a special planar transonic section are presented. An extension of the analytical method of Hall and Mueller to include the internal shock wave from the shroud exit is presented for closed wake operation. Results of this analysis include effects on the flow field and base pressure of ambient pressure ratio, nozzle geometry, and the ratio of specific heats. Static thrust is presented as a function of ambient pressure ratio and nozzle geometry. A new transonic solution method is also presented.

  8. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  9. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  10. Experimental and Analytical Research on Fracture Processes in ROck

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert H.. Einstein; Jay Miller; Bruno Silva

    2009-02-27

    Experimental studies on fracture propagation and coalescence were conducted which together with previous tests by this group on gypsum and marble, provide information on fracturing. Specifically, different fracture geometries wsere tested, which together with the different material properties will provide the basis for analytical/numerical modeling. INitial steps on the models were made as were initial investigations on the effect of pressurized water on fracture coalescence.

  11. A health analytics semantic ETL service for obesity surveillance.

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, M; Papakonstantinou, D; Malamateniou, F; Vassilacopoulos, G

    2015-01-01

    The increasingly large amount of data produced in healthcare (e.g. collected through health information systems such as electronic medical records - EMRs or collected through novel data sources such as personal health records - PHRs, social media, web resources) enable the creation of detailed records about people's health, sentiments and activities (e.g. physical activity, diet, sleep quality) that can be used in the public health area among others. However, despite the transformative potential of big data in public health surveillance there are several challenges in integrating big data. In this paper, the interoperability challenge is tackled and a semantic Extract Transform Load (ETL) service is proposed that seeks to semantically annotate big data to result into valuable data for analysis. This service is considered as part of a health analytics engine on the cloud that interacts with existing healthcare information exchange networks, like the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE), PHRs, sensors, mobile applications, and other web resources to retrieve patient health, behavioral and daily activity data. The semantic ETL service aims at semantically integrating big data for use by analytic mechanisms. An illustrative implementation of the service on big data which is potentially relevant to human obesity, enables using appropriate analytic techniques (e.g. machine learning, text mining) that are expected to assist in identifying patterns and contributing factors (e.g. genetic background, social, environmental) for this social phenomenon and, hence, drive health policy changes and promote healthy behaviors where residents live, work, learn, shop and play. PMID:25991273

  12. Increased intracranial pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Increased intracranial pressure is a rise in the pressure inside the skull that can result from or cause brain injury. ... Increased intracranial pressure can be due to a rise in pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid. This is ...

  13. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Low Blood Pressure Updated:Aug 30,2016 To know if you ... to learn more about blood pressure . If my blood pressure stays around 85/55, do I have a ...

  14. Microcomputer Applications in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Joseph W.

    The first part of this paper addresses the following topics: (1) the usefulness of microcomputers; (2) applications for microcomputers in analytical chemistry; (3) costs; (4) major microcomputer systems and subsystems; and (5) which microcomputer to buy. Following these brief comments, the major focus of the paper is devoted to a discussion of…

  15. Exploratory Analysis in Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, David; de Freitas, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the methods, observations, challenges and implications for exploratory analysis drawn from two learning analytics research projects. The cases include an analysis of a games-based virtual performance assessment and an analysis of data from 52,000 students over a 5-year period at a large Australian university. The complex…

  16. Visual Analytics of Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Faraco, Carlos; Zhu, Dajiang; Chen, Hanbo; Yuan, Yixuan; Lv, Jinglei; Deng, Fan; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Zhang, Degang; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    Identification of regions of interest (ROIs) is a fundamental issue in brain network construction and analysis. Recent studies demonstrate that multimodal neuroimaging approaches and joint analysis strategies are crucial for accurate, reliable and individualized identification of brain ROIs. In this paper, we present a novel approach of visual analytics and its open-source software for ROI definition and brain network construction. By combining neuroscience knowledge and computational intelligence capabilities, visual analytics can generate accurate, reliable and individualized ROIs for brain networks via joint modeling of multimodal neuroimaging data and an intuitive and real-time visual analytics interface. Furthermore, it can be used as a functional ROI optimization and prediction solution when fMRI data is unavailable or inadequate. We have applied this approach to an operation span working memory fMRI/DTI dataset, a schizophrenia DTI/resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) dataset, and a mild cognitive impairment DTI/R-fMRI dataset, in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of visual analytics. Our experimental results are encouraging. PMID:22414991

  17. Visual analytics of brain networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Faraco, Carlos; Zhu, Dajiang; Chen, Hanbo; Yuan, Yixuan; Lv, Jinglei; Deng, Fan; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Zhang, Degang; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2012-05-15

    Identification of regions of interest (ROIs) is a fundamental issue in brain network construction and analysis. Recent studies demonstrate that multimodal neuroimaging approaches and joint analysis strategies are crucial for accurate, reliable and individualized identification of brain ROIs. In this paper, we present a novel approach of visual analytics and its open-source software for ROI definition and brain network construction. By combining neuroscience knowledge and computational intelligence capabilities, visual analytics can generate accurate, reliable and individualized ROIs for brain networks via joint modeling of multimodal neuroimaging data and an intuitive and real-time visual analytics interface. Furthermore, it can be used as a functional ROI optimization and prediction solution when fMRI data is unavailable or inadequate. We have applied this approach to an operation span working memory fMRI/DTI dataset, a schizophrenia DTI/resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) dataset, and a mild cognitive impairment DTI/R-fMRI dataset, in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of visual analytics. Our experimental results are encouraging. PMID:22414991

  18. Analytical Chemistry and the Microchip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Robert K.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical techniques used at various points in making microchips are described. They include: Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (silicon purity); optical emission spectroscopy (quantitative thin-film composition); X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (chemical changes in thin films); wet chemistry, instrumental analysis (process chemicals);…

  19. Visual Analytics Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.

    2007-03-01

    It is an honor to welcome you to the first theme issue of information visualization (IVS) dedicated entirely to the study of visual analytics. It all started from the establishment of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) sponsored National Visualization and Analytics Center™ (NVAC™) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2004. In 2005, under the leadership of NVAC, a team of the world’s best and brightest multidisciplinary scholars coauthored its first research and development (R&D) agenda Illuminating the Path, which defines the study as “the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces.” Among the most exciting, challenging, and educational events developed since then was the first IEEE Symposium on Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST) held in Baltimore, Maryland in October 2006. This theme issue features seven outstanding articles selected from the IEEE VAST proceedings and a commentary article contributed by Jim Thomas, the director of NVAC, on the status and progress of the center.

  20. Analytical Utility of Campylobacter Methodologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF, or the Committee) was asked to address the analytical utility of Campylobacter methodologies in preparation for an upcoming United States Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) baseline study to enumerate Campylobacter...

  1. Analytical Sociology: A Bungean Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Poe Yu-ze

    2012-01-01

    Analytical sociology, an intellectual project that has garnered considerable attention across a variety of disciplines in recent years, aims to explain complex social processes by dissecting them, accentuating their most important constituent parts, and constructing appropriate models to understand the emergence of what is observed. To achieve…

  2. FPI: FM Success through Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickling, Duane

    2013-01-01

    The APPA Facilities Performance Indicators (FPI) is perhaps one of the most powerful analytical tools that institutional facilities professionals have at their disposal. It is a diagnostic facilities performance management tool that addresses the essential questions that facilities executives must answer to effectively perform their roles. It…

  3. ANALYTICAL METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project focused on the development of an analytical method for the analysis of phenols in drinking water. The need for this project is associated with the recently published Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). The following phenolic compounds are listed on the current CCL, a...

  4. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy and Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaghan, Glenn M.

    2006-01-01

    The interpersonal behavior therapy, Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) has been empirically investigated and described in the literature for a little over a decade. Still, little has been written about the process of supervision in FAP. While there are many aspects of FAP supervision shared by other contemporary behavior therapies and…

  5. Analytic Time Depending Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, F.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Considerando las hip6tesis de Chandrasekhar para el estudjo de la GalActicaq se han desarrollado varios modelos analiticos integrables con simetria axial y dependientes del . . By considering Chandrasekhar hypotheses +or the study o+ Galactic Dynamics, several integrable analytic axisymmetric time-depending galactic models have been developed. Ke ords; GALAXY-DYNAMICS - GALAXY-STRUCTURE

  6. University Macro Analytic Simulation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Robert; Gulko, Warren

    The University Macro Analytic Simulation System (UMASS) has been designed as a forecasting tool to help university administrators budgeting decisions. Alternative budgeting strategies can be tested on a computer model and then an operational alternative can be selected on the basis of the most desirable projected outcome. UMASS uses readily…

  7. An Overview of Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clow, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Learning analytics, the analysis and representation of data about learners in order to improve learning, is a new lens through which teachers can understand education. It is rooted in the dramatic increase in the quantity of data about learners and linked to management approaches that focus on quantitative metrics, which are sometimes antithetical…

  8. Faculty Workload: An Analytical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussions of practices in higher education have tended toward muck-raking and self-styled exposure of cynical self-indulgence by faculty and administrators at the expense of students and their families, as usually occurs during periods of economic duress, rather than toward analytical studies designed to foster understanding This article…

  9. Collision cell pressure effect on CID spectra pattern using triple quadrupole instruments: a RRKM modeling.

    PubMed

    Ichou, Farid; Lesage, Denis; Machuron-Mandard, Xavier; Junot, Christophe; Cole, Richard B; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-02-01

    Control of the ion internal energy in mass spectrometry is needed to establish a workable mass spectral library. The purpose of this study is to understand and to compare the pressure effects on the collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectrum pattern recorded using triple quadrupole instruments. The monoprotonated Leucine enkephalin [YGGFL, H(+)] was used as a thermometer molecule to calibrate the electrospray ionization (ESI) and the CID internal energies deposited on the molecular species and the time scale of ion decompositions. The survival yield and the ratio of a(4)/b(4) fragment ions were mainly monitored. The energy uptake for the ESI source geometry used in our study has no impact on the CID spectrum fingerprint. The collision cell pressure for the [YGGFL, H(+)] has a major influence on the SY curves slope and on the experimental time scale. To demonstrate the pressure effect on internal energy distribution, three models (threshold, thermal and collisional) based on RRKM theory were built using the Masskinetics software. As a result, the limit of each model is discussed, and the investigation demonstrates that the thermal model, using truncated Maxwell-Boltzmann internal energy distribution, is well-suited for simulating the experimental data at high pressure widely used in the analytical conditions. PMID:23378090

  10. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  11. Waste minimization in analytical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Smith, L.L.; Crain, J.S.; Boparai, A.S.; Kiely, J.T.; Yaeger, J.S. Schilling, J.B.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) will require a large number of waste characterizations over a multi-year period to accomplish the Department`s goals in environmental restoration and waste management. Estimates vary, but two million analyses annually are expected. The waste generated by the analytical procedures used for characterizations is a significant source of new DOE waste. Success in reducing the volume of secondary waste and the costs of handling this waste would significantly decrease the overall cost of this DOE program. Selection of appropriate analytical methods depends on the intended use of the resultant data. It is not always necessary to use a high-powered analytical method, typically at higher cost, to obtain data needed to make decisions about waste management. Indeed, for samples taken from some heterogeneous systems, the meaning of high accuracy becomes clouded if the data generated are intended to measure a property of this system. Among the factors to be considered in selecting the analytical method are the lower limit of detection, accuracy, turnaround time, cost, reproducibility (precision), interferences, and simplicity. Occasionally, there must be tradeoffs among these factors to achieve the multiple goals of a characterization program. The purpose of the work described here is to add waste minimization to the list of characteristics to be considered. In this paper the authors present results of modifying analytical methods for waste characterization to reduce both the cost of analysis and volume of secondary wastes. Although tradeoffs may be required to minimize waste while still generating data of acceptable quality for the decision-making process, they have data demonstrating that wastes can be reduced in some cases without sacrificing accuracy or precision.

  12. The pressure field of imploding lightbulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechanowski, M.; Ikeda, C.; Duncan, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    The implosion of A19 incandescent lightbulbs in a high-pressure water environment is studied in a 1.77-m-diameter steel tank. Underwater blast sensors are used to measure the dynamic pressure field near the lightbulbs and the implosions are photographed with a high-speed movie camera at a frame rate of 24,000 pps. The movie camera and the pressure signal recording system are synchronized to enable correlation of features in the movie frames with those in the pressure records. It is found that the gross dimensions and weight of the bulbs are very similar from one bulb to another, but the ambient water pressure at which a given bulb implodes (, called the implosion pressure) varies from 6.29 to 11.98 atmospheres, probably due to inconsistencies in the glass wall thickness and perhaps other detailed characteristics of the bulbs. The dynamic pressures (the local pressure minus , as measured by the sensors) first drop during the implosion and then reach a strong positive peak at about the time that the bulb reaches minimum volume. The peak dynamic pressure varies from 3.61 to 28.66 atmospheres. In order to explore the physics of the implosion process, the dynamic pressure signals are compared to calculations of the pressure field generated by the collapse of a spherical bubble in a weakly compressible liquid. The wide range of implosion pressures is used in combination with the calculations to explore the effect of the relative liquid compressibility and the bulb itself on the dynamic pressure field.

  13. Apical pressures developed by needles for canal irrigation.

    PubMed

    Bradford, C E; Eleazer, P D; Downs, K E; Scheetz, J P

    2002-04-01

    Drying instrumented canals with pressurized air may result in patient morbidity or even fatality. Low pressure and side vent needles have been suggested to lessen the danger. This study observed apical pressures from different needles inserted deeply into small round and ovoid canals as instrumentation progressed. Low-pressure (5 psi) air was injected through the needles, and apical pressures were recorded after each instrument. Pressures varied greatly within each test group. Generalities that can be drawn are that binding the needle within the canal gives higher pressures than with the needle slightly short of binding and that pressures were higher with apexes instrumented to size 30 and higher. With the needle tightly bound, neither needle size, needle design, nor canal shape resulted in statistically significant mean pressure differences. With the needle slightly withdrawn, larger bore needles gave higher pressures than small diameter needles. Caution is advised with the clinical use of pressurized air in the drying of root canals. PMID:12043877

  14. Fluid Dynamics of a Pressure Reducing Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Instruments for the monitoring of hazardous gases in and near the space shuttle collect sample gas at pressures on the order of one atmosphere and analyze their properties in an ultra-high vacuum by means of a quadrupole-mass-spectrometer partial pressure transducer. Sampling systems for such devices normally produce the required pressure reduction through combinations of vacuum pumps, fluid Tees and flow restrictors (e.g. orifices, sintered metal frits or capillaries). The present work presents an analytical model of the fluid dynamics of such a pressure reduction system which enables the calculation of the pressure in the receiver vessal in terms of system parameters known from the specifications for a given system (e.g. rated pumping speeds of the pumping hardware and the diameters of two orifices situated in two branches of a fluid Tee). The resulting formulas will expedite the fine tuning of instruments now under development and the design of later generations of such devices.

  15. Validation and Verification of Composite Pressure Vessel Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreger, Stephen T.; Ortyl, Nicholas; Grant, Joseph; Taylor, F. Tad

    2006-01-01

    Ten composite pressure vessels were instrumented with fiber Bragg grating sensors and pressure tested Through burst. This paper and presentation will discuss the testing methodology, the test results, compare the testing results to the analytical model, and also compare the fiber Bragg grating sensor data with data obtained against that obtained from foil strain gages.

  16. Geometry attained by pressurized membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palisoc, Arthur; Veal, Gordon; Cassapakis, Constantine; Greschik, Gyula; Mikulas, Martin

    1998-08-01

    An intensive investigation has been carried out to study the surface profiles obtained as a result of the large deformations of pressurized membranes. The study shows that the inflated membrane shapes may have the requisite surface accuracy for use in future large space apertures. Both analytical and experimental work have been carried out. On the analytical side, the classical work of Hencky on flat circular membranes was extended to eliminate the limitations it imposed; namely a lateral non-follower pressure with no pre-stress. The result is a computer program for the solution of the pressurized circular membrane problem. The reliability of the computer program is demonstrated via verification against FAIM, a nonlinear finite element solver developed primarily for the analysis of inflated membrane shapes. The experimental work includes observations made by Veal on the (W-shaped) deviations between the membrane deflected shape and the predicted profile. More recent measurements have been made of the deformations of pressurized flat circular and parabolic membranes using photogrammetric techniques. The surface error quantification analyses include the effect of material properties, geometric properties, loading uncertainties, and boundary conditions. These effects are very easily handled by the special FEM code FAIM which had recently been enhanced to predict the on-orbit dynamics, RF, and solar concentration characteristics of inflatable parabolic antennas/reflectors such as the IAE that flew off the space shuttle Endeavour in May 1996. The results of measurements have been compared with analyses and their ramifications on precision-shape, large-aperture parabolic space reflectors are discussed. Results show that very large space apertures with surface slope error accuracies on the order to space reflectors are discussed. Results show that very large space apertures with surface slope error accuracies on the order of 1 milliradian or less are feasible. Surface

  17. Venous pressure in man during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, K. A.; Roecker, L.; Gauer, O. H.; Krause, R.; Wicke, H. J.; Leach, C.; Landry, R.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether the body fluid shift from the lower limbs toward the head that occurs during spaceflight leads to lasting increases of venous pressure in the upper body, venous pressure and hematocrit measurements were made on four astronauts before flight and 1 and 12 hours after recovery and compared with measurements in space. During the mission the hematocrit was elevated and the venous pressure lowered by 1 to 8 centimeters of water as compared with the preflight data. One hour after landing the hematocrit decreased, indicating a hemodilution, venous pressures were unexpectedly high, and a body weight loss of 4 to 5 percent was observed. Twelve hours later the venous pressures were the lowest recorded during the study. The fluid shift apparently takes place during the first several hours of spaceflight. Thereafter, the pressure in the peripheral veins and the central circulation is lower than that measured before flight.

  18. Analyte species and concentration identification using differentially functionalized microcantilever arrays and artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Datskos, Panos G; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we have performed analyte species and concentration identification using an array of ten differentially functionalized microcantilevers coupled with a back-propagation artificial neural network pattern recognition algorithm. The array consists of ten nanostructured silicon microcantilevers functionalized by polymeric and gas chromatography phases and macrocyclic receptors as spatially dense, differentially responding sensing layers for identification and quantitation of individual analyte(s) and their binary mixtures. The array response (i.e. cantilever bending) to analyte vapor was measured by an optical readout scheme and the responses were recorded for a selection of individual analytes as well as several binary mixtures. An artificial neural network (ANN) was designed and trained to recognize not only the individual analytes and binary mixtures, but also to determine the concentration of individual components in a mixture. To the best of our knowledge, ANNs have not been applied to microcantilever array responses previously to determine concentrations of individual analytes. The trained ANN correctly identified the eleven test analyte(s) as individual components, most with probabilities greater than 97%, whereas it did not misidentify an unknown (untrained) analyte. Demonstrated unique aspects of this work include an ability to measure binary mixtures and provide both qualitative (identification) and quantitative (concentration) information with array-ANN-based sensor methodologies.

  19. Analytically solvable processes on networks.

    PubMed

    Smilkov, Daniel; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2011-07-01

    We introduce a broad class of analytically solvable processes on networks. In the special case, they reduce to random walk and consensus process, the two most basic processes on networks. Our class differs from previous models of interactions (such as the stochastic Ising model, cellular automata, infinite particle systems, and the voter model) in several ways, the two most important being (i) the model is analytically solvable even when the dynamical equation for each node may be different and the network may have an arbitrary finite graph and influence structure and (ii) when local dynamics is described by the same evolution equation, the model is decomposable, with the equilibrium behavior of the system expressed as an explicit function of network topology and node dynamics. PMID:21867254

  20. Analytic theory of orbit contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, N. X.; Longuski, J. M.; Busemann, A.; Culp, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The motion of a satellite in orbit, subject to atmospheric force and the motion of a reentry vehicle are governed by gravitational and aerodynamic forces. This suggests the derivation of a uniform set of equations applicable to both cases. For the case of satellite motion, by a proper transformation and by the method of averaging, a technique appropriate for long duration flight, the classical nonlinear differential equation describing the contraction of the major axis is derived. A rigorous analytic solution is used to integrate this equation with a high degree of accuracy, using Poincare's method of small parameters and Lagrange's expansion to explicitly express the major axis as a function of the eccentricity. The solution is uniformly valid for moderate and small eccentricities. For highly eccentric orbits, the asymptotic equation is derived directly from the general equation. Numerical solutions were generated to display the accuracy of the analytic theory.

  1. Analytic bootstrap at large spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviraj, Apratim; Sen, Kallol; Sinha, Aninda

    2015-11-01

    We use analytic conformal bootstrap methods to determine the anomalous dimensions and OPE coefficients for large spin operators in general conformal field theories in four dimensions containing a scalar operator of conformal dimension Δ ϕ . It is known that such theories will contain an infinite sequence of large spin operators with twists approaching 2Δ ϕ + 2 n for each integer n. By considering the case where such operators are separated by a twist gap from other operators at large spin, we analytically determine the n, Δ ϕ dependence of the anomalous dimensions. We find that for all n, the anomalous dimensions are negative for Δ ϕ satisfying the unitarity bound. We further compute the first subleading correction at large spin and show that it becomes universal for large twist. In the limit when n is large, we find exact agreement with the AdS/CFT prediction corresponding to the Eikonal limit of a 2-2 scattering with dominant graviton exchange.

  2. Best Children's Recordings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Laurie

    1993-01-01

    This annotated discography lists 45 recordings for children from birth to 14 years, including recordings of stories, songs, ballet, and foreign language songs. Distributors' addresses and phone numbers are provided. (EA)

  3. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  4. Analytical methods under emergency conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlet, J.

    1983-01-01

    This lecture discusses methods for the radiochemical determination of internal contamination of the body under emergency conditions, here defined as a situation in which results on internal radioactive contamination are needed quickly. The purpose of speed is to determine the necessity for medical treatment to increase the natural elimination rate. Analytical methods discussed include whole-body counting, organ counting, wound monitoring, and excreta analysis. 12 references. (ACR)

  5. Ideal bulk pressure of active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas; Jack, Robert L.

    2016-06-01

    The extent to which active matter might be described by effective equilibrium concepts like temperature and pressure is currently being discussed intensely. Here, we study the simplest model, an ideal gas of noninteracting active Brownian particles. While the mechanical pressure exerted onto confining walls has been linked to correlations between particles' positions and their orientations, we show that these correlations are entirely controlled by boundary effects. We also consider a definition of local pressure, which describes interparticle forces in terms of momentum exchange between different regions of the system. We present three pieces of analytical evidence which indicate that such a local pressure exists, and we show that its bulk value differs from the mechanical pressure exerted on the walls of the system. We attribute this difference to the fact that the local pressure in the bulk does not depend on boundary effects, contrary to the mechanical pressure. We carefully examine these boundary effects using a channel geometry, and we show a virial formula for the pressure correctly predicts the mechanical pressure even in finite channels. However, this result no longer holds in more complex geometries, as exemplified for a channel that includes circular obstacles.

  6. Ideal bulk pressure of active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Speck, Thomas; Jack, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    The extent to which active matter might be described by effective equilibrium concepts like temperature and pressure is currently being discussed intensely. Here, we study the simplest model, an ideal gas of noninteracting active Brownian particles. While the mechanical pressure exerted onto confining walls has been linked to correlations between particles' positions and their orientations, we show that these correlations are entirely controlled by boundary effects. We also consider a definition of local pressure, which describes interparticle forces in terms of momentum exchange between different regions of the system. We present three pieces of analytical evidence which indicate that such a local pressure exists, and we show that its bulk value differs from the mechanical pressure exerted on the walls of the system. We attribute this difference to the fact that the local pressure in the bulk does not depend on boundary effects, contrary to the mechanical pressure. We carefully examine these boundary effects using a channel geometry, and we show a virial formula for the pressure correctly predicts the mechanical pressure even in finite channels. However, this result no longer holds in more complex geometries, as exemplified for a channel that includes circular obstacles. PMID:27415318

  7. Measuring the pressure in ultrahigh-pressure mercury arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Hechtfischer, U.; Engelbrecht, B.; Carpaij, M.; Fischer, E.; Koerber, A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) mercury lamps are important as high-brightness light sources for digital projection. Hg pressures are usually above 20 MPa and difficult to measure. We have built special UHP lamps with a liquid Hg condensate in a temperature-controlled reservoir, allowing us to tune the Hg vapor pressure p between 14 and 30 MPa. As a simple measure for p, we recorded the width DELTAlambda of the 546 nm Hg line while varying p and also the lamp current I and voltage U. The data define a function p(DELTAlambda,I,U) that will deliver p to better than 3% from simple measurements of DELTAlambda, I, and U for most UHP lamps in the important 100-200 W power range. The method is applied to sample lamps, yielding pressures up to 26 MPa and demonstrating how filled Hg amount, burning position, arc gap, and lamp power affect the pressure. The effective temperature of typical UHP lamps is found to be 2400 K. We also derive an improved characteristic U(d,p,I) for the dependence of the arc voltage on arc gap, pressure, and current for electrode-stabilized Hg discharges in the UHP regime. Some aspects of the experiment are of general interest in the field of discharge lamps, such as a model for the heat balance of the Hg condensate under conductive, radiative, and evaporative cooling/heating, a short discussion of high-temperature vapor-pressure data for Hg, and an improved Hg equation of state for UHP conditions.

  8. Increasing Impact of Coursework Through Deep Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Schonstein, D.; Buxner, S.; Semken, S. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past few years, ASU has developed the online astrobiology lab course Habitable Worlds, which has been offered to over 1,500 students over seven semesters. The course is offered through Smart Sparrow's intelligent tutoring system, which records student answers, time on question, simulation setups, and additional data that we refer to as "analytics". As the development of the course has stabilized, we have been able to devote more time to analyzing these data, extracting patterns of student behavior and how they have changed as the course has developed. During the most recent two semesters, pre- and post-tests of content knowledge related to the greenhouse effect were administered to assess changes in students' knowledge. The results of the Fall 2013 content assessment and an analysis of each step of every activity using the course platform analytics were used to identify problematic concepts and lesson elements, which were redesigned for the following semester. We observed a statistically significant improvement from pre to post instruction in Spring 2014. Preliminary results seem to indicate that several interactive activities, which replaced written/spoken content, contributed to this positive outcome. Our study demonstrates the benefit of deep analytics for thorough analysis of student results and quick iteration, allowing for significantly improved exercises to be redeployed quickly. The misconceptions that students have and retain depend on the individual student, although certain patterns do emerge in the class as a whole. These patterns can be seen in student discussion board behavior, the types of answers they submit, and the patterns of mistakes they make. By interrogating this wealth of data, we seek to identify the patterns that outstanding, struggling, and failing students display and how early in the class these patterns can be detected. If these patterns can be identified and detected early in the semester, instructors can intervene earlier

  9. Maintaining radiation protection records

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-30

    This Report is part of a series prepared under the auspices of Scientific Committee 46 on Operational Radiation Safety. It provides guidance on maintaining radiation protection records. Record keeping is an essential element of every radiation protection program. This Report describes the elements that should enter into the design of a program for the maintenance of operational radiation safety records. The problems of the length of time for retention of records for operational, regulatory, epidemiologic and legal uses are discussed in detail.

  10. Cryogenic Autogenous Pressurization Testing for Robotic Refueling Mission 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; DiPirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Francis, J.; Mustafi, S.; Li, X.; Barfknecht, P.; DeLee, C. H.; McGuire, J.

    2015-01-01

    A wick-heater system has been selected for use to pressurize the Source Dewar of the Robotic Refueling Mission Phase 3 on-orbit cryogen transfer experiment payload for the International Space Station. Experimental results of autogenous pressurization of liquid argon and liquid nitrogen using a prototype wick-heater system are presented. The wick-heater generates gas to increase the pressure in the tank while maintaining a low bulk fluid temperature. Pressurization experiments were performed in 2013 to characterize the performance of the wick heater. This paper describes the experimental setup, pressurization results, and analytical model correlations.

  11. Advances in multiple analyte profiling.

    PubMed

    Salas, Virginia M; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A

    2008-01-01

    The advent of multiparameter technology has been driven by the need to understand the complexity in biological systems. It has spawned two main branches, one in the arena of high-content measurements, primarily in microscopy and flow cytometry where it has become commonplace to analyze multiple fluorescence signatures arising from multiple excitation sources and multiple emission wavelengths. Microscopy is augmented by topographical content that identifies the source location of the signature. The other branch involves multiplex technology. Here, the intent is to measure multiple analytes simultaneously. A key feature of multiplexing is an address system for the individual analytes. In planar arrays the address system is spatial, in which affinity reactions occur at defined locations. In suspension arrays, the address is encoded as a fluorescent signature in the particle assigned to a specific reaction or analyte. Several hybrid systems have also been developed for multiplexing. In the commercial regime, the most widespread applications of multiplexing are currently in the areas of genome and biomarker analysis. Planar chips with fixed arrays are now available to probe the entire genome at the level of message expression and large segments of the genome at the level of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). In contrast, suspension arrays provide the potential for probing segments of the genome in a customized way, using capture tags that locate specific oligonucleotide sequences to specific array elements. PMID:18429493

  12. Analytical optical scattering in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical optical model for scattering of light due to lightning by clouds of different geometry is being developed. The self-consistent approach and the equivalent medium concept of Twersky was used to treat the case corresponding to outside illumination. Thus, the resulting multiple scattering problem is transformed with the knowledge of the bulk parameters, into scattering by a single obstacle in isolation. Based on the size parameter of a typical water droplet as compared to the incident wave length, the problem for the single scatterer equivalent to the distribution of cloud particles can be solved either by Mie or Rayleigh scattering theory. The super computing code of Wiscombe can be used immediately to produce results that can be compared to the Monte Carlo computer simulation for outside incidence. A fairly reasonable inverse approach using the solution of the outside illumination case was proposed to model analytically the situation for point sources located inside the thick optical cloud. Its mathematical details are still being investigated. When finished, it will provide scientists an enhanced capability to study more realistic clouds. For testing purposes, the direct approach to the inside illumination of clouds by lightning is under consideration. Presently, an analytical solution for the cubic cloud will soon be obtained. For cylindrical or spherical clouds, preliminary results are needed for scattering by bounded obstacles above or below a penetrable surface interface.

  13. Networked analytical sample management system

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrigan, W.J.; Spencer, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1982, the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has operated a computer-controlled analytical sample management system. The system, pogrammed in COBOL, runs on the site IBM 3081 mainframe computer. The system provides for the following subtasks: sample logging, analytical method assignment, worklist generation, cost accounting, and results reporting. Within these subtasks the system functions in a time-sharing mode. Communications between subtasks are done overnight in a batch mode. The system currently supports management of up to 3000 samples a month. Each sample requires, on average, three independent methods. Approximately 100 different analytical techniques are available for customized input of data. The laboratory has implemented extensive computer networking using Ethernet. Electronic mail, RS/1, and online literature searches are in place. Based on our experience with the existing sample management system, we have begun a project to develop a second generation system. The new system will utilize the panel designs developed for the present LIMS, incorporate more realtime features, and take advantage of the many commercial LIMS systems.

  14. Analytic studies in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzochero, Pierre

    Five studies are presented in nuclear astrophysics, which deal with different stages of stellar evolution and which use analytic techniques as opposed to numerical ones. Two problems are described in neutrino astrophysics: the solar-neutrino puzzle is analyzed in the framework of the MSW mechanism for the enhancement of neutrino oscillations in matter; and the cooling of neutron stars is studied by calculating the neutrino emissivity from strangeness condensation. Radiative transfer is then examined as applied to SN1987A: its early spectrum and bolometric corrections are calculated by developing an analytic model which can describe both the extended nature of the envelope and the non-LTE state of the radiation field in the scattering-dominated early atmosphere; and a model-independent relation is derived between mass and kinetic energy for the hydrogen envelope of SN1987A, using only direct observations of its luminosity and photospheric velocity. Finally, an analytic approach is presented to relate the softness of the EOS of dense nuclear matter in the core of a supernova, the hydrostatic structure of such core and the initial strength of the shock wave.

  15. Record-Breaking in Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, W. I.; Turcotte, D. L.; Nicewicz, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    The probabilistic theory of record-breaking was developed by Tata (1969), Nezvorov (1986) and others to describe the frequency of occurrence of record-breaking events in random trials. These results have been applied by Redner and Peterson (2006) in exploring the possible role of global warming on the statistics of record-breaking temperatures and by Newman and Turcotte (2008) to the rate of occurrence of record- breaking earthquakes. In addition, van Aalsburg et al. (2008) have derived the expected values of record- breaking earthquake magnitudes globally and compared this with cataloged observations. We review some of the underlying theory relevant to the distribution of events in time which we then extend to the spatial distribution of record-breaking events. In particular, we derive the distribution function associated with an otherwise random background of events and the emergence of spatial clustering in such situations. Moreover, we employ large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations to extend our analytic results to 2 and 3 dimensions. These results yield some remarkable scaling features including hierarchical behavior, resulting in power-law and fractal features, in situations where one would not intuitively expect to observe such pattern. Furthermore, they provide a "null-hypothesis" that can be used in testing the distribution and spatial scaling of real seismic events such as those studied by Davidsen and Paczuski (2005) and Davidsen, Grassberger, and Paczuski (2006, 2088). Tata, M.N., Z. Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie verw. Geb. 12, 9- 20 (1969). Nezvorov, V.B., Theory, Prob. Appl., 32(2), 201-228, translated from Russian (2006). Redner, S. and Peterson, M.V., Phys. Rev. E 74, 061114 )2006). Newman, W.I. and Turcotte, D.L., 2008 Association of Pacific Rim Universities Symposium "Multi-Hazards around the Pacific Rim," University of California, Davis, August 21-22, 2008. Van Aalsburg, J., Newman, W.I., Turcotte, D.L., and Rundle, J.B., Fall AGU Meeting (this session

  16. Public Records 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard-Schoch, Teresa

    1995-01-01

    Examines developments among public record information providers, including a shift from file acquisition to entire company acquisition. Highlights include a table of remote access to public records by state; pricing information; privacy issues; and information about the three main companies offering access to public records: LEXIS, CDB Infotek,…

  17. Teaching with Historical Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe, Kathleen

    This manual is intended to help elementary and secondary teachers locate and use historical records in social studies and local history courses. There are four major sections to the manual. The first section discusses educational objectives which can be met by using historical records. How to locate and use historical records is the topic of the…

  18. Records Management Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. State Archives and Records Management.

    This manual, prepared primarily for state government agencies, describes the organization and management of Alaska government records. Information is presented in nine topic areas: (1) Alaska's Archives and Records Management Program, which describes the program, its mission, services available, and employee responsibilities; (2) Records in…

  19. Computerized mega code recording.

    PubMed

    Burt, T W; Bock, H C

    1988-04-01

    A system has been developed to facilitate recording of advanced cardiac life support mega code testing scenarios. By scanning a paper "keyboard" using a bar code wand attached to a portable microcomputer, the person assigned to record the scenario can easily generate an accurate, complete, timed, and typewritten record of the given situations and the obtained responses. PMID:3354937

  20. Pressure Measurement during Penetration Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, C.; Demming, J.; Flecht, T.; Heller, S.

    2014-04-01

    Penetration experiments are common tools for the investigation of physical surface properties. Additionally penetration experiments will find several applications in exploration missions in the near future. A penetration test stand has been flown for the investigation of penetration force reduction under reduced gravity in the 2nd Joint European Partial-G Parabolic Flight Campaign (JEPPF-2) of ESA, CNES and DLR [1]. The main contribution to the bearing resistance of a soil is combined of shaft and base resistance. During the penetration the grains of the granular material will be squeezed into the surrounding material. The penetration will cause a change in the pressure distribution inside the surrounding soil [2],[3]. An experimental setup has been designed and built for understanding and measurement of this induced pressure distribution. In the last year the parabolic flight test stand has been further developed for the measurement of pressure during the penetration process. The main part of the experiments stayed the same with a steel rod penetration into a sample cell measuring the penetration force and recording it in relation to the depth. The sample cell is equipped with a supporting sieving mechanism for sample preparation. The pressure sensors are mounted at the sample cell. During the last test campaigns the principle of measurement has been investigated and first measurements have been performed. In the presentation the measurement principle will be shown and its implementation into the parabolic flight setup. Pressure measurement results on ground tests of different penetrator and tip configurations will be presented.

  1. Analyte detection using an active assay

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor; Bailey, Charles L.; Evanskey, Melissa R.

    2010-11-02

    Analytes using an active assay may be detected by introducing an analyte solution containing a plurality of analytes to a lacquered membrane. The lacquered membrane may be a membrane having at least one surface treated with a layer of polymers. The lacquered membrane may be semi-permeable to nonanalytes. The layer of polymers may include cross-linked polymers. A plurality of probe molecules may be arrayed and immobilized on the lacquered membrane. An external force may be applied to the analyte solution to move the analytes towards the lacquered membrane. Movement may cause some or all of the analytes to bind to the lacquered membrane. In cases where probe molecules are presented, some or all of the analytes may bind to probe molecules. The direction of the external force may be reversed to remove unbound or weakly bound analytes. Bound analytes may be detected using known detection types.

  2. Two Analyte Calibration From The Transient Response Of Potentiometric Sensors Employed With The SIA Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cartas, Raul; Mimendia, Aitor; Valle, Manel del; Legin, Andrey

    2009-05-23

    Calibration models for multi-analyte electronic tongues have been commonly built using a set of sensors, at least one per analyte under study. Complex signals recorded with these systems are formed by the sensors' responses to the analytes of interest plus interferents, from which a multivariate response model is then developed. This work describes a data treatment method for the simultaneous quantification of two species in solution employing the signal from a single sensor. The approach used here takes advantage of the complex information recorded with one electrode's transient after insertion of sample for building the calibration models for both analytes. The departure information from the electrode was firstly processed by discrete wavelet for transforming the signals to extract useful information and reduce its length, and then by artificial neural networks for fitting a model. Two different potentiometric sensors were used as study case for simultaneously corroborating the effectiveness of the approach.

  3. Analytical investigation of squeeze film dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicak, Mehmet Murat Altug

    Squeeze film damping effects naturally occur if structures are subjected to loading situations such that a very thin film of fluid is trapped within structural joints, interfaces, etc. An accurate estimate of squeeze film effects is important to predict the performance of dynamic structures. Starting from linear Reynolds equation which governs the fluid behavior coupled with structure domain which is modeled by Kirchhoff plate equation, the effects of nondimensional parameters on the damped natural frequencies are presented using boundary characteristic orthogonal functions. For this purpose, the nondimensional coupled partial differential equations are obtained using Rayleigh-Ritz method and the weak formulation, are solved using polynomial and sinusoidal boundary characteristic orthogonal functions for structure and fluid domain respectively. In order to implement present approach to the complex geometries, a two dimensional isoparametric coupled finite element is developed based on Reissner-Mindlin plate theory and linearized Reynolds equation. The coupling between fluid and structure is handled by considering the pressure forces and structural surface velocities on the boundaries. The effects of the driving parameters on the frequency response functions are investigated. As the next logical step, an analytical method for solution of squeeze film damping based upon Green's function to the nonlinear Reynolds equation considering elastic plate is studied. This allows calculating modal damping and stiffness force rapidly for various boundary conditions. The nonlinear Reynolds equation is divided into multiple linear non-homogeneous Helmholtz equations, which then can be solvable using the presented approach. Approximate mode shapes of a rectangular elastic plate are used, enabling calculation of damping ratio and frequency shift as well as complex resistant pressure. Moreover, the theoretical results are correlated and compared with experimental results both in the

  4. Recent progress of interpretation of bottom pressure during tsunamigenic earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki; Nosov, Mikhail; Kolesov, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Offshore observations make it possible to detect tsunamis in advance prior to their arrival at the shoreline. For this purpose, pressure sensors deployed in the deep sea have been used for a long time. After the 2011 Tohoku tsunami, the offshore tsunami observations have been used for tsunami warning upgrade in Japan. In the meantime, the information of actual observed wave height would be issued since 2013. In the near- or the far-fields, however, bottom pressure records usually exhibit a complicated interface of signals related not only to tsunamis but also to hydroacoustic and seismic waves. This is why we need to interpret the bottom pressure recorded by the pressure sensors. Network of offshore observatories recently deployed in the Nankai Trough, SW Japan (i.e., DONET) provides high sampling records of bottom pressure and seismic records. Additionally, the seismic sensors (both broad-band seismometer and accelerometer) are deployed at the same location of the pressure sensor. In the present study, we review the recent offshore observations of bottom pressure from the tsunamigenic earthquakes. An outer-rise earthquake (Mw7.1) on 25 October 2013 taken place near the Japan Trench, NE Japan, for example, generated a few tens of centimeters tsunami at the nearest shoreline, and it also could be recorded by the DONET pressure sensors as a few millimeters of tsunami. Full seismic waveforms have been recorded by two types of seismic sensors as well. We present some features of the obtained pressure signals during the earthquake, in which it is worthwhile noting that the bottom pressure corresponds to the bottom acceleration in the inter-mediate frequency band. In the high frequency band, on the other hand, the bottom pressure follows the bottom velocity. This characteristic would be used for retrieving tsunami signals from the bottom pressure. Thus, quantitative interpretation and data processing of offshore tsunami observations can contribute to the effective

  5. NASA Records Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Lunsford, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Records Database, comprising a Web-based application program and a database, is used to administer an archive of paper records at Stennis Space Center. The system begins with an electronic form, into which a user enters information about records that the user is sending to the archive. The form is smart : it provides instructions for entering information correctly and prompts the user to enter all required information. Once complete, the form is digitally signed and submitted to the database. The system determines which storage locations are not in use, assigns the user s boxes of records to some of them, and enters these assignments in the database. Thereafter, the software tracks the boxes and can be used to locate them. By use of search capabilities of the software, specific records can be sought by box storage locations, accession numbers, record dates, submitting organizations, or details of the records themselves. Boxes can be marked with such statuses as checked out, lost, transferred, and destroyed. The system can generate reports showing boxes awaiting destruction or transfer. When boxes are transferred to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the system can automatically fill out NARA records-transfer forms. Currently, several other NASA Centers are considering deploying the NASA Records Database to help automate their records archives.

  6. Description of a pressure measurement technique for obtaining surface static pressures of a radial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicicco, L. D.; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-07-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  7. Description of a pressure measurement technique for obtaining surface static pressures of a radial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-02-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  8. Description of a Pressure Measurement Technique for Obtaining Surface Static Pressures of a Radial Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  9. Description of a pressure measurement technique for obtaining surface static pressures of a radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. D.; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  10. Dealing with Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Dealing With Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Kids > Dealing With Peer Pressure ... Let's talk about how to handle it. Defining Peer Pressure Peers influence your life, even if you ...

  11. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  12. High blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000468.htm High blood pressure To use the sharing features on ... body. Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are given as ...

  13. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  14. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  15. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. The fourth report on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Pediatrics . ...

  16. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  17. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  18. Preventing Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Experts \\ Preventing Pressure Sores Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury ... The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from Hospital to ...

  19. Blade-vortex interaction noise predictions using measured blade surface pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegenbein, Perry R.; Oh, Byung K.

    1987-01-01

    The generation of helicopter noise by blade-vortex interactions during descent under impulsive conditions is investigated analytically. A noise-prediction technique is developed on the basis of the dipole source term of the Ffowcs-Williams/Hawkings equation and applied to data from simultaneous blade-pressure and acoustic measurements obtained by Cowan et al. (1986) on a 10-ft-diameter 4-blade rotor model in a wind tunnel. Preliminary results show that input-blade-airload azimuth resolution of 1 deg or better and computational azimuth step size of 2 deg or less are required to achieve good agreement between predicted and recorded acoustic time histories. The need for more sophisticated methods to model chordwise input data and for a more extensive experimental data base is indicated.

  20. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT PRESSURE RESPONSE FROM A CONSTANT FLOW RATE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Olsen, Harold W.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporating a flow pump into a conventional triaxial laboratory system allows fluid to be supplied to or withdrawn from the base of a sediment sample at small and constant rates. An initial transient record of hydraulic head versus time is observed which eventually stabilizes to a constant steady state gradient across the sample; values of hydraulic conductivity can subsequently be determined from Darcy's law. In this paper, analytical methods are presented for determining values of specific storage and hydraulic conductivity from the initial transient phase of such a constant flow rate test. These methods are based on a diffusion equation involving pore pressure and are analogous to those used to describe the soil consolidation process and also to interpret aquifer properties from pumping tests.

  1. Accuracy of the blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Rabbia, F; Del Colle, S; Testa, E; Naso, D; Veglio, F

    2006-08-01

    Blood pressure measurement is the cornerstone for the diagnosis, the treatment and the research on arterial hypertension, and all of the decisions about one of these single aspects may be dramatically influenced by the accuracy of the measurement. Over the past 20 years or so, the accuracy of the conventional Riva-Rocci/Korotkoff technique of blood pressure measurement has been questioned and efforts have been made to improve the technique with automated devices. In the same period, recognition of the phenomenon of white coat hypertension, whereby some individuals with an apparent increase in blood pressure have normal, or reduced, blood pressures when measurement is repeated away from the medical environment, has focused attention on methods of measurement that provide profiles of blood pressure behavior rather than relying on isolated measurements under circumstances that may in themselves influence the level of blood pressure recorded. These methodologies have included repeated measurements of blood pressure using the traditional technique, self-measurement of blood pressure in the home or work place, and ambulatory blood pressure measurement using innovative automated devices. The purpose of this review to serve as a source of practical information about the commonly used methods for blood pressure measurement: the traditional Riva-Rocci method and the automated methods. PMID:17016412

  2. Analytical Studies of Boundary Layer Generated Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.; Shah, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis is made of the "interior noise" produced by high, subsonic turbulent flow over a thin elastic plate partitioned into "panels" by straight edges transverse to the mean flow direction. This configuration models a section of an aircraft fuselage that may be regarded as locally flat. The analytical problem can be solved in closed form to represent the acoustic radiation in terms of prescribed turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations. Two cases are considered: (i) the production of sound at an isolated panel edge (i.e., in the approximation in which the correlation between sound and vibrations generated at neighboring edges is neglected), and (ii) the sound generated by a periodic arrangement of identical panels. The latter problem is amenable to exact analytical treatment provided the panel edge conditions are the same for all panels. Detailed predictions of the interior noise depend on a knowledge of the turbulent boundary layer wall pressure spectrum, and are given here in terms of an empirical spectrum proposed by Laganelli and Wolfe. It is expected that these analytical representations of the sound generated by simplified models of fluid-structure interactions can used to validate more general numerical schemes.

  3. Semi-analytical estimation of wellbore leakage risk during CO2 sequestration in Ottawa County, Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Matteo, E. N.; Elliot, T. R.; Nogues, J. P.; Deng, H.; Fitts, J. P.; Pollak, M.; Bielicki, J.; Wilson, E.; Celia, M. A.; Peters, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    Using the semi-analytical ELSA model, wellbore leakage risk is estimated for CO2 injection into either the Mt. Simon or St. Peter formations, which are part of the Michigan Sedimentary Basin that lies beneath Ottawa County, MI. ELSA is a vertically integrated subsurface modeling tool that can be used to simulate both supercritical CO2 plume distribution/migration and pressure- induced brine displacement during CO2 injection. A composite 3D subsurface domain was constructed for the ELSA simulations based on estimated permeabilities for formation layers, as well as GIS databases containing subsurface stratigraphy, active and inactive and inactive wells, and potential interactions with subsurface activities. These activities include potable aquifers, oil and gas reservoirs, and waste injection sites, which represent potential liabilities if encountered by brine or supercritical CO2 displaced from the injection formation. Overall, the 3D subsurface domain encompasses an area of 1500 km2 to a depth of 2 km and contains over 3,000 wells. The permeabilities for abandoned wells are derived from a ranking system based on available well data including historical records and well logs. This distribution is then randomly sampled in Monte Carlo simulations that are used to generate a probability map for subsurface interferences or atmospheric release resulting from leakage of CO2 and /or brine from the injection formation. This method serves as the basis for comparative testing between various scenarios for injection, as well as for comparing the relative risk of leakage between injection formations or storage sites.

  4. Lab on a stick: multi-analyte cellular assays in a microfluidic dipstick.

    PubMed

    Reis, Nuno M; Pivetal, Jeremy; Loo-Zazueta, Ana L; Barros, João M S; Edwards, Alexander D

    2016-08-01

    A new microfluidic concept for multi-analyte testing in a dipstick format is presented, termed "Lab-on-a-Stick", that combines the simplicity of dipstick tests with the high performance of microfluidic devices. Lab-on-a-stick tests are ideally suited to analysis of particulate samples such as mammalian or bacterial cells, and capable of performing multiple different parallel microfluidic assays when dipped into a single sample with results recorded optically. The utility of this new diagnostics format was demonstrated by performing three types of multiplex cellular assays that are challenging to perform in conventional dipsticks: 1) instantaneous ABO blood typing; 2) microbial identification; and 3) antibiotic minimum inhibitory (MIC) concentration measurement. A pressure balance model closely predicted the superficial flow velocities in individual capillaries, that were overestimated by up to one order of magnitude by the Lucas-Washburn equation conventionally used for wicking in cylindrical pores. Lab-on-a-stick provides a cost-effective, simple, portable and flexible multiplex platform for a range of assays, and will deliver a new generation of advanced yet affordable point-of-care tests for global diagnostics. PMID:27374435

  5. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  6. Rapid Non-Linear Uncertainty Propagation via Analytical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-09-01

    Space situational awareness (SSA) is known to be a data starved problem compared to traditional estimation problems in that observation gaps per object may span over days if not weeks. Therefore, consistent characterization of the uncertainty associated with these objects including non-linear effects is crucial in maintaining an accurate catalog of objects in Earth orbit. Simultaneously, the motion of satellites in Earth orbit is well-modeled in that it is particularly amenable to having their solution and their uncertainty described through analytic or semi-analytic techniques. Even when stronger non-gravitational perturbations such as solar radiation pressure and atmospheric drag are encountered, these perturbations generally have deterministic components that are substantially larger than their time-varying stochastic components. Analytic techniques are powerful because time propagation is only a matter of changing the time parameter, allowing for rapid computational turnaround. These two ideas are combined in this paper: a method of analytically propagating non-linear orbit uncertainties is discussed. In particular, the uncertainty is expressed as an analytic probability density function (pdf) for all time. For a deterministic system model, such pdfs may be obtained if the initial pdf and the system states for all time are also given analytically. Even when closed-form solutions are not available, approximate solutions exist in the form of Edgeworth series for pdfs and Taylor series for the states. The coefficients of the latter expansion are referred to as state transition tensors (STTs), which are a generalization of state transition matrices to arbitrary order. Analytically expressed pdfs can be incorporated in many practical tasks in SSA. One can compute the mean and covariance of the uncertainty, for example, with the moments of the initial pdf as inputs. This process does not involve any sampling and its accuracy can be determined a priori. Analytical

  7. Drive-based recording analyses at >800 Gfc/in 2 using shingled recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William Cross, R.; Montemorra, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Since the introduction of perpendicular recording, conventional perpendicular scaling has enabled the hard disk drive industry to deliver products ranging from ˜130 to well over 500 Gb/in 2 in a little over 4 years. The incredible areal density growth spurt enabled by perpendicular recording is now endangered by an inability to effectively balance writeability with erasure effects at the system level. Shingled magnetic recording (SMR) offers an effective means to continue perpendicular areal density growth using conventional heads and tuned media designs. The use of specially designed edge-write head structures (also known as 'corner writers') should further increase the AD gain potential for shingled recording. In this paper, we will demonstrate the drive-based recording performance characteristics of a shingled recording system at areal densities in excess of 800 Gb/in 2 using a conventional head. Using a production drive base, developmental heads/media and a number of sophisticated analytical routines, we have studied the recording performance of a shingled magnetic recording subsystem. Our observations confirm excellent writeability in excess of 400 ktpi and a perpendicular system with acceptable noise balance, especially at extreme ID and OD skews where the benefits of SMR are quite pronounced. We believe that this demonstration illustrates that SMR is not only capable of productization, but is likely the path of least resistance toward production drive areal density closer to 1 Tb/in 2 and beyond.

  8. 40 CFR 86.142-90 - Records required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 1066.425 for each drive cycle or test phase, as appropriate. (e) Driver and equipment operator... measurements recorded. (j) Test cell barometric pressure, ambient temperature, and humidity. Note: A central laboratory barometer may be used: Provided, that individual test cell barometric pressures are shown to...

  9. Analytical prediction of labyrinth-seal-flow-induced arotor excitation forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajakumar, C.; Sisto, E.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical method to calculate the rotor excitation forces arising from labyrinth seals is presented. The objective is to model the gas flow through the seal clearance passages and cavities when the rotor is positioned eccentricly relative to the stator center. The seal flow model used in the analysis yields solutions which validate the experimentally observed influence of seal parameters on seal forces reported in the literature. The analytically predicted seal pressure distributions and forces were compared with published experimental results.

  10. Data Intensive Architecture for Scalable Cyber Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Bryan K.; Johnson, John R.; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2011-12-19

    Cyber analysts are tasked with the identification and mitigation of network exploits and threats. These compromises are difficult to identify due to the characteristics of cyber communication, the volume of traffic, and the duration of possible attack. In this paper, we describe a prototype implementation designed to provide cyber analysts an environment where they can interactively explore a month’s worth of cyber security data. This prototype utilized On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) techniques to present a data cube to the analysts. The cube provides a summary of the data, allowing trends to be easily identified as well as the ability to easily pull up the original records comprising an event of interest. The cube was built using SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS), with the interface to the cube provided by Tableau. This software infrastructure was supported by a novel hardware architecture comprising a Netezza TwinFin® for the underlying data warehouse and a cube server with a FusionIO drive hosting the data cube. We evaluated this environment on a month’s worth of artificial, but realistic, data using multiple queries provided by our cyber analysts. As our results indicate, OLAP technology has progressed to the point where it is in a unique position to provide novel insights to cyber analysts, as long as it is supported by an appropriate data intensive architecture.

  11. Calculus and analytic geometry. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Mizrahi, A.; Sullivan, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the details of calculus and analytic geometry. The topics covered are: Introduction. Real Numbers. Graphing. The Straight Line. Functions and Their Graphs. Operations on Functions; Types of Functions. Composite Functions. Inverse Functions. Limits from an Intuitive Point of View. Algebraic Techniques for Finding Limits. One-Sided Limits. Continuous Functions. Limit Theorems (If Time Permits). Historical Perspectives. The Derivative. Average Rate of Change. Instantaneous Rate of Change; the Derivative. Two Interpretations of the Derivative Formulas for Finding Derivatives. Formulas for Finding Derivatives (Continued). Higher-Order Derivatives. Derivatives of Trigonometric Functions. The Chain Rule. Implicit Differentiation. Derivative of an Inverse Function; Rational Exponents. Newton's Method of Solving Equations. Functions that are not Differentiable at c., Applications of the Derivative. Related Rates. Differentials. Maxima and Minima. Rolle's Theorem; Mean Value Theorem. Increasing and Decreasing Functions; First Derivative Test. Concavity; Second Derivative Test. Limits at Infinity; Infinite Limits; Asymptotes. Applied Extrema Problems. Antiderivatives. Application to Economics (If Time Permits), The Definite Integral. Area. Evaluation of Area. The Definite Integral. The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Properties of the Definite Integral. The Indefinite Integral; Method of Substitution. Historical Perspectives. Applications of the Integral. Area. Volume of a Solid of Revolution: Disk Method. Volume of a Solid of Revolution: Shell Method. Volume by Slicing. Arc Length. Work. Liquid Pressure and Force. Average Value of a Function.

  12. Technical, analytical and computer support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of a rigorous mathematical model for the design and performance analysis of cylindrical silicon-germanium thermoelectric generators is reported that consists of two parts, a steady-state (static) and a transient (dynamic) part. The material study task involves the definition and implementation of a material study that aims to experimentally characterize the long term behavior of the thermoelectric properties of silicon-germanium alloys as a function of temperature. Analytical and experimental efforts are aimed at the determination of the sublimation characteristics of silicon germanium alloys and the study of sublimation effects on RTG performance. Studies are also performed on a variety of specific topics on thermoelectric energy conversion.

  13. An extensible framework for provenance in human terrain visual analytics.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rick; Slingsby, Aiden; Dykes, Jason; Xu, Kai; Wood, Jo; Nguyen, Phong H; Stephens, Derek; Wong, B L William; Zheng, Yongjun

    2013-12-01

    We describe and demonstrate an extensible framework that supports data exploration and provenance in the context of Human Terrain Analysis (HTA). Working closely with defence analysts we extract requirements and a list of features that characterise data analysed at the end of the HTA chain. From these, we select an appropriate non-classified data source with analogous features, and model it as a set of facets. We develop ProveML, an XML-based extension of the Open Provenance Model, using these facets and augment it with the structures necessary to record the provenance of data, analytical process and interpretations. Through an iterative process, we develop and refine a prototype system for Human Terrain Visual Analytics (HTVA), and demonstrate means of storing, browsing and recalling analytical provenance and process through analytic bookmarks in ProveML. We show how these bookmarks can be combined to form narratives that link back to the live data. Throughout the process, we demonstrate that through structured workshops, rapid prototyping and structured communication with intelligence analysts we are able to establish requirements, and design schema, techniques and tools that meet the requirements of the intelligence community. We use the needs and reactions of defence analysts in defining and steering the methods to validate the framework. PMID:24051780

  14. Space debris collision and production analytic estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Analytic estimates provide useful estimates of collision rates, fragment production rates, and average collision masses and numbers in good agreement with analytic and numerical estimates for the principal quantities of interest.

  15. Selected uses of enzymes with critical fluids in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Turner, Charlotta; King, Jerry W; McKeon, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The use of enzymes coupled with supercritical fluid (SF)-based analytical techniques, such as supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), provides a safer environment platform for the analytical chemist and reduces the use of organic solvents. Incorporation of such techniques not only reduces the use of solvent in analytical laboratories, but it can also lead to overall method simplification and time savings. In this review, some of the fundamental aspects of using enzymes in the presence of SF media are discussed, particularly the influence of extraction (reaction) pressure, temperature, and water content of the extracting fluid and/or the sample matrix. Screening of optimal conditions for conducting reactions in the presence of SF media can be readily accomplished with automated serial or parallel SFE instrumentation, including selection of the proper enzyme. Numerous examples are cited, many based on lipase-initiated conversions of lipid substrates, to form useful analytical derivatives for gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, or SF chromatography analysis. In certain cases, enzymatic-aided processing of samples can permit the coupling of the extraction, sample preparation, and final analysis steps. The derived methods/techniques find application in nutritional food analyses, assays of industrial products, and micro analyses of specific samples. PMID:15295872

  16. General analytical shakedown solution for structures with kinematic hardening materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baofeng; Zou, Zongyuan; Jin, Miao

    2016-04-01

    The effect of kinematic hardening behavior on the shakedown behaviors of structure has been investigated by performing shakedown analysis for some specific problems. The results obtained only show that the shakedown limit loads of structures with kinematic hardening model are larger than or equal to those with perfectly plastic model of the same initial yield stress. To further investigate the rules governing the different shakedown behaviors of kinematic hardening structures, the extended shakedown theorem for limited kinematic hardening is applied, the shakedown condition is then proposed, and a general analytical solution for the structural shakedown limit load is thus derived. The analytical shakedown limit loads for fully reversed cyclic loading and non-fully reversed cyclic loading are then given based on the general solution. The resulting analytical solution is applied to some specific problems: a hollow specimen subjected to tension and torsion, a flanged pipe subjected to pressure and axial force and a square plate with small central hole subjected to biaxial tension. The results obtained are compared with those in literatures, they are consistent with each other. Based on the resulting general analytical solution, rules governing the general effects of kinematic hardening behavior on the shakedown behavior of structure are clearly.

  17. Piezoresistive Cantilever Performance—Part I: Analytical Model for Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Jin; Doll, Joseph C.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    An accurate analytical model for the change in resistance of a piezoresistor is necessary for the design of silicon piezoresistive transducers. Ion implantation requires a high-temperature oxidation or annealing process to activate the dopant atoms, and this treatment results in a distorted dopant profile due to diffusion. Existing analytical models do not account for the concentration dependence of piezoresistance and are not accurate for nonuniform dopant profiles. We extend previous analytical work by introducing two nondimensional factors, namely, the efficiency and geometry factors. A practical benefit of this efficiency factor is that it separates the process parameters from the design parameters; thus, designers may address requirements for cantilever geometry and fabrication process independently. To facilitate the design process, we provide a lookup table for the efficiency factor over an extensive range of process conditions. The model was validated by comparing simulation results with the experimentally determined sensitivities of piezoresistive cantilevers. We performed 9200 TSUPREM4 simulations and fabricated 50 devices from six unique process flows; we systematically explored the design space relating process parameters and cantilever sensitivity. Our treatment focuses on piezoresistive cantilevers, but the analytical sensitivity model is extensible to other piezoresistive transducers such as membrane pressure sensors. PMID:20336183

  18. Piezoresistive Cantilever Performance-Part I: Analytical Model for Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Doll, Joseph C; Pruitt, Beth L

    2010-02-01

    An accurate analytical model for the change in resistance of a piezoresistor is necessary for the design of silicon piezoresistive transducers. Ion implantation requires a high-temperature oxidation or annealing process to activate the dopant atoms, and this treatment results in a distorted dopant profile due to diffusion. Existing analytical models do not account for the concentration dependence of piezoresistance and are not accurate for nonuniform dopant profiles. We extend previous analytical work by introducing two nondimensional factors, namely, the efficiency and geometry factors. A practical benefit of this efficiency factor is that it separates the process parameters from the design parameters; thus, designers may address requirements for cantilever geometry and fabrication process independently. To facilitate the design process, we provide a lookup table for the efficiency factor over an extensive range of process conditions. The model was validated by comparing simulation results with the experimentally determined sensitivities of piezoresistive cantilevers. We performed 9200 TSUPREM4 simulations and fabricated 50 devices from six unique process flows; we systematically explored the design space relating process parameters and cantilever sensitivity. Our treatment focuses on piezoresistive cantilevers, but the analytical sensitivity model is extensible to other piezoresistive transducers such as membrane pressure sensors. PMID:20336183

  19. 7 CFR 94.303 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.303 Section 94.303 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Processed Poultry Products § 94.303 Analytical methods. The analytical methods... latest edition of the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC INTERNATIONAL, Suite 500, 481 North...

  20. 7 CFR 94.103 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.103 Section 94.103 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Voluntary Analyses of Egg Products § 94.103 Analytical methods. The analytical methods used by the Science and Technology Division laboratories to perform voluntary analyses for...