Science.gov

Sample records for pressure sensitive adhesives

  1. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  2. UV curable pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Glotfelter, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA`s) have become a ubiquitous element in our society, so much so, that the relative status of a society can be determined by the per capita consumption of PSA`s. We discuss new monomers as components of PSA formulations which enable adhesion to be achieved on a variety of substrates. Since solventless coating systems are desirable, the UV PSA market is of utmost importance to meeting the strict environmental guidelines now being imposed worldwide. In addition, highly ethoxylated monomers have shown promise in water dispersed PSA formulations, and a self-emulsifying acrylate monomer has been developed to offer dispersive abilities without using traditional emulsifying agents. This talk will focus on the effects of the materials described on properties of adhesive strength and shear strength in UV PSA formulations.

  3. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175... Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives. Pressure-sensitive adhesives may be safely used as the... prescribed conditions: (a) Pressure-sensitive adhesives prepared from one or a mixture of two or more of...

  4. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175... Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives. Pressure-sensitive... accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Pressure-sensitive adhesives prepared from one or...

  5. New pressure-sensitive silicone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiffer, J. L.; Stoops, W. E., Jr.; St. Clair, T. L.; Watkins, V. E., Jr.; Kelly, T. P.

    1981-01-01

    Adhesive for high or low temperatures does not stretch severely under load. It is produced by combining intermediate-molecular-weight pressure sensitive adhesive which does not cure with silicone resin that cures with catalyst to rubbery tack-free state. Blend of silicone tackifier and cured rubbery silicone requires no solvents in either atmospheric or vacuum environments. Ratio of ingredients varies for different degrees of tack, creep resistance, and tensile strength.

  6. Contribution from pressure-sensitive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Gilbert

    1996-03-01

    The successful use of many security papers, foils and films depends on the technology of chemical fastening systems -- especially pressure sensitive adhesives. These are adhesives activated not by heat or by the evaporation of water or some other solvent, but simply by the act of application -- by pressure. These adhesives provide the means whereby laminations, substrates and seals are made effective. In addition to their physical properties these adhesives are often required to possess optical properties to allow the security materials to be visibly active and indeed the adhesive system may itself contribute as a carrier for a variety of security materials. Recent advances in adhesives chemistry have made it possible to achieve virtually all the required physical performance characteristics combined with a choice of optical properties ranging from total opacity to invisibility and including controlled translucency and tinting. The implications for security printing and packaging are important. Opacity is easy to achieve, for example by loading the adhesive with aluminum powder, by the selection of totally opaque materials like metallized film or by various printing processes. But achieving transparency is a different matter, and transparency is mandatory for applications involving the protection of documents, photographs, etc. with a clear film over-laminate. Obvious examples would be for passports, visas and other personal identification. But some security devices may themselves require protection; for example holograms or embossings. And transparency in the test laboratory is not enough. The Australian driving licence is stuck to the windshield, so the transparency of the adhesive must be sustained over long periods without deterioration due to prolonged u/v exposure, climatic conditions or aging. The commercial label market has helped to push the technology forward. There is a strong demand for the 'no-label look' for packaging of clear plastic and glass

  7. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives....

  8. Development of Screenable Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2003-11-29

    An industrial research area of high activity in recent years has been the development of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) products that do not interfere with the processing of post-consumer waste. The problem of PSA contamination is arguably the most important technical challenge in expanding the use of recycled fiber. The presence of PSAs in recovered paper creates problems that reduce the efficiency of recycling and papermaking operations and diminish product quality. The widespread use of PSAs engineered to avoid these problems, often referred to as environmentally benign PSAs, could greatly increase the commercial viability of utilizing secondary fiber. Much of the research efforts in this area have focused on the development of PSAs that are designed for enhanced removal with cleaning equipment currently utilized by recycling plants. Most removal occurs at the pressure screens with the size and shape of residual contaminants in the process being the primary criteria for their separation. A viable approach for developing environmentally benign PSAs is their reformulation to inhibit fragmentation. The reduction of adhesives to small particles occurs almost exclusively during repulping; a process in which water and mechanical energy are used to swell and reduce paper products to their constituent fiber. Engineering PSA products to promote the formation of larger adhesive particles during repulping will greatly enhance their removal and reduce or eliminate their impact on the recycling process.

  9. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives. Pressure-sensitive... accordance with a prior sanction or approval. (3) Color additives listed for use in or on food in parts 73... with isobutylene so that the butyl content of the final product is not less than 18 percent, for use...

  10. Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International’s (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young’s moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most

  11. Structure and macroscopic tackiness of ultrathin pressure sensitive adhesive films.

    PubMed

    Diethert, Alexander; Körstgens, Volker; Magerl, David; Ecker, Katharina; Perlich, Jan; Roth, Stephan V; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Ultrathin layers of the statistical copolymer P(nBA-stat-MA) with a majority of n-butyl acrylate (nBA) and a minority of methyl acrylate (MA) are characterized with respect to the film morphology and the mechanical response in a probe tack test. The probed copolymer can be regarded as a model system of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA). The films are prepared by spin-coating which enables an easy thickness control via the polymer concentration of the solution. The film thickness is determined with x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and white light interferometry (WLI). Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) provides detailed and statistically significant information about the film morphology. Two types of lateral structures are identified and no strong correlation of these structures with the PSA film thickness is observed. In contrast, prominent parameters of the probe tack test, such as the stress maximum and the tack energy, exhibit an exponential dependence on the film thickness. PMID:22817560

  12. Pressure sensitive microparticle adhesion through biomimicry of the pollen-stigma interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Qu, Zihao; Meredith, J Carson

    2016-03-21

    Many soft biomimetic synthetic adhesives, optimized to support macroscopic masses (∼kg), have been inspired by geckos, insects and other animals. Far less work has investigated bioinspired adhesion that is tuned to micro- and nano-scale sizes and forces. However, such adhesive forces are extremely important in the adhesion of micro- and nanoparticles to surfaces, relevant to a wide range of industrial and biological systems. Pollens, whose adhesion is critical to plant reproduction, are an evolutionary-optimized system for biomimicry to engineer tunable adhesion between particles and micro-patterned soft matter surfaces. In addition, the adhesion of pollen particles is relevant to topics as varied as pollinator ecology, transport of allergens, and atmospheric phenomena. We report the first observation of structurally-derived pressure-sensitive adhesion of a microparticle by using the sunflower pollen and stigma surfaces as a model. This strong, pressure-sensitive adhesion results from interlocking between the pollen's conical spines and the stigma's receptive papillae. Inspired by this behavior, we fabricated synthetic polymeric patterned surfaces that mimic the stigma surface's receptivity to pollen. These soft mimics allow the magnitude of the pressure-sensitive response to be tuned by adjusting the size and spacing of surface features. These results provide an important new insight for soft material adhesion based on bio-inspired principles, namely that ornamented microparticles and micro-patterned surfaces can be designed with complementarity that enable a tunable, pressure-sensitive adhesion on the microparticle size and length scale. PMID:26883733

  13. Pressure-sensitive adhesives for transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Tan; Pfister

    1999-02-01

    Adhesives are a critical component in transdermal drug delivery (TDD) devices. In addition to the usual requirements of functional adhesive properties, adhesives for TDD applications must have good biocompatibility with the skin, chemical compatibility with the drug, various components of the formulation, and provide consistent, effective delivery of the drug. This review discusses the three most commonly used adhesives (polyisobutylenes, polyacrylates and silicones) in TDD devices, and provides an update on recently introduced TDD products and recent developments of new adhesives. PMID:10234208

  14. Bond strength of pressure sensitive adhesives for CFRP aluminium-alloy hybrid beams under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, C.

    2003-09-01

    This paper discusses the impact absorbing capabilities of CFRP aluminium-alloy hybrid beams bonded with double-coated pressure sensitive adhesive tapes. Two sorts of double-coated adhesive tapes (VHB and SBT, 3M) were used in experiments. The strength and absorbed energy of the beams under impact loading were measured using an instrumented Charpy tester. Using the beams having the different adhesive tapes and the CFRP of different length, the variations of the strength and the absorbed energy were investigated. The beams bonded with VHB showed sufficient strength and absorbed energy. SBT showed also great capability of absorbing impact energy.

  15. Polymer-Solid Interface Connectivity and Adhesion: Design of a Pressure Sensitive Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Shana P.; Wool, Richard P.

    2007-03-01

    Adhesion at polymer-solid interfaces was explored for a new bio-based PSA in terms of sticker groups φX on the polymer, receptor groups φY on the solid and the strength of the X-Y acid-base interaction, χ. The polymer-solid interface models of Gong, Lee and Wool were extended with new percolation models of entanglements and interface strength to determine the optimal sticker group concentration φ*X. For the general case where φY and χ are constant, it is predicted that when φX<φ*X, the peel strength behaves as G1c˜φX/φ*X and the locus of failure is adhesive between the polymer and the solid. However, when φX>φ*X, failure occurs cohesively in a polymer-polymer interface adjacent to the solid and the strength decreases as G1c˜φ*X/φX. The switch from adhesive to cohesive failure can be understood in terms of the changes in the chain conformations of the adhered chains and their decreasing interpenetration X with the bulk chains, via X˜1/r, where r = χφXφY. The optimal value of φX which maximizes the adhesion and determines the mode of failure is given by φ*X 0.07/C, and for typical values of the characteristic ratio C in the range 7-10, φ*X 1% mole fraction, corresponding to about 2 sticker groups per critical entanglement length Mc. Supported by USDA

  16. Influence of large strain rheology on the peeling performances of Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villey, Richard; Ciccotti, Matteo; Creton, Costantino; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Yarusso, David J.

    2015-03-01

    The dependence of adhesion energy of Pressure Sensitive Adhesives (PSA) on peeling velocity reduces to a master curve using a time-temperature superposition principle, usually verified by the linear rheology of polymers. This result has guided models predicting peeling energy of PSA to consider the small strain rheology of the glue only, despite it can experience very large strains before debonding. The argument of the time-temperature superposition principle can actually also be applied to large strains and is thus not a stringent one. To clarify the role of large strain rheology during the peeling of PSA, we present experiments on commercial and custom-made tapes supplied by 3M Company. Small and large strain rheology differences are obtained by changing the glass transition temperature, the cross-linking density and the density of entanglements, yet remaining close to commercial PSA. The rheology influence is decoupled from geometrical effects, by examining the nontrivial dependence of the adhesion energy on the peeling angle. Finally, adhesion energy measurements and visualizations of the process zone, over a large range of peeling velocities, are discussed, in the perspective of building a model for the adherence considering the complete rheology of the glue.

  17. Processing Effects on Block-Copolymer Based Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, A. E.; Macosko, C. W.

    2000-03-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate how the variables in the hot-melt coating process affect the microstructure and properties of pressure-sensitive adhesives based on a styrene isoprene styrene triblock copolymer. This polymer is a thermoplastic elastomer, able to be coated at high temperatures and physically crosslinked at lower temperatures. Adhesive tape samples have been made through hot-melt and solvent coating methods. Hot-melt coatings are prepared at speeds up to 110 feet/minute. Materials with the same thermal history have been coated using both methods and then tested for comparison of properties. PSA properties are strongly dependent on the time scale of application and debonding, as revealed by shear rheology data, and three types of performance tests (tack, peel, and shear holding power) are used to capture the various responses. Solvent-coated tape has superior shear strength, while hot-melt-coated tape performs better in peel tests. It is expected that the varying flow and deformation histories of the samples will lead to distinct chain orientations, while the rate of cooling of hot-melt-coated samples may influence the degree of phase separation achieved. These factors will cause the adhesive coatings to have different microstructures and therefore different properties.

  18. Tackiness of pressure-sensitive adhesives: An ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Buschbaum, P.; Ittner, T.; Petry, W.

    2004-05-01

    The debonding of a model pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) poly-n-buthylacrylate is investigated by a combination of the mechanical tack test, optical microscopy and in situ ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering. From the mechanical test, macroscopic values such as force-distance curves are determined. The force-distance curve exhibits the typical non-linear behavior. With microscopy the macroscopic cavitation structure is observed. Scattering addresses the structure of the PSA on a microscopic level for the first time. As a new feature, a sub-structure of the usual optically resolvable macroscopic fibrils between the PSA surface and the probe punch is detected. The sub-structure exists over a large distance between the PSA and the probe surface and remains constant in diameter. This behavior of the sub-structure as well as the dependence of the force plateau on the film thickness are compared with theoretical predictions.

  19. Adherence performances of pressure sensitive adhesives on a model viscoelastic synthetic film: a tool for the understanding of adhesion on the human skin.

    PubMed

    Renvoise, Julien; Burlot, Delphine; Marin, Gérard; Derail, Christophe

    2009-02-23

    This work deals with the rheological behavior and adherence properties of pressure sensitive adhesive formulations dedicated to medical applications. We have developed a specific viscoelastic substrate which mimics adhesion on human skin to measure the adherence properties of PSAs when they are stuck on the human skin. By comparing peeling results of PSAs, dedicated to medical applications, stuck on human skin and on this viscoelastic substrate we show that this substrate, based on a blend of natural proteins, presents a better representation of the interactions occurring at the skin/adhesive interface than conventional substrates used for peel test (i.e. glass and steel). PMID:18992309

  20. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness. PMID:26428630

  1. Energy Efficienct Processes for Making Tackifier Dispersions used to make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Rakesh Gupta

    2006-07-26

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an energy efficient, environmentally friendly and low cost process (compared to the current process) for making tackifier dispersions that are used to make pressure-sensitive adhesives. These adhesives are employed in applications such as self-adhesive postage stamps and disposable diapers and are made by combining the tackifier dispersion with a natural or synthetic rubber latex. The current process for tackifier dispersion manufacture begins by melting a (plastic) resin and adding water to it in order to form a water-in-oil emulsion. This is then converted to an oil-in-water emulsion by phase inversion in the presence of continuous stirring. The resulting emulsion is the tackifier dispersion, but it is not concentrated and the remaining excess water has to be transported and removed. The main barrier that has to be overcome in the development of commercial quality tackifier dispersions is the inability to directly emulsify resin in water due to the very low viscosity of water as compared to the viscosity of the molten resin. In the present research, a number of solutions were proposed to overcome this barrier, and these included use of different mixer types to directly form the emulsion from the molten resin but without going through a phase inversion, the idea of forming a solid resin-in-water suspension having the correct size and size distribution but without melting of the resin, and the development of techniques of making a colloidal powder of the resin that could be dispersed in water just prior to use. Progress was made on each of these approaches, and each was found to be feasible. The most appealing solution, though, is the last one, since it does not require melting of the resin. Also, the powder can be shipped in dry form and then mixed with water in any proportion depending on the needs of the process. This research was conducted at Argonne National Laboratory, and it was determined the new process

  2. An instrumented mixer setup for making tackifier dispersions used to make pressure-sensitive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Daoyun; Zhang, Wu; Melby, Earl G.; Gupta, Rakesh K.

    2008-04-01

    Water-based pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are made by combining a tackifier dispersion and a polymer latex. During the process of making the tackifier dispersion, the system initially forms a water-in-oil emulsion, and then inverts to an oil-in-water one as more water is continuously added with constant agitation. To better understand the process, an instrumented mixer setup was constructed to simulate the manufacturing process, and agitation was provided by an inner impeller and an outer impeller. Several variables were monitored in situ. They are the electrical resistance of the emulsion, torque exerted on the inner impeller, agitation speeds of both impellers, power consumption of both impellers and the flow rate of feeding water. Our measurements showed that torque reached a maximum at phase inversion, and this was verified by direct measurements of viscosity during the process. Simultaneously electrical resistance measurements monitored the chemical changes as well as phase inversion. Experiments showed that under a certain low water feeding flow rate, there appeared to be an intermediate agitation speed at which the phase inversion occurred the earliest. This, from the industrial standpoint, is really favorable due to both time and energy efficiency. Furthermore, this intermediate agitation speed also corresponded to a better quality product. All this information may be used for optimizing this process in the future.

  3. Studies on acrylated epoxydised triglyceride resin-co-butyl methacrylate towards the development of biodegradable pressure sensitive adhesives.

    PubMed

    David, S Begila; Sathiyalekshmi, K; Gnana Raj, G Allen

    2009-12-01

    The potential chemical utility of Soya bean oil for the preparation of novel biodegradable polymeric pressure sensitive adhesive has been investigated. Epoxy resin was prepared through in situ epoxidation of Soya bean oil under controlled reaction conditions. Acrylated epoxidised triglyceride resin (AET resin) and copolymer of AET resin with butyl methacrylate were prepared and evaluated. Higher the concentration of butyl methacrylate higher is the degree of copolymerization of AET resin with butyl methacrylate. An optimum concentration of AET resin with butyl methacrylate (100 : 0.40) yields favourable shear holding time and peel strength to qualify as pressure sensitive adhesive. The candidate PSA formulation is biodegradable with antimicrobial activity against gram positive S. aureus ATCC 25923. PMID:18584126

  4. Synthesis, characterization and application of water-soluble and easily removable cationic pressure-sensitive adhesives. Quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-30

    The Institute studied the adsorption of cationic pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) on wood fiber, and the buildup of PSA in a closed water system during paper recycling; the results are presented. Georgia Tech worked to develop an environmentally friendly polymerization process to synthesize a novel re-dispersible PSA by co-polymerizing an oil-soluble monomer (butyl acrylate) and a cationic monomer MAEPTAC; results are presented. At the University of Georgia at Athens the project focused on the synthesis of water-soluble and easily removable cationic polymer PSAs.

  5. Development of Screenable Wax Coatings and Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to design new formulations and production processes for water-based adhesives and wax coatings that can be easily screened from recycling operations.

  6. Development and production of a flame retardant, general purpose, pressure sensitive adhesive tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, P. B.; Doggett, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    The specification results for the finished tape properties were as follows: (1) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on aluminum from 107 to 143 grams per centimeter (0.6 to 0.8 pounds per inch); (2) adhesive strength (180 deg peel) on stainless steel from 71 to 107 grams per centimeter (0.4 to 0.6 pounds per inch); (3) unwind resistance of 536 to 714 grams per centimeter (3 to 4 pounds per inch); (4) tensile strength minimum of 7143 grams per centimeter (40 pounds per inch); (5) elongation from 5 to 10% at break; (6) tear strength, Elmendorf from 200 to 350 grams (0.44 to 0.77 pounds); and (7) tear strength, tongue from 363 to 408 grams (0.8 to 0.9) pounds).

  7. Photon and radiowave emission from peeling pressure sensitive adhesives in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, E. E.; Shen, X. A.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    During separation of an adhesive from a polymer substrate in air, intense bursts of photons ('phE', for photon emission) and long wavelength electromagnetic radiation ('RE', for radiowave emission), similar to those reported earlier by Deryagin, et al. (1978) have been observed. In this paper, careful measurements of the phE time distributions, as well as time correlations between bursts of phE and RE, are reported. These results support the view that patches of electrical charge produced by charge separation between dissimilar materials lead to microdischarges in and near the crack tip. The role of these discharges in producing sustained phE after the discharge has been extinguished is also discussed.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, to application of water soluble and easily removable cationic pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    In recent years, the world has expressed an increasing interest in the recycling of waste paper to supplement the use of virgin fiber as a way to protect the environment. Statistics show that major countries are increasing their use of recycled paper. For example, in 1991 to 1996, the U.S. increased its recovered paper utilization rate from 31% to 39%, Germany went from 50% to 60%, the UK went from 60% to 70%, France increased from 46% to 49%, and China went from 32% to 35% [1]. As recycled fiber levels and water system closures both increase, recycled product quality will need to improve in order for recycled products to compete with products made from virgin fiber [2]. The use of recycled fiber has introduced an increasing level of metal, plastic, and adhesive contamination into the papermaking process which has added to the complexity of the already overwhelming task of providing a uniform and clean recycle furnish. The most harmful of these contaminates is a mixture of adhesives and polymeric substances that are commonly known as stickies. Stickies, which enter the mill with the pulp furnish, are not easily removed from the repulper and become more difficult the further down the system they get. This can be detrimental to the final product quality. Stickies are hydrophobic, tacky, polymeric materials that are introduced into the papermaking system from a mixture of recycled fiber sources. Properties of stickies are very similar to the fibers used in papermaking, viz. size, density, hydrophobicity, and electrokinetic charge. This reduces the probability of their removal by conventional separation processes, such as screening and cleaning, which are based on such properties. Also, their physical and chemical structure allows for them to extrude through screens, attach to fibers, process equipment, wires and felts. Stickies can break down and then reagglomerate and appear at seemingly any place in the mill. When subjected to a number of factors including changes

  9. Mechanical properties of a waterborne pressure-sensitive adhesive with a percolating poly(acrylic acid)-based diblock copolymer network: effect of pH.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Robert S; Morse, Andrew; Siband, Elodie; Dupin, Damien; Armes, Steven P; Keddie, Joseph L

    2015-06-15

    Copolymerizing an acrylic acid comonomer is often beneficial for the adhesive properties of waterborne pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs). Here, we demonstrate a new strategy in which poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) is distributed as a percolating network within a PSA film formed from a polymer colloid. A diblock copolymer composed of PAA and poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) blocks was synthesized using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and adsorbed onto soft acrylic latex particles prior to their film formation. The thin adsorbed shells on the particles create a percolating network that raises the elastic modulus, creep resistance and tensile strength of the final film. When the film formation occurs at pH 10, ionomeric crosslinking occurs, and high tack adhesion is obtained in combination with high creep resistance. The results show that the addition of an amphiphilic PAA-b-PBA diblock copolymer (2.0 wt.%) to a soft latex provides a simple yet effective means of adjusting the mechanical and adhesive properties of the resulting composite film. PMID:25706199

  10. Influence of menthol and pressure-sensitive adhesives on the in vivo performance of membrane-moderated transdermal therapeutic system of nicardipine hydrochloride in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Y S R; Satyanarayana, V; Bhaskar, P

    2003-05-01

    A membrane-moderated transdermal therapeutic system of nicardipine hydrochloride was developed using 2% w/w hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) gel as a reservoir system containing 5% w/w of menthol as a penetration enhancer. The permeability flux of nicardipine hydrochloride through the ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer membrane was found to increase with an increase in vinyl acetate content in the copolymer. The effect of various pressure-sensitive adhesives (MA-31, MA-38 or TACKWHITE A 4MED on the permeability of nicardipine hydrochloride through EVA 2825 membrane (28% w/w vinyl acetate) or EVA 2825 membrane/skin composite was also studied. The results showed that nicardipine hydrochloride permeability through EVA 2825 membrane coated with TACKWHITE A 4MED/skin composite was higher than that coated with MA-31 or MA-38. Thus, a new transdermal therapeutic system for nicardipine hydrochloride was formulated using EVA 2825 membrane coated with a pressure-sensitive adhesive TACKWHITE A 4MED, and 2% w/w HPC gel as reservoir containing 5% w/w of menthol as a penetration enhancer. In vivo studies in healthy human volunteers indicated that the TTS of nicardipine hydrochloride, designed in the present study, provided steady-state plasma concentration of the drug with minimal fluctuations for 26h with improved bioavailability in comparison with the immediate release capsule dosage form. PMID:12754008

  11. Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Bencic, T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews new advances and applications of pressure sensitive paints in aerodynamic testing. Emphasis is placed on important technical aspects of pressure sensitive paint including instrumentation, data processing, and uncertainty analysis.

  12. Comparison of Surfactant Distributions in Pressure-Sensitive Adhesive Films Dried from Dispersion under Lab-Scale and Industrial Drying Conditions.

    PubMed

    Baesch, S; Siebel, D; Schmidt-Hansberg, B; Eichholz, C; Gerst, M; Scharfer, P; Schabel, W

    2016-03-01

    Film-forming latex dispersions are an important class of material systems for a variety of applications, for example, pressure-sensitive adhesives, which are used for the manufacturing of adhesive tapes and labels. The mechanisms occurring during drying have been under intense investigations in a number of literature works. Of special interest is the distribution of surfactants during the film formation. However, most of the studies are performed at experimental conditions very different from those usually encountered in industrial processes. This leaves the impact of the drying conditions and the resulting influence on the film properties unclear. In this work, two different 2-ethylhexyl-acrylate (EHA)-based adhesives with varying characteristics regarding glass transition temperature, surfactants, and particle size distribution were investigated on two different substrates. The drying conditions, defined by film temperature and mass transfer in the gas phase, were varied to emulate typical conditions encountered in the laboratory and industrial processes. Extreme conditions equivalent to air temperatures up to 250 °C in a belt dryer and drying rates of 12 g/(m(2)·s) were realized. The surfactant distributions were measured by means of 3D confocal Raman spectroscopy in the dry film. The surfactant distributions were found to differ significantly with drying conditions at moderate film temperatures. At elevated film temperatures the surfactant distributions are independent of the investigated gas side transport coefficients: the heat and mass transfer coefficient. Coating on substrates with significantly different surface energies has a large impact on surfactant concentration gradients, as the equilibrium between surface and bulk concentration changes. Dispersions with higher colloidal stability showed more homogeneous lateral surfactant distributions. These results indicate that the choice of the drying conditions, colloidal stability, and substrates is crucial

  13. Identification of carbonates as additives in pressure-sensitive adhesive tape substrate with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and its application in three explosive cases.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jungang; Feng, Jimin; Zhang, Wen; Shi, Rongguang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zhaohong; Zhao, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive tape is often used to bind explosive devices. It can become important trace evidence in many cases. Three types of calcium carbonate (heavy, light, and active CaCO(3)), which were widely used as additives in pressure-sensitive tape substrate, were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in this study. A Spectrum GX 2000 system with a diamond anvil cell and a deuterated triglycine sulfate detector was employed for IR observation. Background was subtracted for every measurement, and triplicate tests were performed. Differences in positions of main peaks and the corresponding functional groups were investigated. Heavy CaCO(3) could be identified from the two absorptions near 873 and 855/cm, while light CaCO(3) only has one peak near 873/cm because of the low content of aragonite. Active CaCO(3) could be identified from the absorptions in the 2800-2900/cm region because of the existence of organic compounds. Tiny but indicative changes in the 878-853/cm region were found in the spectra of CaCO(3) with different content of aragonite and calcite. CaCO(3) in pressure-sensitive tape, which cannot be differentiated by scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and thermal analysis, can be easily identified using FTIR. The findings were successfully applied to three specific explosive cases and would be helpful in finding the possible source of explosive devices in future cases. PMID:22724657

  14. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-07-15

    An apparatus is provided for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to said changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic illuminates a fluorescent composition causing it to fluoresce. The fluorescent composition is caused to fluoresce more relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure so that the intensity of fluorescent emissions collected by the same fiber optic used for illumination varies monotonically with pressure. 10 figs.

  15. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to said changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic illuminates a fluorescent composition causing it to fluoresce. The fluorescent composition is caused to more relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure so that the intensity of fluorescent emissions collected by the same fiber optic used for illumination varies monotonically with pressure.

  16. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1982-09-30

    Apparatus and method for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected.

  17. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1985-04-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected. 5 figs.

  18. Pressure-sensitive optrode

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for sensing changes in pressure and for generating optical signals related to changes in pressure. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a movable surface which is coated with a light-responsive material, and which moves relative to the end of the fiber optic in response to changes in pressure. The same fiber optic collects a portion of the reflected or emitted light from the movable surface. Changes in pressure are determined by measuring changes in the amount of light collected.

  19. Effects of monomers on the properties of palm-oil-based radiation curable pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) — a prepolymer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmi Mahmood, Mohd; Abdullah, Zahid; Sakurai, Yasuo; Zaman, Khairul; Mohd. Dahlan, Hj

    2001-01-01

    Various low glass transition temperature ( Tg) acrylate and methacrylate monomers were mixed with epoxidised palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) with the ratio of 50/50 prior to curing with electron beam (EB) irradiation. Methacrylate monomers such as dicyclopentenyloxyethyl methacrylate (DCPOEMA) and isobornyl methacrylate (ISBMA), although displaying relatively high adhesive properties were finally excluded from being further utilised as monomers for PSA because of a very slow curing speed. Literally, it is suggested that poorer adhesive performances of the cured films made from 50/50 : EPOLA/monomer mixture as compared to that of 100% monomer was attributed to the lack of compatibility between EPOLA and the particular monomers. Further compatibility investigations were continued using formulations prepared via the prepolymer route cured by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and the results showed that several monoacrylate monomers with polar and non-polar groups exhibited high curing speed as well as good compatibility with EPOLA as shown by their cured film properties such as surface tackiness, peel adhesion and creep resistance. It is also suggested that these monomers were acting as surfactants for EPOLA which consequently enhance their compatibility upon mixing.

  20. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  1. Pressure sensitive conductive rubber blends

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, H.H. ); Abdel-Bary, E.M. ); El-Mansy, M.K.; Khodair, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR) was blended with polychloroprene (CR) according to standard techniques. The blend was mixed with different concentrations of ZnO. The vulcanized sample was subjected to electrical conductivity ({sigma}) measurements while different values of static pressure were applied on the sample. It was found that samples containing 7.5 phr ZnO showed a reasonable pressure sensitive increase of {sigma}. Furthermore, the {sigma} vs pressure relationship of rubber blend mixed with different concentrations of Fast Extrusion Furnace black (FEF) was investigated. It was found that rubber vulcanizate containing 40 phr FEF resulted in a negative value of the pressure coefficient of conductivity {approx equal} {minus} 4.5 KPa{sup {minus}1}.

  2. Graphene blisters with switchable shapes controlled by pressure and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Boddeti, Narasimha G; Liu, Xinghui; Long, Rong; Xiao, Jianliang; Bunch, J Scott; Dunn, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    We created graphene blisters that cover and seal an annular cylinder-shaped microcavity in a SiO2 substrate filled with a gas. By controlling the pressure difference between the gas inside and outside of the microcavity, we switch the graphene membrane between multiple stable equilibrium configurations. We carried out experiments starting from the situation where the pressure of the gas inside and outside of the microcavity is set equal to a prescribed charging pressure, p0 and the graphene membrane covers the cavity like an annular drum, adhered to the central post and the surrounding substrate due to van der Waals forces. We decrease the outside pressure to a value, pe which causes it to bulge into an annular blister. We systematically increase the charging pressure by repeating this procedure causing the annular blister to continue to bulge until a critical charging pressure pc(i) is reached. At this point the graphene membrane delaminates from the post in an unstable manner, resulting in a switch of graphene membrane shape from an annular to a spherical blister. Continued increase of the charging pressure results in the spherical blister growing with its height increasing, but maintaining a constant radius until a second critical charging pressure pc(o) is reached at which point the blister begins to delaminate from the periphery of the cavity in a stable manner. Here, we report a series of experiments as well as a mechanics and thermodynamic model that demonstrate how the interplay among system parameters (geometry, graphene stiffness (number of layers), pressure, and adhesion energy) results in the ability to controllably switch graphene blisters among different shapes. Arrays of these blisters can be envisioned to create pressure-switchable surface properties where the difference between patterns of annular versus spherical blisters will impact functionalities such as wettability, friction, adhesion, and surface wave characteristics. PMID:24224793

  3. Evaluation of yellow rectangle traps coated with hot melt pressure sensitive adhesive and sticky gel against Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera:Tephritidae) and the possible influence of yellow colors on captures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sticky yellow rectangle traps have been used for many years to capture Rhagoletis fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae). Traditional yellow sticky traps are coated with a sticky gel (SG) that can leave residues on the hands of users. An alternative to SG on traps are hot melt pressure sensitive adhes...

  4. Diaphragm based high sensitive FBG pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengal Rao, P.; Srimannarayana, K.; Sai Shankar, M.; Kishore, P.

    2013-06-01

    A high sensitive pressure sensor based on Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) integrated with a thin metal diaphragm was designed and demonstrated. To enhance the pressure sensitivity FBG is firmly glued across the diameter of the diaphragm. Under pressure, the diaphragm deforms and produces an induced strain along the length of the fiber causes shift in Bragg wavelength of the FBG. Pressure measurement is made by measuring the Bragg wavelength shift against change in pressure. The sensor was tested up to the maximum pressure of 140 psi and the corresponding pressure sensitivity was found to be 0.0204 nm/psi, which is approximately 970 times higher than that can be achieved with a bare FBG. The experimental results show good agreement with the theoretical results and possess good linearity and repeatability. This sensor can be used for the measurement of medium pressure, liquid level and depth of underwater.

  5. Stickiness--some fundamentals of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gay, Cyprien

    2002-12-01

    We review some adhesion mechanisms that have been understood in the field of synthetic adhesives, and more precisely for adhesives that adhere instantaneously (a property named tackiness) and whose adhesive strength usually depends on the applied pressure (pressure-sensitive adhesives). The discussion includes effects of surface roughness, elasticity, cavitation, viscous and elastic fingering, substrate flexibility. PMID:21680396

  6. Optimization of measurements with pressure sensitive paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Donald M.; Puram, Chith K.; Upchurch, Billy T.

    1995-01-01

    Use of luminescent paints for the measurement of global pressures on wind tunnel model surfaces requires a full understanding of the inherent accuracy of the technique. Theoretical emission of the paint luminophor follows the well known Stern-Volmer relation. Inherent in this relation are fundamental limits to achievable sensitivity and accuracy. Equations for relative error in pressure as a function of relative signal intensity (emittance), relative error in pressure as a function of pressure, and the relationship between sensitivity and pressure are derived and represented graphically.

  7. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  8. A no adhesive and temperature-insensitive package design of fiber Bragg grating pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Zhu, Jun; Yin, Hao; Zhang, Zhao; Tang, Haiyu; Yu, Benli

    2012-11-01

    In this study, an innovative temperature-insensitive and no adhesive package for FBG pressure sensor was designed. We presents an package construction to compensate for temperature deviation of a FBG by mechanical properties of different metal materials; the package realize no adhesive utilizing combined technique of electroless plating NI-P and electroplating NI and laser spot welding technology. On the basis of the study on the Material structural properties and the compensation principles analysis of the FBG, the finite element method is used to analysis of the feasibility of the construction and optimize the construction parameters. The results show that this compensation construction can effectively reduce the temperature sensitivity of the FBG.

  9. Pressure-Sensitive Paint: Effect of Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Mark Kenneth; Yang, Leichao; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous ways in which pressure-sensitive paint can be applied to a surface. The choice of substrate and application method can greatly affect the results obtained. The current study examines the different methods of applying pressure-sensitive paint to a surface. One polymer-based and two porous substrates (anodized aluminum and thin-layer chromatography plates) are investigated and compared for luminescent output, pressure sensitivity, temperature sensitivity and photodegradation. Two luminophores [tris-Bathophenanthroline Ruthenium(II) Perchlorate and Platinum-tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) Porphyrin] will also be compared in all three of the substrates. The results show the applicability of the different substrates and luminophores to different testing environments. PMID:22247685

  10. Improved secondary caries resistance via augmented pressure displacement of antibacterial adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-na; Huang, Li; Fang, Ming; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-juan; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2016-01-01

    The present in vitro study evaluated the secondary caries resistance potential of acid-etched human coronal dentin bonded using augmented pressure adhesive displacement in conjunction with an experimental antibacterial adhesive. One hundred and twenty class I cavities were restored with a commercial non-antibacterial etch-and-rinse adhesive (N) or an experimental antibacterial adhesive (A) which was displaced by gentle air-blow (G) or augmented pressure air-blow (H). After bonding and restoration with resin composite, the resulted 4 groups (N-G, N-H, A-G and A-H) were exposed to Streptococcus mutans biofilm for 4, 8, 15, 20 or 25 days. The development of secondary caries in the bonding interface was then examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data acquired from 15, 20 and 25 days of artificial caries induction were analyzed with three-way ANOVA at α = 0.05. The depth of the artificial carious lesions was significantly affected by “adhesive type” (Single Bond 2 vs experimental antibacterial adhesive p = 0.003), “intensity of adhesive displacement” (gentle vs augmented-pressure adhesive displacement; p < 0.001), as well as “artificial caries induction time” (p < 0.001). The combined use of augmented pressure adhesive displacement and experimental antibacterial adhesive reduces the progression of secondary caries. PMID:26928742

  11. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  12. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  13. Water-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Water-based pressure-sensitive paints (PSPs) have been invented as alternatives to conventional organic-solvent-based pressure-sensitive paints, which are used primarily for indicating distributions of air pressure on wind-tunnel models. Typically, PSPs are sprayed onto aerodynamic models after they have been mounted in wind tunnels. When conventional organic-solvent-based PSPs are used, this practice creates a problem of removing toxic fumes from inside the wind tunnels. The use of water-based PSPs eliminates this problem. The waterbased PSPs offer high performance as pressure indicators, plus all the advantages of common water-based paints (low toxicity, low concentrations of volatile organic compounds, and easy cleanup by use of water).

  14. Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Field System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Obara, Clifford J.; Amer, Tahani R.; Faulcon, Nettie D.; Carmine, Michael T.; Burkett, Cecil G.; Pritchard, Daniel W.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Field System that is used to provide global surface pressure and temperature measurements on models tested in Langley wind tunnels. The system was developed and is maintained by Global Surface Measurements Team personnel of the Data Acquisition and Information Management Branch in the Research Facilities Services Competency. Descriptions of the system hardware and software are presented and operational procedures are detailed.

  15. Sterilization of Fuji pressure-sensitive film.

    PubMed

    Liggins, A B; Hardie, W R; Finlay, J B

    1994-11-01

    Fuji Prescale film is a pressure-sensitive medium which produces a characteristic pink stain on the application of pressure. Up to a saturation level, increases in pressure will produce a denser stain, thereby providing a method of determining pressures within the interface between two articulating surfaces. The relationship between the magnitude of applied pressure and the optical density of the resulting stain is non-linear; this relationship also varies with ambient temperature and humidity, in addition to load rate, and therefore requires a calibration procedure prior to use. The use of Fuji prescale film for recording interface pressures within the joint space in vivo has been widely reported; however, the object of this study was to assess the effects of sterilizing this medium, with a view to future in vivo applications. Samples of Fuji film were sterilized using a standard ethylene oxide (ETO) gas process and their subsequent pressure-recording properties were compared to a control group of samples. The 'optical-density vs pressure' relationship for the sterilized group was significantly different from that of the control group (paired Student's t-test, P < = 0.001); however, both groups provided reliable data across the same pressure-range and both exhibited an excellent degree of repeatability (coefficient of variation < 2.5%). It was concluded that Fuji film will continue to produce pressure-stains following ETO sterilization; however, the calibration of this film will only be valid if it is conducted using film from the sterilized group. PMID:7858782

  16. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  17. High blood pressure and visual sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Alvin; Samples, John R.

    2003-09-01

    The study had two main purposes: (1) to determine whether the foveal visual sensitivities of people treated for high blood pressure (vascular hypertension) differ from the sensitivities of people who have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure and (2) to understand how visual adaptation is related to standard measures of systemic cardiovascular function. Two groups of middle-aged subjects-hypertensive and normotensive-were examined with a series of test/background stimulus combinations. All subjects met rigorous inclusion criteria for excellent ocular health. Although the visual sensitivities of the two subject groups overlapped extensively, the age-related rate of sensitivity loss was, for some measures, greater for the hypertensive subjects, possibly because of adaptation differences between the two groups. Overall, the degree of steady-state sensitivity loss resulting from an increase of background illuminance (for 580-nm backgrounds) was slightly less for the hypertensive subjects. Among normotensive subjects, the ability of a bright (3.8-log-td), long-wavelength (640-nm) adapting background to selectively suppress the flicker response of long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cones was related inversely to the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure to heart rate. The degree of selective suppression was also related to heart rate alone, and there was evidence that short-term changes of cardiovascular response were important. The results suggest that (1) vascular hypertension, or possibly its treatment, subtly affects visual function even in the absence of eye disease and (2) changes in blood flow affect retinal light-adaptation processes involved in the selective suppression of the flicker response from LWS cones caused by bright, long-wavelength backgrounds.

  18. Blade Tip Pressure Measurements Using Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Oliver D.; Watkins, Anthony Neal; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, James; Forlines, Alan; Goss, Larry; Gregory, James W.; Juliano, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of pressure sensitive paint using laser-based excitation for measurement of the upper surface pressure distribution on the tips of rotor blades in hover and simulated forward flight. The testing was conducted in the Rotor Test Cell and the 14- by 22-ft Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center on the General Rotor Model System (GRMS) test stand. The Mach-scaled rotor contained three chordwise rows of dynamic pressure transducers for comparison with PSP measurements. The rotor had an 11 ft 1 in. diameter, 5.45 in. main chord and a swept, tapered tip. Three thrust conditions were examined in hover, C(sub T) = 0.004, 0.006 and 0.008. In forward flight, an additional thrust condition, C(sub T) = 0.010 was also examined. All four thrust conditions in forward flight were conducted at an advance ratio of 0.35.

  19. Prestress and Adhesion Site Dynamics Control Cell Sensitivity to Extracellular Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Féréol, S.; Fodil, R.; Laurent, V.M.; Balland, M.; Louis, B.; Pelle, G.; Hénon, S.; Planus, E.; Isabey, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at improving the understanding of mechanisms responsible for cell sensitivity to extracellular environment. We explain how substrate mechanical properties can modulate the force regulation of cell sensitive elements primarily adhesion sites. We present a theoretical and experimental comparison between two radically different approaches of the force regulation of adhesion sites that depends on their either stationary or dynamic behavior. The most classical stationary model fails to predict cell sensitivity to substrate stiffness whereas the dynamic model predicts extracellular stiffness dependence. This is due to a time dependent reaction force in response to actomyosin traction force exerted on cell sensitive elements. We purposely used two cellular models, i.e., alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages exhibiting respectively stationary and dynamic adhesion sites, and compared their sensitivity to theoretical predictions. Mechanical and structural results show that alveolar epithelial cells exhibit significant prestress supported by evident stress fibers and lacks sensitivity to substrate stiffness. On the other hand, alveolar macrophages exhibit low prestress and exhibit sensitivity to substrate stiffness. Altogether, theory and experiments consistently show that adhesion site dynamics and cytoskeleton prestress control cell sensitivity to extracellular environment with an optimal sensitivity expected in the intermediate range. PMID:19254561

  20. Pressure Sensitive Insulated Gate Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suminto, James Tjan-Meng

    A pressure sensitive insulated gate field effect transistor has been developed. The device is an elevated gate field-effect-transistor. It consists of a p-type silicon substrate in which two n^+ region, the source and drain, are formed. The gate electrode is a metal film sandwiched in an insulated micro-diaphragm resembling a pill-box which covers the gate oxide, drain, and source. The space between the gate electrode and the oxide is vacuum or an air-gap. When pressure is applied on the diaphragm it deflects and causes a change in the gate capacitance, and thus modulates the conductance of the channel between source and drain. A general theory dealing with the characteristic of this pressure sensitive insulated gate field effect transistor has been derived, and the device fabricated. The fabrication process utilizes the standard integrated circuit fabrication method. It features a batch fabrication of field effect devices followed by the batch fabrication of the deposited diaphragm on top of each field effect device. The keys steps of the diaphragm fabrication are the formation of spacer layer, formation of the diaphragm layer, and the subsequent removal of the spacer layer. The chip size of the device is 600 μm x 1050 mum. The diaphragm size is 200 μm x 200 mum. Characterization of the device has been performed. The current-voltage characteristics with pressure as parameters have been demonstrated and the current-pressure transfer curves obtained. They show non-linear characteristics as those of conventional capacitive pressure sensors. The linearity of threshold voltage versus pressure transfer curves has been demonstrated. The temperature effect on the device performances has been tested. The temperature coefficient of threshold voltage, rather than the electron mobility, has dominated the temperature coefficient of the device. Two temperature compensation schemes have been tested: one method is by connecting two identical PSIGFET in a differential amplifier

  1. Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.

    2004-01-01

    Preparation and performance of a water-based pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is described. A water emulsion of an oxygen permeable polymer and a platinum porphyrin type luminescent compound were dispersed in a water matrix to produce a PSP that performs well without the use of volatile, toxic solvents. The primary advantages of this PSP are reduced contamination of wind tunnels in which it is used, lower health risk to its users, and easier cleanup and disposal. This also represents a cost reduction by eliminating the need for elaborate ventilation and user protection during application. The water-based PSP described has all the characteristics associated with water-based paints (low toxicity, very low volatile organic chemicals, and easy water cleanup) but also has high performance as a global pressure sensor for PSP measurements in wind tunnels. The use of a water-based PSP virtually eliminates the toxic fumes associated with the application of PSPs to a model in wind tunnels.

  2. Frequency Response of Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, Neal A.; Carroll, Bruce F.; Setzer, Fred M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental method for measuring the frequency response of Pressure Sensitive Paints (PSP) is presented. These results lead to the development of a dynamic correction technique for PSP measurements which is of great importance to the advancement of PSP as a measurement technique. The ability to design such a dynamic corrector is most easily formed from the frequency response of the given system. An example of this correction technique is shown. In addition to the experimental data, an analytical model for the frequency response is developed from the one dimensional mass diffusion equation.

  3. Effect of different adhesive strategies on the post-operative sensitivity of class I composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Yildiz, Esra; Bayrak, Isil; Ozel, Sevda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the post-operative sensitivity of occlusal restorations using different dentin adhesives performed by an undergraduate and a post-doctorate dentist. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight molar occlusal restorations were placed in 39 patients (ages between 18 and 30) using 3 different kind of adhesive systems; Optibond FL (OBF), Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), and iBond (IB) by a post-doctorate dentist or a fifth-year dental student according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Post-operative sensitivity to cold and air was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) after 24 hours, 30, 90, and 180 days. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and Friedman tests (P < 0.05). Results: Post-operative sensitivity scores for OBF and CPB were higher for the dental student (P < 0.05), while IB scores did not differ statistical significantly according to the operator (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Operator skill and experience appears to play a role in determining the outcome of post-operative sensitivity of multi-step adhesive systems although the post-operative sensitivity was low. It is suggested that the less experienced clinicians (rather than experienced clinicians) should better use the self-etching dentin bonding systems with reduced application steps to minimize the potential risk of post-operative sensitivity of dental adhesives. PMID:24966741

  4. Effects of a Temperature-Sensitive, Anti-Adhesive Agent on the Reduction of Adhesion in a Rabbit Laminectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Woo; Cho, Tae Koo; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ryu, Je Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective A common cause of failure in laminectomy surgery is when epidural, peridural, or perineural adhesion occurs postoperatively. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of a temperature-sensitive, anti-adhesive agent (TSAA agent), Guardix-SG®, as a mechanical barrier for the prevention or reduction of peridural scar adhesion in a rabbit laminectomy model. Methods Twenty-six mature rabbits were used for this study. Each rabbit underwent two separate laminectomies at lumbar vertebrae L3 and L6, left empty (the control group) and applied 2 mL of the TSAA agent (the experimental group), respectively. Invasive scar formation or inflammation after laminectomy was quantitatively evaluated by measuring the thickness of the dura, the distance from the surface of dura to the scar tissues, the number of inflammatory cells in the scar tissues at the laminectomy site, and the concentration of collagen in histological sections. Results At 6 weeks postsurgery, the dura was significantly thinner and the distance from the surface of dura to the scar tissues was greater in the experimental group than in the control group (p=0.04 and p=0.01). The number of inflammatory cells was not significantly different in the two groups (p=0.08), although the mean number of inflammatory cells was relatively lower in the experimental group than in the control group. Conclusion The current study suggests that the TSAA agent, Guardix-SG®, could be useful as an interpositional physical barrier after laminectomy for the prevention or reduction of adhesion. PMID:27226857

  5. Investigation Of Adhesion Formation In New Stainless Steel Trim Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Robert E.; Bukowski, Julia V.; Goble, William M.

    2013-04-16

    Examination of proof test data for new (not previously installed) stainless steel (SS) trim spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) reveals that adhesions form between the seat and disc in about 46% of all such SOPRV. The forces needed to overcome these adhesions can be sufficiently large to cause the SOPRV to fail its proof test (FPT) prior to installation. Furthermore, a significant percentage of SOPRV which are found to FPT are also found to ''fail to open'' (FTO) meaning they would not relief excess pressure in the event of an overpressure event. The cases where adhesions result in FTO or FPT appear to be confined to SOPRV with diameters < 1 in and set pressures < 150 psig and the FTO are estimated to occur in 0.31% to 2.00% of this subpopulation of SS trim SOPRV. The reliability and safety implications of these finding for end-users who do not perform pre-installation testing of SOPRV are discussed.

  6. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the identity prescribed in § 177.1620(a) of this chapter. (6) 4- amino]-2,6-di-tert-butylphenol (CAS...) Butanedioic acid, sulfo-1,4-di-(C9-C11 alkyl) ester, ammonium salt (also known as butanedioic acid sulfo-1,...

  7. [Allergens-induced sensitization alters airway epithelial adhesion molecules expression in mice].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Tan, Mei-Ling; Xiang, Yang; Qin, Xiao-Qun; Zhu, Li-Ming; Dai, Ai-Guo

    2015-12-25

    To explore the relationship between the epithelial adhesion molecules and immune responses of airway epithelium, we observed the expression of integrin β4 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the mice airway epithelium after sensitization with allergens. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) and then developed airway hyper-responsiveness as determined by barometric whole-body plethysmography. Both OVA and HDM sensitization led to increases of the number of peripheral leukocytes as well as inflammatory cells infiltration in lungs. OVA sensitized mice showed more severe inflammatory cells infiltration than HDM sensitized mice. Immunohistochemistry analysis of mice lung tissues revealed that sensitization with both allergens also led to a decrease of integrin β4 expression and an increase of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelia. OVA sensitized mice showed a more significant increase of ICAM-1 expression compared with HDM sensitized mice. siRNA mediated silencing of integrin β4 gene in 16HBE cells resulted in an up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression. Our results indicate a possible role of airway epithelial adhesion molecules in allergen-induced airway immune responses. PMID:26701635

  8. Durability of solvent-free one-step self-etch adhesive under simulated intrapulpal pressure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background There are different solvents presented in simplified adhesives. Bond-1 SF has been developed, which contains neither water nor organic solvents, in order to eliminate technical issues in terms of evaporation of solvents and concerns for the durability of resin-dentin bond. Thus this study was conducted to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (?TBS) of solvent-free and ethanol-based one-step self-etch adhesives to dentin under simulated intrapulpal pressure (IPP). Material and Methods Occlusal surfaces of human molars were prepared to expose mid-dentin depth. Bond-1SF Solvent-Free SE [SF] and AdperTM easy one adhesives [AE] were applied on dentin specimens. Resin composite build up was done in increments. Then specimens were stored under simulated IPP 20 mmHg, immersed in artificial saliva at 37 ºC for 24 hours (24h) and 6 months (6m). Specimens were sectioned into sticks of (1 mm²) to be tested for (?TBS) using a universal testing machine. Both fractured sections of each stick were inspected using a stereomicroscope at 40× magnification to determine the mode of failure. Data were statistically analyzed by Two-way ANOVA of Variance. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the mean ?TBS of both [SF] and [AE] adhesives at both aging periods, 24h and 6m (p< 0.1103) and (p< 0.7148) respectively. Only for [AE] there was statistical significance for aging periods (p< 0.0057*). The most represented modes of failure were adhesive failure at tooth side. Conclusions Under simulated IPP solvent-free adhesive [SF] had comparable performance as ethanol-based adhesive [AE] when bonded to dentin substrate. Key words:Bond strength, dentin, simulated intrapulpal pressure, self-etch adhesives, solvents. PMID:26535091

  9. Imaging leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium at high intraluminal pressure.

    PubMed

    Michell, Danielle L; Andrews, Karen L; Woollard, Kevin J; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, hypertension is reported to be in approximately a quarter of the population and is the leading biomedical risk factor for mortality worldwide. In the vasculature hypertension is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation leading to atherosclerosis and various disease states such as chronic kidney disease(2), stroke(3) and heart failure(4). An initial step in vascular inflammation leading to atherogenesis is the adhesion cascade which involves the rolling, tethering, adherence and subsequent transmigration of leukocytes through the endothelium. Recruitment and accumulation of leukocytes to the endothelium is mediated by an upregulation of adhesion molecules such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin as well as increases in cytokine and chemokine release and an upregulation of reactive oxygen species(5). In vitro methods such as static adhesion assays help to determine mechanisms involved in cell-to-cell adhesion as well as the analysis of cell adhesion molecules. Methods employed in previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that acute increases in pressure on the endothelium can lead to monocyte adhesion, an upregulation of adhesion molecules and inflammatory markers(6) however, similar to many in vitro assays, these findings have not been performed in real time under physiological flow conditions, nor with whole blood. Therefore, in vivo assays are increasingly utilised in animal models to demonstrate vascular inflammation and plaque development. Intravital microscopy is now widely used to assess leukocyte adhesion, rolling, migration and transmigration(7-9). When combining the effects of pressure on leukocyte to endothelial adhesion the in vivo studies are less extensive. One such study examines the real time effects of flow and shear on arterial growth and remodelling but inflammatory markers were only assessed via immunohistochemistry(10). Here we present

  10. Monitoring the Contact Stress Distribution of Gecko-Inspired Adhesives Using Mechano-Sensitive Surface Coatings.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Jens W; Xue, Longjian; Erath, Johann; Drotlef, Dirk-M; Campo, Aránzazu Del; Fery, Andreas

    2016-07-20

    The contact geometry of microstructured adhesive surfaces is of high relevance for adhesion enhancement. Theoretical considerations indicate that the stress distribution in the contact zone is crucial for the detachment mechanism, but direct experimental evidence is missing so far. In this work, we propose a method that allows, for the first time, the detection of local stresses at the contact area of biomimetic adhesive microstructures during contact formation, compression and detachment. We use a mechano-sensitive polymeric layer, which turns mechanical stresses into changes of fluorescence intensity. The biomimetic surface is brought into contact with this layer in a well-defined fashion using a microcontact printer, while the contact area is monitored with fluorescence microscopy in situ. Thus, changes in stress distribution across the contact area during compression and pull-off can be visualized with a lateral resolution of 1 μm. We apply this method to study the enhanced adhesive performance of T-shaped micropillars, compared to flat punch microstructures. We find significant differences in the stress distribution of the both differing contact geometries during pull-off. In particular, we find direct evidence for the suppression of crack nucleation at the edge of T-shaped pillars, which confirms theoretical models for the superior adhesive properties of these structures. PMID:27327111

  11. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Modification on Polyimide and Adhesive Joining with Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K. M. B.; Ernst, L. J.; Bhowmik, S.; Ajeesh, G.; Ahmed, S.; Chakraborty, D.

    2015-10-01

    This investigation highlights the effect of surface modification on polyimide by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment with different exposure time. Surface modification of polymer by plasma treatment essentially creates physical and chemical changes such as cross-linking and formation of free radicals. It also forms oxygen functionalization in the form of polar groups on polymer surface, hence improving the wetting and adhesion properties. It is observed that surface energy of the polymer increases with increasing exposure time of atmospheric pressure plasma. However, prolonged exposure time of plasma results in deterioration of the surface layer of polyimide resulting in degradation and embrittlement. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis reveal that there is a considerable morphological change on the polymer surface due to atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that the oxygen functionalities of polymer surface increases significantly when polyimide is exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma. Untreated and atmospheric pressure plasma-treated polyimide sheet are adhesive bonded by employing polyimide adhesive as well as with titanium substrate. Due to surface modification of polyimide, it is observed that there is a significant increase in lap shear tensile strength, and therefore, this technology is highly acceptable for aviation and space applications.

  12. High extracellular pressure promotes gastric cancer cell adhesion, invasion, migration and suppresses gastric cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Su, Changlei; Zhang, Bomiao; Liu, Wenzhi; Zheng, Hongqun; Sun, Lingyu; Tong, Jinxue; Wang, Tian; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Liang, Hongyan; Xue, Li; Zhang, Qifan

    2016-08-01

    Slightly increased pressure stimulates tumor cell adhesion and proliferation. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of high pressure on gene expression and the biological behavior of gastric cancer cells. After incubation for 30 min at 37˚C under ambient and increased pressure, one portion of SGC7901 cells was used for cell proliferation and apoptosis assays, cell cycle analysis, adhesion invasion or migration assays. The other portion of cells was harvested for detection of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), inhibitor of DNA binding-1 (ID1), sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and E-cadherin expression by western blotting or RT-PCR. In addition, we investigated the effects of high pressure on SGC7901 cell ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy. We found that the adhesion fold under increased pressure of 760 and 1,520 mmHg was 2.39±1.05 (P<0.05) and 2.47±0.85 (P<0.01) as compared with the control, respectively. The invasion fold was 3.42±2.06 (P<0.05) and 5.13±2.49 (P<0.01) as compared with the control, respectively. The migration was 1.65±0.20 (P<0.001) and 2.53±0.50 (P<0.001) as compared with the control, respectively. At increased pressure, MMP-2 and ID1 expression increased significantly, while the expression of SHH decreased significantly. However, we did not find significant change in proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle or ultrastructure of the SGC7901 cells under high pressure. In conclusion, high pressure promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of SGC7901 cells. Moreover, the present study suggests that the pressure-augmented invasion and migration may be related to the increase in MMP-2 expression. Moreover, high pressure may suppress SGC7901 cell differentiation, which may result from the change in SHH and ID1 expression. PMID:27278077

  13. Rotor Blade Pressure Measurement in a Rotating Machinery Using Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, S.; Liu, T.; Sullivan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure and temperature sensitive paints have been utilized for the measurement of blade surface pressure and temperature distributions in a high speed axial compressor and an Allied Signal F109 gas turbine engine. Alternate blades were painted with temperature sensitive paints and then pressure sensitive paint. This combination allows temperature distributions to be accounted for when determining the blade suction surface pressure distribution. Measurements were taken and pressure maps on the suction surface of a blade were obtained over a range of rotational speeds. Pressure maps of the suction surface show-strong shock waves at the higher speeds.

  14. Sodium-sensitivity of Blood Pressure in Chinese Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated that a reduced intake of dietary sodium lowers blood pressure. However, blood pressure reduction in response to a decrease in dietary sodium intake varies considerably among different individuals–a phenomenon described as sodium-sensitivity. The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt Sensitivity (GenSalt) study was a large family-based dietary-feeding study conducted in rural north China. This study indicated that approximately 39% of Chinese adults were sodium-sensitive. Sodium-sensitivity was more common in women and in persons who were older and had higher usual blood pressure. Sodium-sensitivity was also more common in individuals with higher responses to cold pressor test and in individuals with the metabolic syndrome. Genetic factors might play an important role in determining sodium-sensitivity in the Chinese population. A better understanding of the genetic and environmental determinants of sodium-sensitivity has important public health and clinical implications. PMID:20424958

  15. Fabrication of High Sensitivity Carbon Microcoil Pressure Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Chung; Li, Chen-Hung; Chang, Neng-Kai; Gao, Feng; Chang, Shuo-Hung

    2012-01-01

    This work demonstrates a highly sensitive pressure sensor that was fabricated using carbon microcoils (CMCs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). CMCs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using various ratios of Fe-Sn catalytic solution. The pressure sensor has a sandwiched structure, in which the as-grown CMCs were inserted between two PDMS layers. The pressure sensor exhibits piezo-resistivity changes in response to mechanical loading using a load cell system. The yields of the growth of CMCs at a catalyst proportion of Fe:Sn = 95:5 reach 95%. Experimental results show that the sensor achieves a high sensitivity of 0.93%/kPa from the CMC yield of 95%. The sensitivity of the pressure sensor increases with increasing yield of CMCs. The demonstrated pressure sensor shows the advantage of high sensitivity and is suitable for mass production. PMID:23112586

  16. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  17. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  18. Gigaseal Mechanics: Creep of the Gigaseal under the Action of Pressure, Adhesion, and Voltage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patch clamping depends on a tight seal between the cell membrane and the glass of the pipet. Why does the seal have such high electric resistance? Why does the patch adhere so strongly to the glass? Even under the action of strong hydrostatic, adhesion, and electrical forces, it creeps at a very low velocity. To explore possible explanations, we examined two physical models for the structure of the seal zone and the adhesion forces and two respective mechanisms of patch creep and electric conductivity. There is saline between the membrane and glass in the seal, and the flow of this solution under hydrostatic pressure or electroosmosis should drag a patch. There is a second possibility: the lipid core of the membrane is liquid and should be able to flow, with the inner monolayer slipping over the outer one. Both mechanisms predict the creep velocity as a function of the properties of the seal and the membrane, the pipet geometry, and the driving force. These model predictions are compared with experimental data for azolectin liposomes with added cholesterol or proteins. It turns out that to obtain experimentally observed creep velocities, a simple viscous flow in the seal zone requires ∼10 Pa·s viscosity; it is unclear what structure might provide that because that viscosity alone severely constrains the electric resistance of the gigaseal. Possibly, it is the fluid bilayer that allows the motion. The two models provide an estimate of the adhesion energy of the membrane to the glass and membrane’s electric characteristics through the comparison between the velocities of pressure-, adhesion-, and voltage-driven creep. PMID:25295693

  19. Gigaseal mechanics: creep of the gigaseal under the action of pressure, adhesion, and voltage.

    PubMed

    Slavchov, Radomir I; Nomura, Takeshi; Martinac, Boris; Sokabe, Masahiro; Sachs, Frederick

    2014-11-01

    Patch clamping depends on a tight seal between the cell membrane and the glass of the pipet. Why does the seal have such high electric resistance? Why does the patch adhere so strongly to the glass? Even under the action of strong hydrostatic, adhesion, and electrical forces, it creeps at a very low velocity. To explore possible explanations, we examined two physical models for the structure of the seal zone and the adhesion forces and two respective mechanisms of patch creep and electric conductivity. There is saline between the membrane and glass in the seal, and the flow of this solution under hydrostatic pressure or electroosmosis should drag a patch. There is a second possibility: the lipid core of the membrane is liquid and should be able to flow, with the inner monolayer slipping over the outer one. Both mechanisms predict the creep velocity as a function of the properties of the seal and the membrane, the pipet geometry, and the driving force. These model predictions are compared with experimental data for azolectin liposomes with added cholesterol or proteins. It turns out that to obtain experimentally observed creep velocities, a simple viscous flow in the seal zone requires ~10 Pa·s viscosity; it is unclear what structure might provide that because that viscosity alone severely constrains the electric resistance of the gigaseal. Possibly, it is the fluid bilayer that allows the motion. The two models provide an estimate of the adhesion energy of the membrane to the glass and membrane's electric characteristics through the comparison between the velocities of pressure-, adhesion-, and voltage-driven creep. PMID:25295693

  20. FAITH Pressure-Sensitive Paint and Surface Oil Flow Visualizations

    NASA Video Gallery

    Pressure-sensitive paint and surface oil flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the compl...

  1. Pressure Sensitivity of Streptococcal Growth in Relation to Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Robert E.; Brown, William P.; Fenn, Wallace O.

    1971-01-01

    The sensitivity of Streptococcus faecalis growth to hydrostatic pressures ranging up to 550 atm was found to depend on the source of adenosine triphosphate for growth. Barotolerance of cultures growing in a complex medium with ribose as major catabolite appeared to be determined primarily by the pressure sensitivity of ribose-degrading enzymes. Apparent activation volumes for growth were nearly identical to those for lactate production from ribose, and yield coefficients per mole of ribose degraded were relatively independent of pressure. In contrast, cultures with glucose as main catabolite were less sensitive to pressure; glycolysis was less severely restricted under high pressure than was growth, and yield coefficients declined with pressure, especially above 400 atm. Thus, two distinct types of barotolerance could be defined—one dominated by catabolic reactions and one dominated by noncatabolic reactions. The results of experiments with a series of other catabolites further supported the view that catabolic reactions can determine streptococcal barotolerance. We also found that growing, glucose-degrading cultures increased in volume under pressure in the same manner that they do at 1 atm. Thus, it appeared that the bacterium has no alternative means of carrying out glycolysis under pressure without dilatation. Also, the observation that cultures grown under pressure did not contain abnormally large or morphologically deformed cells suggested that pressure did not inhibit cell division more than cell growth. PMID:4925191

  2. Increased adhesion of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to acrylic adhesive tape for medical use by surface treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Reche, José Antonio; Pulpytel, Jérôme; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2016-08-01

    The surface properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were modified by treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet (APPJ) and the surface modifications were studied to assess its hydrophilicity and adhesion to acrylic adhesive tape intended for medical applications. Furthermore, the extent of hydrophobic recovery under different storage conditions was studied. The surface treatment of PDMS with the APPJ under optimal conditions noticeably increased the oxygen content and most of the surface silicon species were fully oxidized. A brittle silica-like layer on the outermost surface was created showing changes in topography due to the formation of grooves and cracks. A huge improvement in T-peel and the shear adhesive strength of the APPJ-treated PDMS surface/acrylic tape joints was obtained. On the other hand, the hydrophilicity of the PDMS surface increased noticeably after the APPJ treatment, but 24 h after treatment almost 80% hydrophobicity was recovered and the adhesive strength was markedly reduced with time after the APPJ treatment. However, the application of an acrylic adhesive layer on the just-APPJ-treated PDMS surface retained the adhesive strength, limiting the extent of hydrophobic recovery.

  3. Determination of impact sensitivity of materials at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L.; Pippen, D.; Stradling, J.; Whitaker, D.

    1972-01-01

    Compact device is used to determine impact sensitivity of material in static, high pressure, gaseous environment. It can also be instrumented to monitor and record pressure, temperature, and striker impact force. Device is used in conjunction with commercially available liquid oxygen impact tester which provides impact energy.

  4. Diaphragm size and sensitivity for fiber optic pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    A mechanism which leads to a significant increase in sensitivity and linear operating range in reflective type fiber optic pressure transducers with minute active dimensions is studied. A general theoretical formalism is presented which is in good agreement with the experimental data. These results are found useful in the development of small pressure sensors used in turbulent boundary layer studies and other applications.

  5. Application of Pressure Sensitive Paint in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Carbonaro, Mario; Zemsch, Stephan

    1995-01-01

    It is well known in the aerodynamic field that pressure distribution measurement over the surface of an aircraft model is a problem in experimental aerodynamics. For one thing, a continuous pressure map can not be obtained with the current experimental methods since they are discrete. Therefore, interpolation or CFD methods must be used for a more complete picture of the phenomenon under study. For this study, a new technique was investigated which would provide a continuous pressure distribution over the surface under consideration. The new method is pressure sensitive paint. When pressure sensitive paint is applied to an aerodynamic surface and placed in an operating wind-tunnel under appropriate lighting, the molecules luminesce as a function of the local pressure of oxygen over the surface of interest during aerodynamic flow. The resulting image will be brightest in the areas of low pressure (low oxygen concentration), and less intense in the areas of high pressure (where oxygen is most abundant on the surface). The objective of this investigation was to use pressure sensitive paint samples from McDonnell Douglas (MDD) for calibration purpose in order to assess the response of the paint under appropriate lighting and to use the samples over a flat plate/conical fin mounted at 75 degrees from the center of the plate in order to study the shock/boundary layer interaction at Mach 6 in the Von Karman wind-tunnel. From the result obtained it was concluded that temperature significantly affects the response of the paint and should be given the uppermost attention in the case of hypersonic flows. Also, it was found that past a certain temperature threshold, the paint intensity degradation became irreversible. The comparison between the pressure tap measurement and the pressure sensitive paint showed the right trend. However, there exists a shift when it comes to the actual value. Therefore, further investigation is under way to find the cause of the shift.

  6. Pressure sensitive multifunctional solar cells using carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somani, Prakash R.

    2010-04-01

    A unique multifunctional device combining the photovoltaic action and pressure sensitivity is demonstrated which is based on the heterojunction of n-Si and carbon nanotubes (double walled carbon nanotubes or multiwalled carbon nanotubes) and using copper phthalocyanine surface modified indium-tin-oxide electrode and shows pressure dependent photovoltaic action. The device can work as a solar cell, pressure sensor, or photovoltaic pressure sensor. Such multifunctional organic/organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells are expected to find many applications in the near future.

  7. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-21

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa(-1). The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected. PMID:25588044

  8. Pressure Sensitive Paint Applied to Flexible Models Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    One gap in current pressure-measurement technology is a high-spatial-resolution method for accurately measuring pressures on spatially and temporally varying wind-tunnel models such as Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (IADs), parachutes, and sails. Conventional pressure taps only provide sparse measurements at discrete points and are difficult to integrate with the model structure without altering structural properties. Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) provides pressure measurements with high spatial resolution, but its use has been limited to rigid or semi-rigid models. Extending the use of PSP from rigid surfaces to flexible surfaces would allow direct, high-spatial-resolution measurements of the unsteady surface pressure distribution. Once developed, this new capability will be combined with existing stereo photogrammetry methods to simultaneously measure the shape of a dynamically deforming model in a wind tunnel. Presented here are the results and methodology for using PSP on flexible surfaces.

  9. Highly sensitive flexible pressure sensors with microstructured rubber dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Stoltenberg, Randall M.; Chen, Christopher V. H.-H.; Barman, Soumendra; Muir, Beinn V. O.; Sokolov, Anatoliy N.; Reese, Colin; Bao, Zhenan

    2010-10-01

    The development of an electronic skin is critical to the realization of artificial intelligence that comes into direct contact with humans, and to biomedical applications such as prosthetic skin. To mimic the tactile sensing properties of natural skin, large arrays of pixel pressure sensors on a flexible and stretchable substrate are required. We demonstrate flexible, capacitive pressure sensors with unprecedented sensitivity and very short response times that can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas by microstructuring of thin films of the biocompatible elastomer polydimethylsiloxane. The pressure sensitivity of the microstructured films far surpassed that exhibited by unstructured elastomeric films of similar thickness, and is tunable by using different microstructures. The microstructured films were integrated into organic field-effect transistors as the dielectric layer, forming a new type of active sensor device with similarly excellent sensitivity and response times.

  10. Image measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuation by a pressure-sensitive coating on porous anodized aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, M.; Tabei, T.; Nakakita, K.; Sakaue, H.; Asai, K.

    2005-12-01

    Pressure-sensitive luminescent coating on porous anodized aluminium (AA-PSP) was applied to measure non-periodic unsteady pressure distribution on a wind-tunnel model. A high-speed digital video camera was used to capture the PSP signal. The pressure-sensitive dye was tris(4,7-diphenylphenanthroline) ruthenium(II) ([Ru(dpp)3]2+). The coating has a short response time of O(10 µs), although it exhibits temperature and humidity sensitivities. A hydrophobic coating was applied on the anodized aluminium surface to suppress the humidity sensitivity. A temperature sensitive paint was used to obtain the temperature distribution instantaneously with the pressure. The temperature data were used to correct the PSP response. An appropriate data acquisition procedure as well as digital image processing algorithm was established to compensate for the error from the temperature and humidity sensitivities. The present system was applied to measure the pressure distribution on a delta wing at a high angle of attack in transonic flow, whose flow is unsteady due to the interaction between shock waves and leading edge vortices. The non-periodic unsteady pressure distribution on the delta wing was successfully measured with the sampling rate of 1 kHz and within a few per cent error in absolute pressure level.

  11. Forced and Moment Measurements with Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) to provide aerodynamic loads measurements has been a driving force behind the development of this measurement technique. To demonstrate the suitability of PSP for this purpose, it is necessary to show that PSP-derived pressures can be accurately integrated over the model surface. This cannot be done simply by demonstrating the accuracy of PSP as compared to pressure taps. PSP errors due to misregistration or temperature sensitivity may be high near model edges, where they will have a strong effect on moment measurements, but where pressure taps are rarely installed. A more suitable technique is to compare integrated PSP data over the entire model surface with balance and/or CFD results. This paper presents results from three experiments in which integrated PSP data is compared with balance and/or CFD data. This allows the usefulness of PSP for force and moment measurements, and by implication for loads measurements, to be assessed.

  12. Enhanced sensitivity of piezoelectric pressure sensor with microstructured polydimethylsiloxane layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wook; Lee, Junwoo; Kyoung Yoo, Yong; Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Jinseok; Hoon Lee, Jeong

    2014-03-01

    Highly sensitive detection tools that measure pressure and force are essential in palpation as well as real-time pressure monitoring in biomedical applications. So far, measurement has mainly been done by force sensing resistors and field effect transistor (FET) sensors for monitoring biological pressure and force sensing. We report a pressure sensor by the combination of a piezoelectric sensor layer integrated with a microstructured Polydimethylsiloxane (μ-PDMS) layer. We propose an enhanced sensing tool to be used for analyzing gentle touches without the external voltage source that is used in FET sensors, by incorporating a microstructured PDMS layer in a piezoelectric sensor. By measuring the directly induced electrical charge from the microstructure-enhanced piezoelectric signal, we observed a 3-fold increased sensitivity in a signal response. Both fast signal relaxation from force removal and wide dynamic range from 0.23 to 10 kPa illustrate the good feasibility of the thin film piezoelectric sensor for mimicking human skin.

  13. Process Sensitivity, Performance, and Direct Verification Testing of Adhesive Locking Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.; Leatherwood, Michael D.; Montoya, Michael D.; Kato, Ken A.; Akers, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Phase I: The use of adhesive locking features or liquid locking compounds (LLCs) (e.g., Loctite) as a means of providing a secondary locking feature has been used on NASA programs since the Apollo program. In many cases Loctite was used as a last resort when (a) self-locking fasteners were no longer functioning per their respective drawing specification, (b) access was limited for removal & replacement, or (c) replacement could not be accomplished without severe impact to schedule. Long-term use of Loctite became inevitable in cases where removal and replacement of worn hardware was not cost effective and Loctite was assumed to be fully cured and working. The NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) and United Space Alliance (USA) recognized the need for more extensive testing of Loctite grades to better understand their capabilities and limitations as a secondary locking feature. These tests, identified as Phase I, were designed to identify processing sensitivities, to determine proper cure time, the correct primer to use on aerospace nutplate, insert and bolt materials such as A286 and MP35N, and the minimum amount of Loctite that is required to achieve optimum breakaway torque values. The .1900-32 was the fastener size tested, due to wide usage in the aerospace industry. Three different grades of Loctite were tested. Results indicate that, with proper controls, adhesive locking features can be successfully used in the repair of locking features and should be considered for design. Phase II: Threaded fastening systems used in aerospace programs typically have a requirement for a redundant locking feature. The primary locking method is the fastener preload and the traditional redundant locking feature is a self-locking mechanical device that may include deformed threads, non-metallic inserts, split beam features, or other methods that impede movement between threaded members. The self-locking resistance of traditional locking features can be directly verified

  14. Adhesion improvement of electroless copper plating on phenolic resin matrix composite through a tin-free sensitization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Bian, Cheng; Jing, Xinli

    2013-04-01

    In order to improve the adhesion of electroless copper plating on phenolic resin matrix composite (PRMC), a new and efficient tin-free sensitization process has been developed. Electroless copper plating could be achieved in three steps, namely: (i) chemical etching with potassium permanganate solution; (ii) sensitization and activation with glucose and silver nitrate solution respectively; and (iii) electroless copper plating. Compared with the sample sensitized with stannous chloride (SnCl2), the copper plating obtained in the tin-free process showed excellent adhesion with the PRMC substrate, but had lower plating rate and conductivity. Additionally, the morphology of the copper plating was affected by the sensitization process, and the tin-free process was conducive to the formation of the large spherical copper polycrystal. Although the process is slightly complicated, the new sensitization process is so low-cost and environment-friendly that it is of great significance and could be applied into large-scale commercial manufacturing.

  15. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment on Surface Characteristics and Adhesive Bond Quality of Peel Ply Prepared Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, Ashley C.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate if atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could modify peel ply prepared composite surfaces to create strong adhesive bonds. Two peel ply surface preparation composite systems previously shown to create weak bonds (low fracture energy and adhesion failure) that were potential candidates for plasma treatment were Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prepared with Precision Fabrics Group, Inc. (PFG) 52006 nylon peel ply and Hexcel T300/F155 CFRP prepared with PFG 60001 polyester peel ply. It was hypothesized that atmospheric pressure plasma treatment could functionalize and/or remove peel ply remnants left on the CFRP surfaces upon peel ply removal. Surface characterization measurements and double cantilever beam (DCB) testing were used to determine the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on surface characteristics and bond quality of peel ply prepared CFRP composites. Previous research showed that Toray T800/3900-2 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 52006 peel ply and bonded with Cytec MetlBond 1515-3M structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies when tested in the DCB configuration. Previous research also showed that DCB samples made of Hexcel T300/F155 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites prepared with PFG 60001 peel ply and bonded with Henkel Hysol EA 9696 structural film adhesive failed in adhesion at low fracture energies. Recent research suggested that plasma treatment could be able to activate these "un-bondable" surfaces and result in good adhesive bonds. Nylon peel ply prepared 177 °C cure and polyester peel ply prepared 127 °C cure CFRP laminates were treated with atmospheric pressure plasma after peel ply removal prior to bonding. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was capable of significantly increasing fracture energies and changing failure modes. For Toray T800/3900-2 laminates prepared with PFG 52006 and bonded with

  16. 75 FR 8114 - Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ..., 2009, the Commission established a schedule for the conduct of the review (74 FR 43155, August 26, 2009... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy AGENCY: United States International Trade...

  17. High pressure-sensitive gene expression in Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis.

    PubMed

    Vogel, R F; Pavlovic, M; Hörmann, S; Ehrmann, M A

    2005-08-01

    Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium used in food biotechnology. It is necessary to investigate many aspects of a model organism to elucidate mechanisms of stress response, to facilitate preparation, application and performance in food fermentation, to understand mechanisms of inactivation, and to identify novel tools for high pressure biotechnology. To investigate the mechanisms of the complex bacterial response to high pressure we have analyzed changes in the proteome and transcriptome by 2-D electrophoresis, and by microarrays and real time PCR, respectively. More than 16 proteins were found to be differentially expressed upon high pressure stress and were compared to those sensitive to other stresses. Except for one apparently high pressure-specific stress protein, no pressure-specific stress proteins were found, and the proteome response to pressure was found to differ from that induced by other stresses. Selected pressure-sensitive proteins were partially sequenced and their genes were identified by reverse genetics. In a transcriptome analysis of a redundancy cleared shot gun library, about 7% of the genes investigated were found to be affected. Most of them appeared to be up-regulated 2- to 4-fold and these results were confirmed by real time PCR. Gene induction was shown for some genes up-regulated at the proteome level (clpL/groEL/rbsK), while the response of others to high hydrostatic pressure at the transcriptome level seemed to differ from that observed at the proteome level. The up-regulation of selected genes supports the view that the cell tries to compensate for pressure-induced impairment of translation and membrane transport. PMID:16082466

  18. Temperature Correction of Pressure-Sensitive Paints Simplified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has become a useful tool to augment conventional pressure taps in measuring the surface pressure distribution of aerodynamic components in wind tunnel testing. Although PSP offers the advantage of nonintrusive global mapping of the surface pressure, one prominent drawback to the accuracy of this technique is the inherent temperature sensitivity of PSP's luminescent intensity. Typical aerodynamic surface PSP tests rely on the coated surface to be both spatially and temporally isothermal, along with conventional instrumentation, to yield the highest accuracy pressure mappings. In some tests, however, spatial and temporal thermal gradients are generated by the nature of the test, as in a blowing jet impinging on a surface. In these cases, high accuracy and reliable data cannot be obtained unless the temperature variations on the painted surface are accounted for. A new temperature-correction technique was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to collapse a "family" of PSP calibration curves to a single curve of intensity ratio versus pressure. This correction allows a streamlined procedure to be followed whether or not temperature information is used in the data reduction of the PSP.

  19. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Fast Pressure Sensitive Paint Data.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohd Y; Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2016-01-01

    Fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure and analyze the acoustic pressure field in a rectangular cavity. The high spatial resolution and fast frequency response of PSP effectively captures the spatial and temporal detail of surface pressure resulting in the acoustic pressure field. In this work, a high-speed camera is used to generate a continuous time record of the acoustic pressure fluctuations with PSP. Since the level of the acoustic pressure is near the resolution limit of the sensor system, advanced analysis techniques are used to extract the spatial modes of the pressure field. Both dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are compared with phase averaging for data analysis. While all three techniques effectively extract the pressure field and reduce the impact of sensor noise, DMD and POD are more robust techniques that can be applied to aperiodic or multi-frequency signals. Furthermore, DMD is better than POD at suppressing noise in particular regions of the spectrum and at effectively separating spectral energy when multiple acoustic excitation frequencies are present. PMID:27294939

  20. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Fast Pressure Sensitive Paint Data

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohd Y.; Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure and analyze the acoustic pressure field in a rectangular cavity. The high spatial resolution and fast frequency response of PSP effectively captures the spatial and temporal detail of surface pressure resulting in the acoustic pressure field. In this work, a high-speed camera is used to generate a continuous time record of the acoustic pressure fluctuations with PSP. Since the level of the acoustic pressure is near the resolution limit of the sensor system, advanced analysis techniques are used to extract the spatial modes of the pressure field. Both dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are compared with phase averaging for data analysis. While all three techniques effectively extract the pressure field and reduce the impact of sensor noise, DMD and POD are more robust techniques that can be applied to aperiodic or multi-frequency signals. Furthermore, DMD is better than POD at suppressing noise in particular regions of the spectrum and at effectively separating spectral energy when multiple acoustic excitation frequencies are present. PMID:27294939

  1. Influence of genetic variance on sodium sensitivity of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Luft, F C; Miller, J Z; Weinberger, M H; Grim, C E; Daugherty, S A; Christian, J C

    1987-02-01

    To examine the effect of genetic variance on blood pressure, sodium homeostasis, and its regulatory determinants, we studied 37 pairs of monozygotic twins and 18 pairs of dizygotic twins under conditions of volume expansion and contraction. We found that, in addition to blood pressure and body size, sodium excretion in response to provocative maneuvers, glomerular filtration rate, the renin-angiotensin system, and the sympathetic nervous system are influenced by genetic variance. To elucidate the interaction of genetic factors and an environmental influence, namely, salt intake, we restricted dietary sodium in 44 families of twin children. In addition to a modest decrease in blood pressure, we found heterogeneous responses in blood pressure indicative of sodium sensitivity and resistance which were normally distributed. Strong parent-offspring resemblances were found in baseline blood pressures which persisted when adjustments were made for age and weight. Further, mother-offspring resemblances were observed in the change in blood pressure with sodium restriction. We conclude that the control of sodium homeostasis is heritable and that the change in blood pressure with sodium restriction is familial as well. These data speak to the interaction between the genetic susceptibility to hypertension and environmental influences which may result in its expression. PMID:3553721

  2. Effect of pretreatment methods and chamber pressure on morphology, quality and adhesion of HFCVD diamond coating on cemented carbide inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, S. K.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Chattopadhyay, A. K.

    2008-04-01

    In the present investigation, diamond coating was deposited on cemented carbide substrate by hot filament chemical vapour deposition. The effect of substrate pretreatment methods and chamber pressure on morphology, quality, and adhesion of the diamond film were studied. The carbide inserts were pretreated with acid, Murakami's solution, and Murakami's solution followed by acid, respectively. The chamber pressure was set at 6.6, 13.2, 26.4, 39.6 and 66 mbar. Deposition carried out at pressure of 26.4 and 39.6 mbar on inserts pretreated with acid exhibited uniform crystal habit and provided coating-substrate adhesion adequate for machining application. Good coating morphology was obtained when deposition was done at 6.6 mbar on carbide inserts treated with Murakami's solution. Pretreatment with Murakami's solution followed by acid and deposition at 6.6 mbar also resulted in good morphology of diamond film. Indentation (Rockwell C scale) was done on diamond-coated inserts to assess coating-substrate adhesion under three loads of 294, 588 and 980 N. The diameter of the indentation crack at the coating-substrate interface was observed under SEM. The results suggested that diamond coating deposited at medium pressure of 26.4 mbar on carbide substrate treated with acid not only exhibited best morphology but also highest coating-substrate adhesion and improved machining performance.

  3. Langley 16- Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Obara, Clifford J.; Amer, Tahani R.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Carmine, Michael T.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Burkett, Cecil G.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the NASA Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) System and presents results of a test conducted June 22-23, 2000 in the tunnel to validate the PSP system. The PSP system provides global surface pressure measurements on wind tunnel models. The system was developed and installed by PSP Team personnel of the Instrumentation Systems Development Branch and the Advanced Measurement and Diagnostics Branch. A discussion of the results of the validation test follows a description of the system and a description of the test.

  4. Applying Pressure Sensitive Paint Technology to Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, Jim; Gregory, James W.

    2014-01-01

    This report will present details of a Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) system for measuring global surface pressures on rotorcrtaft blades in simulated forward flight at the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The basics of the PSP method will be discussed and the modifications that were needed to extend this technology for use on rotor blades. Results from a series of tests will also be presented as well as several areas of improvement that have been identified and are currently being developed for future testing.

  5. Imperfection sensitivity of pressured buckling of biopolymer spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Ru, C. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Imperfection sensitivity is essential for mechanical behavior of biopolymer shells [such as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and spherical viruses] characterized by high geometric heterogeneity. In this work, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is conducted based on a refined shell model recently developed for spherical biopolymer shells of high structural heterogeneity and thickness nonuniformity. The influence of related parameters (including the ratio of radius to average shell thickness, the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus, and the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness) on imperfection sensitivity is examined for pressured buckling. Our results show that the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness has a major effect on the imperfection sensitivity, while the effect of the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus is usually negligible. For example, with physically realistic parameters for typical imperfect spherical biopolymer shells, the present model predicts that actual maximum external pressure could be reduced to as low as 60% of that of a perfect UCA spherical shell or 55%-65% of that of a perfect spherical virus shell, respectively. The moderate imperfection sensitivity of spherical biopolymer shells with physically realistic imperfection is largely attributed to the fact that biopolymer shells are relatively thicker (defined by smaller radius-to-thickness ratio) and therefore practically realistic imperfection amplitude normalized by thickness is very small as compared to that of classical elastic thin shells which have much larger radius-to-thickness ratio.

  6. Promotion of adhesive penetration and resin bond strength to dentin using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Chang-Keun; Oh, Kyu-Hwan; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas (NT-APPs) have been shown to improve the bond strength of resin composites to demineralized dentin surfaces. Based on a wet-bonding philosophy, it is believed that a rewetting procedure is necessary after treatment with NT-APP because of its air-drying effect. This study investigated the effect of 'plasma-drying' on the bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive to dentin by comparison with the wet-bonding technique. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were acid-etched and divided into four groups according to the adhesion procedure: wet bonding, plasma-drying, plasma-drying/rewetting, and dry bonding. In plasma treatment groups, the demineralized dentin surfaces were treated with a plasma plume generated using a pencil-type low-power plasma torch. After the adhesion procedures, resin composite/dentin-bonded specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond-strength test. The hybrid layer formation was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The plasma-drying group presented significantly higher bond strength than the wet-bonding and dry-bonding groups. Micro-Raman spectral analysis indicated that plasma-drying improved the penetration and polymerization efficacy of the adhesive. Plasma-drying could be a promising method to control the moisture of demineralized dentin surfaces and improve the penetration of adhesive and the mechanical property of the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:26714586

  7. Polymer-Particle Pressure-Sensitive Paint with High Photostability.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yu; Uchida, Kenta; Egami, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Niimi, Tomohide

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel fast-responding and paintable pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) based on polymer particles, i.e. polymer-particle (pp-)PSP. As a fast-responding PSP, polymer-ceramic (PC-)PSP is widely studied. Since PC-PSP generally consists of titanium (IV) oxide (TiO₂) particles, a large reduction in the luminescent intensity will occur due to the photocatalytic action of TiO₂. We propose the usage of polymer particles instead of TiO₂ particles to prevent the reduction in the luminescent intensity. Here, we fabricate pp-PSP based on the polystyrene particle with a diameter of 1 μm, and investigate the pressure- and temperature-sensitives, the response time, and the photostability. The performances of pp-PSP are compared with those of PC-PSP, indicating the high photostability with the other characteristics comparable to PC-PSP. PMID:27092511

  8. A novel high-sensitivity FBG pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenhua; Fu, Tao; Leng, Jinsong

    2007-07-01

    A novel pressure sensor based on FBG is designed in this paper. Not only in normal environment, also does it accurately work in water and petrol where other conventional sensors can not work normally. In this paper, the principle of the novel sensor is introduced, and two experiments are further performed: One is keeping the sensor flatly in the gastight silo whose pressure is supplied by an air compressing engine, and the other one is keeping the sensor in liquid. The analysis of the result data demonstrates that the sensor possesses high sensitivity, high linearity, high precision and repeatability. Its experimental linearity and sensitivity approach 0.99858 and 5.35×10 -3MPa -1, respectively. It is also discussed using the sensor to measure the volume in tank.

  9. Polymer-Particle Pressure-Sensitive Paint with High Photostability

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yu; Uchida, Kenta; Egami, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Niimi, Tomohide

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel fast-responding and paintable pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) based on polymer particles, i.e. polymer-particle (pp-)PSP. As a fast-responding PSP, polymer-ceramic (PC-)PSP is widely studied. Since PC-PSP generally consists of titanium (IV) oxide (TiO2) particles, a large reduction in the luminescent intensity will occur due to the photocatalytic action of TiO2. We propose the usage of polymer particles instead of TiO2 particles to prevent the reduction in the luminescent intensity. Here, we fabricate pp-PSP based on the polystyrene particle with a diameter of 1 μm, and investigate the pressure- and temperature-sensitives, the response time, and the photostability. The performances of pp-PSP are compared with those of PC-PSP, indicating the high photostability with the other characteristics comparable to PC-PSP. PMID:27092511

  10. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor with electrodes and elastomeric interlayer containing silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Jiu, Jinting; Nogi, Masaya; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Koga, Hirotaka; He, Peng; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-02-01

    The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present study a simple printing process without complex patterning has been used for constructing the sensor, and an interlayer is employed comprising elastomeric composites filled with silver nanowires. By increasing the relative permittivity, εr, of the composite interlayer induced by compression at high nanowire concentration, it has been possible to achieve a maximum sensitivity of 5.54 kPa-1. The improvement in sensitivity did not sacrifice or undermine the other features of the sensor. Thanks to the silver nanowire electrodes, the sensor is flexible and stable after 200 cycles at a bending radius of 2 mm, and exhibits outstanding reproducibility without hysteresis under similar pressure pulses. The sensor has been readily integrated onto an adhesive bandage and has been successful in detecting human movements. In addition to measuring pressure in direct contact, non-contact pressures such as air flow can also be detected.The next-generation application of pressure sensors is gradually being extended to include electronic artificial skin (e-skin), wearable devices, humanoid robotics and smart prosthetics. In these advanced applications, high sensing capability is an essential feature for high performance. Although surface patterning treatments and some special elastomeric interlayers have been applied to improve sensitivity, the process is complex and this inevitably raises the cost and is an obstacle to large-scale production. In the present

  11. Pressure Sensitive Tape in the Manufacture of Reusable Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champneys, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    ATK Launch Systems Inc. manufactures the reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) for NASA's Space Shuttle program. They are used in pairs to launch the Space Shuttle. Pressure sensitive tape (PST) is used throughout the RSRM manufacturing process. A few PST functions are: 1) Secure labels; 2) Provide security seals; and 3) Protect tooling and flight hardware during various inert and live operations. Some of the PSTs used are: Cloth, Paper, Reinforced Teflon, Double face, Masking, and Vinyl. Factors given consideration for determining the type of tape to be used are: 1) Ability to hold fast; 2) Ability to release easily; 3) Ability to endure abuse; 4) Strength; and 5) Absence of adhesive residue after removal.

  12. Improvement of Si Adhesion and Reduction of Electron Recombination for Si Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyunwoong; Wang, Yuting; Sato, Muneharu; Uchida, Giichiro; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) based on multiple exciton generation have attracted much attention. They are capable of generating multiple electrons by single-photon absorption. Si is one of the good QD sources and its nontoxicity and abundance are advantageous for photovoltaics. In this work, Si QDs were fabricated by multihollow discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition, and they were applied to Si QD-sensitized solar cells. Their initial performance was poor because of the weak adhesion of Si and charge recombination. In this work, we solved these problems through the functionalization of Si QDs and a ZnO barrier. Functionalized Si QDs were more adsorbed on TiO2 with strengthened adhesion and the ZnO barrier prevented the contact between TiO2 and the redox electrolyte. Consequently, the improved adhesion and the reduced electron recombination led to the enhancement of overall photovoltaic characteristics.

  13. Development of a Pressure Sensitive Paint System for Measuring Global Surface Pressures on Rotorcraft Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the results from a proof of concept test to examine the feasibility of using Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) to measure global surface pressures on rotorcraft blades in hover. The test was performed using the U.S. Army 2-meter Rotor Test Stand (2MRTS) and 15% scale swept rotor blades. Data were collected from five blades using both the intensity- and lifetime-based approaches. This paper will also outline several modifications and improvements that are underway to develop a system capable of measuring pressure distributions on up to four blades simultaneously at hover and forward flight conditions.

  14. Characteristics of Pressure Sensitive Paint Intrusiveness Effects on Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani R.; Liu, Tianshu; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    One effect of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is the potential intrusiveness to the aerodynamic characteristics of the model. The paint thickness and roughness may affect the pressure distribution, and therefore, the forces and moments on the wind tunnel model. A study of these potential intrusive effects was carried out at NASA Langley Research Center where a series of wind tunnel tests were conducted using the Modem Design of Experiments (MDOE) test approach. The PSP effects on the integrated forces were measured on two different models at different test conditions in both the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at Langley. The paint effect was found to be very small over a range of Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers and angles of attack. This is due to the very low surface roughness of the painted surface. The surface roughness, after applying the NASA Langley developed PSP, was lower than that of the clean wing. However, the PSP coating had a localized effects on the pressure taps, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading.

  15. Characterization of Pressure Sensitive Paint Intrusiveness Effects on Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani R.; Liu, Tianshu; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    One effect of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is the potential intrusiveness to the aerodynamic characteristics of the model. The paint thickness and roughness may affect the pressure distribution. and therefore, the forces and moments on the wind tunnel model. A study of these potential intrusive effects was carried out at NASA Langley Research Center where a series of wind tunnel tests were conducted using the Modem Design of Experiments (MDOE) test approach. The PSP effects on the integrated forces were measured on two different models at different test conditions in both the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at Langley. The paint effect was found to be very small over a range of Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers and angles of attack. This is due to the very low surface roughness of the painted surface. The surface roughness, after applying the NASA Langley developed PSP, was lower than that of the clean wing. However, the PSP coating had a localized effects on the pressure taps, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading.

  16. Effect of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment condition on adhesion of ramie fibers to polypropylene for composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Manolache, Sorin; Qiu, Yiping; Sarmadi, Majid

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the interfacial adhesion between hydrophilic ramie fibers and hydrophobic polypropylene (PP) matrices, ramie fibers are modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with our continuous ethanol flow technique in helium environment. A central composite design of experiments with different plasma processing parameter combinations (treatment current, treatment time and ethanol flow rate) is applied to find the most influential parameter and to obtain the best modification effect. Field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) shows the roughened surfaces of ramie fibers from the treated groups due to plasma etching effect. Dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) demonstrates that the wettability of the treated fibers drastically decreases. Microbond pullout test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between treated ramie fibers and PP matrices increases significantly. Residual gas analysis (RGA) confirms the creation of ethyl groups during plasma treatment. This study shows that our continuous ethanol flow technique is effective in the plasma modification process, during which the ethanol flow rate is the most influential parameter but all parameters have simultaneous influence on plasma modification effect of ramie fibers.

  17. A highly sensitive fiber Bragg grating diaphragm pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Lubansky, Alex; Hinckley, Steven

    2015-10-01

    In this work, a novel diaphragm based pressure transducer with high sensitivity is described, including the physical design structure, in-depth analysis of optical response to changes in pressure, and a discussion of practical implementation and limitations. A flat circular rubber membrane bonded to a cylinder forms the body of the transducer. A fiber Bragg grating bonded to the center of the diaphragm structure enables the fractional change in pressure to be determined by analyzing the change in Bragg wavelength of the reflected spectra. Extensive evaluation of the physical properties and optical characteristics of the transducer has been performed through experimentation, and modeling using small deformation theory. The results show the transducer has a sensitivity of 0.116 nm/kPa, across a range of 15 kPa. Ultra-low cost interrogation of the optical signal was achieved through the use of an optically mismatched Bragg grating acting as an edge filter to convert the spectral change into an intensity change. A numerical model of the intensity based interrogation was implemented in order to validate the experimental results. Utilizing this interrogation technique and housing both the sensing and reference Bragg gratings within the main body of the transducer means it is effectively temperature insensitive and easily connected to electronic systems.

  18. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis and Stiffening

    SciTech Connect

    Rodnizki, J; Ben Aliz, Y; Grin, A; Horvitz, Z; Perry, A; Weissman, L; Davis, G Kirk; Delayen, Jean R.

    2014-12-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) design is based on a 40 MeV 5 mA light ions superconducting RF linac. Phase-I of SARAF delivers up to 2 mA CW proton beams in an energy range of 1.5 - 4.0 MeV. The maximum beam power that we have reached is 5.7 kW. Today, the main limiting factor to reach higher ion energy and beam power is related to the HWR sensitivity to the liquid helium coolant pressure fluctuations. The HWR sensitivity to helium pressure is about 60 Hz/mbar. The cavities had been designed, a decade ago, to be soft in order to enable tuning of their novel shape. However, the cavities turned out to be too soft. In this work we found that increasing the rigidity of the cavities in the vicinity of the external drift tubes may reduce the cavity sensitivity by a factor of three. A preliminary design to increase the cavity rigidity is presented.

  19. Sensitivity of Pressure Sensors Enhanced by Doping Silver Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baozhang; Xu, Chengyi; Zheng, Jianming; Xu, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a highly sensitive flexible pressure sensor based on a piezopolymer and silver nanowires (AgNWs) composite. The composite nanofiber webs are made by electrospinning mixed solutions of poly(inylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and Ag NWs in a cosolvent mixture of dimethyl formamide and acetone. The diameter of the fibers ranges from 200 nm to 500 nm, as demonstrated by SEM images. FTIR and XRD results reveal that doping Ag NWs into PVDF greatly enhances the content of β phase in PVDF. This β phase increase can be attributed to interactions between the Ag NWs and the PVDF matrix, which forces the polymer chains to be embedded into the β phase crystalline. The sensitivity of the pressure sensors agrees well with the FTIR and XRD characteristics. In our experiments, the measured sensitivity reached up to 30 pC/N for the nanofiber webs containing 1.5 wt% Ag NWs, which is close to that of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE), (77/23)]. This study may provide a new method of fabricating high performance flexible sensors at relatively low cost compared with sensors based on [P(VDF-TrFE), (77/23)]. PMID:24901980

  20. Plasma treatment of poly(dimethylsiloxane) surfaces using a compact atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge device for adhesion improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Fellype; Parada, Sergio; Moshkalev, Stanislav; Machida, Munemasa

    2016-02-01

    Results of the treatment of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces using novel atmospheric pressure pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasmas are presented. Different gases (argon, helium, nitrogen) as well as their mixtures with water vapor were compared in terms of the improvement of adhesion between two PDMS samples after processing by plasma. The plasma was characterized by optical emission spectroscopy to identify the emitting species and determine the plasma temperatures. For all the gases studied, plasma processing resulted in increase of adhesion between PDMS samples if long exposure time (larger than 150 s) is applied. However, for very short treatment times (20 plasma pulses, total processing time about 3 s) the highest efficiency was found for helium plasmas. Water contact angles at PDMS surfaces as function of plasma processing time was analyzed. Atomic force microscopy analysis was performed to show reduction in the surface roughness after plasma treatment, which is likely to be the responsible for increase of the surface contact area and thus the adhesion between two PDMS surfaces. The role of the two mechanisms in the improvement of adhesion (enhanced wettability and changes in the surface morphology), for different time scales, is discussed. Interestingly, for the minimum processing time (20 plasma pulses), the improvement in adhesion and reduction of surface roughness are observed although the changes in the water contact angle are insignificant.

  1. A Graphene-Based Resistive Pressure Sensor with Record-High Sensitivity in a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Tian, He; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Bie, Zhi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Li, Cheng; Mi, Wen-Tian; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Pressure sensors are a key component in electronic skin (e-skin) sensing systems. Most reported resistive pressure sensors have a high sensitivity at low pressures (<5 kPa) to enable ultra-sensitive detection. However, the sensitivity drops significantly at high pressures (>5 kPa), which is inadequate for practical applications. For example, actions like a gentle touch and object manipulation have pressures below 10 kPa, and 10–100 kPa, respectively. Maintaining a high sensitivity in a wide pressure range is in great demand. Here, a flexible, wide range and ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor with a foam-like structure based on laser-scribed graphene (LSG) is demonstrated. Benefitting from the large spacing between graphene layers and the unique v-shaped microstructure of the LSG, the sensitivity of the pressure sensor is as high as 0.96 kPa−1 in a wide pressure range (0 ~ 50 kPa). Considering both sensitivity and pressure sensing range, the pressure sensor developed in this work is the best among all reported pressure sensors to date. A model of the LSG pressure sensor is also established, which agrees well with the experimental results. This work indicates that laser scribed flexible graphene pressure sensors could be widely used for artificial e-skin, medical-sensing, bio-sensing and many other areas. PMID:25721159

  2. A Graphene-Based Resistive Pressure Sensor with Record-High Sensitivity in a Wide Pressure Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, He; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Bie, Zhi; Xie, Qian-Yi; Li, Cheng; Mi, Wen-Tian; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Pressure sensors are a key component in electronic skin (e-skin) sensing systems. Most reported resistive pressure sensors have a high sensitivity at low pressures (<5 kPa) to enable ultra-sensitive detection. However, the sensitivity drops significantly at high pressures (>5 kPa), which is inadequate for practical applications. For example, actions like a gentle touch and object manipulation have pressures below 10 kPa, and 10-100 kPa, respectively. Maintaining a high sensitivity in a wide pressure range is in great demand. Here, a flexible, wide range and ultra-sensitive resistive pressure sensor with a foam-like structure based on laser-scribed graphene (LSG) is demonstrated. Benefitting from the large spacing between graphene layers and the unique v-shaped microstructure of the LSG, the sensitivity of the pressure sensor is as high as 0.96 kPa-1 in a wide pressure range (0 ~ 50 kPa). Considering both sensitivity and pressure sensing range, the pressure sensor developed in this work is the best among all reported pressure sensors to date. A model of the LSG pressure sensor is also established, which agrees well with the experimental results. This work indicates that laser scribed flexible graphene pressure sensors could be widely used for artificial e-skin, medical-sensing, bio-sensing and many other areas.

  3. Nanorod-Based Fast-Response Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy; VanderWal, Randall

    2007-01-01

    forms, by use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and wet chemical processes, respectively. The rods would be coated with a PSP dye, and the resulting PSP signals would be compared with those obtained from PSP dye coats on conventional support materials. Another aspect of the proposed development would be to seek to exploit the quantum properties of nanorods of a suitable semiconductor (possibly GaN), which would be synthesized by CVD. These quantum properties of semiconductor nanorods include narrow-wavelength-band optical absorption and emission characteristics that vary with temperature. The temperature sensitivity might enable simultaneous measurement of fluctuating temperature and pressure and to provide a temperature correction for the PSP response.

  4. Detection Angle Calibration of Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Uses of the pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) techniques in areas other than external aerodynamics continue to expand. The NASA Glenn Research Center has become a leader in the application of the global technique to non-conventional aeropropulsion applications including turbomachinery testing. The use of the global PSP technique in turbomachinery applications often requires detection of the luminescent paint in confined areas. With the limited viewing usually available, highly oblique illumination and detection angles are common in the confined areas in these applications. This paper will describe the results of pressure, viewing and excitation angle dependence calibrations using three popular PSP formulations to get a better understanding of the errors associated with these non-traditional views.

  5. Vibration isolation and pressure compensation apparatus for sensitive instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averill, R. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system for attenuating the inherent vibration associated with a mechanical refrigeration unit employed to cryogenically cool sensitive instruments used in measuring chemical constituents of the atmosphere is described. A modular system including an instrument housing and a reaction bracket with a refrigerator unit floated there between comprise the instrumentation system. A pair of evacuated bellows that "float' refrigerator unit and provide pressure compensation at all levels of pressure from seal level to the vacuum of space. Vibration isolators and when needed provide additional vibration damping for the refrigerator unit. A flexible thermal strap (20 K) serves to provide essentially vibration free thermal contact between cold tip of the refrigerator unit and the instrument component mounted on the IDL mount. Another flexible strap (77 K) serves to provide vibration free thermal contact between the TDL mount thermal shroud and a thermal shroud disposed about the thermal shaft.

  6. Diffusion Time-Scale of Porous Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Teduka, Norikazu; Kameda, Masaharu; Asai, Keisuke

    2001-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is an optical pressure sensor that utilizes the oxygen quenching of luminescence. PSP measurements in unsteady aerodynamic flows require fast time response of the paint. There are two characteristic time-scales that are related to the time response of PSP. One is the luminescent lifetime representing an intrinsic physical limit for the achievable temporal resolution of PSP. Another is the time-scale of oxygen diffusion across the PSP layer. When the time-scale of oxygen diffusion is much larger than the luminescent lifetime, the time response of PSP is controlled by oxygen diffusion. In a thin homogenous polymer layer where diffusion is Fickian, the oxygen concentration 1021 can be described by the diffusion equation in one-dimension.

  7. Development of electroluminescence based pressure-sensitive paint system.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Yoshimi; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurement system based on an electroluminescence (EL) as a surface illumination. This consists of an inorganic EL as the illumination, a short-pass filter, and a platinum-porphyrin based PSP. The short-pass filter, which passes below 500 nm, was used to separate an overlay of the EL illumination and the PSP emission. The EL shows an opposite temperature dependency to that of the PSP. It gives a uniform illumination compared to that of a point illumination source such as a xenon lamp. Under atmospheric conditions, the resultant EL-PSP system reduces the temperature dependency by 54% compared to that of a conventional PSP system. An application of the EL-PSP system to a sonic jet impingement shows that the system demonstrated its reduction of the temperature dependency by 75% in a pressure measurement and reduces an image misalignment error. PMID:21280858

  8. Quantifying the Effect of Pressure Sensitive Paint On Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, T. R.; Obara, C. J.; Liu, T.

    2003-01-01

    A thin pressure sensitive paint (PSP) coating can slightly modify the overall shape of a wind-tunnel model and produce surface roughness or smoothness that does not exist on the unpainted model. These undesirable changes in model geometry may alter flow over the model, and affect the pressure distribution and aerodynamic forces and moments on the model. This study quantifies the effects of PSP on three models in low-speed, transonic and supersonic flow regimes. At a 95% confidence level, the PSP effects on the integrated forces are insignificant for a slender arrow-wing-fuselage model and delta wing model with two different paints at Mach 0.2, 1.8, and 2.16 relative to the total balance accuracy limit. The data displayed a repeatability of 2.5 drag counts, while the balance accuracy limit was about 5.5 drag counts. At transonic speeds, the paint has a localized effect at high angles of attack and has a resolvable effect on the normal force, which is significant relative to the balance accuracy limit. For low speeds, the PSP coating has a localized effect on the pressure tap measurements, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading. Moreover, the force and moment measurements had a poor precision, which precluded the ability to measure the PSP effect for this particular test.

  9. Measuring Surface Pressure on Rotating Compressor Blades Using Pressure Sensitive Paint.

    PubMed

    Pastuhoff, Markus; Tillmark, Nils; Alfredsson, P Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) was used to measure pressure on the blades of a radial compressor with a 51 mm inlet diameter rotating at speeds up to 50 krpm using the so called lifetime method. A diode laser with a scanning-mirror system was used to illuminate the paint and the luminescent lifetime was registered using a photo multiplier. With the described technique the surface-pressure fields were acquired for eight points in the compressor map, useful for general understanding of the flow field and for CFD validation. The PSP was of so called fast type, which makes it possible to observe pressure variations with frequencies up to several kHz. Through frequency spectrum analysis we were able to detect the pulsating flow frequency when the compressor was driven to surge. PMID:27005623

  10. Measuring Surface Pressure on Rotating Compressor Blades Using Pressure Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Pastuhoff, Markus; Tillmark, Nils; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) was used to measure pressure on the blades of a radial compressor with a 51 mm inlet diameter rotating at speeds up to 50 krpm using the so called lifetime method. A diode laser with a scanning-mirror system was used to illuminate the paint and the luminescent lifetime was registered using a photo multiplier. With the described technique the surface-pressure fields were acquired for eight points in the compressor map, useful for general understanding of the flow field and for CFD validation. The PSP was of so called fast type, which makes it possible to observe pressure variations with frequencies up to several kHz. Through frequency spectrum analysis we were able to detect the pulsating flow frequency when the compressor was driven to surge. PMID:27005623

  11. Pressure-Sensitive Paints Advance Rotorcraft Design Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    The rotors of certain helicopters can spin at speeds as high as 500 revolutions per minute. As the blades slice through the air, they flex, moving into the wind and back out, experiencing pressure changes on the order of thousands of times a second and even higher. All of this makes acquiring a true understanding of rotorcraft aerodynamics a difficult task. A traditional means of acquiring aerodynamic data is to conduct wind tunnel tests using a vehicle model outfitted with pressure taps and other sensors. These sensors add significant costs to wind tunnel testing while only providing measurements at discrete locations on the model's surface. In addition, standard sensor solutions do not work for pulling data from a rotor in motion. "Typical static pressure instrumentation can't handle that," explains Neal Watkins, electronics engineer in Langley Research Center s Advanced Sensing and Optical Measurement Branch. "There are dynamic pressure taps, but your costs go up by a factor of five to ten if you use those. In addition, recovery of the pressure tap readings is accomplished through slip rings, which allow only a limited amount of sensors and can require significant maintenance throughout a typical rotor test." One alternative to sensor-based wind tunnel testing is pressure sensitive paint (PSP). A coating of a specialized paint containing luminescent material is applied to the model. When exposed to an LED or laser light source, the material glows. The glowing material tends to be reactive to oxygen, explains Watkins, which causes the glow to diminish. The more oxygen that is present (or the more air present, since oxygen exists in a fixed proportion in air), the less the painted surface glows. Imaged with a camera, the areas experiencing greater air pressure show up darker than areas of less pressure. "The paint allows for a global pressure map as opposed to specific points," says Watkins. With PSP, each pixel recorded by the camera becomes an optical pressure

  12. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  13. Ultrafast pressure-sensitive paint for shock compression spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-05-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) consisting of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye in poly-methylacryate (PMMA) polymer is studied during nanosecond GPa shock compression created by km s-1 laser-launched layer plates. In contrast with conventional PSP, whose response time is limited to microseconds by diffusion of O2 in porous materials, the response time of this PSP is limited to ˜10 ns by fundamental photophysical processes. The mechanism of shock-induced PSP intensity loss is shown to be shock-enhanced intersystem crossing, which transfers some R6G population from the emissive S1 state to the dark T1 state. Simulations of dye photophysics and comparisons to experiment show that the PSP is sensitive to the complicated time-dependent density profiles produced in PMMA by different duration shocks. The risetime of the PSP response is limited by the S1 lifetime under shock compression. The fall time is limited by the T1 lifetime, which can be decreased by adding triplet quenchers. The PSP can function in two modes. When dissolved O2 (a triplet quencher) was eliminated, the fall time became relatively slow (microseconds), and the PSP sampled the peak shock pressure and held that value for a long time. When dissolved O2 was present, the intensity loss recovery became faster, so the PSP could function as a transient recorder of the shock-induced time-dependent density profile.

  14. Deformation of rock: A pressure-sensitive, dilatant material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, A.

    1991-12-01

    Permanent (plastic) deformation of rock materials in the brittle regime (cataclastic flow) is modelled here in terms of Mohr-Coulomb behaviour in which all three of the parameters cohesion, friction angle and dilation angle follow hardening (or softening) evolution laws with both plastic straining and increases in confining pressure. The physical basis for such behaviour is provided by a sequence of uniaxial shortening experiments performed by Edmond and Paterson (1972) at confining pressures up to 800 MPa on a variety of materials including Gosford sandstone and Carrara marble. These triaxial compression experiments are important for the large range of confining pressures covered, and for the careful recording of data during deformation, particularly volume change of the specimens. Both materials are pressure-sensitive and dilatant. It is therefore possible to derive from these experiments a set of material parameters which allow a preliminary description of the deformation behaviour in terms of a non-associated, Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model, thus providing the first constitutive modelling of geological materials in the brittle-ductile regime. These parameters are used as input to a finite difference, numerical code (FLAC) with the aim of investigating how closely this numerical model simulates real material behaviour upon breakdown of homogeneous deformation. The mechanical and macrostructural behaviour exhibited by the numerical model is in close agreement with the physical results in that the stress-strain curves are duplicated together with localization behaviour. The results of the modelling illustrate how the strength of the upper-crust may be described by two different but still pressure-dependent models: the linear shear stress/normal stress relationship of Amontons (that is, Byerlee's Law), and a non-linear, Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model. Both include parameters of friction and both describe brittle deformation behaviour. Consideration of the non

  15. Development of a directional sensitive pressure and shear sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Dee, Jeffrey; Ledoux, William; Sangeorzan, Bruce; Reinhall, Per G.

    2002-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a disease that impacts the lives of millions of people around the world. Lower limb complications associated with diabetes include the development of plantar ulcers that can lead to infection and subsequent amputation. Shear stress is thought to be a major contributing factor to ulcer development, but due in part to technical difficulties with transducing shear stress, there is no widely used shear measurement sensor. As such, we are currently developing a directionally sensitive pressure/shear sensor based on fiber optic technology. The pressure/shear sensor consists of an array of optical fibers lying in perpendicular rows and columns separated by elastomeric pads. A map of pressure and shear stress is constructed based on observed macro bending through the intensity attenuation from the physical deformation of two adjacent perpendicular fibers. The sensor has been shown to have low noise and responded linearly to applied loads. The smallest detectable force on each sensor element based on the current setup is ~0.1 lbs. (0.4N). The smallest area we have resolved in our mesh sensor is currently ~1 cm2.

  16. Evaluation of a new miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Haner, P.V.; Maule, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter (tag) was evaluated and field tested as a tool for determining the depths of juvenile salmonids. The tag had an effective radiated power of −19.7 decibels (1 mW reference), dimensions of 23 mm × 7 mm, and a weight of 2.2 g in air. The pulse rate of the tag increased with pressure, resulting in an expected tag life of approximately 11 d at the water surface and 7.5 d at 10.5 m. The tags were accurate to within 16 mm with 95% of observations within ±0.32 m of the true depth. The resolution of the tags was 0.2 m. Errors in indicated depth resulting from differences between the calibration and operating temperatures were minimized by means of a correction factor. Tags surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss indicated a depth 0.2 m less than the same tags in water. This difference was not affected by pressure or temperature and was rectified by adjusting data from tags in fish. A test tag in a Columbia River reservoir was detected from distances of 1,133 m at a depth of 2 m and 148 m at a depth of 14 m. Results ind

  17. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Applied to Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Aircraft icing occurs when a plane flies through a cloud of supercooled water droplets. When the droplets impinge on aircraft components, ice starts to form and accumulate. This accumulation of ice severely increases the drag and lift of the aircraft, and can ultimately lead to catastrophic failures and even loss of life. Knowledge of the air pressures on the surfaces of ice and models in wind tunnels allows researchers to better predict the effects that different icing conditions will have on the performance of real aircraft. The use of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has provided valuable information on similar problems in conventional wind tunnel testing. In NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel, Lewis researchers recently demonstrated the world s first application of PSP on actual ice formed on a wind tunnel model. This proof-of-concept test showed that a new paint formulation developed under a grant by the University of Washington adheres to both the ice shapes and cold aluminum models, provides a uniform coating that preserves the detailed ice shape structure, and responds to simulated pressure changes.

  18. The Hypersonic Lego: Getting started with Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, David; Fletcher, Doug

    2003-11-01

    Pressure Sensitive Paints (PSP) allow collection of surface pressure data simultaneously at a large number of points without the complexity of manufacturing a model with multiple taps, lines and transducers. The project reported here was to implement PSP in the von Karman Institute's (VKI's) Mach 6 hypersonic wind tunnel (H3). The goal was to demonstrate PSP on a simple geometry. The geometry employed is a blunt-faced obstruction (a LEGO) mounted on a flat plate in such a way as to create a bow shock impinging on the plate. This generates a large pressure range on a simple flat geometry. This presentation concentrates on the practical problems with the setup of PSP which are not often addressed in the existing literature and conveys the solutions employed at VKI. Subtler points having to do with optical setup and with post-processing of data have a pronounced effect on the strength and resolution of measurement and on signal to noise ratio. This paper is intended as a brief guide for others who wish to get started with PSP and to get a simple geometry running in their own facility on a base-line case.

  19. Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Shon, C. H.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, S.; Kim, G. C.; Kong, M. G.

    2009-11-01

    Increased expression of integrins and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is important for the survival, growth and metastasis of melanoma cells. Based on this well-established observation in oncology, we propose to use degradation of integrin and FAK proteins as a potential strategy for melanoma cancer therapy. A low-temperature radio-frequency atmospheric microplasma jet is used to study their effects on the adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells. Microplasma treatment is shown to (1) cause significant cell detachment from the bottom of microtiter plates coated with collagen, (2) induce the death of human melanoma cells, (3) inhibit the expression of integrin α2, integrin α4 and FAK on the cell surface and finally (4) change well-stretched actin filaments to a diffuse pattern. These results suggest that cold atmospheric pressure plasmas can strongly inhibit the adhesion of melanoma cells by reducing the activities of adhesion proteins such as integrins and FAK, key biomolecules that are known to be important in malignant transformation and acquisition of metastatic phenotypes.

  20. Anomaly of sensitivity to pressure of side-hole HB optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Jan; Mergo, Pawel; Makara, Mariusz

    1999-04-01

    The birefringence of common types of optical fibers monotonically depends on temperature and pressure. Birefringence of some types of the side-hole (SH) optical fiber change sign of pressure sensitivity with change of pressure and temperature. This paper theoretically describes these phenomena. It is a supplement to previously described method of calculation of pressure and temperature sensitivity of SH optical fiber.

  1. Effects of antioxidant supplementation on insulin sensitivity, endothelial adhesion molecules, and oxidative stress in normal-weight and overweight young adults.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Heather K; Bourguignon, Cheryl M; Weltman, Arthur L; Vincent, Kevin R; Barrett, Eugene; Innes, Karen E; Taylor, Ann G

    2009-02-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether short-term antioxidant (AOX) supplementation affects insulin sensitivity, endothelial adhesion molecule levels, and oxidative stress in overweight young adults. A randomized, double-blind, controlled study tested the effects of AOXs on measures of insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index), endothelial adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular adhesion molecule, and endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1), adiponectin, and oxidative stress (lipid hydroperoxides) in overweight and normal-weight individuals (N = 48, 18-30 years). Participants received either AOX (vitamin E, 800 IU; vitamin C, 500 mg; beta-carotene, 10 mg) or placebo for 8 weeks. The HOMA values were initially higher in the overweight subjects and were lowered with AOX by week 8 (15% reduction, P = .02). Adiponectin increased in both AOX groups. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 decreased in overweight AOX-treated groups by 6% and 13%, respectively (P < .05). Plasma lipid hydroperoxides were reduced by 0.31 and 0.70 nmol/mL in the normal-weight and overweight AOX-treated groups, respectively, by week 8 (P < .05). Antioxidant supplementation moderately lowers HOMA and endothelial adhesion molecule levels in overweight young adults. A potential mechanism to explain this finding is the reduction in oxidative stress by AOX. Long-term studies are needed to determine whether AOXs are effective in suppressing diabetes or vascular activation over time. PMID:19154960

  2. An in vitro comparison of adhesive techniques and rotary instrumentation on shear bond strength of nanocomposite with simulated pulpal pressure

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Jayshree; Sravanthi, Y

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite to tooth using different adhesive techniques and rotary instruments under simulated pulpal pressure. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molars were randomly divided into two groups of 30 samples each (group I and II), according to the adhesive technique followed (i.e. total etch and self etch groups). Each group was further divided into two sub-groups (Sub-groups A and B) of 15 samples each according to the cutting instrument (diamond abrasive or carbide burs) used. Class II cavities were made with diamond abrasive or carbide burs, and restored with nano-composite under positive intra-pulpal pressure. Shear bond strength of the specimens were recorded simultaneously. Results: After statistical evaluation using two-way ANOVA and t-test, the mean shear bond strength values of the groups are as follows: Group IA- 4.69 MPa, Group IB-6.15 MPa, Group IIA-4.3 MPa, and Group IIB-6.24 MPa. It was seen that group IIB showed highest bond strength followed by group IB. Group II A showed the least bond strength. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, diamond abrasive gave better bond strength than carbide bur with both the adhesive techniques. PMID:22025823

  3. A versatile pH sensitive chondroitin sulfate-PEG tissue adhesive and hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Strehin, Iossif; Nahas, Zayna; Arora, Karun; Nguyen, Thao; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    We developed a chondroitin sulfate-polyethylene glycol (CS-PEG) adhesive hydrogel with numerous potential biomedical applications. The carboxyl groups on chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains were functionalized with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) to yield chondroitin sulfate succinimidyl succinate (CS-NHS). Following purification, the CS-NHS molecule can react with primary amines to form amide bonds. Hence, using six arm polyethylene glycol amine PEG-(NH2)6 as a crosslinker we formed a hydrogel which was covalently bound to proteins in tissue via amide bonds. By varying the initial pH of the precursor solutions, the hydrogel stiffness, swelling properties, and kinetics of gelation could be controlled. The sealing/adhesive strength could also be modified by varying the damping and storage modulus properties of the material. The adhesive strength of the material with cartilage tissue was shown to be ten times higher than that of fibrin glue. Cells encapsulated or in direct contact with the material remained viable and metabolically active. Furthermore, CS-PEG material produced minimal inflammatory response when implanted subcutaneously in a rat model and enzymatic degradation was demonstrated in vitro. This work establishes an adhesive hydrogel derived from biological and synthetic components with potential application in wound healing and regenerative medicine. PMID:20047758

  4. Babesia bovis expresses a neutralization-sensitive antigen that contains a microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gene coding for a protein with sequence similarity to the Toxoplasma gondii micronemal 1 (MIC1) protein that contains a copy of a domain described as a sialic acid-binding micronemal adhesive repeat was identified in the Babesia bovis genome. The single copy gene, located in chromosome 3, contains...

  5. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and endothelial adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) as predictive markers for blood pressure reduction after renal sympathetic denervation.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Oliver; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Gaede, Luise; Troidl, Christian; Rixe, Johannes; Hamm, Christian; Nef, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is a treatment option for patients with resistant arterial hypertension, but in some patients it is not successful. Predictive parameters on the success of RSD remain unknown. The angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are known to be associated with endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodeling, and hypertension. We evaluated whether sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 are predictive markers for blood pressure reduction after RSD. Consecutive patients (n=55) undergoing renal denervation were included. Venous serum samples for measurement of sFlt-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were collected before and 6 months after RSD. A therapeutic response was defined as an office systolic blood pressure reduction of >10 mm Hg 6 months after RSD. A significant mean office systolic blood pressure reduction of 31.2 mm Hg was observed in 46 patients 6 months after RSD. Nine patients were classified as nonresponders, with a mean systolic blood pressure reduction of 4.6 mm Hg. At baseline, sFLT-1 levels were significantly higher in responders than in nonresponders (P<0.001) as were ICAM-1 (P<0.001) and VCAM-1 levels (P<0.01). The areas under the curve for sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were 0.82 (interquartile range, 0.718-0.921; P<0.001), 0.754 (0.654-0.854; P<0.001), and 0.684 (0.564-804; P=0.01), respectively, demonstrating prediction of an RSD response. Responders showed significantly higher serum levels of sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 at baseline compared with nonresponders. Thus, this study identified for the first time potential biomarkers with a predictive value indicating a responder or nonresponder before renal denervation. PMID:24470464

  6. Point pressure sensitivity in early stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Doty, Richard L; Gandhi, Shifa S; Osman, Allen; Hurtig, Howard I; Pawasarat, Ian; Beals, Evan; Chung, Inna; Dubroff, Jacob; Newberg, Andrew; Ying, Gui-Shang; Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E

    2015-01-01

    A number of sensory changes occur in the earliest stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), some of which precede the expression of the classic motor phenotype by years (e.g., olfactory dysfunction). Whether point pressure sensitivity (PPS), a cutaneous measure of light touch mediated by myelinated Aβ fibers, is altered in early PD is not clear. Prior studies on this point are contradictory and are based on non-forced-choice threshold tests that confound the sensitivity measure with the response criterion. While α-synuclein pathology, a defining feature of PD, is present in the skin of PD patients, it is restricted to unmyelinated nerve fibers, suggesting PPS may be spared in this disease. We determined PPS thresholds using a state-of-the-art forced-choice staircase threshold test paradigm in 29 early stage PD patients and 29 matched controls at 11 body sites: the center of the forehead and the left and right forearms, index fingers, palms, medial soles of the feet, and plantar halluces. The patients were tested, in counterbalanced sessions, both on and off dopamine-related medications (DRMs). PPS was not influenced by PD and did not correlate with DRM l-DOPA equivalents, scores on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, side of the major motor disturbances, or SPECT imaging of the striatal dopamine transporter, as measured by technetium-99m TRODAT. However, PPS thresholds were lower on the left than on the right side of the body (p=0.008) and on the upper extremities relative to the toes and feet (ps<0.0001). Positive correlations were evident among the thresholds obtained across all body sectors, even though disparate regions of the body differed in terms of absolute sensitivity. This study indicates that PPS is not influenced in early stage PD regardless of whether patients are on or off DRMs. PMID:25447476

  7. Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

  8. Pressure sensitive paint systems for pressure distribution measurements in wind tunnels and turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engler, R. H.; Klein, Chr; Trinks, O.

    2000-07-01

    We have used the pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) intensity and lifetime methods for basic research and PSP measurements in wind tunnels and turbomachines, to investigate and understand the qualitative and quantitative aerodynamic measurements mainly in transonic flow. We performed a number of investigations in different speed ranges from transonic to low-speed flow and compared them with conventional techniques like pressure taps and light sheets. The influence of errors was checked and a comparison with numerical methods performed. Various models were investigated, from the basic configuration of a double-delta-wing up to a complex Airbus A340 half model and oscillating turbine blades. Finally, two excellent PSP systems are now available to perform precise measurements and support the theory using these techniques.

  9. Adhesive-backed terminal board eliminates mounting screws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Low-profile terminal board is used in dense electronic circuits where mounting and working space is limited. The board has a thin layer of pressure-sensitive adhesive backing which eliminates the need for mounting screws.

  10. Measuring Global Surface Pressures on a Circulation Control Concept Using Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Anthony N.; Lipford, William E.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Goad, William K.

    2012-01-01

    This report will present the results obtained from the Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) technique on a circulation control concept model. This test was conducted at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center. PSP was collected on the upper wing surface while the facility was operating in cryogenic mode at 227 K (-50 oF). The test envelope for the PSP portion included Mach numbers from 0.7 to 0.8 with angle of attack varying between 0 and 8 degrees and a total pressure of approximately 168 kPa (24.4 psi), resulting in a chord Reynolds number of approximately 15 million. While the PSP results did exhibit high levels of noise in certain conditions (where the oxygen content of the flow was very small), some conditions provided good correlation between the PSP and pressure taps, showing the ability of the PSP technique. This work also served as a risk reduction opportunity for future testing in cryogenic conditions at the NTF.

  11. Oxalic acid under adhesive restorations as a means to reduce dentin sensitivity: a four-month clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Claudia; Xaus, Gloria; Leighton, Catherine; Martin, Javier; Gordan, Valeria V; Moncada, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the reduction of dentin sensitivity using an oxalate-based compound, placed under adhesive restorations, during a four-month period. One hundred three preoperatively sensitive teeth, on 36 patients aged 25-66 years (mean, 40.3±7), were included in the study. Group A (experimental) was treated with oxalic acid (BisBlock) before resin-based composite (RBC) restorations (n=52), and group B (control) was treated with distilled water before RBC restorations (n=51). The first tooth in each patient was randomly assigned to group A, and the second tooth received group B. Clinical evaluation as made by a thermal/evaporation test with an air syringe and measurement by visual analog scale (VAS) at baseline and four months after treatment. The results showed sensitivity reduction during the evaluation period (expressed in VAS values): group A, 7.6 to 0.8; group B, 7.3 to 2.6. We concluded from this study that both treatments reduced dentin sensitivity during the evaluation period, with group A showing significantly less dentin sensitivity after four months (p<0.05). PMID:21777095

  12. Current pharmaceutical design on adhesive based transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Animesh; Banerjee, Subham; Kaity, Santanu; Wong, Tin W

    2015-01-01

    Drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery matrix exploits intimate contact of the carrier with stratum corneum, the principal skin barrier to drug transport, to deliver the actives across the skin and into the systemic circulation. The main application challenges of drug-in-adhesive matrix lie in the physicochemical properties of skin varying with age, gender, ethnicity, health and environmental condition of patients. This in turn poses difficulty to design a universal formulation to meet the intended adhesiveness, drug release and drug permeation performances. This review focuses on pressure-sensitive adhesives, and their adhesiveness and drug release/permeation modulation mechanisms as a function of adhesive molecular structure and formulation attributes. It discusses approaches to modulate adhesive tackiness, strength, elasticity, hydrophilicity, molecular suspension capability and swelling capacity, which contribute to the net effect of adhesive on skin bonding, drug release and drug permeation. PMID:25925119

  13. Modeling flow in a pressure-sensitive, heterogeneous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, Donald W.; Minkoff, Susan E.

    2009-06-01

    Using an asymptotic methodology, including an expansion in inverse powers of {radical}{omega}, where {omega} is the frequency, we derive a solution for flow in a medium with pressure dependent properties. The solution is valid for a heterogeneous medium with smoothly varying properties. That is, the scale length of the heterogeneity must be significantly larger then the scale length over which the pressure increases from it initial value to its peak value. The resulting asymptotic expression is similar in form to the solution for pressure in a medium in which the flow properties are not functions of pressure. Both the expression for pseudo-phase, which is related to the 'travel time' of the transient pressure disturbance, and the expression for pressure amplitude contain modifications due to the pressure dependence of the medium. We apply the method to synthetic and observed pressure variations in a deforming medium. In the synthetic test we model one-dimensional propagation in a pressure-dependent medium. Comparisons with both an analytic self-similar solution and the results of a numerical simulation indicate general agreement. Furthermore, we are able to match pressure variations observed during a pulse test at the Coaraze Laboratory site in France.

  14. Design and Application of a High Sensitivity Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor for Low Pressure Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huiyang; Huang, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a pressure sensor for low pressure detection (0.5 kPa–40 kPa) is proposed. In one structure (No. 1), the silicon membrane is partly etched to form a crossed beam on its top for stress concentration. An aluminum layer is also deposited as part of the beam. Four piezoresistors are fabricated. Two are located at the two ends of the beam. The other two are located at the membrane periphery. Four piezoresistors connect into a Wheatstone bridge. To demonstrate the stress concentrate effect of this structure, two other structures were designed and fabricated. One is a flat membrane structure (No. 2), the other is a structure with the aluminum beam, but without etched silicon (No. 3). The measurement results of these three structures show that the No.1 structure has the highest sensitivity, which is about 3.8 times that of the No. 2 structure and 2.7 times that of the No. 3 structure. They also show that the residual stress in the beam has some backside effect on the sensor performance. PMID:26371001

  15. Design and Application of a High Sensitivity Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor for Low Pressure Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huiyang; Huang, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a pressure sensor for low pressure detection (0.5 kPa-40 kPa) is proposed. In one structure (No. 1), the silicon membrane is partly etched to form a crossed beam on its top for stress concentration. An aluminum layer is also deposited as part of the beam. Four piezoresistors are fabricated. Two are located at the two ends of the beam. The other two are located at the membrane periphery. Four piezoresistors connect into a Wheatstone bridge. To demonstrate the stress concentrate effect of this structure, two other structures were designed and fabricated. One is a flat membrane structure (No. 2), the other is a structure with the aluminum beam, but without etched silicon (No. 3). The measurement results of these three structures show that the No.1 structure has the highest sensitivity, which is about 3.8 times that of the No. 2 structure and 2.7 times that of the No. 3 structure. They also show that the residual stress in the beam has some backside effect on the sensor performance. PMID:26371001

  16. Enhancement of carbon-steel peel adhesion to rubber blend using atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kršková, Jana; Skácelová, Dana; Kováčik, Dušan; Ráhel', Jozef; Pret'o, Jozef; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The surface of carbon-steel plates was modified by non-equilibrium plasma of diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) in order to improve the adhesive properties to the NR (natural rubber) green rubber compound. The effect of different treatment times as well as different input power and frequency of supplied high voltage was investigated. The samples were characterized using contact angle and surface free energy measurement, measurement of adhesive properties, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface chemical composition was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Significant increase in wettability was observed even after 2 s of plasma exposure. The surface modification was confirmed also by peel test, where the best results were obtained for 6 s of plasma treatment. In addition the ageing effect was studied to investigate the durability of modification, which is crucial for the industrial applications. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  17. Mutation of Drosophila Focal Adhesion Kinase Induces Bang-Sensitive Behavior and Disrupts Glial Function, Axonal Conduction and Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Atsushi; Grabbe, Caroline; Lee, Jihye; Lee, Jisue; Palmer, Ruth H.; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2009-01-01

    The role of the conserved Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the development and physiological functions of the CNS has long been an area of interest among neuroscientists. In this report, we observe that Drosophila mutants lacking Fak56 exhibit a decreased life span, accompanied by a bang-sensitive phenotype, which is characterised by sensitivity to mechanical and high-frequency electrical stimulation. Fak56 mutant animals display lower thresholds and higher rates of seizures in response to electroconvulsive stimuli, and direct measurements of action potential conduction in larval segmental nerves demonstrate a slowed propagation speed and failure during high-frequency nerve stimulation. In addition, neuromuscular junctions in Fak56 mutant animals display transmission blockade during high-frequency activity as a result of action potential failure. Endogenous Fak56 protein is abundant in glial cells ensheathing the axon bundles, and structural alterations of segmental nerve bundles can be observed in mutants. Manipulation of Fak56 function specifically in glial cells also disrupts action potential conduction and neurotransmission, suggesting a glial component in the Fak56 bang-sensitive phenotype. Furthermore, we show that increased intracellular calcium levels result in the dephosphorylation of endogenous Fak56 protein in Drosophila cell lines, in parallel with our observations of highly variable synaptic potentials at a higher Ca2+ level in Fak56 mutant larvae. Together these findings suggest that modulation of Fak56 function is important for action potential propagation and Ca2+-regulated neuromuscular transmission in vivo. PMID:18540882

  18. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  19. CD44 sensitivity of platelet activation, membrane scrambling and adhesion under high arterial shear rates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guilai; Liu, Guoxing; Alzoubi, Kousi; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Walker, Britta; Münzer, Patrick; Luo, Dong; Umbach, Anja T; Elvira, Bernat; Chen, Hong; Voelkl, Jakob; Föller, Michael; Mak, Tak W; Borst, Oliver; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    CD44 is required for signalling of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an anti-apoptotic pro-inflammatory cytokine. MIF is expressed and released from blood platelets, key players in the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Nothing is known about a role of CD44 in the regulation of platelet function. The present study thus explored whether CD44 modifies degranulation (P-selectin exposure), integrin activation, caspase activity, phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface, platelet volume, Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca(2+)-activity ([Ca2+]i). Platelets from mice lacking CD44 (cd44(-/-)) were compared to platelets from corresponding wild-type mice (cd44(+/+)). In resting platelets, P-selectin abundance, α(IIb)β3 integrin activation, caspase-3 activity and phosphatidylserine exposure were negligible in both genotypes and Orai1 protein abundance, [Ca2+]i, and volume were similar in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet degranulation and α(IIb)β3 integrin activation were significantly increased by thrombin (0.02 U/ml), collagen related peptide (CRP, 2 µg/ml and Ca(2+)-store depletion with thapsigargin (1 µM), effects more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml) increased platelet [Ca2+]i, caspase-3 activity, phosphatidylserine exposure and Orai1 surface abundance, effects again significantly stronger in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin further decreased forward scatter in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets, an effect which tended to be again more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet adhesion and in vitro thrombus formation under high arterial shear rates (1,700 s(-1)) were significantly augmented in cd44(-/-) mice. In conclusion, genetic deficiency of CD44 augments activation, apoptosis and pro-thrombotic potential of platelets. PMID:26355696

  20. Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Measurements on Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John

    1999-01-01

    Luminescent molecular probes imbedded in a polymer binder form a temperature or pressure paint. On excitation by light of the proper wavelength, the luminescence, which is quenched either thermally or by oxygen, is detected by a camera or photodetector. From the detected luminescent intensity, temperature and pressure can be determined. The basic photophysics, calibration, accuracy and time response of luminescent paints is described followed by applications in wind tunnels and in rotating machinery.

  1. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of a forearm blood pressure measurement method in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Marie-Ève; Cloutier, Lyne; Poirier, Paul

    2015-04-01

    For blood pressure assessment, it has been reported that forearm blood pressure measurement appears to be as valid as an upper-arm blood pressure measurement method in individuals with severe obesity when correlated to the intra-arterial method, considered as the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for the presence of systemic hypertension in 25 severely obese patients from 352 blood pressure measurements were calculated. The sensitivity (0.98) and the positive predictive value (0.93) for hypertension on forearm blood pressure measurements are excellent, indicating that the forearm approach is a promising alternative to systemic hypertension diagnosis in severe obesity. PMID:25757220

  2. Application of the pressure sensitive paint technique to steady and unsteady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimbo, Y.; Mehta, R.; Cantwell, B.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paint is a newly-developed optical measurement technique with which one can get a continuous pressure distribution in much shorter time and lower cost than a conventional pressure tap measurement. However, most of the current pressure sensitive paint applications are restricted to steady pressure measurement at high speeds because of the small signal-to-noise ratio at low speed and a slow response to pressure changes. In the present study, three phases of work have been completed to extend the application of the pressure sensitive paint technique to low-speed testing and to investigate the applicability of the paint technique to unsteady flow. First the measurement system using a commercially available PtOEP/GP-197 pressure sensitive paint was established and applied to impinging jet measurements. An in-situ calibration using only five pressure tap data points was applied and the results showed good repeatability and good agreement with conventional pressure tap measurements on the whole painted area. The overall measurement accuracy in these experiments was found to be within 0.1 psi. The pressure sensitive paint technique was then applied to low-speed wind tunnel tests using a 60 deg delta wing model with leading edge blowing slots. The technical problems encountered in low-speed testing were resolved by using a high grade CCD camera and applying corrections to improve the measurement accuracy. Even at 35 m/s, the paint data not only agreed well with conventional pressure tap measurements but also clearly showed the suction region generated by the leading edge vortices. The vortex breakdown was also detected at alpha=30 deg. It was found that a pressure difference of 0.2 psi was required for a quantitative pressure measurement in this experiment and that temperature control or a parallel temperature measurement is necessary if thermal uniformity does not hold on the model. Finally, the pressure sensitive paint was applied to a periodically

  3. Application of the Polymer Based Pressure Sensitive Paint for Qualitative and Quantitative Flow Visualisation in a Transonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, K. H.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Kontis, K.; Qin, N.

    Surface pressure measurement by Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) becomes an active area of research in the engineering industry. Conventional pressure measurement techniques require to incoporate pressure taps within the model.

  4. Printing transferable components using microstructured elastomeric surfaces with pressure modulated reversible adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Menard, Etienne; Rogers, John A.; Kim, Seok; Carlson, Andrew

    2016-08-09

    In a method of printing a transferable component, a stamp including an elastomeric post having three-dimensional relief features protruding from a surface thereof is pressed against a component on a donor substrate with a first pressure that is sufficient to mechanically deform the relief features and a region of the post between the relief features to contact the component over a first contact area. The stamp is retracted from the donor substrate such that the component is adhered to the stamp. The stamp including the component adhered thereto is pressed against a receiving substrate with a second pressure that is less than the first pressure to contact the component over a second contact area that is smaller than the first contact area. The stamp is then retracted from the receiving substrate to delaminate the component from the stamp and print the component onto the receiving substrate. Related apparatus and stamps are also discussed.

  5. Pressure sensitivity of adiabatic shear banding in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanina, E.; Rittel, D.; Rosenberg, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a dynamic failure mode characterized by large plastic strains in a narrow localized band. ASB occurs at high strain rates (ɛ˙⩾103s-1), under adiabatic conditions leading to a significant temperature rise inside the band [H. Tresca, Annales du Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers 4, (1879); Y. L. Bai and B. Dodd, Adiabatic Shear Localization-Occurrence, Theories, and Applications (Pergamon, Oxford, 1992); M. A. Meyers, Dynamic Behavior of Materials (Wiley, New York, 1994).; and J. J. Lewandowski and L. M. Greer, Nat. Mater. 5, 15 (2006)]. Large hydrostatic pressures are experienced in many dynamic applications involving ASB formation (e.g., ballistic penetration, impact, and machining). The relationship between hydrostatic pressure and ASB development remains an open question, although its importance has been often noted. This letter reports original experimental results indicating a linear relationship between the (normalized) dynamic deformation energy and the (normalized) hydrostatic pressure.

  6. Visualization of turbulent wedges under favorable pressure gradients using shear-sensitive and temperature-sensitive liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tze-Pei; Zhong, Shan; Hodson, Howard P

    2002-10-01

    Turbulent wedges induced by a three-dimensional surface roughness placed on a flat plate were studied using both shear sensitive and temperature sensitive liquid crystals, respectively denoted by SSLC and TSLC. The experiments were carried out at a free-stream velocity of 28 m/sec at three different favorable pressure gradients. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the spreading angles of the turbulent wedges, as indicated by their associated surface shear stresses and heat transfer characteristics, and to obtain more insight about the behavior of transitional momentum and thermal boundary layers when a streamwise pressure gradient exists. It was shown that under a zero pressure gradient the spreading angles indicated by the two types of liquid crystals are the same, but the difference increases as the level of the favorable pressure gradient increases. The result from the present study is important for modelling the transition of thermal boundary layers over gas turbine blades. PMID:12496003

  7. Variable high pressure processing sensitivities for GII human noroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne diseases worldwide. High pressure processing (HPP) is one of the most promising non-thermal technologies for decontamination of viral pathogens in foods. However, the survival of HuNoVs by HPP is poorly understood because these viruses cann...

  8. Impact sensitivity of materials in contact with liquid and gaseous oxygen at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    As a result of the Apollo 13 incident, increased emphasis is being placed on materials compatibility in a high pressure GOX environment. It is known that in addition to impact sensitivity of materials, approximately adiabatic compression conditions can contrive to induce materials reactivity. Test runs at high pressure using the ABMA tester indicate the following: (1) The materials used in the tests showed an inverse relationship between thickness and impact sensitivity. (2) Several materials tested exhibited greater impact sensitivity in GOX than in LOX. (3) The impact sensitivity of the materials tested in GOX, at the pressures tested, showed enhanced impact sensitivity with higher pressure. (4) The rank ordering of the materials tested in LOX up to 1000 psia is the same as the rank ordering resulting from tests in LOX at 14.7 psia.

  9. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-06-01

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels.

  10. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  11. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Saintclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of preparing aromatic polyamide-acids for use as adhesives is described. An equimolar quantity of an aromatic dianhydride is added to a stirred solution of an aromatic diamine in a water or alcohol-miscible ether solvent to obtain a viscous polymer solution. The polymeric-acid intermediate polymer does not become insoluble but directly forms a smooth viscous polymer solution. These polyamic-acid polymers are converted, by heating in the range of 200-300 C and with pressure, to form polyimides with excellent adhesive properties.

  12. Pressure Effects on the Temperature Sensitivity of Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou

    2012-01-01

    A 3-dimensional physical model was developed to relate the wavelength shifts resulting from temperature changes of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to the thermal expansion coefficients, Young s moduli of optical fibers, and thicknesses of coating polymers. Using this model the Bragg wavelength shifts were calculated and compared with the measured wavelength shifts of FBGs with various coating thickness for a finite temperature range. There was a discrepancy between the calculated and measured wavelength shifts. This was attributed to the refractive index change of the fiber core by the thermally induced radial pressure. To further investigate the pressure effects, a small diametric load was applied to a FBG and Bragg wavelength shifts were measured over a temperature range of 4.2 to 300K.

  13. Pressure-Sensitive System for Gas-Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesaro, Richard S; Matz, Norman

    1948-01-01

    A thermodynamic relation is derived and simplified for use as a temperature-limiting control equation involving measurement of gas temperature before combustion and gas pressures before and after combustion. For critical flow in the turbine nozzles of gas-turbine engines, the control equation is further simplified to require only measurements upstream of the burner. Hypothetical control systems are discussed to illustrate application of the control equations.

  14. Acquisition of cell-adhesion capability of the surface of crosslinked albumin films irradiated with atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Iwamura, Mami; Taga, Ryosuke; Kashiwagi, Yukiyasu; Nakajima, Kota; Ogata, Yuji; Tanaka, Kenji; Tachibana, Akira; Tanabe, Toshizumi

    2016-07-01

    Crosslinked albumin films, to which L929 cells do not attach by nature, acquire the L929-cell-adhesion capability by irradiation of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) of He gas. The number of attached cells was 2.6 × 104 cells/cm2 after the APPJ irradiation for 180 s, while conventional UV photolithography, which was performed in our previous work, required 2 h to obtain the same order of magnitude of the number of attached cells. The contact angle of samples decreased steeply from 105 to 38° in the first 10 s irradiation, but decreased quite gradually from 38 to 32° with increasing irradiation time from 10 to 180 s. In contrast to the nonlinear variation in the contact angles, the number of attached cells almost linearly increased from 4.5 × 103 to 2.6 × 104 cells/cm2 with increasing treatment time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the samples indicated that hydrophilic functional groups of C–C=O gradually formed with increasing APPJ irradiation time up to 180 s. These results suggest that the cell-adhesion capability of the crosslinked albumin films is not simply explained by the decrease in contact angle but also by the formation of oxidized functional groups on the surface. The effects of UV and vacuum UV light from APPJ were negligible, which indicates that the formation of oxidized functional groups on the surface is not caused by photon-assisted surface reactions but by reactions involving chemically active species supplied from APPJ.

  15. High-sensitivity Fabry-Perot interferometric pressure sensor based on a nanothick silver diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Ren, Dongxu; Shi, Xiaolong; Li, Can; Lu, Weiwei; Lu, Lu; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2012-01-15

    We present a fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer pressure sensor based on a nanothick silver diaphragm. The sensing diaphragm, with a thickness measured in a few hundreds of nanometers, is fabricated by the electroless plating method, which provides a simple fabrication process involving a high-quality diaphragm at a low cost. The sensor exhibits a relatively linear response within the pressure variation range of 0-50 kPa, with a high pressure sensitivity of 70.5 nm/kPa. This sensor is expected to have potential applications in the field of highly sensitive pressure sensors. PMID:22854444

  16. Amine Enrichment of Thin-Film Composite Membranes via Low Pressure Plasma Polymerization for Antimicrobial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rackel; Dumée, Ludovic F; He, Li; She, Fenghua; Orbell, John D; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Duke, Mikel C

    2015-07-15

    Thin-film composite membranes, primarily based on poly(amide) (PA) semipermeable materials, are nowadays the dominant technology used in pressure driven water desalination systems. Despite offering superior water permeation and salt selectivity, their surface properties, such as their charge and roughness, cannot be extensively tuned due to the intrinsic fabrication process of the membranes by interfacial polymerization. The alteration of these properties would lead to a better control of the materials surface zeta potential, which is critical to finely tune selectivity and enhance the membrane materials stability when exposed to complex industrial waste streams. Low pressure plasma was employed to introduce amine functionalities onto the PA surface of commercially available thin-film composite (TFC) membranes. Morphological changes after plasma polymerization were analyzed by SEM and AFM, and average surface roughness decreased by 29%. Amine enrichment provided isoelectric point changes from pH 3.7 to 5.2 for 5 to 15 min of plasma polymerization time. Synchrotron FTIR mappings of the amine-modified surface indicated the addition of a discrete 60 nm film to the PA layer. Furthermore, metal affinity was confirmed by the enhanced binding of silver to the modified surface, supported by an increased antimicrobial functionality with demonstrable elimination of E. coli growth. Essential salt rejection was shown minimally compromised for faster polymerization processes. Plasma polymerization is therefore a viable route to producing functional amine enriched thin-film composite PA membrane surfaces. PMID:26083007

  17. Reverse-micelle-induced porous pressure-sensitive rubber for wearable human-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungmook; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jaemin; Choi, Suji; Lee, Jongsu; Park, Inhyuk; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2014-07-23

    A novel method to produce porous pressure-sensitive rubber is developed. For the controlled size distribution of embedded micropores, solution-based procedures using reverse micelles are adopted. The piezosensitivity of the pressure sensitive rubber is significantly increased by introducing micropores. Using this method, wearable human-machine interfaces are fabricated, which can be applied to the remote control of a robot. PMID:24827418

  18. Reinforcing element and demand sensitive pressure intensifier for sealing a well casing

    SciTech Connect

    Wambaugh, J. O.

    1985-10-08

    A reinforcing element for an elastomeric sealing element for use within a well casing and passable through production tubing is formed of two metallic plate members having a plurality of radially extending projections, and the radially extending projections are bent and joined to one another to allow the reinforcing element to be passed through production tubing. A demand sensitive pressure intensifier for use with a hydraulic fluid pump and passable through production tubing has a means for compressing hydraulic fluid to a pressure which exceeds the maximum output pressure of the pump, and the compression means is selectively actuated when the output pressure of the pump reaches a predetermined pressure value.

  19. Low-Speed Flow Studies Using the Pressure Sensitive Paint Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, O. C.; Mehta, R. D.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1998-01-01

    Optical pressure measurements have been made on a NACA 0012 airfoil coated with Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) at very low flow speeds (less than 50 m/s). Angle of attack was limited to 5 deg. for most measurements. Effects of temperature gradients and mis-registration errors on PSP response have been established and minimized. By reducing measurement error caused by these effects. PSP sensitivity has been enhanced. Acceptable aerodynamic data at flow speeds down to 20 m/s have been obtained and valid pressure paint response was observed down to 10 m/s. Measurement errors (in terms of pressure and pressure coefficient) using PSP with pressure taps as a reference are provided for the range of flow speeds from 50 m/s to 10 m/s.

  20. Ultrafast Time Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Unsteady Shock-Wave Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) is an optical pressure measurement technique widely used in aerodynamic experiments, and has been applied to unsteady shock-wave phenomena [1, 2]. However, one of the largest problems to apply PSP to high-speed and unsteady phenomena is the response time of PSP.

  1. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using conductive composite elastomers with wavy structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rujie; Zhang, Xiao-Chong; Rossiter, Jonathan; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Flexible pressure sensors are crucial components for the next generation wearable devices to monitor human physiological conditions. In this paper, we present a novel resistive pressure sensor based on hybrid composites made from carbon nanotube (CNT) for the conductive coating layer and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers as the substrate. The high sensitivity of these sensors is attributed to the change of contact resistance caused by the variation of the contact areas between the wavy film and the electrodes. Porous electrodes were designed to increase the roughness of the interfaces, thus further enhancing the pressure sensitivity. The developed device was verified through a series of tests, and the sensor exhibited a high sensitivity of 2.05 kPa-1 under a low pressure of 35.6 Pa.

  2. Effect of surfactants on pressure-sensitivity of CNT filled cement mortar composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Baoguo; Yu, Xun

    2014-11-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) were used as surfactants to disperse multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) in cement mortar and fabricate pressure-sensitive carbon nanotubes filled cement mortar composites. The pressure-sensitivity of cement mortar composites with different concentrations of MWNT and different surfactants was explored under repeated loading and impulsive loading, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the response of the electrical resistance of composites with NaDDBS to external force is more stable and sensitive than that of composites with SDS. Therefore, NaDDBS has higher efficiency than SDS for the dispersion of MWNT in cement mortar, and it is an effective surfactant for fabricating MWNT filled cement mortar composites with superior pressure-sensitivity.

  3. Effect of Temperature-Sensitive Poloxamer Solution/Gel Material on Pericardial Adhesion Prevention: Supine Rabbit Model Study Mimicking Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun; Chung, Yoon Sang; Kim, Sang Wook; Choi, Geun Joo; Kim, Beom Gyu; Park, Suk Won; Seok, Ju Won; Hong, Joonhwa

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated the mobility of a temperature-sensitive poloxamer/Alginate/CaCl2 mixture (PACM) in relation to gravity and cardiac motion and the efficacy of PACM on the prevention of pericardial adhesion in a supine rabbit model. Methods A total of 50 rabbits were randomly divided into two groups according to materials applied after epicardial abrasion: PACM and dye mixture (group PD; n = 25) and saline as the control group (group CO; n = 25). In group PD, rabbits were maintained in a supine position with appropriate sedation, and location of mixture of PACM and dye was assessed by CT scan at the immediate postoperative period and 12 hours after surgery. The grade of adhesions was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically two weeks after surgery. Results In group PD, enhancement was localized in the anterior pericardial space, where PACM and dye mixture was applied, on immediate post-surgical CT scans. However, the volume of the enhancement was significantly decreased at the anterior pericardial space 12 hours later (P < .001). Two weeks after surgery, group PD had significantly lower macroscopic adhesion score (P = .002) and fibrosis score (P = .018) than did group CO. Inflammation score and expression of anti-macrophage antibody in group PD were lower than those in group CO, although the differences were not significant. Conclusions In a supine rabbit model study, the anti-adhesion effect was maintained at the area of PACM application, although PACM shifted with gravity and heart motion. For more potent pericardial adhesion prevention, further research and development on the maintenance of anti-adhesion material position are required. PMID:26580394

  4. Flexible suspended gate organic thin-film transistors for ultra-sensitive pressure detection

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yaping; Zhang, Fengjiao; Huang, Dazhen; Gao, Xike; Di, Chong-an; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of organic devices as pressure-sensing elements in artificial intelligence and healthcare applications represents a fascinating opportunity for the next-generation electronic products. To satisfy the critical requirements of these promising applications, the low-cost construction of large-area ultra-sensitive organic pressure devices with outstanding flexibility is highly desired. Here we present flexible suspended gate organic thin-film transistors (SGOTFTs) as a model platform that enables ultra-sensitive pressure detection. More importantly, the unique device geometry of SGOTFTs allows the fine-tuning of their sensitivity by the suspended gate. An unprecedented sensitivity of 192 kPa−1, a low limit-of-detection pressure of <0.5 Pa and a short response time of 10 ms were successfully realized, allowing the real-time detection of acoustic waves. These excellent sensing properties of SGOTFTs, together with their advantages of facile large-area fabrication and versatility in detecting various pressure signals, make SGOTFTs a powerful strategy for spatial pressure mapping in practical applications. PMID:25872157

  5. Flexible suspended gate organic thin-film transistors for ultra-sensitive pressure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Yaping; Zhang, Fengjiao; Huang, Dazhen; Gao, Xike; di, Chong-An; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-03-01

    The utilization of organic devices as pressure-sensing elements in artificial intelligence and healthcare applications represents a fascinating opportunity for the next-generation electronic products. To satisfy the critical requirements of these promising applications, the low-cost construction of large-area ultra-sensitive organic pressure devices with outstanding flexibility is highly desired. Here we present flexible suspended gate organic thin-film transistors (SGOTFTs) as a model platform that enables ultra-sensitive pressure detection. More importantly, the unique device geometry of SGOTFTs allows the fine-tuning of their sensitivity by the suspended gate. An unprecedented sensitivity of 192 kPa-1, a low limit-of-detection pressure of <0.5 Pa and a short response time of 10 ms were successfully realized, allowing the real-time detection of acoustic waves. These excellent sensing properties of SGOTFTs, together with their advantages of facile large-area fabrication and versatility in detecting various pressure signals, make SGOTFTs a powerful strategy for spatial pressure mapping in practical applications.

  6. Graphene ``microdrums'' on a freestanding perforated thin membrane for high sensitivity MEMS pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiugu; Hong, Wei; Dong, Liang

    2016-03-01

    We present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) graphene-based pressure sensor realized by transferring a large area, few-layered graphene on a suspended silicon nitride thin membrane perforated by a periodic array of micro-through-holes. Each through-hole is covered by a circular drum-like graphene layer, namely a graphene ``microdrum''. The uniqueness of the sensor design is the fact that introducing the through-hole arrays into the supporting nitride membrane allows generating an increased strain in the graphene membrane over the through-hole array by local deformations of the holes under an applied differential pressure. Further reasons contributing to the increased strain in the devised sensitive membrane include larger deflection of the membrane than that of its imperforated counterpart membrane, and direct bulging of the graphene microdrum under an applied pressure. Electromechanical measurements show a gauge factor of 4.4 for the graphene membrane and a sensitivity of 2.8 × 10-5 mbar-1 for the pressure sensor with a good linearity over a wide pressure range. The present sensor outperforms most existing MEMS-based small footprint pressure sensors using graphene, silicon, and carbon nanotubes as sensitive materials, due to the high sensitivity.

  7. Graphene "microdrums" on a freestanding perforated thin membrane for high sensitivity MEMS pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiugu; Hong, Wei; Dong, Liang

    2016-04-14

    We present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) graphene-based pressure sensor realized by transferring a large area, few-layered graphene on a suspended silicon nitride thin membrane perforated by a periodic array of micro-through-holes. Each through-hole is covered by a circular drum-like graphene layer, namely a graphene "microdrum". The uniqueness of the sensor design is the fact that introducing the through-hole arrays into the supporting nitride membrane allows generating an increased strain in the graphene membrane over the through-hole array by local deformations of the holes under an applied differential pressure. Further reasons contributing to the increased strain in the devised sensitive membrane include larger deflection of the membrane than that of its imperforated counterpart membrane, and direct bulging of the graphene microdrum under an applied pressure. Electromechanical measurements show a gauge factor of 4.4 for the graphene membrane and a sensitivity of 2.8 × 10(-5) mbar(-1) for the pressure sensor with a good linearity over a wide pressure range. The present sensor outperforms most existing MEMS-based small footprint pressure sensors using graphene, silicon, and carbon nanotubes as sensitive materials, due to the high sensitivity. PMID:26988111

  8. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurements on Surfaces with Non-Uniform Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has become a useful tool to augment conventional pressure taps in measuring the surface pressure distribution of aerodynamic components in wind tunnel testing. While the PSP offers the advantage of a non-intrusive global mapping of the surface pressure, one prominent drawback to the accuracy of this technique is the inherent temperature sensitivity of the coating's luminescent intensity. A typical aerodynamic surface PSP test has relied on the coated surface to be both spatially and temporally isothermal, along with conventional instrumentation for an in situ calibration to generate the highest accuracy pressure mappings. In some tests however, spatial and temporal thermal gradients are generated by the nature of the test as in a blowing jet impinging on a surface. In these cases, the temperature variations on the painted surface must be accounted for in order to yield high accuracy and reliable data. A new temperature correction technique was developed at NASA Lewis to collapse a "family" of PSP calibration curves to a single intensity ratio versus pressure curve. This correction allows a streamlined procedure to be followed whether or not temperature information is used in the data reduction of the PSP. This paper explores the use of conventional instrumentation such as thermocouples and pressure taps along with temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) to correct for the thermal gradients that exist in aeropropulsion PSP tests. Temperature corrected PSP measurements for both a supersonic mixer ejector and jet cavity interaction tests are presented.

  9. Female SHR have greater blood pressure sensitivity and renal T cell infiltration following chronic NOS inhibition than males

    PubMed Central

    Brinson, Krystal N.; Elmarakby, Ahmed A.; Tipton, Ashlee J.; Crislip, G. Ryan; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Baban, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a critical regulator of blood pressure (BP) and inflammation, and female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have higher renal nitric oxide bioavailability than males. We hypothesize that female SHR will have a greater rise in BP and renal T cell infiltration in response to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition than males. Both male and female SHR displayed a dose-dependent increase in BP to the nonspecific NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME: 2, 5, and 7 mg·kg−1·day−1 for 4 days each); however, females exhibited a greater increase in BP than males. Treatment of male and female SHR with 7 mg·kg−1·day−1 l-NAME for 2 wk significantly increased BP in both sexes; however, prior exposure to l-NAME only increased BP sensitivity to chronic NOS inhibition in females. l-NAME-induced hypertension increased renal T cell infiltration and indices of renal injury in both sexes, yet female SHR exhibited greater increases in Th17 cells and greater decreases in regulatory T cells than males. Chronic l-NAME was also associated with larger increases in renal cortical adhesion molecule expression in female SHR. The use of triple therapy to block l-NAME-mediated increases in BP attenuated l-NAME-induced increases in renal T cell counts and normalized adhesion molecule expression in SHR, suggesting that l-NAME-induced increases in renal T cells were dependent on both increases in BP and NOS inhibition. Our data suggest that NOS is critical in the ability of SHR, females in particular, to maintain BP and limit a pro-inflammatory renal T cell profile. PMID:23883679

  10. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using a double-layered graphene structure for tactile sensing.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong-Sik; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-07-21

    In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa(-1)) and high pressure (0.039 kPa(-1)) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures. PMID:26098064

  11. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase suppresses the adverse phenotype of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells and improves endocrine response in endocrine-sensitive cells.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Stephen; Barnfather, Peter; Hayes, Edd; Bramble, Pamela; Christensen, James; Nicholson, Robert I; Barrett-Lee, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is a major clinical problem. Previous reports have demonstrated that cell models of acquired endocrine resistance have altered cell-matrix adhesion and a highly migratory phenotype, features which may impact on tumour spread in vivo. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that regulates signalling pathways central to cell adhesion, migration and survival and its expression is frequently deregulated in breast cancer. In this study, we have used the novel FAK inhibitor PF573228 to address the role of FAK in the development of endocrine resistance. Whilst total-FAK expression was similar between endocrine-sensitive and endocrine-resistant MCF7 cells, FAK phosphorylation status (Y397 or Y861) was altered in resistance. PF573228 promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Y397 but did not affect other FAK activation sites (pY407, pY576 and pY861). Endocrine-resistant cells were more sensitive to these inhibitory effects versus MCF7 (mean IC(50) for FAK pY397 inhibition: 0.43 μM, 0.05 μM and 0.13 μM for MCF7, TamR and FasR cells, respectively). Inhibition of FAK pY397 was associated with a reduction in TamR and FasR adhesion to, and migration over, matrix components. PF573228 as a single agent (0-1 μM) did not affect the growth of MCF7 cells or their endocrine-resistant counterparts. However, treatment of endocrine-sensitive cells with PF573228 and tamoxifen combined resulted in greater suppression of proliferation versus single agent treatment. Together these data suggest the importance of FAK in the process of endocrine resistance, particularly in the development of an aggressive, migratory cell phenotype and demonstrate the potential to improve endocrine response through combination treatment. PMID:20354780

  12. Characterization of pressure dynamics in an axisymmetric separating/reattaching flow using fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitter, Martin; Hara, Tatsuya; Hain, Rainer; Yorita, Daisuke; Asai, Keisuke; Kähler, Christian J.

    2012-12-01

    This collaborative work discusses the results of time-resolved pressure-sensitive paint measurements performed on a model of a generic spacecraft under sub- and transonic test conditions. It is shown that optical pressure measurements using an active layer from platinum-porphyrin complexes (PtTFPP) in combination with a polymer-ceramic base layer are able to measure dynamic flow phenomena in the trisonic wind tunnel facility up to sampling rates of 2 kHz. Low amplitude fluctuations in the order of 0.1 kPa were determined by means of this measurement technique. The buffet dynamics, as well as the spatial extent of the recirculation area in the near-wake, compare well with numerical predictions and PIV measurements. Furthermore, characteristic coherent pressure modes on the base were resolved, which were predicted by large-eddy simulations.

  13. Reliable prediction of electric spark sensitivity of nitramines: a general correlation with detonation pressure.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Pouretedal, Hamid Reza; Semnani, Abolfazl

    2009-08-15

    For nitramines, a general correlation has been introduced to predict electric spark sensitivity through detonation pressure. New method uses maximum obtainable detonation pressure as a fundamental relation so that it can be corrected for some nitramines which have some specific molecular structure. There is no need to use crystal density and heat of formation of nitramine explosives for predicting detonation pressure and electric spark sensitivity. The predicted electric spark sensitivities are compared with calculated results on the basis of quantum mechanical computations for some nitramines that latter can be applied. The root mean square (rms) deviations from experiment for new method and the predicted results of complicated quantum mechanical method are 1.18 and 3.49J, respectively. PMID:19188021

  14. Effects of inner materials on the sensitivity and phase depth of wireless inductive pressure sensors for monitoring intraocular pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Cheol-In; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Kim, Mi Jeung; Yun, Kwang-Seok; Park, Ki Ho; Kang, Ji Yoon; Lee, Soo Hyun

    2016-03-01

    In this research, we developed wireless, inductive, pressure sensors with high sensitivity and investigated the effects of the inner materials (copper or ferrite) on the performance of the sensors. The proposed sensor is comprised of two parts, i.e., the top and the bottom parts. The top part includes a micro coil and a capacitor for the wireless transfer of data, and the bottom part includes the inner materials and a thick or thin flexible membrane to induce changes in the inductance. An anchor is used to assemble the top and bottom parts. The behavior of the sensor with copper was based on the eddy current effect, and, as the pressure increased, its resonance frequency increased, while its phase depth decreased exponentially. The principle of the sensor with ferrite was related to the effective permeability between a ferrite and a coil, and its response was the opposite of that with copper, i.e., as the pressure increased, the resonance frequency decreased linearly, and the phase depth increased linearly. These different operational mechanisms can be explained by the changes in the equations of inductance presented in this paper. After characterizing four different types of inductive pressure sensors in ambient air, one type of inductive pressure sensor was used to monitor the intraocular pressure (IOP) of a rabbit's eye as a biomedical application. The results showed that, in the animal tests, the measured responsivity and sensitivity were 16.7 kHz/mmHg and 1340 ppm/mmHg, respectively. These data indicate that the proposed sensor is a good candidate for monitoring IOP.

  15. [The sensitivity of mesenchymal stromal cell subpopulations with different times of adhesion property manifestation and derived from hemopoietic organs to growth factors EGF, bFGF, and PDGF].

    PubMed

    Molchanova, E A; Bueverova, E I; Starostin, V I; Domaratskaia, E I

    2011-01-01

    The action of three growth factors (EGF, bFGF, and PDGF) on mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) subpopulations from mature bone marrow (BM) and rat embryo liver (EL) was investigated. These cells are plastic-adhesive and have different rates of adhesion (AC1-AC4 subpopulations). The efficiency of colony-formation, the size of colonies, and the number of early osteogenic progenitors with alkaline phosphatase activity in colonies and induced osteogenesis were analyzed. It was shown that EGF increased the number of bone marrow (BM) MSC colonies, but it had no influence on osteogenic differentiation. bFGF suppressed colony formation, but it stimulated both early and late stages of steogenesis. PDGF increased the size and the number of colonies in AC2 and AC3 subpopulations, but it stimulated only the ostegenesis terminal stage. The distinction between MSC subpopulations from two organs were found: MSC from EL had small osteogenic capacities and low sensitivity to grow factors; MSC from BM had no such characteristics. MSC subpopulations with different adhesion properties and from different tissues had compatible sensitivity to growth factors. Thus, these cells have no parent-progeny relationship. PMID:21506387

  16. FBG based high sensitive pressure sensor and its low-cost interrogation system with enhanced resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachava, Vengal Rao; Kamineni, Srimannarayana; Madhuvarasu, Sai Shankar; Putha, Kishore; Mamidi, Venkata Reddy

    2015-12-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) pressure sensor with high sensitivity and resolution has been designed and demonstrated. The sensor is configured by firmly fixing the FBG with a metal bellows structure. The sensor works by means of measuring the Bragg wavelength shift of the FBG with respect to pressure change. From the experimental results, the pressure sensitivity of the sensor is found to be 90.6 pm/psi, which is approximately 4000 times as that of a bare fiber Bragg grating. A very good linearity of 99.86% is observed between the Bragg wavelength of the FBG and applied pressure. The designed sensor shows good repeatability with a negligible hysteresis error of ± 0.29 psi. A low-cost interrogation system that includes a long period grating (LPG) and a photodiode (PD) accompanied with simple electronic circuitry is demonstrated for the FBG sensor, which enables the sensor to attain high resolution of up to 0.025 psi. Thermal-strain cross sensitivity of the FBG pressure sensor is compensated using a reference FBG temperature sensor. The designed sensor can be used for liquid level, specific gravity, and static/dynamic low pressure measurement applications.

  17. The Role of the Kallikrein-Kinin System Genes in the Salt Sensitivity of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dongfeng; Zhao, Qi; Kelly, Tanika N.; Hixson, James E.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jing; Li, Jianxin; Chen, Jichun; Ji, Xu; Hu, Dongsheng; Wang, Xushan; Liu, De-Pei; He, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    The current study comprehensively examined the association between common genetic variants of the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) and blood pressure salt sensitivity. A 7-day low-sodium followed by a 7-day high-sodium dietary intervention was conducted among 1,906 Han Chinese participants recruited from 2003 to 2005. Blood pressure was measured by using a random-zero sphygmomanometer through the study. A total of 205 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering 11 genes of the KKS were selected for the analyses. Genetic variants of the bradykinin receptor B2 gene (BDKRB2) and the endothelin converting enzyme 1 gene (ECE1) showed significant associations with the salt-sensitivity phenotypes even after adjustment for multiple testing. Compared with the major G allele, the BDKRB2 rs11847625 minor C allele was significantly associated with increased systolic blood pressure responses to low-sodium intervention (P = 0.0001). Furthermore, a haplotype containing allele C was associated with an increased systolic blood pressure response to high-sodium intervention (P = 0.0009). Seven highly correlated ECE1 SNPs were shown to increase the diastolic blood pressure response to low-sodium intervention (P values ranged from 0.0003 to 0.002), with 2 haplotypes containing these 7 SNPs also associated with this same phenotype (P values ranged from 0.0004 to 0.002). In summary, genetic variants of the genes involved in the regulation of KKS may contribute to the salt sensitivity of blood pressure. PMID:23035147

  18. Deployment of a Pressure Sensitive Paint System for Measuring Global Surface Pressures on Rotorcraft Blades in Simulated Forward Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley; Lipford, William E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, Jim; Forlines, Alan; Goss, Larry P.; Gregory, James W.; Juliano, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper will present details of a Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) system for measuring global surface pressures on the tips of rotorcraft blades in simulated forward flight at the 14- x 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The system was designed to use a pulsed laser as an excitation source and PSP data was collected using the lifetime-based approach. With the higher intensity of the laser, this allowed PSP images to be acquired during a single laser pulse, resulting in the collection of crisp images that can be used to determine blade pressure at a specific instant in time. This is extremely important in rotorcraft applications as the blades experience dramatically different flow fields depending on their position in the rotor disk. Testing of the system was performed using the U.S. Army General Rotor Model System equipped with four identical blades. Two of the blades were instrumented with pressure transducers to allow for comparison of the results obtained from the PSP. Preliminary results show that the PSP agrees both qualitatively and quantitatively with both the expected results as well as with the pressure taps. Several areas of improvement have been indentified and are currently being developed.

  19. Solvent-based to waterbased adhesive-coated substrate retrofit. Volume 4. Film and label manufacturing case study, Flexcon Company, Incorporated. Final report, November 1992-June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McMinn, B.W.; Snow, W.S.; Bowman, D.T.

    1995-12-01

    This volume discusses a visit to a site operated by Flexcon Company Incorporated, a pressure-sensitive adhesive coater, to collect information on the pollution prevention opportunities and barriers associated with waterbased adhesives. Chapter 2 includes the market profile and overall plant description. Chapter 3 provides a general process description. Chapter 4 discusses environmental issues associated with process conversion. Chapter 5 describes Flexcon`s waterbased adhesive formulation experience. Chapter 6 identifies the opportunities for future use waterbased and other adhesives at Flexcon.

  20. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain sensitivity and temporal summation by cuff pressure algometry: a reliability study.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Finocchietti, Sara; Handberg, Gitte; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is linked with sensitization, and standardized methods for assessment are needed. This study investigated (1) the test-retest reliability of computer-controlled cuff-pressure algometry (pain thresholds and temporal pain summation) on the arm and leg and (2) conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessed by cuff algometry. The influences of age and gender were evaluated. On 2 different days, cuff pain threshold (cPPT), cuff pain tolerance (cPTT), and temporal summation of pain (TSP) by visual analog scale scores to 10 repeated cuff stimulations at cPTT intensity, as well as pressure pain threshold with handheld pressure algometry, were assessed in 136 healthy subjects. In one session, cuff pain sensitivity was also assessed before and after cold pressor-induced CPM. Good-to-excellent intraclass correlations (0.60-0.90) were demonstrated for manual and cuff algometry, and no systematic bias between sessions was found for cPPT, cPTT, and TSP on the leg and for cPTT and TSP on the arm. Cuff pressure pain threshold and cPTT were higher in men compared with women (P < 0.05). Middle-aged subjects had higher pressure pain threshold, but lower cPPT and cPTT, compared with younger subjects (P < 0.05). Temporal summation of pain was increased in women compared with men (P < 0.05). Cuff algometry was sensitive to CPM demonstrated as increased cPPT and cPTT and reduced TSP (P < 0.05). Reliability and sensitivity of computer-controlled cuff algometry for pain assessment is comparable with manual pressure algometry and constitutes a user-independent method for assessment of pain. Difference in age-related pain sensitivity between manual and cuff algometry should be further investigated. PMID:26172551

  1. A bioinspired wet/dry microfluidic adhesive for aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Sharma, Ashutosh; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2010-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive, nonreacting and nonfouling adhesive which can perform well both in air and underwater is very desirable because of its potential applications in various settings such as biomedical, marine, and automobile. Taking a clue from nature that many natural adhesive pads have complex structures underneath the outer adhesive layer, we have prepared thin elastic adhesive films with subsurface microstructures using PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) and investigated their performance underwater. The presence of embedded structure enhances the energy of adhesion considerably both in air and underwater. Furthermore, filling the channels with liquid of suitable surface tension modifies the internal stress profile, resulting into significant enhancement in adhesive performance. As this increase in adhesion is mediated by mechanics and not by surface chemistry, the presence of water does not alter its performance much. For the same reason, this adhesion mechanism works with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The adhesive can be reused because of its elastic surface. Moreover, unlike many other present-day adhesives, its performance does not decrease with time. PMID:20038181

  2. Free-stream static pressure measurements in the Longshot hypersonic wind tunnel and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossir, Guillaume; Van Hove, Bart; Paris, Sébastien; Rambaud, Patrick; Chazot, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The performance of fast-response slender static pressure probes is evaluated in the short-duration, cold-gas, VKI Longshot hypersonic wind tunnel. Free-stream Mach numbers range between 9.5 and 12, and unit Reynolds numbers are within 3-10 × 106/m. Absolute pressure sensors are fitted within the probes, and an inexpensive calibration method, suited to low static pressure environments (200-1000 Pa), is described. Transfer functions relating the probe measurements p w to the free-stream static pressure p ∞ are established for the Longshot flow conditions based on numerical simulations. The pressure ratios p w / p ∞ are found to be close to unity for both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Weak viscous effects characterized by small viscous interaction parameters {bar{χ }}<1.5 are confirmed experimentally for probe aspect ratios of L/ D > 16.5 by installing multiple pressure sensors in a single probe. The effect of pressure orifice geometry is also evaluated experimentally and found to be negligible for either straight or chamfered holes, 0.6-1 mm in diameter. No sensitivity to probe angle of attack could be evidenced for α < 0.33°. Pressure measurements are compared to theoretical predictions assuming an isentropic nozzle flow expansion. Significant deviations from this ideal case and the Mach 14 contoured nozzle design are uncovered. Validation of the static pressure measurements is obtained by comparing shock wave locations on Schlieren photographs to numerical predictions using free-stream properties derived from the static pressure probes. While these results apply to the Longshot wind tunnel, the present methodology and sensitivity analysis can guide similar investigations for other hypersonic test facilities.

  3. A Stretchable Electronic Fabric Artificial Skin with Pressure-, Lateral Strain-, and Flexion-Sensitive Properties.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jin; Sun, Li; Zhang, Fu-Rui; Zhang, Ye; Shi, Lu-An; Zhao, Hao-Yu; Zhu, Hong-Wu; Jiang, Hai-Long; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-01-27

    A stretchable and multiple-force-sensitive electronic fabric based on stretchable coaxial sensor electrodes is fabricated for artificial-skin application. This electronic fabric, with only one kind of sensor unit, can simultaneously map and quantify the mechanical stresses induced by normal pressure, lateral strain, and flexion. PMID:26618615

  4. A nanofiber based artificial electronic skin with high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weibin; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wu, Yongzhi; Wang, Yuedan; Qing, Xing; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-16

    Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The protuberances composed of intertwined elastic POE nanofibers and PPy@PVA-co-PE nanofibers afford a tunable effective elastic modulus that is capable of capturing varied strains and stresses, thereby contributing to a high sensitivity for pressure sensing. This electronic skin-like sensor demonstrates an ultra-high sensitivity (1.24 kPa(-1)) below 150 Pa with a detection limit as low as about 1.3 Pa. The pixelated sensor array and a RGB-LED light are then assembled into a circuit and show a feasibility for visual detection of spatial pressure. Furthermore, a nanofiber based proof-of-concept wireless pressure sensor with a bluetooth module as a signal transmitter is proposed and has demonstrated great promise for wireless monitoring of human physiological signals, indicating a potential for large scale wearable electronic devices or e-skin. PMID:27250529

  5. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O2 in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments. PMID:26404294

  6. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O₂ in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments. PMID:26404294

  7. A highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive hydrogel spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Yanlong; Mulle, Matthieu; Aguilar Ventura, Isaac; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-08-01

    Wearable pressure sensing solutions have promising future for practical applications in health monitoring and human/machine interfaces. Here, a highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/alginate hydrogel spheres is reported. Conductive and piezoresistive spheres are embedded between conductive electrodes (indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate films) and subjected to environmental pressure. The detection mechanism is based on the piezoresistivity of the SWCNT/alginate conductive spheres and on the sphere-electrode contact. Step-by-step, we optimized the design parameters to maximize the sensitivity of the sensor. The optimized hydrogel sensor exhibited a satisfactory sensitivity (0.176 ΔR/R0/kPa-1) and a low detectable limit (10 Pa). Moreover, a brief response time (a few milliseconds) and successful repeatability were also demonstrated. Finally, the efficiency of this strategy was verified through a series of practical tests such as monitoring human wrist pulse, detecting throat muscle motion or identifying the location and the distribution of an external pressure using an array sensor (4 × 4).Wearable pressure sensing solutions have promising future for practical applications in health monitoring and human/machine interfaces. Here, a highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/alginate hydrogel spheres is reported. Conductive and piezoresistive spheres are embedded between conductive electrodes (indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate films) and subjected to environmental pressure. The detection mechanism is based on the piezoresistivity of the SWCNT/alginate conductive spheres and on the sphere-electrode contact. Step-by-step, we optimized the design parameters to maximize the sensitivity of the sensor. The optimized hydrogel sensor exhibited a satisfactory sensitivity (0.176 ΔR/R0/kPa-1) and a low

  8. The Design and Optimization of a Highly Sensitive and Overload-Resistant Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiawei; Zhao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    A piezoresistive pressure sensor with a beam-membrane-dual-island structure is developed for micro-pressure monitoring in the field of aviation, which requires great sensitivity and overload resistance capacity. The design, fabrication, and test of the sensor are presented in this paper. By analyzing the stress distribution of sensitive elements using the finite element method, a novel structure incorporating sensitive beams with a traditional bossed diaphragm is built up. The proposed structure proved to be advantageous in terms of high sensitivity and high overload resistance compared with the conventional bossed diaphragm and flat diaphragm structures. Curve fittings of surface stress and deflection based on ANSYS simulation results are performed to establish the sensor equations. Fabricated on an n-type single crystal silicon wafer, the sensor chips are wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB) and packaged for experiments. The static and dynamic characteristics are tested and discussed. Experimental results show that the sensor has a sensitivity as high as 17.339 μV/V/Pa in the range of 500 Pa at room temperature, and a high overload resistance of 200 times overpressure. Due to the excellent performance, the sensor can be applied in measuring micro-pressure lower than 500 Pa. PMID:27005627

  9. The Design and Optimization of a Highly Sensitive and Overload-Resistant Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiawei; Zhao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    A piezoresistive pressure sensor with a beam-membrane-dual-island structure is developed for micro-pressure monitoring in the field of aviation, which requires great sensitivity and overload resistance capacity. The design, fabrication, and test of the sensor are presented in this paper. By analyzing the stress distribution of sensitive elements using the finite element method, a novel structure incorporating sensitive beams with a traditional bossed diaphragm is built up. The proposed structure proved to be advantageous in terms of high sensitivity and high overload resistance compared with the conventional bossed diaphragm and flat diaphragm structures. Curve fittings of surface stress and deflection based on ANSYS simulation results are performed to establish the sensor equations. Fabricated on an n-type single crystal silicon wafer, the sensor chips are wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB) and packaged for experiments. The static and dynamic characteristics are tested and discussed. Experimental results show that the sensor has a sensitivity as high as 17.339 μV/V/Pa in the range of 500 Pa at room temperature, and a high overload resistance of 200 times overpressure. Due to the excellent performance, the sensor can be applied in measuring micro-pressure lower than 500 Pa. PMID:27005627

  10. Functionally Different Pads on the Same Foot Allow Control of Attachment: Stick Insects Have Load-Sensitive “Heel” Pads for Friction and Shear-Sensitive “Toe” Pads for Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Stick insects (Carausius morosus) have two distinct types of attachment pad per leg, tarsal “heel” pads (euplantulae) and a pre-tarsal “toe” pad (arolium). Here we show that these two pad types are specialised for fundamentally different functions. When standing upright, stick insects rested on their proximal euplantulae, while arolia were the only pads in surface contact when hanging upside down. Single-pad force measurements showed that the adhesion of euplantulae was extremely small, but friction forces strongly increased with normal load and coefficients of friction were 1. The pre-tarsal arolium, in contrast, generated adhesion that strongly increased with pulling forces, allowing adhesion to be activated and deactivated by shear forces, which can be produced actively, or passively as a result of the insects' sprawled posture. The shear-sensitivity of the arolium was present even when corrected for contact area, and was independent of normal preloads covering nearly an order of magnitude. Attachment of both heel and toe pads is thus activated partly by the forces that arise passively in the situations in which they are used by the insects, ensuring safe attachment. Our results suggest that stick insect euplantulae are specialised “friction pads” that produce traction when pressed against the substrate, while arolia are “true” adhesive pads that stick to the substrate when activated by pulling forces. PMID:24349156

  11. A high sensitivity pressure sensor based on two-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Shangbin; Chen, Deyuan; Wang, Juebin; Qiao, Jing; Duan, Yali

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose and simulate a pressure sensor based on two-dimensional photonic crystal with the high quality factor and sensitivity. The sensor is formed by the coupling of two photonic crystal based waveguides and one nanocavity. The photonic crystal with the triangular lattice is composed of GaAs rods. The detailed structures of the waveguides and nanocavity are optimized to achieve better quality factor and sensitivity of the sensor. For the optimized structures, the resonant wavelength of the sensor has a linear redshift as increasing the applied pressure in the range of 0-2 GPa, and the quality factor keeps unchanged nearly. The optimized quality factor is around 1500, and the sensitivity is up to 13.9 nm/GPa.

  12. Pressure- and Temperature-Sensitive Paint at 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Recently both Pressure- and Temperature-Sensitive Paint experiments were conducted at cryogenic conditions in the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. This represented a re-introduction of the techniques to the facility after more than a decade, and provided a means to upgrade the measurements using newer technology as well as demonstrate that the techniques were still viable in the facility. Temperature-Sensitive Paint was employed on a laminar airfoil for transition detection and Pressure-Sensitive Paint was employed on a supercritical airfoil. This report will detail the techniques and their unique challenges that need to be overcome in cryogenic environments. In addition, several optimization strategies will also be discussed.

  13. Use of Pressure Sensitive Paint for Diagnostics in Turbomachinery Flows With Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    The technology of pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is well established in external aerodynamics. In internal flows in narrow channels and in turbomachinery cascades, however, there are still unresolved problems. In particular, the internal flows with complex shock structures inside highly curved channels present a challenge. It is not always easy and straightforward to distinguish between true signals and "ghost" images due to multiple internal reflections in narrow channels. To address some of the problems, investigations were first carried out in a narrow supersonic channel of Mach number 2.5. A single wedge or a combination of two wedges were used to generate a complex shock wave structure in the flow. The experience gained in a small supersonic channel was used for surface pressure measurements on the stator vane of a supersonic throughflow fan. The experimental results for several fan operating conditions are shown in a concise form, including performance map points, midspan static tap pressure distributions, and vane suction side pressure fields. Finally, the PSP technique was used in the NASA transonic flutter cascade to compliment flow visualization data and to acquire backwall pressure fields to assess the cascade flow periodicity. A summary of shortcomings of the pressure sensitive paint technology for internal flow application and lessons learned are presented in the conclusion of the paper.

  14. Surface-modified piezoresistive nanocomposite flexible pressure sensors with high sensitivity and wide linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Yi; Tian, He; Yang, Yi; Li, Cheng; Cui, Yalong; Mi, Wentian; Li, Yuxing; Wang, Zhe; Deng, Ningqin; Peng, Bo; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-04-01

    Flexible pressure sensors working in a low pressure range (<10 kPa) have become an important part of recent research due to their applications in ``artificial skin'', foldable electronics and so on. Several efforts have been focused on the high sensitivity of devices with the neglect of linearity which is essential for real applications. Here, we present a device with a new Gaussian random distribution contact surface profile and a novel contact and piezoresistive composite working principle by numerical simulation, which predicts the combination of wide linearity and high sensitivity. With the modified surfaces' contact effect and the piezoresistive capability of these nanocomposite structures, an outstanding linearity can be achieved all along the measuring scale from 0 to 14 kPa, with a high sensitivity around 13.8 kPa-1. The random distribution surface also provides the device with fine stability and reproducibility, which are validated in the test.Flexible pressure sensors working in a low pressure range (<10 kPa) have become an important part of recent research due to their applications in ``artificial skin'', foldable electronics and so on. Several efforts have been focused on the high sensitivity of devices with the neglect of linearity which is essential for real applications. Here, we present a device with a new Gaussian random distribution contact surface profile and a novel contact and piezoresistive composite working principle by numerical simulation, which predicts the combination of wide linearity and high sensitivity. With the modified surfaces' contact effect and the piezoresistive capability of these nanocomposite structures, an outstanding linearity can be achieved all along the measuring scale from 0 to 14 kPa, with a high sensitivity around 13.8 kPa-1. The random distribution surface also provides the device with fine stability and reproducibility, which are validated in the test. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI

  15. Sensitivity enhancement using annealed polymer optical-fibre-based sensors for pressure sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospori, A.; Marques, C. A. F.; Sáez-Rodríguez, D.; Nielsen, K.; Bang, O.; Webb, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal annealing can be used to induce a permanent negative Bragg wavelength shift for polymer fibre grating sensors and it was originally used for multiplexing purposes. Recently, researchers showed that annealing can also provide additional benefits, such as strain and humidity sensitivity enhancement and augmented temperature operational range. The annealing process can change both the optical and mechanical properties of the fibre. In this paper, the annealing effects on the stress and force sensitivities of PMMA fibre Bragg grating sensors are investigated. The incentive for that investigation was an unexpected behaviour observed in an array of sensors which were used for liquid level monitoring. One sensor exhibited much lower pressure sensitivity and that was the only one that was not annealed. To further investigate the phenomenon, additional sensors were photo-inscribed and characterised with regard their stress and force sensitivities. Then, the fibres were annealed by placing them in hot water, controlling with that way the humidity factor. After annealing, stress and force sensitivities were measured again. The results show that the annealing can improve the stress and force sensitivity of the devices. This can provide better performing sensors for use in stress, force and pressure sensing applications.

  16. Bronchial biopsy evidence for leukocyte infiltration and upregulation of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion molecules 6 hours after local allergen challenge of sensitized asthmatic airways.

    PubMed Central

    Montefort, S; Gratziou, C; Goulding, D; Polosa, R; Haskard, D O; Howarth, P H; Holgate, S T; Carroll, M P

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the mucosal changes occurring in bronchial biopsies from six atopic asthmatics 5-6 h after local endobronchial allergen challenge and compared them with biopsies from saline-challenged segments from the same subjects at the same time point. All the subjects developed localized bronchoconstriction in the allergen-challenged segment and had a decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (P < 0.01) and a decrease in their methacholine provocative concentration of agonist required to reduce FEV1 from baseline by 20% (P < 0.05) 24 h postchallenge. At 6 h we observed an increase in neutrophils (P = 0.03), eosinophils (P = 0.025), mast cells (P = 0.03), and CD3+ lymphocytes (P = 0.025), but not in CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocyte counts. We also detected an increase in endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (P < 0.05) and E-selectin (P < 0.005), but not vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 expression with a correlative increase in submucosal and epithelial LFA+ leucocytes (P < 0.01). Thus, in sensitized asthmatics, local endobronchial allergen instillation leads to an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate of the airway mucosa that involves upregulation of specific adhesion molecules expressed on the microvasculature. Images PMID:7512980

  17. Enteral n-3 fatty acids and micronutrients enhance percentage of positive neutrophil and lymphocyte adhesion molecules: a potential mediator of pressure ulcer healing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Theilla, Miriam; Schwartz, Betty; Zimra, Yael; Shapiro, Haim; Anbar, Ronit; Rabizadeh, Esther; Cohen, Jonathan; Singer, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    n-3 Fatty acids are recognised as influencing both wound healing and immunity. We assessed the impact of a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula (study formula) on the healing of pressure ulcers and on immune function in critically ill patients in an intensive care unit. A total of forty patients with pressure ulcers and receiving nutritional support were enrolled (intervention group, n 20, received study formula; and a control group, n 20, received an isoenergetic formula). Total and differential leucocyte count and percentage of adhesion molecule positive granulocyte and lymphocyte cells (CD11a, CD11b, CD18 and CD49b) were measured on days 0, 7 and 14. Percentage of positive lymphocytes for CD54, CD49b, CD49d and CD8 were also measured on days 0, 7 and 14. The state of pressure ulcers was assessed by using the pressure ulcer scale for healing tool score on days 7, 14 and 28 of treatment. No between-group differences in patient demographics, anthropometry or diagnostic class were observed. Patients who received the study formula showed significant increases in the percentage of positive CD18 and CD11a lymphocytes and of CD49b granulocytes as compared to controls (P < 0·05). While the severity of pressure ulcers was not significantly different between the two groups on admission, severity increased significantly over time for the control group (P < 0·05), but not for the study group. The present study suggests that a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula may prevent worsening of pressure ulcers and that this effect may be mediated by an effect on adhesion molecule expression. PMID:22040465

  18. A subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) source and interface for improved sensitivity in mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-15

    Subambient Pressure Ionization with Nanoelectrospray (SPIN), an electrospray ionization source that operates at 30 Torr inside the first vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer, has been demonstrated for reversed-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of a protein tryptic digest solution. A 5–12-fold improvement in sensitivity relative to a standard atmospheric pressure ESI source was observed for a variety of detected peptides. The low liquid chromatographic flow rate (300 nL/min) allowed stable electrospray to be established before the onset of electrical discharge, and the higher operating pressure of the SPIN source relative to previous low-pressure ESI source designs prevented the solvents from freezing. The range of accessible flow rates for the SPIN source was also extended to 2.5 μL/min by using an array of electrospray emitters that divided the flow to 6 discrete electrosprays.

  19. On the sensitivity to partial pressure of oxygen of the mobility in cadmium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grado-Caffaro, M. A.; Grado-Caffaro, M.

    2015-11-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen during the deposition process of cadmium oxide is a crucial quantity whose influence on the electrical and optical properties of this material is really very significant (consider, for example, the experimental technique known as activated reactive evaporation). In fact, this paper is a theoretical formulation to evaluate the sensitivity changes of the aforementioned pressure of the electron drift-mobility and velocity in CdO. Indeed, as we will see later, given that the electron relaxation time depends upon the oxygen partial pressure, then the electron drift-mobility, mean free path and velocity also depend on this pressure. Relevant calculations involving the above physical quantities are carried out.

  20. A highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive hydrogel spheres.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yanlong; Mulle, Matthieu; Aguilar Ventura, Isaac; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-09-21

    Wearable pressure sensing solutions have promising future for practical applications in health monitoring and human/machine interfaces. Here, a highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/alginate hydrogel spheres is reported. Conductive and piezoresistive spheres are embedded between conductive electrodes (indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate films) and subjected to environmental pressure. The detection mechanism is based on the piezoresistivity of the SWCNT/alginate conductive spheres and on the sphere-electrode contact. Step-by-step, we optimized the design parameters to maximize the sensitivity of the sensor. The optimized hydrogel sensor exhibited a satisfactory sensitivity (0.176 ΔR/R0/kPa(-1)) and a low detectable limit (10 Pa). Moreover, a brief response time (a few milliseconds) and successful repeatability were also demonstrated. Finally, the efficiency of this strategy was verified through a series of practical tests such as monitoring human wrist pulse, detecting throat muscle motion or identifying the location and the distribution of an external pressure using an array sensor (4 × 4). PMID:26288336

  1. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using a double-layered graphene structure for tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong-Sik; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa-1) and high pressure (0.039 kPa-1) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures.In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa-1) and high pressure (0.039 kPa-1) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures. Electronic

  2. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Investigation of Double-Delta Wing Vortex Flow Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Gonzalez, Hugo A.

    2004-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique was applied in a wind tunnel experiment in the NASA Langley Research Center 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to quantify the effect of wing fillets on the global vortex-induced surface static pressure field about a sharp leading-edge 76o/40o double delta wing, or strake-wing, model at subsonic and transonic speeds. Global calibrations of the PSP were obtained at M = 0.50, 0.70, 0.85, 0.95, and 1.20, a Reynolds number per unit length of 2.0 million, and angles of attack from 10 degrees to 20 degrees using an in-situ method featuring the simultaneous acquisition of electronically-scanned pressures (ESP) at discrete locations on the model. The mean error in the PSP measurements relative to the ESP data was approximately 2 percent or less at M = 0.50 to 0.85 but increased to several percent at M =0.95 and 1.20. The PSP pressure distributions and pseudo-colored planform view pressure maps clearly revealed the vortex-induced pressure signatures at all Mach numbers and angles of attack. Small fillets having a parabolic or diamond planform situated at the strake-wing intersection were designed to manipulate the vortical flows by, respectively, removing the leading-edge discontinuity or introducing additional discontinuities. The fillets caused global changes in the vortex-dominated surface pressure field that were effectively captured in the PSP measurements. The vortex surface pressure signatures were compared to available off-surface vortex cross-flow structures obtained using a laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization technique. The fillet effects on the PSP pressure distributions and the observed leading-edge vortex flow characteristics were consistent with the trends in the measured lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients.

  3. Pressure-Sensitive Paint Investigation of Double-Delta Wing Vortex Flow Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Gonzalez, Hugo A.

    2005-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique was applied in a wind tunnel experiment in the NASA Langley Research Center 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to quantify the effect of wing fillets on the global vortex-induced surface static pressure field about a sharp leading-edge 76 deg/40 deg double delta wing, or strake-wing, model at subsonic and transonic speeds. Global calibrations of the PSP were obtained at M = 0.50, 0.70, 0.85, 0.95, and 1.20, a Reynolds number per unit length of 2.0 million, and angles of attack from 10 degrees to 30 degrees using an in-situ method featuring the simultaneous acquisition of electronically-scanned pressures (ESP) at discrete locations on the model. The mean error in the PSP measurements relative to the ESP data was approximately 2 percent or less at M = 0.50 to 0.85 but increased to several percent at M = 0.95 and 1.20. The PSP pressure distributions and pseudo-colored planform view pressure maps clearly revealed the vortex-induced pressure signatures at all Mach numbers and angles of attack. Small fillets having a parabolic or diamond planform situated at the strake-wing intersection were designed to manipulate the vortical flows by, respectively, removing the leading-edge discontinuity or introducing additional discontinuities. The fillets caused global changes in the vortex-dominated surface pressure field that were effectively captured in the PSP measurements. The vortex surface pressure signatures were compared to available off-surface vortex cross-flow structures obtained using a laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization technique. The fillet effects on the PSP pressure distributions and the observed leading-edge vortex flow characteristics were consistent with the trends in the measured lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients.

  4. Highly sensitive contact pressure measurements using FBG patch in endotracheal tube cuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, R.; Blackman, O. R.; Hernandez, F. U.; Korposh, S.; Morgan, S. P.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; James, S. W.; Evans, D.; Norris, A.

    2016-05-01

    A method for measuring the contact pressure between an endotracheal tube cuff and the trachea was designed and developed by using a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) based optical fibre sensor. The FBG sensor is encased in an epoxy based UV-cured cuboid patch and transduces the transversely loaded pressure into an axial strain that induces wavelength shift of the Bragg reflection. The polymer patch was created by using a PTFE based mould and increases tensile strength and sensitivity of the bare fibre FBG to pressure to 2.10×10-2 nm/kPa. The characteristics of the FBG patch allow for continuous measurement of contact pressure. The measurement of contact pressure was demonstrated by the use of a 3D printed model of a human trachea. The influence of temperature on the measurements is reduced significantly by the use of a second FBG sensor patch that is not in contact with the trachea. Intracuff pressure measurements performed using a commercial manometer agreed well with the FBG contact pressure measurements.

  5. A subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) source and interface for improved sensitivity in mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    An electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) source and interface has been designed that enables efficient ion production and transmission in a 30 Torr pressure environment using solvents compatible with typical reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) separations. In this design, the electrospray emitter is located inside the mass spectrometer in the same region as an electrodynamic ion funnel. This avoids the use of a conductance limit ion inlet, as required by a conventional atmospheric pressure ESI source, and allows more efficient ion transmission to the mass analyzer. The new source, titled Subambient Pressure Ionization with Nanoelectrospray (SPIN), improves instrument sensitivity, increases the understanding of the electrospray process, and enables new electrospray interface designs. Performance of the SPIN source was evaluated by electrospraying standard solutions at 300 nL/min, and comparing results with those obtained from a standard atmospheric pressure ESI source that used a heated capillary inlet. The importance of desolvation was also investigated by electrospraying at different flow rates, which showed that the ion funnel provided an effective desolvation region to aid the creation of gas phase analyte ions. This initial study demonstrated a ∼ 5-fold improvement in sensitivity when the SPIN source was used compared to a standard atmospheric pressure ESI source. PMID:18237189

  6. Method development for compensating temperature effects in pressure sensitive paint measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demandante, Carlo Greg N.

    1994-01-01

    Pressure sensitive luminescent paints (PSP) have recently emerged as a viable technique for aerodynamic pressure measurements. The technique uses a surface coating which contains probe molecules that luminesce when excited by light of an appropriate wavelength. The photoluminescence of these materials is known to be quenched by the presence of molecular oxygen. Since oxygen is a fixed mole fraction of the air, the coating's luminescence intensity varies inversely with air pressure. Digital imaging of the luminescence varying across a coated surface produces a pressure distribution map over that surface. One difficulty encountered with this technique is the temperature effect on the luminescence intensity. Present PSP formulations have significant sensitivity to temperature. At the moment, the most practical way of correcting for temperature effects is to calibrate the paint in place at the operating temperatures by using a few well-placed pressure taps. This study is looking at development of temperature indicating coatings that can be applied and measured concurrently with PSP, and use the temperature measurement to compute the correct pressure. Two methods for this dual paint formulation are proposed. One method will use a coating that consists of temperature sensitive phosphors in a polymer matrix. This is similar in construction to PSP, except that the probe molecules used are selected primarily for their temperature sensitivity. Both organic phosphors (e.g., europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, bioprobes) and inorganic phosphors (e.g., Mg4(F)GeO6:Mn, La2O2S:Eu, Radelin Type phosphors, Sylvania Type phosphors) will be evaluated for their temperature sensing potential. The next method will involve a novel coating composing of five membered heterocyclic conducting polymers which are known to show temperature dependent luminescence (e.g., poly(3-alkylthiopene), poly(3-alkylselenophene), poly(3-alkylfuran)). Both methods will involve applying a bottom layer of

  7. Preparation of an Adhesive in Emulsion for Maxillofacial Prosthetic

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-García, Judith A.; Ortega, Alejandra; Barceló-Santana, Federico H.; Palacios-Alquisira, Joaquín

    2010-01-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA-MMA-EA) and (AA-MMA-2EHA) with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA-MMA-2EHA) with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives. PMID:21152308

  8. Organo-Chlorinated Thin Films Deposited by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition for Adhesion Enhancement between Rubber and Zinc-Plated Steel Monofilaments.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Cédric; Bulou, Simon; Maurau, Rémy; Siffer, Frederic; Belmonte, Thierry; Choquet, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    A continuous-flow plasma process working at atmospheric pressure is developed to enhance the adhesion between a rubber compound and a zinc-plated steel monofilament, with the long-term objective to find a potential alternative to the electrolytic brass plating process, which is currently used in tire industry. For this purpose, a highly efficient tubular dielectric barrier discharge reactor is built to allow the continuous treatment of "endless" cylindrical substrates. The best treatment conditions found regarding adhesion are Ar/O2 plasma pretreatment, followed by the deposition from dichloromethane of a 75 nm-thick organo-chlorinated plasma polymerized thin film. Ar/O2 pretreatment allows the removal of organic residues, coming from drawing lubricants, and induces external growth of zinc oxide. The plasma layer has to be preferably deposited at low power to conserve sufficient hydrocarbon moieties. Surface analyses reveal the complex chemical mechanism behind the establishment of strong adhesion levels, more than five times higher after the plasma treatment. During the vulcanization step, superficial ZnO reacts with the chlorinated species of the thin film and is converted into porous and granular bump-shaped ZnwOxHyClz nanostructures. Together, rubber additives diffuse through the plasma layer and lead to the formation of zinc sulfide on the substrate surface. Hence, two distinct interfaces, rubber/thin film and thin film/substrate, are established. On the basis of these observations, hypotheses explaining the high bonding strength results are formulated. PMID:26069994

  9. Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurements on 15% Scale Rotor Blades in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Oliver D.; Watkins, Anthony Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a proof of concept test to examine the feasibility of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) to measure the pressure distributions on a rotor in hover. The test apparatus consisted of the US Army 2-meter Rotor Test Stand (2MRTS) and 15% scale swept tip rotor blades. Two camera/rotor separations were examined: 0.76 and 1.35 radii. The outer 15% of each blade was painted with PSP. Intensity and lifetime based PSP measurement techniques were attempted. Data were collected from all blades at thrust coefficients ranging from 0.004 to 0.009.

  10. Sound pressure enhances the hearing sensitivity of Chaetodon butterflyfishes on noisy coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Tricas, Timothy C; Boyle, Kelly S

    2015-05-15

    Butterflyfishes are conspicuous members of coral reefs that communicate with acoustic signals during social interactions with mates and other conspecifics. Members of the genus Chaetodon have a laterophysic connection (LC) - a unique association of anterior swim bladder horns and the cranial lateral line - but the action of the LC system on auditory sensitivity is unexplored. Here, we show in baseline auditory evoked potential threshold experiments that Forcipiger flavissimus (which lacks swim bladder horns and LC) is sensitive to sound tones from 100 Hz up to 1000 Hz, and that thresholds for three species of Chaetodon are 10-15 dB lower, with extended hearing ranges up to 1700-2000 Hz. The relatively high thresholds to sound pressure and low pass response near 500 Hz for all four species are consistent with a primary sensitivity to hydrodynamic particle acceleration rather than sound pressure. Deflation of the swim bladder in F. flavissimus had no measurable effect on auditory sensitivity. In contrast, displacement of gas from the swim bladder horns in Chaetodon multicinctus and Chaetodon auriga increased thresholds (decreased sensitivity) by 5-20 dB, with the greatest effect at 600 Hz. The evolution of swim bladder horns associated with the LC system in Chaetodon species has increased hearing sensitivity through sound pressure transduction in the frequency bands used for social acoustic communication. The close affiliative behaviors that are common in Chaetodon species and other butterflyfish facilitate sound perception and acoustic communication at close distances relative to the high background noise levels found in their natural reef environment. PMID:25722003

  11. A nanofiber based artificial electronic skin with high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weibin; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wu, Yongzhi; Wang, Yuedan; Qing, Xing; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The protuberances composed of intertwined elastic POE nanofibers and PPy@PVA-co-PE nanofibers afford a tunable effective elastic modulus that is capable of capturing varied strains and stresses, thereby contributing to a high sensitivity for pressure sensing. This electronic skin-like sensor demonstrates an ultra-high sensitivity (1.24 kPa-1) below 150 Pa with a detection limit as low as about 1.3 Pa. The pixelated sensor array and a RGB-LED light are then assembled into a circuit and show a feasibility for visual detection of spatial pressure. Furthermore, a nanofiber based proof-of-concept wireless pressure sensor with a bluetooth module as a signal transmitter is proposed and has demonstrated great promise for wireless monitoring of human physiological signals, indicating a potential for large scale wearable electronic devices or e-skin.Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The

  12. Novel highly sensitive and wearable pressure sensors from conductive three-dimensional fabric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianfeng; Xu, Bingang

    2015-12-01

    Pressure sensors based on three-dimensional fabrics have all the excellent properties of the textile substrate: excellent compressibility, good air permeability and moisture transmission ability, which will find applications ranging from the healthcare industry to daily usage. In this paper, novel pressure sensors based on 3D spacer fabrics have been developed by a proposed multi-coating method. By this coating method, carbon black can be coated uniformly on the silicon elastomer which is attached and slightly cured on the 3D fabric surface beforehand. The as-made pressure sensors have good conductivity and can measure external pressure up to 283 kPa with an electrical conductivity range of 9.8 kΩ. The sensitivity of 3D fabric pressure sensors can be as high as 50.31×10-3 kPa-1, which is better than other textile based pressure sensors. When the as-made sensors are pressed, their electrical resistance will decrease because of more conductive connections and bending of fibers in the spacer layer. The sensing mechanism related to fiber bending has been explored by using an equivalent resistance model. The newly developed 3D sensor devices can be designed to exhibit different sensing performances by simply changing the structures of fabric substrate, which endows this kind of device more flexibility in related applications.

  13. Behavior of plant plasma membranes under hydrostatic pressure as monitored by fluorescent environment-sensitive probes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Yann; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Gervais, Patrick; Mély, Yves; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    We monitored the behavior of plasma membrane (PM) isolated from tobacco cells (BY-2) under hydrostatic pressures up to 3.5kbar at 30 degrees C, by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy using the newly introduced environment-sensitive probe F2N12S and also Laurdan and di-4-ANEPPDHQ. The consequences of sterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin were also studied. We found that application of hydrostatic pressure led to a marked decrease of hydration as probed by F2N12S and to an increase of the generalized polarization excitation (GPex) of Laurdan. We observed that the hydration effect of sterol depletion was maximal between 1 and 1.5 kbar but was much less important at higher pressures (above 2 kbar) where both parameters reached a plateau value. The presence of a highly dehydrated gel state, insensitive to the sterol content, was thus proposed above 2.5 kbar. However, the F2N12S polarity parameter and the di-4-ANEPPDHQ intensity ratio showed strong effect on sterol depletion, even at very high pressures (2.5-3.5 kbar), and supported the ability of sterols to modify the electrostatic properties of membrane, notably its dipole potential, in a highly dehydrated gel phase. We thus suggested that BY-2 PM undergoes a complex phase behavior in response to the hydrostatic pressure and we also emphasized the role of phytosterols to regulate the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on plant PM. PMID:20381451

  14. High sensitivity detection of trace gases at atmospheric pressure using tunable diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, J.; Sinclair, R. L.; Grant, W. B.; Menzies, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed study of the detection of trace gases at atmospheric pressure using tunable diode lasers is described. The influence of multipass cells, retroreflectors and topographical targets is examined. The minimum detectable infrared absorption ranges from 0.1 percent for a pathlength of 1.2 km to 0.01 percent over short pathlengths. The factors which limit this sensitivity are discussed, and the techniques are illustrated by monitoring atmospehric CO2 and CH4.

  15. Variants in Striatin Gene are Associated with Salt Sensitive Blood Pressure in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Baudrand, Rene; Yao, Tham; Moize, Burhanuddin; Hafiz, Wan M; Romero, Jose R.; Adler, Gail K.; Ferri, Claudio; Hopkins, Paul N.; Pojoga, Luminita H.; Williams, Gordon H.

    2015-01-01

    Striatin is a novel protein that interacts with steroid receptors and modifies rapid, non-genomic activity in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that striatin would in turn affect mineralocorticoid receptor function and consequently sodium, water, and blood pressure homeostasis in an animal model. We evaluated salt sensitivity of blood pressure in novel striatin heterozygote knockout mice. When compared with wild type, striatin heterozygote exhibited a significant increase in blood pressure when sodium intake was increased from restricted (0.03%) to liberal (1.6%) sodium). Further, renal expression of mineralocorticoid receptor and its genomic downstream targets serum/glucocoticoid-regulated kinase 1 and epithelial sodium channel were increased in striatin heterozygote versus wild type mice on liberal sodium intake while the pAkt/Akt ratio, readout of mineralocoriticoid receptor's rapid, non-genomic pathway, was reduced. To determine the potential clinical relevance of these findings, we tested the association between single nucleotide polymorphic variants of striatin gene and salt sensitivity of blood presure in 366 Caucasian hypertensive subjects. HapMap derived tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms identified an association between rs2540923 with salt sensitivity of blood pressure (OR, 6.25; 95% CI 1.7-20; P=0.01). These data provide the first in vivo evidence in humans and rodents that associates striatin with markers of mineralocoriticoid receptor activity. The data also support the hypothesis that the rapid, non-genomic mineralocoriticoid receptor pathway (mediated via striatin) has a role in modulating the interaction between salt intake and blood pressure. PMID:25368024

  16. Interpretation of Helioseismic Travel Times. Sensitivity to Sound Speed, Pressure, Density, and Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent; Birch, Aaron C.

    2015-12-01

    Time-distance helioseismology uses cross-covariances of wave motions on the solar surface to determine the travel times of wave packets moving from one surface location to another. We review the methodology to interpret travel-time measurements in terms of small, localised perturbations to a horizontally homogeneous reference solar model. Using the first Born approximation, we derive and compute 3D travel-time sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels for perturbations in sound-speed, density, pressure, and vector flows. While kernels for sound speed and flows had been computed previously, here we extend the calculation to kernels for density and pressure, hence providing a complete description of the effects of solar dynamics and structure on travel times. We treat three thermodynamic quantities as independent and do not assume hydrostatic equilibrium. We present a convenient approach to computing damped Green's functions using a normal-mode summation. The Green's function must be computed on a wavenumber grid that has sufficient resolution to resolve the longest lived modes. The typical kernel calculations used in this paper are computer intensive and require on the order of 600 CPU hours per kernel. Kernels are validated by computing the travel-time perturbation that results from horizontally-invariant perturbations using two independent approaches. At fixed sound-speed, the density and pressure kernels are approximately related through a negative multiplicative factor, therefore implying that perturbations in density and pressure are difficult to disentangle. Mean travel-times are not only sensitive to sound-speed, density and pressure perturbations, but also to flows, especially vertical flows. Accurate sensitivity kernels are needed to interpret complex flow patterns such as convection.

  17. Single-shot temperature- and pressure-sensitive paint measurements on an unsteady helicopter blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Peng, Di; Juliano, Thomas J.; Gregory, James W.; Crafton, Jim W.; Komerath, Narayanan M.

    2014-02-01

    Unsteady pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurements were acquired on an articulated model helicopter rotor of 0.26 m diameter in edgewise flow to simulate forward flight conditions. The rotor was operated at advance ratios (free stream velocity normalized by hover tip speed) of 0.15 and 0.30 at a cycle-averaged tip chord Reynolds number of 1.1 × 105, with collective and longitudinal cyclic pitch inputs of 10° and 2.5°, respectively. A single-shot data acquisition technique allowed a camera to record the paint luminescence after a single pulse of high-energy laser excitation, yielding sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to avoid image averaging. Platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) in a porous polymer/ceramic binder served as the PSP. To address errors caused by image blurring and temperature sensitivity, a previously reported motion deblurring algorithm was implemented and the temperature correction was made using temperature-sensitive paint measurements on a second rotor blade. Instantaneous, unsteady surface pressure maps at a rotation rate of 82 Hz captured different aerodynamic responses between the two sides of the rotor disk and were compared to the nominally steady hover case. Cycle-to-cycle variations in tip unsteadiness on the retreating blade were also observed, causing oblique pressure features which may be linked to three-dimensional stall.

  18. Luminophore Application Study of Polymer-Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Tatsunori; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    A polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PC-PSP) is a fast responding and sprayable PSP which has been applied for capturing global unsteady flows. The luminophore application process is studied to enhance the characterization of the PC-PSP. A dipping deposition method is used to apply a luminophore on a polymer-ceramic coating. The method selects a solvent by its polarity index. The characterization includes the signal level, pressure sensitivity, temperature dependency, and response time. It is found that the luminophore application process affects the steady-state characterizations, such as the signal level, pressure sensitivity, and temperature dependency. A range of change for each characterization, which is based on the minimum quantity, is a factor of 4.7, 9, and 3.8, respectively. A response time on the order of ten microseconds is shown. The application process is not a dominant factor for changing the response time, which is within the uncertainty of the thickness variation. Comparisons of the effects on the luminophore application process and the polymer content are made to discuss the PC-PSP characterization results. PMID:23760088

  19. Dielectric resonator-based resonant structure for sensitive ESR measurements at high-hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Vileno, Bertrand; Garaj, Slaven; Jaworski, Marek; Forró, László

    2005-12-01

    We present a newly developed microwave probe head that accommodates a gasketed sapphire anvil cell (SAC) for performing sensitive electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements under high-hydrostatic pressures. The system was designed around commercially available dielectric resonators (DRs) having the dielectric permittivity of approximately 30. The microwave resonant structure operates in a wide-stretched double-stacked geometry and resonates in the lowest cylindrical quasi TE(011) mode around 9.2 GHz. The most vital parts of the probe's microwave heart were made of plastic materials, thus making the resonant structure transparent to magnetic field modulation at 100 kHz. The overall ESR sensitivity of the probe was demonstrated for a small speck of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) positioned in the gasket of the SAC, using water as the pressure-transmitting medium. The system was also used for studying pressure-induced changes in spin-relaxation mechanisms of a quasi-1D-conducting polymer, K(1)C(60). For small samples located in the sample hole of the gasket the probe reveals sensitivity that is only approximately 3 times less than that yielded by regular ESR cavities. PMID:16168687

  20. A new type of functional chemical sensitizer MgH2 for improving pressure desensitization resistance of emulsion explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. F.; Yan, S. L.; Ma, H. H.; Shen, Z. W.; Liu, R.

    2016-03-01

    In millisecond-delay blasting and deep water blasting projects, traditional emulsion explosives sensitized by the chemical sensitizer NaNO2 often encounter incomplete explosion or misfire problems because of the "pressure desensitization" phenomenon, which seriously affects blasting safety and construction progress. A MgH2-sensitized emulsion explosive was invented to solve these problems. Experimental results show that MgH2 can effectively reduce the problem of pressure desensitization. In this paper, the factors which influence the pressure desensitization of two types of emulsion explosives are studied, and resistance to this phenomenon of MgH2-sensitized emulsion explosives is discussed.

  1. Improving Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Sensitivity Using a Subambient Pressure Ionization with Nanoelectrospray (SPIN) Interface

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S.; Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) ion source and interface, which operates at ~15–30 Torr, is demonstrated to be compatible with gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography-MS applications, exemplified here with the analysis of complex samples (a protein tryptic digest and a whole cell lysate). A low liquid chromatographic flow rate (100–400 nL/min) allowed stable electrospray to be established while avoiding electrical breakdown. Efforts to increase the operating pressure of the SPIN source relative to previously reported designs prevented solvent freezing and enhanced charged cluster/droplet desolvation. A 5- to 12-fold improvement in sensitivity relative to a conventional atmospheric pressure nanoelectrospray ionization (ESI) source was obtained for detected peptides. PMID:21953185

  2. Controlled Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Opportunities exist for controllably enhancing the adhesion of silicone surfaces, ranging from modest enhancement of release force levels of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) release liners by incorporation of adhesion promoters known as high release additives (HRA), to permanent bonding of silicone elastomers using surface modification techniques such as plasma or corona treatment. Although only a part of the complex interaction of factors contributing to adhesion, surface properties such as wettability are a critical component in the understanding and control of release and adhesion phenomena. Surface characterization studies of low-surface-energy silicones before and after various adhesion modification strategies are reviewed. The silicones include polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosiloxane elastomers and coatings. Techniques used include contact angle, the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Topics addressed are: use of HRA in PDMS release liners, the interaction of PDMS PSAs with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and the effect of plasma treatment on PDMS and fluorosiloxane surfaces.

  3. Application of Pressure Sensitive Paint to Confined Flow at Mach Number 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bencic, T. J.; Bruckner, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is a novel technology that is being used frequently in external aerodynamics. For internal flows in narrow channels, and applications at elevated nonuniform temperatures, however, there are still unresolved problems that complicate the procedures for calibrating PSP signals. To address some of these problems, investigations were carried out in a narrow channel with supersonic flows of Mach 2.5. The first set of tests focused on the distribution of the wall pressure in the diverging section of the test channel downstream of the nozzle throat. The second set dealt with the distribution of wall static pressure due to the shock/wall interaction caused by a 25 deg. wedge in the constant Mach number part of the test section. In addition, the total temperature of the flow was varied to assess the effects of temperature on the PSP signal. Finally, contamination of the pressure field data, caused by internal reflection of the PSP signal in a narrow channel, was demonstrated. The local wall pressures were measured with static taps, and the wall pressure distributions were acquired by using PSP. The PSP results gave excellent qualitative impressions of the pressure field investigated. However, the quantitative results, specifically the accuracy of the PSP data in narrow channels, show that improvements need to be made in the calibration procedures, particularly for heated flows. In the cases investigated, the experimental error had a standard deviation of +/- 8.0% for the unheated flow, and +/- 16.0% for the heated flow, at an average pressure of 11 kpa.

  4. The blood pressure-salt sensitivity paradigm: pathophysiologically sound yet of no practical value.

    PubMed

    Galletti, Ferruccio; Strazzullo, Pasquale

    2016-09-01

    Sodium plays an important pathophysiological role in blood pressure (BP) values and in the development of hypertension, and epidemiological studies such as the Intersalt Study have shown that the increase in BP occurring with age is determined by salt intake. Recently, a meta-analysis of 13 prospective studies has also shown the close relationship between excess sodium intake and higher risk of stroke and total cardiovascular events. However, the BP response to changing salt intake displayed a marked variability, as first suggested by Kawasaki et al. (The effect of high-sodium and low-sodium intakes on blood pressure and other related variables in human subjects with idiopathic hypertension. Am J Med 1978; 64: 193-198) and later by Weinberger et al. (Definitions and characteristics of sodium sensitivity and blood pressure resistance. Hypertension 1986; 8: II127-II134), who recognized the heterogeneity of the BP response to salt and developed the concept of salt sensitivity. We have a large body of evidence in favour of a major role of metabolic and neuro-hormonal factors in determining BP salt sensitivity in association with the effect of genetic variation. There is evidence that salt sensitivity influences the development of organ damage, even independently-at least in part-of BP levels and the occurrence of hypertension. In addition, several observational studies indicate that salt sensitivity is clearly associated with a higher rate of cardiovascular events and mortality, independently of BP levels and hypertension. A cluster of factors with well-known atherogenic potential such as hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia and microalbuminuria-all known to be prevalent in salt-sensitive hypertension-might at least partially explain the increased cardiovascular risk observed in salt sensitive individuals. The gold standard for the evaluation of BP salt sensitivity is the BP response to a moderate reduction of salt intake for several weeks; nevertheless, these protocols

  5. Responsiveness vs. basal activity of plasma ANG II as a determinant of arterial pressure salt sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Osborn, John W; Ariza-Nieto, Pilar; Collister, John P; Soucheray, Sandra; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Katz, Stephen

    2003-11-01

    Infusion of angiotensin II (ANG II) causes salt-sensitive hypertension. It is unclear whether this is due to the body's inability to suppress ANG II during increased salt intake or, rather, an elevated basal level of plasma ANG II itself. To distinguish between these mechanisms, Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with arterial and venous catheters for measurement of arterial pressure and infusion of drugs, respectively. The sensitivity of arterial pressure to salt was measured in four groups with the following treatments: 1) saline control (Con, n = 12); 2) administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril to block endogenous ANG II (ANG-Lo, n = 10); 3) administration of enalapril and 5 ng.kg(-1).min(-1) ANG II to clamp plasma ANG II at normal levels (ANG-Norm, n = 10); and 4) administration of enalapril and 20 ng.kg(-1).min(-1) ANG II to clamp ANG II at high levels (ANG-Hi, n = 10). Rats ingested a 0.4% NaCl diet for 3 days and then a 4.0% NaCl diet for 11 days. Arterial pressure of rats fed the 0.4% NaCl diet was lower in ANG-Lo (84 +/- 2 mmHg) compared with Con (101 +/- 3 mmHg) and ANG-Norm (98 +/- 4 mmHg) groups, whereas ANG-Hi rats were hypertensive (145 +/- 4 mmHg). Salt sensitivity was expressed as the change in arterial pressure divided by the change in sodium intake on the last day of the 4.0% NaCl diet. Salt sensitivity (in mmHg/meq Na) was lowest in Con rats (0.0 +/- 0.1) and progressed from ANG-Lo (0.8 +/- 0.2) to ANG-Norm (1.5 +/- 0.5) to ANG-Hi (3.5 +/- 0.5) rats. We conclude that the major determinant of salt sensitivity of arterial pressure is the basal level of plasma ANG II rather than the responsiveness of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:12881218

  6. Application of Pressure-Sensitive Paint to Ice-Accreted Wind Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has been successfully used to measure global surface pressures on an ice-accreted model in an icing wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. Until now, the PSP technique has been limited to use in normal wind tunnels and clear flight environments. This is the first known application of PSP directly to ice in subfreezing conditions. Several major objectives were achieved in these tests. The procedure for applying the coating in the subfreezing tunnel environment was verified. Inspection of the painted ice surface revealed that the paint did not alter the original ice shape and adhered well over the entire coated area. Several procedures were used to show that the paint responded to changes in air pressure and that a repeatable pressure-dependent calibration could be achieved on the PSP-coated surfaces. Differences in pressure measurements made simultaneously on the ice and the metal test model are not yet fully understood, and techniques to minimize or correct them are being investigated.

  7. High-sensitivity NMR beyond 200,000 atmospheres of pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, T.; Reichardt, S.; Haase, J.

    2015-08-01

    Pressure-induced changes in the chemical or electronic structure of solids require pressures well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range due to the strong bonding. Anvil cell designs can reach such pressures, but their small and mostly inaccessible sample chamber has severely hampered NMR experiments in the past. With a new cell design that has a radio frequency (RF) micro-coil in the high pressure chamber, NMR experiments beyond 20 Giga-Pascal are reported for the first time. 1 H NMR of water shows sensitivity and resolution obtained with the cells, and 63 Cu NMR on a cuprate superconductor (YBa2Cu3O7-δ) demonstrates that single-crystals can be investigated, as well. 115 In NMR of the ternary chalcogenide AgInTe2 discovers an insulator-metal transition with shift and relaxation measurements. The pressure cells can be mounted easily on standard NMR probes that fit commercial wide-bore magnets with regular cryostats for field- and temperature-dependent measurements ready for many applications in physics and chemistry.

  8. Salt sensitivity of blood pressure is associated with polymorphisms in the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert M; Schoeffel, Cynthia D; Gildea, John J; Jones, John E; McGrath, Helen E; Gordon, Lindsay N; Park, Min Jeong; Sobota, Rafal S; Underwood, Patricia C; Williams, Jonathan; Sun, Bei; Raby, Benjamin; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Hopkins, Paul N; Adler, Gail K; Williams, Scott M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the sodium-bicarbonate co-transporter gene (SLC4A5) are associated with hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that SNPs in SLC4A5 are associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure in 185 whites consuming an isocaloric constant diet with a randomized order of 7 days of low Na(+) (10 mmol/d) and 7 days of high Na(+) (300 mmol/d) intake. Salt sensitivity was defined as a ≥ 7-mm Hg increase in mean arterial pressure during a randomized transition between high and low Na(+) diet. A total of 35 polymorphisms in 17 candidate genes were assayed, 25 of which were tested for association. Association analyses with salt sensitivity revealed 3 variants that associated with salt sensitivity, 2 in SLC4A5 (P<0.001) and 1 in GRK4 (P=0.020). Of these, 2 SNPs in SLC4A5 (rs7571842 and rs10177833) demonstrated highly significant results and large effects sizes, using logistic regression. These 2 SNPs had P values of 1.0 × 10(-4) and 3.1 × 10(-4) with odds ratios of 0.221 and 0.221 in unadjusted regression models, respectively, with the G allele at both sites conferring protection. These SNPs remained significant after adjusting for body mass index and age (P=8.9 × 10(-5) and 2.6 × 10(-4) and odds ratios 0.210 and 0.286, respectively). Furthermore, the association of these SNPs with salt sensitivity was replicated in a second hypertensive population. Meta-analysis demonstrated significant associations of both SNPs with salt sensitivity (rs7571842 [P=1.2 × 10(-5)]; rs1017783 [P=1.1 × 10(-4)]). In conclusion, SLC4A5 variants are strongly associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure in 2 separate white populations. PMID:22987918

  9. Vibration Sensitivity of a Wide-Temperature Electronically Scanned Pressure Measurement (ESP) Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Garza, Frederico R.

    2001-01-01

    A vibration sensitivity test was conducted on a Wide-Temperature ESP module. The test object was Module "M4," a 16-channel, 4 psi unit scheduled for installation in the Arc Sector of NTF. The module was installed on a vibration exciter and loaded to positive then negative full-scale pressures (+/-2.5 psid). Test variables were the following: Vibration frequencies: 20, 55, 75 Hz. Vibration level: 1 g. Vibration axes: X, Y, Z. The pressure response was measured on each channel, first without and then with the vibration turned on, and the difference analyzed by means of the statistical t-test. The results show that the vibration sensitivity does not exceed 0.01% Full Scale Output per g (with the exception of one channel on one axis) to a 95 percent confidence level. This specification, limited by the resolution of the pressure source, lies well below the total uncertainty specification of 0.1 percent Full Scale Output.

  10. A wearable and highly sensitive pressure sensor with ultrathin gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shu; Schwalb, Willem; Wang, Yongwei; Chen, Yi; Tang, Yue; Si, Jye; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Cheng, Wenlong

    2014-02-01

    Ultrathin gold nanowires are mechanically flexible yet robust, which are novel building blocks with potential applications in future wearable optoelectronic devices. Here we report an efficient, low-cost fabrication strategy to construct a highly sensitive, flexible pressure sensor by sandwiching ultrathin gold nanowire-impregnated tissue paper between two thin polydimethylsiloxane sheets. The entire device fabrication process is scalable, enabling facile large-area integration and patterning for mapping spatial pressure distribution. Our gold nanowires-based pressure sensors can be operated at a battery voltage of 1.5 V with low energy consumption (<30 μW), and are able to detect pressing forces as low as 13 Pa with fast response time (<17 ms), high sensitivity (>1.14 kPa-1) and high stability (>50,000 loading-unloading cycles). In addition, our sensor can resolve pressing, bending, torsional forces and acoustic vibrations. The superior sensing properties in conjunction with mechanical flexibility and robustness enabled real-time monitoring of blood pulses as well as detection of small vibration forces from music.